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Sample records for human pathogenic fungi

  1. Lectins in human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Belém; Martínez, Ruth; Pérez, Laura; Del Socorro Pina, María; Perez, Eduardo; Hernández, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins widely distributed in nature. They constitute a highly diverse group of proteins consisting of many different protein families that are, in general, structurally unrelated. In the last few years, mushroom and other fungal lectins have attracted wide attention due to their antitumour, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activities. The present mini-review provides concise information about recent developments in understanding lectins from human pathogenic fungi. A bibliographic search was performed in the Science Direct and PubMed databases, using the following keywords "lectin", "fungi", "human" and "pathogenic". Lectins present in fungi have been classified; however, the role played by lectins derived from human pathogenic fungi in infectious processes remains uncertain; thus, this is a scientific field requiring more research. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative genomics and the evolution of pathogenicity in human pathogenic fungi.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2011-01-01

    Because most fungi have evolved to be free-living in the environment and because the infections they cause are usually opportunistic in nature, it is often difficult to identify specific traits that contribute to fungal pathogenesis. In recent years, there has been a surge in the number of sequenced genomes of human fungal pathogens, and comparison of these sequences has proved to be an excellent resource for exploring commonalities and differences in how these species interact with their hosts. In order to survive in the human body, fungi must be able to adapt to new nutrient sources and environmental stresses. Therefore, genes involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and transport and genes encoding secondary metabolites tend to be overrepresented in pathogenic species (e.g., Aspergillus fumigatus). However, it is clear that human commensal yeast species such as Candida albicans have also evolved a range of specific factors that facilitate direct interaction with host tissues. The evolution of virulence across the human pathogenic fungi has occurred largely through very similar mechanisms. One of the most important mechanisms is gene duplication and the expansion of gene families, particularly in subtelomeric regions. Unlike the case for prokaryotic pathogens, horizontal transfer of genes between species and other genera does not seem to have played a significant role in the evolution of fungal virulence. New sequencing technologies promise the prospect of even greater numbers of genome sequences, facilitating the sequencing of multiple genomes and transcriptomes within individual species, and will undoubtedly contribute to a deeper insight into fungal pathogenesis.

  3. Identification and analysis of cation channel homologues in human pathogenic fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Prole

    Full Text Available Fungi are major causes of human, animal and plant disease. Human fungal infections can be fatal, but there are limited options for therapy, and resistance to commonly used anti-fungal drugs is widespread. The genomes of many fungi have recently been sequenced, allowing identification of proteins that may become targets for novel therapies. We examined the genomes of human fungal pathogens for genes encoding homologues of cation channels, which are prominent drug targets. Many of the fungal genomes examined contain genes encoding homologues of potassium (K(+, calcium (Ca(2+ and transient receptor potential (Trp channels, but not sodium (Na(+ channels or ligand-gated channels. Some fungal genomes contain multiple genes encoding homologues of K(+ and Trp channel subunits, and genes encoding novel homologues of voltage-gated K(v channel subunits are found in Cryptococcus spp. Only a single gene encoding a homologue of a plasma membrane Ca(2+ channel was identified in the genome of each pathogenic fungus examined. These homologues are similar to the Cch1 Ca(2+ channel of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genomes of Aspergillus spp. and Cryptococcus spp., but not those of S. cerevisiae or the other pathogenic fungi examined, also encode homologues of the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter (MCU. In contrast to humans, which express many K(+, Ca(2+ and Trp channels, the genomes of pathogenic fungi encode only very small numbers of K(+, Ca(2+ and Trp channel homologues. Furthermore, the sequences of fungal K(+, Ca(2+, Trp and MCU channels differ from those of human channels in regions that suggest differences in regulation and susceptibility to drugs.

  4. Evaluation of antifungal potential of selected medicinal plants against human pathogenic fungi

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    Hayat Sakander

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Evaluation of medicinal plants used in traditional medicine lead to novel bioactive compounds with antifungal activity that could be exploited as therapeutic agents. Aims: The aim was to screen selected medicinal plants for antifungal activity against three important human pathogenic fungi and to identify the broad group of phytochemicals responsible for the activity. Materials and Methods: A total of 8 medicinal plants were screened for antifungal activity against three human pathogenic fungi. Aqueous and the solvent extracts of the plant materials were prepared by polarity based solvent extraction. Antifungal activity was tested by well and disc diffusion methods. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of the active extract was determined by micro-broth dilution technique. Phytochemical analysis of the active extract was done. Statistical Analysis Used: The results were statistically analysed by One-Way analysis of variance with Post-hoc Tukey′s B test at P < 0.05 using the  Software SPSS version 20 (IBM Corp. Armonk, NY Released 2011. Results: Significant antifungal activity was observed in the aqueous extracts of the fruits of Terminalia chebula (47.75 mm against Microsporum gypseum and the mesocarp of Persea americana (40.5 mm against Microsporum canis. Candida albicans was inhibited by the ethyl acetate (20 mm and aqueous extracts (16 mm of T. chebula fruits and aqueous extract of the seeds of Syzygium jambos (16 mm. The aqueous extract of mesocarp of P. americana showed lowest MIC value (312.5 μg/ml against M. canis and M. gypseum. Phytochemical analysis of the active extracts revealed the presence of phenols, tannins, alkaloids and flavonoids. Conclusions: The study validates the use of the plants in the treatment of fungal infections and has provided important leads for the discovery of new plant-based antifungal agents.

  5. Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are notorious plant pathogens and use similar strategies to infect plants. The majority of plants, however, is not infected by pathogens as they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors that mediate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) ,

  6. Plant Pathogenic Fungi and Oomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and Oomycetes are notorious plant pathogens and use similar strategies to infect plants. The majority of plants, however, is not infected by pathogens as they recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors that mediate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) ,

  7. Crossover fungal pathogens: the biology and pathogenesis of fungi capable of crossing kingdoms to infect plants and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Gregory M; Keller, Nancy P

    2013-12-01

    The outbreak of fungal meningitis associated with contaminated methylprednisolone acetate has thrust the importance of fungal infections into the public consciousness. The predominant pathogen isolated from clinical specimens, Exserohilum rostratum (teleomorph: Setosphaeria rostrata), is a dematiaceous fungus that infects grasses and rarely humans. This outbreak highlights the potential for fungal pathogens to infect both plants and humans. Most crossover or trans-kingdom pathogens are soil saprophytes and include fungi in Ascomycota and Mucormycotina phyla. To establish infection, crossover fungi must overcome disparate, host-specific barriers, including protective surfaces (e.g. cuticle, skin), elevated temperature, and immune defenses. This review illuminates the underlying mechanisms used by crossover fungi to cause infection in plants and mammals, and highlights critical events that lead to human infection by these pathogens. Several genes including veA, laeA, and hapX are important in regulating biological processes in fungi important for both invasive plant and animal infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Agent-based modeling approach of immune defense against spores of opportunistic human pathogenic fungi

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    Christian eTokarski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic human pathogenic fungi like the ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus are a majorthreat to immunocompromised patients. An impaired immune system renders the body vulnerable to inva-sive mycoses that often lead to the death of the patient. While the number of immunocompromised patientsis rising with medical progress, the process and dynamics of defence against invaded and ready to germinatefungal conidia are still insufficiently understood.Besides macrophages, neutrophil granulocytes form an important line of defence in that they clear conidia.Live imaging shows the interaction of those phagocytes and conidia as a dynamic process of touching, drag-ging and phagocytosis. To unravel strategies of phagocytes on the hunt for conidia an agent-based modelingapproach is used, implemented in NetLogo. Different modes of movement of phagocytes are tested regard-ing their clearing efficiency: random walk, short term persistence in their recent direction, chemotaxis ofchemokines excreted by conidia and communication between phagocytes.

  9. Human pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and viruses in Drosophila: disease modeling, lessons, and shortcomings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayidou, Stavria; Ioannidou, Eleni; Apidianakis, Yiorgos

    2014-02-15

    Drosophila has been the invertebrate model organism of choice for the study of innate immune responses during the past few decades. Many Drosophila-microbe interaction studies have helped to define innate immunity pathways, and significant effort has been made lately to decipher mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Here we catalog 68 bacterial, fungal, and viral species studied in flies, 43 of which are relevant to human health. We discuss studies of human pathogens in flies revealing not only the elicitation and avoidance of immune response but also mechanisms of tolerance, host tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and predisposition to cancer. Prominent among those is the emerging pattern of intestinal regeneration as a defense response induced by pathogenic and innocuous bacteria. Immunopathology mechanisms and many microbial virulence factors have been elucidated, but their relevance to human health conventionally necessitates validation in mammalian models of infection.

  10. Aerosol dissemination veterinary pathogenic and human opportunistic thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi from thermal effluents of nuclear production reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tansey, M.R.; Fliermans, C.B.; Kern, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    The extent to which veterinary pathogenic and human opportunistic species of thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi disseminate in aerosols from heated effluents of nuclear production reactors of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), South Carolina, has been measured. Aerosol samples were taken at 140 sites, from directly over thermal effluents to more than 100 kilometers from the SRP boundary. Sampling methods included settle plates, liquid impingement, filtration, and a particle sizing cascade impactor (Andersen Sampler). Soils, foams, and microbial mats from thermal effluents, and vegetation were sampled to study distribution of particular species. Sampling was done under a variety of conditions; hot weather and cold, wet and dry, day and night, windy and calm, reactor(s) operating and not, disturbed vegetation and undisturbed. At 102 of the aerosol sampling sites, sophisticated meterological analysis were used to allow sampling of air in the plume which originated from thermal effluents. Soil, foam, microbial mat, vegetation, and aerosol samples were quantitatively plated for detection of viable units; filters were halved and then both plated and observed microscopically. Significant dissemination of thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi from thermal effluents was not detected. Thermophilic and thermotolerant fungi were widely distributed in soil, air, and on vegetation. Dactylaria gallopava, the indicator species and dominant fungus in microbial mats lining SRP thermal effluents and the cause of epidemic fatal phaeohyphomycosis in flocks of turkeys and chickens in South Carolina, Georgia, and elsewhere, was isolated from air at a maximum of 50 meters from effluents.

  11. Conditionally pathogenic fungi in recreational waters

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    Matavulj Milan N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of health and life conditions depends on various environmental factors. The exposition to organic and inorganic pollutants, as well as to the broad spectar of microorganisms is one of these factors. Medically important fungi have been increasing their number recently especially in urban and in recreational zones. Some of them, first of all molds and yeasts, are involved by different means in causing more or less serious diseases of man and animals. Frequency of alergic symptoms and human mycotic lesions increased significantly during last decades. Such phenomena have provoked more scientific attention recently. According to the available literature data, micro-fungi, causing mycoses and "environmental" fungi too could be considered as an important factor of health risk, being neglected and underestimated so far, especially in analyses of safe use of recreational waters and surrounding areas, among them swimming pools, river and sea beaches. On the basis of such statement there arises conclusion that water and ground of recreational zones could serve as vectors in transmission pathways of potentially or conditionally pathogenic fungi, being dangerous especially for immunocompromised individuals, which suggests inclusion of qualitative and quantitative composition of fungal community into a continual monitoring of hygienic status of recreational zones.

  12. The RAM network in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saputo, Sarah; Chabrier-Rosello, Yeissa; Luca, Francis C; Kumar, Anuj; Krysan, Damian J

    2012-06-01

    The regulation of Ace2 and morphogenesis (RAM) network is a protein kinase signaling pathway conserved among eukaryotes from yeasts to humans. Among fungi, the RAM network has been most extensively studied in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been shown to regulate a range of cellular processes, including daughter cell-specific gene expression, cell cycle regulation, cell separation, mating, polarized growth, maintenance of cell wall integrity, and stress signaling. Increasing numbers of recent studies on the role of the RAM network in pathogenic fungal species have revealed that this network also plays an important role in the biology and pathogenesis of these organisms. In addition to providing a brief overview of the RAM network in S. cerevisiae, we summarize recent developments in the understanding of RAM network function in the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Pneumocystis spp.

  13. Pathogenic seed-borne fungi of triticale

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    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of pathogenic fungi on 86 triticale seed samples was studied during the years 1992-1994. From each samples 400 seeds were tested using the blotter method with prefreezing and keeping under lights. In the greenhouse experiment pathogenicity of isolated fungi was evaluated. It was found that 20% of tested kernels were transmitting pathogenic fungi. Species of the genus Fusarium (including Microdochium nivale were isolated from 9,7 % of tested kernels, Drechslera tritici-repentis from 4,6 %, Stagonospora nodorum from 4,2 %, Bipolaris sorokiniana from 1,2%, Botryris cinerea from 0,9% and Drechslera dematioidea was noted sporadically.

  14. Fungi with multifunctional lifestyles: endophytic insect pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Larissa; Moonjely, Soumya; Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the symbiotic, evolutionary, proteomic and genetic basis for a group of fungi that occupy a specialized niche as insect pathogens as well as endophytes. We focus primarily on species in the genera Metarhizium and Beauveria, traditionally recognized as insect pathogenic fungi but are also found as plant symbionts. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these fungi are more closely related to grass endophytes and diverged from that lineage ca. 100 MYA. We explore how the dual life cycles of these fungi as insect pathogens and endophytes are coupled. We discuss the evolution of insect pathogenesis while maintaining an endophytic lifestyle and provide examples of genes that may be involved in the transition toward insect pathogenicity. That is, some genes for insect pathogenesis may have been co-opted from genes involved in endophytic colonization. Other genes may be multifunctional and serve in both lifestyle capacities. We suggest that their evolution as insect pathogens allowed them to effectively barter a specialized nitrogen source (i.e. insects) with host plants for photosynthate. These ubiquitous fungi may play an important role as plant growth promoters and have a potential reservoir of secondary metabolites.

  15. Gold nanoparticles synthesized by Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) acting as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piruthiviraj, Prakash; Margret, Anita; Krishnamurthy, Poornima Priyadharsani

    2016-04-01

    Production of antimicrobial agents through the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using green technology has been extensively made consistent by various researchers; yet, this study uses the flower bud's aqueous extracts of Brassica oleracea (Broccoli) as a reducing agent for chloroauric acid (1 mM). After 30 min of incubation, synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNps) was observed by a change in extract color from pale yellow to purple color. Synthesis of AuNps was confirmed in UV-visible spectroscopy at the range of approximately 560 nm. The SEM analysis showed the average nanoparticles size of 12-22 nm. The antimicrobial activity of AuNps was analyzed by subjecting it to human pathogenic bacteria (Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Klebsiella pneumonia) and fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans) using disc diffusion method. The broccoli-synthesized AuNps showed the efficient antibacterial and antifungal activity of above-mentioned microbes. It was confirmed that AuNps have the best antimicrobial agent compared to the standard antibiotics (Gentamicin and Fluconazole). When the concentrations of AuNps were increased (10, 25, and 50 µg/ml), the sensitivity zone also increased for all the tested microbes. The synthesized AuNps are capable of rendering high antimicrobial efficacy and, hence, have a great potential in the preparation of drugs used against major bacterial and fungal diseases in humans.

  16. Rapid identification and detection of pathogenic Fungi by padlock probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsui, C.K.M.; Wang, B.; Schoen, C.D.; Hamelin, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi are important pathogens of human diseases, as well as to agricultural crop and trees. Molecular diagnostics can detect diseases early, and improve identification accuracy and follow-up disease management. The use of padlock probe is effective to facilitate these detections and pathogen identif

  17. Evolutionary interaction networks of insect pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Jacobus J; Jensen, Annette B; Meyling, Nicolai V; Eilenberg, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    Lineages of insect pathogenic fungi are concentrated in three major clades: Hypocreales (several genera), Entomophthoromycota (orders Entomophthorales and Neozygitales), and Onygenales (genus Ascosphaera). Our review focuses on aspects of the evolutionary biology of these fungi that have remained underemphasized in previous reviews. To ensure integration with the better-known domains of insect pathology research, we followed a conceptual framework formulated by Tinbergen, asking complementary questions on mechanism, ontogeny, phylogeny, and adaptation. We aim to provide an introduction to the merits of evolutionary approaches for readers with a background in invertebrate pathology research and to make the insect pathogenic fungi more accessible as model systems for evolutionary biologists. We identify a number of questions in which fundamental research can offer novel insights into the evolutionary forces that have shaped host specialization and life-history traits such as spore number and size, somatic growth rate, toxin production, and interactions with host immune systems.

  18. Improving ITS sequence data for identification of plant pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Henrik Nilsson; Kevin D. Hyde; Julia Pawłowska; Martin Ryberg; Leho Tedersoo; Anders Bjørnsgard Aas; Siti A. Alias; Artur Alves; Cajsa Lisa Anderson; Alexandre Antonelli; A. Elizabeth Arnold; Barbara Bahnmann; Mohammad Bahram; Johan Bengtsson-Palme; Anna Berlin; Sara Branco; Putarak Chomnunti; Asha Dissanayake; Rein Drenkhan; Hanna Friberg; Tobias Guldberg Frøslev; Bettina Halwachs; Martin Hartmann; Beatrice Henricot; Ruvishika Jayawardena; Ari Jumpponen; Håvard Kauserud; Sonja Koskela; Tomasz Kulik; Kare Liimatainen; Björn D. Lindahl; Daniel Lindner; Jian-Kui Liu; Sajeewa Maharachchikumbura; Dimuthu Manamgoda; Svante Martinsson; Maria Alice Neves; Tuula Niskanen; Stephan Nylinder; Olinto Liparini Pereira; Danilo Batista Pinho; Teresita M. Porter; Valentin Queloz; Taavi Riit; Marisol Sánchez-García; Filipe de Sousa; Emil Stefańczyk; Mariusz Tadych; Susumu Takamatsu; Qing Tian; Dhanushka Udayanga; Martin Unterseher; Zheng Wang; Saowanee Wikee; Jiye Yan; Ellen Larsson; Karl-Henrik Larsson; Urmas Kõljalg; Kessy Abarenkov

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi are a large and diverse assemblage of eukaryotes with substantial impacts on natural ecosystems and human endeavours. These taxa often have complex and poorly understood life cycles, lack observable, discriminatory morphological characters, and may not be amenable to in vitro culturing. As a result, species identification is frequently difficult...

  19. Sandpits as a reservoir of potentially pathogenic fungi for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Anna; Błaszkowska, Joanna; Kurnatowski, Piotr; Góralska, Katarzyna

    2016-12-23

    Fungi belonging to various physiological and morphological groups present in the environment are potential human pathogens. Some of them are considered as emerging pathogens. Therefore, their presence in children's playgrounds should be regarded as health risk factor. Sixty-eight samples of sand collected from 17 sandpits of different localities in Łódź, Poland, in autumn 2010 and 2011, and in spring 2011 and 2012 were evaluated. The fungi were isolated with classical mycological methods and identified on the basis of morphological and biochemical features. The prevalence of fungi in spring was 94.1% of sandpits in both layers of sand (depth 0-3 cm and 10-15 cm) and in one kindergarten sandpit, but only in a deeper layer. In autumn, fungi occurred in both layers in all sandpits (100%). The fungal concentration (CFU/g of sand) varied considerably (range 0 - uncountable) in both layers. A total of 352 isolates belonging to 80 species were found. There were 69 yeasts and yeast-like fungi isolates from 12 species (9 species in each season), and 283 filamentous fungi from 68 species: 35 species in spring and 55 in autumn, with 4 keratinolytic species. There were important causes of allergies, among them Cladosporium herbarum and Alternaria alternata, as well as of opportunistic mycoses: Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus fumigatus and new and 'emerging' fungal pathogens e.g., Trichosporon, Rhodotorula, Fusarium and Scedosporium species. Potentially pathogenic fungi are present in the sand taken from sandpits in Łódź. This fact poses a significant threat to child health and therefore proper maintenance and periodic checking of sandpits are of great importance.

  20. Long-Term Live Cell Imaging of Cell Migration: Effects of Pathogenic Fungi on Human Epithelial Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wöllert, Torsten; Langford, George M

    2016-01-01

    Long-term live cell imaging was used in this study to determine the responses of human epithelial cells to pathogenic biofilms formed by Candida albicans. Epithelial cells of the skin represent the front line of defense against invasive pathogens such as C. albicans but under certain circumstances, especially when the host's immune system is compromised, the skin barrier is breached. The mechanisms by which the fungal pathogen penetrates the skin and invade the deeper layers are not fully understood. In this study we used keratinocytes grown in culture as an in vitro model system to determine changes in host cell migration and the actin cytoskeleton in response to virulence factors produced by biofilms of pathogenic C. albicans. It is clear that changes in epithelial cell migration are part of the response to virulence factors secreted by biofilms of C. albicans and the actin cytoskeleton is the downstream effector that mediates cell migration. Our goal is to understand the mechanism by which virulence factors hijack the signaling pathways of the actin cytoskeleton to alter cell migration and thereby invade host tissues. To understand the dynamic changes of the actin cytoskeleton during infection, we used long-term live cell imaging to obtain spatial and temporal information of actin filament dynamics and to identify signal transduction pathways that regulate the actin cytoskeleton and its associated proteins. Long-term live cell imaging was achieved using a high resolution, multi-mode epifluorescence microscope equipped with specialized light sources, high-speed cameras with high sensitivity detectors, and specific biocompatible fluorescent markers. In addition to the multi-mode epifluorescence microscope, a spinning disk confocal long-term live cell imaging system (Olympus CV1000) equipped with a stage incubator to create a stable in vitro environment for long-term real-time and time-lapse microscopy was used. Detailed descriptions of these two long-term live

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF PATHOGENIC FUNGI GENOMES USING PULSED FIELD GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴绍熙; 郭宁如; 殷正男; 柴建华

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed field gel eleetrophoresis (PFGE) has been firstly introdueed in characterization of the pathogenic fungi Pericillium marneffei and Exophiata dermatitidis genomes. The numbers and sizes of their chromosomes have been detected. Polymorphism was identified on the smallest chromosome of E.derntatitidis. The result shows that PFGE for characterization of large molecular DNA pathogenic fungi is very suitable, it is more simple and more efficacy. The result also shows the diversity of pathogenic fungi is relative common even in rare occurred pathogeafie fungi such as E. dermatitidis.

  2. QUALITATIVE PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING AND ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF CARICA PAPAYA LEAF EXTRACT AGAINST HUMAN AND PLANT PATHOGENIC FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikandar Khan Sherwani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have been explored extensively all over the globe in quest of a novel bioactive compound that could a good therapeutic candidate treating infectious diseases especially against drug resistant microbes. Qualitative phytochemical analyses of Carica papaya leaf extract reveal that except steroids and tannins all the possible phytochemical constituents including carbohydrates, proteins, anthraquinones, flavonoids, saponins, cardiac glycosides and alkaloids were present. Two ways of Carica papaya leaf extract preparations i.e crushed and boiled were tested for their antifungal activity against 6 saprophytic fungi Penicillium sp, Aspergilus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium sp, Rhizopus and Helminthosporum, 5 dermatophytic fungi Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton tonsurans and 6 yeasts including Candida albicans, Candida albicans ATCC 0383, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida galbrata, Candida tropicalis, Candida kruzei. The activity was found against majority of fungi but was much better in case of crushed leaf extract.

  3. The Zinc Transport Systems and Their Regulation in Pathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Won Hee

    2015-09-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient required for many enzymes that play essential roles in a cell. It was estimated that approximately 3% of the total cellular proteins are required for zinc for their functions. Zinc has long been considered as one of the key players in host-pathogen interactions. The host sequesters intracellular zinc by utilizing multiple cellular zinc importers and exporters as a means of nutritional immunity. To overcome extreme zinc limitation within the host environment, pathogenic microbes have successfully evolved a number of mechanisms to secure sufficient concentrations of zinc for their survival and pathogenesis. In this review, we briefly discuss the zinc uptake systems and their regulation in the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in major human pathogenic fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans, and Cryptococcus gattii.

  4. International Society of Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM)-ITS reference DNA barcoding database--the quality controlled standard tool for routine identification of human and animal pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinyi, Laszlo; Serena, Carolina; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Arabatzis, Michael; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Vu, Duong; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Arthur, Ian; Normand, Anne-Cécile; Giraldo, Alejandra; da Cunha, Keith Cassia; Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Hendrickx, Marijke; Nishikaku, Angela Satie; de Azevedo Melo, Analy Salles; Merseguel, Karina Bellinghausen; Khan, Aziza; Parente Rocha, Juliana Alves; Sampaio, Paula; da Silva Briones, Marcelo Ribeiro; e Ferreira, Renata Carmona; de Medeiros Muniz, Mauro; Castañón-Olivares, Laura Rosio; Estrada-Barcenas, Daniel; Cassagne, Carole; Mary, Charles; Duan, Shu Yao; Kong, Fanrong; Sun, Annie Ying; Zeng, Xianyu; Zhao, Zuotao; Gantois, Nausicaa; Botterel, Françoise; Robbertse, Barbara; Schoch, Conrad; Gams, Walter; Ellis, David; Halliday, Catriona; Chen, Sharon; Sorrell, Tania C; Piarroux, Renaud; Colombo, Arnaldo L; Pais, Célia; de Hoog, Sybren; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely Maria; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Toriello, Conchita; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Delhaes, Laurence; Stubbe, Dirk; Dromer, Françoise; Ranque, Stéphane; Guarro, Josep; Cano-Lira, Jose F; Robert, Vincent; Velegraki, Aristea; Meyer, Wieland

    2015-05-01

    Human and animal fungal pathogens are a growing threat worldwide leading to emerging infections and creating new risks for established ones. There is a growing need for a rapid and accurate identification of pathogens to enable early diagnosis and targeted antifungal therapy. Morphological and biochemical identification methods are time-consuming and require trained experts. Alternatively, molecular methods, such as DNA barcoding, a powerful and easy tool for rapid monophasic identification, offer a practical approach for species identification and less demanding in terms of taxonomical expertise. However, its wide-spread use is still limited by a lack of quality-controlled reference databases and the evolving recognition and definition of new fungal species/complexes. An international consortium of medical mycology laboratories was formed aiming to establish a quality controlled ITS database under the umbrella of the ISHAM working group on "DNA barcoding of human and animal pathogenic fungi." A new database, containing 2800 ITS sequences representing 421 fungal species, providing the medical community with a freely accessible tool at http://www.isham.org/ and http://its.mycologylab.org/ to rapidly and reliably identify most agents of mycoses, was established. The generated sequences included in the new database were used to evaluate the variation and overall utility of the ITS region for the identification of pathogenic fungi at intra-and interspecies level. The average intraspecies variation ranged from 0 to 2.25%. This highlighted selected pathogenic fungal species, such as the dermatophytes and emerging yeast, for which additional molecular methods/genetic markers are required for their reliable identification from clinical and veterinary specimens.

  5. Production of cross-kingdom oxylipins by pathogenic fungi: An update on their role in development and pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Gregory J; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-03-01

    Oxylipins are a class of molecules derived from the incorporation of oxygen into polyunsaturated fatty acid substrates through the action of oxygenases. While extensively investigated in the context of mammalian immune responses, over the last decade it has become apparent that oxylipins are a common means of communication among and between plants, animals, and fungi to control development and alter host-microbe interactions. In fungi, some oxylipins are derived nonenzymatically while others are produced by lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases, and monooxygenases with homology to plant and human enzymes. Recent investigations of numerous plant and human fungal pathogens have revealed oxylipins to be involved in the establishment and progression of disease. This review highlights oxylipin production by pathogenic fungi and their role in fungal development and pathogen/host interactions.

  6. GROWTH INHIBITION OF PATHOGENIC ROOT FUNGI BY EXTRACTS OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI OR Picea glehnii INOCULATED WITH ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA CATARINA MEGUMI KASUYA

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This work sought to verify the presence of compounds with antimicrobial properties in extracts of ectomycorrhizal fungi or in Picea glehnii inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Extracts from Pisolithus tinctorius, Scleroderma flavidum, Amanita pantherina and Paxillus sp., grown in liquid culture media, and from P. glehnii seedlings inoculated or not with the above ectomycorrhizal fungi and cultivated in in vitro condition, were processed to obtain two fractions, water and ethyl acetate solubles. These fractions were tested for the presence of inhibitory constituents against Fusarium roseum, Pythium sp. and Rhizoctonia solani. Direct bioautography technique on TLC or paper disc technique was used, depending on the extract and pathogenic fungi tested. The results showed the production on inhibitory components, not only by ectomycorrhizal fungi, but also by P. glehnii inoculated or not with ectomycorrhizal fungi. The sensitivity varied considerably according to the type of fungus or extract.

  7. Amoeba provide insight into the origin of virulence in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Why are some fungi pathogenic while the majority poses no threat to humans or other hosts? Of the more than 1.5 million fungal species only about 150-300 are pathogenic for humans, and of these, only 10-15 are relatively common pathogens. In contrast, fungi are major pathogens for plants and insects. These facts pose several fundamental questions including the mechanisms responsible for the origin of virulence among the few pathogenic species and the high resistance of mammals to fungal diseases. This essay explores the origin of virulences among environmental fungi with no obvious requirement for animal association and proposes that selection pressures by amoeboid predators led to the emergence of traits that can also promote survival in mammalian hosts. In this regard, analysis of the interactions between the human pathogenic funges Cryptococcus neoformans and amoeba have shown a remarkable similarity with the interaction of this fungus with macrophages. Hence the virulence of environmental pathogenic fungi is proposed to originate from a combination of selection by amoeboid predators and perhaps other soil organism with thermal tolerance sufficient to allow survival in mammalian hosts.

  8. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Swainsonine Biosynthesis Genes in Diverse Symbiotic and Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cook

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Swainsonine—a cytotoxic fungal alkaloid and a potential cancer therapy drug—is produced by the insect pathogen and plant symbiont Metarhizium robertsii, the clover pathogen Slafractonia leguminicola, locoweed symbionts belonging to Alternaria sect. Undifilum, and a recently discovered morning glory symbiont belonging to order Chaetothyriales. Genome sequence analyses revealed that these fungi share orthologous gene clusters, designated “SWN,” which included a multifunctional swnK gene comprising predicted adenylylation and acyltransferase domains with their associated thiolation domains, a β-ketoacyl synthase domain, and two reductase domains. The role of swnK was demonstrated by inactivating it in M. robertsii through homologous gene replacement to give a ∆swnK mutant that produced no detectable swainsonine, then complementing the mutant with the wild-type gene to restore swainsonine biosynthesis. Other SWN cluster genes were predicted to encode two putative hydroxylases and two reductases, as expected to complete biosynthesis of swainsonine from the predicted SwnK product. SWN gene clusters were identified in six out of seven sequenced genomes of Metarhzium species, and in all 15 sequenced genomes of Arthrodermataceae, a family of fungi that cause athlete’s foot and ringworm diseases in humans and other mammals. Representative isolates of all of these species were cultured, and all Metarhizium spp. with SWN clusters, as well as all but one of the Arthrodermataceae, produced swainsonine. These results suggest a new biosynthetic hypothesis for this alkaloid, extending the known taxonomic breadth of swainsonine producers to at least four orders of Ascomycota, and suggest that swainsonine has roles in mutualistic symbioses and diseases of plants and animals.

  10. Nine Pathogenic Fungi of Waterhyacinth Isolated in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Yi; ZHAO Nan; CHU Jian-jun

    2008-01-01

    The native pathogens of waterhyacinth in China, were studied and compared on pathogenicity by Koch's postulate. Nine pathogenic fungi, YBH, YBB, YB, YYX, YY, YBA1, YBA2, YBA3 and YYB12, were isolated from diseased waterhyacinth plants, and collected from Zhejiang province and Shanghai. According to cultural characteristics, the nine isolates were preliminarily identified. Isolates YBH and YBB were Collectotrichum sp.:YB, YYX and YY were placed in fungi imperfecti:the isolates YBA1, YBA2, YBA3 and YYB12 were Alternaria sp. The isolate YBH was the highly virulent with a disease index (DI) of 65.28% after one month inoculation. The isolate YBA3 was equily virulent, with the disease index of 67% after 7 day introduction. These two pathogens appear to have the potential as biocontrol agents and they deserve further study.

  11. Genomic transition to pathogenicity in chytrid fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Joneson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanisms of pathogen emergence is central to mitigating the impacts of novel infectious disease agents. The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd is an emerging pathogen of amphibians that has been implicated in amphibian declines worldwide. Bd is the only member of its clade known to attack vertebrates. However, little is known about the molecular determinants of - or evolutionary transition to - pathogenicity in Bd. Here we sequence the genome of Bd's closest known relative - a non-pathogenic chytrid Homolaphlyctis polyrhiza (Hp. We first describe the genome of Hp, which is comparable to other chytrid genomes in size and number of predicted proteins. We then compare the genomes of Hp, Bd, and 19 additional fungal genomes to identify unique or recent evolutionary elements in the Bd genome. We identified 1,974 Bd-specific genes, a gene set that is enriched for protease, lipase, and microbial effector Gene Ontology terms. We describe significant lineage-specific expansions in three Bd protease families (metallo-, serine-type, and aspartyl proteases. We show that these protease gene family expansions occurred after the divergence of Bd and Hp from their common ancestor and thus are localized to the Bd branch. Finally, we demonstrate that the timing of the protease gene family expansions predates the emergence of Bd as a globally important amphibian pathogen.

  12. Effects of alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shinsaku; Yazawa, Satoru; Nakagawa, Yasutaka; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2015-04-15

    Alkyl parabens are used as antimicrobial preservatives in cosmetics, food, and pharmaceutical products. However, the mode of action of these chemicals has not been assessed thoroughly. In this study, we determined the effects of alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi. All the fungi tested, were susceptible to parabens. The effect of linear alkyl parabens on plant pathogenic fungi was related to the length of the alkyl chain. In addition, the antifungal activity was correlated with the paraben-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption. The antifungal activity of linear alkyl parabens likely originates, at least in part, from their ability to inhibit the membrane respiratory chain, especially mitochondrial complex II. Additionally, we determined that some alkyl parabens inhibit Alternaria brassicicola infection of cabbage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Occurrence of invertebrate-pathogenic fungi in a Cerrado ecosystem in Central Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological diversity of microorganisms in natural environments is threatened worldwide by human activities. In a protected area of Cerrado, Goiás State, Brazil, naturally occurring invertebrate-pathogenic fungi were isolated from soils, slurries and water samples collected during the dry season in 2...

  14. Parallels in amphibian and bat declines from pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskew, Evan A; Todd, Brian D

    2013-03-01

    Pathogenic fungi have substantial effects on global biodiversity, and 2 emerging pathogenic species-the chytridiomycete Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians, and the ascomycete Geomyces destructans, which causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats-are implicated in the widespread decline of their vertebrate hosts. We synthesized current knowledge for chytridiomycosis and white-nose syndrome regarding disease emergence, environmental reservoirs, life history characteristics of the host, and host-pathogen interactions. We found striking similarities between these aspects of chytridiomycosis and white-nose syndrome, and the research that we review and propose should help guide management of future emerging fungal diseases.

  15. Pathogenic fungi and Bio-control agents: Competitive bio-assay research

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Fungi of the genus Trichoderma have a track record of being antagonist to quite of a number of agricultural important pathogens. Trichoderma have some unique characteristics that make it scientifically proven and suitable bio-control agents against varieties of pathogenic organism infecting economic food crops. Trichoderma has the advantage of being environment friendly and not hazardous to the health of human beings, livestock, soil and environment. Competitive bio-assay experiment was carri...

  16. Acquisition, transport, and storage of iron by pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, D H

    1999-07-01

    Iron is required by most living systems. A great variety of means of acquisition, avenues of uptake, and methods of storage are used by pathogenic fungi to ensure a supply of the essential metal. Solubilization of insoluble iron polymers is the first step in iron assimilation. The two methods most commonly used by microorganisms for solubilization of iron are reduction and chelation. Reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron by enzymatic or nonenzymatic means is a common mechanism among pathogenic yeasts. Under conditions of iron starvation, many fungi synthesize iron chelators known as siderophores. Two classes of compounds that function in iron gathering are commonly observed: hydroxamates and polycarboxylates. Two major responses to iron stress in fungi are a high-affinity ferric iron reductase and siderophore synthesis. Regulation of these two mechanisms at the molecular level has received attention. Uptake of siderophores is a diverse process, which varies among the different classes of compounds. Since free iron is toxic, it must be stored for further metabolic use. Polyphosphates, ferritins, and siderophores themselves have been described as storage molecules. The iron-gathering mechanisms used by a pathogen in an infected host are largely unknown and can only be posited on the basis of in vitro studies at present.

  17. Particle-size distributions and seasonal diversity of allergenic and pathogenic fungi in outdoor air

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; BIBBY, KYLE; Qian, Jing; Hospodsky, Denina; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Nazaroff, William W.; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in outdoor air, and their concentration, aerodynamic diameters and taxonomic composition have potentially important implications for human health. Although exposure to fungal allergens is considered a strong risk factor for asthma prevalence and severity, limitations in tracking fungal diversity in air have thus far prevented a clear understanding of their human pathogenic properties. This study used a cascade impactor for sampling, and quantitative real-time PCR plus 454...

  18. Pathogenic Fungi Regulate Immunity by Inducing Neutrophilic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieber, Nikolaus; Singh, Anurag; Öz, Hasan; Carevic, Melanie; Bouzani, Maria; Amich, Jorge; Ost, Michael; Ye, Zhiyong; Ballbach, Marlene; Schäfer, Iris; Mezger, Markus; Klimosch, Sascha N.; Weber, Alexander N.R.; Handgretinger, Rupert; Krappmann, Sven; Liese, Johannes; Engeholm, Maik; Schüle, Rebecca; Salih, Helmut Rainer; Marodi, Laszlo; Speckmann, Carsten; Grimbacher, Bodo; Ruland, Jürgen; Brown, Gordon D.; Beilhack, Andreas; Loeffler, Juergen; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite continuous contact with fungi, immunocompetent individuals rarely develop pro-inflammatory antifungal immune responses. The underlying tolerogenic mechanisms are incompletely understood. Using both mouse models and human patients, we show that infection with the human pathogenic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans induces a distinct subset of neutrophilic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which functionally suppress T and NK cell responses. Mechanistically, pathogenic fungi induce neutrophilic MDSCs through the pattern recognition receptor Dectin-1 and its downstream adaptor protein CARD9. Fungal MDSC induction is further dependent on pathways downstream of Dectin-1 signaling, notably reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation as well as caspase-8 activity and interleukin-1 (IL-1) production. Additionally, exogenous IL-1β induces MDSCs to comparable levels observed during C. albicans infection. Adoptive transfer and survival experiments show that MDSCs are protective during invasive C. albicans infection, but not A. fumigatus infection. These studies define an innate immune mechanism by which pathogenic fungi regulate host defense. PMID:25771792

  19. Entomopathogenic Fungi: New Insights into Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, T M; Coates, C J; Dubovskiy, I M; Ratcliffe, N A

    2016-01-01

    Although many insects successfully live in dangerous environments exposed to diverse communities of microbes, they are often exploited and killed by specialist pathogens. Studies of host-pathogen interactions (HPI) provide valuable insights into the dynamics of the highly aggressive coevolutionary arms race between entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) and their arthropod hosts. The host defenses are designed to exclude the pathogen or mitigate the damage inflicted while the pathogen responds with immune evasion and utilization of host resources. EPF neutralize their immediate surroundings on the insect integument and benefit from the physiochemical properties of the cuticle and its compounds that exclude competing microbes. EPF also exhibit adaptations aimed at minimizing trauma that can be deleterious to both host and pathogen (eg, melanization of hemolymph), form narrow penetration pegs that alleviate host dehydration and produce blastospores that lack immunogenic sugars/enzymes but facilitate rapid assimilation of hemolymph nutrients. In response, insects deploy an extensive armory of hemocytes and macromolecules, such as lectins and phenoloxidase, that repel, immobilize, and kill EPF. New evidence suggests that immune bioactives work synergistically (eg, lysozyme with antimicrobial peptides) to combat infections. Some proteins, including transferrin and apolipophorin III, also demonstrate multifunctional properties, participating in metabolism, homeostasis, and pathogen recognition. This review discusses the molecular intricacies of these HPI, highlighting the interplay between immunity, stress management, and metabolism. Increased knowledge in this area could enhance the efficacy of EPF, ensuring their future in integrated pest management programs.

  20. Sexual reproduction of human fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitman, Joseph; Carter, Dee A; Dyer, Paul S; Soll, David R

    2014-08-01

    We review here recent advances in our understanding of sexual reproduction in fungal pathogens that commonly infect humans, including Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans/gattii, and Aspergillus fumigatus. Where appropriate or relevant, we introduce findings on other species associated with human infections. In particular, we focus on rapid advances involving genetic, genomic, and population genetic approaches that have reshaped our view of how fungal pathogens evolve. Rather than being asexual, mitotic, and largely clonal, as was thought to be prevalent as recently as a decade ago, we now appreciate that the vast majority of pathogenic fungi have retained extant sexual, or parasexual, cycles. In some examples, sexual and parasexual unions of pathogenic fungi involve closely related individuals, generating diversity in the population but with more restricted recombination than expected from fertile, sexual, outcrossing and recombining populations. In other cases, species and isolates participate in global outcrossing populations with the capacity for considerable levels of gene flow. These findings illustrate general principles of eukaryotic pathogen emergence with relevance for other fungi, parasitic eukaryotic pathogens, and both unicellular and multicellular eukaryotic organisms.

  1. Calcium homeostasis and signaling in fungi and their relevance for pathogenicity of yeasts and filamentous fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tisi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Though fungi show peculiarities in the purposes and specific traits of calcium signaling pathways, the general scheme and the most important players are well conserved if compared to higher eukaryotes. This provides a powerful opportunity either to investigate shared features using yeast as a model or to exploit fungal specificities as potential targets for antifungal therapies. The sequenced genomes from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa were already published more than ten years ago. More recently the genome sequences of filamentous fungi of Aspergillus genus, some of which threatening pathogens, and dimorphic fungi Ustilago maydis were published, giving the chance to identify several proteins involved in calcium signaling based on their homology to yeast or mammalian counterparts. Nonetheless, unidentified calcium transporters are still present in these organisms which await to be molecularly characterized. Despite the relative simplicity in yeast calcium machinery and the availability of sophisticated molecular tools, in the last years, a number of new actors have been identified, albeit not yet fully characterized. This review will try to describe the state of the art in calcium channels and calcium signaling knowledge in yeast, with particular attention to the relevance of this knowledge with respect to pathological fungi.

  2. Can insects develop resistance to insect pathogenic fungi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M Dubovskiy

    Full Text Available Microevolutionary adaptations and mechanisms of fungal pathogen resistance were explored in a melanic population of the Greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Under constant selective pressure from the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, 25(th generation larvae exhibited significantly enhanced resistance, which was specific to this pathogen and not to another insect pathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae. Defense and stress management strategies of selected (resistant and non-selected (susceptible insect lines were compared to uncover mechanisms underpinning resistance, and the possible cost of those survival strategies. We hypothesize that the insects developed a transgenerationally primed resistance to the fungus B. bassiana, a costly trait that was achieved not by compromising life-history traits but rather by prioritizing and re-allocating pathogen-species-specific augmentations to integumental front-line defenses that are most likely to be encountered by invading fungi. Specifically during B. bassiana infection, systemic immune defenses are suppressed in favour of a more limited but targeted repertoire of enhanced responses in the cuticle and epidermis of the integument (e.g. expression of the fungal enzyme inhibitor IMPI, and cuticular phenoloxidase activity. A range of putative stress-management factors (e.g. antioxidants is also activated during the specific response of selected insects to B. bassiana but not M. anisopliae. This too occurs primarily in the integument, and probably contributes to antifungal defense and/or helps ameliorate the damage inflicted by the fungus or the host's own immune responses.

  3. Fungi of the genus Fusarium as pathogens of soybean seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Marcinkowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty isolates of fungi of the genus Fusarium collected in the period 1980-1982 from various organs of diseased soybean plants were investigated. Eight of them proved pathogenic to soybean seedlings. The species F. culmorum was most numerously represented among the isolated (4 of 8 pathogens. Isolates of F. sambucinum were also pathogenic (2 of 4 and those of F. soloni (1 of 3, too. The only isolate of F. avenaceum also caused seedling blight. Two isolates of F. oxysporum and two of F. arthrosporioides were not pathogenic. Numerous isolates affected seed gernination and one greatly inhibited growth of the infected seedlings. Pathogenicity was tested in the laboratory in Petri plates on isolate cultures and on filter paper imbibed with fungal inoculum and, in the greenhouse on a peat and perlite substrate. The degree of infection and the character of the disease symptoms depended on the experimental conditions. The results of experiments in plates and in the greenhouse supplemented one another.

  4. Can insects develop resistance to insect pathogenic fungi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovskiy, Ivan M; Whitten, Miranda M A; Yaroslavtseva, Olga N; Greig, Carolyn; Kryukov, Vadim Y; Grizanova, Ekaterina V; Mukherjee, Krishnendu; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Glupov, Viktor V; Butt, Tariq M

    2013-01-01

    Microevolutionary adaptations and mechanisms of fungal pathogen resistance were explored in a melanic population of the Greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella. Under constant selective pressure from the insect pathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, 25(th) generation larvae exhibited significantly enhanced resistance, which was specific to this pathogen and not to another insect pathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae. Defense and stress management strategies of selected (resistant) and non-selected (susceptible) insect lines were compared to uncover mechanisms underpinning resistance, and the possible cost of those survival strategies. We hypothesize that the insects developed a transgenerationally primed resistance to the fungus B. bassiana, a costly trait that was achieved not by compromising life-history traits but rather by prioritizing and re-allocating pathogen-species-specific augmentations to integumental front-line defenses that are most likely to be encountered by invading fungi. Specifically during B. bassiana infection, systemic immune defenses are suppressed in favour of a more limited but targeted repertoire of enhanced responses in the cuticle and epidermis of the integument (e.g. expression of the fungal enzyme inhibitor IMPI, and cuticular phenoloxidase activity). A range of putative stress-management factors (e.g. antioxidants) is also activated during the specific response of selected insects to B. bassiana but not M. anisopliae. This too occurs primarily in the integument, and probably contributes to antifungal defense and/or helps ameliorate the damage inflicted by the fungus or the host's own immune responses.

  5. Pathogenicity determinants in smut fungi revealed by genome comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirawski, Jan; Mannhaupt, Gertrud; Münch, Karin; Brefort, Thomas; Schipper, Kerstin; Doehlemann, Gunther; Di Stasio, Maurizio; Rössel, Nicole; Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio; Pester, Doris; Müller, Olaf; Winterberg, Britta; Meyer, Elmar; Ghareeb, Hassan; Wollenberg, Theresa; Münsterkötter, Martin; Wong, Philip; Walter, Mathias; Stukenbrock, Eva; Güldener, Ulrich; Kahmann, Regine

    2010-12-10

    Biotrophic pathogens, such as the related maize pathogenic fungi Ustilago maydis and Sporisorium reilianum, establish an intimate relationship with their hosts by secreting protein effectors. Because secreted effectors interacting with plant proteins should rapidly evolve, we identified variable genomic regions by sequencing the genome of S. reilianum and comparing it with the U. maydis genome. We detected 43 regions of low sequence conservation in otherwise well-conserved syntenic genomes. These regions primarily encode secreted effectors and include previously identified virulence clusters. By deletion analysis in U. maydis, we demonstrate a role in virulence for four previously unknown diversity regions. This highlights the power of comparative genomics of closely related species for identification of virulence determinants.

  6. Resistance in human pathogenic yeasts and filamentous fungi: prevalence, underlying molecular mechanisms and link to the use of antifungals in humans and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rasmus Hare

    2016-10-01

    was a retrospective laboratory-based study and aimed to elucidate the prevalence of azole resistance in A. fumigatus isolates from 2010-2014 in Denmark. This study also sought to uncover the underlying resistance mechanisms, primarily attributable to CYP51A mutations, and finally to assess the accumulated genotyping data. Among 1,162 A. fumigatus isolates, 94.5% were screened for azole resistance and a significant increasing trend was observed for the number of azole-resistant isolates to approximately 6% in 2014 (presistance mutations were diverse but still dominated by the TR34/L98H resistance mechanism responsible for >50% of all our azole-resistant isolates. The genotyping data of resistant and a selection of susceptible A. fumigatus showed high identity to foreign isolates (>15%). This could argue for the hypothesis on clonal expansion, which has previously been suggested for TR34/L98H clones in the Netherlands and India, but could also indicate an insufficient discriminatory power of such analysis. Still, a proposed A. fumigatus outbreak in a haematology ward was unresolved since no genetically identical isolates were recovered from patients and air samples, illustrating the ubiquitous nature of this organism. Overall, the main concerns are a changing Candida epidemiology towards species less susceptible to fluconazole combined with the rapid acquisition of echinocandin resistance, especially among C. glabrata isolates. For A. fumigatus, the concern is the emergence of azole resistant strains in the environment, displaying cross-resistance to clinical azoles, and thus posing unforeseen clinical challenges in the management of invasive aspergillosis. Collectively, these findings call for an increased awareness especially at clinical microbiology laboratories, which ideally would lead to susceptibility testing of all clinically relevant isolates by reference or validated methods. Moreover, novel diagnostic approaches for non-culturable pathogens are warranted and

  7. DNA barcoding of fungi causing infections in humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irinyi, Laszlo; Lackner, Michaela; de Hoog, G Sybren; Meyer, Wieland

    2016-02-01

    Correct species identification is becoming increasingly important in clinical diagnostics. Till now, many mycological laboratories rely on conventional phenotypic identification. But this is slow and strongly operator-dependent. Therefore, to improve the quality of pathogen identification, rapid, reliable, and objective identification methods are essential. One of the most encouraging approaches is molecular barcoding using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the rDNA, which is rapid, easily achievable, accurate, and applicable directly from clinical specimens. It relies on the comparison of a single ITS sequence with a curated reference database. The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology (ISHAM) working group for DNA barcoding has recently established such a database, focusing on the majority of human and animal pathogenic fungi (ISHAM-ITS, freely accessible at http://www.isham.org/ or directly from http://its.mycologylab.org). For some fungi the use of secondary barcodes may be necessary.

  8. Particle-size distributions and seasonal diversity of allergenic and pathogenic fungi in outdoor air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naomichi; Bibby, Kyle; Qian, Jing; Hospodsky, Denina; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Nazaroff, William W; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-10-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in outdoor air, and their concentration, aerodynamic diameters and taxonomic composition have potentially important implications for human health. Although exposure to fungal allergens is considered a strong risk factor for asthma prevalence and severity, limitations in tracking fungal diversity in air have thus far prevented a clear understanding of their human pathogenic properties. This study used a cascade impactor for sampling, and quantitative real-time PCR plus 454 pyrosequencing for analysis to investigate seasonal, size-resolved fungal communities in outdoor air in an urban setting in the northeastern United States. From the 20 libraries produced with an average of ∼800 internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences (total 15 326 reads), 12 864 and 11 280 sequences were determined to the genus and species levels, respectively, and 558 different genera and 1172 different species were identified, including allergens and infectious pathogens. These analyses revealed strong relationships between fungal aerodynamic diameters and features of taxonomic compositions. The relative abundance of airborne allergenic fungi ranged from 2.8% to 10.7% of total airborne fungal taxa, peaked in the fall, and increased with increasing aerodynamic diameter. Fungi that can cause invasive fungal infections peaked in the spring, comprised 0.1-1.6% of fungal taxa and typically increased in relative abundance with decreasing aerodynamic diameter. Atmospheric fungal ecology is a strong function of aerodynamic diameter, whereby through physical processes, the size influences the diversity of airborne fungi that deposit in human airways and the efficiencies with which specific groups of fungi partition from outdoor air to indoor environments.

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi counteract the Janzen-Connell effect of soil pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Etienne, Rampal S; Huang, Fengmin; Wang, Yongfan; Yu, Shixiao

    2015-01-01

    Soilborne pathogens can contribute to diversity maintenance in tree communities through the Janzen-Connell effect, whereby the pathogenic reduction of seedling performance attenuates with distance from conspecifics. By contrast, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been reported to promote seedli

  10. Bridging the Gap to Non-toxic Fungal Control: Lupinus-Derived Blad-Containing Oligomer as a Novel Candidate to Combat Human Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Pinheiro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The lack of antifungal drugs with novel modes of action reaching the clinic is a serious concern. Recently a novel antifungal protein referred to as Blad-containing oligomer (BCO has received regulatory approval as an agricultural antifungal agent. Interestingly its spectrum of antifungal activity includes human pathogens such as Candida albicans, however, its mode of action has yet to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that BCO exerts its antifungal activity through inhibition of metal ion homeostasis which results in apoptotic cell death in C. albicans. HIP HOP profiling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a panel of signature strains that are characteristic for common modes of action identified hypersensitivity in yeast lacking the iron-dependent transcription factor Aft1 suggesting restricted iron uptake as a mode of action. Furthermore, global transcriptome profiling in C. albicans also identified disruption of metal ion homeostasis as a potential mode of action. Experiments were carried out to assess the effect of divalent metal ions on the antifungal activity of BCO revealing that BCO activity is antagonized by metal ions such as Mn2+, Zn2+, and Fe2+. The transcriptome profile also implicated sterol synthesis as a possible secondary mode of action which was subsequently confirmed in sterol synthesis assays in C. albicans. Animal models for toxicity showed that BCO is generally well tolerated and presents a promising safety profile as a topical applied agent. Given its potent broad spectrum antifungal activity and novel multitarget mode of action, we propose BCO as a promising new antifungal agent for the topical treatment of fungal infections.

  11. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly eDzhavakhiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or chemosensitization. Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA, 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of A. alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of F. sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  12. Chemosensitization of plant pathogenic fungi to agricultural fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhavakhiya, Vitaly; Shcherbakova, Larisa; Semina, Yulia; Zhemchuzhina, Natalia; Campbell, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    A common consequence of using agricultural fungicides is the development of resistance by fungal pathogens, which undermines reliability of fungicidal effectiveness. A potentially new strategy to aid in overcoming or minimizing this problem is enhancement of pathogen sensitivity to fungicides, or "chemosensitization." Chemosensitization can be accomplished by combining a commercial fungicide with a certain non- or marginally fungicidal substance at levels where, alone, neither compound would be effective. Chemosensitization decreases the probability of the pathogen developing resistance, reduces the toxic impact on the environment by lowering effective dosage levels of toxic fungicides, and improves efficacy of antifungal agents. The present study shows that the antifungal activity of azole and strobilurin fungicides can be significantly enhanced through their co-application with certain natural or synthetic products against several economically important plant pathogenic fungi. Quadris (azoxystrobin) combined with thymol at a non-fungitoxic concentration produced much higher growth inhibition of Bipolaris sorokiniana, Phoma glomerata, Alternaria sp. and Stagonospora nodorum than the fungicide alone. The effect of Dividend (difenoconazole) applied with thymol significantly enhanced antifungal activity against B. sorokiniana and S. nodorum. Folicur (tebuconazole) combined with 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (4-HBA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde or thymol significantly inhibited growth of Alternaria alternata, at a much greater level than the fungicide alone. In addition, co-application of Folicur and 4-HBA resulted in a similar enhancement of antifungal activity against Fusarium culmorum. Lastly, we discovered that metabolites in the culture liquid of Fusarium sambucinum biocontrol isolate FS-94 also had chemosensitizing activity, increasing S. nodorum sensitivity to Folicur and Dividend.

  13. In vitro antifungal activity of three geophytic plant extracts against three post-harvest pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maswada, Hanafey F; Abdallah, Sabry A

    2013-12-01

    Plant extracts appear to be one of the most effective alternative methods of plant diseases control which are less harmful to human beings and environment. In vitro antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of three promising wild geophytic plants against three post-harvest pathogenic fungi using radial growth technique was conducted. These extracts included the shoot system (S) and underground parts (R) of Asparagus stipularis, Cyperus capitatus and Stipagrostis lanata. The tested fungi were Alternaria solani, Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus stolonifer. The results exhibited that, all plant extracts had antifungal activity against the tested fungi. The antifungal activity greatly varied depending on plant parts and/or plant species. R. stolonifer was the most susceptible fungus to the tested plant extracts followed by A. niger and then A. solani. On the other hand, the most effective plant extracts against tested fungi were S. lanata (S) and A. stipularis (R). The most effective plant extracts against R. stolonifer were S. lanata (R) and C. capitatus (S). While, the extracts of A. stipularis (R) and S. lanata (S) were the most effective against A. niger. The extracts of C. capitatus (S) and S. lanata (S) exhibited the highest antifungal activity against A. solani. The results demonstrated that, the methanolic extracts of A. stipularis, C. capitatus and S. lanata had potential antifungal activity against A. solani, A. niger and R. stolonifer.

  14. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and their secretion in plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicek, Christian P; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2014-01-01

    Approximately a tenth of all described fungal species can cause diseases in plants. A common feature of this process is the necessity to pass through the plant cell wall, an important barrier against pathogen attack. To this end, fungi possess a diverse array of secreted enzymes to depolymerize the main structural polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall, i.e., cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin. Recent advances in genomic and systems-level studies have begun to unravel this diversity and have pinpointed cell wall-degrading enzyme (CWDE) families that are specifically present or enhanced in plant-pathogenic fungi. In this review, we discuss differences between the CWDE arsenal of plant-pathogenic and non-plant-pathogenic fungi, highlight the importance of individual enzyme families for pathogenesis, illustrate the secretory pathway that transports CWDEs out of the fungal cell, and report the transcriptional regulation of expression of CWDE genes in both saprophytic and phytopathogenic fungi.

  15. Pathogenicity of three entomopathogenic fungi to Matsucoccus matsumurae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Liu

    Full Text Available Matsucoccus matsumurae (Kuwana (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Matsucoccidae is an invasive alien species and a destructive pest of two native Chinese pines, Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. and P. massoniana Lamb., throughout the eastern regions of China. The pathogenicity of three entomopathogenic fungi, Lecanicillium lecanii strain V3.4504 and V3.4505, Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti strain HEB01 and Lecanicillium fungicola strain HEB02, against M. matsumurae was tested in four instars, to evaluate their potential as a biological control agent. The results showed that the four strains caused disease and death of the scale insect, among which the L. lecanii strains V3.4504 and V3.4505 displayed stronger virulence than the F. incarnatum-equiseti strains HEB01 and L. fungicola strain HEB02 to M. matsumurae in the 2nd-instar nymphs and the adult females. Furthermore, L. lecanii V3.4505 was most virulent to M. matsumurae. The adult females and the male 3rd-instar nymphs of M. matsumurae were susceptible to L. lecanii V3.4505; the adult females were more susceptible at LT50 = 1.96 than the 3rd-instar nymphs at LT50 = 5.67. The body surface structure, cuticle thickness and wax secretions of M. matsumurae impacted the fungal infection. L. lecanii is a promising biocontrol agent, and newly emerged male 3rd-instar nymphs and adult females are a crucial period of the insect's life cycle for M. matsumurae biocontrol.

  16. Pathogenicity of three entomopathogenic fungi to Matsucoccus matsumurae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weimin; Xie, Yingping; Dong, Jing; Xue, Jiaoliang; Zhang, Yanfeng; Lu, Yaobin; Wu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Matsucoccus matsumurae (Kuwana) (Hemiptera: Coccoidea: Matsucoccidae) is an invasive alien species and a destructive pest of two native Chinese pines, Pinus tabulaeformis Carr. and P. massoniana Lamb., throughout the eastern regions of China. The pathogenicity of three entomopathogenic fungi, Lecanicillium lecanii strain V3.4504 and V3.4505, Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti strain HEB01 and Lecanicillium fungicola strain HEB02, against M. matsumurae was tested in four instars, to evaluate their potential as a biological control agent. The results showed that the four strains caused disease and death of the scale insect, among which the L. lecanii strains V3.4504 and V3.4505 displayed stronger virulence than the F. incarnatum-equiseti strains HEB01 and L. fungicola strain HEB02 to M. matsumurae in the 2nd-instar nymphs and the adult females. Furthermore, L. lecanii V3.4505 was most virulent to M. matsumurae. The adult females and the male 3rd-instar nymphs of M. matsumurae were susceptible to L. lecanii V3.4505; the adult females were more susceptible at LT50 = 1.96 than the 3rd-instar nymphs at LT50 = 5.67. The body surface structure, cuticle thickness and wax secretions of M. matsumurae impacted the fungal infection. L. lecanii is a promising biocontrol agent, and newly emerged male 3rd-instar nymphs and adult females are a crucial period of the insect's life cycle for M. matsumurae biocontrol.

  17. Virulence-specific cell cycle and morphogenesis connections in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martín, José; Bardetti, Paola; Castanheira, Sónia; de la Torre, Antonio; Tenorio-Gómez, María

    2016-09-01

    To initiate pathogenic development, pathogenic fungi respond to a set of inductive cues. Some of them are of an extracellular nature (environmental signals), while others are intracellular (developmental signals). These signals must be integrated into a single response whose major outcome is changes in the morphogenesis of the fungus. The regulation of the cell cycle is pivotal during these cellular differentiation steps; therefore, cell cycle regulation would likely provide control points for infectious development by fungal pathogens. Here, we provide clues to understanding how the control of the cell cycle is integrated with the morphogenesis program in pathogenic fungi, and we review current examples that support these connections.

  18. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergstrom Gary C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for the production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly cellulolytic and is a major industrial microbial source for commercial cellulases, xylanases and other cell wall degrading enzymes. However, enzyme-prospecting research continues to identify opportunities to enhance the activity of T. reesei enzyme preparations by supplementing with enzymatic diversity from other microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic potential of a broad range of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi for their ability to degrade plant biomass and isolated polysaccharides. Results Large-scale screening identified a range of hydrolytic activities among 348 unique isolates representing 156 species of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify groups of species with similar hydrolytic profiles. Among moderately and highly active species, plant pathogenic species were found to be more active than non-pathogens on six of eight substrates tested, with no significant difference seen on the other two substrates. Among the pathogenic fungi, greater hydrolysis was seen when they were tested on biomass and hemicellulose derived from their host plants (commelinoid monocot or dicot. Although T. reesei has a hydrolytic profile that is highly active on cellulose and pretreated biomass, it was less active than some natural isolates of fungi when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. Conclusions Several highly active isolates of plant pathogenic fungi were identified, particularly when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. There were statistically significant preferences for biomass type reflecting the monocot or dicot host preference of the

  19. Regulation of hypoxia adaptation: an overlooked virulence attribute of pathogenic fungi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahl, Nora; Cramer, Robert A

    2010-02-01

    Over the past two decades, the incidence of fungal infections has dramatically increased. This is primarily due to increases in the population of immunocompromised individuals attributed to the HIV/AIDS pandemic and immunosuppression therapies associated with organ transplantation, cancer, and other diseases where new immunomodulatory therapies are utilized. Significant advances have been made in understanding how fungi cause disease, but clearly much remains to be learned about the pathophysiology of these often lethal infections. Fungal pathogens face numerous environmental challenges as they colonize and infect mammalian hosts. Regardless of a pathogen's complexity, its ability to adapt to environmental changes is critical for its survival and ability to cause disease. For example, at sites of fungal infections, the significant influx of immune effector cells and the necrosis of tissue by the invading pathogen generate hypoxic microenvironments to which both the pathogen and host cells must adapt in order to survive. However, our current knowledge of how pathogenic fungi adapt to and survive in hypoxic conditions during fungal pathogenesis is limited. Recent studies have begun to observe that the ability to adapt to various levels of hypoxia is an important component of the virulence arsenal of pathogenic fungi. In this review, we focus on known oxygen sensing mechanisms that non-pathogenic and pathogenic fungi utilize to adapt to hypoxic microenvironments and their possible relation to fungal virulence.

  20. Swainsonine biosynthesis genes in diverse symbiotic and pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swainsonine, a cytotoxic fungal alkaloid and a potential cancer therapy drug, is produced by the insect pathogen and plant symbiont, Metarhizium robertsii, the clover pathogen Slafractonia leguminicola, locoweed symbionts belonging to Alternaria sect. Undifilum, and a recently discovered morning glo...

  1. Differential Communications between Fungi and Host Plants Revealed by Secretome Analysis of Phylogenetically Related Endophytic and Pathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xihui; He, Qin; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Chulong

    During infection, both phytopathogenic and endophytic fungi form intimate contact with living plant cells, and need to resist or disable host defences and modify host metabolism to adapt to their host. Fungi can achieve these changes by secreting proteins and enzymes. A comprehensive comparison of the secretomes of both endophytic and pathogenic fungi can improve our understanding of the interactions between plants and fungi. Although Magnaporthe oryzae, Gaeumannomyces graminis, and M. poae are economically important fungal pathogens, and the related species Harpophora oryzae is an endophyte, they evolved from a common pathogenic ancestor. We used a pipeline analysis to predict the H. oryzae, M. oryzae, G. graminis, and M. poae secretomes and identified 1142, 1370, 1001, and 974 proteins, respectively. Orthologue gene analyses demonstrated that the M. oryzae secretome evolved more rapidly than those of the other three related species, resulting in many species-specific secreted protein-encoding genes, such as avirulence genes. Functional analyses highlighted the abundance of proteins involved in the breakdown of host plant cell walls and oxidation-reduction processes. We identified three novel motifs in the H. and M. oryzae secretomes, which may play key roles in the interaction between rice and H. oryzae. Furthermore, we found that expression of the H. oryzae secretome involved in plant cell wall degradation was downregulated, but the M. oryzae secretome was upregulated with many more upregulated genes involved in oxidation-reduction processes. The divergent in planta expression patterns of the H. and M. oryzae secretomes reveal differences that are associated with mutualistic and pathogenic interactions, respectively.

  2. Immune Interactions with Pathogenic and Commensal Fungi: A Two-Way Street.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, David M; Pearlman, Eric

    2015-11-17

    We are exposed to a wide spectrum of fungi including innocuous environmental organisms, opportunistic pathogens, commensal organisms, and fungi that can actively and explicitly cause disease. Much less is understood about effective host immunity to fungi than is generally known about immunity to bacterial and viral pathogens. Innate and adaptive arms of the immune system are required for effective host defense against Candida, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, and others, with specific elements of the host response regulating specific types of fungal infections (e.g., mucocutaneous versus systemic). Here we will review themes and controversies that are currently shaping investigation of antifungal immunity (primarily to Candida and Aspergillus) and will also examine the emerging field of the role of fungi in the gut microbiome.

  3. Susceptibility of different parsley cultivars to infestation by pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Nawrocki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiments were carried out in the years 2002 and 2003 on parsley seeds of 6 cultivars: Alba, Berlińska, Cukrowa, Kinga, Lenka, and Vistula. Mycological analysis of parsley seeds showed that the most common inhabitans were fungi from genus Alternaria (mainly A. alternata and A. radicina and Fusarium, especially F. avenaceum and F. oxysporum. During the glasshouse investigations fungi Alternaria radicina, A. alternata and Fusarium avenaceum were the main reason for parsley damping-off. The highest number of infected seedlings was observed for Berlińska and Kinga, because in both years of experiments these cultivars had the lowest number of healthy seedlings. The highest number of healthy seedlings had cultivars Alba and Lenka, especially in the second year of experiments. In the field experiments not only fungi from genus Alternaria and Fusarium were the most often isolated from diseased parsley seedlings. Fusarium oxysporum was more often isolated from diseased field seedlings than from glasshouse parsley seedlings. Other fungies isolated often from parsley seedlings cultivated in the field were: Pythium spp., Rhizoctonia solani, Cylindrocarpon destructans and Stemphylium botryosum.

  4. The possible usage of mycoviruses in biological control against tree pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Gülden Aday Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoviruses in many organism including plant pathogenic fungi. They are mostly spread intracellularly via asexual and sexual reproduction of the fungi and cause some changes on them. Although many mycoviruses have no clear effect on their hosts, there are also many reports that they cause some phenotypic chances. Especially, they have effect on plant pathogenic fungi by increasing or decreasing their virulence. When they reduce the virulence of the host like in Chestnut canker sample, it is possible to use them in biological control. In this review, mycoviruses detected on some important fungal pathogens of forest trees both in our country and world were introduced and the studies carried out were summarized.

  5. Entomopathogenic fungi as biological controllers: New insights into their virulence and pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Ali Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic fungi vary considerably in their mode of action and virulence. Successful infection depends primarily on the adherence and penetration ability of a fungus to the host integuments. A variety of extracellular enzymes is produced during the degradation of insect integument. The attempts to control insects have changed over time from chemicals to natural control methods. This is why the development of natural methods of insect control or biopesticides, is preferred. By the use of fungal entomopathogens, insect pests can be controlled. There is no doubt that insects have been used for many years, but their effective use in the field remains elusive. However, their additional role in nature has also been discovered. Comparison of entomopathogens with conventional chemical pesticides depends on their efficiency and cost. In addition to efficiency, there are advantages in using microbial control agents, such as human safety and other non-target organisms; pesticide residues are minimized in food and biodiversity increased in managed ecosystems. In the present review the pathogenicity and virulence of entomopathogenic fungi and their role as biological control agents using biotechnology will be discussed.

  6. Pathogenicity of endophytic entomopathogenic fungi to Ornithodoros erraticus and Ornithodoros moubata (Acari: Argasidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalgogeazcoa, Iñigo; Oleaga, Ana; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo

    2008-12-20

    The argasid ticks O. erraticus and O. moubata are of great medical and veterinary importance because they are vectors of the African swine fever virus and several species of human relapsing fever borreliae. Biocontrol of these ticks using entomopathogenic fungi has not been previously reported. We examined the pathogenicity to different developmental stages of these two argasids of six strains of the fungal species Beauveria bassiana (strains Bb1764 and Bb2157), Lecanicillium lecanii (strains Ll586, Ll618 and Ll3047) and Tolypocladium cylindrosporum (strain Tc3398). Three strains, Bb1764, Bb2157, and Tc3398, caused in Spanish O. erraticus mean mortality rates between 34.4% and 62% in 14-28 days post-inoculation. Additionally, Bb2157 also induced in African O. moubata mean mortality rates of 31.9%. The remaining strains caused lower mortality rates and were not considered effective. This is the first study in which some strains of entomopathogenic fungi are found to be effective against argasid ticks of the genus Ornithodoros, and its results might justify further efforts towards the application of entomopathogenic fungal strains as anti-argasid biocontrol agents.

  7. Diaporthe: a genus of endophytic, saprobic and plant pathogenic fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, R.R.; Glienke, C.; Videira, S.I.R.; Lombard, L.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2013-01-01

    Diaporthe (Phomopsis) species have often been reported as plant pathogens, non-pathogenic endophytes or saprobes, commonly isolated from a wide range of hosts. The primary aim of the present study was to resolve the taxonomy and phylogeny of a large collection of Diaporthe species occurring on diver

  8. Chaetomium-like fungi causing opportunistic infections in humans: a possible role for extremotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; Khan, Ziauddin; Wang, Xue-wei; Moussa, Tarek A. A.; Al-Zahrani, Hassan S.; Almaghrabi, Omar A.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Ahmad, S.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Diepeningen, Anne; Menken, S. B. J.; Najafzadeh, M. J.; Crous, Pedro W.; Cornely, Oliver; Hamprecht, Axel; Vehreschild, Maria J. G. T.; Kindo, A. J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Chaetomiaceae are ubiquitous ascosporulating fungi commonly, which reside in soil enriched with manure or cellulosic materials. Their role as human pathogens is largely ignored. However, the ability of some species to grow at high temperature enables them to play an important r

  9. Chaetomium-like fungi causing opportunistic infections in humans: a possible role for extremotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; Khan, Ziauddin; Wang, Xue-wei; Moussa, Tarek A. A.; Al-Zahrani, Hassan S.; Almaghrabi, Omar A.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Ahmad, S.; Groenewald, Johannes Z.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; Diepeningen, Anne; Menken, S. B. J.; Najafzadeh, M. J.; Crous, Pedro W.; Cornely, Oliver; Hamprecht, Axel; Vehreschild, Maria J. G. T.; Kindo, A. J.; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    Members of the family Chaetomiaceae are ubiquitous ascosporulating fungi commonly, which reside in soil enriched with manure or cellulosic materials. Their role as human pathogens is largely ignored. However, the ability of some species to grow at high temperature enables them to play an important

  10. Chaetomium-like fungi causing opportunistic infections in humans: a possible role for extremotolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, S.A.; Khan, Z.; Wang, X.; Moussa, T.A.A.; Al-Zahrani, H.S.; Almaghrabi, O.A.; Sutton, D.A.; Ahmad, S.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Alastruey-Izquierdo, A.; van Diepeningen, A.; Menken, S.B.J.; Najafzadeh, M.J.; Crous, P.W.; Cornely, O.; Hamprecht, A.; Vehreschild, M.J.G.T.; Kindo, A.J.; de Hoog, G.S.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the family Chaetomiaceae are ubiquitous ascosporulating fungi commonly, which reside in soil enriched with manure or cellulosic materials. Their role as human pathogens is largely ignored. However, the ability of some species to grow at high temperature enables them to play an important

  11. Detailed sterol compositions of two pathogenic rust fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, José-Luis; Zhao, Hui

    2004-08-01

    Teliospores of cedar-apple rust Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae were collected from the eastern red cedar Juniperus virginiana, and aeciospores of quince rust G. clavipes were collected from the fruit of English hawthorn Crataegus laevigata. The sterol fractions were separated by HPLC, and their identities were determined by 600 MHz 1H NMR. Twenty-six sterols were isolated from G. juniperi-virginianae and 18 sterols were isolated from G. clavipes. The principal sterol of both fungi was (Z)-stigmasta-7,24(28)-dien-3beta-ol. Other major sterols were (24S)-ergost-7-en-3beta-ol, (24S)-stigmast-7-en-3beta-ol, and (24S)-stigmasta-5,7-dien-3beta-ol. The sterols of the hosts were found to be very different from those of the fungi. The 24-alkyl sterols of the fungi had the 24alpha-configuration, whereas those of the hosts had the 24beta-configuration. Similarities to the sterol composition of the AIDS pneumonia fungus Pneumocystis carinii are discussed.

  12. Contribution to the knowledge of pathogenic fungi of spiders in Argentina. Southernmost record in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfrino, Romina G; González, Alda; Barneche, Jorge; Tornesello Galván, Julieta; Hywell-Jones, Nigel; López Lastra, Claudia C

    The aim of this study was to identify entomopathogenic fungi infecting spiders (Araneae) in a protected area of Buenos Aires province, Argentina. The Araneae species identified was Stenoterommata platensis. The pathogens identified were Lecanicillium aphanocladii Zare & W. Gams, Purpureocillium lilacinum (Thom) Luangsa-ard, Houbraken, Hywel Jones & Samson and Ophiocordyceps caloceroides (Berk & M.A. Curtis). This study constitutes the southernmost records in the world and contributes to expanding the knowledge of the biodiversity of pathogenic fungi of spiders in Argentina. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Ulvans induce resistance against plant pathogenic fungi independently of their sulfation degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Mateus B; Ferreira, Luciana G; Hawerroth, Caroline; Duarte, Maria Eugênia R; Noseda, Miguel D; Stadnik, Marciel J

    2015-11-20

    The present work aimed to evaluate the defense responses induced by chemically sulfated ulvans in Arabidopsis thaliana plants against the phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Colletotrichum higginsianum. Derivatives with growing sulfate content (from 20.9 to 36.6%) were prepared with SO3-pyridine complex in formamide. NMR and FTIR spectroscopic analyses confirmed the increase of sulfate groups after the chemical sulfation process. The native sulfated polysaccharide (18.9% of sulfate) and its chemically sulfated derivatives similarly reduced the severity of both pathogenic fungi infections. Collectively, our results suggest that ulvans induce resistance against both fungal pathogens independently of its sulfation degree.

  14. Seedborne Pathogenic Fungi in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. INTA Rojo) in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcenaro, Delfia; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume with high nutritional value. In Nicaragua, certified healthy seeds of local bean varieties are not available, and seedborne fungi have gained little attention. Here, were surveyed seedborne pathogenic fungi in an important local bean cultivar, 'INTA Rojo'. Beans grown in the four main production areas in Nicaragua (Boaco, Carazo, Estelí, Matagalpa) for future use as seed stock were sampled from four seed storehouses and six seed lots. A total of 133 fungal strains were isolated from surface-sterilized beans and inoculated to healthy lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) under controlled conditions. Eighty-seven isolates caused symptoms of varying severity in the seedlings, including discoloration, necrotic lesions, cankers, rot, and lethal necrosis. Pathogenic isolates were divided into eight phenotypically distinguishable groups based on morphology and growth characteristics on artificial growth medium, and further identified by analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal RNA genes. The pathogenic isolates belonged to eight genera. Fusarium spp. (F. chlamydosporum, F. equiseti, F. incarnatum), Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Penicillium citrinum were the most damaging and common fungi found in the seed lots. Furthermore, Corynespora cassiicola, Colletotrichum capsisi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Aspergillus flavus, and Diaporthe sp. (Phomopsis) were seedborne in cultivar 'INTA Rojo' and found to be pathogenic to bean seedlings. This study reveals, for the first time, many seedborne pathogenic fungi in beans in Nicaragua; furthermore, prior to this study, little information was available concerning F. equiseti, F. incarnatum, L. theobromae, C. cassiicola, and Diaporthe spp. as seedborne pathogens of common bean. Our results lay the basis for developing diagnostic tools for seed health inspection and for further study of the epidemiology

  15. Comparative Genomics Including the Early-Diverging Smut Fungus Ceraceosorus bombacis Reveals Signatures of Parallel Evolution within Plant and Animal Pathogens of Fungi and Oomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Xia, Xiaojuan; Riess, Kai; Bauer, Robert; Thines, Marco

    2015-08-27

    Ceraceosorus bombacis is an early-diverging lineage of smut fungi and a pathogen of cotton trees (Bombax ceiba). To study the evolutionary genomics of smut fungi in comparison with other fungal and oomycete pathogens, the genome of C. bombacis was sequenced and comparative genomic analyses were performed. The genome of 26.09 Mb encodes for 8,024 proteins, of which 576 are putative-secreted effector proteins (PSEPs). Orthology analysis revealed 30 ortholog PSEPs among six Ustilaginomycotina genomes, the largest groups of which are lytic enzymes, such as aspartic peptidase and glycoside hydrolase. Positive selection analyses revealed the highest percentage of positively selected PSEPs in C. bombacis compared with other Ustilaginomycotina genomes. Metabolic pathway analyses revealed the absence of genes encoding for nitrite and nitrate reductase in the genome of the human skin pathogen Malassezia globosa, but these enzymes are present in the sequenced plant pathogens in smut fungi. Interestingly, these genes are also absent in cultivable oomycete animal pathogens, while nitrate reductase has been lost in cultivable oomycete plant pathogens. Similar patterns were also observed for obligate biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic fungal and oomycete pathogens. Furthermore, it was found that both fungal and oomycete animal pathogen genomes are lacking cutinases and pectinesterases. Overall, these findings highlight the parallel evolution of certain genomic traits, revealing potential common evolutionary trajectories among fungal and oomycete pathogens, shaping the pathogen genomes according to their lifestyle.

  16. Nutrient acquisition and secondary metabolites in plant pathogenic fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Droce, Aida

    and infection processes of these two distinct phytopathogens are described with special attention on the importance of uptake and reallocation of nutrients. Nutrient uptake from host plant is crucial for fungi to grow and proliferate and during several developmental processes nutrient reallocation, a mechanism...... called autophagy, is crucial. In this ph.d project autophagy and dipeptide transport in Fg and Bgh is assessed with respect to pathology, developmental processes and mycotoxins production. Several techniques within molecular biology, bioinformatics, microbiology, analytical chemistry and plant pathology...

  17. Synthesis and in vitro antifungal efficacy of oleoyl-chitosan nanoparticles against plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ke; Shen, Xiaoqiang; Zhu, Xiao; Ju, Xiuyun; Miao, Xiangmin; Tian, Jun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Peng, Xue; Jiang, Jihong; Qin, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    An antifungal dispersion system was prepared by oleoyl-chitosan (O-chitosan) nanoparticles, and the antifungal activity against several plant pathogenic fungi was investigated. Under scanning electron microscopy, the nanoparticles formulation appeared to be uniform with almost spherical shape. The particle size of nanoparticles was around 296.962 nm. Transmission electron microscopy observation showed that nanoparticles could be well distributed in potato dextrose agar medium. Mycelium growth experiment demonstrated that Nigrospora sphaerica, Botryosphaeria dothidea, Nigrospora oryzae and Alternaria tenuissima were chitosan-sensitive, while Gibberella zeae and Fusarium culmorum were chitosan-resistant. The antifungal index was increased as the concentration of nanoparticles increased for chitosan-sensitive fungi. Fatty acid analyses revealed that plasma membranes of chitosan-sensitive fungi were shown to have lower levels of unsaturated fatty acid than chitosan-resistant fungi. Phylogenetic analysis based on ITS gene sequences indicated that two chitosan-resistant fungi had a near phylogenetic relationship. Results showed that O-chitosan nanoparticles could be a useful alternative for controlling pathogenic fungi in agriculture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. First survey on ecological host range of aphid pathogenic fungi (Phylum Entomophthoromycota) in Tunisia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben Fekih, Ibtissem; Boukhris-Bouhachem, Sonia; Allagui, Mohamed Bechir;

    2015-01-01

    sites belonging to three different bioclimatic zones. Four pathogens from the phylum Entomophthoromycota were found to occur naturally in Tunisian ecosystems: Pandora neoaphidis (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae), Entomophthora planchoniana (Entomophthorales: Entomophthoraceae), Conidiobolus obscurus...... (Entomophthorales: Ancylistaceae) and Neozygites fresenii (Neozygitales: Neozygitaceae). The occurrence of entomophthoralean fungi depended on the sampling area, the bioclimatic zone, and aphid species. P. neoaphidis and E. planchoniana were the predominant pathogens infecting a wide range of aphid species whereas...

  19. Foliar endophytic fungi as potential protectors from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants

    OpenAIRE

    González-Teuber, M.; Jimenez-Aleman, G.; W Boland

    2014-01-01

    In defensive ant-plant interactions myrmecophytic plants express reduced chemical defense in their leaves to protect themselves from pathogens, and it seems that mutualistic partners are required to make up for this lack of defensive function. Previously, we reported that mutualistic ants confer plants of Acacia hindsii protection from pathogens, and that the protection is given by the ant-associated bacteria. Here, we examined whether foliar endophytic fungi may potentially act as a new part...

  20. First records of fungi pathogenic on spiders for the Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić, Dragiša

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During an investigation into parasitic fungi on arthropods in the mixed forests of Mt. Fruška Gora, Republic of Serbia, two pathogenic species were found: Cordyceps thaxteri Mains (anamorph: Cordyceps thaxteri Mains (Anamorph: Akanthomyces aranearum (Petch Mains and Torrubiella arachnophila (J.R. Johnst. Mains (Anamorph: Gibellula leiopus (Vuill. ex Maubl. Mains (Hypocreales, Cordycipitaceae. Both specimens were found in the anamorphic (asexual stage. Previously, there have been no investigations of this group of fungi in this region, thus these are the first records of pathogenic fungi for both Mt. Fruška Gora and the entire territory of the Republic of Serbia. Collected specimens are deposited in the Herbarium of the National Park Fruška Gora, Republic of Serbia.

  1. The isolation and identification of pathogenic fungi from Tessaratoma papillosa Drury (Hemiptera: Tessaratomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Meng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Litchi stink-bug, Tessaratoma papillosa Drury (Hemiptera: Tessaratomidae, is one of the most widespread and destructive pest species on Litchi chinensis Sonn and Dimocarpus longan Lour in Southern China. Inappropriate use of chemical pesticides has resulted in serious environmental problems and food pollution. Generating an improved Integrated Pest Management (IPM strategy for litchi stink-bug in orchard farming requires development of an effective biological control agent. Entomopathogenic fungi are regarded as a vital ecological factor in the suppression of pest populations under field conditions. With few effective fungi and pathogenic strains available to control litchi stink-bug, exploration of natural resources for promising entomopathogenic fungi is warranted. Methods & Results In this study, two pathogenic fungi were isolated from cadavers of adult T. papillosa. They were identified as Paecilomyces lilacinus and Beauveria bassiana by morphological identification and rDNA-ITS homogeneous analysis. Infection of T. papillosa with B. bassiana and P. lilacinus occurred initially from the antennae, metameres, and inter-segmental membranes. Biological tests showed that the two entomopathogenic fungi induced high mortality in 2nd and 5th instar nymphs of T. papillosa. B. bassiana was highly virulent on 2nd instar nymphs of T. papillosa, with values for cadaver rate, LC50 and LT50 of 88.89%, 1.92 × 107 conidia/mL and 4.34 days respectively. Discussion This study provides two valuable entomopathogenic fungi from T. papillosa. This finding suggests that the highly virulent P. lilacinus and B. bassiana play an important role in the biocontrol of T. papillosa in China. These pathogenic fungi had no pollution or residue risk, and could provide an alternative option for IPM of litchi stink-bug.

  2. Snow in the city as a spore bank of potentially pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejdys, Elżbieta; Biedunkiewicz, Anna; Dynowska, Maria; Sucharzewska, Ewa

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluates the role of snow as a specific ecological niche and a vector in fungal spreading with particular emphasis on potential pathogens in seasonally and daily changing conditions. The experimental material was fungi isolated from the atmospheric air, snow cover, and fragments of ice and soil from underneath the snow cover. The total count of microfungi in the air before snowfall, i.e. in the autumn, reached 1756.1 CFU/m(3) on average. After the first snowfalls, it dropped to 85.2 CFU/m(3). The analyzed samples of snow cover contained from 101.6 to 8500.0 CFU/m(3) of fungi. Furthermore, 26 species of yeast and yeast-like fungi were isolated from the experimental material. Amongst the analyzed species, 13 were potential anthropopathogens. Though another three species were isolated from organ ontocenoses, i.e. Candida intermedia, Saccharomyces bayanus and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, their pathogenic potential has not yet been explicitly confirmed. The results of the presented study may be applied in predicting concentrations of fungal spores responsible for mycoses. The first snowfalls significantly reduced the number of colony-forming units of fungi in the air. Under conditions of temperate climate, snow becomes a temporary bank of yeast-like fungi spores and while it melts cells of deposited microfungi migrate to the atmosphere. Hence, individuals with impaired immunity or in the course of immunosuppression or recovery should avoid long walks during periods of snow melting. The count of fungi in urban bioaerosol during the melt may be reduced through systematic removal of snow cover, which is a significant reservoir of potential pathogens. In addition, it should be noted that even a typical psychrophilic strain, capable of surviving at a temperature of 37°C, may bear a significant pathogenic potential.

  3. Protecting Plants against Pests and Pathogens with Entomopathogenic Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keyser, Chad Alton

    is an increasingly important area of research. Efforts to maximize agricultural output are significantly dependent on reliable means for pest suppression. Biological control, or the use of living organisms to suppress a pest population, is a leading alternative to traditional chemical-based pesticides for crop...... protection. The fungal genus Metarhizium is one of the most intensely researched groups of entomopathogenic fungi and several isolates have been successfully employed as biopesticides for crop protection; however, inconsistent field reliability has limited wider implementation. Research emphasizing...... of variability with in the species. The results of these studies further clarify the important role Metarhizium spp. play in the natural environment and highlight their vast potential to be implemented as biological control agents of important pest insects....

  4. Protecting Plants against Pests and Pathogens with Entomopathogenic Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keyser, Chad Alton

    This thesis investigates the natural occurrence of the fungal genus Metarhizium in association with crop-roots in Denmark, and advances the current understanding of how these fungi interact with other root-associating organisms when applied as a biological control agent. Insect-pest management...... is an increasingly important area of research. Efforts to maximize agricultural output are significantly dependent on reliable means for pest suppression. Biological control, or the use of living organisms to suppress a pest population, is a leading alternative to traditional chemical-based pesticides for crop...... of variability with in the species. The results of these studies further clarify the important role Metarhizium spp. play in the natural environment and highlight their vast potential to be implemented as biological control agents of important pest insects....

  5. Foliar endophytic fungi as potential protectors from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Jiménez-Alemán, Guillermo H; Boland, Wilhelm

    2014-10-01

    In defensive ant-plant interactions myrmecophytic plants express reduced chemical defense in their leaves to protect themselves from pathogens, and it seems that mutualistic partners are required to make up for this lack of defensive function. Previously, we reported that mutualistic ants confer plants of Acacia hindsii protection from pathogens, and that the protection is given by the ant-associated bacteria. Here, we examined whether foliar endophytic fungi may potentially act as a new partner, in addition to mutualistic ants and their bacteria inhabitants, involved in the protection from pathogens in myrmecophytic Acacia plants. Fungal endophytes were isolated from the asymptomatic leaves of A. hindsii plants for further molecular identification of 18S rRNA gene. Inhibitory effects of fungal endophytes were tested against Pseudomonas plant pathogens. Our findings support a potential role of fungal endophytes in pathogen the protection mechanisms against pathogens in myrmecophytic plants and provide the evidence of novel fungal endophytes capable of biosynthesizing bioactive metabolites.

  6. The biotechnological use and potential of plant pathogenic smut fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrügge, Michael; Kellner, Ronny; Schipper, Kerstin

    2013-04-01

    Plant pathogens of the family Ustilaginaceae parasitise mainly on grasses and cause smut disease. Among the best characterised members of this family are the covered smut fungus Ustilago hordei colonising barley and oat as well as the head smut Sporisorium reilianum and the corn smut Ustilago maydis, both infecting maize. Over the past years, U. maydis in particular has matured into a model system for diverse topics like plant-pathogen interaction, cellular transport processes or DNA repair. Consequently, a broad set of genetic, molecular and system biological methods has been established. This set currently serves as a strong foundation to improve existing and establish novel biotechnological applications. Here, we review four promising aspects covering different fields of applied science: (1) synthesis of secondary metabolites produced at fermenter level. (2) Lipases and other hydrolytic enzymes with potential roles in biocatalytic processes. (3) Degradation of ligno-cellulosic plant materials for biomass conversion. (4) Protein expression based on unconventional secretion, a novel approach inspired by basic research on mRNA transport. Thus, plant pathogenic Ustilaginaceae offer a great potential for future biotechnological applications by combining basic research and applied science.

  7. Independent expansion of zincin metalloproteinases in Onygenales fungi may be associated with their pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available To get a comprehensive view of fungal M35 family (deuterolysin and M36 family (fungalysin genes, we conducted genome-wide investigations and phylogenetic analyses of genes in these two families from 50 sequenced Ascomycota fungi with different life styles. Large variations in the number of M35 family and M36 family genes were found among different fungal genomes, indicating that these two gene families have been highly dynamic through fungal evolution. Moreover, we found obvious expansions of Meps in two families of Onygenales: Onygenaceae and Arthodermataceae, whereas species in family Ajellomycetace did not show expansion of these genes. The strikingly different gene duplication and loss patterns in Onygenales may be associated with the different pathogenicity of these species. Interestingly, likelihood ratio tests (LRT of both M35 family and M36 family genes suggested that several branches leading to the duplicated genes in dermatophytic and Coccidioides fungi had signatures of positive selection, indicating that the duplicated Mep genes have likely diverged functionally to play important roles during the evolution of pathogenicity of dermatophytic and Coccidioides fungi. The potentially positively selected residues discovered by our analysis may have contributed to the development of new physiological functions of the duplicated Mep genes in dermatophytic fungi and Coccidioides species. Our study adds to the current knowledge of the evolution of Meps in fungi and also establishes a theoretical foundation for future experimental investigations.

  8. Independent expansion of zincin metalloproteinases in Onygenales fungi may be associated with their pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    To get a comprehensive view of fungal M35 family (deuterolysin) and M36 family (fungalysin) genes, we conducted genome-wide investigations and phylogenetic analyses of genes in these two families from 50 sequenced Ascomycota fungi with different life styles. Large variations in the number of M35 family and M36 family genes were found among different fungal genomes, indicating that these two gene families have been highly dynamic through fungal evolution. Moreover, we found obvious expansions of Meps in two families of Onygenales: Onygenaceae and Arthodermataceae, whereas species in family Ajellomycetace did not show expansion of these genes. The strikingly different gene duplication and loss patterns in Onygenales may be associated with the different pathogenicity of these species. Interestingly, likelihood ratio tests (LRT) of both M35 family and M36 family genes suggested that several branches leading to the duplicated genes in dermatophytic and Coccidioides fungi had signatures of positive selection, indicating that the duplicated Mep genes have likely diverged functionally to play important roles during the evolution of pathogenicity of dermatophytic and Coccidioides fungi. The potentially positively selected residues discovered by our analysis may have contributed to the development of new physiological functions of the duplicated Mep genes in dermatophytic fungi and Coccidioides species. Our study adds to the current knowledge of the evolution of Meps in fungi and also establishes a theoretical foundation for future experimental investigations.

  9. Pseudogenization in pathogenic fungi with different host plants and lifestyles might reflect their evolutionary past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Burgt, Ate; Karimi Jashni, Mansoor; Bahkali, Ali H; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2014-02-01

    Pseudogenes are genes with significant homology to functional genes, but contain disruptive mutations (DMs) leading to the production of non- or partially functional proteins. Little is known about pseudogenization in pathogenic fungi with different lifestyles. Here, we report the identification of DMs causing pseudogenes in the genomes of the fungal plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea, Cladosporium fulvum, Dothistroma septosporum, Mycosphaerella fijiensis, Verticillium dahliae and Zymoseptoria tritici. In these fungi, we identified 1740 gene models containing 2795 DMs obtained by an alignment-based gene prediction method. The contribution of sequencing errors to DMs was minimized by analyses of resequenced genomes to obtain a refined dataset of 924 gene models containing 1666 true DMs. The frequency of pseudogenes varied from 1% to 5% in the gene catalogues of these fungi, being the highest in the asexually reproducing fungus C. fulvum (4.9%), followed by D. septosporum (2.4%) and V. dahliae (2.1%). The majority of pseudogenes do not represent recent gene duplications, but members of multi-gene families and unitary genes. In general, there was no bias for pseudogenization of specific genes in the six fungi. Single exceptions were those encoding secreted proteins, including proteases, which appeared more frequently pseudogenized in C. fulvum than in D. septosporum. Most pseudogenes present in these two phylogenetically closely related fungi are not shared, suggesting that they are related to adaptation to a different host (tomato versus pine) and lifestyle (biotroph versus hemibiotroph). © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  10. Essential metals at the host-pathogen interface: nutritional immunity and micronutrient assimilation by human fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Aaron; Wilson, Duncan

    2015-11-01

    The ability of pathogenic microorganisms to assimilate sufficient nutrients for growth within their hosts is a fundamental requirement for pathogenicity. However, certain trace nutrients, including iron, zinc and manganese, are actively withheld from invading pathogens in a process called nutritional immunity. Therefore, successful pathogenic species must have evolved specialized mechanisms in order to adapt to the nutritionally restrictive environment of the host and cause disease. In this review, we discuss recent advances which have been made in our understanding of fungal iron and zinc acquisition strategies and nutritional immunity against fungal infections, and explore the mechanisms of micronutrient uptake by human pathogenic fungi.

  11. Online Databases for Taxonomy and Identification of Pathogenic Fungi and Proposal for a Cloud-Based Dynamic Data Network Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Peralam Yegneswaran; Irinyi, Laszlo; Halliday, Catriona; Chen, Sharon; Robert, Vincent; Meyer, Wieland

    2017-04-01

    The increase in public online databases dedicated to fungal identification is noteworthy. This can be attributed to improved access to molecular approaches to characterize fungi, as well as to delineate species within specific fungal groups in the last 2 decades, leading to an ever-increasing complexity of taxonomic assortments and nomenclatural reassignments. Thus, well-curated fungal databases with substantial accurate sequence data play a pivotal role for further research and diagnostics in the field of mycology. This minireview aims to provide an overview of currently available online databases for the taxonomy and identification of human and animal-pathogenic fungi and calls for the establishment of a cloud-based dynamic data network platform. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Study of Pathogens of Fungal Keratitis and the Sensitivity of Pathogenic Fungi to Therapeutic Agents with the Disk Diffusion Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lulu; Wang, Liya; Han, Lei; Yin, Weijing

    2015-01-01

    To identify the causative fungi of fungal keratitis, test their susceptibility to antifungal agents with the disk diffusion method and study the relationship between the organisms, the inhibition zones and the clinical outcomes. 535 patients with fungal keratitis in one eye were included in this study. Pathogenic fungi were isolated by corneal scraping, identified by fungal cultivation and subjected to drug sensitivity tests conducted with the disk diffusion method. The patients were treated initially with voriconazole, terbinafine and natamycin eye drops for one week. Further treatment continued using the most effective drug according to the drug sensitivity results. The patients were followed up every week until three months after cured. The inhibition zones of fungi cultured with voriconazole, terbinafine and natamycin were compared. The relationship between inhibition zones and organism, organism and treatment results measure, and each treatment results measure and inhibition zones were evaluated. Of 535 patients, 53.84%, 19.25% and 26.91% were infected with Aspergillus, Fusarium and other fungi, respectively. Keratitis patients infected with Aspergillus keratitis had the worst outcome. The size of the inhibition zones of Aspergillus spp., Fusarium spp. and other fungal genera differed significantly in response to voriconazole, terbinafine and natamycin. The inhibition zone associated with natamycin correlated significantly with the clinical outcome of fungal keratitis (OR = 0.925), but no other such correlations were found for the other drugs tested. Aspergillus and Fusarium were the predominant pathogenic genera causing fungal keratitis in our patients. Among the causative fungi, infections due to Aspergillus spp. were associated with the worst outcomes. The inhibition zones of fungal isolates in response to natamycin significantly correlated with the treatment outcomes of keratitis. Specifically, the smaller the natamycin inhibition zone, the lower the

  13. Morphological characteristics and pathogenicity of fungi associated with Roselle (Hibiscus Sabdariffa) diseases in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslaminejad, Touba; Zakaria, Maziah

    2011-11-01

    Roselle, or Jamaica sorrel (Hibiscus sabdariffa) is a popular vegetable in many tropical regions, cultivated for its leaves, seeds, stems and calyces which, the dried calyces are used to prepare tea, syrup, jams and jellies and as beverages. The main objectives of this study were to identify and characterise fungal pathogens associated with Roselle diseases based on their morphological and cultural characteristics and to determine the pathogenicity of four fungi infecting Roselle seedlings, namely Phoma exigua, Fusarium nygamai, Fusarium tgcq and Rhizoctonia solani in Penang. A total of 200 fungal isolates were obtained from 90 samples of symptomatic Roselle tissues. The isolates were identified based on cultural and morphological characteristics, as well as their pathogenicity. The fungal pathogen most frequently isolated was P. exigua (present in 45% of the samples), followed by F. nygamai (25%), Rhizoctonia solani (19%) and F. camptoceras (11%). Pathogenicity tests showed that P. exigua, F. nygamai, F. camptoceras and R. solani were able to infect both wounded and unwounded seedlings with different degrees of severity as indicated by the Disease severity (DS). R. solani was the most pathogenic fungus affecting both wounded and unwounded Roselle seedlings, followed by P. exigua that was highly pathogenic on wounded seedlings. F. nygamai was less pathogenic while the least pathogenic fungus was F. camptoceras, infecting only the unwounded seedlings but, surprisingly, not the wounded plants.

  14. Antifungal Substances from Streptomyces sp. A3265 Antagonistic to Plant Pathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Minh, Nguyen; Woo, E-Eum; Kim, Ji-Yul; Kim, Dae-Won; Hwang, Byung Soon; Lee, Yoon-Ju; Lee, In-Kyoung; Yun, Bong-Sik

    2015-09-01

    In a previous study, we identified a Streptomyces sp., A3265, as exhibiting potent antifungal activity against various plant pathogenic fungi, including Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and Rhizoctonia solani. This strain also exhibited a biocontrolling effect against ginseng root rot and damping-off disease, common diseases of ginseng and other crops. In this study, we isolated two antifungal substances responsible for this biocontrolling effect via Diaion HP-20 and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography, medium pressure liquid chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography. These compounds were identified as guanidylfungin A and methyl guanidylfungin A by spectroscopic methods. These compounds exhibited potent antimicrobial activity against various plant pathogenic fungi as well as against bacteria.

  15. A survey on the pathogenic fungi in soil samples of potted plants from Sari hospitals, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, M T; Mohseni-Bandpi, A; Moradi, S

    2004-09-01

    A total of 23 soil samples of potted plants was collected from hospitals in Sari, Iran. Each sample contained approximately 200 g soil, taken from a depth of 0-10 cm of the pots. Samples were analysed by two different methods. (1) Culture on Sabouraud's dextrose agar medium containing chloramphenicol (SC); cultured fungi were identified by macroscopic and microscopic characterization. (2) The hair-baiting technique (HBT) was used to isolate the keratinophilic fungi. After culture on SC medium, 100% of plates were positive for fungal growth, and in total 1150 colonies with 13 different types of fungi were isolated. Penicillium spp. (52%), Acremonium spp. (20%), Paecilomyces spp. (11.9%), Cladsporium spp. (3.7%) and Aspergillus spp. (3.1%) were the predominant fungal species. Rhizopus spp. (0.1%) were less frequent. Keratinophilic fungi such as Microsporum gypseum, Microsporum cookei and Chrysosporium spp. were isolated using HBT. The presence of pathogenic fungi such as Cladosporium spp, Aspergillus spp, M. gypseum, and M. cookei in potted plants in hospitals represents a potential source of nosocomial infection.

  16. DNA topoisomerases from pathogenic fungi: targets for the discovery of antifungal drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, L L; Baranowski, J; Fostel, J.; Montgomery, D A; Lartey, P A

    1992-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases, a class of enzymes that change the topological structure of DNA, have been shown to be the target of many therapeutic agents, including antibacterial agents (quinolones) and anticancer agents. These drugs inhibit the enzyme in a unique way so that the enzyme is converted into a cellular poison. Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger are two major opportunistic fungal pathogens. Our results show that these fungi have high levels of both type I and type II topoisomerases (wi...

  17. Identification of Plant-Pathogenic Fungi Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Combined with Chemometric Analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAI A-li; WANG Yi-kai; ZHU Fa-di; SHI Yan-xia; XIE Xue-wen; LI Bao-ju

    2016-01-01

    Identification of plant-pathogenic fungi is time-consuming due to cultivation and microscopic exami-nation and can be influenced by the interpretation of the micro-morphological characters observed.The present investigation aimed to create a simple but sophisticated method for the identification of plant-pathogenic fungi by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)spectroscopy.In this study,FTIR-attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy was used in combination with chemometric analysis for identification of important pathogenic fun-gi of horticultural plants.Mixtures of mycelia and spores from 27 fungal strains belonging to nine different families were collected from liquid PD or solid PDA media cultures and subj ected to FTIR-ATR spectroscopy measurements.The FTIR-ATR spectra ranging from 4 000 to 400 cm-1 were obtained.To classify the FTIR-ATR spectra,cluster analysis was compared with canonical vitiate analysis (CVA)in the spectral regions of 3 050~2 800 and 1 800~900 cm-1 .Results showed that the identification accuracies achieved 97.53% and 9 9.1 8% for the cluster analysis and CVA analysis,respectively,demonstrating the high potential of this tech-nique for fungal strain identification.

  18. Fungal Control of Pathogenic Fungi Isolated From Some Wild Plants in Taif Governorate, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou-Zeid, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty two plants were collected from Taif Governorate and identified as: Aerva lanata, Arnebia hispidissima, Artemisia judaica, Artemisia monosperma, Asphodelus aestives, Avena barbata, Capparis dcidua, Eucalyptus globulus, Euphorbia glomerifera, Foeniculum vulgare, Forsskaolea tenacissima, Juniperus procera, Launaea mucronata, Launaea sonchoides, Medicago sativa, Opuntia ficus, Phagnalon sinaicum, Prunus persica, Pulicaria crispa, Punica granatum, Rumex dentatus and Trichodesma calathiforme. Pathogenic fungi were isolated from some of these plants and identified as Alternaria alternata, Cephalosporium madurae, Cladosporium herbarum, Fusarium oxysporum, Humicola grisea, Penicillium chrysogenum and Ulocladium botrytis. Four antagonistic isolates were tested, 2 from Gliocladium fungus and 2 from Trichoderma fungus. We found that all the four antagonistic isolates (G. deliquescens, G. virens, T. viride and T. hamatum significantly inhibited the radial growth of the pathogenic fungi tested, with different ratios. The results indicated that the antibiotics produced by the antagonists were more effective than the fungus itself and differ with different fungi. Coating plant stems with antagonists or with antagonist extracts reduce the severity of the disease but not prevent it in all tested pathogens.

  19. Inteins in pathogenic fungi: a phylogenetic tool and perspectives for therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cordeiro Theodoro

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Inteins or "internal proteins" are coding sequences that are transcribed and translated with flanking sequences (exteins. After translation, the inteins are excised by an autocatalytic process and the host protein assumes its normal conformation and develops its expected function. These parasitic genetic elements have been found in important, conserved proteins in all three domains of life. Most of the eukaryotic inteins are present in the fungi kingdom and the PRP8 intein is one of the most widespread inteins, occurring in important pathogens such as Cryptococcus neoformans (varieties grubii and neoformans, Cryptococcus gattii, Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The knowledge of conserved and non-conserved domains in inteins have opened up new opportunities for the study of population variability in pathogenic fungi, including their phylogenetic relationships and recognition or diagnoses of species. Furthermore, inteins in pathogenic fungi should also be considered a promising therapeutic drug target, since once the autocatalytic splicing is inhibited, the host protein, which is typically vital, will not be able to perform its normal function and the fungal cell will not survive or reproduce.

  20. Pathogenicity, Ovicidal Action, and Median Lethal Concentrations (LC 50 ) of Entomopathogenic Fungi against Exotic Spiralling Whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell

    OpenAIRE

    Boopathi Thangavel; Karuppuchamy Palaniappan; Kalyanasundaram Manickavasagam Pillai; Mohankumar Subbarayalu; Ravi Madhaiyan

    2013-01-01

    Biological control using entomopathogenic fungi could be a promising alternative to chemical control. Entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin, Lecanicillium lecanii (Zimmerm.) Zare and Gams, and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Wize) Brown and Smith, were tested for their pathogenicity, ovicidal effect, and median lethal concentrations (LC50) against exotic spiralling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell. The applications were...

  1. In Vitro Studies of Chromone-Tetrazoles against Pathogenic Protozoa, Bacteria, and Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Cano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In vitro studies to fourteen previously synthesized chromone-tetrazoles and four novel fluorine-containing analogs were conducted against pathogenic protozoan (Entamoeba histolytica, pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and human fungal pathogens (Sporothrix schenckii, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis, which have become in a serious health problem, mainly in tropical countries.

  2. In Vitro Studies of Chromone-Tetrazoles against Pathogenic Protozoa, Bacteria, and Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Pedro A; Islas-Jácome, Alejandro; Rangel-Serrano, Ángeles; Anaya-Velázquez, Fernando; Padilla-Vaca, Felipe; Trujillo-Esquivel, Elías; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Martínez-Richa, Antonio; Gámez-Montaño, Rocío

    2015-07-08

    In vitro studies to fourteen previously synthesized chromone-tetrazoles and four novel fluorine-containing analogs were conducted against pathogenic protozoan (Entamoeba histolytica), pathogenic bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus), and human fungal pathogens (Sporothrix schenckii, Candida albicans, and Candida tropicalis), which have become in a serious health problem, mainly in tropical countries.

  3. Emerging infections due to filamentous fungi in humans and animals: only the tip of the iceberg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debourgogne, Anne; Dorin, Joséphine; Machouart, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Over the last few decades, the number of patients susceptible to invasive filamentous fungal infections has steadily increased, especially in populations suffering from hematological diseases. The pathogens responsible for such mycoses are now quite well characterized, such as Aspergillus spp. - the most commonly isolated mold -, Mucorales, Fusarium spp., Scedosporium spp. or melanized fungi. An increase in the incidence of this category of 'emerging' fungi has been recently highlighted, evoking a shift in fungal ecology. Starting from these medical findings, taking a step back and adopt a wider perspective offers possible explanations of this phenomenon on an even larger scale than previously reported. In this review, we illustrate the link between emerging fungi in medicine and changes in ecology or human behaviours, and we encourage integrative approaches to apprehend the adverse effects of progress and develop preventive measures in vast domains, such as agriculture or medicine. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Occurrence of entomopathogenic fungi in tejocote (Crataegus mexicana) orchard soils and their pathogenicity against Rhagoletis pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz-Reyes, E; Guzmán-Franco, A W; Sánchez-Escudero, J; Nieto-Angel, R

    2014-11-01

    To determine the abundance and diversity of entomopathogenic fungi in tejocote orchard soils and evaluate their ability to infect Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh., the main pest of tejocote. Surveys were made in two locations in Mexico state and two in Puebla state. Soil from selected locations was baited for entomopathogenic fungi with Galleria mellonella (L.). All isolates were identified morphologically to genus level and to species level using Bloc and elongation factor 1-α gene sequence information, respectively; Beauveria bassiana ((Bals.-Criv.) Vuill.), B. pseudobassiana (S.A. Rehner & Humber) and Metarhizium robertsii (J.F. Bisch., Rehner & Humber) were found, with B. bassiana being the most abundant and widely distributed. Pathogenicity of five selected B. bassiana isolates and three M. robertsii isolates was evaluated against larvae and pupae of R. pomonella. All isolates infected larvae resulting in an average mortality of 35%. Pupae were not susceptible; however, adults emerging from inoculated pupae did die due to infection. At least three species of entomopathogenic fungi are present in the soil from tejocote orchards, with B. bassiana being the most abundant and widely distributed. Rhagoletis pomonella larvae were more susceptible to infection than pupae. Our study has produced new information about the distribution of entomopathogenic fungi in cultivated soils from this region of North America, contributing to a better understanding of their natural occurrence and underpinning the development of biological control approaches. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis and growth in plant pathogenic fungi in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajam, B; Rajam, M V

    1996-02-01

    Polyamine (PA) biosynthesis inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) and bis-(cyclohexylammonium) sulphate (BCHA) have been tested for their effects on colony diameters at different intervals after inoculation of four plant pathogenic fungi (Helminthosporium oryzae, Curvularia lunata, Pythium aphanidermatum and Colletotrichum capsici). All these inhibitors, except DFMA had strongly retarded the growth of four fungi in a dose- and species-dependent fashion, and H. oryzae and C. lunata were found to be most sensitive to the effects of PA inhibitors. P. aphanidermatum and C. capsici were relatively insensitive and required rather high concentrations of inhibitors to get greater inhibition of mycelial growth, except DFMA which had stimulatory effect on the growth of these two fungi. However DFMA had greatly suppressed the growth of H. oryzae and C. lunata. The effect was generally more pronounced with MGBG than with DFMO and BCHA, and 1 mM Put completely prevented the inhibitory effects of 1 and 5 mM DFMO. Analysis of free and conjugated PAs in two sensitive fungi (H. oryzae and C. lunata) revealed that Put was present in highest concentrations followed by Spd and Spm and their levels were greatly reduced by DFMO application, and such inhibitions were totally reversed by exogenously supplied Put; in fact, PA titers were considerably increased by 1 mM Put alone and in combination with 1 mM DFMO. These results suggest that PA inhibitors, particularly DFMO and MGBG may be useful as target-specific fungicides in plants.

  6. Pathogenic Fungi Transmitted Through Cucumber Seeds and Safely Elimination by Application of Peppermint Extract and Oil

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    Eman S.H. FARRAG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diseases induced by Fusarium, like damping-off and wilt on cucumber, are serious problems around the world. Samples of cucumber seeds were collected from commercial markets in Egypt and tested for seed-borne fungi. In order to detect the maximum number of internal and external seed-borne fungi, agar plate examination of disinfected and non-disinfected seeds were used. Two species of Fusarium were the most frequent and predominant fungi. Facultative parasites of the genera Alternaria, Rhizoctonia, Helminthosporium and Penicillium were also found. A total 33 isolates of Fusarium spp. were obtained using Komadas selective medium. Fusarium oxysporum and F. solani were highly frequent. Pathogenicity test indicated that, F. oxysporum isolate (Fem8 was the main causal organism of pre- and post-emergence damping off. Furthermore, it occurred in all seed parts tested. Some infected seeds germinate, but they were either rapidly overgrown by F. oxysporum or they developed into a diseased seedling. The water extract of garlic, peppermint and rheum completely inhibited the conidiospore germination and mycelial growth of F. oxysporum at tested conc. 3, 2 and 3%, respectively. Soaked seeds in 2% peppermint extract and evaporated seeds by vapor of peppermint oil caused a highly reduction in the infection and reduced transmission of the referred fungi from seeds to the growing seedlings. The vigor of cucumber seedlings raised from the treated seeds was better than that developed from untreated ones.

  7. Pathogenic Fungi Transmitted Through Cucumber Seeds and Safely Elimination by Application of Peppermint Extract and Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman S.H. FARRAG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diseases induced by Fusarium, like damping-off and wilt on cucumber, are serious problems around the world. Samples of cucumber seeds were collected from commercial markets in Egypt and tested for seed-borne fungi. In order to detect the maximum number of internal and external seed-borne fungi, agar plate examination of disinfected and non-disinfected seeds were used. Two species of Fusarium were the most frequent and predominant fungi. Facultative parasites of the genera Alternaria, Rhizoctonia, Helminthosporium and Penicillium were also found. A total 33 isolates of Fusarium spp. were obtained using Komada�s selective medium. Fusarium oxysporum and F. solani were highly frequent. Pathogenicity test indicated that, F. oxysporum isolate (Fem8 was the main causal organism of pre- and post-emergence damping off. Furthermore, it occurred in all seed parts tested. Some infected seeds germinate, but they were either rapidly overgrown by F. oxysporum or they developed into a diseased seedling. The water extract of garlic, peppermint and rheum completely inhibited the conidiospore germination and mycelial growth of F. oxysporum at tested conc. 3, 2 and 3%, respectively. Soaked seeds in 2% peppermint extract and evaporated seeds by vapor of peppermint oil caused a highly reduction in the infection and reduced transmission of the referred fungi from seeds to the growing seedlings. The vigor of cucumber seedlings raised from the treated seeds was better than that developed from untreated ones.

  8. A review on the inhibitory potential of Nigella sativa against pathogenic and toxigenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) grows in various parts of the world, particularly in Iran. It has been traditionally used as a folk remedy to treat a number of diseases. The seeds of this plant contain moisture, proteins, carbohydrates, crude fiber, alkaloids, saponins, ash, fixed oils and essential oil. The major components of the essential oil are thymoquinone, p-cymene, trans-anethole, 2-methyl-5(1-methyl ethyl)-Bicyclo[3.1.0]hex-2-en and γ-terpinene. So far, several pharmacological effects such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and anti-microbial have been reported for N. sativa or its active compounds. Thymoquinone, thymohydroquinone and thymol are the most active constituents which have different beneficial properties. The oil, extracts and some of N. sativa active components possessed moderate in vitro and in vivo inhibitory activity against pathogenic yeasts, dermatophytes, non-dermatophytic filamentous fungi and aflatoxin-producing fungi. The main morphological changes of pathogenic and toxigenic fungi treated with N. sativa oil were observed in the cell wall, plasma membrane and membranous organelles, particularly in the nuclei and mitochondria. Although this review represents first step in the search for a new anti-fungal drug, the full potential of N. sativa as a fungitoxic agent has not been exploited and necessitates further investigations.

  9. A review on the inhibitory potential of Nigella sativa against pathogenic and toxigenic fungi

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    Hojjatollah Shokri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa (N. sativa grows in various parts of the world, particularly in Iran. It has been traditionally used as a folk remedy to treat a number of diseases. The seeds of this plant contain moisture, proteins, carbohydrates, crude fiber, alkaloids, saponins, ash, fixed oils and essential oil. The major components of the essential oil are thymoquinone, p-cymene, trans-anethole, 2-methyl-5(1-methyl ethyl-Bicyclo[3.1.0]hex-2-en and γ-terpinene. So far, several pharmacological effects such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and anti-microbial have been reported for N. sativa or its active compounds. Thymoquinone, thymohydroquinone and thymol are the most active constituents which have different beneficial properties. The oil, extracts and some of N. sativa active components possessed moderate in vitro and in vivo inhibitory activity against pathogenic yeasts, dermatophytes, non-dermatophytic filamentous fungi and aflatoxin-producing fungi. The main morphological changes of pathogenic and toxigenic fungi treated with N. sativa oil were observed in the cell wall, plasma membrane and membranous organelles, particularly in the nuclei and mitochondria. Although this review represents first step in the search for a new anti-fungal drug, the full potential of N. sativa as a fungitoxic agent has not been exploited and necessitates further investigations.

  10. The modular nature of dendritic cell responses to commensal and pathogenic fungi.

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    Lisa Rizzetto

    Full Text Available The type of adaptive immune response following host-fungi interaction is largely determined at the level of the antigen-presenting cells, and in particular by dendritic cells (DCs. The extent to which transcriptional regulatory events determine the decision making process in DCs is still an open question. By applying the highly structured DC-ATLAS pathways to analyze DC responses, we classified the various stimuli by revealing the modular nature of the different transcriptional programs governing the recognition of either pathogenic or commensal fungi. Through comparison of the network parts affected by DC stimulation with fungal cells and purified single agonists, we could determine the contribution of each receptor during the recognition process. We observed that initial recognition of a fungus creates a temporal window during which the simultaneous recruitment of cell surface receptors can intensify, complement and sustain the DC activation process. The breakdown of the response to whole live cells, through the purified components, showed how the response to invading fungi uses a set of specific modules. We find that at the start of fungal recognition, DCs rapidly initiate the activation process. Ligand recognition is further enhanced by over-expression of the receptor genes, with a significant correspondence between gene expression and protein levels and function. Then a marked decrease in the receptor levels follows, suggesting that at this moment the DC commits to a specific fate. Overall our pathway based studies show that the temporal window of the fungal recognition process depends on the availability of ligands and is different for pathogens and commensals. Modular analysis of receptor and signalling-adaptor expression changes, in the early phase of pathogen recognition, is a valuable tool for rapid and efficient dissection of the pathogen derived components that determine the phenotype of the DC and thereby the type of immune response

  11. Lifestyle transitions in plant pathogenic Colletotrichum fungi deciphered by genome and transcriptome analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Richard J; Thon, Michael R; Hacquard, Stéphane; Amyotte, Stefan G; Kleemann, Jochen; Torres, Maria F; Damm, Ulrike; Buiate, Ester A; Epstein, Lynn; Alkan, Noam; Altmüller, Janine; Alvarado-Balderrama, Lucia; Bauser, Christopher A; Becker, Christian; Birren, Bruce W; Chen, Zehua; Choi, Jaeyoung; Crouch, Jo Anne; Duvick, Jonathan P; Farman, Mark A; Gan, Pamela; Heiman, David; Henrissat, Bernard; Howard, Richard J; Kabbage, Mehdi; Koch, Christian; Kracher, Barbara; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Law, Audrey D; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Miyara, Itay; Moore, Neil; Neumann, Ulla; Nordström, Karl; Panaccione, Daniel G; Panstruga, Ralph; Place, Michael; Proctor, Robert H; Prusky, Dov; Rech, Gabriel; Reinhardt, Richard; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Rounsley, Steve; Schardl, Christopher L; Schwartz, David C; Shenoy, Narmada; Shirasu, Ken; Sikhakolli, Usha R; Stüber, Kurt; Sukno, Serenella A; Sweigard, James A; Takano, Yoshitaka; Takahara, Hiroyuki; Trail, Frances; van der Does, H Charlotte; Voll, Lars M; Will, Isa; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zhang, Jingze; Zhou, Shiguo; Dickman, Martin B; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Ma, Li-Jun; Vaillancourt, Lisa J

    2012-09-01

    Colletotrichum species are fungal pathogens that devastate crop plants worldwide. Host infection involves the differentiation of specialized cell types that are associated with penetration, growth inside living host cells (biotrophy) and tissue destruction (necrotrophy). We report here genome and transcriptome analyses of Colletotrichum higginsianum infecting Arabidopsis thaliana and Colletotrichum graminicola infecting maize. Comparative genomics showed that both fungi have large sets of pathogenicity-related genes, but families of genes encoding secreted effectors, pectin-degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism enzymes, transporters and peptidases are expanded in C. higginsianum. Genome-wide expression profiling revealed that these genes are transcribed in successive waves that are linked to pathogenic transitions: effectors and secondary metabolism enzymes are induced before penetration and during biotrophy, whereas most hydrolases and transporters are upregulated later, at the switch to necrotrophy. Our findings show that preinvasion perception of plant-derived signals substantially reprograms fungal gene expression and indicate previously unknown functions for particular fungal cell types.

  12. Effect of root exudates of various plants on composition of bacteria and fungi communities with special regard to pathogenic soil-borne fungi

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    Danuta Piętka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the studies conducted in the years 1996 - 1998 was to determine the composition of bacteria and fungi populations in the rhizosphere of winter wheat, spring wheat, soybean and potato, and in non-rhizosphere soil. Besides, the effect of root exudates of these plants on the formation of pathogenic fungi communities was established. The microbiological analysis showed that the greatest tolal number of bacteria was found in the rhizospheres of potato and soybean, and the lowest number in non-rhizosphere soil. The smallest total number of fungi was found in the rhizosphere of winter wheat, and the largest in the rhizosphere of soybean. Pathogenic fungi dominated in the rhizospheres of soybean and potato, while non-rhizosphere soil was the poorest in these microorganisms. Among the pathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum, F.culmorum and F.solani were most frequently isolated. Soybean roots exudated the greatest amount of aminoacids, and acidic aminoacids, which have a positive effect on the development of phytopathogens, dominated in their content. On the other hand, the best quantitative and qualitative composition of aminoacids was found out in the root exudates of winter wheat, since they conlained big amounts of alkaline and aromatic aminoacids.

  13. [Potentially pathogenic fungi in the waters of the Charzykowskie Lake in Zaborski Landscape Park].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnatowski, Piotr; Rózga, Anna; Rózga, Błazei; Babski, Piotr; Wójcik, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The occurrence of potentially pathogenic fungal strains in the Charzykowskie Lake and runnels flowing into and out of it was investigated. The study material was obtained in 2005 and in 2006, in the periods of spring intermix and summer stagnation, and in 2005 in the period of autumn intermix. The fungi found in the Charzykowski Lake belonged to 5 genera: Rhodotorula (R. minuta, R. rubra and R. glutinis), Cryptoccocus (C. neoformans, C. laurentii, C. terreus and C. laurentii), Candida (C. inconspicua, C. lusitaniae, C. tropicalis, C. pelliculosa, C. kefir, C. glabrata, C. inconspicua, C. parapsilosis, C. ciferrii and C. colliculosa), Trichosporon (T. cutaneum) and Klockera (K. apiculata). The fungi found in runnels flowing into and out of the Charzykowskie Lake belonged to 4 genera: Rhodotorula (R. rubra and R. glutinis), Cryptoccocus (C. laurentii, C. neoformans, C. albidus and C. terreus), Candida (C. colliculosa, C. lusitaniae, C. tropicalis, C. pelliculosa, C. cifferii, C. glabrata) and Trichosporon (T. cutaneum).

  14. Isolation and Identification of Pathogenic Fungi from Thorns and Thistles in Isfahan and Adjacent Cities

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    M Emami

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most important subcutaneous fungal infections in man are caused by injury due to contaminated thistles and thorns. From an epidemiological point of view , it is important to recognize the fungi as well as their frequency of them in various thistles and thorns Methods: The present research has been conducted on thorns and thistles of 16 regions including cities and villages of Isfahan province. 800 samples have been collected. Specimens were inoculated and incubated at 25◦C in S & SCC medium. In order to isolate and identify the fungi, cultures in specific media, intraperitoneal injections of mice and disc diffusion test have been applied. Results: Over one year of study, 1676 colonies of actinomycetes and fungi were recognized. The most common fungi were as follows: Alternaria (22/4%,Aspergillus(11/8% , Cladosporium (10/8%,Esteril mycellium(10/6% and Penicillium (9/7%. The prevalence was most in Shahreza city(10/2% , while the least was in Ardestan(3%. The most prevalent yeasts were Candida tropicalis (50% , Rodotrula rubra (12/5% , Candida kerusei(11/4%,Trichosporon candida (7/9% , Unknown yeasts (6/8%, Candida gillermondi (5/7%, Saccharomyces cervisia (3/4%, Geotricum candidum and Trichosporon glabrata (Candida glabrata each one (1/1%. The prevalence was most in Khansar city(19/2%. In this study, 4 species similar to Coccidioides immitis, Phialophora verrucosa (4 species and Exophiala jeanselmei (3 species were identified. Conclusion: In this study done for the first time in this area, pathogenic and opportunistic fungi were isolated. Furthermore, Exophiala jeanselmei and Nocardiopsis dassonvillei were isolated for the first time from thorns in the country.

  15. SCREENING OF FLUORESCENT RHIZOBACTERIA FOR THE BIOCONTROL OF SOILBORNE PLANT PATHOGENIC FUNGI

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    ANELISE DIAS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocontrol of soilborne plant pathogens represents a promising approach from the environ- mental and practical points of view. Fluorescent pseudomonad rhizobacteria are well known by their antagonis- tic capacity towards several plant pathogens due to a diversity of antimicrobial metabolites they produce. This study was conceived to select and characterize rhizobacteria having antagonistic potential towards the patho- genic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. A total of 94 bacterial strains isolated from the rhizospheres of four vegetable species under organic cultivation were evaluated. Twenty-two strains which predominate in lettuce and rudbeckia rhizospheres showed identical biochemical profiles to Pseudomonas fluo- rescens, while in kale and parsley rhizospheres identical profiles to Pseudomonas putida (subgroups A and B strains prevailed. Two types of antagonism were verified in vitro and defined as competition and inhibition of mycelial growth. Sixty percent of the evaluated strains showed antagonistic potential and, among those, 24 strains expressed antagonism to both target fungi, with P. fluorescens being the most representative bacterial species. This work clearly identified a number of strains with potential for use as plant growth-promoting and biocontrol of the two soilborne fungal pathogens in vegetable crops production systems.

  16. Comparative analysis of plant-produced, recombinant dimeric IgA against cell wall β-glucan of pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capodicasa, Cristina; Catellani, Marcello; Moscetti, Ilaria; Bromuro, Carla; Chiani, Paola; Torosantucci, Antonella; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2017-08-19

    Immunoglobulins A (IgA) are crucially involved in protection of human mucosal surfaces from microbial pathogens. In this work, we devised and expressed in plants recombinant chimeric antifungal antibodies (Abs) of isotype A (IgA1, IgA2, and scFvFcA1), derived from a murine mAb directed to the fungal cell wall polysaccharide β-glucan which had proven able to confer protection against multiple pathogenic fungi. All recombinant IgA (rIgA) were expressed and correctly assembled in dimeric form in plants and evaluated for yield, antigen-binding efficiency and antifungal properties in vitro, in comparison with a chimeric IgG1 version. Production yields and binding efficiency to purified β-glucans showed significant variations not only between Abs of different isotypes but also between the different IgA formats. Moreover, only the dimeric IgA1 was able to strongly bind cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and to restrain its adhesion to human epithelial cells. Our data indicate that IgG to IgA switch and differences in molecular structure among different rIgA formats can impact expression in plant and biological activity of anti-β-glucans Abs and provide new insights for the design of recombinant IgA as anti-infective immunotherapeutics, whose potential is still poorly investigated. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The pathogenic fungi in mushroom cultivation of Agaricus bisporus (Lange. Imbach.

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    Agata Tekiela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted in a mushroom growing facility located near Rzeszów, consisting of three production cycles. The number and composition of microorganisms which accompany the mushroom cultivation depended on the healthiness of: the compost, casing and spawn of Agaricus bisporus. The presence of pathogenic fungi in the cultivation halls at the beginning of the production cycle is a serious threat to the cultivation of common mushroom because their rapid development shortens the span of fruiting body harvests.

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo; Ferreira, Márcia Eliana da Silva; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; León-Narváez, Henry; Longo, Larissa V. G.; Ma, Li-Jun; Malavazi, Iran; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Morais, Flavia V.; Pereira, Maristela; Rodríguez-Brito, Sabrina; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salem-Izacc, Silvia M.; Sykes, Sean M.; Teixeira, Marcus Melo; Vallejo, Milene C.; Walter, Maria Emília Machado Telles; Yandava, Chandri; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zucker, Jeremy; Felipe, Maria Sueli; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Haas, Brian J.; McEwen, Juan G.; Nino-Vega, Gustavo; Puccia, Rosana; San-Blas, Gioconda; Soares, Celia Maria de Almeida; Birren, Bruce W.; Cuomo, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18) and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01). These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic species of

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of human fungal pathogens causing paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Desjardins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18 and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01. These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic

  20. Antifungal Activities of Extracts from Selected Lebanese Wild Plants against Plant Pathogenic Fungi

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    Y. Abou-Jawdah

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of nine plant species growing wild in Lebanon were tested for their efficacy against seven plant pathogenic fungi: Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Penicillium sp., Cladosporium sp., Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. melonis, Rhizoctonia solani and Sphaerotheca cucurbitae. Extracts of three of the plants, Origanum syriacum, Micromeria nervosa and Plumbago maritima, showed the highest levels of in vitro activity against spore germination and mycelial growth of the fungi tested. Inula viscosa showed high activity against spore germination but only moderate activity against mycelial growth. The other five plant species tested Calamintha origanifolia, Micromeria juliana, Ruta sp., Sideritis pullulans and Urginea maritima showed only moderate to low activity against these fungi. Preventive sprays with extracts of O. syriacum, M. nervosa, P. maritima and I. viscosa, applied at concentrations ranging between 4 and 8% to squash and cucumber seedlings, gave efficient protection against gray mold caused by B. cinerea and powdery mildew caused by S. cucurbitae. However, these extracts did not control green mold of citrus fruits caused by Penicillium sp. Thin layer chromatography revealed three inhibitory bands in extracts of O. syriacum, two in I. viscosa and only one in each of the other plants tested: M. nervosa, P. maritima, C. origanifolia and Ruta sp.

  1. Extended studies on the diversity of arthropod-pathogenic fungi in Austria and Poland

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    Cezary Tkaczyk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of studies on diversity of arthropod-pathogenic fungi in selected habitats in Austria and Poland carried out in the years 2006-2007 and 2009-2010 are discussed. In total 47 species of entomopathogenic fungi were found as pathogens of different arthropods in Austria. Twenty six entomophthoralean species from different insects and one species from mites were identified and 16 of them are recorded as new to Austria. From among 21 species of anamorphic Hypocreales (Ascomycota affecting arthropods in Austria, 13 species so far have not been known from this country. In total 51 species of fungi affecting different arthropods in Poland were recorded, among them 28 species of Entomophthorales and 23 anamorphic Hypocreales (Ascomycota were separated. The most frequent species of the entomopathogenic fungi both in agricultural and afforested areas in Austria were the common and usually worldwide distributed cordycipitaceous anamorphs Beauveria bassiana, Isaria fumosorosea and in areas of this study less numerous I. farinosa. The most frequent pathogens occurring in mite communities on plants and in wood infested by insects were Hirsutella species. Several entomophthoralean species developed epizootics that caused high reduction in host populations of different arthropods in both countries. Especially interesting is the first record of mycoses (up to 60% mortality, caused by Zoophthora spp. on Phyllobius beetles in a mixed forest near Białowieża. During our joint research, we found the first time in Poland and Europe, the presence of the fungus Furia cf. shandongensis on earwigs and Hirsutella entomophila on Ips typographus adults in forest habitats. From the feeding sites of the latter bark beetle and other subcortical species in oak bark (mostly Dryocoetes villosus and D. alni in black alder over a dozen of various Lecanicillium strains - including few of the features not allowing to classify them to any of so far known species – were

  2. In vitro antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles against ocular pathogenic filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Gao, Chuanwen; Li, Xiaohua; He, Yi; Zhou, Lutan; Pang, Guangren; Sun, Shengtao

    2013-03-01

    Fungal keratitis is emerging as a major cause of vision loss in a developing country such as China because of higher incidence and the unavailability of effective antifungals. It is urgent to explore broad-spectrum antifungals to effectively suppress ocular fungal pathogens, and to develop new antifungal eye drops to combat this vision-threatening infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the antifungal activity of silver nanoparticles (nano-Ag) in comparison with that of natamycin against ocular pathogenic filamentous fungi in vitro. Susceptibility tests were performed against 216 strains of fungi isolated from patients with fungal keratitis from the Henan Eye Institute in China by broth dilution antifungal susceptibility test of filamentous fungi approved by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A document. The isolates included 112 Fusarium isolates (82 Fusarium solani species complex, 20 Fusarium verticillioides species complex, and 10 Fusarium oxysporum species complex), 94 Aspergillus isolates (61 Aspergillus flavus species complex, 11 Aspergillus fumigatus species complex, 12 Aspergillus versicolor species complex, and 10 Aspergillus niger species complex), and 10 Alternaria alternata isolates. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range and mode, the MIC for 50% of the strains tested (MIC50 value), and the MIC90 value were provided for the isolates with the SPSS statistical package. MIC50 value of nano-Ag were 1, 0.5, and 0.5 μg/mL for Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp., and Al. alternata, respectively. MIC90 values of nano-Ag were 1, 1, and 1 μg/mL for Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp., and Al. alternata, respectively. MIC50 values of natamycin were 4, 32, and 4 μg/mL for Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp., and Al. alternata, respectively. MIC90 values of natamycin were 8, 32, and 4 μg/mL for Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp., and Al. alternata, respectively. Nano-Ag, relative to natamycin, exhibits potent in vitro activity against

  3. Evidence for transmission of aphid-pathogenic fungi by migratory flight of Myzus persicae alates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The alates of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, were daily trapped from the air from late October through early January and carried to laboratory for determination of fungal infection by individually rearing them for 7 d on detached cabbage leaves in Petri dishes. Among 760 alates trapped, 266 (35%) were found carrying various fungal pathogens, 87.3% of them died due to mycosis during the first 3-day period of rearing and the rest died in the following two days. Most of the deaths of the alates were attributed to entomophthoralean fungi, taking 94.4%, and the rest were the hyphomycetous fungus Beauveria bassiana. Among the Entomophthorales-killed alates, P. neoaphidis took a proportion of 66.1%, Z. anhuiensis 22.6%, E. planchoniana 9.7%, and N. fresenii 1.6%, respectively. Two alates were found suffering from cross infection of two fungal species, i.e. P. neoaphidis with Z. anhuiensis and N. fresenii, respectively. The results represent the first report on transmission of aphid-pathogenic fungi by M. persicae alates through migratory flight.

  4. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles uptake by Vitis vinifera and grapevine-pathogenic fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valletta, Alessio [“Sapienza” University of Rome, Department of Environmental Biology (Italy); Chronopoulou, Laura; Palocci, Cleofe, E-mail: cleofe.palocci@uniroma1.it [“Sapienza” University of Rome, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Baldan, Barbara [University of Padua, Department of Biology (Italy); Donati, Livia; Pasqua, Gabriella [“Sapienza” University of Rome, Department of Environmental Biology (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-based NPs are currently considered among the most promising drug carriers, nevertheless their use in plants has never been investigated. In this work, for the first time, we demonstrated the ability of PLGA NPs to cross the plant cell wall and membrane of Vitis vinifera cell cultures and grapevine-pathogenic fungi. By means of fluorescence microscopy, we established that PLGA NPs can enter in grapevine leaf tissues through stomata openings and that they can be absorbed by the roots and transported to the shoot through vascular tissues. TEM analysis on cultured cells showed that NPs ≤ 50 nm could enter cells, while bigger ones remained attached to the cell wall. Viability tests demonstrated that PLGA NPs were not cytotoxic for V. vinifera-cultured cells. The cellular uptake of PLGA NPs by some important grapevine-pathogenic fungi has also been observed, thus suggesting that PLGA NPs could be used to deliver antifungal compounds within fungal cells. Overall the results reported suggest that such NPs may play a key role in future developments of agrobiotechnologies, as it is currently happening in biomedicine.

  5. Antifungal activity of diketopiperazines and stilbenes against plant pathogenic fungi in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Nishanth; Nambisan, Bala

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate antifungal activity of a stilbene and diketopiperazine compounds against plant pathogenic fungi, including Phytophthora capsici, P. colocasiae, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Minimal inhibition concentrations (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentrations (MFC) of stilbenes and diketopiperazines for each fungus were determined using microplate method. Best activity was recorded by stilbenes against P. capsici and P. colocasiae. All four test compounds were effective in inhibiting different stages of the life cycle of test fungi. Stilbenes were more effective than diketopiperazines in inhibiting mycelial growth and inhibiting different stages of the life cycle of P. capsici and P. colocasiae. Rupture of released zoospores induced by stilbenes was reduced by addition of 100 mM glucose. The effects of stilbenes on mycelial growth and zoospore release, but not zoospore rupture, were reduced largely when pH value was above 7. In addition, stilbenes were investigated for its antifungal stability against Phytophthora sp. The results showed that stilbenes maintained strong fungistatic activity over a wide pH range (pH 4–9) and temperature range (70–120 °C). The compound stilbenes exhibited strong and stable broad-spectrum antifungal activity, and had a significant fungicidal effect on fungal cells. Results from prebiocontrol evaluations performed to date are probably useful in the search for alternative approaches to controlling serious plant pathogens.

  6. Histone deacetylases: revealing the molecular base of dimorphism in pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Elías-Villalobos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fungi, as every living organism, interact with the external world and have to adapt to its fluctuations. For pathogenic fungi, such interaction involves adapting to the hostile environment of their host. Survival depends on the capacity of fungi to detect and respond to external stimuli, which is achieved through a tight and efficient genetic control. Chromatin modifications represent a well-known layer of regulation that controls gene expression in response to environmental signals. However, less is known about the chromatin modifications that are involved in fungal virulence and the specific cues and signalling pathways that target chromatin modifications to specific genes. In a recently published study, our research group identified one such regulatory pathway. We demonstrated that the histone deacetylase (HDAC Hos2 is involved in yeast-to-hyphal transition (dimorphism and it is associated with the virulence of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis, the causative agent of smut disease in corn. Hos2 activates mating-type genes by directly binding to their gene bodies. Furthermore, Hos2 acts downstream of the nutrient-sensing cyclic AMP-Protein Kinase A pathway. We also found that another HDAC, Clr3, contributes to this regulation, possibly in cooperation with Hos2. As a whole, our data suggest that there is a direct link between changes in the environment and acetylation of nucleosomes within certain genes. We propose that histone acetylation is critical to the proper timing and induction of transcription of the genes encoding factors that coordinate changes in morphology with pathogenesis.

  7. Human-associated fungi in deep subseafloor sediment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulfer, V. M.; Kirkpatrick, J. B.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have reported fungi in marine sediment samples from depths as great as 1740 meters below seafloor (mbsf) (Rédou et al., 2014). Such studies have utilized a variety of techniques to identify fungi, including cultivation of isolates, amplicon sequencing, and metagenomics. Six recent studies of marine sediment collectively identify nearly 100 fungal taxa at the genus and species levels (Damare et al., 2006; Lai et al., 2007; Edgcomb et al., 2010; Singh et al., 2010; Orsi et al., 2013; Rédou et al., 2014). Known marine taxa are rarely identified by these studies. For individual studies with more than two taxa, between 16% and 57% of the fungal taxa are human microflora or associated with human environments (e.g., human skin or indoor air). For example, three of the six studies identified Malassezia species that are common skin inhabitants of humans and dogs. Although human-associated taxa have been identified in both shallow and deep sediment, they pose a particularly acute problem for deep subseafloor samples, where claims of a eukaryotic deep biosphere are most striking; depending on the study, 25% to 38% of species identified in sediment taken at depths greater than 40 meters are human-associated. Only one to three species have been reported from each of the four samples taken at depths greater than one km (eight species total; Rédou et al., 2014). Of these eight species, three are human-associated. This ubiquity of human-associated microflora is very problematic for interpretations of an indigenous deep subseafloor fungal community; either human-associated taxa comprise a large fraction of marine sedimentary fungi, or sample and analytical contamination is so widespread that the extent and ubiquity of a deep subseafloor fungal community remains uncertain. This highlights the need for stringent quality control measures throughout coring, sampling, and recovery of marine sediment, and when cultivating, extracting, and/or sequencing fungi from

  8. The Spectrum of Fungi That Infects Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia R.; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John

    2015-01-01

    Few among the millions of fungal species fulfill four basic conditions necessary to infect humans: high temperature tolerance, ability to invade the human host, lysis and absorption of human tissue, and resistance to the human immune system. In previously healthy individuals, invasive fungal disease is rare because animals’ sophisticated immune systems evolved in constant response to fungal challenges. In contrast, fungal diseases occur frequently in immunocompromised patients. Paradoxically, successes of modern medicine have put increasing numbers of patients at risk for invasive fungal infections. Uncontrolled HIV infection additionally makes millions vulnerable to lethal fungal diseases. A concerted scientific and social effort is needed to meet these challenges. PMID:25367975

  9. The effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on interactions between plant roots, arbuscular-mycorrhizal and pathogenic fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rillig, M.C.; Klironomos, J.N.; Allen, M.F. [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Of all effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plants and ecosystems, the least is known about plant rhizosphere responses. Rhizosphere fungi are fed primarily by root-derived substrates, and fulfill functions such as immobilization, decomposition, pathogeneity, and improvement of plant nutrition. This study describes the effect of elevated CO{sub 2} on the interaction between the pathogen Fusarium solani and the AM fungus Glomus intraradices in the rhizosphere of Artemisia tridentata. We measured intraradical infection and extraradical growth by the two fungi under elevated and ambient CO{sub 2} concentrations. We found a strong interaction between the two fungi. Root infection by and extraradical hyphal length of solani did not differ significantly between CO{sub 2} treatments in the presence of G. intraradices. In the absence of G. intraradices, however, infection by F. solani and its extraradical hyphal length increased under elevated CO{sub 2}. Our results indicate that pathogenic fungi do respond to elevated CO{sub 2} by increased hyphal growth and root infection (potential response), but also show that mycorrhizal fungi can profit more from the new conditions and serve to suppress the pathogen.

  10. Proteomic study of three component interactions:plant, pathogens and antagonistic fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marra R; Turrà D; Scala F; Lorito M; Ambrosino P; Scala V; Romano C; Vinale F; Ferraioli S; Ruocco M; Carbone V; Woo S L

    2004-01-01

    @@ The molecular factors involved in the three-way interaction between plant, pathogenic fungi and antagonistic/biocontrol fungi, such as Trichoderma,are still poorly understood, even if they represent a matter of interest for improving crop management and developing new strategies for plant diseases control. The aim of this work is to investigate the components involved in this interaction and, for this purpose, a proteomic approach was used. 2-D maps of the protein extracts from the single components in various interactions between plants (potato, bean,tobacco or tomato), pathogens (Botrytis cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani or Pythium ultimum) and biocontrol fungi ( Trichoderma atroviride strain P1 or Trichoderma harzianum strain T22) were obtained. The protcome of each partner was collected separately and extracted by acetone precipitation in presence of trichloroacetic acid and a reducing agent (DTT). The extracted proteins were separated by isoelectrofocusing (IEF), using IPG (Immobilized pH gradient) strips, followed by SDS-PAGE. In order to improve resolution the separations were performed both on wide than narrow pH range and on different gel lengths. Differential spots were noted in the proteome of the three-way interaction when compared to each single component. These were further characterized by mass spectrometry and in silico analysis with the aim of identifying and cloning the relative genes. During the in vitro interaction of T. harzianum strain T22 with tomato and the culture filtrate or cell walls of pathogens,the spot number was higher than in the presence of pathogen biomass. In terms of Trichoderma differential proteins displayed on 2D gels, the most important changes were obtained in the presence of P. ultimum . During the in vivo interaction with tomato, the antagonist proteome changed much more in presence of soilborne fungi R. solani and P. ultimum than with the foliar fungus B. cinerea, both in terms of total and increased or novel spots In

  11. Isolation and Identification of Pathogenic Filamentous Fungi and Yeasts From Adult House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Captured From the Hospital Environments in Ahvaz City, Southwestern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassiri, Hamid; Zarrin, Majid; Veys-Behbahani, Rahele; Faramarzi, Sama; Kasiri, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Musca domestica L., 1758 is capable of transferring a number of pathogenic viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites to animals and humans. The objective of this study was to isolate and identify medically important filamentous fungi and yeasts from adult M. domestica collected from two wards of three hospital environments in Ahvaz city, Khuzestan Province, southwestern Iran. The common house flies were caught by a sterile net. These insects were washed in a solution of 1% sodium hypochlorite for 3 min and twice in sterile distilled water for 1 min. The flies were individually crushed with sterile swabs in sterile test tubes. Then 2 ml of sterile normal saline (0.85%) was added to each tube, and the tube was centrifuged for 5 min. The supernatant was then discarded, and the remaining sediment was inoculated with a sterile swab in the Sabouraud's dextrose agar medium containing chloramphenicol. Isolation and identification of fungi were made by standard mycological methods. In this research, totally 190 M. domestica from hospital environments were captured. In total, 28 fungal species were isolated. The main fungi isolated were Aspergillus spp. (67.4%), Penicillium sp. (11.6%), Mucorales sp. (11%), Candida spp. (10.5%), and Rhodotorula sp. (8.4%). Among the house flies caught at the hospitals, about 80% were found to carry one or more medically important species of fungi. This study has established that common house flies carry pathogenic fungi in the hospital environments of Ahvaz. The control of M. domestica in hospitals is essential in order to control the nosocomial fungal infections in patients. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The microscopic pathogenic fungi of the Łęczna-Włodawa Lake District. I. The occurrence of pathogenic fungi in plant communities and theirs phenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesław Mułenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the studies on tbe occurrence and phenology of puthogenic fungi in plant communities of the Łęczna-Włodawa Lake District in 1981-1984. The taxonomic list of collected fungi species will be published in another paper.

  13. Seasonality of pathogenic fungi in mites of rubber tree plantations adjacent to fragments of Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PR. Demite

    Full Text Available Fungi are the most frequently observed pathogens of mite populations, helping to control them on different crops. Twenty-five samples of leaves were collected from rubber tree plantations adjacent to two fragments of Cerrado vegetation. Each rubber tree plantation had 25 plants selected for sampling and seven leaves from around each tree top were collected up to seven to eight meters above ground. Approximately 250 individuals of Calacarus heveae Feres, Phyllocoptruta seringueirae Feres, and Tenuipalpus heveae Baker, collected randomly, were mounted from each plantation. Hirsutella thompsoni Fisher was observed on all three mites and T. heveae was the most infected species. The highest infestation levels occurred from November to February (rainy season. In the dry season, infestation levels were below 5%. Hirsutella thompsonii has potential to be used as mycoacaricide during the rainy season.

  14. Asymmetric total synthesis of 6-Tuliposide B and its biological activities against tulip pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigetomi, Kengo; Omoto, Shoko; Kato, Yasuo; Ubukata, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The structure-activity relationship was investigated to evaluate the antifungal activities of tuliposides and tulipalins against tulip pathogenic fungi. 6-Tuliposide B was effectively synthesized via the asymmetric Baylis-Hillman reaction. Tuliposides and tulipalins showed antifungal activities against most of the strains tested at high concentrations (2.5 mM), while Botrytis tulipae was resistant to tuliposides. Tulipalin formation was involved in the antifungal activity, tulipalin A showed higher inhibitory activity than 6-tuliposide B and tulipalin B. Both the tuliposides and tulipalins showed pigment-inducing activity against Gibberella zeae and inhibitory activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp tulipae. These activities were induced at a much lower concentration (0.05 mM) than the antifungal MIC values.

  15. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by the endophytic fungus Epicoccum nigrum and their activity against pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yongqing; Yu, Huimei; He, Dan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Wanting; Wan, Xue; Wang, Li

    2013-11-01

    There is an enormous interest in developing safe, cost-effective and environmentally friendly technologies for nano-materials synthesis. In the present study, extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles was achieved by Epicoccum nigrum, an endophytic fungus isolated from the cambium of Phellodendron amurense. The reduction of the silver ions was monitored by UV-visible spectrophotometry, and the characterization of the Ag NPs was carried out by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The synthesized Ag NPs were exceptionally stable. It was found that an alkaline pH favored the formation of Ag NPs and elevated temperature accelerated the reduction process. Furthermore, the antifungal activity of the Ag NPs was assessed using a microdilution method. The biosynthesized Ag NPs showed considerable activity against the pathogenic fungi. The current research opens a new path for the green synthesis of Ag NPs and the process is easy to scale up for biomedical applications.

  16. Impact of selected antagonistic fungi on Fusarium species – toxigenic cereal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delfina Popiel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium-ear blight is a destructive disease in various cereal-growing regions and leads to significant yield and quality losses for farmers and to contamination of cereal grains with mycotoxins, mainly deoxynivalenol and derivatives, zearalenone and moniliformin. Fusarium pathogens grow well and produce significant inoculum on crop resiudues. Reduction of mycotoxins production and pathogen sporulation may be influenced by saprophytic fungi, exhibiting antagonistic effect. Dual culture bioassays were used to examine the impact of 92 isolates (belonging to 29 fungal species against three toxigenic species, i.e. Fusarium avenaceum (Corda Saccardo, F. culmorum (W.G.Smith Saccardo and F. graminearum Schwabe. Both F.culmorum and F. graminearum isolates produce trichothecene mycotoxins and mycohormone zearalenone and are considered to be the most important cereal pathogens worldwide. Infection with those pathogens leads to accumulation of mycotoxins: deoxynivalenol (DON and zearalenone (ZEA in grains. Fusarium avenaceum isolates are producers of moniliformin (MON and enniatins. Isolates of Trichoderma sp. were found to be the most effective ones to control the growth of examined Fusarium species. The response of Fusarium isolates to antagonistic activity of Trichoderma isolates varied and also the isolates of Trichoderma differed in their antagonistic activity against Fusarium isolates. The production of MON by two isolates of F. avenaceum in dual culture on rice was reduced by 95% to 100% by T. atroviride isolate AN 35. The same antagonist reduced the amount of moniliformin from 100 μg/g to 6.5 μg/g when inoculated to rice culture contaminated with MON, which suggests the possible decomposition of this mycotoxin.

  17. Tools to kill: genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Haque, Md Samiul; Islam, Mohammad Moinul; Emdad, Emdadul Mannan; Halim, Abdul; Hossen, Quazi Md Mosaddeque; Hossain, Md Zakir; Ahmed, Borhan; Rahim, Sifatur; Rahman, Md Sharifur; Alam, Md Monjurul; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Saito, Jennifer A; Alam, Maqsudul

    2012-09-19

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs) of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE) are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  18. Tools to kill: Genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Md

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. Results We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. Conclusions The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  19. Pathogenicity, Ovicidal Action, and Median Lethal Concentrations (LC50 of Entomopathogenic Fungi against Exotic Spiralling Whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boopathi Thangavel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological control using entomopathogenic fungi could be a promising alternative to chemical control. Entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo Vuillemin, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff Sorokin, Lecanicillium lecanii (Zimmerm. Zare and Gams, and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Wize Brown and Smith, were tested for their pathogenicity, ovicidal effect, and median lethal concentrations (LC50 against exotic spiralling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell. The applications were made at the rate of 2 × 109 conidia mL−1 for evaluating the pathogenicity and ovicidal effect of entomopathogenic fungi against A. dispersus. The results of pathogenicity test showed that P. fumosoroseus (P1 strain was highly pathogenic to A. dispersus recording 100% mortality at 15 days after treatment (DAT. M. anisopliae (M2 strain had more ovicidal effect causing 37.3% egg mortality at 8 DAT. However, L. lecanii (L1 strain caused minimum egg hatchability (23.2% at 10 DAT as compared to control (92.6%. The lowest LC50 produced by P. fumosoroseus (P1 strain as 8.189 × 107 conidia mL−1 indicated higher virulence against A. dispersus. Hence, there is potential for use of entomopathogenic fungi in the field conditions as an alternate control method in combating the insect pests and other arthropod pests since they are considered natural mortality agents and are environmentally safe.

  20. Pathogenicity, Ovicidal Action, and Median Lethal Concentrations (LC 50 ) of Entomopathogenic Fungi against Exotic Spiralling Whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, Boopathi; Palaniappan, Karuppuchamy; Manickavasagam Pillai, Kalyanasundaram; Subbarayalu, Mohankumar; Madhaiyan, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Biological control using entomopathogenic fungi could be a promising alternative to chemical control. Entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin, Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin, Lecanicillium lecanii (Zimmerm.) Zare and Gams, and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Wize) Brown and Smith, were tested for their pathogenicity, ovicidal effect, and median lethal concentrations (LC50) against exotic spiralling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell. The applications were made at the rate of 2 × 10(9) conidia mL(-1) for evaluating the pathogenicity and ovicidal effect of entomopathogenic fungi against A. dispersus. The results of pathogenicity test showed that P. fumosoroseus (P1 strain) was highly pathogenic to A. dispersus recording 100% mortality at 15 days after treatment (DAT). M. anisopliae (M2 strain) had more ovicidal effect causing 37.3% egg mortality at 8 DAT. However, L. lecanii (L1 strain) caused minimum egg hatchability (23.2%) at 10 DAT as compared to control (92.6%). The lowest LC50 produced by P. fumosoroseus (P1 strain) as 8.189 × 10(7) conidia mL(-1) indicated higher virulence against A. dispersus. Hence, there is potential for use of entomopathogenic fungi in the field conditions as an alternate control method in combating the insect pests and other arthropod pests since they are considered natural mortality agents and are environmentally safe.

  1. Azole drugs are imported by facilitated diffusion in Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryce E Mansfield

    Full Text Available Despite the wealth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action and the mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungals, very little is known about how the azoles are imported into pathogenic fungal cells. Here the in-vitro accumulation and import of Fluconazole (FLC was examined in the pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. In energized cells, FLC accumulation correlates inversely with expression of ATP-dependent efflux pumps. In de-energized cells, all strains accumulate FLC, suggesting that FLC import is not ATP-dependent. The kinetics of import in de-energized cells displays saturation kinetics with a K(m of 0.64 μM and V(max of 0.0056 pmol/min/10⁸ cells, demonstrating that FLC import proceeds via facilitated diffusion through a transporter rather than passive diffusion. Other azoles inhibit FLC import on a mole/mole basis, suggesting that all azoles utilize the same facilitated diffusion mechanism. An analysis of related compounds indicates that competition for azole import depends on an aromatic ring and an imidazole or triazole ring together in one molecule. Import of FLC by facilitated diffusion is observed in other fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida krusei, indicating that the mechanism of transport is conserved among fungal species. FLC import was shown to vary among Candida albicans resistant clinical isolates, suggesting that altered facilitated diffusion may be a previously uncharacterized mechanism of resistance to azole drugs.

  2. Azole drugs are imported by facilitated diffusion in Candida albicans and other pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Bryce E; Oltean, Hanna N; Oliver, Brian G; Hoot, Samantha J; Leyde, Sarah E; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; White, Theodore C

    2010-09-30

    Despite the wealth of knowledge regarding the mechanisms of action and the mechanisms of resistance to azole antifungals, very little is known about how the azoles are imported into pathogenic fungal cells. Here the in-vitro accumulation and import of Fluconazole (FLC) was examined in the pathogenic fungus, Candida albicans. In energized cells, FLC accumulation correlates inversely with expression of ATP-dependent efflux pumps. In de-energized cells, all strains accumulate FLC, suggesting that FLC import is not ATP-dependent. The kinetics of import in de-energized cells displays saturation kinetics with a K(m) of 0.64 μM and V(max) of 0.0056 pmol/min/10⁸ cells, demonstrating that FLC import proceeds via facilitated diffusion through a transporter rather than passive diffusion. Other azoles inhibit FLC import on a mole/mole basis, suggesting that all azoles utilize the same facilitated diffusion mechanism. An analysis of related compounds indicates that competition for azole import depends on an aromatic ring and an imidazole or triazole ring together in one molecule. Import of FLC by facilitated diffusion is observed in other fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida krusei, indicating that the mechanism of transport is conserved among fungal species. FLC import was shown to vary among Candida albicans resistant clinical isolates, suggesting that altered facilitated diffusion may be a previously uncharacterized mechanism of resistance to azole drugs.

  3. Phytotoxicity of pathogenic fungi and their mycotoxins to cereal seedling viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H A

    2001-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus, Alternaria alternata and Fusarium oxysporum were found to be the pathogenic fungi mostly reducing cereal (barley, sorghum and wheat) seedlings. The pathogens have the ability to produce aflatoxin B1 and G1, diacetoxyscirpenol, kojic acid and tenuazonic acid that reduced seedling viability. The inhibition dose for 50% reduction (LD50) was recorded by aflatoxins at 0.83 mg L-1 for barley, 1.74 mg L-1 for wheat and 2.75 mg L-1 for sorghum. Diacetoxyscirpenol produced its inhibition at 1.26 mg L-1 for barley, 3.98 mg L-1 for wheat and 10 mg L-1 for sorghum. Kojic acid induced 50% inhibition at 63 mg L-1 for barley, 105 mg L-1 for wheat and 251 mg L-1 for sorghum. However, tenuazonic acid was less toxic where, the toxicity was ranged between 79-550 mg L-1. The inhibition in germination was more pronounced in barley followed by wheat and negligible in sorghum to all tested mycotoxins. This inhibition attributed to the reduction in seedling amylase activity. Amylase was also reduced in the same trend: barley > wheat > sorghum. Grain treatment with carboxin-captan and thiophanatemethyl-thiram at 1 g kg-1 grain increased seedlings vigour of wheat in sterilized soil by 45 and 22%, barley by 24 and 33% and sorghum by 15 and 30%, respectively. These fungicides have also a positive effect on cereal when soil was inoculated with A. flavus, A. alternata and F. oxysporum.

  4. Solar photocatalytic disinfection of agricultural pathogenic fungi (Curvularia sp.) in real urban wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguas, Yelitza; Hincapie, Margarita; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; Polo-López, María Inmaculada

    2017-12-31

    The interest in developing alternative water disinfection methods that increase the access to irrigation water free of pathogens for agricultural purposes is increasing in the last decades. Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) have been demonstrated to be very efficient for the abatement of several kind of pathogens in contaminated water. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate and compare the capability of several solar AOPs for the inactivation of resistant spores of agricultural fungi. Solar photoassisted H2O2, solar photo-Fenton at acid and near-neutral pH, and solar heterogeneous photocatalysis using TiO2, with and without H2O2, have been studied for the inactivation of spores of Curvularia sp., a phytopathogenic fungi worldwide found in soils and crops. Different concentrations of reagents and catalysts were evaluated at bench scale (solar vessel reactors, 200mL) and at pilot plant scale (solar Compound Parabolic Collector-CPC reactor, 20L) under natural solar radiation using distilled water (DW) and real secondary effluents (SE) from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Inactivation order of Curvularia sp. in distilled water was determined, i.e. TiO2/H2O2/sunlight (100/50mgL(-1))>H2O2/sunlight (40mgL(-1))>TiO2/sunlight (100mgL(-1))>photo-Fenton with 5/10mgL(-1) of Fe(2+)/H2O2 at pH3 and near-neutral pH. For the case of SE, at near neutral pH, the most efficient solar process was H2O2/Solar (60mgL(-1)); nevertheless, the best Curvularia sp. inactivation rate was obtained with photo-Fenton (10/20mgL(-1) of Fe(2+)/H2O2) requiring a previous water adicification to pH3, within 300 and 210min of solar treatment, respectively. These results show the efficiency of solar AOPs as a feasible option for the inactivation of resistant pathogens in water for crops irrigation, even in the presence of organic matter (average Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC): 24mgL(-1)), and open a window for future wastewater reclamation and irrigation use. Copyright © 2017

  5. Adult trees cause density-dependent mortality in conspecific seedlings by regulating the frequency of pathogenic soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Gilbert, Gregory S; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Shan; Huang, Fengmin; Yu, Shixiao

    2016-12-01

    Negative density-dependent seedling mortality has been widely detected in tropical, subtropical and temperate forests, with soil pathogens as a major driver. Here we investigated how host density affects the composition of soil pathogen communities and consequently influences the strength of plant-soil feedbacks. In field censuses of six 1-ha permanent plots, we found that survival was much lower for newly germinated seedlings that were surrounded by more conspecific adults. The relative abundance of pathogenic fungi in soil increased with increasing conspecific tree density for five of nine tree species; more soil pathogens accumulated around roots where adult tree density was higher, and this greater pathogen frequency was associated with lower seedling survival. Our findings show how tree density influences populations of soil pathogens, which creates plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to community-level and population-level compensatory trends in seedling survival.

  6. Diversity of Endophytic Fungi from Red Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc. Plant and Their Inhibitory Effect to Fusarium oxysporum Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIHEGIKO KANAYA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has been known as a country with high medicinal plant diversity. One of the most common medicinal plant from Indonesia is red ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.. Nevertheless, limited studies of endophytic fungi associated with these medicinal plants are hitherto available. The objectives of this research were to study the diversity of endophytic fungi on red ginger and to analyze their potential as a source of antifungal agent. All parts of plant organs such as leaf, rhizome, root, and stem were subjected for isolation. Fungal identification was carried out by using a combination of morphological characteristic and molecular analysis of DNA sequence generated from ITS rDNA region. Thirty endophytic fungi were successfully isolated from leaf, rhizome, root, and stem of red ginger plant. Antagonistic activity was tested against Fusarium oxysporum, a pathogenic fungus on plants, using an antagonistic assay. Based on this approach, the fungi were assigned as Acremonium macroclavatum, Beltraniella sp., Cochliobolus geniculatus and its anamorphic stage Curvularia affinis, Fusarium solani, Glomerella cingulata, and its anamorphic stage Colletotrichum gloeosporoides, Lecanicillium kalimantanense, Myrothecium verrucaria, Neonectria punicea, Periconia macrospinosa, Rhizopycnis vagum, and Talaromyces assiutensis. R. vagum was found specifically on root whereas C. affinis, L. kalimantanense, and M. verrucaria were found on stem of red ginger plant. A. macroclavatum was found specifically in red ginger plant’s organ which located under the ground, whereas C. affinis was found from shoot or organ which located above the ground. The antagonistic activity of isolated endophytic fungi against F. oxysporum varied with the inhibition value range from 1.4 to 68.8%. C. affinis (JMbt7, F. solani (JMd14, and G. cingulata (JMr2 had significantly high antagonistic activity with the value above 65%; and R. vagum (JMa4 and C. geniculatus (JMbt9 had

  7. Development of modified medium for the enhancement in antifungal activity of P. steckii (MF1 mangrove fungi against verticillium wilt pathogenic fungi of rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotasanmayee Sabat

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal activity of Penicillium steckii (MF1 against pathogenic fungi of rose causing verticillium wilt was evaluated under differential nutrient condition. A suitable and modified medium was obtained in which test fungus exhibited enhanced antifungal activity and produced larger inhibition zone against the verticillium fungus. The study carried out to modify the medium components at level of nitrogen, carbon source and their concentration on agar plates. Addition of amino acids, metals and plant growth hormones did not show positive effect but glycerol enhanced the antifungal activity very much.

  8. Nonpathogenic, environmental fungi induce activation and degranulation of human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoshinari; Matsuwaki, Yoshinori; Shin, Seung-Heon; Ponikau, Jens U; Kita, Hirohito

    2005-10-15

    Eosinophils and their products are probably important in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases, such as bronchial asthma, and in host immunity to certain organisms. An association between environmental fungal exposure and asthma has been long recognized clinically. Although products of microorganisms (e.g., lipopolysaccharides) directly activate certain inflammatory cells (e.g., macrophages), the mechanism(s) that triggers eosinophil degranulation is unknown. In this study we investigated whether human eosinophils have an innate immune response to certain fungal organisms. We incubated human eosinophils with extracts from seven environmental airborne fungi (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus versicolor, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Candida albicans, Cladosporium herbarum, Curvularia spicifera, and Penicillium notatum). Alternaria and Penicillium induced calcium-dependent exocytosis (e.g., eosinophil-derived neurotoxin release) in eosinophils from normal individuals. Alternaria also strongly induced other activation events in eosinophils, including increases in intracellular calcium concentration, cell surface expression of CD63 and CD11b, and production of IL-8. Other fungi did not induce eosinophil degranulation, and Alternaria did not induce neutrophil activation, suggesting specificity for fungal species and cell type. The Alternaria-induced eosinophil degranulation was pertussis toxin sensitive and desensitized by preincubating cells with G protein-coupled receptor agonists, platelet-activating factor, or FMLP. The eosinophil-stimulating activity in Alternaria extract was highly heat labile and had an M(r) of approximately 60 kDa. Thus, eosinophils, but not neutrophils, possess G protein-dependent cellular activation machinery that directly responds to an Alternaria protein product(s). This innate response by eosinophils to certain environmental fungi may be important in host defense and in the exacerbation of inflammation in asthma and allergic diseases.

  9. The rising threat of fungicide resistance in plant pathogenic fungi: Botrytis as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of site-specific fungicides almost 50 years ago has revolutionized chemical plant protection, providing highly efficient, low toxicity compounds for control of fungal diseases. However, it was soon discovered that plant pathogenic fungi can adapt to fungicide treatments by mutations leading to resistance and loss of fungicide efficacy. The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea, a major cause of pre- and post-harvest losses in fruit and vegetable production, is notorious as a 'high risk' organism for rapid resistance development. In this review, the mechanisms and the history of fungicide resistance in Botrytis are outlined. The introduction of new fungicide classes for grey mould control was always followed by the appearance of resistance in field populations. In addition to target site resistance, B. cinerea has also developed a resistance mechanism based on drug efflux transport. Excessive spraying programmes have resulted in the selection of multiresistant strains in several countries, in particular in strawberry fields. The rapid erosion of fungicide activity against these strains represents a major challenge for the future of fungicides against Botrytis. To maintain adequate protection of intensive cultures against grey mould, strict implementation of resistance management measures are required as well as alternative strategies with non-chemical products.

  10. Bacteria, fungi and arthropod pests collected on modern human mummies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Palla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A survey of opportunistic biocenosis (macro and micro organisms associated with a rest of human mummy samples was carried out to characterise the biocenosis and to detect the potential of biodeteriogens. The rests of the human modern mummies come from a hypogeic site. Since mummies are relevant from a historic-artistic-scientific point of view, an aspect of this study was the identification and characterization of the biological systems related with biodeterioration of organic matter. In a first step, different sampling methods, according to the taxa, were applied. Technological procedures were combined in order to have an interdisciplinary approach to the conservation actions for testing future restoration protocols. Specimens were collected, identified and characterized by Microscopy (light, SEM, CLSM and molecular analyses (DNA extraction, in vitro target sequence amplification, sequencing, sequence analysis. The results highlight a rather complex biocenonsis consisting of fungi, cyanobacteria, several insects and other arthropods.

  11. Friend or foe: differential responses of rice to invasion by mutualistic or pathogenic fungi revealed by RNAseq and metabolite profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xi-Hui; Wang, Chen; Li, Shu-Xian; Su, Zhen-Zhu; Zhou, Hui-Na; Mao, Li-Juan; Feng, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Ping-Ping; Chen, Xia; Hugh Snyder, John; Kubicek, Christian P; Zhang, Chu-Long; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2015-09-08

    The rice endophyte Harpophora oryzae shares a common pathogenic ancestor with the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Direct comparison of the interactions between a single plant species and two closely-related (1) pathogenic and (2) mutualistic fungi species can improve our understanding of the evolution of the interactions between plants and fungi that lead to either mutualistic or pathogenic interactions. Differences in the metabolome and transcriptome of rice in response to challenge by H. or M. oryzae were investigated with GC-MS, RNA-seq, and qRT-PCR. Levels of metabolites of the shikimate and lignin biosynthesis pathways increased continuously in the M. oryzae-challenged rice roots (Mo-roots); these pathways were initially induced, but then suppressed, in the H. oryzae-challenged rice roots (Ho-roots). Compared to control samples, concentrations of sucrose and maltose were reduced in the Ho-roots and Mo-roots. The expression of most genes encoding enzymes involved in glycolysis and the TCA cycle were suppressed in the Ho-roots, but enhanced in the Mo-roots. The suppressed glycolysis in Ho-roots would result in the accumulation of glucose and fructose which was not detected in the Mo-roots. A novel co-evolution pattern of fungi-host interaction is proposed which highlights the importance of plant host in the evolution of fungal symbioses.

  12. Oligo-DNA custom macroarray for monitoring major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria in the phyllosphere of apple trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hong He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To monitor the richness in microbial inhabitants in the phyllosphere of apple trees cultivated under various cultural and environmental conditions, we developed an oligo-DNA macroarray for major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of apple trees. METHODS AND FINDINGS: First, we isolated culturable fungi and bacteria from apple orchards by an agar-plate culture method, and detected 32 fungal and 34 bacterial species. Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium, Rhodotorula, Cystofilobasidium, and Epicoccum genera were predominant among the fungi, and Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Pantoea genera were predominant among the bacteria. Based on the data, we selected 29 major non-pathogenic and 12 phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria as the targets of macroarray. Forty-one species-specific 40-base pair long oligo-DNA sequences were selected from the nucleotide sequences of rDNA-internal transcribed spacer region for fungi and 16S rDNA for bacteria. The oligo-DNAs were fixed on nylon membrane and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes prepared for each species. All arrays except those for Alternaria, Bacillus, and their related species, were specifically hybridized. The array was sensitive enough to detect 10(3 CFU for Aureobasidium pullulans and Bacillus cereus. Nucleotide sequencing of 100 each of independent fungal rDNA-ITS and bacterial 16S-rDNA sequences from apple tree was in agreement with the macroarray data obtained using the same sample. Finally, we analyzed the richness in the microbial inhabitants in the samples collected from apple trees in four orchards. Major apple pathogens that cause scab, Alternaria blotch, and Marssonina blotch were detected along with several non-phytopathogenic fungal and bacterial inhabitants. CONCLUSIONS: The macroarray technique presented here is a strong tool to monitor the major microbial species and the community structures in

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Pathogenic Fungi Reveals Highly Expressed Conserved Cell Wall Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Champer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a quantitative proteomics tally of the most commonly expressed conserved fungal proteins of the cytosol, the cell wall, and the secretome. It was our goal to identify fungi-typical proteins that do not share significant homology with human proteins. Such fungal proteins are of interest to the development of vaccines or drug targets. Protein samples were derived from 13 fungal species, cultured in rich or in minimal media; these included clinical isolates of Aspergillus, Candida, Mucor, Cryptococcus, and Coccidioides species. Proteomes were analyzed by quantitative MSE (Mass Spectrometry—Elevated Collision Energy. Several thousand proteins were identified and quantified in total across all fractions and culture conditions. The 42 most abundant proteins identified in fungal cell walls or supernatants shared no to very little homology with human proteins. In contrast, all but five of the 50 most abundant cytosolic proteins had human homologs with sequence identity averaging 59%. Proteomic comparisons of the secreted or surface localized fungal proteins highlighted conserved homologs of the Aspergillus fumigatus proteins 1,3-β-glucanosyltransferases (Bgt1, Gel1-4, Crf1, Ecm33, EglC, and others. The fact that Crf1 and Gel1 were previously shown to be promising vaccine candidates, underlines the value of the proteomics data presented here.

  14. Looking in ticks for human bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediannikov, O; Fenollar, F

    2014-12-01

    Ticks are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases and the most important vectors of disease-causing pathogens in domestic and wild animals. A number of emerging tick-borne pathogens are already discovered; however, the proportion of undiagnosed infectious diseases, especially in tropical regions, may suggest that there are still more pathogens associated with ticks. Moreover, the identification of bacteria associated with ticks may provide new tool for the control of ticks and tick-borne diseases. Described here molecular methods of screening of ticks, extensive use of modern culturomics approach, newly developed artificial media and different cell line cultures may significantly improve our knowledge about the ticks as the agents of human and animal pathology.

  15. Antimicrobial activities of chicken β -defensin (4 and 10 peptides against pathogenic bacteria and fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham Ahmed Yacoub

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Host Defense Peptides (HDPs are small cationic peptides found in several organisms. They play a vital role in innate immunity response and immunomodulatory stimulation. This investigation was designed to study the antimicrobial activities of β-defensin peptide-4 (sAvBD-4 and 10 (sAvBD-4 derived from chickens against pathogenic organisms including bacteria and fungi. Ten bacterial strains and three fungal species were used in investigation. The results showed that the sAvBD-10 displayed a higher bactericidal potency against all the tested bacterial strains than that of sAvBD-4. The exhibited bactericidal activity was significant against almost the different bacterial strains at different peptide concentrations except for that of P. aeruginosa and Str. bovis strains where a moderate effect was noted. Both peptides were effective in the inactivation of fungal species tested yielding a killing rate of up to 95%. The results revealed that the synthetic peptides were resistant to salt at a concentration of 50mM NaCl. However, they lost antimicrobial potency when applied in the presence of high salt concentrations. Based on blood hemolysis studies, a little hemolytic effect was showed in the case of both peptides even when applied at high concentrations. The data obtained from this study indicated that synthetic avian peptides exhibit strong antibacterial and antifungal activity. In conclusion, future work and research should be tailored to a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of those peptides and their potential use in the pharmaceutical industry to help reduce the incidence and impact of infectious agent and be marketed as a naturally occurring antibiotic.

  16. Antimicrobial activities of chicken β-defensin (4 and 10) peptides against pathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Haitham A; Elazzazy, Ahmed M; Abuzinadah, Osama A H; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Mahmoud, Maged M; Harakeh, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Host Defense Peptides (HDPs) are small cationic peptides found in several organisms. They play a vital role in innate immunity response and immunomodulatory stimulation. This investigation was designed to study the antimicrobial activities of β-defensin peptide-4 (sAvBD-4) and 10 (sAvBD-4) derived from chickens against pathogenic organisms including bacteria and fungi. Ten bacterial strains and three fungal species were used in investigation. The results showed that the sAvBD-10 displayed a higher bactericidal potency against all the tested bacterial strains than that of sAvBD-4. The exhibited bactericidal activity was significant against almost the different bacterial strains at different peptide concentrations except for that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Streptococcus bovis (Str. bovis) strains where a moderate effect was noted. Both peptides were effective in the inactivation of fungal species tested yielding a killing rate of up to 95%. The results revealed that the synthetic peptides were resistant to salt at a concentration of 50 mM NaCl. However, they lost antimicrobial potency when applied in the presence of high salt concentrations. Based on blood hemolysis studies, a little hemolytic effect was showed in the case of both peptides even when applied at high concentrations. The data obtained from this study indicated that synthetic avian peptides exhibit strong antibacterial and antifungal activity. In conclusion, future work and research should be tailored to a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of those peptides and their potential use in the pharmaceutical industry to help reduce the incidence and impact of infectious agent and be marketed as a naturally occurring antibiotic.

  17. Forgotten natural enemies: interactions between Coccinellids and insect-pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research literature on insect pest species and entomopathogenic fungi is abundant. In stark contrast, little research has been done on the interactions of natural populations of Coccinellidae with entomopathogenic fungi. Most research on entomopathogens and Coccinellidae focuses on the non-tar...

  18. Opportunistic fungi in lake water and fungal infections in associated human population in Dal Lake, Kashmir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandh, Suhaib A; Kamili, Azra N; Ganai, Bashir A; Lone, Bashir A

    2016-04-01

    Natural habitats of opportunistic fungal pathogens are outside of the host; therefore, it is critically important to understand their ecology and routes of transmission. In this study, we investigated the presence of human pathogenic opportunistic fungi in lake water and incidence of fungal infections in associated population in Kashmir, India. Six hundred forty water samples were taken on seasonal basis from a wide network of sampling stations of the lake for an extended period of two years for screening their occurrence. The samples were inoculated onto rose bengal agar, malt extract agar, potato dextrose agar and other specified culture media supplemented with Chloramphenicol and Streptomycin followed by incubation at 37 °C. All the samples were positive for fungi, which were later identified by sequencing the rDNA internal transcribed spacer region aided by classical morphological culture techniques and physiological profiling. The whole process led to the isolation of sixteen species of opportunistic fungal pathogens belonging to genus Aspergillus, Candida, Penicillium, Cryptococcus, Fusarium, Rhizopus and Mucor in decreasing order of prevalence. Furthermore, 20% population (n = 384) of Dal inhabitants was examined for possible fungal infections and it was observed that only 8.07% individuals were positive for fungal infections with 4.68% skin infection cases, 2.34% onychomycosis cases and 1.04% candidiasis cases. Scrapings from onychomycosis and candidiasis patients showed the presence of Aversicolor and Calbicans respectively, resembling exactly the strains isolated from the lake water. However, the skin infection was because of a dermatophyte not isolated for the lake water. Higher prevalence of infection (6.77%) was seen in people using lake water followed by a positive prevalence of 1.30% using tap water. The results of present study suggest that the lake inhabitants are at a greater risk of getting life threatening fungal diseases which may lead to

  19. Cell entry by human pathogenic arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Jillian M; Kunz, Stefan

    2008-04-01

    The arenaviruses Lassa virus (LASV) in Africa and Machupo (MACV), Guanarito (GTOV) and Junin viruses (JUNV) in South America cause severe haemorrhagic fevers in humans with fatality rates of 15-35%. The present review focuses on the first steps of infection with human pathogenic arenaviruses, the interaction with their cellular receptor molecules and subsequent entry into the host cell. While similarities exist in genomic organization, structure and clinical disease caused by pathogenic Old World and New World arenaviruses these pathogens use different primary receptors. The Old World arenaviruses employ alpha-dystroglycan, a cellular receptor for proteins of the extracellular matrix, and the human pathogenic New World arenaviruses use the cellular cargo receptor transferrin receptor 1. While the New World arenavirus JUNV enters cells via clathrin-dependent endocytosis, evidence occurred for clathrin-independent entry of the prototypic Old World arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Upon internalization, arenaviruses are delivered to the endosome, where pH-dependent membrane fusion is mediated by the envelope glycoprotein (GP). While arenavirus GPs share characteristics with class I fusion GPs of other enveloped viruses, unusual mechanistic features of GP-mediated membrane fusion have recently been discovered for arenaviruses with important implications for viral entry.

  20. Human to human transmission of arthropod-borne pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martina, Byron E.; Barzon, Luisa; Pijlman, Gorben P.; Fuente, de la José; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Wammes, Linda J.; Takken, Willem; Rij, van Ronald P.; Papa, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Human-to-human (H2H) transmitted arthropod-borne pathogens are a growing burden worldwide, with malaria and dengue being the most common mosquito-borne H2H transmitted diseases. The ability of vectors to get infected by humans during a blood meal to further propel an epidemic depends on complex i

  1. The Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles Methyl Salicylate and Menthol Positively affect Growth and Pathogenicity of Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongwen; Qasim, Muhammad; Hussain, Mubasher; Akutse, Komivi Senyo; Avery, Pasco Bruce; Dash, Chandra Kanta; Wang, Liande

    2017-01-01

    Some herbivore-induced-plant volatiles (HIPVs) compounds are vital for the functioning of an ecosystem, by triggering multi-trophic interactions for natural enemies, plants and herbivores. However, the effect of these chemicals, which play a crucial role in regulating the multi-trophic interactions between plant-herbivore-entomopathogenic fungi, is still unknown. To fill this scientific gap, we therefore investigated how these chemicals influence the entomopathogenic fungi growth and efficacy. In this study, Lipaphis erysimi induced Arabidopsis thaliana HIPVs were collected using headspace system and detected with GC-MS, and then analyzed the effects of these HIPVs chemicals on Lecanicillium lecanii strain V3450. We found that the HIPVs menthol and methyl salicylate at 1 and 10 nmol·ml−1 improved many performance aspects of the fungus, such as germination, sporulation, appressorial formation as well as its pathogenicity and virulence. These findings are not only important for understanding the multi-trophic interactions in an ecosystem, but also would contribute for developing new and easier procedures for conidial mass production as well as improve the pathogenicity and virulence of entomopathogenic fungi in biological pest management strategies. PMID:28079180

  2. The Herbivore-Induced Plant Volatiles Methyl Salicylate and Menthol Positively affect Growth and Pathogenicity of Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yongwen; Qasim, Muhammad; Hussain, Mubasher; Akutse, Komivi Senyo; Avery, Pasco Bruce; Dash, Chandra Kanta; Wang, Liande

    2017-01-01

    Some herbivore-induced-plant volatiles (HIPVs) compounds are vital for the functioning of an ecosystem, by triggering multi-trophic interactions for natural enemies, plants and herbivores. However, the effect of these chemicals, which play a crucial role in regulating the multi-trophic interactions between plant-herbivore-entomopathogenic fungi, is still unknown. To fill this scientific gap, we therefore investigated how these chemicals influence the entomopathogenic fungi growth and efficacy. In this study, Lipaphis erysimi induced Arabidopsis thaliana HIPVs were collected using headspace system and detected with GC-MS, and then analyzed the effects of these HIPVs chemicals on Lecanicillium lecanii strain V3450. We found that the HIPVs menthol and methyl salicylate at 1 and 10 nmol·ml-1 improved many performance aspects of the fungus, such as germination, sporulation, appressorial formation as well as its pathogenicity and virulence. These findings are not only important for understanding the multi-trophic interactions in an ecosystem, but also would contribute for developing new and easier procedures for conidial mass production as well as improve the pathogenicity and virulence of entomopathogenic fungi in biological pest management strategies.

  3. Identifying and naming plant-pathogenic fungi: past, present, and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crous, P.W.; Hawksworth, D.L.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific names are crucial in communicating knowledge about fungi. In plant pathology, they link information regarding the biology, host range, distribution, and potential risk. Our understanding of fungal biodiversity and fungal systematics has undergone an exponential leap, incorporating genomic

  4. 53 review article a review of the virulence factors of pathogenic fungi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    various virulence factors which help with fungal survival and persistence in the host resulting in tissue damage and disease. This review ... Mannitol which protect against reactive oxygen species (ROS). Some fungi ..... Sun SH, and Hearn VM.

  5. Aerially transmitted human fungal pathogens: what can we learn from metagenomics and comparative genomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliouat-Denis, Cécile-Marie; Chabé, Magali; Delhaes, Laurence; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades, aerially transmitted human fungal pathogens have been increasingly recognized to impact the clinical course of chronic pulmonary diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thanks to recent development of culture-free high-throughput sequencing methods, the metagenomic approaches are now appropriate to detect, identify and even quantify prokaryotic or eukaryotic microorganism communities inhabiting human respiratory tract and to access the complexity of even low-burden microbe communities that are likely to play a role in chronic pulmonary diseases. In this review, we explore how metagenomics and comparative genomics studies can alleviate fungal culture bottlenecks, improve our knowledge about fungal biology, lift the veil on cross-talks between host lung and fungal microbiota, and gain insights into the pathogenic impact of these aerially transmitted fungi that affect human beings. We reviewed metagenomic studies and comparative genomic analyses of carefully chosen microorganisms, and confirmed the usefulness of such approaches to better delineate biology and pathogenesis of aerially transmitted human fungal pathogens. Efforts to generate and efficiently analyze the enormous amount of data produced by such novel approaches have to be pursued, and will potentially provide the patients suffering from chronic pulmonary diseases with a better management. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  6. Effect of rare earth application on the growth of Trichoderma spp.and several plant pathogenic fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    d'Aquino L; Carboni M; Woo S L; Morgana M; Nardi L; Lorito M

    2004-01-01

    @@ Rare earth elements (REEs) enriched fertilisers are currently used in China for soil and foliar applications to crops, but little is known about the effect of REEs applications on the growth of beneficial and detrimental soilborne microorganisms. The growth of biological control agents Trichoderma atroviride strain P1, Trichoderma harzianum strain A6 and strain T22, plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria alternata, Fusarium solani, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was investigated in the presence of REEs. An in vitro assays was used to monitor the effect of different concentration levels of either a mix of REEs (La, Ce, Pr, Nd) nitrates or lanthanum alone in comparison to treatments conducted with potassium nitrate and water. Although all fungi were affected when the REEs mix or lanthanum were present at concentrations higher than 100 mM, the growth inhibition depended mainly upon the combination of compounds, the dose and the fungal species or strains tested. Trichoderma strains and B. cinerea were more sensitive than A.alternata, F. solani, R. solani or at higher concentrations. Differing growth responses of some fungi to treatments with REEs mix vs. lanthanum alone indicated that in given situations the effect of the REEs compounds may be caused by elements other than lanthanum or by element mixtures.Further investigations are in progress to determine the effect of REEs on important interactions in the soil community between beneficial fungi, pathogenic fungi and/or the plant. REEs are naturally present in the environment and in biological systems but accumulation in soil can take place following successive applications. Therefore, it would be useful to achieve a better understanding of the effect of REEs accumulation on the activity of rhizosphere microorganisms given the widespread use in some regions of rare earths as fertilizers and their presence as fertilizer contaminants.

  7. Pathogens spectrum of deep human mycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kulko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes characteristics of two different etiology groups of deep human mycosis — extremely dangerous endemic deep mycoses (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, penicilliosis due to Penicillium marneffei and opportunistic deep mycosis (candidiasis, cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis. Information on fungal pathogens and antifungal agents is presented. The own results of cultural studies obtained during pneumomycosis diagnosis in patients with tuberculosis are shown.

  8. Pathogens spectrum of deep human mycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kulko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article describes characteristics of two different etiology groups of deep human mycosis — extremely dangerous endemic deep mycoses (histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, penicilliosis due to Penicillium marneffei and opportunistic deep mycosis (candidiasis, cryptococcosis, aspergillosis, mucormycosis. Information on fungal pathogens and antifungal agents is presented. The own results of cultural studies obtained during pneumomycosis diagnosis in patients with tuberculosis are shown.

  9. Efficacy of Origanum essential oils for inhibition of potentially pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadábia Almeida B Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the efficacy of O. vulgare L. and O. majorana L. essential oil in inhibiting the growth and survival of potentially pathogenic fungal strains and also sought to evaluate the possible mechanisms involved in the establishment of the antifungal property of the tested essential oils through assays of osmotic stability and morphogenesis. Test strains included in this study were Candida albicans ATCC 7645, C. tropicalis LM-14, C. krusei LM-09, Cryptococcus neoformans FGF-5, Aspergillus flavus LM-02, A. fumigatus IPP-21, T. rubrum ATCC 28184, T. mentagrophytes LM-64, Microsporum gypseum ATCC 184, M. canis LM-36 and Cladosporium herbarium ATCC 26362. O. vulgare essential oil presented a MIC value of 80 µL/mL, while for O. majorana this was 160 µL/mL. C. krusei LM-09 was the only strain resistant to all assayed concentrations of both essential oils. O. vulgare and O. majorana essential oil at their MIC values provided a cidal effect against C. albicans ATCC 7645 after 4 h of exposure. O. vulgare essential oil at 80 µL/mL exhibited 100 % inhibition of the radial mycelia growth of T. rubrum ATCC 28184 and M. canis LM-36 for 14 days. Assayed fungus strain protected by sorbitol (osmo-protectant agent grew in media containing higher concentrations of O. vulgare and O. majorana essential oil in comparison to media without sorbitol, suggesting some specificity of these essential oils for targeting cell wall in the fungi cell. Main morphological changes observed under light microscopy provided by the essential oil of O. vulgare in A. flavus LM-02 were decreased conidiation, leakage of cytoplasm, loss of pigmentation and disrupted cell structure indicating fungal wall degeneration. These results suggest that essential oils from Origanum could be regarded as a potential antifungal compound for controlling the growth of pathogen fungi and the occurrence of mycoses.O objetivo deste estudo foi observar a eficácia do óleo essencial de O

  10. Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, J.H.; Rose, Joan B.

    2003-01-01

    This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and

  11. Insights on the susceptibility of plant pathogenic fungi to phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and its chemical derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, Gerardo; Masi, Marco; Raio, Aida; Andolfi, Anna; Zoina, Astolfo; Cimmino, Alessio; Evidente, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71 produced two phenazine compounds as main secondary metabolites. These metabolites were identified as phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) and 2-hydroxyphenazine (2-OH P). In this study, the spectrum of the activity of PCA and 2-OH P was evaluated against a group of crop and forestal plant pathogenic fungi by an agar plate bioassay. PCA was active against most of the tested plant pathogens, while 2-OH P slightly inhibited a few fungal species. Furthermore, four semisynthesised derivatives of PCA (phenazine-1-carboxymethyl, phenazine-1-carboxamide, phenazine-1-hydroxymethyl and phenazine-1-acetoxymethyl) were assayed for their antifungal activity against 11 phytopathogenic species. Results showed that the carboxyl group is a structural feature important for the antifungal activity of PCA. Since the activity of phenazine-1-carboxymethyl and phenazine-1-carboxamide, the two more lipophilic and reversible PCA derivatives remained substantially unaltered compared with PCA.

  12. Flexible gateway constructs for functional analyses of genes in plant pathogenic fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, Rahim; Mirzadi Gohari, Amir; Silva, da Gilvan Ferreira; Steinberg, Gero; Kema, Gert H.J.; Wit, de Pierre J.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of fungi requires quick, low-cost, efficient, high-throughput and molecular tools. In this paper, we report 22 entry constructs as new molecular tools based on the Gateway technology facilitating rapid construction of binary vectors that can be used for functional analysis of

  13. Poly(lactic- co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles uptake by Vitis vinifera and grapevine-pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valletta, Alessio; Chronopoulou, Laura; Palocci, Cleofe; Baldan, Barbara; Donati, Livia; Pasqua, Gabriella

    2014-12-01

    Poly(lactic- co-glycolic) acid (PLGA)-based NPs are currently considered among the most promising drug carriers, nevertheless their use in plants has never been investigated. In this work, for the first time, we demonstrated the ability of PLGA NPs to cross the plant cell wall and membrane of Vitis vinifera cell cultures and grapevine-pathogenic fungi. By means of fluorescence microscopy, we established that PLGA NPs can enter in grapevine leaf tissues through stomata openings and that they can be absorbed by the roots and transported to the shoot through vascular tissues. TEM analysis on cultured cells showed that NPs ≤ 50 nm could enter cells, while bigger ones remained attached to the cell wall. Viability tests demonstrated that PLGA NPs were not cytotoxic for V. vinifera-cultured cells. The cellular uptake of PLGA NPs by some important grapevine-pathogenic fungi has also been observed, thus suggesting that PLGA NPs could be used to deliver antifungal compounds within fungal cells. Overall the results reported suggest that such NPs may play a key role in future developments of agrobiotechnologies, as it is currently happening in biomedicine.

  14. Allelopathic effects of essential oil from Eucalyptus grandis × E.urophylla on pathogenic fungi and pest insects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study on the allelopathic effects and chemical components of the essential oil from Eucalyptus grandis × E.urophylla shows that the leaf oil emulsion of E.grandis × E.urophylla can inhibit the proliferation of pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum,Pyriculerie grisea,Glorosprium musa rum and Phytophthora capsici.Pupation and feeding of the pest insects Spodopteralitura Fabricius and Helicoverpa armigera Hubner are shown to be affected with restraining effects which increase with the increasing levels of oil concentration.A GC/MS analysis of the leaf oil indicated that the main components,with a relative content of≥3%,were alloocimene (43.22%),α-pinene (13.63%),γ-terpinene (5.49%),(E)-3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol (3.58%),β-fenchyl alcohol (4.58%),and 2-amino-3,5-dicyano-6-(4-methoxyphenoxy)-pyridine (3.67%).Terpenes played an important role in the inhibitory effects of E.grandis × E.urophylla essential oil on pathogenic fungi and pest insects.Poor biodiversity of eucalyptus plantations is a function of allelopathy.

  15. Air-conditioning vs. presence of pathogenic fungi in hospital operating theatre environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gniadek, Agnieszka; Macura, Anna B

    2011-01-01

    Infections related to modern surgical procedures present a difficult problem for contemporary medicine. Infections acquired during surgery represent a risk factor related to therapeutical interventions. Eradication of microorganisms from hospital operating theatre environment may contribute to reduction of infections as the laminar flow air-conditioning considerably reduces the number of microorganisms in the hospital environment. The objective of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of fungi in air-conditioned operating theatre rooms. The study was carried out in one of the hospitals in Krak6w during December 2009. Indoor air samples and imprints from the walls were collected from five operating theatre rooms. A total of fifty indoor air samples were collected with a MAS-100 device, and twenty five imprints from the walls were collected using a Count Tact method. Fungal growth was observed in 48 air samples; the average numbers of fungi were within the range of 5-100 c.f.u. in one cubic metre of the air. Fungi were detected only in four samples of the wall imprints; the number of fungi was 0.01 c.f.u. per one square centimetre of the surface. The mould genus Aspergillus was most frequently isolated, and the species A. fumigatus and A. versicolor were the dominating ones. To ensure microbiological cleanness of hospital operating theatre, the air-conditioning system should be properly maintained. Domination of the Aspergillus fungi in indoor air as well as increase in the number of moulds in the samples taken in evenings (p < 0.05) may suggest that the room decontamination procedures were neglected.

  16. Genome Studies on Nematophagous and Entomogenous Fungi in China

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Zhang; Xiaoli Cheng; Xingzhong Liu; Meichun Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The nematophagous and entomogenous fungi are natural enemies of nematodes and insects and have been utilized by humans to control agricultural and forestry pests. Some of these fungi have been or are being developed as biological control agents in China and worldwide. Several important nematophagous and entomogenous fungi, including nematode-trapping fungi (Arthrobotrys oligospora and Drechslerella stenobrocha), nematode endoparasite (Hirsutella minnesotensis), insect pathogens (Beauveria bas...

  17. Screening of Fungi from Chinese Medical Plants for Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to isolate anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents from natural products, 97 ethanolic extracts of 90 fungi were tested for their inhibitory activity on HIV-1. Most of the extracts tested were relatively non-toxic to human lymphocytic MT-4 cells, but extracts of some fungi exhibited potent anti-HIV activity in an in vitro 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay with a selectivity index greater than 3. Most fungi were isolated from Dendrobium sp. and Taxus sp.

  18. Photodynamic treatment with phenothiazinium photosensitizers kills both ungerminated and germinated microconidia of the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium moniliforme and Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Henrique Dantas; Tonani, Ludmilla; Bachmann, Luciano; Wainwright, Mark; Braga, Gilberto Úbida Leite; von Zeska Kress, Marcia Regina

    2016-11-01

    The search for alternatives to control microorganisms is necessary both in clinical and agricultural areas. Antimicrobial photodynamic treatment (APDT) is a promising light-based approach that can be used to control both human and plant pathogenic fungi. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of photodynamic treatment with red light and four phenothiazinium photosensitizers (PS): methylene blue (MB), toluidine blue O (TBO), new methylene blue N (NMBN) and the phenothiazinium derivative S137 on ungerminated and germinated microconidia of Fusarium oxysporum, F. moniliforme, and F. solani. APDT with each PS killed efficiently both the quiescent ungerminated microconidia and metabolically active germinated microconidia of the three Fusarium species. Washing away the unbound PS from the microconidia (both ungerminated and germinated) before red light exposure reduced but did not prevent the effect of APDT. Subcelullar localization of PS in ungerminated and germinated microconidia and the effects of photodynamic treatment on cell membranes were also evaluated in the three Fusarium species. APDT with MB, TBO, NMBN or S137 increased the membrane permeability in microconidia and APDT with NMBN or S137 increased the lipids peroxidation in microconidia of the three Fusarium species. These findings expand the understanding of photodynamic inactivation of filamentous fungi with phenothiazinium PS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunodetection of fungal and oomycete pathogens: established and emerging threats to human health, animal welfare and global food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Christopher R; Wills, Odette E

    2015-02-01

    Filamentous fungi (moulds), yeast-like fungi, and oomycetes cause life-threatening infections of humans and animals and are a major constraint to global food security, constituting a significant economic burden to both agriculture and medicine. As well as causing localized or systemic infections, certain species are potent producers of allergens and toxins that exacerbate respiratory diseases or cause cancer and organ damage. We review the pathogenic and toxigenic organisms that are etiologic agents of both animal and plant diseases or that have recently emerged as serious pathogens of immunocompromised individuals. The use of hybridoma and phage display technologies and their success in generating monoclonal antibodies for the detection and control of fungal and oomycete pathogens are explored. Monoclonal antibodies hold enormous potential for the development of rapid and specific tests for the diagnosis of human mycoses, however, unlike plant pathology, their use in medical mycology remains to be fully exploited.

  20. Human Babesiosis: Pathogens, Prevalence, Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ord, Rosalynn Louise; Lobo, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    Human babesiosis is a zoonotic disease caused by protozoan parasites of the Babesia genus, primarily in the Northeastern and Midwest United States due to B. microti, and Western Europe due to B. divergens. Parasites are transmitted by the bite of the ixodid tick when the vector takes a blood meal from the vertebrate host, and the economic importance of bovine babesiosis is well understood. The pathology of human disease is a direct result of the parasite’s ability to invade host’s red blood cells. The current understanding of human babesiosis epidemiology is that many infections remain asymptomatic, especially in younger or immune competent individuals, and the burden of severe pathology resides within older or immunocompromised individuals. However, transfusion-transmitted babesiosis is an emerging threat to public health as asymptomatic carriers donate blood and there are as yet no licensed or regulated tests to screen blood products for this pathogen. Reports of tick-borne cases within new geographical regions such as the Pacific Northwest of the US, through Eastern Europe, and into China are also on the rise. Further, new Babesia spp. have been identified globally as agents of severe human babesiosis, suggesting that the epidemiology of this disease is rapidly changing, and it is clear that human babesiosis is a serious public health concern that requires close monitoring and effective intervention measure. PMID:26594611

  1. Entomopathogenic fungi as biological controllers: New insights into their virulence and pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Shahid Ali Ahmad; Rao Qayyum Abdul; Bakhsh Allah; Husnain Tayyab

    2012-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi vary considerably in their mode of action and virulence. Successful infection depends primarily on the adherence and penetration ability of a fungus to the host integuments. A variety of extracellular enzymes is produced during the degradation of insect integument. The attempts to control insects have changed over time from chemicals to natural control methods. This is why the development of natural methods of insect control or biopesticides, is preferred. By the ...

  2. Independent Expansion of Zincin Metalloproteinases in Onygenales Fungi May Be Associated with Their Pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Li; Ke-Qin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    To get a comprehensive view of fungal M35 family (deuterolysin) and M36 family (fungalysin) genes, we conducted genome-wide investigations and phylogenetic analyses of genes in these two families from 50 sequenced Ascomycota fungi with different life styles. Large variations in the number of M35 family and M36 family genes were found among different fungal genomes, indicating that these two gene families have been highly dynamic through fungal evolution. Moreover, we found obvious expansions ...

  3. Opportunistic invasive fungal pathogen Macrophomina phaseolina prognosis from immunocompromised humans to potential mitogenic RBL with an exceptional and novel antitumor and cytotoxic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, P; Dilbaghi, N; Chaudhury, A

    2012-02-01

    With the ever-increasing risk for fungal infections, one can no longer ignore fungi. It is imperative that clinical manifestations "presume fungus" with their epidemiologic and pathogenic features when evaluating a potentially infected patient. In the high-risk patient groups, fungi with intrinsic resistance to antifungal agents already exist, with a tendency to emerge as opportunistic pathogens. One of the smart pathogens is Macrophomina phaseolina, with the potential to disarm plant, animal, and human immunity. The response prophylaxis may vary from antifungal therapy and surgical measures to biochemical (Rhizoctonia bataticola lectin [RBL] with antitumor and cytotoxic nature) and gene therapeutics.

  4. Generic aspects of the airborne spread of human pathogens indoors and emerging air decontamination technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, M Khalid; Zargar, Bahram; Wright, Kathryn E; Rubino, Joseph R; Sattar, Syed A

    2016-09-02

    Indoor air can be an important vehicle for a variety of human pathogens. This review provides examples of airborne transmission of infectious agents from experimental and field studies and discusses how airborne pathogens can contaminate other parts of the environment to give rise to secondary vehicles leading air-surface-air nexus with possible transmission to susceptible hosts. The following groups of human pathogens are covered because of their known or potential airborne spread: vegetative bacteria (staphylococci and legionellae), fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Cladosporium spp and Stachybotrys chartarum), enteric viruses (noro- and rotaviruses), respiratory viruses (influenza and coronaviruses), mycobacteria (tuberculous and nontuberculous), and bacterial spore formers (Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis). An overview of methods for experimentally generating and recovering airborne human pathogens is included, along with a discussion of factors that influence microbial survival in indoor air. Available guidelines from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other global regulatory bodies for the study of airborne pathogens are critically reviewed with particular reference to microbial surrogates that are recommended. Recent developments in experimental facilities to contaminate indoor air with microbial aerosols are presented, along with emerging technologies to decontaminate indoor air under field-relevant conditions. Furthermore, the role that air decontamination may play in reducing the contamination of environmental surfaces and its combined impact on interrupting the risk of pathogen spread in both domestic and institutional settings is discussed.

  5. Lifestyle transitions in plant pathogenic Colletotrichum fungi deciphered by genome and transcriptome analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Connell, R.J.; Thon, M.R.; Hacquard, S.; Amyotte, S.G.; Kleemann, J.; Torres, M.F.; Damm, U.; Buiate, E.A.; Epstein, L.; Alkan, N.; Altmuller, J.; Alvarado-Balderrama, L.; Bauser, C.A.; Becker, C.; Birren, B.W.; Chen, Z.; Choi, J.; Crouch, J.A.; Duvick, J.P.; Farman, M.A.; Gan, P.; Heiman, D.; Henrissat, B.; Howard, R.J.; Kabbage, M.; Koch, C.; Kracher, B.; Kubo, Y.; Law, A.D.; Lebrun, M.-H.; Lee, Y.-H.; Miyara, I.; Moore, N.; Neumann, U.; Nordstrom, K.; Panaccione, D.G.; Panstruga, R.; Place, M.; Proctor, R.H.; Prusky, D.; Rech, G.; Reinhardt, R.; Rollins, J.A.; Rounsley, S.; Schardl, C.L.; Schwartz, D.C.; Shenoy, N.; Shirasu, K.; Sikhakolli, U.R.; Stuber, K.; Sukno, S.A.; Sweigard, J.A.; Takano, Y.; Takahara, H.; Trail, F.; Does, H.C.; Voll, L.M.; Will, I.; Young, S.; Zeng, Q.; Zhang, Jingze; Zhou, S.; Dickman, M.B.; Schulze-Lefert, P.; Verloren van Themaat, E.; Ma, L.-J.; Vaillancourt, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Colletotrichum species are fungal pathogens that devastate crop plants worldwide. Host infection involves the differentiation of specialized cell types that are associated with penetration, growth inside living host cells (biotrophy) and tissue destruction (necrotrophy). We report here genome and

  6. Pathogenicity of two seed-borne fungi commonly involved in maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nazar Hussain

    2013-03-20

    Mar 20, 2013 ... deteriorate food grains by producing mycotoxins and aflotoxins during ... These species were tested to determine their pathogenicity to maize seed germination ..... genetically modified maize grown in France and Spain.

  7. Lifestyle transitions in plant pathogenic Colletotrichum fungi deciphered by genome and transcriptome analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Connell, R.J.; Thon, M.R.; Hacquard, S.; Amyotte, S.G.; Kleemann, J.; Torres, M.F.; Damm, U.; Buiate, E.A.; Epstein, L.; Alkan, N.; Altmuller, J.; Alvarado-Balderrama, L.; Bauser, C.A.; Becker, C.; Birren, B.W.; Chen, Z.; Choi, J.; Crouch, J.A.; Duvick, J.P.; Farman, M.A.; Gan, P.; Heiman, D.; Henrissat, B.; Howard, R.J.; Kabbage, M.; Koch, C.; Kracher, B.; Kubo, Y.; Law, A.D.; Lebrun, M.-H.; Lee, Y.-H.; Miyara, I.; Moore, N.; Neumann, U.; Nordstrom, K.; Panaccione, D.G.; Panstruga, R.; Place, M.; Proctor, R.H.; Prusky, D.; Rech, G.; Reinhardt, R.; Rollins, J.A.; Rounsley, S.; Schardl, C.L.; Schwartz, D.C.; Shenoy, N.; Shirasu, K.; Sikhakolli, U.R.; Stuber, K.; Sukno, S.A.; Sweigard, J.A.; Takano, Y.; Takahara, H.; Trail, F.; Does, H.C.; Voll, L.M.; Will, I.; Young, S.; Zeng, Q.; Zhang, Jingze; Zhou, S.; Dickman, M.B.; Schulze-Lefert, P.; Verloren van Themaat, E.; Ma, L.-J.; Vaillancourt, L.J.

    2012-01-01

    Colletotrichum species are fungal pathogens that devastate crop plants worldwide. Host infection involves the differentiation of specialized cell types that are associated with penetration, growth inside living host cells (biotrophy) and tissue destruction (necrotrophy). We report here genome and tr

  8. Interactions of Neotyphodium gansuense, Achnatherum inebrians, and plant-pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-jie; Gao, Jia-hui; Nan, Zhi-biao

    2007-10-01

    Interactions of Neotyphodium gansuense, Achnatherum inebrians, and nine fungal pathogens were studied by tests of inhibition of four fungal pathogens by Neotyphodium endophytes in vitro and by inoculation of nine fungal pathogens on detached leaves of endophyte-infected (E+) and endophyte-free (E-) plants. Compared with the controls, most isolates of N. gansuense significantly inhibited the growth in vitro of, in decreasing order of inhibition, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Curvularia lunata, Fusarium acuminatum, and Alternaria alternata. Inhibition zones appeared between pathogens and some isolates of N. gansuense. Some isolates of N. gansuense significantly inhibited sporulation of B. sorokiniana, A. alternata, and C. lunata. However, there was no significant inhibition of F. acuminatum and a few isolates significantly increased sporulation. The leaf inoculation trial indicated that almost all fungal pathogens were able to cause lesions on detached leaves regardless of endophyte status. Both the number and size of disease lesions on E+A. inebrians leaves caused by A. alternata, F. chlamydosporum, F. oxysporum, and F. solani were reduced compared with those on E- leaves. Only lesion numbers (not size) of Ascochyta leptospora leaf spots were significantly reduced on E+ leaves compared with E- leaves. Conversely, only the length of Ascochyta leptospora leaf spots were significantly smaller on E+ leaves than on E- leaves; numbers of lesions were not significantly affected. C. lunata was strongly pathogenic to both E+ and E- leaves and numerous lesions developed and merged into patches, the leaf surface was covered and the leaf rotted away.

  9. Influence of temperature, precipitation, and cultivar characteristics on changes in the spectrum of pathogenic fungi in winter wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hýsek, Josef; Vavera, Radek; Růžek, Pavel

    2016-12-01

    In view of the threat posed by climate change, we studied the influence of temperature, precipitation, cultivar characteristics, and technical management measures on the occurrence of phytopathogenic fungi in wheat during 2009-2013. This work involved experiments at two sites differing in average temperatures and precipitation. Temperature and precipitation appear to influence differences in the spectrum of phytopathogenic fungi at the individual sites. In 2009 (the warmest year), Alternaria triticina was dominant. In 2010 (having the smallest deviations from the average for individual years), Septoria tritici dominated. In 2011, Puccinia triticina was most prominent, while in 2012, the genus Drechslera (Pyrenophora) and in 2013, S. tritici and Drechslera tritici-repentis (DTR) dominated. Temperature and precipitation levels in the individual spring months (warmer March to May) played a large role, especially for the leaf rust P. triticina in 2011. A change of only 1 °C with different precipitation during a year played a significant role in changing wheat's fungal spectrum. Cluster analysis showed the differences between single pathogenic fungi on wheat in a single year due to temperature and precipitation. Alternaria abundance was strongly influenced by year (p < 0.001) while locality was significant only in certain years (2012, 2013; p = 0.004 and 0.015, respectively). The same factors were revealed to be significant in the case of Puccinia, but locality played a role (p < 0.001) in different years (2011, 2013). The abundance of S. tritici and Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Drechslera tritici-repentis) was influenced only by year (p < 0.001).

  10. THE EFFECT OF LOW INDUCTIVITY STATIC MAGNETIC FIELD ON SOME PLANT PATHOGEN FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pál NAGY

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Growth and sporulation of phytopathogen microscopic fungi were studied under a static magnetic fi eld. The applied flux densities were 0,1, 0,5 and 1 mT. As a result of our experiments, the magnetic fi eld decreased the growth of colonies by 10 % using this fl ux density region. At the same time, the number of the developed conidia of Alternaria alternata and Curvularia inaequalis increased by 68-133 percent, but the number of Fusarium oxysporum conidia decreased by 79-83 percent.

  11. Human metapneumovirus: a new respiratory pathogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Broor; P Bharaj; H S Chahar

    2008-11-01

    Human metapneumovirus is a recently recognized pathogen of acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) in children as well as elderly and immunocompromised adults. The virus belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae, sub family Pneumovirinae and genus Metapneumovirus. Through genetic analysis it has been characterized into two groups A and B which are further divided into four sub-lineages. The virus is difficult to grow in tissue culture and hence reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for N and L gene is the method of choice for diagnosis. The virus has been seen in all countries with seasonal distribution in winter months for temperate and spring/summer for tropical countries. F gene is the most conserved among different lineages and efforts are underway to design recombination vaccine using F gene.

  12. Soil eukaryotic microorganism succession as affected by continuous cropping of peanut--pathogenic and beneficial fungi were selected.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingna Chen

    Full Text Available Peanut is an important oil crop worldwide and shows considerable adaptability but growth and yield are negatively affected by continuous cropping. Soil micro-organisms are efficient bio-indicators of soil quality and plant health and are critical to the sustainability of soil-based ecosystem function and to successful plant growth. In this study, 18S rRNA gene clone library analyses were employed to study the succession progress of soil eukaryotic micro-organisms under continuous peanut cultivation. Eight libraries were constructed for peanut over three continuous cropping cycles and its representative growth stages. Cluster analyses indicated that soil micro-eukaryotic assemblages obtained from the same peanut cropping cycle were similar, regardless of growth period. Six eukaryotic groups were found and fungi predominated in all libraries. The fungal populations showed significant dynamic change and overall diversity increased over time under continuous peanut cropping. The abundance and/or diversity of clones affiliated with Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Glomerales, Orbiliales, Mucorales and Tremellales showed an increasing trend with continuous cropping but clones affiliated with Agaricales, Cantharellales, Pezizales and Pyxidiophorales decreased in abundance and/or diversity over time. The current data, along with data from previous studies, demonstrated that the soil microbial community was affected by continuous cropping, in particular, the pathogenic and beneficial fungi that were positively selected over time, which is commonplace in agro-ecosystems. The trend towards an increase in fungal pathogens and simplification of the beneficial fungal community could be important factors contributing to the decline in peanut growth and yield over many years of continuous cropping.

  13. Soil eukaryotic microorganism succession as affected by continuous cropping of peanut--pathogenic and beneficial fungi were selected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingna; Li, Xiao; Yang, Qingli; Chi, Xiaoyuan; Pan, Lijuan; Chen, Na; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Tong; Wang, Mian; Yu, Shanlin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut is an important oil crop worldwide and shows considerable adaptability but growth and yield are negatively affected by continuous cropping. Soil micro-organisms are efficient bio-indicators of soil quality and plant health and are critical to the sustainability of soil-based ecosystem function and to successful plant growth. In this study, 18S rRNA gene clone library analyses were employed to study the succession progress of soil eukaryotic micro-organisms under continuous peanut cultivation. Eight libraries were constructed for peanut over three continuous cropping cycles and its representative growth stages. Cluster analyses indicated that soil micro-eukaryotic assemblages obtained from the same peanut cropping cycle were similar, regardless of growth period. Six eukaryotic groups were found and fungi predominated in all libraries. The fungal populations showed significant dynamic change and overall diversity increased over time under continuous peanut cropping. The abundance and/or diversity of clones affiliated with Eurotiales, Hypocreales, Glomerales, Orbiliales, Mucorales and Tremellales showed an increasing trend with continuous cropping but clones affiliated with Agaricales, Cantharellales, Pezizales and Pyxidiophorales decreased in abundance and/or diversity over time. The current data, along with data from previous studies, demonstrated that the soil microbial community was affected by continuous cropping, in particular, the pathogenic and beneficial fungi that were positively selected over time, which is commonplace in agro-ecosystems. The trend towards an increase in fungal pathogens and simplification of the beneficial fungal community could be important factors contributing to the decline in peanut growth and yield over many years of continuous cropping.

  14. [Plants and pathogenic agents, a refined and dangerous relationship: the example of fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré-Tugayé, M T

    2001-10-01

    Plant-fungus interactions are highly diverse, either being beneficial to the host plant such as those leading to mycorhizal symbiosis, or very detrimental when leading to severe diseases. Since the beginning of agriculture, improvement of plant resistance to pathogens has remained a major challenge. Breeding for resistance, first conducted empirically in the past centuries, was then performed on a more theoretical basis after the statement of heredity laws by Mendel at the end of the XIXth century. As a result, most cultivated species contain various cultivars whose resistance or susceptibility to a given pathogen species depend on their interaction with various races of that pathogen. Such highly specific race-cultivar systems are particularly suited for understanding the molecular dialogue which underlies compatible (host susceptible/pathogen virulent) or incompatible (host resistant/pathogen avirulent) interactions. During the twentieth century, one of the major events that paved the way for future research was the statement by Flor [1946, 1947] of the gene-for-gene concept. Studying inheritance of the disease phenotype in the interaction between flax and Melampsora lini he showed that resistance in the host and avirulence in the pathogen are dictated by single dominant genes which correspond one to one, i.e. one resistance gene for one avirulence gene. The fact that incompatibility may depend on the presence of only one resistance (R) gene in the host and one avirulence (Avr) gene in the pathogen was fully confirmed about 40 years later. Molecular genetics and complementation experiments have allowed to isolate numerous R and Avr genes from various plant-pathogen systems, and to verify the gene-for-gene concept. These studies have enlightened the elicitor/receptor concept, formerly introduced to account for the specificity of the compatible and incompatible interactions. The present knowledge of R and Avr genes also allows to predict how such genes have evolved

  15. Chemical constituents from Melodorum fruticosum Lour. flowers against plant pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachsawan Mongkol

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal activity of hexane, dichloromethane and methanol extracts of 45 Thai plants were in vitro screened against plant phytopathogenic fungi (Alternaria porri, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Fusarium oxysporum and Phytophthora parasitica. Seven extracts strongly inhibited the mycelial growth of fungi. The plant extracts with highest antifungal activity were Limnophila aromatic, Eupatorium odoratum, Melodorum fruticosum and Alpinia galanga with 70%, 58%, 74% and 100% inhibition, respectively. The potent dichloromethane extract from M. fruticosum flowers was separated using bioassay guided against P. parasitica. Eight compounds: 1-hexacosanol (1, 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone (2, β-sitosterol (3, melodorinone B (4, benzoic acid (5, chrysin (6, melodorinol (7 and melodorinone A (8 could be isolated. Among the isolated compounds, benzoic acid (5 and melodorinol (7 exhibited strong activity against mycelial growth of P. parasitica at 100% and 93% inhibition with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 108 μg/mL and 130 μg/mL, respectively. This plant could be exploited for eco-friendly management control of plant diseases.

  16. Use of DNA sequencing to detect pathogenic, saprotrophic, and stain fungi in sapwood of declining red pine (Pinus resinosa) in the Upper Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.T. Banik; D.L. Lindner; J. Juzwik; J.A. Glaeser

    2013-01-01

    An inexpensive kit was developed to collect wood samples for molecular detection of pathogenic, saprotrophic and stain fungi in declining Pinus resinosa in the Upper Midwest. The kit contained materials for "clean" collection of sapwood drill shavings, which were then subjected to PCR of the rDNA ITS region with fungal-specific primers,...

  17. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  18. Cadophora species as trunk pathogens and wood-infecting fungi of grapevine in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadophora species, in particular Cadophora luteo-olivacea, are reported from grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) in California, South Africa, Spain, Uruguay, and Canada. Frequent isolation from vines co-infected with the Esca pathogens (Togninia minima, Phaeomoniella chlamydospora), and confirmation of it...

  19. Biocontrol Activity of Bacillus subtilis Isolated from Agaricus bisporus Mushroom Compost Against Pathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Can; Sheng, Jiping; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Yanyan; Lee, David Yue Wei; Yang, Yang; Xu, Mingshuang; Shen, Lin

    2015-07-08

    Bacillus subtilis strain B154, isolated from Agaricus bisporus mushroom compost infected by red bread mold, exhibited antagonistic activities against Neurospora sitophila. Antifungal activity against phytopathogenic fungi was also observed. The maximum antifungal activity was reached during the stationary phase. This antifungal activity was stable over a wide pH and temperature range and was not affected by proteases. Assay of antifungal activity in vitro indicated that a purified antifungal substance could strongly inhibit mycelia growth and spore germination of N. sitophila. In addition, treatment with strain B154 in A. bisporus mushroom compost infected with N. sitophila significantly increased the yield of bisporus mushrooms. Ultraviolet scan spectroscopy, tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, matrix-associated laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed a molecular weight consistent with 1498.7633 Da. The antifungal compound might belong to a new type of lipopeptide fengycin.

  20. External beam analysis of living sycamore xylem infected by pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, G. W.; Pearce, R. B.

    1995-09-01

    Interactions between the living xylem (sapwood) of sycamore ( Acer pseudoplatanus) and wood inhabiting fungi have been investigated using a number of techniques including conventional histochemical and biochemical methods, non-invasive NMR imaging and external beam micro PIXE analysis using a 200 μm diameter beam of 3 MeV protons from the new external beam facility on the Oxford Scanning Proton Microprobe. The site of the fungal lesion on a living tree was exposed by a fresh cut immediately prior to analysis and both longitudinal and radial profiles through the infected regions were obtained in a point-by-point fashion. Profiles of several inorganic elements were obtained which correlated well with the observed discoloration due to the infection. The new external beamline at Oxford is described and results are presented. These are discussed in relation to the investigation of anti-microbial defence mechanisms in living trees.

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Extracts from Leaves, Stems and Flowers of Euphorbia macroclada against plant pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Al-Mughrabi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracts drawn from dried and powdered flowers, stems and leaves of Euphorbia macroclada with some organic solvents were tested for antimicrobial effect against the fungi Verticillium dahliae, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizopus stolonifer, Penicillium italicum, Rhizoctonia solani, Alternaria solani, Stemphylium solani, Cladosporium sp., Mucor sp., and Pythium sp. The strongest inhibitory effect of the extracts was observed against R. solani, V. dahliae, F. oxysporum, Pythium sp. and R. stolonifer. The weakest effect was against A. solani. Extracts from the stems had a stronger inhibitory effect than those from the flowers or leaves. Butanol was the best solvent to extract antimicrobial compounds from leaves, stems and flowers and was superior to chloroform, water and petroleum ether. Results clearly indicate that E. macroclada is a promising source of antimicrobial compounds.

  2. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak

    2014-01-01

    cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction...... of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental...... calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity and diet, thereby extending direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past....

  3. Phylogenetic relationships of the intercellular fish pathogen Ichthyophonus hoferi and fungi, choanoflagellates and the rosette agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Bettina; Skouboe, P.; Rossen, L.

    1996-01-01

    Ichthyophonus hoferi Plehn and Mulsow, 1911 is thought to be one of the few pathogenic fungal infections of marine fish. The result of an attack is severe epizootics in herring stocks with drastic reduction in the population as a consequence. The exact phylogenetic position of the genus Ichthyoph......Ichthyophonus hoferi Plehn and Mulsow, 1911 is thought to be one of the few pathogenic fungal infections of marine fish. The result of an attack is severe epizootics in herring stocks with drastic reduction in the population as a consequence. The exact phylogenetic position of the genus...... Ichthyophonus is not known. In the present study, a combination of molecular data, ultrastructure and biochemical characters were utilized to investigate the phylogeny of I. hoferi. The genomic DNA encoding the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) was amplified and sequenced. Comparisons with other eukaryotic...

  4. Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens within the Human Host

    OpenAIRE

    Bliven, Kimberly A.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2016-01-01

    Selective pressures within the human host, including interactions with innate and adaptive immune responses, exposure to medical interventions such as antibiotics, and competition with commensal microbiota all facilitate the evolution of bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we present examples of pathogen strategies which emerged as a result of selective pressures within the human host niche, and discuss the resulting co-evolutionary ‘arms race’ between these organisms. In bacterial pathogen...

  5. Short Rotations in Forest Plantations Accelerate Virulence Evolution in Root-Rot Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Paul Soularue

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As disease outbreaks in forest plantations are causing concern worldwide, a clear understanding of the influence of silvicultural practices on the development of epidemics is still lacking. Importantly, silvicultural practices are likely to simultaneously affect epidemiological and evolutionary dynamics of pathogen populations. We propose a genetically explicit and individual-based model of virulence evolution in a root-rot pathogenic fungus spreading across forest landscapes, taking the Armillaria ostoyae–Pinus pinaster pathosystem as reference. We used the model to study the effects of rotation length on the evolution of virulence and the propagation of the fungus within a forest landscape composed of even-aged stands regularly altered by clear-cutting and thinning operations. The life cycle of the fungus modeled combines asexual and sexual reproduction modes, and also includes parasitic and saprotrophic phases. Moreover, the tree susceptibility to the pathogen is primarily determined by the age of the stand. Our simulations indicated that the shortest rotation length accelerated both the evolution of virulence and the development of the epidemics, whatever the genetic variability in the initial fungal population and the asexuality rate of the fungal species

  6. Impact of Moringa aqueous extract on pathogenic bacteria and fungi in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifa A. Al_husnan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Moringa peregrine have many benefits. In this study aqueous extract of Moringa plant inhibited the activity of these bacteria which include Bacillus cereus; Staphylococcus aureus; Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli; Enterococcus cloacae; Salmonella typhi and; Proteus vulgaris. Moringa extracts has shown an impact on the growth of bacteria on the Blood with inhibition zone variable (23.5 ± 0.45 to 12.5 ± 0.50 mm according to the type of bacteria. The mean growth inhibition percentages were 85.9 ± 0.42 to 65.3 ± 0.34 nm against all tested bacteria. As regards to fungi, high potency extract displayed zones of inhibition of ⩾10 mm, moderate potent extracts gave zones of inhibition between <10 and 9 mm. The results indicated that, Moringa aqueous extract played variable antifungal activity ranged from high (18 ± 0.54 mm, moderate (13.2 ± 0.58 mm and low (6.6 ± 0.47 mm. The inhibition zones diameter in millimeters against A. niger, A. flavus, P. italicum, F. oxysporum, R. stolonifer, Alternaria sp., C. albicans, C. parapsilosis were 15.2 ± 0.52, 12.4 ± 0.55, 10.5 ± 0.26, 9.4 ± 0.71, 13.2 ± 0.58, 6.6 ± 0.47, 12 ± 0.44 and 18 ± 0.54, respectively. On the other hand, the mean inhibition of growth (as percentages were 75.2 ± 0.55, 59.4 ± 0.75, 58.2 ± 0.63, 46.5 ± 0.63, 62.5 ± 0.77, 24.5 ± 0.65, 20.3 ± 0.75 and 80.00 ± 0.70% respectively. Thus, the aqueous extract of Moringa leaves showed antimicrobial activity against tested bacteria, fungi and yeasts at different concentrations.

  7. Effect of soil fungi communities on the growth of damping-off pathogens in relation to incubation temperature and medium pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Kacprzak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Four communities of saprotrophic fungi from a forest nursery soil were tested for their effect on the in vitro growth of damping-off pathogens: Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium avenaceum, F. culmorum, F. oxysporum and F. solani in relation to incubation temperature (5, 10, 15, 20 or 25°C and medium pH (4.3; 5.6 or 7.5. The soil fungi communities weakly suppressed the growth of pathogens studied only at the lower temperatures (5 or 10°C. At the higher temperatures the communities tested supported the growth of all pathogens. The supporting effct was increasing with the increase of temperature, independently of pH. The effect was highly dependent on incubation temperature and not dependent on medium pH (P

  8. The elicitation effect of pathogenic fungi on trichodermin production by Trichoderma brevicompactum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shentu, Xu-Ping; Liu, Wei-Ping; Zhan, Xiao-Huan; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2013-01-01

    The effects of six species of phytopathogenic fungi mycelia as elicitors on trichodermin yield by Trichoderma brevicompactum were investigated. Neither nonviable nor viable mycelia of Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Thanatephorus cucumeris demonstrated any elicitation on the accumulation of trichodermin. However, the production of trichodermin was increased by the presence of viable/nonviable Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum mycelia. The strongest elicitation effect was found at the presence of nonviable R. solani. At the presence of nonviable R. solani, the maximum yield of trichodermin (144.55 mg/L) was significantly higher than the Control (67.8 mg/L), and the cultivation time to obtain the maximum yield of trichodermin decreased from 72 h to 60 h. No difference of trichodermin accumulation was observed by changing the concentration of nonviable R. solani from 0.1 to 1.6 g/L. It was observed that the optimum time for adding nonviable R. solani is immediately after inoculation. The diameter of T. brevicompactum mycelial globule after 72 h cultivation with nonviable R. solani elicitor was smaller than that of the Control.

  9. The Elicitation Effect of Pathogenic Fungi on Trichodermin Production by Trichoderma brevicompactum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ping Shentu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of six species of phytopathogenic fungi mycelia as elicitors on trichodermin yield by Trichoderma brevicompactum were investigated. Neither nonviable nor viable mycelia of Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Thanatephorus cucumeris demonstrated any elicitation on the accumulation of trichodermin. However, the production of trichodermin was increased by the presence of viable/nonviable Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum mycelia. The strongest elicitation effect was found at the presence of nonviable R. solani. At the presence of nonviable R. solani, the maximum yield of trichodermin (144.55 mg/L was significantly higher than the Control (67.8 mg/L, and the cultivation time to obtain the maximum yield of trichodermin decreased from 72 h to 60 h. No difference of trichodermin accumulation was observed by changing the concentration of nonviable R. solani from 0.1 to 1.6 g/L. It was observed that the optimum time for adding nonviable R. solani is immediately after inoculation. The diameter of T. brevicompactum mycelial globule after 72 h cultivation with nonviable R. solani elicitor was smaller than that of the Control.

  10. The Elicitation Effect of Pathogenic Fungi on Trichodermin Production by Trichoderma brevicompactum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shentu, Xu-Ping; Liu, Wei-Ping; Zhan, Xiao-Huan; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2013-01-01

    The effects of six species of phytopathogenic fungi mycelia as elicitors on trichodermin yield by Trichoderma brevicompactum were investigated. Neither nonviable nor viable mycelia of Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Thanatephorus cucumeris demonstrated any elicitation on the accumulation of trichodermin. However, the production of trichodermin was increased by the presence of viable/nonviable Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum mycelia. The strongest elicitation effect was found at the presence of nonviable R. solani. At the presence of nonviable R. solani, the maximum yield of trichodermin (144.55 mg/L) was significantly higher than the Control (67.8 mg/L), and the cultivation time to obtain the maximum yield of trichodermin decreased from 72 h to 60 h. No difference of trichodermin accumulation was observed by changing the concentration of nonviable R. solani from 0.1 to 1.6 g/L. It was observed that the optimum time for adding nonviable R. solani is immediately after inoculation. The diameter of T. brevicompactum mycelial globule after 72 h cultivation with nonviable R. solani elicitor was smaller than that of the Control. PMID:24385883

  11. Disparate Proteome Responses of Pathogenic and Non-pathogenic Aspergilli to Human Serum Measured by Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Ansong, Charles; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Fortuin, Suereta; Hofstad, Beth A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2013-07-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the primary pathogen causing the devastating pulmonary disease Invasive Aspergillosis in immunocompromised individuals. Genomic analysis shows high synteny between A. fumigatus and closely related rarely pathogenic Neosartorya fischeri and Aspergillus clavatus genomes. To investigate the presence of unique or highly inducible protein reactivity in the pathogen, we applied activity-based protein profiling to compare protein reactivity of all three fungi over time in minimal media growth and in response to human serum. We found 350 probe-reactive proteins exclusive to A. fumigatus, including known virulence associated proteins, and 13 proteins associated with stress response exclusive to A. fumigatus culture in serum. Though the fungi are highly orthologous, A. fumigatus has significantly more activity across varied biological process. Only 50% of expected orthologs of measured A. fumigatus reactive proteins were observed in N. fischeri and A. clavatus. Human serum induced processes uniquely or significantly represented in A. fumigatus include actin organization and assembly, transport, and fatty acid, cell membrane, and cell wall synthesis. Additionally, signaling proteins regulating vegetative growth, conidiation, and cell wall integrity, required for appropriate cellular response to external stimuli, had higher reactivity over time in A. fumigatus and N. fisheri, but not in A. clavatus. Together, we show that measured proteins and physiological processes identified solely or significantly over-represented in A. fumigatus reveal a unique adaptive response to human protein not found in closely related, but rarely aspergilli. These unique protein reactivity responses may reveal how A. fumigatus initiates pulmonary invasion leading to Invasive Aspergillosis.

  12. Diversity of Endophytic Fungi from Red Ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) Plant and Their Inhibitory Effect to Fusarium oxysporum Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    SIHEGIKO KANAYA; LATIFAH KOSIM DARUSMAN; NAMPIAH SUKARNO; UTUT WIDYASTUTI; ROHANI CINTA BADIA GINTING

    2013-01-01

    Indonesia has been known as a country with high medicinal plant diversity. One of the most common medicinal plant from Indonesia is red ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.). Nevertheless, limited studies of endophytic fungi associated with these medicinal plants are hitherto available. The objectives of this research were to study the diversity of endophytic fungi on red ginger and to analyze their potential as a source of antifungal agent. All parts of plant organs such as leaf, rhizome, root,...

  13. Antimicrobial activity of Calendula officinalis petal extracts against fungi, as well as Gram-negative and Gram-positive clinical pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiou, Efstratios; Hussain, Abdullah I; Nigam, Poonam S; Moore, John E; Ayub, Muhammad A; Rao, Juluri R

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the antimicrobial activity of methanol and ethanol extracts of pot marigold (Calendula officinalis) petals against clinical pathogens. The antimicrobial potential of C. officinalis extracts was evaluated against a panel of microorganisms isolated from patients at the Belfast City Hospital (BCH), including bacteria and fungi, using disc diffusion assay. Methanol extract of C. officinalis exhibited better antibacterial activity against most of the bacteria tested, than ethanol extract. Both methanol and ethanol extracts showed excellent antifungal activity against tested strains of fungi, while comparing with Fluconazole.

  14. Macelignan inhibits bee pathogenic fungi Ascophaera apis growth through HOG1 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.K. Shin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ascosphaera apis is a bee pathogen that causes bee larvae infection disease, to which treatment is not yet well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate antifungal susceptibility in vitro against A. apis and to identify a new antifungal agent for this pathogen through minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC assay and western blot analysis. Macelignan had 1.56 and 3.125 μg/mL MIC against A. apis after 24 and 48 h, respectively, exhibiting the strongest growth inhibition against A. apis among the tested compounds (corosolic acid, dehydrocostus lactone, loganic acid, tracheloside, fangchinoline and emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside. Furthermore, macelignan showed a narrow-ranged spectrum against various fungal strains without any mammalian cell cytotoxicity. In spite of miconazole having powerful broad-ranged anti-fungal activity including A. apis, it demonstrated strong cytotoxicity. Therefore, even if macelignan alone was effective as an antifungal agent to treat A. apis, combined treatment with miconazole was more useful to overcome toxicity, drug resistance occurrence and cost effectiveness. Finally, HOG1 was revealed as a target molecule of macelignan in the anti-A. apis activity by inhibiting phosphorylation using S. cerevisiae as a model system. Based on our results, macelignan, a food-grade antimicrobial compound, would be an effective antifungal agent against A. apis infection in bees.

  15. Antifungal Effects of Zataria multiflora Essential Oil on the Inhibitory Growth of some Postharvest Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh NASSERI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration of the essential oil of Zataria multiflora to control Alternaria solani, Rhizoctonia solani, Rhizopus stolonifer, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus ochraceus and Aspergillus niger. The essential oil of Zataria multiflora was tested in vitro on PDA (malt extract agar medium with eight concentrations: 0, 10, 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 and 1000 ppm. This investigation followed the completely randomized design (CRD with three replications. GC-MS evaluations of the essential oil revealed that thymol (35%, carvacrol (34%, cymene-p (9.89%, gamma-terpinene (5.88% and alpha-pinene (4.22% were the main compounds of Zataria multiflora oil. The results showed that the essential oil of Zataria multiflora has antifungal activity; the lowest inhibition (75% was observed in the A. niger, while the highest inhibition (95.3% was observed in A. solani. Minimum inhibitory concentration for A. solani, R. solani, R. stolonifer, A. flavus, A. ochraceus and A. niger was 200, 200, 200, 300, 300 and 200 ppm respectively. In addition, the present results showed that minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC for A. solani, R. solani, R .stolonifer, A. niger and A.ochraceus was 600, 400, 300, 900 and 700 ppm respectively and none of the tested concentrations were fatal for A. flavus. A. solani and R. solani showed a strong sensitivity to Zataria multiflora essential oil at all concentrations. Findings of the current study suggest that essential oils of Zataria multiflora could be used for control of postharvest phytopathogenic fungi on fruits or vegetables.

  16. Evolution of Bacterial Pathogens Within the Human Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliven, Kimberly A; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2016-02-01

    Selective pressures within the human host, including interactions with innate and adaptive immune responses, exposure to medical interventions such as antibiotics, and competition with commensal microbiota all facilitate the evolution of bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we present examples of pathogen strategies that emerged as a result of selective pressures within the human host niche and discuss the resulting coevolutionary "arms race" between these organisms. In bacterial pathogens, many of the genes responsible for these strategies are encoded on mobile pathogenicity islands or plasmids, underscoring the importance of horizontal gene transfer in the emergence of virulent microbial species.

  17. Is Predominant Clonal Evolution a Common Evolutionary Adaptation to Parasitism in Pathogenic Parasitic Protozoa, Fungi, Bacteria, and Viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibayrenc, M; Ayala, F J

    2017-01-01

    We propose that predominant clonal evolution (PCE) in microbial pathogens be defined as restrained recombination on an evolutionary scale, with genetic exchange scarce enough to not break the prevalent pattern of clonal population structure. The main features of PCE are (1) strong linkage disequilibrium, (2) the widespread occurrence of stable genetic clusters blurred by occasional bouts of genetic exchange ('near-clades'), (3) the existence of a "clonality threshold", beyond which recombination is efficiently countered by PCE, and near-clades irreversibly diverge. We hypothesize that the PCE features are not mainly due to natural selection but also chiefly originate from in-built genetic properties of pathogens. We show that the PCE model obtains even in microbes that have been considered as 'highly recombining', such as Neisseria meningitidis, and that some clonality features are observed even in Plasmodium, which has been long described as panmictic. Lastly, we provide evidence that PCE features are also observed in viruses, taking into account their extremely fast genetic turnover. The PCE model provides a convenient population genetic framework for any kind of micropathogen. It makes it possible to describe convenient units of analysis (clones and near-clades) for all applied studies. Due to PCE features, these units of analysis are stable in space and time, and clearly delimited. The PCE model opens up the possibility of revisiting the problem of species definition in these organisms. We hypothesize that PCE constitutes a major evolutionary strategy for protozoa, fungi, bacteria, and viruses to adapt to parasitism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardins, Christopher A; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailao, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo de Macedo; Silva Ferreira, Marcia Eliana da; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Leon-Narvaez, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasi...

  19. Antifungal activity of nettle (Urtica dioica L.), colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), oleander (Nerium oleander L.) and konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) extracts on plants pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadizadeh, I; Peivastegan, B; Kolahi, M

    2009-01-01

    Anti-mycotic activity of the ethanol extracts from Nettle (Urtica dioica L.), Colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), Konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) and Oleander (Nerium oleander L.) floral parts were screened in vitro against four important plant pathogenic fungi viz.; Alternaria alternate, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani and Rizoctonia solani using agar dilution bioassay. Extracts showed antifungal activity against all the tested fungi. Among the plants, Nettle and Colocynth were the most effective against A. alternate and R. solani while Oleander possesses the best inhibition on F. oxysporum and F. solani. Konar was the most effective extract by reducing the growth of Rizoctonia solani than other fungi. These results showed that extracts could be considered suitable alternatives to chemical additives for the control of fungal diseases in plants.

  20. Application of Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles for the Control of Land Snail Eobania vermiculata and Some Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa M. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The land snail Eobania vermiculata is an important crop pest causing considerable damage in agriculture. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the possibilities of using silver nanoparticles (AgNPs to control the land snail. The AgNPs have been synthesized biologically using white radish (Raphanus sativus var. aegyptiacus. The biosynthesis was regularly monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction spectra revealed peaks of crystalline nature of AgNPs and the transmission electron micrographs further confirmed the size of the synthesized nanoparticles ranging from 6 to 38 nm. The exposure of the snails and soil matrix to AgNPs in a laboratory experiment reduced the activity and the viability of the land snail (20% of AgNPs treated snails died as well as the frequency of fungal population in the surrounding soil. Moreover histology and ultrastructure alterations have been found in both kidney and the digestive gland of AgNPs treated land snails. The synergistic effect of synthesized AgNPs as antifungal was evaluated and clearly revealed that AgNPs can be effectively used against various plant pathogenic fungi. The present study results may open a new avenue to use the snail as bioindicator organism of environmental pollution.

  1. The effect of chitosan on limitation of growth and development of some pathogenic fungi for ornamental plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Saniewska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effect of crab-shell chitosan, medium (200-800 cps and high molecular weight ( 800-2000 cps (purchased from Sigma-Aldrich Chemicals toward Alternaria alternata, Botrytis tulipae, Fiisarium oxysporum f. sp. callistephi, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. tulipae, Phoma narcissi and Phoma poolensis was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The chitosan evidently inhibited in vitro growth of all tested pathogens, with a marked effect at higher concentrations above 200 μg/cm3. Chitosan at a concentration of 1,25; 2,5 and 5,0 mg/cm3 didn't have inhibitory action in appearance of fungi growth on naturally contaminated Callistephus chinensis seeds. At the same concentrations, chitosan applied as bulb scales dressing of Hymenocallis narcissiflora bulbs, before inoculation or after inoculation with Phoma narcissi, inhibited the development of necrotic spots on scales. Chitosan used preventively or curatively at a concentrations of 1,25; 2,5 and 5,0 mg/cm3 indicated inhibitory effect on development of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. tulipae on tulip bulbs. Chitosan at a concentration of 10 mg/cm3 applied preventively (first spray 12th June was very effective in the control of Puccinia antirrhini on snapdragon in the field. The strongest inhibitory effect was observed on snapdragon treated 8 times at week intervals.

  2. In vitro activity of tea tree oil against Candida albicans mycelial conversion and other pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Auria, F D; Laino, L; Strippoli, V; Tecca, M; Salvatore, G; Battinelli, L; Mazzanti, G

    2001-08-01

    The antifungal activity of Melaleuca alternifolia Maiden (Myrtaceae) essential oil against yeasts (Candida spp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Debaryomyces hansenii) and dermatophytes (Microsporum spp. and Tricophyton spp.) is reported. We focused on the ability of tea tree oil to inhibit Candida albicans conversion from the yeast to the pathogenic mycelial form. Moreover we carried out broth microdilution test and contact tests to evaluate the killing time. M. alternifolia essential oil inhibited the conversion of C. albicans from yeast to the mycelial form at a concentration of 0.16% (v/v). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranged from 0.12% to 0.50% (v/v) for yeasts and 0.12% to 1% (v/v) for dermatophytes; the cytocidal activity was generally expressed at the same concentration. These results, if considered along with the lipophilic nature of the oil which enables it to penetrate the skin, suggest it may be suitable for topical therapeutic use in the treatment of fungal mucosal and cutaneous infections.

  3. Transcriptional control of drug resistance, virulence and immune system evasion in pathogenic fungi: a cross-species comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pais

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a central role in the referred mechanisms in the human fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis. Current knowledge on the activity of the transcription factors characterized in each of these pathogenic fungal species will be addressed. Particular focus is given to their mechanisms of activation, regulatory targets and phenotypic outcome. The review further provides an evaluation on the conservation of transcriptional circuits among different fungal pathogens, highlighting the pathways that translate common or divergent traits among these species in what concerns their drug resistance, virulence and host immune evasion features. It becomes evident that the regulation of transcriptional networks is complex and presents significant variations among different fungal pathogens. Only the oxidative stress regulators Yap1 and Skn7 are conserved among all studied species; while some transcription factors, involved in nutrient homeostasis, pH adaptation, drug resistance and morphological switching are present in several, though not all species. Interestingly, in some cases not very homologous transcription factors display orthologous functions, whereas some homologous proteins have diverged in terms of their function in different species. A few cases of species specific transcription factors are also observed.

  4. Thailandins A and B, New Polyene Macrolactone Compounds Isolated from Actinokineospora bangkokensis Strain 44EHW(T), Possessing Antifungal Activity against Anthracnose Fungi and Pathogenic Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intra, Bungonsiri; Greule, Anja; Bechthold, Andreas; Euanorasetr, Jirayut; Paululat, Thomas; Panbangred, Watanalai

    2016-06-29

    Two new polyene macrolactone antibiotics, thailandins A, 1, and B, 2, were isolated from the fermentation broth of rhizosphere soil-associated Actinokineospora bangkokensis strain 44EHW(T). The new compounds from this strain were purified using semipreparative HPLC and Sephadex LH-20 gel filtration while following an antifungal activity guided fractionation. Their structures were elucidated through spectroscopic techniques including UV, HR-ESI-MS, and NMR. These compounds demonstrated broad spectrum antifungal activity against fungi causing anthracnose disease (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides DoA d0762, Colletotrichum gloeosporiodes DoA c1060, and Colletotrichum capsici DoA c1511) as well as pathogenic yeasts (Candida albicans MT 2013/1, Candida parasilopsis DKMU 434, and Cryptococcus neoformans MT 2013/2) with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging between 16 and 32 μg/mL. This is the first report of polyene antibiotics produced by Actinokineospora species as bioactive compounds against anthracnose fungi and pathogenic yeast strains.

  5. Antibacterial activity of mangrove leaf extracts against human pathogens

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sahoo, G.; Mulla, N.S.S.; Ansari, Z.A.; Mohandass, C.

    The antibacterial activity of leaf extract of mangroves, namely, Rhizophora mucronata, Sonneratia alba and Exoecaria agallocha from Chorao island, Goa was investigated against human bacterial pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus sp...

  6. Accuracy of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry for identification of clinical pathogenic fungi: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Huazhi; Yuan, Zhijie; Shen, Jilu; Wang, Zhongxin; Xu, Yuanhong

    2014-07-01

    Fungal infections in the clinic have become increasingly serious. In many cases, the identification of clinically relevant fungi remains time-consuming and may also be unreliable. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF MS) is a newly developed diagnostic tool that is increasingly being employed to rapidly and accurately identify clinical pathogenic microorganisms. The present meta-analysis aimed to systematically evaluate the accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical pathogenic fungi. After a rigorous selection process, 33 articles, involving 38 trials and a total of 9,977 fungal isolates, were included in the meta-analysis. The random-effects pooled identification accuracy of MALDI-TOF MS increased from 0.955 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.939 to 0.969) at the species level to 0.977 (95% CI, 0.955 to 0.993) at the genus level (P meta-analysis and some of the subanalyses. In parallel, significant differences in heterogeneity among different systems and among different methods for calculating the identification ratios were found by multivariate metaregression, but none of the factors, except for the moderator of outcome, was significantly associated with heterogeneity by univariate metaregression. In summary, the MALDI-TOF MS method is highly accurate for the identification of clinically pathogenic fungi; future studies should analyze the comprehensive capability of this technology for clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  7. Corynebacterium ulcerans, an emerging human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Elena; Antunes, Camila A; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L; Burkovski, Andreas; Tauch, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    While formerly known infections of Corynebacterium ulcerans are rare and mainly associated with contact to infected cattle, C. ulcerans has become an emerging pathogen today. In Western Europe, cases of respiratory diphtheria caused by C. ulcerans have been reported more often than infections by Corynebacterium diphtheria, while systemic infections are also increasingly reported. Little is known about factors that contribute to host colonization and virulence of this zoonotic pathogen. Research in this field has received new impetus by the publication of several C. ulcerans genome sequences in the past years. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the basic knowledge of C. ulcerans, as well as the recent advances made in the analysis of putative virulence factors.

  8. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak; Trachsel, Christian; Shved, Natallia; Grossmann, Jonas; Radini, Anita; Hancock, Y; Tito, Raul Y; Fiddyment, Sarah; Speller, Camilla; Hendy, Jessica; Charlton, Sophy; Luder, Hans Ulrich; Salazar-García, Domingo C; Eppler, Elisabeth; Seiler, Roger; Hansen, Lars H; Castruita, José Alfredo Samaniego; Barkow-Oesterreicher, Simon; Teoh, Kai Yik; Kelstrup, Christian D; Olsen, Jesper V; Nanni, Paolo; Kawai, Toshihisa; Willerslev, Eske; von Mering, Christian; Lewis, Cecil M; Collins, Matthew J; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Rühli, Frank; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental calculus permits the simultaneous investigation of pathogen activity, host immunity and diet, thereby extending direct investigation of common diseases into the human evolutionary past.

  9. Mice with human immune system components as in vivo models for infections with human pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Rämer, P C; Chijioke, O; Meixlsperger, S; Leung, C S; Münz, C.

    2011-01-01

    Many pathogens relevant to human disease do not infect other animal species. Therefore, animal models that reconstitute or harbour human tissues are explored as hosts for these. In this review, we will summarize recent advances to utilize mice with human immune system components, reconstituted from hematopoietic progenitor cells in vivo. Such mice can be used to study human pathogens that replicate in leucocytes. In addition to studying the replication of these pathogens, the reconstituted hu...

  10. Targeted Disruption of Melanin Biosynthesis Genes in the Human Pathogenic Fungus Lomentospora prolificans and Its Consequences for Pathogen Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayat Al-Laaeiby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The dematiaceous (melanised fungus Lomentospora (Scedosporium prolificans is a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised humans, resistant to anti-fungal drugs. Melanin has been shown to protect human pathogenic fungi against antifungal drugs, oxidative killing and environmental stresses. To determine the protective role of melanin in L. prolificans to oxidative killing (H2O2, UV radiation and the polyene anti-fungal drug amphotericin B, targeted gene disruption was used to generate mutants of the pathogen lacking the dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN-melanin biosynthetic enzymes polyketide synthase (PKS1, tetrahydroxynapthalene reductase (4HNR and scytalone dehydratase (SCD1. Infectious propagules (spores of the wild-type strain 3.1 were black/brown, whereas spores of the PKS-deficient mutant ΔLppks1::hph were white. Complementation of the albino mutant ΔLppks1::hph restored the black-brown spore pigmentation, while the 4HNR-deficient mutant ΔLp4hnr::hph and SCD-deficient mutant ΔLpscd1::hph both produced orange-yellow spores. The mutants ΔLppks1::hph and ΔLp4hnr::hph showed significant reductions in spore survival following H2O2 treatment, while spores of ΔLpscd1::hph and the ΔLppks1::hph complemented strain ΔLppks1::hph:PKS showed spore survivals similar to strain 3.1. Spores of the mutants ΔLp4hnr::hph and ΔLpscd1::hph and complemented strain ΔLppks1::hph:PKS showed spore survivals similar to 3.1 following exposure to UV radiation, but survival of ΔLppks1::hph spores was significantly reduced compared to the wild-type strain. Strain 3.1 and mutants ΔLp4hnr::hph and ΔLppks1::hph:PKS were resistant to amphotericin B while, paradoxically, the PKS1- and SCD1-deficient mutants showed significant increases in growth in the presence of the antifungal drug. Taken together, these results show that while melanin plays a protective role in the survival of the pathogen to oxidative killing and UV radiation, melanin does not

  11. Targeted Disruption of Melanin Biosynthesis Genes in the Human Pathogenic Fungus Lomentospora prolificans and Its Consequences for Pathogen Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Laaeiby, Ayat; Kershaw, Michael J; Penn, Tina J; Thornton, Christopher R

    2016-03-24

    The dematiaceous (melanised) fungus Lomentospora (Scedosporium) prolificans is a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised humans, resistant to anti-fungal drugs. Melanin has been shown to protect human pathogenic fungi against antifungal drugs, oxidative killing and environmental stresses. To determine the protective role of melanin in L. prolificans to oxidative killing (H₂O₂), UV radiation and the polyene anti-fungal drug amphotericin B, targeted gene disruption was used to generate mutants of the pathogen lacking the dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin biosynthetic enzymes polyketide synthase (PKS1), tetrahydroxynapthalene reductase (4HNR) and scytalone dehydratase (SCD1). Infectious propagules (spores) of the wild-type strain 3.1 were black/brown, whereas spores of the PKS-deficient mutant ΔLppks1::hph were white. Complementation of the albino mutant ΔLppks1::hph restored the black-brown spore pigmentation, while the 4HNR-deficient mutant ΔLp4hnr::hph and SCD-deficient mutant ΔLpscd1::hph both produced orange-yellow spores. The mutants ΔLppks1::hph and ΔLp4hnr::hph showed significant reductions in spore survival following H₂O₂ treatment, while spores of ΔLpscd1::hph and the ΔLppks1::hph complemented strain ΔLppks1::hph:PKS showed spore survivals similar to strain 3.1. Spores of the mutants ΔLp4hnr::hph and ΔLpscd1::hph and complemented strain ΔLppks1::hph:PKS showed spore survivals similar to 3.1 following exposure to UV radiation, but survival of ΔLppks1::hph spores was significantly reduced compared to the wild-type strain. Strain 3.1 and mutants ΔLp4hnr::hph and ΔLppks1::hph:PKS were resistant to amphotericin B while, paradoxically, the PKS1- and SCD1-deficient mutants showed significant increases in growth in the presence of the antifungal drug. Taken together, these results show that while melanin plays a protective role in the survival of the pathogen to oxidative killing and UV radiation, melanin does not

  12. 云南芒果果实潜伏侵染真菌的研究%Latent Infection of Pathogenic Fungi on Mango Fruits from Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡美姣; 李敏; 高兆银; 文静; 汪晓雯; 杨凤珍

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of latent infection of pathogenic fungi on mango (Mangifera indica L) fruits without any disease symptoms from 5 regions of Yunnan Province was studied The results showed that the latent infection of fungi was commonly found in the healthy mango fruits, and there existed significantly difference in the latent infection of fungi between Yuanjiang and Simao. The rate of latent infection fungi was the highest on the fruit stem end among the isolated sites, followed by the petiole. Six pathogenic fungi were identified to be Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat., Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz., Phomposis mangiferae Ahmad., C. Acutatum Simmonds, Pestcdotiopsis mangiferae (P. Henning) Sutton. And Aspergillus sp. The rate of B. Theobromae reached 40.28% being the highest among the 6 latent infection fungi, followed by C. Gloeosporioides, Phomposis mangiferae and C. Acutatum. The rates of Pestalotiopsis mangiferae and Aspergillus sp. Were lower than the other latent infection fungi.%对云南5个地区的芒果果实进行真菌潜伏侵染研究.结果表明,云南的芒果果实普遍存在真菌潜伏侵染现象,且元江与思茅的带菌率存在显著差异;从芒果果实的部位看,果实蒂部的带菌率最高,果柄、果中部和果端部的带菌率依次降低;从潜伏侵染真菌的种类看,共分离获到6种潜伏侵染真菌,其中分离比例最高的是可可球二孢(Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat.),达到40.28%,其次是胶孢炭疽菌(Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz.)、拟茎点霉(Phomposis mangiferae Ahmad.)和尖孢炭疽菌(Colletotrichum acutatum Simmonds),而拟盘多毛孢[Pestalotiopsis mangiferae(P.Henning)Sutton.]、曲霉(Aspergillus sp.)的分离率较少.

  13. Differential in vitro pathogenicity of predatory fungi of the genus Monacrosporium for phytonematodes, free-living nematodes and parasitic nematodes of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.S. Gomes

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro tests were carried out on the pathogenicity of nine isolates of the predatory fungi of the genus Monacrosporium (5 M. sinense isolates, 3 M. appendiculatum and 1 M. thaumasium isolate for a phytonematode (second stage juveniles from Meloidogyne incognita, race 3, a free-living nematode (Panagrellus spp, and two gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes of cattle (infective larvae of Cooperia punctata and Haemonchus placei. A suspension containing 2,000 nematodes from each species was added to Petri dishes containing fungi and grown on 2% water-agar medium at 25oC in the dark for up to 7 days. The dishes were examined every other day for 7 days and predation-free nematodes were counted. The results showed that the free-living nematodes, Panagrellus spp, were the most susceptible (P³98.5% viable. However, a variable susceptibility of the nematodes to different fungi was observed. This indicates that the use of predatory fungi for the environmental control of nematodes will be limited by the multiplicity of nematodes in the environment and their differential susceptibility to fungal isolates of the same genus.

  14. [THE IDENTIFICATION AND DIFFERENTIATION OF BACTERIOPHAGES OF HUMAN PATHOGENIC VIBRIO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaevskaia, N E; Kudriakova, T A; Makedonova, L D; Kachkina, G V

    2015-04-01

    The issue of identification and differentiation of large group of bacteriophages of human pathogenic vibrio is still unresolved. In research and practical applied purposes it is important to consider characteristics of bacteriophages for establishing similarity and differences between them. The actual study was carried out to analyze specimens of DNA-containing bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio. The overwhelming majority of them characterized by complicated type of symmetry--phages with double-helical DNA and also phages with mono-helical DNA structure discovered recently in vibrio. For the first time, the general framework of identification and differentiation of bacteriophages of pathogenic vibrio was developed. This achievement increases possibility to establish species assignment of phages and to compare with phages registered in the database. "The collection of bacteriophages and test-strains of human pathogenic vibrio" (No2010620549 of 24.09.210).

  15. The role of extraintestinal foodborne pathogens in human illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years understanding the role of foodborne pathogens in human disease has evolved to include conditions outside the gastrointestinal diseases typically associated with bacteria such as Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Listeria monocytogenes, etc. Other human pathog...

  16. Selection of Antagonistic Fungi to Species of Pathogens on Camellia oleifera%油茶病原菌拮抗菌筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢东升; 产帅; 代兵

    2012-01-01

    通过拮抗实验,研究了59个野菊内生真菌菌株对油茶炭疽病及油茶稍枯病病原菌的拮抗性.结果表明:89.8%供试真菌菌株对油茶病原菌孢子萌发或菌丝生长有抑制作用.拮抗菌株在代谢过程中能产生抑制病原菌生长发育的抑菌物质,这些物质存在于菌丝内或分泌于菌丝外.筛选得到2个油荼病原菌强拮抗菌株,大茎点霉菌Y11和Y29.%Through antagonistic test,the antagonistic characteristics of 59 endophytic fungus strains from Chrysanthemum indicum to two species of pathogens on Camellia oleifera were studied. The results showed that 89. 8% strains of the endophytic fungi tested can inhibit the spore bourgeon and hypha growth of the pathogen on Camellia oleifera. The antagonistic fungus strains could produce some substances,existed in hypha cells or excreted out of mycelium, to restrain fungi. Two strains of endophytic fungi,Yll and Y29,having strong antagonistic characteristic were gained by selection.

  17. Epidemiological study of pathogenic fungi in China: 1986 and 1996%致病真菌10年动态流行病学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴绍熙; 瘳万清; 郭宁如

    2001-01-01

    Objective An annual decade epidemiological survey of pathogenic fungi of inpatients or outpatients includes more than 25 provinces in China has been done in 1986 and 1996. Methods In 1986, there were a total of 9096 strains of pathogenic fungi collected from more than 41 units of 25 provinces in China. 10 years late, 18085 strains of pathogenic fungi from 41 units of 25 provinces were collected from January 1st to December 31st in 1996. Results The results showed that during this decade the prominent pathogenic fungus was Trichophyton rubrum, but its ratio gradually decreased. On the contrary, Candida albicans gradually increased in its ratio from 5th in 1986 to 2nd in 1996. Conclusion The pathogenic fungi in China have changed greatly in the past decade from 1986 to 1996.%目的 研究1986年-1996年,我国致病真菌菌群的变化情况。 方法 1986年1月1日-12月31日和1996年1月1日-12月31日在全国25个省、市、自治区40多个有代表性的单位对临床或现场确定的致病菌进行了动态研究,就病原菌变迁、各区动态情况和具体疾病等作了详细分析。 结果 发现10年间较易治疗的皮肤癣菌比例下降,而较难治疗的酵母菌和霉菌比例升高。 结论 10年间致病真菌菌群的变化较大,我们应根据变化情况进行相应的研究及制定出相应治疗措施。

  18. Pathogenicity of human high pathogenic H5N1 virus with different plaque property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-qiang LI

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To determine the pathogenicity of human high pathogenic H5N1 virus with different plaque property,and provide a new train of thought and basis for research on crossing species-genus transmission of avian influenza virus.Methods Variants with different plaque property(larger-and smaller-plaque variant were isolated from A/Beijing/01/03(H5N1(BJ01 by the plaque purification.Mice were inoculated intranasally(i.n. with each kind of isolated variant and monitored for 14 days to record and calculate the body weight change and the survival rate.The difference in pathogenicity of isolated variants was estimated with proper principle of statistics.Results The plaques of original strain of BJ01 virus were heterogeneous with various size and shape.Larger-plaque variants(L1 and L2 and smaller-plaque variants(S1,S2 and S3 were isolated separately.The pathogenicity was higher in S1 and S2 variants than in S3,L1 and L2 variants,and that of L2 variant was the lowest.Variants forming different plaques were heterogeneous in pathogenicity,and those forming same plaques were also heterogeneous in pathogenicity.Conclusion There is no linear correlation between the pathogenicity of variants and the size of plaque they formed.The variants with different pathogenicity could be isolated from the same H5N1 virus strain by plaque purification.These results would provide a basis for vaccine development and the studies on molecular mechanism of H5N1 virus.

  19. Dung-inhabiting fungi: a potential reservoir of novel secondary metabolites for the control of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrocco, Sabrina

    2016-04-01

    Coprophilous fungi are a large group of saprotrophic fungi mostly found in herbivore dung. The number of these fungi undergoing investigation is continually increasing, and new species and genera continue to be described. Dung-inhabiting fungi play an important ecological role in decomposing and recycling nutrients from animal dung. They produce a large array of bioactive secondary metabolites and have a potent enzymatic arsenal able to utilise even complex molecules. Bioactive secondary metabolites are actively involved in interaction with and defence against other organisms whose growth can be inhibited, resulting in an enhanced ecological fitness of producer strains. Currently, these antibiotics and bioactive secondary metabolites are of interest in medicine in particular, while very little information is available concerning their potential use in agriculture. This review introduces the ecology of dung-inhabiting fungi, with particular emphasis on the production of antibiotic compounds as a means to compete with other microorganisms. Owing to the fast pace of technological progress, new approaches to predicting the biosynthesis of bioactive metabolites are proposed. Coprophilous fungi should be considered as elite candidate organisms for the discovery of novel antifungal compounds, above all in view of their exploitation for crop protection. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Bacillus cereus, a volatile human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottone, Edward J

    2010-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive aerobic or facultatively anaerobic, motile, spore-forming, rod-shaped bacterium that is widely distributed environmentally. While B. cereus is associated mainly with food poisoning, it is being increasingly reported to be a cause of serious and potentially fatal non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. The pathogenicity of B. cereus, whether intestinal or nonintestinal, is intimately associated with the production of tissue-destructive exoenzymes. Among these secreted toxins are four hemolysins, three distinct phospholipases, an emesis-inducing toxin, and proteases. The major hurdle in evaluating B. cereus when isolated from a clinical specimen is overcoming its stigma as an insignificant contaminant. Outside its notoriety in association with food poisoning and severe eye infections, this bacterium has been incriminated in a multitude of other clinical conditions such as anthrax-like progressive pneumonia, fulminant sepsis, and devastating central nervous system infections, particularly in immunosuppressed individuals, intravenous drug abusers, and neonates. Its role in nosocomial acquired bacteremia and wound infections in postsurgical patients has also been well defined, especially when intravascular devices such as catheters are inserted. Primary cutaneous infections mimicking clostridial gas gangrene induced subsequent to trauma have also been well documented. B. cereus produces a potent beta-lactamase conferring marked resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. Antimicrobials noted to be effective in the empirical management of a B. cereus infection while awaiting antimicrobial susceptibility results for the isolate include ciprofloxacin and vancomycin.

  1. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S; Ernst, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  2. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E Wiens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HLA (human leukocyte antigen molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. METHODS: We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. RESULTS: We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  3. The Black Yeast Exophiala dermatitidis and Other Selected Opportunistic Human Fungal Pathogens Spread from Dishwashers to Kitchens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Zupančič

    Full Text Available We investigated the diversity and distribution of fungi in nine different sites inside 30 residential dishwashers. In total, 503 fungal strains were isolated, which belong to 10 genera and 84 species. Irrespective of the sampled site, 83% of the dishwashers were positive for fungi. The most frequent opportunistic pathogenic species were Exophiala dermatitidis, Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Exophiala phaeomuriformis, Fusarium dimerum, and the Saprochaete/Magnusiomyces clade. The black yeast E. dermatitidis was detected in 47% of the dishwashers, primarily at the dishwasher rubber seals, at up to 106 CFU/cm2; the other fungi detected were in the range of 102 to 105 CFU/cm2. The other most heavily contaminated dishwasher sites were side nozzles, doors and drains. Only F. dimerum was isolated from washed dishes, while dishwasher waste water contained E. dermatitidis, Exophiala oligosperma and Sarocladium killiense. Plumbing systems supplying water to household appliances represent the most probable route for contamination of dishwashers, as the fungi that represented the core dishwasher mycobiota were also detected in the tap water. Hot aerosols from dishwashers contained the human opportunistic yeast C. parapsilosis, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and E. dermatitidis (as well as common air-borne genera such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Trichoderma and Cladosporium. Comparison of fungal contamination of kitchens without and with dishwashers revealed that virtually all were contaminated with fungi. In both cases, the most contaminated sites were the kitchen drain and the dish drying rack. The most important difference was higher prevalence of black yeasts (E. dermatitidis in particular in kitchens with dishwashers. In kitchens without dishwashers, C. parapsilosis strongly prevailed with negligible occurrence of E. dermatitidis. F. dimerum was isolated only from kitchens with dishwashers, while Saprochaete/Magnusiomyces isolates were only found within

  4. The Black Yeast Exophiala dermatitidis and Other Selected Opportunistic Human Fungal Pathogens Spread from Dishwashers to Kitchens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupančič, Jerneja; Novak Babič, Monika; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the diversity and distribution of fungi in nine different sites inside 30 residential dishwashers. In total, 503 fungal strains were isolated, which belong to 10 genera and 84 species. Irrespective of the sampled site, 83% of the dishwashers were positive for fungi. The most frequent opportunistic pathogenic species were Exophiala dermatitidis, Candida parapsilosis sensu stricto, Exophiala phaeomuriformis, Fusarium dimerum, and the Saprochaete/Magnusiomyces clade. The black yeast E. dermatitidis was detected in 47% of the dishwashers, primarily at the dishwasher rubber seals, at up to 106 CFU/cm2; the other fungi detected were in the range of 102 to 105 CFU/cm2. The other most heavily contaminated dishwasher sites were side nozzles, doors and drains. Only F. dimerum was isolated from washed dishes, while dishwasher waste water contained E. dermatitidis, Exophiala oligosperma and Sarocladium killiense. Plumbing systems supplying water to household appliances represent the most probable route for contamination of dishwashers, as the fungi that represented the core dishwasher mycobiota were also detected in the tap water. Hot aerosols from dishwashers contained the human opportunistic yeast C. parapsilosis, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and E. dermatitidis (as well as common air-borne genera such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Trichoderma and Cladosporium). Comparison of fungal contamination of kitchens without and with dishwashers revealed that virtually all were contaminated with fungi. In both cases, the most contaminated sites were the kitchen drain and the dish drying rack. The most important difference was higher prevalence of black yeasts (E. dermatitidis in particular) in kitchens with dishwashers. In kitchens without dishwashers, C. parapsilosis strongly prevailed with negligible occurrence of E. dermatitidis. F. dimerum was isolated only from kitchens with dishwashers, while Saprochaete/Magnusiomyces isolates were only found within dishwashers. We

  5. YERSINIA ENTEROCOLITICA: AN IMPORTANT HUMAN FOODBORNE PATHOGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a Gram-negative microbe of public health importance and is under national FoodNet surveillance in the United States. The majority of human yersiniosis cases are foodborne. Consumption of dairy products (milk, ice cream), water, vegetables (tofu), and pork have been linke...

  6. Pathogenic Mineralization of Calcium Phosphate on Human Heart Valves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    When calcium phosphate forms in soft tissues such as blood vessels and heart valves, it causes disease. The abnormal formation of calcium phosphate is called pathogenic mineralization or pathogenic calcification. Cases of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) always occur with fibrotic and calcified tissue of heart valve. In this article, samples taken from calcified human heart valves were studied. The characterization was performed by scanning electronic micrascope, X-ray Diffraction and transmission electron microscopy with selective diffraction patterns. It is found for the first time that calcium phosphate grains existing in the calcified human heart valves contain octacalcium phosphate (OCP).

  7. Archaea and fungi of the human gut microbiome: correlations with diet and bacterial residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Diet influences health as a source of nutrients and toxins, and by shaping the composition of resident microbial populations. Previous studies have begun to map out associations between diet and the bacteria and viruses of the human gut microbiome. Here we investigate associations of diet with fungal and archaeal populations, taking advantage of samples from 98 well-characterized individuals. Diet was quantified using inventories scoring both long-term and recent diet, and archaea and fungi were characterized by deep sequencing of marker genes in DNA purified from stool. For fungi, we found 66 genera, with generally mutually exclusive presence of either the phyla Ascomycota or Basiodiomycota. For archaea, Methanobrevibacter was the most prevalent genus, present in 30% of samples. Several other archaeal genera were detected in lower abundance and frequency. Myriad associations were detected for fungi and archaea with diet, with each other, and with bacterial lineages. Methanobrevibacter and Candida were positively associated with diets high in carbohydrates, but negatively with diets high in amino acids, protein, and fatty acids. A previous study emphasized that bacterial population structure was associated primarily with long-term diet, but high Candida abundance was most strongly associated with the recent consumption of carbohydrates. Methobrevibacter abundance was associated with both long term and recent consumption of carbohydrates. These results confirm earlier targeted studies and provide a host of new associations to consider in modeling the effects of diet on the gut microbiome and human health.

  8. Ubiquity of insect-derived nitrogen transfer to plants by endophytic insect-pathogenic fungi: an additional branch of the soil nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    The study of symbiotic nitrogen transfer in soil has largely focused on nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Vascular plants can lose a substantial amount of their nitrogen through insect herbivory. Previously, we showed that plants were able to reacquire nitrogen from insects through a partnership with the endophytic, insect-pathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii. That is, the endophytic capability and insect pathogenicity of M. robertsii are coupled so that the fungus acts as a conduit to provide insect-derived nitrogen to plant hosts. Here, we assess the ubiquity of this nitrogen transfer in five Metarhizium species representing those with broad (M. robertsii, M. brunneum, and M. guizhouense) and narrower insect host ranges (M. acridum and M. flavoviride), as well as the insect-pathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana and Lecanicillium lecanii. Insects were injected with (15)N-labeled nitrogen, and we tracked the incorporation of (15)N into two dicots, haricot bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and soybean (Glycine max), and two monocots, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and wheat (Triticum aestivum), in the presence of these fungi in soil microcosms. All Metarhizium species and B. bassiana but not L. lecanii showed the capacity to transfer nitrogen to plants, although to various degrees. Endophytic association by these fungi increased overall plant productivity. We also showed that in the field, where microbial competition is potentially high, M. robertsii was able to transfer insect-derived nitrogen to plants. Metarhizium spp. and B. bassiana have a worldwide distribution with high soil abundance and may play an important role in the ecological cycling of insect nitrogen back to plant communities.

  9. 3-Bromopyruvate: a novel antifungal agent against the human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyląg, Mariusz; Lis, Paweł; Niedźwiecka, Katarzyna; Ko, Young H; Pedersen, Peter L; Goffeau, Andre; Ułaszewski, Stanisław

    2013-05-03

    We have investigated the antifungal activity of the pyruvic acid analogue: 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP). Growth inhibition by 3-BP of 110 strains of yeast-like and filamentous fungi was tested by standard spot tests or microdilution method. The human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans exhibited a low Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of 0.12-0.15 mM 3-BP. The high toxicity of 3-BP toward C. neoformans correlated with high intracellular accumulation of 3-BP and also with low levels of intracellular ATP and glutathione. Weak cytotoxicity towards mammalian cells and lack of resistance conferred by the PDR (Pleiotropic Drug Resistance) network in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are other properties of 3-BP that makes it a novel promising anticryptococcal drug.

  10. Insect Immunity to Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H-L; St Leger, R J

    2016-01-01

    The study of infection and immunity in insects has achieved considerable prominence with the appreciation that their host defense mechanisms share many fundamental characteristics with the innate immune system of vertebrates. Studies on the highly tractable model organism Drosophila in particular have led to a detailed understanding of conserved innate immunity networks, such as Toll. However, most of these studies have used opportunistic human pathogens and may not have revealed specialized immune strategies that have arisen through evolutionary arms races with natural insect pathogens. Fungi are the commonest natural insect pathogens, and in this review, we focus on studies using Metarhizium and Beauveria spp. that have addressed immune system function and pathogen virulence via behavioral avoidance, the use of physical barriers, and the activation of local and systemic immune responses. In particular, we highlight studies on the evolutionary genetics of insect immunity and discuss insect-pathogen coevolution.

  11. Multiplex characterization of human pathogens including species and antibiotic-resistance gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barisˇ ić, Ivan; Petzka, Josefine; Schoenthaler, Silvia; Vierlinger, Klemens; Noehammer, Christa; Wiesinger-Mayr, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    The efficient medical treatment of infections requires detailed information about the pathogens involved and potential antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. The dramatically increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria especially highlights the importance of sophisticated diagnostic tests enabling a fast patient-customized therapy. However, the current molecular detection methods are limited to either the detection of species or only a few antibiotic-resistance genes.In this work, we present a human pathogen characterization assay using a rRNA gene microarray identifying 75 species comprising bacteria and fungi. A statistical classifier was developed to facilitate the automated species identification. Additionally, the clinically most important β-lactamases were identified simultaneously in a 100-plex reaction using padlock probes and the same microarray. The specificity and sensitivity of the combined assay was determined using clinical isolates. The detection limit was 10(5) c.f.u. ml(-1), recovering 89 % of the detectable β-lactamase-encoding genes specifically. The total assay time was less than 7 hand the modular character of the antibiotic-resistance detection allows the easy integration of further genetic targets. In summary, we present a fast, highly specific and sensitive multiplex pathogen characterization assay.

  12. The GRF10 homeobox gene regulates filamentous growth in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anup K; Wangsanut, Tanaporn; Fonzi, William A; Rolfes, Ronda J

    2015-12-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and can cause life-threatening infections. Filamentous growth is critical in the pathogenicity of C. albicans, as the transition from yeast to hyphal forms is linked to virulence and is also a pivotal process in fungal biofilm development. Homeodomain-containing transcription factors have been linked to developmental processes in fungi and other eukaryotes. We report here on GRF10, a homeobox transcription factor-encoding gene that plays a role in C. albicans filamentation. Deletion of the GRF10 gene, in both C. albicans SN152 and BWP17 strain backgrounds, results in mutants with strongly decreased hyphal growth. The mutants are defective in chlamydospore and biofilm formation, as well as showing dramatically attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. Expression of the GRF10 gene is highly induced during stationary phase and filamentation. In summary, our study emphasizes a new role for the homeodomain-containing transcription factor in morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  13. Biosynthesis of UDP-4-keto-6-deoxyglucose and UDP-rhamnose in pathogenic fungi Magnaporthe grisea and Botryotinia fuckeliana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez, Viviana; Ingwers, Miles; Smith, James; Glushka, John; Yang, Ting; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2012-01-01

    .... Nevertheless, little is known about the pathways for the synthesis of these glycans. We show that rhamnose is present in glycans isolated from the rice pathogen Magnaporthe grisea and from the plant pathogen Botryotinia fuckeliana...

  14. Pathogens and host immunity in the ancient human oral cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warinner, Christina; Rodrigues, João F Matias; Vyas, Rounak

    2014-01-01

    cavity has long served as a reservoir for bacteria implicated in both local and systemic disease. We characterize (i) the ancient oral microbiome in a diseased state, (ii) 40 opportunistic pathogens, (iii) ancient human-associated putative antibiotic resistance genes, (iv) a genome reconstruction......Calcified dental plaque (dental calculus) preserves for millennia and entraps biomolecules from all domains of life and viruses. We report the first, to our knowledge, high-resolution taxonomic and protein functional characterization of the ancient oral microbiome and demonstrate that the oral...... of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia, (v) 239 bacterial and 43 human proteins, allowing confirmation of a long-term association between host immune factors, 'red complex' pathogens and periodontal disease, and (vi) DNA sequences matching dietary sources. Directly datable and nearly ubiquitous, dental...

  15. Exploring Antagonistic Candidate Fungi for Controling Pathogenic Fungi (Colletotricum gloeosporioides Causing Anthracnose Disease in Kintamani Siam Orange Plants (Citrus Nobillis Lour Var. Hass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Darsini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Orange plantation center in Bali are located in Bangli Regency, Kintamani District. Kintamani orange plantations cultivated three types of oranges: tangerine, selayer, and mandarin oranges. The famous orange in Bali today is Kintamani orange,  tangerine type.  The typical flavor and aroma of Kintamani tangerine make it is favored by consumers from various regions. Based on the information from Bangli District Agriculture Office and the results of field surveys in the last two years (in 2013 and 2014, cultivation of orange in Kintamani has been infected with anthracnose disease. The disease is characterized by symptoms whereby brown twigs spread to the leaves and fruit, and the fruits which are about to be harvested rot simultaneously and eventually fall due to decay. This condition causes farmers to suffer significant losses. The cause of anthracnose on Kintamani orange is Colletotrichum gloeosporioides .  The Control of these diseases has been carried out by farmers with various synthetic fungicides but the disease is still widespread.   It is feared that the uncontrolled use of synthetic pesticides can harm the environment, cause resistance to C. gloeosporioides fungi, and kill non-target beneficial micro-organism. It is necessary to conduct research that aims to control anthracnose biologically to maintain the ecological balance and environmental safety. Based on the results of this research by exploring the fungi on healthy plants around orange trees infected with anthracnose diseases, nine isolates of antagonist candidate fungus were obtained based on colony color of fungal hyphae (IS1, IS2, IS3, IS4, IS5. IS6, IS7, IS8, IS9.   Based on the test results of the in vitro dual culture, two candidates of antagonistic fungal isolates were selected,  the isolates IS4 and IS7. It was because on day 7 after the second dual culture, these two isolates had the highest percentage of inhibition,  89.22% and 85.11 % respectively. Based on the

  16. Natural soil reservoirs for human pathogenic and fecal indicator bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiroli, Maria L; Falkinham, Joseph; Favre-Bonte, Sabine; Nazaret, Sylvie; Piveteau, Pascal; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Delaquis, Pascal; Hartmann, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Soils receive inputs of human pathogenic and indicator bacteria through land application of animal manures or sewage sludge, and inputs by wildlife. Soil is an extremely heterogeneous substrate and contains meso- and macrofauna that may be reservoirs for bacteria of human health concern. The ability to detect and quantify bacteria of human health concern is important in risk assessments and in evaluating the efficacy of agricultural soil management practices that are protective of crop quality and protective of adjacent water resources. The present chapter describes the distribution of selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in soils. Methods for detecting and quantifying soilborne bacteria including extraction, enrichment using immunomagnetic capture, culturing, molecular detection and deep sequencing of metagenomic DNA to detect pathogens are overviewed. Methods for strain phenotypic and genotypic characterization are presented, as well as how comparison with clinical isolates can inform the potential for human health risk.

  17. Salmonella Typhi: from a Human Pathogen to a Vaccine Vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lian Zhang; Victor Tunje Jeza; Qin Pan

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella (S.) typhi is an important intracellular pathogen. Among the more than 2,300 closely-related Salmonella serovars bacteria recognized, S. Typhi is the only one that is pathogenic exclusively for humans, in whom it causes typhoid or enteric fever. The pathogen has been around for many years and many studies have been done in an effort to combat it. Molecular and biologic features of S. Typhi and host factors and immune responses involved in Salmonella invasion have been extensively studies. Vaccines that have been developed most notably are Vi polysaccharide and Ty21a. However, as the results show, there is still a long way to go. It is also shown that multi-drug resistance has occurred to the few available antibiotics. More and more studies have shown that Salmonella can be used as a vaccine vector carrying antigens of other pathogens. This has been promising in that the immune system can be elicited in response to both the Salmonella bacteria and the antigen of the pathogen in question. This review aims to highlight some of the milestones attained in the fight against the disease from the time S. Typhi was seen as a pathogen causing typhoid fever to the use of Salmonella as a vaccine vector.

  18. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...... of molecular tools for E. cymbalariae to enable a faster and more efficient approach for genetic comparisons between Eremothecium genus fungi....

  19. Filamentous Growth in Eremothecium Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskarsson, Therese

    , this thesis deals with some of the aspects of hyphal growth, which is an important virulence factor for pathogenic fungi infecting both humans and plants. Hyphal establishment through continuous polar growth is a complex process, requiring the careful coordination of a large subset of proteins involved......-regulatory activity of AgGts1, the protein could have additional actin organizing properties. In the second and third part, this thesis addresses the use of A. gossypii and its relative E. cymbalariae as model organisms for filamentous growth. A series of assays analyzed the capability of Eremothecium genus fungi...... of molecular tools for E. cymbalariae to enable a faster and more efficient approach for genetic comparisons between Eremothecium genus fungi....

  20. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of crude extracts of ascidian Didemnum psammathodes Sluiter, 1895 against isolated human and fish pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N Sri Kumaran; S Bragadeeswaran; VK Meenakshi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antimicrobial activities of ascidian Didemnum psammathodes (D. psammathodes) against human and fish pathogenic organisms. Methods: In this study antimicrobial activities were carried out by standard disc diffusion method. In this experiment 40 human, fish bacterial and fungal pathogens were isolated and assayed against 7 different solvents such as methanol, acetone, ethanol, n-butanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate and dichloromethane. Each solvent were assayed at different concentrations of 25, 50, 75, 100 mg/mL. Results: From this experiment solvent having higher concentrations showed high inhibition activity and the fungi are showed more resistant than the bacterial strains used. Conclusions: These results indicate that the ascidian D. psammathodes is found to have remarkable antimicrobial activities against isolated microbes. Further studies will fulfill for purification and structural elucidation of antimicrobial drugs.

  1. 63例成人头癣的病原菌分析%Analysis for pathogenic fungi of tinea capitis in adult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周敬; 方莉; 雷玲; 徐阳

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解湖北赤壁市人民医院近12年成人头癣的病原菌分布情况。方法:对2002年1月至2012年12月确诊的成人头癣患者的临床类型及病原菌进行回顾性分析。结果:63例成人头癣患者中男4例,女59例,年龄18~89岁;好发于45~74岁的女性。主要病原菌为紫色毛癣菌41株(65.08%)。结论:63例成人头癣的病原菌以亲人性的紫色毛癣菌为主要致病菌。%Objective: To investigate the distribution of the pathogens of tinea capitis (TC) in adult in Chibi City People's Hospital of Hubei province. Methods:The pathogenic strains of fungi among the patients with TC diagnosed from January 2002 to December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. Results:A total of 63 patients with TC were diagnosed, including 4 males and 59 females. The age of the patients ranged from 18 to 89 years old. Majority of the patients were females and their age ranged from 45 to 74 years old. The most com-mon pathogenic fungi were Trichophyton violaceum (41 strains, 65.08%), followed by Microsporum canis (14 strains, 22.22%), and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (5 stains, 7.94%). Conclusion:Trichophyton violaceum remains the dominant pathogen in TC of adult in our patients.

  2. Comparative genomics allowed the identification of drug targets against human fungal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Natalia F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of invasive fungal infections (IFIs has increased steadily worldwide in the last few decades. Particularly, there has been a global rise in the number of infections among immunosuppressed people. These patients present severe clinical forms of the infections, which are commonly fatal, and they are more susceptible to opportunistic fungal infections than non-immunocompromised people. IFIs have historically been associated with high morbidity and mortality, partly because of the limitations of available antifungal therapies, including side effects, toxicities, drug interactions and antifungal resistance. Thus, the search for alternative therapies and/or the development of more specific drugs is a challenge that needs to be met. Genomics has created new ways of examining genes, which open new strategies for drug development and control of human diseases. Results In silico analyses and manual mining selected initially 57 potential drug targets, based on 55 genes experimentally confirmed as essential for Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus and other 2 genes (kre2 and erg6 relevant for fungal survival within the host. Orthologs for those 57 potential targets were also identified in eight human fungal pathogens (C. albicans, A. fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Paracoccidioides lutzii, Coccidioides immitis, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Of those, 10 genes were present in all pathogenic fungi analyzed and absent in the human genome. We focused on four candidates: trr1 that encodes for thioredoxin reductase, rim8 that encodes for a protein involved in the proteolytic activation of a transcriptional factor in response to alkaline pH, kre2 that encodes for α-1,2-mannosyltransferase and erg6 that encodes for Δ(24-sterol C-methyltransferase. Conclusions Our data show that the comparative genomics analysis of eight fungal pathogens enabled the identification of

  3. Aeromonas dhakensis, an increasingly recognized human pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Lin eChen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas dhakensis was first isolated from children with diarrhea in Dhaka, Bangladesh and described in 2002. In the past decade, increasing evidence indicate this species is widely distributed in the environment and can cause a variety of infections both in human and animals, especially in coastal areas. A. dhakensis is often misidentified as A. hydrophila, A. veronii or A. caviae by commercial phenotypic tests in the clinical laboratory. Correct identification relies on molecular methods. Increasingly used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS may be able to identify Aeromonas specie rapidly and accurately. A. dhakensis has shown its potent virulence in different animal models and clinical infections. Although several virulence factors had been reported, no single mechanism is conclusive. Characteristically A. dhakensis is the principal species causing soft tissue infection and bacteremia, especially among patients with liver cirrhosis or malignancy. Of note, A. dhakensis bacteremia is more lethal than bacteremia due to other Aeromonas species. The role of this species in gastroenteritis remains controversial. Third generation cephalosporins and carbapenems should be used cautiously in the treatment of severe A. dhakensis infection due to the presence of AmpC β-lactamase and metallo-β-lactamase genes, and optimal regimens may be cefepime or fluoroquinolones. Studies of bacterial virulence factors and associated host responses may provide the chance to understand the heterogeneous virulence between species. The hypothesis A. dhakensis with varied geographic prevalence and enhanced virulence that compared to other Aeromonas species warrants more investigations.

  4. Activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 is a general phenomenon in infections with human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Werth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1 is the key transcriptional factor involved in the adaptation process of cells and organisms to hypoxia. Recent findings suggest that HIF-1 plays also a crucial role in inflammatory and infectious diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using patient skin biopsies, cell culture and murine infection models, HIF-1 activation was determined by immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and reporter gene assays and was linked to cellular oxygen consumption. The course of a S. aureus peritonitis was determined upon pharmacological HIF-1 inhibition. Activation of HIF-1 was detectable (i in all ex vivo in biopsies of patients suffering from skin infections, (ii in vitro using cell culture infection models and (iii in vivo using murine intravenous and peritoneal S. aureus infection models. HIF-1 activation by human pathogens was induced by oxygen-dependent mechanisms. Small colony variants (SCVs of S. aureus known to cause chronic infections did not result in cellular hypoxia nor in HIF-1 activation. Pharmaceutical inhibition of HIF-1 activation resulted in increased survival rates of mice suffering from a S. aureus peritonitis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Activation of HIF-1 is a general phenomenon in infections with human pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa. HIF-1-regulated pathways might be an attractive target to modulate the course of life-threatening infections.

  5. Galleria mellonella as a model host for human pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2012-01-01

    The number of studies using G. mellonella as a model host for human pathogens has increased significantly in the last few years. Important studies were published from different countries for evaluating the pathogenesis of bacterial and fungal infections and for exploring the host defenses against pathogens. Therefore, standardized conditions for the use of G. melonella larvae need to be established. Recent research showed that the deprivation of G. mellonella larvae of food during the experiment caused a reduction in immune responses and an increased susceptibility to infection, suggesting that incubating of larvae in the presence or absence of nutrition may affect the results and comparisons among different laboratories. PMID:23211681

  6. Biological therapeutics of Pongamia pinnata coated zinc oxide nanoparticles against clinically important pathogenic bacteria, fungi and MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaikozhundan, Balasubramanian; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Vijayakumar, Sekar; Pandiselvi, Karuppiah; Kalanjiam, Mohamed Ali Rajamohamed; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    The overuse of antimicrobics and drugs has led to the development of resistance in a number of pathogens and parasites, which leads to great concerns for human health and the environment. Furthermore, breast cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women. MCF-7 is a widely used epithelial cancer cell line, derived from breast adenocarcinoma for in vitro breast cancer studies, since the cell line has retained several ideal characteristics particular to the mammary epithelium. In this scenario, the development of novel and eco-friendly drugs are of timely importance. Green synthesis of nanoparticles is cost effective, environmental friendly and does not involve the use of toxic chemicals or elevate energy inputs. This research focused on the anticancer activity of Pongamia pinnata seed extract-fabricated zinc oxide nanoparticles (Pp-ZnO NPs) on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells, antibiofilm activity against bacteria and fungi was also investigated. Nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Pp-ZnO NPs effectively inhibited the growth of Gram positive Bacillus licheniformis (zone of inhibition: 17.3 mm) at 25 μg ml(-1) followed by Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14.2 mm) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (12.2 mm). Pp-ZnO NPs also effectively inhibited the biofilm formation of C. albicans at 50 μg ml(-1). Cytotoxicity studies revealed that a single treatment with Pp-ZnO NPs significantly reduced the cell viability of breast cancer MCF-7 cells at doses higher than 50 μg ml(-1). Morphological changes in the Pp-ZnO NPs treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells were observed using phase contrast microscopy. This study concludes that the green synthesized Pp-ZnO NPs may be used as an effective antimicrobial and antibreast cancer agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. Human commensals producing a novel antibiotic impair pathogen colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipperer, Alexander; Konnerth, Martin C; Laux, Claudia; Berscheid, Anne; Janek, Daniela; Weidenmaier, Christopher; Burian, Marc; Schilling, Nadine A; Slavetinsky, Christoph; Marschal, Matthias; Willmann, Matthias; Kalbacher, Hubert; Schittek, Birgit; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike; Grond, Stephanie; Peschel, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard

    2016-07-28

    The vast majority of systemic bacterial infections are caused by facultative, often antibiotic-resistant, pathogens colonizing human body surfaces. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to invasive infection, but the mechanisms that permit or interfere with pathogen colonization are largely unknown. Whereas soil microbes are known to compete by production of antibiotics, such processes have rarely been reported for human microbiota. We show that nasal Staphylococcus lugdunensis strains produce lugdunin, a novel thiazolidine-containing cyclic peptide antibiotic that prohibits colonization by S. aureus, and a rare example of a non-ribosomally synthesized bioactive compound from human-associated bacteria. Lugdunin is bactericidal against major pathogens, effective in animal models, and not prone to causing development of resistance in S. aureus. Notably, human nasal colonization by S. lugdunensis was associated with a significantly reduced S. aureus carriage rate, suggesting that lugdunin or lugdunin-producing commensal bacteria could be valuable for preventing staphylococcal infections. Moreover, human microbiota should be considered as a source for new antibiotics.

  8. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes produced by human pathogenic Vibrio species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichi eMiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria in the genus Vibrio produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes to obtain nutrients via digestion of various protein substrates. However, the enzymes secreted by human pathogenic species have been documented to modulate the bacterial virulence. Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed vibriolysin. The vibriolysin from V. vulnificus, a causative agent of serious systemic infection, is a major toxic factor eliciting the secondary skin damage characterized by formation of the hemorrhagic brae. The vibriolysin from intestinal pathogens may play indirect roles in pathogenicity because it can activate protein toxins and hemagglutinin by the limited proteolysis and can affect the bacterial attachment to or detachment from the intestinal surface by degradation of the mucus layer. Two species causing wound infections, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus, produce another metalloproteases so-called collagenases. Although the detailed pathological roles have not been studied, the collagenase is potent to accelerate the bacterial dissemination through digestion of the protein components of the extracellular matrix. Some species produce cymotrypsin-like serine proteases, which may also affect the bacterial virulence potential. The intestinal pathogens produce sufficient amounts of the metalloprotease at the small intestinal temperature; however, the metalloprotease production by extra-intestinal pathogens is much higher around the body surface temperature. On the other hand, the serine protease is expressed only in the absence of the metalloprotease.

  9. Pathogen-Driven Selection in the Human Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Cagliani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases and epidemics have always accompanied and characterized human history, representing one of the main causes of death. Even today, despite progress in sanitation and medical research, infections are estimated to account for about 15% of deaths. The hypothesis whereby infectious diseases have been acting as a powerful selective pressure was formulated long ago, but it was not until the availability of large-scale genetic data and the development of novel methods to study molecular evolution that we could assess how pervasively infectious agents have shaped human genetic diversity. Indeed, recent evidences indicated that among the diverse environmental factors that acted as selective pressures during the evolution of our species, pathogen load had the strongest influence. Beside the textbook example of the major histocompatibility complex, selection signatures left by pathogen-exerted pressure can be identified at several human loci, including genes not directly involved in immune response. In the future, high-throughput technologies and the availability of genetic data from different populations are likely to provide novel insights into the evolutionary relationships between the human host and its pathogens. Hopefully, this will help identify the genetic determinants modulating the susceptibility to infectious diseases and will translate into new treatment strategies.

  10. Integral membrane pyrophosphatases: a novel drug target for human pathogens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Xhaard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Membrane-integral pyrophosphatases (mPPases are found in several human pathogens, including Plasmodium species, the protozoan parasites that cause malaria. These enzymes hydrolyze pyrophosphate and couple this to the pumping of ions (H+ and/or Na+ across a membrane to generate an electrochemical gradient. mPPases play an important role in stress tolerance in plants, protozoan parasites, and bacteria. The solved structures of mPPases from Vigna radiata and Thermotoga maritima open the possibility of using structure-based drug design to generate novel molecules or repurpose known molecules against this enzyme. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding mPPases, focusing on their structure, the proposed mechanism of action, and their role in human pathogens. We also summarize different methodologies in structure-based drug design and propose an example region on the mPPase structure that can be exploited by these structure-based methods for drug targeting. Since mPPases are not found in animals and humans, this enzyme is a promising potential drug target against livestock and human pathogens.

  11. Genome Studies on Nematophagous and Entomogenous Fungi in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The nematophagous and entomogenous fungi are natural enemies of nematodes and insects and have been utilized by humans to control agricultural and forestry pests. Some of these fungi have been or are being developed as biological control agents in China and worldwide. Several important nematophagous and entomogenous fungi, including nematode-trapping fungi (Arthrobotrys oligospora and Drechslerella stenobrocha, nematode endoparasite (Hirsutella minnesotensis, insect pathogens (Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium spp. and Chinese medicinal fungi (Ophiocordyceps sinensis and Cordyceps militaris, have been genome sequenced and extensively analyzed in China. The biology, evolution, and pharmaceutical application of these fungi and their interacting with host nematodes and insects revealed by genomes, comparing genomes coupled with transcriptomes are summarized and reviewed in this paper.

  12. Human herpesvirus 8 – A novel human pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelman Daniel C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1994, Chang and Moore reported on the latest of the gammaherpesviruses to infect humans, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 1. This novel herpesvirus has and continues to present challenges to define its scope of involvement in human disease. In this review, aspects of HHV-8 infection are discussed, such as, the human immune response, viral pathogenesis and transmission, viral disease entities, and the virus's epidemiology with an emphasis on HHV-8 diagnostics.

  13. Thermophilic Fungi to Dominate Aflatoxigenic/Mycotoxigenic Fungi on Food under Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Robert Russell M; Lima, Nelson

    2017-02-17

    Certain filamentous fungi produce mycotoxins that contaminate food. Mycotoxin contamination of crops is highly influenced by environmental conditions and is already affected by global warming, where there is a succession of mycotoxigenic fungi towards those that have higher optimal growth temperatures. Aflatoxigenic fungi are at the highest limit of temperature although predicted increases in temperature are beyond that constraint. The present paper discusses what will succeed these fungi and represents the first such consideration. Aflatoxins are the most important mycotoxins and are common in tropical produce, much of which is exported to temperate regions. Hot countries may produce safer food under climate change because aflatoxigenic fungi will be inhibited. The same situation will occur in previously temperate regions where these fungi have recently appeared, although decades later. Existing thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi (TTF) will dominate, in contrast to the conventional mycotoxigenic fungi adapting or mutating, as it will be quicker. TTF produce a range of secondary metabolites, or potential mycotoxins and patulin which may become a new threat. In addition, Aspergillus fumigatus will appear more frequently, a serious human pathogen, because it is (a) thermotolerant and (b) present on crops: hence this is an even greater problem. An incubation temperature of 41 °C needs employing forthwith to detect TTF. Finally, TTF in crops requires study because of the potential for diseases in humans and animals under climate change.

  14. Thermophilic Fungi to Dominate Aflatoxigenic/Mycotoxigenic Fungi on Food under Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Robert Russell M.; Lima, Nelson

    2017-01-01

    Certain filamentous fungi produce mycotoxins that contaminate food. Mycotoxin contamination of crops is highly influenced by environmental conditions and is already affected by global warming, where there is a succession of mycotoxigenic fungi towards those that have higher optimal growth temperatures. Aflatoxigenic fungi are at the highest limit of temperature although predicted increases in temperature are beyond that constraint. The present paper discusses what will succeed these fungi and represents the first such consideration. Aflatoxins are the most important mycotoxins and are common in tropical produce, much of which is exported to temperate regions. Hot countries may produce safer food under climate change because aflatoxigenic fungi will be inhibited. The same situation will occur in previously temperate regions where these fungi have recently appeared, although decades later. Existing thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi (TTF) will dominate, in contrast to the conventional mycotoxigenic fungi adapting or mutating, as it will be quicker. TTF produce a range of secondary metabolites, or potential mycotoxins and patulin which may become a new threat. In addition, Aspergillus fumigatus will appear more frequently, a serious human pathogen, because it is (a) thermotolerant and (b) present on crops: hence this is an even greater problem. An incubation temperature of 41 °C needs employing forthwith to detect TTF. Finally, TTF in crops requires study because of the potential for diseases in humans and animals under climate change. PMID:28218685

  15. Thermophilic Fungi to Dominate Aflatoxigenic/Mycotoxigenic Fungi on Food under Global Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Russell M. Paterson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Certain filamentous fungi produce mycotoxins that contaminate food. Mycotoxin contamination of crops is highly influenced by environmental conditions and is already affected by global warming, where there is a succession of mycotoxigenic fungi towards those that have higher optimal growth temperatures. Aflatoxigenic fungi are at the highest limit of temperature although predicted increases in temperature are beyond that constraint. The present paper discusses what will succeed these fungi and represents the first such consideration. Aflatoxins are the most important mycotoxins and are common in tropical produce, much of which is exported to temperate regions. Hot countries may produce safer food under climate change because aflatoxigenic fungi will be inhibited. The same situation will occur in previously temperate regions where these fungi have recently appeared, although decades later. Existing thermotolerant and thermophilic fungi (TTF will dominate, in contrast to the conventional mycotoxigenic fungi adapting or mutating, as it will be quicker. TTF produce a range of secondary metabolites, or potential mycotoxins and patulin which may become a new threat. In addition, Aspergillus fumigatus will appear more frequently, a serious human pathogen, because it is (a thermotolerant and (b present on crops: hence this is an even greater problem. An incubation temperature of 41 °C needs employing forthwith to detect TTF. Finally, TTF in crops requires study because of the potential for diseases in humans and animals under climate change.

  16. Stress tolerance and virulence of insect-pathogenic fungi are determined by environmental conditions during conidial formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto U L; Fernandes, Éverton K K; Keyser, Chad A; Hallsworth, John E; Roberts, Donald W

    2015-08-01

    The virulence to insects and tolerance to heat and UV-B radiation of conidia of entomopathogenic fungi are greatly influenced by physical, chemical, and nutritional conditions during mycelial growth. This is evidenced, for example, by the stress phenotypes of Metarhizium robertsii produced on various substrates. Conidia from minimal medium (Czapek's medium without sucrose), complex medium, and insect (Lepidoptera and Coleoptera) cadavers had high, moderate, and poor tolerance to UV-B radiation, respectively. Furthermore, conidia from minimal medium germinated faster and had increased heat tolerance and were more virulent to insects than those from complex medium. Low water-activity or alkaline culture conditions also resulted in production of conidia with high tolerance to heat or UV-B radiation. Conidia produced on complex media exhibited lower stress tolerance, whereas those from complex media supplemented with NaCl or KCl (to reduce water activity) were more tolerant to heat and UV-B than those from the unmodified complex medium. Osmotic and nutritive stresses resulted in production of conidia with a robust stress phenotype, but also were associated with low conidial yield. Physical conditions such as growth under illumination, hypoxic conditions, and heat shock before conidial production also induced both higher UV-B and heat tolerance; but conidial production was not decreased. In conclusion, physical and chemical parameters, as well as nutrition source, can induce great variability in conidial tolerance to stress for entomopathogenic fungi. Implications are discussed in relation to the ecology of entomopathogenic fungi in the field, and to their use for biological control. This review will cover recent technologies on improving stress tolerance of entomopathogenic fungi for biological control of insects.

  17. Bats as reservoir hosts of human bacterial pathogen, Bartonella mayotimonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veikkolainen, Ville; Vesterinen, Eero J; Lilley, Thomas M; Pulliainen, Arto T

    2014-06-01

    A plethora of pathogenic viruses colonize bats. However, bat bacterial flora and its zoonotic threat remain ill defined. In a study initially conducted as a quantitative metagenomic analysis of the fecal bacterial flora of the Daubenton's bat in Finland, we unexpectedly detected DNA of several hemotrophic and ectoparasite-transmitted bacterial genera, including Bartonella. Bartonella spp. also were either detected or isolated from the peripheral blood of Daubenton's, northern, and whiskered bats and were detected in the ectoparasites of Daubenton's, northern, and Brandt's bats. The blood isolates belong to the Candidatus-status species B. mayotimonensis, a recently identified etiologic agent of endocarditis in humans, and a new Bartonella species (B. naantaliensis sp. nov.). Phylogenetic analysis of bat-colonizing Bartonella spp. throughout the world demonstrates a distinct B. mayotimonensis cluster in the Northern Hemisphere. The findings of this field study highlight bats as potent reservoirs of human bacterial pathogens.

  18. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITIES OF RICINUS COMMUNIS AGAINST SOME HUMAN PATHOGENS

    OpenAIRE

    Kushwah Poonam; Singh Krishan Pratap

    2012-01-01

    The present paper deals with the antimicrobial activities of seed extracts of Ricinus communis against some human pathogenic bacteria namely Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and two fungal strains namely Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. The aqueous and methanol extracts of seeds were screened for their antibacterial activity using agar disc diffusion method. The aqueous seed extracts were less active but methanol extracts showed high degree zon...

  19. 宜昌地区浅部真菌病及真菌分析%Prevalence of pathogenic fungi of superficial mycoses in Yichang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈春燕; 王鹏

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the prevalence and pathogenic fungi species of superficial mycoses in Yichang district. METHODS A total of 1982 specimens of clinically suspected patients in dermatological department with dermatomycoses were examined by Microscopy. The bacterial culture and identification were performed.RESULTS Among 1982 cases, the frequencies of onychomycosis(691 cases), tinea cruris (402 cases) and tinea pedis (374 cases) were 34.9% ,20. 3% and 18.9%, respectively. 1030 strains of pathogenic fungi were isolated,in which the most frequently isolated fungus was Trichophyton rubrum 626 (60. 8%), followed by Trichophyton mentagrophytes (5.5 %), Epidermophyton floccosum (2.8 %), candida and yeast-like fungi (22.2 %) and others (2.4%). CONCLUSION Onychomycosis is the most common, and Trichophyton rubrum is the most predominant pathogen of dermatomycoses. The percentage of candida and yeast-like fungus is increased year by year.%目的 了解宜昌地区浅部真菌病及真菌分布特点.方法 对在医院皮肤科就诊,并拟诊为浅部真菌病感染的1982例患者标本,行显微镜检查、细菌培养及菌种鉴定.结果 1982例浅部真菌病患者中,甲真菌病691例,占34.9%,股癣402例,占20.3%,足癣374例,占18.9%;分离的1030株真菌中,主要为红色毛癣菌626株,占60.8%;其余依次为假丝酵母菌属、须癣毛癣菌、絮状表皮癣菌及犬小孢子菌,分别占22.2%、5.5%、2.8%、2.4%.结论 在浅部真菌病及病原菌中,甲真菌病最为常见,致病菌以红色毛癣菌占主导地位,假丝酵母菌属所占比例较往年有大幅增多.

  20. Mice with human immune system components as in vivo models for infections with human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämer, Patrick C; Chijioke, Obinna; Meixlsperger, Sonja; Leung, Carol S; Münz, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Many pathogens relevant to human disease do not infect other animal species. Therefore, animal models that reconstitute or harbor human tissues are explored as hosts for these. In this review, we will summarize recent advances to utilize mice with human immune system components, reconstituted from hematopoietic progenitor cells in vivo. Such mice can be used to study human pathogens that replicate in leukocytes. In addition to studying the replication of these pathogens, the reconstituted human immune system components can also be analyzed for initiating immune responses and control against these infections. Moreover, these new animal models of human infectious disease should replicate the reactivity of the human immune system to vaccine candidates and, especially, the adjuvants contained in them, more faithfully.

  1. Comamonas testosteroni: Is It Still a Rare Human Pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shaika; Farooq, Rumana; Nahvi, Nahida

    2017-01-01

    Comamonas testosteroni (formally Pseudomonas testosteroni) is common environmental bacterium that is not part of the human microbiome. Since its identification as a human pathogen in 1987, numerous reports have drizzled in, implicating this organism for various infections. Although these organisms are of low virulence, some of their obscurity perhaps is due to the incapability of clinical laboratories to identify them. Most of the reported cases are bloodstream infections. We report a case of gastroenteritis caused by this organism in a 65-year-old female with colostomy in situ. PMID:28203137

  2. Comparative genomics of Dothideomycete fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgt, van der A.

    2014-01-01

    Fungi are a diverse group of eukaryotic micro-organisms particularly suited for comparative genomics analyses. Fungi are important to industry, fundamental science and many of them are notorious pathogens of crops, thereby endangering global food supply. Dozens of fungi have been sequenced in the la

  3. Transcriptional control of drug resistance, virulence and immune system evasion in pathogenic fungi: a cross-species comparison.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Pais; Catarina Costa; Mafalda Cavalheiro; Daniela Romão; Miguel Cacho Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a...

  4. Transcriptional Control of Drug Resistance, Virulence and Immune System Evasion in Pathogenic Fungi: A Cross-Species Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Pais, Pedro; Costa, Catarina; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Romão, Daniela; Teixeira, Miguel C.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a...

  5. IN VITRO ANTAGONISM AND EVALUATION OF CHITINASE ACTIVITY OF BACTERIAâBACILLUS CIRCULANS AGAINST PATHOGENIC FUNGI IN VIGNA UNGUICULATA

    OpenAIRE

    Florentyna Rodrigues; Priadharsini.K; S. Suja; P. Palani

    2014-01-01

    Scientists of agriculture and plant pathology are on the lookout for potential biological control agents to control the plant pathogenic organisms in order to avoid soil contamination. Rhizospheric bacteria are excellent agents to control soil-borne plant pathogens. In this study an attempt has been made to evaluate the antagonistic activity of a bacterial strain Bacillus circulans against Curvularia lunata, Alternaria alternata and Cladosporium sp., which are important seed and soil borne pa...

  6. Probiotic Activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii Against Human Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Rajkowska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diarrhoea is associated with a modification of the intestinal microflora and colonization of pathogenic bacteria. Tests were performed for seven probiotic yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, designated for the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea. To check their possible effectiveness against diarrhoea of different etiologies, the activity against a variety of human pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria was investigated in vitro. In mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae var. boulardii, a statistically significant reduction was observed in the number of cells of Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, by even 55.9 % in the case of L. monocytogenes compared with bacterial monocultures. The influence of yeasts was mostly associated with the shortening of the bacterial lag phase duration, more rapid achievement of the maximum growth rates, and a decrease by 4.4–57.1 % (L. monocytogenes, P. aeruginosa, or an increase by 1.4–70.6 % (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Salmonella Typhimurium in the exponential growth rates. Another issue included in the research was the ability of S. cerevisiae var. boulardii to bind pathogenic bacteria to its cell surface. Yeasts have shown binding capacity of E. coli, S. Typhimurium and additionally of S. aureus, Campylobacter jejuni and E. faecalis. However, no adhesion of L. monocytogenes and P. aeruginosa to the yeast cell wall was noted. The probiotic activity of S. cerevisiae var. boulardii against human pathogens is related to a decrease in the number of viable and active cells of bacteria and the binding capacity of yeasts. These processes may limit bacterial invasiveness and prevent bacterial adherence and translocation in the human intestines.

  7. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic, and human pathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Rodrigo; Garbeva, Paolina; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2013-09-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protective microbial shield and to overcome the innate plant defense mechanisms in order to cause disease. A third group of microorganisms that can be found in the rhizosphere are the true and opportunistic human pathogenic bacteria, which can be carried on or in plant tissue and may cause disease when introduced into debilitated humans. Although the importance of the rhizosphere microbiome for plant growth has been widely recognized, for the vast majority of rhizosphere microorganisms no knowledge exists. To enhance plant growth and health, it is essential to know which microorganism is present in the rhizosphere microbiome and what they are doing. Here, we review the main functions of rhizosphere microorganisms and how they impact on health and disease. We discuss the mechanisms involved in the multitrophic interactions and chemical dialogues that occur in the rhizosphere. Finally, we highlight several strategies to redirect or reshape the rhizosphere microbiome in favor of microorganisms that are beneficial to plant growth and health. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibacterial potential of three seagrasses against human pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajasekaran Arumugam; Perumal Anantharaman

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antibacterial activity ofHalophila stipulacea (H. stipulacea), Cymodocea serrulata (C. serrulata) andHalodule pinifolia (H. pinifolia) against seven human bacterial pathogens.Methods:The antibacterial activities of the extracts on the various test organisms using disc diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentraction(MIC).Results:Methanol and chloroform extracts of all the three seagrasses were active against all the tested pathogens, whereas the hexane extract of seagrasses was not active againstStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Antibacterial activity of three seagrass screened, was in the order ofH. pinifolia >H. stipulacea>C. serrulata.Conclusions: This antibacterial studies can further investigated on seagrasses for purification of bioactive substance and its possible utility in disease control.

  9. Bioactive berry compounds-novel tools against human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Nohynek, Liisa; Alakomi, Hanna-Leena; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2005-04-01

    Berry fruits are rich sources of bioactive compounds, such as phenolics and organic acids, which have antimicrobial activities against human pathogens. Among different berries and berry phenolics, cranberry, cloudberry, raspberry, strawberry and bilberry especially possess clear antimicrobial effects against, e.g. Salmonella and Staphylococcus. Complex phenolic polymers, like ellagitannins, are strong antibacterial agents present in cloudberry and raspberry. Several mechanisms of action in the growth inhibition of bacteria are involved, such as destabilisation of cytoplasmic membrane, permeabilisation of plasma membrane, inhibition of extracellular microbial enzymes, direct actions on microbial metabolism and deprivation of the substrates required for microbial growth. Antimicrobial activity of berries may also be related to antiadherence of bacteria to epithelial cells, which is a prerequisite for colonisation and infection of many pathogens. Antimicrobial berry compounds may have important applications in the future as natural antimicrobial agents for food industry as well as for medicine. Some of the novel approaches are discussed.

  10. The action of berry phenolics against human intestinal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Nohynek, Liisa; Alakomi, Hanna-Leena; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2005-01-01

    Phenolic compounds present in berries selectively inhibit the growth of human gastrointestinal pathogens. Especially cranberry, cloudberry, raspberry, strawberry and bilberry possess clear antimicrobial effects against e.g. salmonella and staphylococcus. Complex phenolic polymers, such as ellagitannins, are strong antibacterial agents present in cloudberry, raspberry and strawberry. Berry phenolics seem to affect the growth of different bacterial species with different mechanisms. Adherence of bacteria to epithelial surfaces is a prerequisite for colonization and infection of many pathogens. Antimicrobial activity of berries may also be related to anti-adherence activity of the berries. Utilization of enzymes in berry processing increases the amount of phenolics and antimicrobial activity of the berry products. Antimicrobial berry compounds are likely to have many important applications in the future as natural antimicrobial agents for food industry as well as for medicine.

  11. Superficial mxcosis and distribution of pathogenic fungi%某院浅部真菌病及其病原菌分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘万俊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the occurrence and distribution characteristics of pathogenic fungi causing su-perficial mycosis in a hospital. Methods Specimens from patients suspected of superficial mycosis were conducted direct microscope examination,cultivation and pathogenic identification.Results Among 398 cases of suspected su-perficial mycosis,the positive rate of fungi was 51.01% (n= 203 )by direct microscopy and 59.55% (n= 237)by fungi cultivation,positive rate of microscope examination was significantly lower than cultivation (χ2= 6.057,P=0.014). Of 237 patients with confirmed diagnosis of superficial mycosis ,100 (42.19% )were children and 137 (57.81% )were adults ;109 cases (45.99% )were diagnosed with tinea of feet and hands,89 (37.55% )tinea capi-tis,26 (10.97% )tinea corporis,and 13 (5.48% )tinea unguium. The major fungi from children was Microsporum canis (49.00% ),and from adults was Trichophytonrubrum(45.99% ). Conclusion The most common superficial mycosis in this hospital is tinea of feet and hands,and the major fungi are Trichophytonrubrum and Microsporum canis ,the species causing mycosis in adults and children are different.%目的:了解某院浅部真菌病的感染情况及病原菌的分布特点。方法对该院临床拟诊为浅部真菌病的患者标本进行直接显微镜检查(以下简称镜检)、培养及菌种鉴定。结果临床拟诊为浅部真菌病的患者398例,其中真菌镜检阳性203例(51.01%),培养阳性237例(59.55%),镜检阳性率显著低于培养阳性率(χ2=6.057,P=0.014)。237例确诊病例中,儿童100例(42.19%),成人137例(57.81%);以手足癣病(109例,45.99%)和头癣病(89例,37.55%)为主,其次为体癣病(26例,10.97%)和甲真菌病(13例,5.48%)。分离病原菌,儿童以犬小孢子菌为主(49.00%),成人以红色毛癣菌为主(45.99%)。结论该院浅部真菌病以

  12. Parasites and fungi as risk factors for human and animal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góralska, Katarzyna; Błaszkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Recent literature data suggests that parasitic and fungal diseases, which pose a threat to both human and animal health, remain a clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic problem. Attention is increasingly paid to the role played by natural microbiota in maintaining homeostasis in humans. A particular emphasis is placed on the possibility of manipulating the human microbiota (permanent, transient, pathogenic) and macrobiota (e.g., Trichuris suis) to support the treatment of selected diseases such as Crohn's disease, obesity, diabetes and cancer. Emphasis is placed on important medical species whose infections not only impair health but can also be life threatening, such as Plasmodium falciparum, Echinococcus multilocularis and Baylisascaris procyonis, which expand into areas which have so far been uninhabited. This article also presents the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of opportunistic parasitoses imported from the tropics, which spread across large groups of people through human-to-human transmission (Enterobius vermicularis, Sarcoptes scabiei). It also discusses the problem of environmentally-conditioned parasitoses, particularly their etiological factors associated with food contaminated with invasive forms (Trichinella sp., Toxoplasma gondii). The analysis also concerns the presence of developmental forms of geohelminths (Toxocara sp.) and ectoparasites (ticks), which are vectors of serious human diseases (Lyme borreliosis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis), in the environment. Mycological topics contains rare cases of mycoses environmentally conditioned (CNS aspergillosis) and transmissions of these pathogens in a population of hospitalized individuals, as well as seeking new methods used to treat mycoses.

  13. Stepwise screening of microorganisms for commercial use in biological control of plant pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Biological Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhl, J.; Postma, J.; Nicot, P.; Ruocco, M.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new biocontrol products against plant diseases requires screening of high numbers of candidate antagonists. Antagonists for commercial use have to fulfill many different requirements. Besides being active against the specific targeted plant pathogens they must be safe and cost-eff

  14. 泌尿系真菌感染分布及耐药性%Distribution and antimicrobial resistance of pathogenic fungi causing urinary tract infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨朵; 解泽强; 马冬媛

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析首都医科大学附属北京世纪坛医院患者泌尿系深部真菌感染病原菌的分布及其耐药性,为临床合理选用抗真菌药物提供依据.方法 收集北京世纪坛医院2009年1月-2010年12月尿液样本中分离的真菌,采用科玛嘉培养基及VITEK-2 Compact鉴定系统进行菌株鉴定,ATB Fungus 3进行药物MIC测定,卡方检验进行统计学分析.结果 共分离出各类酵母样真菌217株,白色假丝酵母菌66株,占30.4%,热带假丝酵母菌57株,占26.3%,光滑假丝酵母菌53株,占24.4%,近平滑假丝酵母菌20株,占9.2%;分离的真菌对5-氟胞嘧啶、两性霉素B敏感性好,对氟康唑耐药率为4.6%与伏立康唑的8.8%差异无统计学意义,对氟康唑耐药率为7.4%与伊曲康唑的14.3%差异有统计学意义(x2=5.37,P<0.05).结论 尿液标本真菌感染以白色假丝酵母菌、热带假丝酵母菌、光滑假丝酵母菌、近平滑假丝酵母菌为主,对5-氟胞嘧啶、两性霉素B、氟康唑、伏立康唑敏感性较好.%OBJECTIVE To analyze the distribution and antibiotic resistance of pathogenic fungi causing urinary-tract infections of Shijitan Hospital so as to facilitate the appropriate selection of antimicrobial agents in clinical practice. METHODS The pathogenic fungi isolated from urine samples between Jan 2009 to Dec 2010 in Shijitan Hospital were collected and identified by CHROMaga media and VITEK-2 Compact system, the drug susceptibility testing was performed with ATB Fungus 3 and the chi square test was used for statistics analysis. RESULTS Of totally 217 strains of various species of Candida, there were 66 (30. 4%) strains of Candida albi-cans, 57 (26.3%) strains of C. tropicalis, 53 (24.4%) strains of C. glabrata and 20 (9.2%) strains of C. pa-rapsilosis; the fungi isolates were very sensitive to 5-flucytosine and amphotericin ,B, there was no statistical difference between the drug resistance rates to fluconazole(4. 6%) and

  15. Pathogenicity of three entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana, and Paecilomyces lilacinus, to Tetranychus kanzawai infesting papaya seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayan Sanjaya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetranychus kanzawai is an economically important polyphagous mite species in East and South Asia. In the Philippines, it commonly infests cassava and papaya plants. The mites attack and severely damage the older leaves of papaya trees as well as seedlings. Its serious damage causes the leaves to dry up, thus, reducing the photosynthetic activity of the plant. Three entomopathogenic fungal isolates were tested on mites under greenhouse conditions using treated papaya seedlings following a completely randomized design. The mites tested were examined under a dissecting scope to determine the causal agent and to confirm mortality. The LT50 of Metarhizium anisopliae, Beauveria bassiana and Paecilomyces lilacinus on T. kanzawai were estimated. Our results indicate that among these entomopathogenic fungi, the Metarhizium anisopliae Ma6 isolate (LT50= 3.00 days has potentiality for the control of T. kanzawai.

  16. Proteomic analysis of the secretions of Pseudallescheria boydii, a human fungal pathogen with unknown genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Bianca Alcântara; Sodré, Cátia Lacerda; Souza-Gonçalves, Ana Luiza; Aor, Ana Carolina; Kneipp, Lucimar Ferreira; Fonseca, Beatriz Bastos; Rozental, Sonia; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Perales, Jonas; Kalume, Dário Eluan; dos Santos, André Luis Souza

    2012-01-01

    Pseudallescheria boydii is a filamentous fungus that causes a wide array of infections that can affect practically all the organs of the human body. The treatment of pseudallescheriosis is difficult since P. boydii exhibits intrinsic resistance to the majority of antifungal drugs used in the clinic and the virulence attributes expressed by this fungus are unknown. The study of the secretion of molecules is an important approach for understanding the pathogenicity of fungi. With this task in mind, we have shown that mycelial cells of P. boydii were able to actively secrete proteins into the extracellular environment; some of them were recognized by antibodies present in the serum of a patient with pseudallescheriosis. Additionally, molecules secreted by P. boydii induced in vitro irreversible damage in pulmonary epithelial cells. Subsequently, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry was carried out in order to start the construction of a map of secreted proteins from P. boydii mycelial cells. The two-dimensional map showed that most of the proteins (around 100 spots) were focused at pH ranging from 4 to 7 with molecular masses ranging from 14 to >117 kDa. Fifty spots were randomly selected, of which 30 (60%) were consistently identified, while 20 (40%) spots generated peptides that showed no resemblance to any known protein from other fungi and/or MS with low quality. Notably, we identified proteins involved in metabolic pathways (energy/carbohydrate, nucleotide, and fatty acid), cell wall remodeling, RNA processing, signaling, protein degradation/nutrition, translation machinery, drug elimination and/or detoxification, protection against environmental stress, cytoskeleton/movement proteins, and immunogenic molecules. Since the genome of this fungus is not sequenced, we performed enzymatic and immunodetection assays in order to corroborate the presence of some released proteins. The identification of proteins actively secreted by P

  17. Characterizing ncRNAs in human pathogenic protists using high-throughput sequencing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Joan Collins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are key genes in many human diseases including cancer and viral infection, as well as providing critical functions in pathogenic organisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses and protists. Until now the identification and characterization of ncRNAs associated with disease has been slow or inaccurate requiring many years of testing to understand complicated RNA and protein gene relationships. High-throughput sequencing now offers the opportunity to characterize miRNAs, siRNAs, snoRNAs and long ncRNAs on a genomic scale making it faster and easier to clarify how these ncRNAs contribute to the disease state. However, this technology is still relatively new, and ncRNA discovery is not an application of high priority for streamlined bioinformatics. Here we summarize background concepts and practical approaches for ncRNA analysis using high-throughput sequencing, and how it relates to understanding human disease. As a case study, we focus on the parasitic protists Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, where large evolutionary distance has meant difficulties in comparing ncRNAs with those from model eukaryotes. A combination of biological, computational and sequencing approaches has enabled easier classification of ncRNA classes such as snoRNAs, but has also aided the identification of novel classes. It is hoped that a higher level of understanding of ncRNA expression and interaction may aid in the development of less harsh treatment for protist-based diseases.

  18. Immunity to pathogens taught by specialized human dendritic cell subsets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens A. E. Geginat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are specialized antigen-presenting cells (APC that have a key role in immune responses, because they bridge the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. They mature upon recognition of pathogens and up-regulate MHC molecules and co-stimulatory receptors to activate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. It is now well established that DC are not a homogeneous population, but are composed of different subsets with specialized functions in immune responses to specific pathogens. Upon viral infections, plasmacytoid DC (pDC rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-α, which has potent anti-viral functions and activates several other immune cells. However, pDC are not particularly potent APC and induce the tolerogenic cytokine IL-10 in CD4+ T-cells. In contrast, myeloid DC (mDC are very potent APC and possess the unique capacity to prime naïve T-cells and consequently to initiate a primary adaptive immune response. Different subsets of myeloid DC with specialized functions have been identified. In mice, CD8α+ mDC capture antigenic material from necrotic cells, secrete high levels of IL-12, and prime Th1 and cytotoxic T cell responses to control intracellular pathogens. Conversely, CD8α- mDC preferentially prime CD4+ T-cells and promote Th2 or Th17 differentiation. BDCA-3+ mDC2 are the human homologue of CD8α+ mDC, since they share the expression of several key molecules, the capacity to cross-present antigens to CD8+ T-cells and to produce IFN-λ. However, although several features of the DC network are conserved between humans and mice, the expression of several relevant toll-like receptors as well as the production of cytokines that regulate T-cell differentiation are different. Intriguingly, recent data suggests specific roles for human DC subsets in immune responses against individual pathogens. The biology of human DC subsets holds the promise to be exploitable in translational medicine, in particular for the

  19. Pathogen receptor discovery with a microfluidic human membrane protein array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Yair; Ben-Ari, Ya’ara; Drayman, Nir; Pellach, Michal; Neveu, Gregory; Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Avrahami, Dorit; Einav, Shirit; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of how a pathogen invades a cell requires one to determine which host cell receptors are exploited. This determination is a challenging problem because the receptor is invariably a membrane protein, which represents an Achilles heel in proteomics. We have developed a universal platform for high-throughput expression and interaction studies of membrane proteins by creating a microfluidic-based comprehensive human membrane protein array (MPA). The MPA is, to our knowledge, the first of its kind and offers a powerful alternative to conventional proteomics by enabling the simultaneous study of 2,100 membrane proteins. We characterized direct interactions of a whole nonenveloped virus (simian virus 40), as well as those of the hepatitis delta enveloped virus large form antigen, with candidate host receptors expressed on the MPA. Selected newly discovered membrane protein–pathogen interactions were validated by conventional methods, demonstrating that the MPA is an important tool for cellular receptor discovery and for understanding pathogen tropism. PMID:27044079

  20. Standardized metadata for human pathogen/vector genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien G Dugan

    Full Text Available High throughput sequencing has accelerated the determination of genome sequences for thousands of human infectious disease pathogens and dozens of their vectors. The scale and scope of these data are enabling genotype-phenotype association studies to identify genetic determinants of pathogen virulence and drug/insecticide resistance, and phylogenetic studies to track the origin and spread of disease outbreaks. To maximize the utility of genomic sequences for these purposes, it is essential that metadata about the pathogen/vector isolate characteristics be collected and made available in organized, clear, and consistent formats. Here we report the development of the GSCID/BRC Project and Sample Application Standard, developed by representatives of the Genome Sequencing Centers for Infectious Diseases (GSCIDs, the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRCs for Infectious Diseases, and the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH, informed by interactions with numerous collaborating scientists. It includes mapping to terms from other data standards initiatives, including the Genomic Standards Consortium's minimal information (MIxS and NCBI's BioSample/BioProjects checklists and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI. The standard includes data fields about characteristics of the organism or environmental source of the specimen, spatial-temporal information about the specimen isolation event, phenotypic characteristics of the pathogen/vector isolated, and project leadership and support. By modeling metadata fields into an ontology-based semantic framework and reusing existing ontologies and minimum information checklists, the application standard can be extended to support additional project-specific data fields and integrated with other data represented with comparable standards. The use of this metadata standard by all ongoing and future GSCID sequencing projects will

  1. In vitro and in vivo antagonism of pathogenic turfgrass fungi by Streptomyces hygroscopicus strains YCED9 and WYE53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, K; Crawford, D L

    1999-07-01

    Disease prevention is a current practice used to minimize fungal diseases of turfgrasses in lawns and golf greens. Prevention is accomplished through fungicide applications, and by periodic thatch removal. During the development of a microbial biodethatch product utilizing the lignocellulose-degrading Streptomyces hygroscopicus strains YCED9 and WYE53, we demonstrated using in vitro plate antagonism bioassays that both strains are antagonists of various turfgrass fungal pathogens. These activities were present when the cultures were growing on thatch, as demonstrated by antifungal antagonism bioassays with culture filtrates. Experiments conducted using a growth chamber demonstrated that a bio-dethatch formulation containing spores of strains YCED9 and WYE53 in a zeolite carrier, provided protection for Kentucky bluegrass seedlings against turfgrass pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani, Sclerotinia homeocarpa, Gaeumannomyces graminis and Microdochium nivale. Results showed that by integrating the use of the S. hygroscopicus YCED9/WYE53 bio-dethatch formulation into routine turf management practices, it should be possible to both minimize thatch build-up while also controlling fungal turfgrass diseases by way of the antifungal biocontrol activity of these strains. This in turn would help control fungal pathogens in turfgrass while minimizing the need for routine chemical fungicide applications.

  2. Drosophila as a genetic model for studying pathogenic human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tamara T; Allen, Amanda L; Bardin, Joseph E; Christian, Megan N; Daimon, Kansei; Dozier, Kelsey D; Hansen, Caom L; Holcomb, Lisa M; Ahlander, Joseph

    2012-02-05

    Viruses are infectious particles whose viability is dependent on the cells of living organisms, such as bacteria, plants, and animals. It is of great interest to discover how viruses function inside host cells in order to develop therapies to treat virally infected organisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for studying the molecular mechanisms of replication, amplification, and cellular consequences of human viruses. In this review, we describe the advantages of using Drosophila as a model system to study human viruses, and highlight how Drosophila has been used to provide unique insight into the gene function of several pathogenic viruses. We also propose possible directions for future research in this area.

  3. Oxidative Stress Responses in the Human Fungal Pathogen, Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra da Silva Dantas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen.

  4. Saffold virus, a novel human Cardiovirus with unknown pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeda, Toshiki; Ohara, Yoshiro

    2012-02-01

    Although cardioviruses have been thought to mainly infect rodents, a novel human cardiovirus, designated Saffold virus (SAFV), was identified in 2007. SAFV is grouped with Theiler-like rat virus and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in the species Theilovirus of the genus Cardiovirus of the family Picornaviridae. Eight genotypes of SAFV have now been identified. SAFV has been isolated from nasal and stool specimens from infants presenting with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms as well as from children with nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis; however, the relationship of SAFV to this symptomatology remains unclear. Of note, the virus has also been isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid specimens of patients with aseptic meningitis. This finding is of interest since TMEV is known to cause a multiple sclerosis-like syndrome in mice. The involvement of SAFV in various diseases (e.g., respiratory illness, gastrointestinal illness, neurological diseases, and type I diabetes) is presently under investigation. In order to clarify the pathogenicity of SAFV, additional epidemiological studies are required. Furthermore, identification of the SAFV cellular receptor will help establish an animal model for SAFV infection and help clarify the pathogenesis of SAFV-related diseases. In addition, investigation of the tissue-specific expression of the receptor may facilitate development of a novel picornavirus vector, which could be a useful tool in gene therapy for humans. The study of viral factors involved in viral pathogenicity using a reverse genetics technique will also be important.

  5. Active suppression of early immune response in tobacco by the human pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shirron, Natali; Yaron, Sima

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of enteric pathogens on plants has been studied extensively, mainly due to the potential hazard of human pathogens such as Salmonella enterica being able to invade and survive in/on plants...

  6. Antifungal activity of wide band gap Thioglycolic acid capped ZnS:Mn semiconductor nanoparticles against some pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Isam M; Ali, Iftikhar M; Dheeb, Batol Imran; Abas, Qayes A; Asmeit Ramizy; Eisa, M H; Aljameel, A I

    2017-04-01

    The manganese doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles were synthesized by simple aqueous chemical reaction of manganese chloride, zinc acetate and thioacitamide in aqueous solution. Thioglycolic acid is used as capping agent for controlling the nanoparticle size. The main advantage of the ZnS:Mn nanoparticles of diameter ~2.73nm is that the sample is prepared by using non-toxic precursors in a cost effective and eco-friendly way. The structural, morphological and chemical composition of the nanoparticles have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The nanosize of the prepared nanoparticles was elucidated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). FTIR result ensures that Thioglycolic acid is well bonded on the surface of ZnS:Mn NPs. The antifungal effects of Thioglycolic acid capped ZnS:Mn nanoparticles exhibited a potent antifungal activity against tested fungal strains, so deserving further investigation for clinical applications. The antifungal property of manganese doped zinc sulphide nanoparticles is attributed to the generation of reactive oxygen species due to the interaction of nanoparticles with water. Additionally, the presence of Zn and S in the zone of inhibition area leads to perturbation of fungi cell membranes resulting in growth inhibition.

  7. Inhibition of plant-pathogenic fungi by the barley cystatin Hv-CPI (gene Icy) is not associated with its cysteine-proteinase inhibitory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, M; López-Solanilla, E; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, P; Carbonero, P; Díaz, I

    2003-10-01

    The recombinant barley cystatin Hv-CPI inhibited the growth of three phytopathogenic fungi (Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum graminicola, and Plectosphaerella cucumerina) and the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma viride. Several mutants of barley cystatin were generated by polymerase chain reaction approaches and both their antifungal and their cysteine-proteinase inhibitory properties investigated. Point mutants R38-->G, Q63-->L, and Q63-->P diminished their capacity for inhibiting papain and cathepsin B, retaining their antifungal properties. However, mutant C68-->G was more active for papain and cathepsin B than the wild type. These results indicate that in addition to the consensus cystatin-reactive site, Q63-V64-V65-A66-G67, the A37-R38-F39-A40-V41 region, common to all cereal cystatins, and the C68 residue are important for barley cystatin activity. On the other hand, the K92-->P mutant is inactive as a fungicide, but still retains measurable inhibitory activity for papain and cathepsin B. Against B. cinerea, the antifungal effect of Hv-CPI and of its derived mutants does not always correlate with their activities as proteinase inhibitors, because the Q63-->P mutant is inactive as a cystatin, while still inhibiting fungal growth, and the K92-->P mutant shows the reciprocal effects. These data indicate that inhibition of plant-pathogenic fungi by barley cystatin is not associated with its cysteine-proteinase inhibitory activity. Moreover, these results are corroborated by the absence of inhibition of intra- and extramycelia-proteinase activities by barley cystatin and by other well-known inhibitors of cysteine-proteinase activity in the fungal zymograms of B. cinerea.

  8. Mycobiome of the bat white nose syndrome affected caves and mines reveals diversity of fungi and local adaptation by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces destructans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available Current investigations of bat White Nose Syndrome (WNS and the causative fungus Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces destructans (Pd are intensely focused on the reasons for the appearance of the disease in the Northeast and its rapid spread in the US and Canada. Urgent steps are still needed for the mitigation or control of Pd to save bats. We hypothesized that a focus on fungal community would advance the understanding of ecology and ecosystem processes that are crucial in the disease transmission cycle. This study was conducted in 2010-2011 in New York and Vermont using 90 samples from four mines and two caves situated within the epicenter of WNS. We used culture-dependent (CD and culture-independent (CI methods to catalogue all fungi ('mycobiome'. CD methods included fungal isolations followed by phenotypic and molecular identifications. CI methods included amplification of DNA extracted from environmental samples with universal fungal primers followed by cloning and sequencing. CD methods yielded 675 fungal isolates and CI method yielded 594 fungal environmental nucleic acid sequences (FENAS. The core mycobiome of WNS comprised of 136 operational taxonomic units (OTUs recovered in culture and 248 OTUs recovered in clone libraries. The fungal community was diverse across the sites, although a subgroup of dominant cosmopolitan fungi was present. The frequent recovery of Pd (18% of samples positive by culture even in the presence of dominant, cosmopolitan fungal genera suggests some level of local adaptation in WNS-afflicted habitats, while the extensive distribution of Pd (48% of samples positive by real-time PCR suggests an active reservoir of the pathogen at these sites. These findings underscore the need for integrated disease control measures that target both bats and Pd in the hibernacula for the control of WNS.

  9. 布替奈芬体外抗眼部致病真菌活性研究%Activity of butenafine against ocular pathogenic filamentous fungi in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐岩; 庞广仁; 赵东卿; 高传文; 周路坦; 孙声桃; 王丙亮; 陈祖基

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate antifungal activity of butenafine in comparison with that of natamycin, amphotericin B and fluconazole against ocular pathogenic filmentous fungi in vitro.Methods It was an experimental study.Susceptibility tests were performed against 260 isolates of ocular pathogenic filmentous fungi by broth dilution antifungal susceptibility test of filamentous fungi approved by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M38-A document The isolates included Fusarium spp.(136) , Aspergillus spp.(98), Alternaria alternata (9), Curmdaria lunata (3), and unusual ocular pathogens (14).Final concentration ranged from 0.008 to 16.000 mg/L for butenafine, from 0.031 to 16.000 mg/L for amphotericin B and natamycin, and from 0.5 to 256.0 mg/L for fluconazole.Following incubation at 35 ℃ for 48 h, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined according to the CLSI M38-A document For amphotericin B and natamycin, the MIC was defined as the lowest drug concentration that prevented any discernible growth.For butenafine and fluconazole, the MIC was defined as the lowest concentration in which an approximately 75% reduction compared to the growth of the control was observed.Candida parapsilosis ATCC22019 was used as quality control strains to validated the results.Mean MIC and MIC range, the MIC at which 50% of the isolates tested were inhibited (MIC_(50)) and the MIC at which 90% of the isolates tested were inhibited (MIC_(90)) , were provided for all the isolates tested by using descriptive statistical analysis with the statistical SPSS package (version 13.0).Results MIC_(90) of butenafine, natamycin, amphotericin B and fluconazole were 4,8,2 and 512 mg/L for Fusarium spp., respectively; 0.063, 32.000, 2.000 and 256.000 mg/L for Aspergillus spp., respectively; 0.5, 8.0, 2.0 and 128.0 mg/L for Alternaria alternat, respectively; 0.125, 2.000, 0.500 and 4.000 mg/L for Curvularia lunata, respectively; and 1,4,1 and 256 mg/L for unusual ocular

  10. Culturable fungi in potting soils and compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Doris; Lesch, Susanne; Buzina, Walter; Galler, Herbert; Gutschi, Anna Maria; Habib, Juliana; Pfeifer, Bettina; Luxner, Josefa; Reinthaler, Franz F

    2016-11-01

    In the present study the spectrum and the incidence of fungi in potting soils and compost was investigated. Since soil is one of the most important biotopes for fungi, relatively high concentrations of fungal propagules are to be expected. For detection of fungi, samples of commercial soils, compost and soils from potted plants (both surface and sub-surface) were suspended and plated onto several mycological media. The resulting colonies were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. The results from the different sampling series vary, but concentrations on the surface of potted plants and in commercial soils are increased tenfold compared to compost and sub-surface soils. Median values range from 9.5 × 10(4) colony forming units (CFU)/g to 5.5 × 10(5) CFU/g. The spectrum of fungi also varies in the soils. However, all sampling series show high proportion of Aspergillus and Penicillium species, including potentially pathogenic species such as Aspergillus fumigatus. Cladosporium, a genus dominant in the ambient air, was found preferably in samples which were in contact with the air. The results show that potentially pathogenic fungi are present in soils. Immunocompromised individuals should avoid handling soils or potted plants in their immediate vicinity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Preliminary molecular characterization of the human pathogen Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ai

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human angiostrongyliasis is an emerging food-borne public health problem, with the number of cases increasing worldwide, especially in mainland China. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the causative agent of this severe disease. However, little is known about the genetics and basic biology of A. cantonensis. Results A cDNA library of A. cantonensis fourth-stage larvae was constructed, and ~1,200 clones were sequenced. Bioinformatic analyses revealed 378 cDNA clusters, 54.2% of which matched known genes at a cutoff expectation value of 10-20. Of these 378 unique cDNAs, 168 contained open reading frames encoding proteins containing an average of 238 amino acids. Characterization of the functions of these encoded proteins by Gene Ontology analysis showed enrichment in proteins with binding and catalytic activity. The observed pattern of enzymes involved in protein metabolism, lipid metabolism and glycolysis may reflect the central nervous system habitat of this pathogen. Four proteins were tested for their immunogenicity using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and histopathological examinations. The specificity of each of the four proteins was superior to that of crude somatic and excretory/secretory antigens of larvae, although their sensitivity was relatively low. We further showed that mice immunized with recombinant cystatin, a product of one of the four cDNA candidate genes, were partially protected from A. cantonensis infection. Conclusion The data presented here substantially expand the available genetic information about the human pathogen A. cantonensis, and should be a significant resource for angiostrongyliasis researchers. As such, this work serves as a starting point for molecular approaches for diagnosing and controlling human angiostrongyliasis.

  12. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry applied to identifying species of insect-pathogenic fungi from the Metarhizium anisopliae complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rogério Biaggioni; Faria, Marcos; Souza, Daniela Aguiar; Bloch, Carlos; Silva, Luciano P; Humber, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has proven to be a powerful tool for taxonomic resolution of microorganisms. In this proof-of-concept study, we assessed the effectiveness of this technique to track the current gene sequence-based phylogenetic classification of species in the Metarhizium anisopliae complex. Initially the phylogenetic analysis of 5' strains by sequencing of the 59' end of the TEF-1α gene region revealed seven species within M. anisopliae sensu lato and two varieties outside this complex. Because initial studies on MS profiles from different cell types showed that mycelial fragments or conidia produced on nutrient-poor medium may yield too much background noise, all subsequent spectrometric analyses were performed with acidhydrolyzed conidia from 10-12 d old PDA cultures. The initial MALDI-TOF reference library included protein spectral profiles from nine taxonomically distinct, molecularly identified isolates sharing high genetic homology with the ex-type or ex-epitype isolates of these taxa in Metarhizium. A second reference library added one isolate each for M. anisopliae sensu stricto and M. robertsii. The second, larger reference library (including 11 taxa) allowed nearly perfect MALDI-TOF matching of DNA-based species identification for the 40 remaining isolates molecularly recognized as M. anisopliae sensu stricto (n = 19), M. robertsii (n = 6), M. majus (n = 3), M. lepidiotae (n = 1), M. acridum (n = 3), M. flavoviride var. pemphigi (n = 1), plus seven unidentified strains (six of them phylogenetically close to M. anisopliae sensu stricto and one outside the Metarhizium pingshaense-anisopliae-robertsii-brunneum clade). Due to the increasing frequency of phylogenetically (genomically) based taxonomic revisions of fungi, this approach is especially useful for culture collections, because once the protein profiles of Metarhizium isolates are obtained taxonomic updating of MALDI

  13. Evidence that the Human Pathogenic Fungus Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii May Have Evolved in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvintseva, Anastasia P.; Carbone, Ignazio; Rossouw, Jenny; Thakur, Rameshwari; Govender, Nelesh P.; Mitchell, Thomas G.

    2011-01-01

    Most of the species of fungi that cause disease in mammals, including Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii (serotype A), are exogenous and non-contagious. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is associated worldwide with avian and arboreal habitats. This airborne, opportunistic pathogen is profoundly neurotropic and the leading cause of fungal meningitis. Patients with HIV/AIDS have been ravaged by cryptococcosis – an estimated one million new cases occur each year, and mortality approaches 50%. Using phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, we present evidence that C. neoformans var. grubii may have evolved from a diverse population in southern Africa. Our ecological studies support the hypothesis that a few of these strains acquired a new environmental reservoir, the excreta of feral pigeons (Columba livia), and were globally dispersed by the migration of birds and humans. This investigation also discovered a novel arboreal reservoir for highly diverse strains of C. neoformans var. grubii that are restricted to southern Africa, the mopane tree (Colophospermum mopane). This finding may have significant public health implications because these primal strains have optimal potential for evolution and because mopane trees contribute to the local economy as a source of timber, folkloric remedies and the edible mopane worm. PMID:21589919

  14. Virulence determinants of the human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus protect against soil amoeba predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, Falk; Novohradská, Silvia; Mattern, Derek J; Forberger, Tilmann; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Westermann, Martin; Winckler, Thomas; Brakhage, Axel A

    2015-08-01

    Filamentous fungi represent classical examples for environmentally acquired human pathogens whose major virulence mechanisms are likely to have emerged long before the appearance of innate immune systems. In natural habitats, amoeba predation could impose a major selection pressure towards the acquisition of virulence attributes. To test this hypothesis, we exploited the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum to study its interaction with Aspergillus fumigatus, two abundant soil inhabitants for which we found co-occurrence in various sites. Fungal conidia were efficiently taken up by D. discoideum, but ingestion was higher when conidia were devoid of the green fungal spore pigment dihydroxynaphtalene melanin, in line with earlier results obtained for immune cells. Conidia were able to survive phagocytic processing, and intracellular germination was initiated only after several hours of co-incubation which eventually led to a lethal disruption of the host cell. Besides phagocytic interactions, both amoeba and fungus secreted cross inhibitory factors which suppressed fungal growth or induced amoeba aggregation with subsequent cell lysis, respectively. On the fungal side, we identified gliotoxin as the major fungal factor killing Dictyostelium, supporting the idea that major virulence attributes, such as escape from phagocytosis and the secretion of mycotoxins are beneficial to escape from environmental predators.

  15. Evidence that the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii may have evolved in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia P Litvintseva

    Full Text Available Most of the species of fungi that cause disease in mammals, including Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii (serotype A, are exogenous and non-contagious. Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is associated worldwide with avian and arboreal habitats. This airborne, opportunistic pathogen is profoundly neurotropic and the leading cause of fungal meningitis. Patients with HIV/AIDS have been ravaged by cryptococcosis--an estimated one million new cases occur each year, and mortality approaches 50%. Using phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, we present evidence that C. neoformans var. grubii may have evolved from a diverse population in southern Africa. Our ecological studies support the hypothesis that a few of these strains acquired a new environmental reservoir, the excreta of feral pigeons (Columba livia, and were globally dispersed by the migration of birds and humans. This investigation also discovered a novel arboreal reservoir for highly diverse strains of C. neoformans var. grubii that are restricted to southern Africa, the mopane tree (Colophospermum mopane. This finding may have significant public health implications because these primal strains have optimal potential for evolution and because mopane trees contribute to the local economy as a source of timber, folkloric remedies and the edible mopane worm.

  16. Using fungi and yeasts to manage vegetable crop diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punja, Zamir K; Utkhede, Raj S

    2003-09-01

    Vegetable crops are grown worldwide as a source of nutrients and fiber in the human diet. Fungal plant pathogens can cause devastation in these crops under appropriate environmental conditions. Vegetable producers confronted with the challenges of managing fungal pathogens have the opportunity to use fungi and yeasts as biological control agents. Several commercially available products have shown significant disease reduction through various mechanisms to reduce pathogen development and disease. Production of hydrolytic enzymes and antibiotics, competition for plant nutrients and niche colonization, induction of plant host defense mechanisms, and interference with pathogenicity factors in the pathogen are the most important mechanisms. Biotechnological techniques are becoming increasingly valuable to elucidate the mechanisms of action of fungi and yeasts and provide genetic characterization and molecular markers to monitor the spread of these agents.

  17. Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli, a Common Human Pathogen: Challenges for Vaccine Development and Progress in the Field

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is the most common gram-negative bacterial pathogen in humans. ExPEC causes the vast majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), is a leading cause of adult bacteremia, and is the second most common cause of neonatal meningitis. Increasing multidrug resistance among ExPEC strains constitutes a major obstacle to treatment and is implicated in increasing numbers of hospitalizations and deaths and increasing healthcare costs associated with Ex...

  18. The graphene oxide contradictory effects against human pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Valentina; Carmela Lauriola, Maria; Ciasca, Gabriele; Conti, Claudio; De Spirito, Marco; Papi, Massimiliano

    2017-04-01

    Standing out as the new wonder bidimensional material, graphene oxide (GO) has aroused an exceptional interest in biomedical research by holding promise for being the antibacterial of future. First, GO possesses a specific interaction with microorganisms combined with a mild toxicity for human cells. Additionally, its antibacterial action seems to be directed to multiple targets in pathogens, causing both membranes mechanical injury and oxidative stress. Lastly, compared to other carbon materials, GO has easy and low-cost processing and is environment-friendly. This remarkable specificity and multi-targeting antibacterial activity come at a time when antibiotic resistance represents the major health challenge. Unfortunately, a comprehensive framework to understand how to effectively utilize this material against microorganisms is still lacking. In the last decade, several groups tried to define the mechanisms of interaction between GO flakes and pathogens but conflicting results have been reported. This review is focused on all the contradictions of GO antimicrobial properties in solution. Flake size, incubation protocol, time of exposure and species considered are examples of factors influencing results. These parameters will be summarized and analyzed with the aim of defining the causes of contradictions, to allow fast GO clinical application.

  19. KERATINOPHILIC FUNGI IN SOILS STRESSED BY OCCURRENCE OF ANIMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava Kačinová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to isolate and identify keratinophilic fungi from soils stressed by occurrence of animals, both pets and farm animals. Keratinophilic fungi are present in the environment with variable distribution patterns that depend on different factors, such as human and or animal presence, which are of fundamental importance. This article draws the attention towards the incidence of fungal opportunistic pathogen (Pseudallescheria boydii in soil sample, stressed by occurrence dog. This substrate should be considered as a potential source of the opportunists. Trichophyton ajelloi was representative and encountered in all the samples investigated. A human pathogen, a geophilic dermatophyte Microsporum gypseum was isolated from all 6 soil samples, stressed by occurrence of a dog. Another soil samples genus Chrysosporium has also occurred, namely Chrysosporium keratinophilum and Chrysosporium queenslandicum. Preliminary results showed that keratinophilic fungi were richly represented in the soils in Slovakia and should pay attention to their occurrence especially in the human environmThe aim of this study was to isolate and identify keratinophilic fungi from soils stressed by occurrence of animals, both pets and farm animals. Keratinophilic fungi are present in the environment with variable distribution patterns that depend on different factors, such as human and or animal presence, which are of fundamental importance. This article draws the attention towards the incidence of fungal opportunistic pathogen (Pseudallescheria boydii in soil sample, stressed by occurrence dog. This substrate should be considered as a potential source of the opportunists. Trichophyton ajelloi was representative and encountered in all the samples investigated. A human pathogen, a geophilic dermatophyte Microsporum gypseum was isolated from all 6 soil samples, stressed by occurrence of a dog. Another soil samples genus Chrysosporium has also occurred, namely

  20. [Keratinophilic fungi in soils of parks of Corrientes city, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, María Mercedes; Mangiaterra, Magdalena; Bojanich, María Viviana; Basualdo, Juan Ángel; Giusiano, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The soil is a natural reservoir of keratinophilic fungi, which are a small but important group of filamentous fungi, some of which typically develop on keratinized tissues of living animals. There are numerous species of saprophytic fungi with recognized keratinophilic abilities, and several studies have been undertaken in order to link their presence to possible human disease. To know the biota of geophilic fungi in general and of keratinophilic fungi particularly in soils from two public parks. Soil samples from two public parks of Corrientes city, Argentina, were studied during two seasons, using the hook technique and serial dilutions for fungal isolation. Using the hook technique, 170 isolates were classified into 17 genera and 21 species, among which it is worth mentioning the presence of Microsporum canis. Shannon index for keratinophilic fungi in autumn was 2.27, and 1.92 in spring. By means of the serial dilutions technique, 278 fungi isolated were identified into 33 genera and 71 species. Shannon index in autumn was 3.9, and 3.5 in spring. The soils studied have particularly favorable conditions for the survival of pathogens and opportunistic geophilic fungi for humans and animals. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Rickettsia felis, an emerging flea-transmitted human pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Graves

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Rickettsia felis was first recognised two decades ago and has now been described as endemic to all continents except Antarctica. The rickettsiosis caused by R. felis is known as flea-borne spotted fever or cat-flea typhus. The large number of arthropod species found to harbour R. felis and that may act as potential vectors support the view that it is a pan-global microbe. The main arthropod reservoir and vector is the cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, yet more than 20 other species of fleas, ticks, and mites species have been reported to harbour R. felis. Few bacterial pathogens of humans have been found associated with such a diverse range of invertebrates. With the projected increase in global temperature over the next century, there is concern that changes to the ecology and distribution of R. felis vectors may adversely impact public health.

  2. Host cell modulation by human, animal and plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Siv G E; Kempf, Volkhard A J

    2004-04-01

    Members of the alpha-proteobacteria display a broad range of interactions with higher eukaryotes. Some are pathogens of humans, such as Rickettsia and Bartonella that are associated with diseases like epidemic typhus, trench fever, cat scratch disease and bacillary angiomatosis. Others like the Brucella cause abortions in pregnant animals. Yet other species have evolved elaborate interactions with plants; in this group we find both plant symbionts and parasites. Despite radically different host preferences, extreme genome size variations and the absence of toxin genes, similarities in survival strategies and host cell interactions can be recognized among members of the alpha-proteobacteria. Here, we review some of these similarities, with a focus on strategies for modulation of the host target cell.

  3. Interrelationships of food safety and plant pathology: the life cycle of human pathogens on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Jeri D; Schroeder, Brenda K

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial food-borne pathogens use plants as vectors between animal hosts, all the while following the life cycle script of plant-associated bacteria. Similar to phytobacteria, Salmonella, pathogenic Escherichia coli, and cross-domain pathogens have a foothold in agricultural production areas. The commonality of environmental contamination translates to contact with plants. Because of the chronic absence of kill steps against human pathogens for fresh produce, arrival on plants leads to persistence and the risk of human illness. Significant research progress is revealing mechanisms used by human pathogens to colonize plants and important biological interactions between and among bacteria in planta. These findings articulate the difficulty of eliminating or reducing the pathogen from plants. The plant itself may be an untapped key to clean produce. This review highlights the life of human pathogens outside an animal host, focusing on the role of plants, and illustrates areas that are ripe for future investigation.

  4. Fate of pathogenic bacteria in microcosms mimicking human body sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Francesco; Ghidini, Valentina; Tafi, Maria Carla; Boaretti, Marzia; Lleo, Maria M

    2013-07-01

    During the infectious process, pathogens may reach anatomical sites where they are exposed to substances interfering with their growth. These substances can include molecules produced by the host, and his resident microbial population, as well as exogenous antibacterial drugs. Suboptimal concentrations of inhibitory molecules and stress conditions found in vivo (high or low temperatures, lack of oxygen, extreme pH) might induce in bacteria the activation of survival mechanisms blocking their division capability but allowing them to stay alive. These "dormant" bacteria can be reactivated in particular circumstances and would be able to express their virulence traits. In this study, it was evaluated the effect of some environmental conditions, such as optimal and suboptimal temperatures, direct light and antibiotic sub-inhibitory concentrations doses of antibiotic, on the human pathogens Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis when incubated in fluids accumulated in the body of patients with different pathologies. It is shown that inoculation in a number of accumulated body fluids and the presence of gentamicin, reliable conditions encountered during pathological states, induce stress-responding strategies enabling bacteria to persist in microcosms mimicking the human body. Significant differences were detected in Gram-negative and Gram-positive species with E. faecalis surviving, as starved or viable but non-culturable forms, in any microcosm and condition tested and E. coli activating a viable but non-culturable state only in some clinical samples. The persistence of bacteria under these conditions, being non-culturable, might explain some recurrent infections without isolation of the causative agent after application of the standard microbiological methods.

  5. A Quantitative Prioritisation of Human and Domestic Animal Pathogens in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, K. Marie; Setzkorn, Christian; Hepworth, Philip J.; Morand, Serge; Morse, Andrew P.; Baylis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Disease or pathogen risk prioritisations aid understanding of infectious agent impact within surveillance or mitigation and biosecurity work, but take significant development. Previous work has shown the H-(Hirsch-)index as an alternative proxy. We present a weighted risk analysis describing infectious pathogen impact for human health (human pathogens) and well-being (domestic animal pathogens) using an objective, evidence-based, repeatable approach; the H-index. This study established the highest H-index European pathogens. Commonalities amongst pathogens not included in previous surveillance or risk analyses were examined. Differences between host types (humans/animals/zoonotic) in pathogen H-indices were explored as a One Health impact indicator. Finally, the acceptability of the H-index proxy for animal pathogen impact was examined by comparison with other measures. 57 pathogens appeared solely in the top 100 highest H-indices (1) human or (2) animal pathogens list, and 43 occurred in both. Of human pathogens, 66 were zoonotic and 67 were emerging, compared to 67 and 57 for animals. There were statistically significant differences between H-indices for host types (humans, animal, zoonotic), and there was limited evidence that H-indices are a reasonable proxy for animal pathogen impact. This work addresses measures outlined by the European Commission to strengthen climate change resilience and biosecurity for infectious diseases. The results include a quantitative evaluation of infectious pathogen impact, and suggest greater impacts of human-only compared to zoonotic pathogens or scientific under-representation of zoonoses. The outputs separate high and low impact pathogens, and should be combined with other risk assessment methods relying on expert opinion or qualitative data for priority setting, or could be used to prioritise diseases for which formal risk assessments are not possible because of data gaps. PMID:25136810

  6. The landscape of human proteins interacting with viruses and other pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Dyer

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases result in millions of deaths each year. Mechanisms of infection have been studied in detail for many pathogens. However, many questions are relatively unexplored. What are the properties of human proteins that interact with pathogens? Do pathogens interact with certain functional classes of human proteins? Which infection mechanisms and pathways are commonly triggered by multiple pathogens? In this paper, to our knowledge, we provide the first study of the landscape of human proteins interacting with pathogens. We integrate human-pathogen protein-protein interactions (PPIs for 190 pathogen strains from seven public databases. Nearly all of the 10,477 human-pathogen PPIs are for viral systems (98.3%, with the majority belonging to the human-HIV system (77.9%. We find that both viral and bacterial pathogens tend to interact with hubs (proteins with many interacting partners and bottlenecks (proteins that are central to many paths in the network in the human PPI network. We construct separate sets of human proteins interacting with bacterial pathogens, viral pathogens, and those interacting with multiple bacteria and with multiple viruses. Gene Ontology functions enriched in these sets reveal a number of processes, such as cell cycle regulation, nuclear transport, and immune response that participate in interactions with different pathogens. Our results provide the first global view of strategies used by pathogens to subvert human cellular processes and infect human cells. Supplementary data accompanying this paper is available at http://staff.vbi.vt.edu/dyermd/publications/dyer2008a.html.

  7. Draft genome sequence of the first human isolate of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seersholm, Frederik Valeur; Fischer, Anne; Heller, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is a well-known pathogen of small ruminants. A recent human case of septicemia involving this agent raised the question of its potential pathogenicity to humans. We present the first draft genome sequence of a human Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum...

  8. Anti-dermatophyte efficacy and environmental safety of some essential oils commercial and in vitro extracted pure and combined against four keratinophilic pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sahar Yassin; Abd El-Salam, Magda Magdy

    2015-07-01

    Establish new biocontrol practices with low persistence in the environment against dermatophyte causing mycosis. Antimycotic activity of twenty-six plant-derived commercial essential oils (EOs) was evaluated against four dermatophyte keratinophilic fungi (Microsporum canis, Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes). Commercial EOs which showed the strongest mycelial growth inhibitions were selected and re-extracted in vitro from fresh plant samples. Minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) and antifungal index (AI) of pure and combined extracted oils and were evaluated. All samples were collected and examined during the year of 2014. The results revealed that commercial EOs of Prunus armeniaca, Prunus dulcis var. amara, Olea europaea and Mentha piperita were the most potent antidermatophyte. The mixture of the extracted four oils was the strongest fungicides followed by the alternative two-oil combined extractions then pure extracted oils. MIC was at 50, 25 and 12.5 μg/disc for pure oils, two-oil combinations and four-oil mixture, respectively. Achieved values of AI were found variable. Using of natural products like plant-derived EOs instead of chemotherapy on pathogens can be regarded as an environmental safety mode of diseases control.

  9. Functional analysis of the conserved transcriptional regulator CfWor1 in Cladosporium fulvum reveals diverse roles in the virulence of plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okmen, Bilal; Collemare, Jérôme; Griffiths, Scott; van der Burgt, Ate; Cox, Russell; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2014-04-01

    Fungal Wor1-like proteins are conserved transcriptional regulators that are reported to regulate the virulence of several plant pathogenic fungi by affecting the expression of virulence genes. Here, we report the functional analysis of CfWor1, the homologue of Wor1 in Cladosporium fulvum. Δcfwor1 mutants produce sclerotium-like structures and rough hyphae, which are covered with a black extracellular matrix. These mutants do not sporulate and are no longer virulent on tomato. A CE.CfWor1 transformant that constitutively expresses CfWor1 produces fewer spores with altered morphology and is also reduced in virulence. RNA-seq and RT-qrtPCR analyses suggest that reduced virulence of Δcfwor1 mutants is due to global downregulation of transcription, translation and mitochondrial respiratory chain. The reduced virulence of the CE.CfWor1 transformant is likely due to downregulation of effector genes. Complementation of a non-virulent Δfosge1 (Wor1-homologue) mutant of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici with CfWor1 restored expression of the SIX effector genes in this fungus, but not its virulence. Chimeric proteins of CfWor1/FoSge1 also only partially restored defects of the Δfosge1 mutant, suggesting that these transcriptional regulators have functionally diverged. Altogether, our results suggest that CfWor1 primarily regulates development of C. fulvum, which indirectly affects the expression of a subset of virulence genes.

  10. Advances in controlling of pathogenic fungi infections in post-harvest strawberry%草莓采后真菌病害控制研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨书珍; 柳丽梅; 彭丽桃; 周厚成; 潘思轶; 张丽华

    2012-01-01

    草莓采后极易受病原真菌的侵染,使果实腐烂变质、品质下降,给生产带来重大的经济损失.随着我国草莓种植面积的扩大,草莓采后的防腐保鲜已经成为急需解决的问题.本文从物理途径、化学途径、生物途径等方面对草莓采后真菌病害控制方法的研究进展进行综述,为有效控制草莓采后真菌病害和延长货架期提供思路.%Post-harvest strawberries are susceptible to the decay of fruit and deterioration of quality due to pathogenic fungi infections,a main factor leading to economic losses for both growers and retailers. With the increase of strawberries planting in China, it is urgent to effectively reduce post-harvest rots of strawberry fruits. In this review, new management developments for controlling fungal diseases in post-harvest strawberry were summarized in terms of physical,chemical and biological approaches, which can help to extend the on-shelf time of strawberry fruits.

  11. Sensitivity of four Yeasts to Fungicides and CO2 Concentrations and Their Antagonistic Ability in Combination with Fungicide to pathogenic Fungi in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shi-ping; YAO Hong-jie; QIN Guo-zheng; XU Yong; FENG Xiao-yuan

    2004-01-01

    The yeasts Cryptococcus laurentii,Trichosporon pullulans,Rhodotorula glutinis and Trichosporon sp.were used to investigate their sensitivity to four fungicides and different concentrations of CO2,as well as their antagonistic ability to Penicilliumexpansum and Alternaria alternata in vitro when applied with fungicide.There were significant differences in sensitivity to the fungicides among the different yeasts(P = 0.05).R.glutinis was more sensitive to Deccocil,Iprodione and Stroby as compared to other yeasts.Combination antagonistic yeasts with fungicide could more significantly enhance biocontrol ability of the yeasts against the pathogenic fungi in vitro(P = 0.05).C.laurentii was the most effective antagonist among the four yeasts and could completely control spore germination of P.expansum and A.alternata when combined with Stroby at the concentration of 100 μL L-1.The yeasts,except R.glutinis,could grow well on nutrient yeast dextrose agar (NYDA) after 8 d incubation even at 20% CO2 concentration at 25℃.Particularly Trichosporon sp.showeda better adaptability to low temperature as compared to other antagonists.

  12. Characterization of community structure of culturable endophytic fungi in sweet cherry composite trees and their growth-retarding effect against pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadderafshi, Neda; Pósa, Tímea Borbála; Péter, Gábor; Gáspár, László; Ladányi, Márta; Hrotkó, Károly; Lukács, Noémi; Halász, Krisztián

    2016-09-01

    Endophytic fungi have the potential to protect their host plants in stress situations. Characterizing the ecology and complex interaction between these endophytes and their host plants is therefore of great practical importance, particularly in horticultural plants. Among horticultural plants, fruit trees form a special category because of their longevity and because they are composites of rootstock and scion, which often belong to different plant species. Here we present the first characterization of culturable endophytic fungal community of sweet cherry. Samples from the Hungarian cultivar 'Petrus' grafted on 11 different rootstocks were collected in autumn and in spring in a bearing orchard and the dependence of colonization rate and endophyte diversity on rootstock, organ and season was analysed. On the basis of their ITS sequences 26 fungal operational taxonomic units were identified at least down to the genus level. The dominant genus, comprising more than 50% of all isolates, was Alternaria, followed by different Fusarium and Epicoccum species. We observed some organ-specificity amongst endophytes, and organs showed more sizeable differences in colonization rates and endophyte diversity than rootstocks. Most dynamic endophyte populations, strongly influenced by environmental conditions and crop management, were observed in leaves. The potential of selected endophytes to confer protection against Monilinia laxa was also analysed and 7 isolates were found to inhibit the growth of this pathogen in vitro.

  13. Community composition and population genetics of insect pathogenic fungi in the genus Metarhizium from soils of a long-term agricultural research system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Ryan M; Ugine, Todd A; Maul, Jude E; Cavigelli, Michel A; Rehner, Stephen A

    2015-08-01

    Fungi in the genus Metarhizium are insect pathogens able to function in other niches, including soil and plant rhizosphere habitats. In agroecosystems, cropping and tillage practices influence soil fungal communities with unknown effects on the distribution of Metarhizium, whose presence can reduce populations of crop pests. We report results from a selective media survey of Metarhizium in soils sampled from a long-term experimental farming project in the mid-Atlantic region. Field plots under soybean cultivation produced higher numbers of Metarhizium colony-forming units (cfu) than corn or alfalfa. Plots managed organically and via chisel-till harboured higher numbers of Metarhizium cfu than no-till plots. Sequence typing of Metarhizium isolates revealed four species, with M. robertsii and M. brunneum predominating. The M. brunneum population was essentially fixed for a single clone as determined by multilocus microsatellite genotyping. In contrast, M. robertsii was found to contain significant diversity, with the majority of isolates distributed between two principal clades. Evidence for recombination was observed only in the most abundant clade. These findings illuminate multiple levels of Metarhizium diversity that can be used to inform strategies by which soil Metarhizium populations may be manipulated to exert downward pressure on pest insects and promote plant health. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Pathogenicity of conidia-based preparations of entomopathogenic fungi against the greenhouse pest aphids Myzus persicae, Aphis gossypii, and Aulacorthum solani (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandricic, S E; Filotas, M; Sanderson, J P; Wraight, S P

    2014-05-01

    Seeking new isolates of entomopathogenic fungi with greater virulence against greenhouse aphid pests than those currently registered in North America for control of these insects, single-dose screening assays of 44 selected fungal isolates and 4 commercially available strains were conducted against first-instar nymphs of Myzus persicae and Aphis gossypii. The assays identified a number of Beauveria and Metarhizium isolates with virulence equal to or greater than that of the commercial strains against the nymphal aphids, but none exhibited exceptionally high virulence. Virulence of Isaria isolates was unexpectedly low (1000conidia/mm(2)). In dose-response assays, Beauveria ARSEF 5493 proved most virulent against M. persicae and A. gossypii; however, LC50s of this isolate did not differ significantly from those of B. bassiana commercial strain JW-1. Dose-response assays were also conducted with Aulacorthum solani, the first reported evaluations of Beauveria and Metarhizium against this pest. The novel isolate Metarhizium 5471 showed virulence⩾that of Beauveria 5493 in terms of LC25 and LC50, but 5493 produced a steeper dose response (slope). Additional tests showed that adult aphids are more susceptible than nymphs to fungal infection but confirmed that infection has a limited pre-mortem effect on aphid reproduction. Effects of assay techniques and the potential of fungal pathogens as aphid-control agents are discussed.

  15. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PATHOGENIC CANDIDA SPECIES IN WATER USING FLOW CYTOMETRY COUPLED WITH TAQMAN PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the incidence of human fungal infection increases, the ability to detect and identify pathogenic fungi in potential environmental reservoirs becomes increasingly important for disease control. PCR based assays are widely used for diagnostic purposes, but may be inadequate for...

  16. Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbuta, Mary Augustina; Mwanza, Mulunda

    2017-01-01

    Filamentous fungi occur widely in the environment, contaminating soil, air, food and other substrates. Due to their wide distribution, they have medical and economic implications. Regardless of their use as a source of antibiotics, vitamins and raw materials for various industrially important chemicals, most fungi and filamentous fungi produce metabolites associated with a range of health risks, both in humans and in animals. The association of filamentous fungi and their metabolites to different negative health conditions in humans and animals, has contributed to the importance of investigating different health risks induced by this family of heterotrophs. This review aims to discuss health risks associated with commonly occurring filamentous fungal species which belong to genera Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, as well as evaluating their pathogenicity and mycotoxic properties. PMID:28677641

  17. Health Risks Associated with Exposure to Filamentous Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Augustina Egbuta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi occur widely in the environment, contaminating soil, air, food and other substrates. Due to their wide distribution, they have medical and economic implications. Regardless of their use as a source of antibiotics, vitamins and raw materials for various industrially important chemicals, most fungi and filamentous fungi produce metabolites associated with a range of health risks, both in humans and in animals. The association of filamentous fungi and their metabolites to different negative health conditions in humans and animals, has contributed to the importance of investigating different health risks induced by this family of heterotrophs. This review aims to discuss health risks associated with commonly occurring filamentous fungal species which belong to genera Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium, as well as evaluating their pathogenicity and mycotoxic properties.

  18. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Brumlik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known.

  19. Use of cell culture media for cultivation of the mite pathogenic fungi Neozygites tanajoae and Neozygites floridana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delalibera, Italo; Hajek, Ann E; Humber, Richard A

    2003-10-01

    The pathogenic fungus Neozygites tanajoae, one of the most efficient natural enemies of the cassava green mite (CGM) Mononychellus tanajoa in Brazil, was introduced experimentally in Benin in 1998/1999 for the control of CGM. Isolation methods and culture media for in vitro production of N. tanajoae are reported for the first time in this study. Continuous growth of N. tanajoae was achieved using medium NT-1 (IPL-41+5-10% fetal bovine serum+0.3% lactalbumin hydrolysate+0.3% yeastolate). This medium supported production of N. tanajoae up to 1.53 (+ or - 0.08) x 10(7) hyphal bodies/mL after 8 days. The growth of N. tanajoae from Cruz das Almas, Brazil, was compared to the growth of two Neozygites floridana isolates with wider host ranges from North Carolina, US, and Palmira, Colombia, in 11 cell culture media. We demonstrated that differences in nutritional requirements exist between N. tanajoae and the similar species, N. floridana. N. tanajoae is a particularly fastidious species highly specific to CGM and grows well in few media while N. floridana which is less host specific, grows in a broader range of media, including serum free media. N. floridana isolates produced more than 2 x 10(6) hyphal bodies/mL in > or =7 of the 11 media tested. However, the N. tanajoae isolate reached the same final concentration in only 3 media. Cell densities of N. tanajoae also increased slower than in N. floridana isolates in most media. N. tanajoae differed morphologically from the two N. floridana isolates in vitro. Hyphal bodies of eight N. tanajoae isolates are shorter than hyphal bodies of the two N. floridana isolates. The distinction of these two species was initially proposed based on host specificity, genetic and physiological patterns and is supported by the results presented in this study.

  20. Antimicrobial properties of marine seaweed, Sargassum muticum against human pathogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Puthamohan Vinayaga Moorthi; Chelliah Balasubramanian

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antibacterial efficiency of the seaweed, Sargassum muticum (S. muticum) collected from Pudumadam, Ramanathapuram, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods:Crude solvent extracts of S. muticum were obtained by using Soxhlet extraction and the solvents like acetone, methanol and chloroform. These different extracts were tested against different human bacterial pathogens such as Micrococcus sp., Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin resistance), Salmonella paratyphi B, Staphylococcus epidermis (3615), Enterobacter aerogenus (111), Klebsiella pneumonia (109), Shigella fleschneri (1457) (S. fleschneri), Proteus vulgaris (1771), Staphylococcus aureus (96) and Salmonella typhymurium (SP7) which were obtained from Microbial Type Culture Collection, Indian Institute of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh, India. Results:The results revealed that acetone extract had unveiled the maximum of 11 mm zone of inhibition at 40 µL against S. fleschneri. Similar zone of inhibition (11 mm) was also observed at 50 µL against Micrococcus sp. and S. fleschneri. Followed by acetone extract, chloroform extract also contributed 11 mm zone of inhibition against S. fleschneri and Salmonella paratyphi B at 40 and 50 µL respectively. Besides, methanol extracts revealed meager antibacterial activity (9 mm). Conclusions:The present investigation suggests that the phytochemical constituent of the S. muticum might be suitable agents for the control of human deadly diseases.

  1. The anti-biofilm potential of pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) extract against human bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Nandhini, Janarthanam Rathna; Malathy, Balakumar; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases caused by bacteria and fungi are the major cause of morbidity and mortality across the globe. Multi-drug resistance in these pathogens augments the complexity and severity of the diseases. Various studies have shown the role of biofilms in multi-drug resistance, where the pathogen resides inside a protective coat made of extracellular polymeric substances. Since biofilms directly influence the virulence and pathogenicity of a pathogen, it is optimal to employ a strategy that effectively inhibits the formation of biofilm. Pomegranate is a common food and is also used traditionally to treat various ailments. This study assessed the anti-biofilm activity of a methanolic extract of pomegranate against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Methanolic extract of pomegranate was shown to inhibit the formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Candida albicans. Apart from inhibiting the formation of biofilm, pomegranate extract disrupted pre-formed biofilms and inhibited germ tube formation, a virulence trait, in C. albicans. Characterization of the methanolic extract of pomegranate revealed the presence of ellagic acid (2,3,7,8-tetrahydroxy-chromeno[5,4,3-cde]chromene-5,10-dione) as the major component. Ellagic acid is a bioactive tannin known for its antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. Further studies revealed the ability of ellagic acid to inhibit the growth of all species in suspension at higher concentrations (>75 μg ml(-1)) and biofilm formation at lower concentrations (pomegranate for the treatment of human ailments.

  2. Plant biomass degradation by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the topic is highly relevant in the field of plant pathogenic fungi as they degrade plant biomass to either gain access to the plant or as carbon source, resulting in significant crop losses. Finally, fungi are the main degraders of plant biomass in nature and as such have an essential role in the global carbon cycle and ecology in general. In this review we provide a global view on the development of this research topic in saprobic ascomycetes and basidiomycetes and in plant pathogenic fungi and link this to the other papers of this special issue on plant biomass degradation by fungi. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The human-bacterial pathogen protein interaction networks of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Dyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis are bacterial pathogens that can cause anthrax, lethal acute pneumonic disease, and bubonic plague, respectively, and are listed as NIAID Category A priority pathogens for possible use as biological weapons. However, the interactions between human proteins and proteins in these bacteria remain poorly characterized leading to an incomplete understanding of their pathogenesis and mechanisms of immune evasion. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we used a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid assay to identify physical interactions between human proteins and proteins from each of these three pathogens. From more than 250,000 screens performed, we identified 3,073 human-B. anthracis, 1,383 human-F. tularensis, and 4,059 human-Y. pestis protein-protein interactions including interactions involving 304 B. anthracis, 52 F. tularensis, and 330 Y. pestis proteins that are uncharacterized. Computational analysis revealed that pathogen proteins preferentially interact with human proteins that are hubs and bottlenecks in the human PPI network. In addition, we computed modules of human-pathogen PPIs that are conserved amongst the three networks. Functionally, such conserved modules reveal commonalities between how the different pathogens interact with crucial host pathways involved in inflammation and immunity. SIGNIFICANCE: These data constitute the first extensive protein interaction networks constructed for bacterial pathogens and their human hosts. This study provides novel insights into host-pathogen interactions.

  4. Banana peel culture as an indigenous medium for easy identification of late-sporulation human fungal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A J Kindo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Fungi are increasing in incidence as human pathogens and newer and rarer species are continuously being encountered. Identifying these species from growth on regular culture media may be challenging due to the absence of typical features. An indigenous and cheap medium, similar to the natural substrate of these fungi, was standardised in our laboratory as an aid to species identification in a conventional laboratory setting. Materials and Methods: Ripe banana peel pieces, sterilised in an autoclave at 121°C temperature and 15 lbs pressure for 15 min promoted good growth of hyphae and pycnidia or acervuli in coelomycetes, flabelliform and medusoid fruiting bodies of basidiomycetes and fruit bodies such as cleistothecium in ascomycetes. The growth from the primary isolation medium was taken and inoculated onto the pieces of double-autoclaved ripe banana peel pieces in a sterile glass Petri dish with some moisture (sprinkles of sterile distilled water. A few sterile coverslips were placed randomly inside the Petri dish for the growing fungus to stick on to it. The plates were kept at room temperature and left undisturbed for 15–20 days. At a time, one coverslip was taken out and placed on a slide with lactophenol cotton blue and focused under the microscope to look for fruit bodies. Results: Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Macrophomina phaseolina, Nigrospora sphaerica, Chaetomium murorum, Nattrassia mangiferae and Schizophyllum commune were identified by characteristic features from growth on banana peel culture. Conclusions: Banana peel culture is a cheap and effective medium resembling the natural substrate of fungi and is useful for promoting characteristic reproductive structures that aid identification.

  5. Assessment of human exposure to airborne fungi in agricultural confinements: personal inhalable sampling versus stationary sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Atin; Reponen, Tiina; Lee, Shu-An; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2004-01-01

    Accurate exposure assessment to airborne fungi in agricultural environments is essential for estimating the associated occupational health hazards of workers. The objective of this pilot study was to compare personal and stationary sampling for assessing farmers' exposure to airborne fungi in 3 different agricultural confinements located in Ohio, USA (hog farm, dairy farm, and grain farm), using Button Personal Inhalable Samplers. Personal exposures were measured with samplers worn by 3 subjects (each carrying 2 samplers) during 3 types of activities, including animal feeding in the hog farm, cleaning and animal handling in the dairy farm, and soybean unloading and handling in the grain farm. Simultaneously, the stationary measurements were performed using 5 static Button Samplers and 1 revolving Button Sampler. The study showed that the total concentration of airborne fungi ranged from 1.4 x 10(4)-1.2 x 10(5) spores m(-3) in 3 confinements. Grain unloading and handling activity generated highest concentrations of airborne fungi compared to the other 2 activities. Prevalent airborne fungi belonged to Cladosporium, Aspergillus/Penicillium, Ascospores, smut spores, Epicoccum, Alternaria, and Basidiospores. Lower coefficients of variations were observed for the fungal concentrations measured by personal samplers (7-12%) compared to the concentrations measured by stationary samplers (27-37%). No statistically significant difference was observed between the stationary and personal measurement data for the total concentrations of airborne fungi (p > 0.05). Revolving stationary and static stationary Button Samplers demonstrated similar performance characteristics for the collection of airborne fungi. This reflects the low sensitivity of the sampler's efficiency to the wind speed and direction. The results indicate that personal exposure of agricultural workers in confinements may be adequately assessed by placing several Button Samplers simultaneously operating in a

  6. Production of recombinant proteins by filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Owen P

    2012-01-01

    causes of the deleterious impacts of fungi, for example as human, mammalian and plant pathogens, and then to bring forward solutions, is expected to represent a very important future focus of fungal recombinant protein technology. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Salmonella, a cross-kingdom pathogen infecting humans and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Reyes, Casandra; Schikora, Adam

    2013-06-01

    Infections with non-typhoidal Salmonella strains are constant and are a non-negligible threat to the human population. In the last two decades, salmonellosis outbreaks have increasingly been associated with infected fruits and vegetables. For a long time, Salmonellae were assumed to survive on plants after a more or less accidental infection. However, this notion has recently been challenged. Studies on the infection mechanism in vegetal hosts, as well as on plant immune systems, revealed an active infection process resembling in certain features the infection in animals. On one hand, Salmonella requires the type III secretion systems to effectively infect plants and to suppress their resistance mechanisms. On the other hand, plants recognize these bacteria and react to the infection with an induced defense mechanism similar to the reaction to other plant pathogens. In this review, we present the newest reports on the interaction between Salmonellae and plants. We discuss the possible ways used by these bacteria to infect plants as well as the plant responses to the infection. The recent findings indicate that plants play a central role in the dissemination of Salmonella within the ecosystem.

  8. In Silico Prediction of Human Pathogenicity in the gamma-Proteobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Nielsen, Morten; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2010-01-01

    strongly needed to mine the fast growing number of genome sequences and assess in a rapid and reliable way the pathogenicity of novel bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings: We describe a new in silico method for the prediction of bacterial pathogenicity, based on the identification in microbial genomes...... to be able to separate pathogenic organisms from non-pathogenic ones. Using traditional experimental methods for this purpose can be very costly and time-consuming, and also uncertain since animal models are not always good predictors for pathogenicity in humans. Bioinformatics-based methods are therefore....... A set of protein families that differentiate pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains were identified, including families of yet uncharacterized proteins that are suggested to be involved in bacterial pathogenicity....

  9. An unclassified microorganism: novel pathogen candidate lurking in human airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Fukuda

    Full Text Available During the assessments of the correlation of the diseases and the microbiota of various clinical specimens, unique 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequences (less than 80% similarity to known bacterial type strains were predominantly detected in a bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF specimen from a patient with chronic lower respiratory tract infection. The origin of this unique sequence is suspected to be the causative agent of the infection. We temporarily named the owner organism of this sequence "IOLA" (Infectious Organism Lurking in Airways. In order to evaluate the significance of IOLA in human lung disorders, we performed several experiments. IOLA-16S rRNA genes were detected in 6 of 386 clone libraries constructed from clinical specimens of patients with respiratory diseases (in our study series. The gene sequences (1,427 bp are identical, and no significantly similar sequence was found in public databases (using NCBI blastn except for the 8 shorter sequences detected from patients with respiratory diseases in other studies from 2 other countries. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the 16S rRNA gene of IOLA is more closely related to eukaryotic mitochondria than bacteria. However, the size and shape of IOLA seen by fluorescent in-situ hybridization are similar to small bacteria (approximately 1 µm with a spherical shape. Furthermore, features of both bacteria and mitochondria were observed in the genomic fragment (about 19 kb of IOLA, and the GC ratio of the sequence was extremely low (20.5%. Two main conclusions were reached: (1 IOLA is a novel bacteria-like microorganism that, interestingly, possesses features of eukaryotic mitochondria. (2 IOLA is a novel pathogen candidate, and it may be the causative agent of human lung or airway disease. IOLA exists in BALF specimens from patients with remarkable symptoms; this information is an important piece for helping solve the elusive etiology of chronic respiratory disorders.

  10. Screening of plant pathogenic fungi by ginsenoside compound K production%人参皂苷compound K转化菌株的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨元超; 王英平; 闫梅霞; 孙成贺; 郑培和

    2011-01-01

    目的:筛选具有人参皂苷转化能力的真菌菌株,用于生产稀有人参皂苷compound K.方法:通过液态发酵,以三七茎叶总皂苷为底物,采用TLC和HPLC-ELSD检测转化产物,从12株植物病原真菌中筛选能够转化产生人参皂苷compoundK的最佳菌株.结果:获得一株高效人参皂苷转化真菌,可以转化产生人参皂苷compound K,该菌株为镰刀属真菌串珠镰孢Fusarium moniliforme.结论:串珠镰孢对三七茎叶总皂苷具有较高的转化效率,有望用于生产制备compound K等低含量高活性的稀有人参皂苷.%Objective:To screen a new strain which can transform panaxadiol saponins into the rare ginsenoside compound K.Method:The total saponins in stems and leaves of Panax notoginseng was used as a substrate in the liquid state fermentation process.and the results were detected by TCL and HPLC-ELSD to screen a strain from twelve plant pathogenic fungi which can produce ginsenoside compound K.Result:Fusarium moniliforme was found to transform the total saponins to ginsenoside compound K efficiently in the all twelve fungal strains.In the fermentation process, ginsenoside Rb1 was transformed almost completely,and the content of ginsenoside Rd was decreasing evidently.Conclusion:F.moniliforme is selected as a new high-yield strain.It is expected to be used to produce the high activity infrequent ginsenoside compound K and to improve the content of active principles in medicinal plants.

  11. RIPEN FRUITS OF INDIAN GINSENG: PHYTO-CHEMICAL AND PHARMACOLOGICAL EXAMINATION AGAINST HUMAN AND PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premlata Singariya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The ripen fruit extracts of Withania somniferawere evaluated against medically importantbacteria viz.Proteusmerabilis, Klebsiella pnemoniae, Agerobacterium tumefaciens(plant pathogenandone fungi Aspergillus niger.The dried and powdered ripen fruits were successively extracted with a seriesof non polar to polar solvents using soxhlet assembly. The antimicrobial assay was done by both discdiffusion and broth dilution methods. Glacial acetic acid extract of W. somniferashow highest activityagainst A. tumefaciens(plant pathogen and water extract againstK. pnemoniaeto varying degrees in theterms of high inhibition zone and activity index. A. tumefacienswas the most susceptible organism incompare to the other organism. Gentamycin and Ketoconazole, the standard antibacterial and antifungalused was effective against the bacteria and fungi. The extract of W. somniferaalso significantly (P>0.005inhibited the bacterial and fungal growth. The inhibitory effect is very identical in magnitude andcomparable with that of standard antibiotics used.

  12. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  13. Adaptive immunity to fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2014-11-06

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases.

  14. Iron acquisition functions expressed by the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbler, Daniel L; Penwell, William F; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Menke, Sharon M; Tomaras, Andrew P; Connerly, Pamela L; Actis, Luis A

    2009-02-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram-negative bacterium that causes serious infections in compromised patients. More recently, it has emerged as the causative agent of severe infections in military personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan. This pathogen grows under a wide range of conditions including iron-limiting conditions imposed by natural and synthetic iron chelators. Initial studies using the type strain 19606 showed that the iron proficiency of this pathogen depends on the expression of the acinetobactin-mediated iron acquisition system. More recently, we have observed that hemin but not human hemoglobin serves as an iron source when 19606 isogenic derivatives affected in acinetobactin transport and biosynthesis were cultured under iron-limiting conditions. This finding is in agreement with the observation that the genome of the strain 17978 has a gene cluster coding for putative hemin-acquisition functions, which include genes coding for putative hemin utilization functions and a TonBExbBD energy transducing system. This system restored enterobactin biosynthesis in an E. coli ExbBD deficient strain but not when introduced into a TonB mutant. PCR and Southern blot analyses showed that this hemin-utilization gene cluster is also present in the 19606 strain. Analysis of the 17978 genome also showed that this strain harbors genes required for acinetobactin synthesis and transport as well as a gene cluster that could code for additional iron acquisition functions. This hypothesis is in agreement with the fact that the inactivation of the basD acinetobactin biosynthetic gene did not affect the growth of A. baumannii 17978 cells under iron-chelated conditions. Interestingly, this second iron uptake gene cluster is flanked by perfect inverted repeats and includes transposase genes that are expressed transcriptionally. Also interesting is the observation that this additional cluster could not be detected in the type strain 19606, an observation that suggests some

  15. Antagonistic activity of antibiotic producing Streptomyces sp. against fish and human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazmul Hossain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to isolate Streptomyces sp. from soil samples of two different regions of Bangladesh and evaluate their antagonistic activity against fish and human pathogenic bacteria. A total of 10 isolates were identified as Streptomyces sp. based on several morphological, physiological and biochemical tests. Cross streak method was used to observe the antagonistic activity of the Streptomyces sp. isolates against different fish pathogens belonging to the genus Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Edwardsiella and human clinical isolates belonging to the genus Klebsiella, Salmonella and Streptococcus. Seven Streptomyces sp. isolates showed antagonism against both fish and human pathogenic bacteria. Four isolates viz., N24, N26, N28 and N47 showed broad spectrum of antagonistic activity (80-100% against all genera of fish and human pathogenic bacteria. The isolate N49 exhibited highest spectrum of antagonism against all fish pathogens (90-100% but comparatively lower degree of antagonism against human pathogens (50-60%. Rest of the two isolates (N21 and N23 showed variability in their antagonism. Results showed that broad spectrum antibiotic(s could be developed from the isolates N24, N26, N28 and N47against several human and fish pathogens. The isolate N49 could be a potential source of antibiotic, especially for fish pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Phylogeny and comparative genome analysis of a Basidiomycete fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Robert W.; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor; Hibbett, David

    2011-03-14

    Fungi of the phylum Basidiomycota, make up some 37percent of the described fungi, and are important from the perspectives of forestry, agriculture, medicine, and bioenergy. This diverse phylum includes the mushrooms, wood rots, plant pathogenic rusts and smuts, and some human pathogens. To better understand these important fungi, we have undertaken a comparative genomic analysis of the Basidiomycetes with available sequenced genomes. We report a phylogeny that sheds light on previously unclear evolutionary relationships among the Basidiomycetes. We also define a `core proteome? based on protein families conserved in all Basidiomycetes. We identify key expansions and contractions in protein families that may be responsible for the degradation of plant biomass such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Finally, we speculate as to the genomic changes that drove such expansions and contractions.

  17. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  18. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  19. The rhizosphere microbiome: significance of plant beneficial, plant pathogenic, and human pathogenic microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, R.; Garbeva, P.V.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial communities play a pivotal role in the functioning of plants by influencing their physiology and development. While many members of the rhizosphere microbiome are beneficial to plant growth, also plant pathogenic microorganisms colonize the rhizosphere striving to break through the protect

  20. Host-pathogen interactions between the human innate immune system and Candida albicans-understanding and modeling defense and evasion strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dühring, Sybille; Germerodt, Sebastian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Dandekar, Thomas; Schuster, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The diploid, polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is one of the most important human pathogenic fungi. C. albicans can grow, proliferate and coexist as a commensal on or within the human host for a long time. However, alterations in the host environment can render C. albicans virulent. In this review, we describe the immunological cross-talk between C. albicans and the human innate immune system. We give an overview in form of pairs of human defense strategies including immunological mechanisms as well as general stressors such as nutrient limitation, pH, fever etc. and the corresponding fungal response and evasion mechanisms. Furthermore, Computational Systems Biology approaches to model and investigate these complex interactions are highlighted with a special focus on game-theoretical methods and agent-based models. An outlook on interesting questions to be tackled by Systems Biology regarding entangled defense and evasion mechanisms is given.

  1. Developmental gene expression profiles of the human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Geoffrey N; Moertel, Luke; Brindley, Paul J; McManus, Donald P

    2009-01-01

    Background The schistosome blood flukes are complex trematodes and cause a chronic parasitic disease of significant public health importance worldwide, schistosomiasis. Their life cycle is characterised by distinct parasitic and free-living phases involving mammalian and snail hosts and freshwater. Microarray analysis was used to profile developmental gene expression in the Asian species, Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNAs were isolated from the three distinct environmental phases of the lifecycle – aquatic/snail (eggs, miracidia, sporocysts, cercariae), juvenile (lung schistosomula and paired but pre-egg laying adults) and adult (paired, mature males and egg-producing females, both examined separately). Advanced analyses including ANOVA, principal component analysis, and hierarchal clustering provided a global synopsis of gene expression relationships among the different developmental stages of the schistosome parasite. Results Gene expression profiles were linked to the major environmental settings through which the developmental stages of the fluke have to adapt during the course of its life cycle. Gene ontologies of the differentially expressed genes revealed a wide range of functions and processes. In addition, stage-specific, differentially expressed genes were identified that were involved in numerous biological pathways and functions including calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism and parasite defence. Conclusion The findings provide a comprehensive database of gene expression in an important human pathogen, including transcriptional changes in genes involved in evasion of the host immune response, nutrient acquisition, energy production, calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism, egg production and tegumental function during development. This resource should help facilitate the identification and prioritization of new anti-schistosome drug and vaccine targets for the control of schistosomiasis. PMID:19320991

  2. Developmental gene expression profiles of the human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McManus Donald P

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The schistosome blood flukes are complex trematodes and cause a chronic parasitic disease of significant public health importance worldwide, schistosomiasis. Their life cycle is characterised by distinct parasitic and free-living phases involving mammalian and snail hosts and freshwater. Microarray analysis was used to profile developmental gene expression in the Asian species, Schistosoma japonicum. Total RNAs were isolated from the three distinct environmental phases of the lifecycle – aquatic/snail (eggs, miracidia, sporocysts, cercariae, juvenile (lung schistosomula and paired but pre-egg laying adults and adult (paired, mature males and egg-producing females, both examined separately. Advanced analyses including ANOVA, principal component analysis, and hierarchal clustering provided a global synopsis of gene expression relationships among the different developmental stages of the schistosome parasite. Results Gene expression profiles were linked to the major environmental settings through which the developmental stages of the fluke have to adapt during the course of its life cycle. Gene ontologies of the differentially expressed genes revealed a wide range of functions and processes. In addition, stage-specific, differentially expressed genes were identified that were involved in numerous biological pathways and functions including calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism and parasite defence. Conclusion The findings provide a comprehensive database of gene expression in an important human pathogen, including transcriptional changes in genes involved in evasion of the host immune response, nutrient acquisition, energy production, calcium signalling, sphingolipid metabolism, egg production and tegumental function during development. This resource should help facilitate the identification and prioritization of new anti-schistosome drug and vaccine targets for the control of schistosomiasis.

  3. Human mobility networks and persistence of rapidly mutating pathogens

    CERN Document Server

    Aleta, Alberto; Meloni, Sandro; Poletto, Chiara; Colizza, Vittoria; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly mutating pathogens may be able to persist in the population and reach an endemic equilibrium by escaping hosts' acquired immunity. For such diseases, multiple biological, environmental and population-level mechanisms determine the dynamics of the outbreak, including pathogen's epidemiological traits (e.g. transmissibility, infectious period and duration of immunity), seasonality, interaction with other circulating strains and hosts' mixing and spatial fragmentation. Here, we study a susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible model on a metapopulation where individuals are distributed in subpopulations connected via a network of mobility flows. Through extensive numerical simulations, we explore the phase space of pathogen's persistence and map the dynamical regimes of the pathogen following emergence. Our results show that spatial fragmentation and mobility play a key role in the persistence of the disease whose maximum is reached at intermediate mobility values. We describe the occurrence of differen...

  4. From Environment to Man: Genome Evolution and Adaptation of Human Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Estelle Jumas-Bilak; Hélène Marchandin; Brigitte Lamy; Anne Lotthé; Fabien Aujoulat; Frédéric Roger; Alice Bourdier

    2012-01-01

    Environment is recognized as a huge reservoir for bacterial species and a source of human pathogens. Some environmental bacteria have an extraordinary range of activities that include promotion of plant growth or disease, breakdown of pollutants, production of original biomolecules, but also multidrug resistance and human pathogenicity. The versatility of bacterial life-style involves adaptation to various niches. Adaptation to both open environment and human specific niches is a major challe...

  5. The arable plant ecosystem as battleground for emergence of human pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo eVan Overbeek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Disease incidences related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica infections by consumption of (fresh vegetables, sprouts and occasionally fruits made clear that these pathogens are not only transmitted to humans via the ‘classical’ routes of meat, eggs and dairy products, but also can be transmitted to humans via plants or products derived from plants. Nowadays, it is of major concern that these human pathogens, especially the ones belonging to the taxonomical family of Enterobacteriaceae, become adapted to environmental habitats without losing their virulence to humans. Adaptation to the plant environment would lead to longer persistence in plants, increasing their chances on transmission to humans via consumption of plant-derived food. One of the mechanisms of adaptation to the plant environment in human pathogens, proposed in this paper, is horizontal transfer of genes from different microbial communities present in the arable ecosystem, like the ones originating from soil, animal digestive track systems (manure, water and plants themselves. Genes that would confer better adaptation to the phytosphere might be genes involved in plant colonization, stress resistance and nutrient acquisition and utilization. Because human pathogenic enterics often were prone to genetic exchanges via phages and conjugative plasmids, it was postulated that these genetic elements may be hold key responsible for horizontal gene transfers between human pathogens and indigenous microbes in agroproduction systems. In analogy to zoonosis, we coin the term phytonosis for a human pathogen that is transmitted via plants and not exclusively via animals.

  6. Disease-Causing Fungi in Homes and Yards in the Midwestern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgardner, Dennis J.

    2016-01-01

    A number of fungal pathogens that may result in a variety of human diseases are found in residential homes and yards. The growth of these microscopic fungi is often favored by particular characteristics of the dwelling and nearby outdoor environment. Evolved virulence factors or increased ability of specific fungi to grow in diverse, and sometimes harsh, microenvironments presented by the domestic environment may promote growth and pathogenesis. Infection may occur by inhalation or direct ino...

  7. Auxin-mediated relationships between apple plants and root inhabiting fungi: impact on root pathogens and potentialities of growth-promoting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to examine the symbiotic relationship between plant hosts and endophytic fungi recovered in multi-generation replanted apple orchard soils. Based upon results obtained, subsequent studies were oriented toward investigating fungal populations showing a mutualistic symbiotic rel...

  8. Endophytic fungi harbored in Panax notoginseng: diversity and potential as biological control agents against host plant pathogens of root-rot disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Kun Zheng

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggested that P. notoginseng harbors diversified endophytic fungi that would provide a basis for the identification of new bioactive compounds, and for effective biocontrol of notoginseng root rot.

  9. Genetically Engineering Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Lovett, B; Fang, W

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have been developed as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides in biocontrol programs for agricultural pests and vectors of disease. However, mycoinsecticides currently have a small market share due to low virulence and inconsistencies in their performance. Genetic engineering has made it possible to significantly improve the virulence of fungi and their tolerance to adverse conditions. Virulence enhancement has been achieved by engineering fungi to express insect proteins and insecticidal proteins/peptides from insect predators and other insect pathogens, or by overexpressing the pathogen's own genes. Importantly, protein engineering can be used to mix and match functional domains from diverse genes sourced from entomopathogenic fungi and other organisms, producing insecticidal proteins with novel characteristics. Fungal tolerance to abiotic stresses, especially UV radiation, has been greatly improved by introducing into entomopathogens a photoreactivation system from an archaean and pigment synthesis pathways from nonentomopathogenic fungi. Conversely, gene knockout strategies have produced strains with reduced ecological fitness as recipients for genetic engineering to improve virulence; the resulting strains are hypervirulent, but will not persist in the environment. Coupled with their natural insect specificity, safety concerns can also be mitigated by using safe effector proteins with selection marker genes removed after transformation. With the increasing public concern over the continued use of synthetic chemical insecticides and growing public acceptance of genetically modified organisms, new types of biological insecticides produced by genetic engineering offer a range of environmentally friendly options for cost-effective control of insect pests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ambrosia fungi in the insect-fungi symbiosis in relation to cork oak decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Joana; Inácio, Maria Lurdes; Sousa, Edmundo

    2006-09-01

    Ambrosia fungi live associated with beetles (Scolytidae and Platypodidae) in host trees and act as a food source for the insects. The symbiotic relation is important to the colonizing strategies of host trees by beetles. Ambrosia fungi are dimorphic: they grow as ambrosial form and as mycelium. The fungi are highly specialized, adapted to a specific beetle and to the biotope where they both live. In addition other fungi have been found such as tree pathogenic fungi that may play a role in insects host colonization success. Saprophytic fungi are also present in insects galleries. These may decompose cellulose and/or be antagonistic to other less beneficial fungi. This paper summarizes the importance of ambrosia fungi and the interaction with insects and hosts. The possibility of the transport of pathogenic fungi by Platypus cylindrus to cork oak thus contributing for its decline is discussed.

  11. Use of bacillus subtilis strains to inhibit postharvest pathogenic fungi; Attivita` antagonista di alcuni ceppi di bacillus subtilis nei confronti di funghi patogeni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arras, G.; Gambella, F.; Demontis, S.; Petretto, A.

    1995-09-01

    An isolate (87) of the bacillus subtilis strains isolated from cold stored citrus fruit 13 proved to inhibit the growth in vitro of the penicillium italicum used in the experiment (from 50.6% to 92.2%) and to inhibit botrytis cinerea (from 65.3% to 95.9%). A further test, superimposing on plates containing PDA strains Nos. 13, 173, and 160, totally inhibited the fungi. Tested in vivo on artificially bruised oranges, they significantly inhibited two fungi.

  12. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of anamorphic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Madrid Lorca, Hugo

    2011-01-01

    Anamorphic fungi (those reproducing asexually) are a big part of kingdom Fungi. Most of them occur as saprobes in nature, but numerous species are pathogenic to plants and animals including man. With the aim of contributing to the knowledge of the diversity and distribution of anamorphic fungi, we performed a phenotypic and molecular characterization of environmental and clinical isolates of these fungi. Based on a polyphasic taxonomy approach which included morphology, physiology and DNA seq...

  13. Cold plasma inactivation of human pathogens on foods and regulatory status update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of foods with human pathogens such as Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, norovirus, and other pathogens is an ongoing challenge for growers and processors. In recent years, cold plasma has emerged as a promising antimicrobial treatment for fresh and fresh-cut...

  14. Pathogen sensing, subsequent signalling, and signalosome in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Olivier; Berthet, Julien; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2011-04-01

    Beyond haemostasis, platelets exert a potent role in innate immunity and particularly in its inflammatory arm. The extent of this action remains however debatable, despite clear - and old - evidence of a link between platelets and infection. Platelets can sense infectious pathogens by pathogen recognition receptors and they can even discriminate between various types of infectious signatures. In reply, they can shape their capacity to respond by activating a signalosome and by producing different profiles of pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products. The links between pathogen sensing, signalosome activation and protein production, and their finely tuned regulation are still under investigation since platelets lack a nucleus and thus, canonical molecular biology and genomics apparati.

  15. Isolation of fungi belonging to the genera Geotrichum and Trichosporum from human dermal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, A; De Uribe, L

    1976-08-30

    Isolates of Geotrichum and Trichosporum spp. obtained from patients with a variety of dermal lesions were studied. Among 2,202 cases examined, microorganisms of these genera were recovered from 100 (4,5%); there were 38 isolated of Geotrichum- and 62 of Trichosporum- spp. Most isolations were obtained from nails: 52 cases. The species most frequently found were T. beigelii (25 cases) and G. candidum (30 cases). In 50 of the patients, these fungi were isolated in pure culture, in an additional 40 Trichosporum spp. were found. Mixed cultures with C. albicans were observed in 28 patients, with other Candida spp. in 16 and with dermatophytes in 6. Among the patients whose isolations occurred in pure cultures, the number of colonies recovered was large in 20 cases, 1 with Geotrichum candidum - 19 with Trichosporum (16 T. beigelii, 3 T. capitatum). The relationship between the isolated yeast-like fungi and the dermal lesion was considered to be direct in these 20 patients.

  16. Innate Defense against Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Rebecca A; Gaffen, Sarah L; Hise, Amy G; Brown, Gordon D

    2014-11-10

    Human fungal infections have been on the rise in recent years and proved increasingly difficult to treat as a result of the lack of diagnostics, effective antifungal therapies, and vaccines. Most pathogenic fungi do not cause disease unless there is a disturbance in immune homeostasis, which can be caused by modern medical interventions, disease-induced immunosuppression, and naturally occurring human mutations. The innate immune system is well equipped to recognize and destroy pathogenic fungi through specialized cells expressing a broad range of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This review will outline the cells and PRRs required for effective antifungal immunity, with a special focus on the major antifungal cytokine IL-17 and recently characterized antifungal inflammasomes.

  17. Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio Cholerae Paradigm (7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colwell, Rita [University of Maryland

    2012-06-01

    Rita Colwell on "Experimental Reservoirs of Human Pathogens: The Vibrio cholerae paradigm" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  18. Abundance of sewage-pollution indicator and human pathogenic bacteria in a tropical estuarine complex

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagvenkar, G.S.; Ramaiah, N.

    Studies on abundance and types of various pollution indicator bacterial populations from tropical estuaries are rare. This study was aimed to estimate current levels of pollution indicator as well as many groups of human pathogenic bacteria...

  19. [Advances in humans and animals opportunistic pathogens from environment infecting plants by crossing kingdoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min; Wu, Yixin; He, Pengfei

    2016-02-04

    Some pathogenic microorganisms ubiquitous in the environment could cross kingdoms to infect diverse hosts. Several cross-kingdom human pathogens were summarized in this paper, including Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeuriginosa. They are ubiquitous in the nature and could cause plant diseases using the same or different infection strategies with which they infect humans and broaden host range. Among these bacteria, Klebsiella pneumoniae causes top rot disease of maize in the nature, revealing some plants in the environment could serve as a reservoir of various pathogens which might infect animals and probably humans when conditions are favorable, and even potentially harm food. Research on these cross-kingdom pathogens may play a very important role in the epidemiology of human, animal and plant diseases and be a hot topic in environment science.

  20. Genome sequence of the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae Amazonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, C.C.; Marin, M.A.; Dias, G.M.; Dutilh, B.E.; Edwards, R.A.; Iida, T.; Thompson, F.L.; Vicente, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 Amazonia is a pathogen that was isolated from cholera-like diarrhea cases in at least two countries, Brazil and Ghana. Based on multilocus sequence analysis, this lineage belongs to a distinct profile compared to strains from El Tor and classical biotypes. The genomic analysis rev

  1. Human enteric pathogen internalization by root uptake into food crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    With an increasing number of outbreaks and illnesses associated with pre-harvest contaminated produce, understanding the potential and mechanisms of produce contamination by enteric pathogens can aid in the development of preventative measures and post-harvest processing to reduce microbial populati...

  2. Genome sequence of the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae Amazonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, C.C.; Marin, M.A.; Dias, G.M.; Dutilh, B.E.; Edwards, R.A.; Iida, T.; Thompson, F.L.; Vicente, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 Amazonia is a pathogen that was isolated from cholera-like diarrhea cases in at least two countries, Brazil and Ghana. Based on multilocus sequence analysis, this lineage belongs to a distinct profile compared to strains from El Tor and classical biotypes. The genomic analysis

  3. Bottlenecks in the Transferability of Antibiotic Resistance from Natural Ecosystems to Human Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that resistance genes acquired by human pathogens through horizontal gene transfer originated in environmental, non-pathogenic bacteria. As a consequence, there is increasing concern on the roles that natural, non-clinical ecosystems, may play in the evolution of resistance. Recent studies have shown that the variability of determinants that can provide antibiotic resistance on their expression in a heterologous host is much larger than what is actually found in human...

  4. Characterization of the interaction between the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and the model host C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Karina Trankjær; Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Thomsen, Line E.;

    . elegans. Finally, we have developed a liquid based killing assay which enables us to set up a high-throughput screening system for the identification of L. monocytogenes virulence genes required for host-pathogen interactions.     References:   [1]: Kurz, C. L., and Ewbank, J. J. (2007) Curr Opin....... In addition, C. elegans is a promising model for the identification of novel virulence factors in various pathogens. A large number of human, animal, plant and insect pathogens have been shown to kill the worm, when C. elegans was allowed to feed on pathogens in stead of its normal laboratory diet [1......, which has been shown to kill C. elegans through the production of a toxic secondary metabolite [3] and Staphylococcus aureus, which establishes a persistent infection in the gut of the worm, leading to its death [4].   Recently, the facultative intracellular human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has...

  5. Human soil-borne pathogens and risks associated with land use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereg, Lily

    2017-04-01

    Soil is a source of pathogenic, neutral and beneficial microorganisms. Natural events and anthropogenic activity can affect soil biodiversity and influence the balance and distribution of soil-borne human pathogens. Important bacterial and fungal pathogens, such as Bacillus anthracis, Coxiella bernetii, Clostridium tetani, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Aspergillus fumigatus and Sporothrix schenckii will be discussed. This presentation will concentrate on soil pathogenic microorganisms and the effects of land use change on their prevalence and distribution. In particular, the potential of agricultural soil cultivation to enhance pathogen transmission to human through the release of soil microbes into the air attached to dust particles, contamination of waterways and infection of food plants and animal. Emerging solutions, such as biocontrol and probiotics, will be discussed.

  6. Staurosporine Induces Filamentation in the Human Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans via Signaling through Cyr1 and Protein Kinase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jinglin L.; O’Meara, Teresa R.; Polvi, Elizabeth J.; Robbins, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein kinases are key regulators of signal transduction pathways that participate in diverse cellular processes. In fungal pathogens, kinases regulate signaling pathways that govern drug resistance, stress adaptation, and pathogenesis. The impact of kinases on the fungal regulatory circuitry has recently garnered considerable attention in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality. Complex regulatory circuitry governs the C. albicans morphogenetic transition between yeast and filamentous growth, which is a key virulence trait. Here, we report that staurosporine, a promiscuous kinase inhibitor that abrogates fungal drug resistance, also influences C. albicans morphogenesis by inducing filamentation in the absence of any other inducing cue. We further establish that staurosporine exerts its effect via the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 and the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Strikingly, filamentation induced by staurosporine does not require the known upstream regulators of Cyr1, Ras1 or Pkc1, or effectors downstream of PKA, including Efg1. We further demonstrate that Cyr1 is capable of activating PKA to enable filamentation in response to staurosporine through a mechanism that does not require degradation of the transcriptional repressor Nrg1. We establish that staurosporine-induced filamentation is accompanied by a defect in septin ring formation, implicating cell cycle kinases as potential staurosporine targets underpinning this cellular response. Thus, we establish staurosporine as a chemical probe to elucidate the architecture of cellular signaling governing fungal morphogenesis and highlight the existence of novel circuitry through which the Cyr1 and PKA govern a key virulence trait. IMPORTANCE The impact of fungal pathogens on human health is devastating. One of the most pervasive fungal pathogens is Candida albicans, which kills ~40% of people suffering from bloodstream

  7. The Food Production Environment and the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Pathogens of Animal Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, Manjusha; Ammini, Parvathi; Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F

    2017-03-14

    Food-borne pathogens are a serious human health concern worldwide, and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant food pathogens has further confounded this problem. Once-highly-efficacious antibiotics are gradually becoming ineffective against many important pathogens, resulting in severe treatment crises. Among several reasons for the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance, their overuse in animal food production systems for purposes other than treatment of infections is prominent. Many pathogens of animals are zoonotic, and therefore any development of resistance in pathogens associated with food animals can spread to humans through the food chain. Human infections by antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are increasing. Considering the human health risk due to emerging antibiotic resistance in food animal-associated bacteria, many countries have banned the use of antibiotic growth promoters and the application in animals of antibiotics critically important in human medicine. Concerted global efforts are necessary to minimize the use of antimicrobials in food animals in order to control the development of antibiotic resistance in these systems and their spread to humans via food and water.

  8. The Food Production Environment and the Development of Antimicrobial Resistance in Human Pathogens of Animal Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, Manjusha; Ammini, Parvathi; Kumar, Sanath; Varela, Manuel F.

    2017-01-01

    Food-borne pathogens are a serious human health concern worldwide, and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant food pathogens has further confounded this problem. Once-highly-efficacious antibiotics are gradually becoming ineffective against many important pathogens, resulting in severe treatment crises. Among several reasons for the development and spread of antimicrobial resistance, their overuse in animal food production systems for purposes other than treatment of infections is prominent. Many pathogens of animals are zoonotic, and therefore any development of resistance in pathogens associated with food animals can spread to humans through the food chain. Human infections by antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus are increasing. Considering the human health risk due to emerging antibiotic resistance in food animal–associated bacteria, many countries have banned the use of antibiotic growth promoters and the application in animals of antibiotics critically important in human medicine. Concerted global efforts are necessary to minimize the use of antimicrobials in food animals in order to control the development of antibiotic resistance in these systems and their spread to humans via food and water. PMID:28335438

  9. Adhesins of human pathogens from the genus Yersinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Jack C; Skurnik, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria of the Gram-negative genus Yersinia are environmentally ubiquitous. Three species are of medical importance: the intestinal pathogens Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis, and the plague bacillus Y. pestis. The two former species, spread by contaminated food or water, cause a range of gastrointestinal symptoms and, rarely, sepsis. On occasion, the primary infection is followed by autoimmune sequelae such as reactive arthritis. Plague is a systemic disease with high mortality. It is a zoonosis spread by fleas, or more rarely by droplets from individuals suffering from pneumonic plague. Y. pestis is one of the most virulent of bacteria, and recent findings of antibiotic-resistant strains together with its potential use as a bioweapon have increased interest in the species. In addition to being significant pathogens in their own right, the yersiniae have been used as model systems for a number of aspects of pathogenicity. This chapter reviews the molecular mechanisms of adhesion in yersiniae. The enteropathogenic species share three adhesins: invasin, YadA and Ail. Invasin is the first adhesin required for enteric infection; it binds to β(1) integrins on microfold cells in the distal ileum, leading to the ingestion of the bacteria and allows them to cross the intestinal epithelium. YadA is the major adhesin in host tissues. It is a multifunctional protein, conferring adherence to cells and extracellular matrix components, serum and phagocytosis resistance, and the ability to autoagglutinate. Ail has a minor role in adhesion and serum resistance. Y. pestis lacks both invasin and YadA, but expresses several other adhesins. These include the pH 6 antigen and autotransporter adhesins. Also the plasminogen activator of Y. pestis can mediate adherence to host cells. Although the adhesins of the pathogenic yersiniae have been studied extensively, their exact roles in the biology of infection remain elusive.

  10. Occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum among healthy dairy animals: an emerging public health hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Hamza, Dalia A

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum in the feces of dairy animals. Fecal samples were collected from 203 apparently healthy dairy animals (50 cattle, 50 buffaloes, 52 sheep, 51 goats). Samples were cultured to recover C. botulinum while human pathogenic C. botulinum strains were identified after screening of all C. botulinum isolates for the presence of genes that encode toxins type A, B, E, F. The overall prevalence of C. botulinum was 18.7% whereas human pathogenic C. botulinum strains (only type A) were isolated from six animals at the rates of 2, 2, 5.8, and 2% for cattle, buffaloes, sheep, and goats, respectively. High fecal carriage rates of C. botulinum among apparently healthy dairy animals especially type A alarm both veterinary and public health communities for a potential role which may be played by dairy animals in the epidemiology of such pathogen.

  11. Detection of Fungi in Hair-brushes in Beauty Salons at Jatinangor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Mitchelle Edward

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various beauty tools are used in beauty salons, among those is the hair-brush. The hair-brush can conceal various human skin pathogens although under harsh environmental conditions, most pathogens are killed; nevertheless, few microorganisms, such as the fungi can adapt and survive. Moreover, the moist conditions of the hair-brush predisposes the growth of fungi however the ability of these fungi to instigate disease in an individual is dependent on the portal of entry and the host immunological status. This study was conducted to determine the fungus that is present in the beauty salon’s hair-brushes. Methods: This study was conducted in beauty salons located in Jatinangor area during September–October 2013 using the descriptive laboratory method. Fifteen beauty salons were included in this study based on sample size calculation for dichotomous variable. The specimens from all the hair-brushes were collected after the owner’s informed consent, then cultured onto 30 sabouraud agar, two for each beauty salon (dermatophyte and non-dermatophyte agar. The fungi were detected macroscopically and microscopically. Results: Overall, 93% revealed to be culture positive, with 90% of them were found to be non-dermatophytes, most of which are saprophytic fungi. The remaining 3% were dermatophytes. Conclusions: Beauty salon’s hair-brushes contain a wide range of fungi distribution which may be a source of fungal colonization. However, most of the fungi found in the beauty salons are saprophytic fungi, therefore it is unnecessary to be anxious about a small amount of pathogenic fungi are found in humans.

  12. 火棘抑菌内生真菌的筛选与拮抗植物病原菌作用研究%Screening of Pyracantha fortuneana Endophytic Fungus and Function Examination of Antagonism to Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田小曼; 陈阿敏

    2012-01-01

    采用常规分离方法从火棘的茎、叶、果实中分离得到15株内生真菌,以小麦根腐病菌、小麦赤霉病菌、番茄早疫病菌等9种病原真菌作靶标菌,筛选出了一株具有较高抑菌活性的菌株-J4,采用形态学观察和ITS序列测定相结合的方法对J4进行鉴定.结果表明,J4菌株为子囊菌亚门间座壳属(Dia porthe)真菌.%Fifteen endophytic fungi were screened from the stems, leaves, and fruits of Pyracantha fortuneana. The antifungal activities of the fungi to 9 plant pathogenic fungi (including Bipolaris sorokiniana , Gibberella zeae ,and Alternaria solani and so on) were selected. One strain, J4 with high antifungal activity was screened and obtained. Morphological observations and ITS sequence of strain J4 were conducted. The results showed that the strain belonged to ascomycetes Diaporthe genus.

  13. Population performance of collembolans feeding on soil fungi from different ecological niches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.; Johansen, A.; Larsen, S.E.;

    2008-01-01

    The potential reproductive value of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Gloinus intraradices and Glomus invermaium), root pathogenic fungi (Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium culmorum) and saprotrophic fungi (Penicillium hordei and Trichoderma harzianum) were examined for the collembolans Folsomia candida...

  14. Pathogen inactivation of human serum facilitates its clinical use for islet cell culture and subsequent transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhle, Magnus U; Brandhorst, Daniel; Korsgren, Olle; Knutson, Folke

    2011-01-01

    Serum is regarded as an essential supplement to promote survival and growth of cells during culture. However, the potential risk of transmitting diseases disqualifies the use of serum for clinical cell therapy in most countries. Hence, most clinical cell therapy programs have replaced human serum with human serum albumin, which can result in inferior quality of released cell products. Photochemical treatment of different blood products utilizing Intercept® technology has been shown to inactivate a broad variety of pathogens of RNA and DNA origin. The present study assesses the feasibility of using pathogen-inactivated, blood group-compatible serum for use in human pancreatic islet culture. Isolated human islets were cultured at 37°C for 3-4 days in CMRL 1066 supplemented with 10% of either pathogen-inactivated or nontreated human serum. Islet quality assessment included glucose-stimulated insulin release (perifusion), ADP/ATP ratio, cytokine expression, and posttransplant function in diabetic nude mice. No differences were found between islets cultured in pathogen-inactivated or control serum regarding stimulated insulin release, intracellular insulin content, and ADP/ATP ratio. Whether media was supplemented with treated or nontreated serum, islet expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, or tissue factor was not affected. The final diabetes-reversal rate of mice receiving islets cultured in pathogen-inactivated or nontreated serum was 78% and 87%, respectively (NS). As reported here, pathogen-inactivated human serum does not affect viability or functional integrity of cultured human islets. The implementation of this technology for RNA- and DNA-based pathogen inactivation should enable reintroduction of human serum for clinical cell therapy.

  15. Evaluation of Risk of Resistance in Plant Pathogenous Fungi to Fungicides%植物病原菌对杀菌剂抗性风险评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文桥; 马志强; 张小风; 张文吉

    2001-01-01

    植物病原菌对杀菌剂的抗性风险由基本风险和治理风险组成。杀菌剂使用之前或之初可根据人工诱变、药剂选择或驯化实验、田间野生敏感菌株敏感性变异、抗药菌株的生物及遗传特征、杀菌剂作用方式等进行基本抗药风险预测;杀菌剂使用数年之后可根据人工诱变、药剂选择或驯化、田间药效与抗药性发生、抗药菌株的生物及遗传特征、杀菌剂作用方式与使用对策等已有资料进行抗药风险评估。目前已有4种方法用于抗药风险评估。由杀菌剂与病害共同决定的基本抗药风险可分成低、中和高度。基本抗性风险高的药剂合理使用可延缓田间抗药性发生,中度基本抗性风险药剂不合理使用也可引发田间抗药性发生和药效明显降低。%Risk of resistance in plant pathogenous fungi to fungicides is composed of inherent risk and management risk. At the beginning of the application of target fungicide, inherent risk of resistance can be predicted by artificial induction or fungicide selection, sensitivity variation of wild-type sensitive strains, biological and genetic characteristics of resistant strains and mode of action of target fungicide. Several years after application of target fungicide, risk of resistance can be assessed according to the known experimental data, such as artificial induction or fungicide selection, efficacy appearance and resistance occurrence in field, biological and genetic characteristics of resistant strains, mode of action and application strategies of target fungicide. Currently, 4 methods have been adopted to evaluate risk of resistance. Inherent risk of resistance caused by diseases and fungicides can be divided into low, intermediate, and high level. High risk of resistance to phenylamide fungicides and lower risk of resistance to cymoxanil have been assessed in Phytophthora infestans and Plasmopara viticola. Low or intermediate risk of

  16. Fungi and mycotoxins in silage: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, V A; Pereyra, C M; Keller, L A M; Dalcero, A M; Rosa, C A R; Chiacchiera, S M; Cavaglieri, L R

    2013-09-01

    The present revision shows the early and current knowledge in the field of silage fungi and mycotoxins explaining the relevance of fungi and mycotoxins in silage. The problem does not end in animal disease or production losses as mycotoxins in feed can lead to the presence of their metabolic products in dairy products, which will be eventually affecting human health, mainly infants. Silage is green forage preserved by lactic fermentation under anaerobic conditions. This ecosystem maintains its quality and nutritional value depending on interactions among physical, chemical and biological agents. Forages used for ensilage are naturally in contact with yeasts and filamentous fungi, and the contamination often occurs in the field and can also occur during harvesting, transport, storage. Moreover, postharvest poor management can lead to a rapid spoilage. Studies on fungal contamination of dairy cattle feed have shown how corn silage influences the contamination degree of feed supplied to livestock. Increasing knowledge in this area will help elucidate the influence that this microbiota exerts on production and/or degradation of mycotoxins present in silage. Some of these fungi, although opportunist pathogens, are relevant epidemiologically and represent a high risk of contamination to farm workers who handle them improperly. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Centromeres of filamentous fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kristina M.; Galazka, Jonathan M.; Phatale, Pallavi A.; Connolly, Lanelle R.; Freitag, Michael

    2012-01-01

    How centromeres are assembled and maintained remains one of the fundamental questions in cell biology. Over the past 20 years the idea of centromeres as precise genetic loci has been replaced by the realization that it is predominantly the protein complement that defines centromere localization and function. Thus, placement and maintenance of centromeres are excellent examples of epigenetic phenomena in the strict sense. In contrast, the highly derived “point centromeres” of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its close relatives are counterexamples for this general principle of centromere maintenance. While we have learned much in the past decade, it remains unclear if mechanisms for epigenetic centromere placement and maintenance are shared amongst various groups of organisms. For that reason it seems prudent to examine species from many different phylogenetic groups with the aim to extract comparative information that will yield a more complete picture of cell division in all eukaryotes. This review addresses what has been learned by studying the centromeres of filamentous fungi, a large, heterogeneous group of organisms that includes important plant, animal and human pathogens, saprobes and symbionts that fulfill essential roles in the biosphere, as well as a growing number of taxa that have become indispensable for industrial use. PMID:22752455

  18. STUDIES ON SYNBIOTIC BARLEY GRAIN EXTRACT AGAINST SOME HUMAN PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sheela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated that effect of prebiotic food containing oligosaccharide to enhance the growth and activity of probiotic strains. Barley grains probioticated using different strains of probiotics are Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens, Candida kefir,and saccharomyces boluradii. To select a suitable prebiotics like inulin for the development of Synbiotic barley and tested for antibacterial activity against diarrhoea causing pathogen such as Esherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella paratyphi A, Shigella dysenteriae, Vibrio cholerae. Analysis of identified compound from synbiotic barley grain using GC-MS.

  19. The USDA Forest Service-RMRS forest fungi collection: Resource for fungal identification, developing biological controls, predicting invasive pathogens, and predicting potential impacts of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara M. Ashiglar; John W. Hanna; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2014-01-01

    The Moscow Forestry Sciences Laboratory of the Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) has a unique collection of forest/tree-associated fungi with over 15,000 living specimens. Based in Moscow, ID, this USDA APHIS-PPQ (Plant Protection and Quarantine) containment facility houses fungal archives from approximately 35 states and 30 countries. The collection involves the...

  20. Pathogenicity of conidia-based preparations of entomopathogenic fungi against the greenhouse pest aphids: green peach aphid, melon aphid, and foxglove aphid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeking new isolates of entomopathogenic fungi with greater virulence against greenhouse aphid pests than those currently registered in North America for control of these insects, single-dose screening assays of 44 selected fungal isolates and 4 commercially available strains were conducted against ...

  1. From Environment to Man: Genome Evolution and Adaptation of Human Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujoulat, Fabien; Roger, Frédéric; Bourdier, Alice; Lotthé, Anne; Lamy, Brigitte; Marchandin, Hélène; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2012-01-01

    Environment is recognized as a huge reservoir for bacterial species and a source of human pathogens. Some environmental bacteria have an extraordinary range of activities that include promotion of plant growth or disease, breakdown of pollutants, production of original biomolecules, but also multidrug resistance and human pathogenicity. The versatility of bacterial life-style involves adaptation to various niches. Adaptation to both open environment and human specific niches is a major challenge that involves intermediate organisms allowing pre-adaptation to humans. The aim of this review is to analyze genomic features of environmental bacteria in order to explain their adaptation to human beings. The genera Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Ochrobactrum provide valuable examples of opportunistic behavior associated to particular genomic structure and evolution. Particularly, we performed original genomic comparisons among aeromonads and between the strictly intracellular pathogens Brucella spp. and the mild opportunistic pathogens Ochrobactrum spp. We conclude that the adaptation to human could coincide with a speciation in action revealed by modifications in both genomic and population structures. This adaptation-driven speciation could be a major mechanism for the emergence of true pathogens besides the acquisition of specialized virulence factors. PMID:24704914

  2. Host-induced aneuploidy and phenotypic diversification in the Sudden Oak Death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneuploidy can result in significant phenotypic changes, which can sometimes be selectively advantageous. For example, aneuploidy confers resistance to antifungal drugs in human pathogenic fungi. Aneuploidy has also been observed in invasive fungal and oomycete plant pathogens in the field. Environm...

  3. Disinfection and removal of human pathogenic bacteria in arctic waste stabilization ponds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yannan; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Ragush, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) are commonly used to treat municipal wastewater in Arctic Canada. The biological treatment in the WSPs is strongly influenced by climatic conditions. Currently, there is limited information about the removal of fecal and pathogenic bacteria during the short...... cool summer treatment season. With relevance to public health, the objectives of this paper were to determine if treatment in arctic WSPs resulted in the disinfection (i.e., removal of fecal indicator bacteria, Escherichia coli) and removal of selected human bacterial pathogens from the treated...... treatment of the wastewater with a 2–3 Log removal of generic indicator E. coli. The bacterial pathogens Salmonella spp., pathogenic E. coli, and Listeria monocytogenes, but not Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter pylori, were detected in the untreated and treated wastewater, indicating that human...

  4. Plants as a habitat for beneficial and/or human pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Heather L; Triplett, Eric W

    2008-01-01

    Non-plant pathogenic endophytic bacteria can promote plant growth, improve nitrogen nutrition, and, in some cases, are human pathogens. Recent work in several laboratories has shown that enteric bacteria are common inhabitants of the interior of plants. These observations led to the experiments that showed the entry into plants of enteric human pathogens such as Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7. The extent of endophytic colonization by strains is regulated by plant defenses and several genetic determinants necessary for this interior colonization in endophytic bacteria have been identified. The genomes of four endophytic bacteria now available should promote discovery of other genes that contribute to this phenotype. Common virulence factors in plant and animal pathogens have also been described in bacteria that can infect both plant and animal models. Future directions in all of these areas are proposed.

  5. Bottlenecks in the transmission of antibiotic resistance from natural ecosystems to human bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that resistance genes acquired by human pathogens trough horizontal gene transfer have been originated in environmental, non pathogenic bacteria. As the consequence, there exists an increasing concern on the role that natural, non-clinical ecosystems, may play on the evolution of resistance. Recent studies have shown that the variability of determinants that can provide antibiotic resistance upon their expression in a heterologous host is much larger than what is actually found in human pathogens. Along the review, the role that different processes as founder effect, ecological connectivity, fitness costs or second-order selection may have on the establishment of a specific resistance determinant in the population of bacterial pathogens is analysed.

  6. Immune Recognition of Latency-insitigating Pathogens by Human Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Jonas Nørskov

    Latent infections with the human pathogenic microorganisms Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are creating some of the most devastating pandemics to date, with great impact on the infected people’s lives, their expected lifetime, as well as general costs...

  7. Disease induction by human microbial pathogens in plant-model systems: potential, problems and prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarlen, van P.; Belkum, van A.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Relatively simple eukaryotic model organisms such as the genetic model weed plant Arabidopsis thaliana possess an innate immune system that shares important similarities with its mammalian counterpart. In fact, some human pathogens infect Arabidopsis and cause overt disease with human symptomology.

  8. The distribution features of pathogenic fungi of 127 cases of tinea capitis in Jingzhou%荆州地区127例头癣的病原菌分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽; 方静; 刘进先

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution features of pathogenic fungi of 127 cases of tinea capitis in Jingzhou. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 127 cases which were diagnosed as tinea capitis by fungal microscopic examination and culture,from January 2004 to June 201 5 in Jingzhou.Results The incidence of tinea capitis was higest in 2006,then was a trend of fluctuation,however,declined as a whole.A total 127 strains of pathogenic fungi were isolated,of these strains,the major pathogenic fungi were Trichophyton violaceum (61.42%),Trichophyton rubrum (14.1 7%)and Trichophyton mentagrophyte (1 1.81%)in turn.The 4 clinical types were black dot tinea (57.48%),tinea kerion (24.41%), tinea alba (1 7.32%)and tinea favosa (0.79%).Conclusion The most common clinical type was black dot tinea and the path-ogenic fungus was Trichophyton violaceum .%目的了解荆州地区头癣的病原菌的分布特点。方法对2004年1月~2015年6月荆州地区127例经真菌镜检和真菌培养鉴定为头癣患者进行回顾性分析。结果荆州地区头癣发病率于2006年最高,此后呈波动状态,整体呈下降趋势。共分离出127株菌株,主要致病菌依次为紫色毛癣菌(61.42%)、红色毛癣菌(14.17%)和须癣毛癣菌(11.81%)。4种临床类型依次为黑点癣(57.48%)、脓癣(24.41%)、白癣(17.32%)和黄癣(0.79%)。结论荆州地区头癣以黑点癣最为常见,主要致病菌为紫色毛癣菌。

  9. Prevalence of plant beneficial and human pathogenic bacteria isolated from salad vegetables in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithya, Angamuthu; Babu, Subramanian

    2017-03-14

    The study aimed at enumerating, identifying and categorizing the endophytic cultivable bacterial community in selected salad vegetables (carrot, cucumber, tomato and onion). Vegetable samples were collected from markets of two vegetable hot spot growing areas, during two different crop harvest seasons. Crude and diluted vegetable extracts were plated and the population of endophytic bacteria was assessed based on morphologically distinguishable colonies. The bacterial isolates were identified by growth in selective media, biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The endophytic population was found to be comparably higher in cucumber and tomato in both of the sampling locations, whereas lower in carrot and onion. Bacterial isolates belonged to 5 classes covering 46 distinct species belonging to 19 genera. Human opportunistic pathogens were predominant in carrot and onion, whereas plant beneficial bacteria dominated in cucumber and tomato. Out of the 104 isolates, 16.25% are human pathogens and 26.5% are human opportunistic pathogens. Existence of a high population of plant beneficial bacteria was found to have suppressed the population of plant and human pathogens. There is a greater potential to study the native endophytic plant beneficial bacteria for developing them as biocontrol agents against human pathogens that are harboured by plants.

  10. Divergent and Convergent Evolution of Fungal Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yanfang; Xiao, Guohua; Zheng, Peng; Cen, Kai; Zhan, Shuai; Wang, Chengshu

    2016-05-12

    Fungal pathogens of plants and animals have multifarious effects; they cause devastating damages to agricultures, lead to life-threatening diseases in humans, or induce beneficial effects by reducing insect pest populations. Many virulence factors have been determined in different fungal pathogens; however, the molecular determinants contributing to fungal host selection and adaptation are largely unknown. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of seven ascomycete insect pathogens and performed the genome-wide analyses of 33 species of filamentous ascomycete pathogenic fungi that infect insects (12 species), plants (12), and humans (9). Our results revealed that the genomes of plant pathogens encode more proteins and protein families than the insect and human pathogens. Unexpectedly, more common orthologous protein groups are shared between the insect and plant pathogens than between the two animal group pathogens. We also found that the pathogenicity of host-adapted fungi evolved multiple times, and that both divergent and convergent evolutions occurred during pathogen-host cospeciation thus resulting in protein families with similar features in each fungal group. However, the role of phylogenetic relatedness on the evolution of protein families and therefore pathotype formation could not be ruled out due to the effect of common ancestry. The evolutionary correlation analyses led to the identification of different protein families that correlated with alternate pathotypes. Particularly, the effector-like proteins identified in plant and animal pathogens were strongly linked to fungal host adaptation, suggesting the existence of similar gene-for-gene relationships in fungus-animal interactions that has not been established before. These results well advance our understanding of the evolution of fungal pathogenicity and the factors that contribute to fungal pathotype formation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  11. Pathogen prevalence predicts human cross-cultural variability in individualism/collectivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincher, Corey L; Thornhill, Randy; Murray, Damian R; Schaller, Mark

    2008-06-07

    Pathogenic diseases impose selection pressures on the social behaviour of host populations. In humans (Homo sapiens), many psychological phenomena appear to serve an antipathogen defence function. One broad implication is the existence of cross-cultural differences in human cognition and behaviour contingent upon the relative presence of pathogens in the local ecology. We focus specifically on one fundamental cultural variable: differences in individualistic versus collectivist values. We suggest that specific behavioural manifestations of collectivism (e.g. ethnocentrism, conformity) can inhibit the transmission of pathogens; and so we hypothesize that collectivism (compared with individualism) will more often characterize cultures in regions that have historically had higher prevalence of pathogens. Drawing on epidemiological data and the findings of worldwide cross-national surveys of individualism/collectivism, our results support this hypothesis: the regional prevalence of pathogens has a strong positive correlation with cultural indicators of collectivism and a strong negative correlation with individualism. The correlations remain significant even when controlling for potential confounding variables. These results help to explain the origin of a paradigmatic cross-cultural difference, and reveal previously undocumented consequences of pathogenic diseases on the variable nature of human societies.

  12. Cave Entrance dependent Spore Dispersion of Filamentous Fungi Isolated from Various Sediments of Iron Ore Cave in Brazil: a colloquy on human threats while caving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Linzi Silva Taylor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Caves are stable environments with characteristics favoring the development of fungi. The fungal community present in a cave also includes pathogenic and opportunistic species out of which some are also served as energy sources in such energy stared ecosystems. Studies on microbial diversity and their role on such energy starved ecosystem are scarce. The present study was aimed to identify the cultivable filamentous fungi present in the various sediment of an iron ore cave and to recognize them as pathogenic and/or opportunistic species. Further the impact of cave entrance on the spore depositions on various distances dependent sediments were analyzed. The results suggest a diverse microbial community inhabiting the cave and an influence of cave entrance over spore deposition on various sediments. We counted a total of 4,549 filamentous fungi that included 34 species of 12 genera: Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Fusarium, Geotrichum, Paecilomyces, Purpureocillium, Penicillium, Torula, Trichoderma, Mucor and Rhizopus. A positive significant relation was observed between spore deposition and distance from cave entrance (p= 0.001. Areas of potential mycoses risks were recognized. This is the first study on microbiological community of an iron ore cave in the country.

  13. In vitro activity of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil on filamentous fungi and toxicity to human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeyer, Diane C; Sanchez, Carlos J; Mende, Katrin; Beckius, Miriam L; Murray, Clinton K; Wenke, Joseph C; Akers, Kevin S

    2015-04-01

    Invasive fungal wound infections (IFIs) are increasingly reported in trauma patients and cause considerable morbidity and mortality despite standard of care treatment in trauma centers by experienced medical personnel. Topical agents such as oil of melaleuca, also known as tea tree oil (TTO), have been proposed for adjunctive treatment of IFIs. We evaluated the activity of TTO against filamentous fungi associated with IFIs by testing 13 clinical isolates representing nine species via time-kill assay with seven concentrations of TTO (100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, 5%, and 1%). To ascertain the safety of topical application to wounds, cell viability assays were performed in vitro using human fibroblasts, keratinocytes, osteoblasts, and umbilical vein endothelial cells with 10 concentrations of TTO (75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, 5%, and 10-fold serial dilutions from 1 to 0.0001%) at five time points (5, 15, 30, 60, and 180 min). Compatibility of TTO with explanted porcine tissues was also assessed with eight concentrations of TTO (100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, 10%, 5%, 1%, and 0.1%) at the time points used for cellular assays and at 24 h. The time-kill studies showed that fungicidal activity was variable between isolates. The effect of TTO on cell viability was primarily concentration dependent with significant cytotoxicity at concentrations of ≥ 10% and ≥ 50% for cells lines and whole tissue, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that TTO possesses antifungal activity against filamentous fungi associated with IFIs; furthermore that negligible effects on whole tissues, in contrast to individual cells, were observed following exposure to TTO. Collectively, these findings indicate a potential use of TTO as topical treatment of IFIs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa against oral human pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Renzo Alberto Ccahuana-Vasquez; Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos Santos; Cristiane Yumi Koga-Ito; Antonio Olavo Cardoso Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa is considered a medicinal plant used over centuries by the peruvian population as an alternative treatment for several diseases. Many microorganisms usually inhabit the human oral cavity and under certain conditions can become etiologic agents of diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa on different strains of microorganisms isolated from the human oral cavity. Micropulverized Uncaria t...

  15. Human pathogen shown to cause disease in the threatened eklhorn coral Acropora palmata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Patterson Sutherland

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are in severe decline. Infections by the human pathogen Serratia marcescens have contributed to precipitous losses in the common Caribbean elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata, culminating in its listing under the United States Endangered Species Act. During a 2003 outbreak of this coral disease, called acroporid serratiosis (APS, a unique strain of the pathogen, Serratia marcescens strain PDR60, was identified from diseased A. palmata, human wastewater, the non-host coral Siderastrea siderea and the corallivorous snail Coralliophila abbreviata. In order to examine humans as a source and other marine invertebrates as vectors and/or reservoirs of the APS pathogen, challenge experiments were conducted with A. palmata maintained in closed aquaria to determine infectivity of strain PDR60 from reef and wastewater sources. Strain PDR60 from wastewater and diseased A. palmata caused disease signs in elkhorn coral in as little as four and five days, respectively, demonstrating that wastewater is a definitive source of APS and identifying human strain PDR60 as a coral pathogen through fulfillment of Koch's postulates. A. palmata inoculated with strain PDR60 from C. abbreviata showed limited virulence, with one of three inoculated fragments developing APS signs within 13 days. Strain PDR60 from non-host coral S. siderea showed a delayed pathogenic effect, with disease signs developing within an average of 20 days. These results suggest that C. abbreviata and non-host corals may function as reservoirs or vectors of the APS pathogen. Our results provide the first example of a marine "reverse zoonosis" involving the transmission of a human pathogen (S. marcescens to a marine invertebrate (A. palmata. These findings underscore the interaction between public health practices and environmental health indices such as coral reef survival.

  16. Patogenic fungi associated with blue lupine seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Over 10% ofseeds harvested in 1991 and 1992 (50 samples, 400 seeds in each sample proved to be infested with various fungi. Fusarium spp. and Botrytis cinerea were the most common pathogens isolated. Fusarium avenaceum was the most common and highIy pathogenic species. Fusarium semitectum and F. tricinctum were highly pathogenic to lupin seedlings but they were the least common Fusarium isolated from seeds. Similarily, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was isolated only from 0,2% seeds tested but this fungus was highly pathogenic to lupin seedlings. Some other fungi know as lupin pathogens (F. oxysporum, Stemphylium botryosum, Pleiochaeta setosa and Phomopsis leptostromiformis were also noted in tested seeds.

  17. CaPSID: A bioinformatics platform for computational pathogen sequence identification in human genomes and transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borozan Ivan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is now well established that nearly 20% of human cancers are caused by infectious agents, and the list of human oncogenic pathogens will grow in the future for a variety of cancer types. Whole tumor transcriptome and genome sequencing by next-generation sequencing technologies presents an unparalleled opportunity for pathogen detection and discovery in human tissues but requires development of new genome-wide bioinformatics tools. Results Here we present CaPSID (Computational Pathogen Sequence IDentification, a comprehensive bioinformatics platform for identifying, querying and visualizing both exogenous and endogenous pathogen nucleotide sequences in tumor genomes and transcriptomes. CaPSID includes a scalable, high performance database for data storage and a web application that integrates the genome browser JBrowse. CaPSID also provides useful metrics for sequence analysis of pre-aligned BAM files, such as gene and genome coverage, and is optimized to run efficiently on multiprocessor computers with low memory usage. Conclusions To demonstrate the usefulness and efficiency of CaPSID, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of both a simulated dataset and transcriptome samples from ovarian cancer. CaPSID correctly identified all of the human and pathogen sequences in the simulated dataset, while in the ovarian dataset CaPSID’s predictions were successfully validated in vitro.

  18. Dandruff-associated Malassezia genomes reveal convergent and divergent virulence traits shared with plant and human fungal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jun; Saunders, Charles W.; Hu, Ping; Grant, Raymond A.; Boekhout, Teun; Kuramae, Eiko E.; Kronstad, James W.; DeAngelis, Yvonne M.; Reeder, Nancy L.; Johnstone, Kevin R.; Leland, Meredith; Fieno, Angela M.; Begley, William M.; Sun, Yiping; Lacey, Martin P.; Chaudhary, Tanuja; Keough, Thomas; Chu, Lien; Sears, Russell; Yuan, Bo; Dawson, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    Fungi in the genus Malassezia are ubiquitous skin residents of humans and other warm-blooded animals. Malassezia are involved in disorders including dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis, which together affect > 50% of humans. Despite the importance of Malassezia in common skin diseases, remarkably

  19. Dandruff-associated Malassezia genomes reveal convergent and divergent virulence traits shared with plant and human fungal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Saunders, C.; Hu, P.; Grant, R.A.; Boekhout, T.; Kuramae, E.E.; Kronstad, J.W.; DeAngelis, Y.M.; Reeder, N.L.; Johnstone, K.R.; Leland, M.; Fieno, A.M.; Begley, W.M.; Sun, Y.; Lacey, M.P.; Chaudhary, T.; Keough, T.; Chu, L.; Sears, R.; Yuan, B.; Dawson Jr., T.L.

    2007-01-01

    Fungi in the genus Malassezia are ubiquitous skin residents of humans and other warm-blooded animals. Malassezia are involved in disorders including dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis, which together affect >50% of humans. Despite the importance of Malassezia in common skin diseases, remarkably

  20. Dandruff-associated Malassezia genomes reveal convergent and divergent virulence traits shared with plant and human fungal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jun; Saunders, Charles W.; Hu, Ping; Grant, Raymond A.; Boekhout, Teun; Kuramae, Eiko E.; Kronstad, James W.; DeAngelis, Yvonne M.; Reeder, Nancy L.; Johnstone, Kevin R.; Leland, Meredith; Fieno, Angela M.; Begley, William M.; Sun, Yiping; Lacey, Martin P.; Chaudhary, Tanuja; Keough, Thomas; Chu, Lien; Sears, Russell; Yuan, Bo; Dawson, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    Fungi in the genus Malassezia are ubiquitous skin residents of humans and other warm-blooded animals. Malassezia are involved in disorders including dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis, which together affect > 50% of humans. Despite the importance of Malassezia in common skin diseases, remarkably lit

  1. Dandruff-associated Malassezia genomes reveal convergent and divergent virulence traits shared with plant and human fungal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Saunders, C.; Hu, P.; Grant, R.A.; Boekhout, T.; Kuramae, E.E.; Kronstad, J.W.; DeAngelis, Y.M.; Reeder, N.L.; Johnstone, K.R.; Leland, M.; Fieno, A.M.; Begley, W.M.; Sun, Y.; Lacey, M.P.; Chaudhary, T.; Keough, T.; Chu, L.; Sears, R.; Yuan, B.; Dawson Jr., T.L.

    2007-01-01

    Fungi in the genus Malassezia are ubiquitous skin residents of humans and other warm-blooded animals. Malassezia are involved in disorders including dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis, which together affect >50% of humans. Despite the importance of Malassezia in common skin diseases, remarkably litt

  2. Conserved differences in protein sequence determine the human pathogenicity of Ebolaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappalardo, Morena; Juliá, Miguel; Howard, Mark J.; Rossman, Jeremy S.; Michaelis, Martin; Wass, Mark N.

    2016-01-01

    Reston viruses are the only Ebolaviruses that are not pathogenic in humans. We analyzed 196 Ebolavirus genomes and identified specificity determining positions (SDPs) in all nine Ebolavirus proteins that distinguish Reston viruses from the four human pathogenic Ebolaviruses. A subset of these SDPs will explain the differences in human pathogenicity between Reston and the other four ebolavirus species. Structural analysis was performed to identify those SDPs that are likely to have a functional effect. This analysis revealed novel functional insights in particular for Ebolavirus proteins VP40 and VP24. The VP40 SDP P85T interferes with VP40 function by altering octamer formation. The VP40 SDP Q245P affects the structure and hydrophobic core of the protein and consequently protein function. Three VP24 SDPs (T131S, M136L, Q139R) are likely to impair VP24 binding to human karyopherin alpha5 (KPNA5) and therefore inhibition of interferon signaling. Since VP24 is critical for Ebolavirus adaptation to novel hosts, and only a few SDPs distinguish Reston virus VP24 from VP24 of other Ebolaviruses, human pathogenic Reston viruses may emerge. This is of concern since Reston viruses circulate in domestic pigs and can infect humans, possibly via airborne transmission. PMID:27009368

  3. Zoonotic Babesia: possibly emerging pathogens to be considered for tick-infested humans in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunfeld, K P; Brade, V

    2004-04-01

    The three host-tick Ixodes (I.) ricinus is regarded as an important vector of tick-borne microorganisms pathogenic for humans in central Europe and is primarily known as the main vector of Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi and the virus causing tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), the most clinically relevant tick transmitted pathogens for humans in European countries. Furthermore, it is now well established that I. ricinus also transmits Ehrlichia (E.) phagocytophila, Babesia (Ba.) divergens, and Ba. microti, all agents of zoonotic infections in dear, sheep, cattle, dogs, and horses. In addition to their known zoonotic potential, recent molecular-epidemiological and seroepidemiological surveys as well as increasingly reported clinical cases of infections caused by these tick-borne organisms other than B. burgdorferi (TOBB) also strongly suggest a possible relevance of Babesia, Ehrlichia and Rickettsia for humans at risk in Europe. However, there are few medical microbiological investigations and epidemiological data on the distribution and relevance of Babesia for humans in our part of the northern hemisphere. There is also very little diagnostic and clinical knowledge on human babesiosis in many regions of Europe. Furthermore, sophisticated diagnostic tools designed for the reliable detection of the underlying pathogens, are not yet generally available to the microbiological laboratory. This review aims to provide basic information on human babesiosis and the most relevant causative pathogens of the disease in Europe and to draw attention to this parasitic infection as a possibly emerging and probably under-diagnosed disease in this part of the northern hemisphere.

  4. Probiotic Potential of Lactobacillus Strains with Antimicrobial Activity against Some Human Pathogenic Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Shokryazdan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to isolate, identify, and characterize some lactic acid bacterial strains from human milk, infant feces, and fermented grapes and dates, as potential probiotics with antimicrobial activity against some human pathogenic strains. One hundred and forty bacterial strains were isolated and, after initial identification and a preliminary screening for acid and bile tolerance, nine of the best isolates were selected and further identified using 16 S rRNA gene sequences. The nine selected isolates were then characterized in vitro for their probiotic characteristics and their antimicrobial activities against some human pathogens. Results showed that all nine isolates belonged to the genus Lactobacillus. They were able to tolerate pH 3 for 3 h, 0.3% bile salts for 4 h, and 1.9 mg/mL pancreatic enzymes for 3 h. They exhibited good ability to attach to intestinal epithelial cells and were not resistant to the tested antibiotics. They also showed good antimicrobial activities against the tested pathogenic strains of humans, and most of them exhibited stronger antimicrobial activity than the reference strain L. casei Shirota. Thus, the nine Lactobacillus strains could be considered as potential antimicrobial probiotic strains against human pathogens and should be further studied for their human health benefits.

  5. Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli, a Common Human Pathogen: Challenges for Vaccine Development and Progress in the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolman, Jan T; Wacker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) is the most common gram-negative bacterial pathogen in humans. ExPEC causes the vast majority of urinary tract infections (UTIs), is a leading cause of adult bacteremia, and is the second most common cause of neonatal meningitis. Increasing multidrug resistance among ExPEC strains constitutes a major obstacle to treatment and is implicated in increasing numbers of hospitalizations and deaths and increasing healthcare costs associated with ExPEC infections. An effective vaccine against ExPEC infection is urgently needed. The O antigen, a component of the surface lipopolysaccharide, has been identified as a promising vaccine target. With the availability of a novel bioconjugation technology it is expected that multivalent O antigen conjugate vaccines can be produced at industrial scale. Clinical proof of concept of a 4-valent O antigen conjugate vaccine is ongoing. An ExPEC vaccine effective against strains that are associated with major diseases and resistant to multiple drugs could be routinely delivered to individuals at risk of developing severe E. coli infection, such as elderly people, individuals undergoing abdominal surgery and prostatic biopsy procedures, and persons at risk of recurrent and/or complicated UTI.

  6. Influence of different oils on penetration of human hair by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahuguna, S; Kushwaha, R K

    1993-02-01

    Synopsis The hair perforating ability of Microsporum gypseum and Trichophyton vanbreuseghemii was tested in presence of seventeen oils. Clove, olive and turpentine oils were found to be fully inhibitory for hair penetration by both fungi. Hair segments smeared with cantheridine oil and keocarpin hair vitalizer failed to reveal any perforation by T. vanbreuseghemii whereas arnica and shikakai oils showed little perforation by this fungus. Résumé La capacité de pénétration du Microsporum gypseum et du Trichophyton vanbreuseghemii a été testée en présence de 17 huiles. Les huiles de clou de girofle, d'olive et de térébenthine se sont avérées complétement inhibitrices du pouvoir de pénétration des 2 levures sur les cheveux. Des cheveux frottés avec de l'huile de cantharidine et un produit vitalisant des cheveux à kéocarpine n'ont révélé aucune pénétration par le T. vanbreuseghemii alors que l'huile d'arnica et l'huile de shikakai ont favorisé une légère pénétration par cette levure.

  7. MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM AS AN ACTUAL PATHOGEN OF HUMAN MYCOBACTERIOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Starkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Mycobacteriosis is an infectious disease of animals and humans caused by non-tuberculosis mycobacteria including M. avium complex. Despite the fact that the transmission of M. avium from human to human has not been proved, and mycobacteriosis has been sporadic, the number of cases of disseminated forms of disease caused by M. avium among HIV-positive patients during the last ten years was increasing. Limited knowledge about the structure of M. avium population in Russia and the lack of simple methods for the microbiological diagnosis make difficult the epidemiological monitoring of mycobacteriosis. This facilitates the use of modern, efficient molecular genetic methods for the species and subspecies identification and typing of M. avium. Thus, the detection of mobile element IS901, restriction fragment polymorphism analysis of hsp65 gene and IS1245 allow the detection and subspecies identification of M. avium. The study of genomic polymorphisms of bacterial strains for the assessment of M. avium population structure became feasible due to a complex of molecular techniques: VNTR-typing, IS1245-and IS1311-RFLP-typing.

  8. Adaptive Immunity to Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akash; Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Life-threatening fungal infections have risen sharply in recent years, owing to the advances and intensity of medical care that may blunt immunity in patients. This emerging crisis has created the growing need to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi with the ultimate goal of therapeutic intervention. We describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses that are deployed against pathogenic fungi. We focus on adaptive immunity to the major medically important fungi and emphasize three elements that coordinate the response: (1) dendritic cells and subsets that are mobilized against fungi in various anatomical compartments; (2) fungal molecular patterns and their corresponding receptors that signal responses and shape the differentiation of T-cell subsets and B cells; and, ultimately (3) the effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these invaders while constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. These insights create a foundation for the development of new, immune-based strategies for prevention or enhanced clearance of systemic fungal diseases. PMID:25377140

  9. 茅苍术挥发油及主要组分对3种病原菌和2种内生菌的抑菌活性%Antifungal activities of essential oil from Atractylis lancea against three species of pathogenic fungi and two species of endophytic fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈飞; 李蕾; 周佳宇; 戴传超

    2015-01-01

    研究内生真菌如何与宿主植物建立拮抗平衡,以及该过程与病原菌侵染过程的差别。以药用植物茅苍术及几种真菌为材料,采用水蒸馏法提取挥发油并分离各组分,应用平板生长速率法、滤纸片扩散法、悬滴法和扫描电镜观察研究挥发油对病原真菌和内生真菌的抑菌作用。结果表明,高浓度挥发油对病原菌中交链孢的抑菌活性最强,达77�56%,对尖孢镰刀菌和腐皮镰刀菌的抑菌作用次之,分别为71�75%和70�07%,而对2种内生真菌AL11和AL12则具有较小抑制作用,分别为61�90%和23�57%;挥发油中β⁃桉叶醇和茅术醇对5种真菌均无抑制作用,苍术素相比于苍术酮对病原菌有更强的抑制效果;在苍术酮和苍术素的胁迫下,病原真菌的孢子萌发受到了不同程度的抑制,内生真菌表现为菌丝分支增多,分支间距离变短;苍术酮和苍术素可以引起交链孢的菌丝断裂,褶皱,细胞表面疣状突起。说明茅苍术挥发油及其主要组分苍术酮和苍术素对内生真菌生长有限制作用,但这种作用明显低于对病原菌的抑制作用,说明苍术酮和苍术素很可能是宿主植物与内生真菌建立拮抗平衡的关键物质。%This study aims to investigate how the endophytic fungi and host plant establish an antagonistic balance and its difference with pathogen infection. The vol⁃atile oil and four primary components from medicinal plant Atractylodes lancea were extracted by water distillation ex⁃traction, and its antifungal activities against three species of pathogenic fungi and two species of endophytic fungi were determined by plate growth method, paper disc assay, drop method and scanning electron microscopy. The volatile oil exhibited the strongest antifungal activity of 77�56% against Alternaria solani, stronger activities against Fusari⁃um solani and F. oxysporum, and weak activities

  10. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF ALKALOIDS OF TRIDAX PROCUMBENS L. AGAINST HUMAN PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jindal et al

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tridax procumbens L. is a well known medicinal plant. In the present study alkaloids from pedicle and buds of the plant were extracted and evaluated for antimicrobial activity by ‘Disc Diffusion Assay’ against selected bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabilis and fungi (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. Minimum inhibitory concentration, minimum bactericidal/fungicidal concentration and total activity of each active extract were also evaluated. Significant antibacterial activity was recorded by alkaloids of pedicle against P. mirabilis (IZ 20mm, AI 0.83 and same MIC, MBC 0.039 mg/ml and antifungal activity was recorded by buds against C. albicans (IZ 9.2mm, AI 0.92, MIC 0.625 mg/ml and MFC 1.25 mg/ml. MIC ranged from 0.039 mg/ml-0.625 mg/ml and MBC/MFC ranged from 0.039 mg/ml-1.25 mg/ml against susceptible pathogens. It is noteworthy that MIC values of active extracts was found very low (0.039 mg/ml-0.625 mg/ml and was recorded below 1 mg/ml against inhibited pathogens, thus ascertain their strong antimicrobial potential against selected microbes. Thus, the result of the present study advocates the exploitation of alkaloid extracts of T. procumbens for future antimicrobial drugs.

  11. Use of Mass-Participation Outdoor Events to Assess Human Exposure to Tickborne Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jessica L; Alpers, Kathrin; Bown, Kevin J; Martin, Stephen J; Birtles, Richard J

    2017-03-01

    Mapping the public health threat of tickborne pathogens requires quantification of not only the density of infected host-seeking ticks but also the rate of human exposure to these ticks. To efficiently sample a high number of persons in a short time, we used a mass-participation outdoor event. In June 2014, we sampled ≈500 persons competing in a 2-day mountain marathon run across predominantly tick-infested habitat in Scotland. From the number of tick bites recorded and prevalence of tick infection with Borrelia burgdoferi sensu lato and B. miyamotoi, we quantified the frequency of competitor exposure to the pathogens. Mass-participation outdoor events have the potential to serve as excellent windows for epidemiologic study of tickborne pathogens; their concerted use should improve spatial and temporal mapping of human exposure to infected ticks.

  12. Characterization and Identification of Two Opportunistic Human Bacterial Pathogens in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Yuan-chan; XIE Guan-lin; ZHANG Li-xin; AN Gilmyong; FANG Yuan; LUO Jin-yan; HAO Xiao-juan; ZHAO Si-feng

    2006-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (Bc) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) are both biocontrol agents in agriculture and opportunistic human pathogens in hospitals. Effective management and utilization practice is needed to understand their characteristics and distribution in rice. During the last decade, the two opportunistic human pathogens were detected in 631 samples of rice seed and 117 samples of rice plant in plain, highland and mountainous rice growing areas of China. Bc and Pa were primarily differentiated by common bacteriological characteristics and pathogenic tests and then identified into species by Biolog and FAME tests. However,the genotypes of Bc still could not be distinguished. It has been noted that the Bc and Pa mainly existed in rice root with the highest distribution frequency in plain areas ( 6.1% and 16.1%) and lowest in the mountainous areas (1.0% and 7.8%).

  13. [Water fungi occurence in the River Supraśl-bath Jurowce near Białystok].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiziewicz, Bozena; Kozłowska, Mariola; Godlewska, Anna; Muszyńvska, Elzbieta; Mazalska, Bozenna

    2004-01-01

    Studies on the occurrence of aquatic fungi in the bathing sites of the Supraśl River in Jurowce village were collected in years 2000-2003. Hydrochemical analysis was performed using standard methods. Bait method was used to isolate the fungi. In the Supraśl River at Jurowce village 36 fungi species were identified, among them fish pathogens Achlya orion, Aphanomyces laevis, Dictyuchus monosporus, Saprolegnia ferax, Saprolegnia monoica, S. parasitica, human pathogens Aspergillus flavus, Candida albicans, Lagenidium humanum, Penicillium mycetomagenum, Rhizophydium keratinophilum and Trichosporon cutaneum, phytopathogens Achlya racemosa, Phytophthora gonapodoides, Pythium butleri, P. myriotylum and P. debaryanum. Physicochemical parameters of waters in Supraśl River-bathing sites had no important effect on the occurrence of fungi.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Uncaria tomentosa against oral human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ccahuana-Vasquez, Renzo Alberto; Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira dos; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa is considered a medicinal plant used over centuries by the peruvian population as an alternative treatment for several diseases. Many microorganisms usually inhabit the human oral cavity and under certain conditions can become etiologic agents of diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of different concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa on different strains of microorganisms isolated from the human oral cavity. Micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa was tested in vitro to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on selected microbial strains. The tested strains were oral clinical isolates of Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus spp., Candida albicans, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The tested concentrations of Uncaria tomentosa ranged from 0.25-5% in Müeller-Hinton agar. Three percent Uncaria tomentosa inhibited 8% of Enterobacteriaceae isolates, 52% of S. mutans and 96% of Staphylococcus spp. The tested concentrations did not present inhibitory effect on P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. It could be concluded that micropulverized Uncaria tomentosa presented antimicrobial activity on Enterobacteriaceae, S. mutans and Staphylococcus spp. isolates.

  15. The role of human movement in the transmission of vector-borne pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Stoddard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human movement is a key behavioral factor in many vector-borne disease systems because it influences exposure to vectors and thus the transmission of pathogens. Human movement transcends spatial and temporal scales with different influences on disease dynamics. Here we develop a conceptual model to evaluate the importance of variation in exposure due to individual human movements for pathogen transmission, focusing on mosquito-borne dengue virus. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We develop a model showing that the relevance of human movement at a particular scale depends on vector behavior. Focusing on the day-biting Aedes aegypti, we illustrate how vector biting behavior combined with fine-scale movements of individual humans engaged in their regular daily routine can influence transmission. Using a simple example, we estimate a transmission rate (R(0 of 1.3 when exposure is assumed to occur only in the home versus 3.75 when exposure at multiple locations--e.g., market, friend's--due to movement is considered. Movement also influences for which sites and individuals risk is greatest. For the example considered, intriguingly, our model predicts little correspondence between vector abundance in a site and estimated R(0 for that site when movement is considered. This illustrates the importance of human movement for understanding and predicting the dynamics of a disease like dengue. To encourage investigation of human movement and disease, we review methods currently available to study human movement and, based on our experience studying dengue in Peru, discuss several important questions to address when designing a study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Human movement is a critical, understudied behavioral component underlying the transmission dynamics of many vector-borne pathogens. Understanding movement will facilitate identification of key individuals and sites in the transmission of pathogens such as dengue, which then may provide

  16. Human caspase-4 mediates noncanonical inflammasome activation against gram-negative bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Cierra N.; Yu, Janet; Reyes, Valeria M.; Taschuk, Frances O.; Yadav, Anjana; Copenhaver, Alan M.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Collman, Ronald G.; Shin, Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are critical for host defense against bacterial pathogens. In murine macrophages infected by gram-negative bacteria, the canonical inflammasome activates caspase-1 to mediate pyroptotic cell death and release of IL-1 family cytokines. Additionally, a noncanonical inflammasome controlled by caspase-11 induces cell death and IL-1 release. However, humans do not encode caspase-11. Instead, humans encode two putative orthologs: caspase-4 and caspase-5. Whether either ortholog functions similar to caspase-11 is poorly defined. Therefore, we sought to define the inflammatory caspases in primary human macrophages that regulate inflammasome responses to gram-negative bacteria. We find that human macrophages activate inflammasomes specifically in response to diverse gram-negative bacterial pathogens that introduce bacterial products into the host cytosol using specialized secretion systems. In primary human macrophages, IL-1β secretion requires the caspase-1 inflammasome, whereas IL-1α release and cell death are caspase-1–independent. Instead, caspase-4 mediates IL-1α release and cell death. Our findings implicate human caspase-4 as a critical regulator of noncanonical inflammasome activation that initiates defense against bacterial pathogens in primary human macrophages. PMID:25964352

  17. Can Plant Viruses Cross the Kingdom Border and Be Pathogenic to Humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Balique

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Phytoviruses are highly prevalent in plants worldwide, including vegetables and fruits. Humans, and more generally animals, are exposed daily to these viruses, among which several are extremely stable. It is currently accepted that a strict separation exists between plant and vertebrate viruses regarding their host range and pathogenicity, and plant viruses are believed to infect only plants. Accordingly, plant viruses are not considered to present potential pathogenicity to humans and other vertebrates. Notwithstanding these beliefs, there are many examples where phytoviruses circulate and propagate in insect vectors. Several issues are raised here that question if plant viruses might further cross the kingdom barrier to cause diseases in humans. Indeed, there is close relatedness between some plant and animal viruses, and almost identical gene repertoires. Moreover, plant viruses can be detected in non-human mammals and humans samples, and there are evidence of immune responses to plant viruses in invertebrates, non-human vertebrates and humans, and of the entry of plant viruses or their genomes into non-human mammal cells and bodies after experimental exposure. Overall, the question raised here is unresolved, and several data prompt the additional extensive study of the interactions between phytoviruses and non-human mammals and humans, and the potential of these viruses to cause diseases in humans.

  18. Metagenomic analysis of medicinal Cannabis samples; pathogenic bacteria, toxigenic fungi, and beneficial microbes grow in culture-based yeast and mold tests [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin McKernan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of bacteria and fungi in medicinal or recreational Cannabis poses a potential threat to consumers if those microbes include pathogenic or toxigenic species. This study evaluated two widely used culture-based platforms for total yeast and mold (TYM testing marketed by 3M Corporation and Biomérieux, in comparison with a quantitative PCR (qPCR approach marketed by Medicinal Genomics Corporation. Methods: A set of 15 medicinal Cannabis samples were analyzed using 3M and Biomérieux culture-based platforms and by qPCR to quantify microbial DNA. All samples were then subjected to next-generation sequencing and metagenomics analysis to enumerate the bacteria and fungi present before and after growth on culture-based media. Results: Several pathogenic or toxigenic bacterial and fungal species were identified in proportions of >5% of classified reads on the samples, including Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Ralstonia pickettii, Salmonella enterica, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Aspergillus ostianus, Aspergillus sydowii, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium steckii. Samples subjected to culture showed substantial shifts in the number and diversity of species present, including the failure of Aspergillus species to grow well on either platform. Substantial growth of Clostridium botulinum and other bacteria were frequently observed on one or both of the culture-based TYM platforms. The presence of plant growth promoting (beneficial fungal species further influenced the differential growth of species in the microbiome of each sample. Conclusions: These findings have important implications for the Cannabis and food safety testing industries.

  19. Developing a Salivary Antibody Multiplex Immunoassay to Measure Human Exposure to Environmental Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The etiology and impacts of human exposure to environmental pathogens are of major concern worldwide and, thus, the ability to assess exposure and infections using cost effective, high-throughput approaches would be indispensable. The principal objective of this work is to devel...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Animal and Human Pathogen Malassezia pachydermatis Strain CBS 1879

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triana, Sergio; González, Andrés; Ohm, Robin A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837628; Wosten, Han|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/120693186; de Cock, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/087737116; Restrepo, Silvia; Celis, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is a basidiomycetous yeast that causes infections in humans and animals. Here, we report the genome sequence of Malassezia pachydermatis strain CBS 1879, which will facilitate the study of mechanisms underlying pathogenicity of the only non-lipid-dependent Malasezzia

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Animal and Human Pathogen Malassezia pachydermatis Strain CBS 1879.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Sergio; González, Andrés; Ohm, Robin A; Wösten, Han A B; de Cock, Hans; Restrepo, Silvia; Celis, Adriana

    2015-10-15

    Malassezia pachydermatis is a basidiomycetous yeast that causes infections in humans and animals. Here, we report the genome sequence of Malassezia pachydermatis strain CBS 1879, which will facilitate the study of mechanisms underlying pathogenicity of the only non-lipid-dependent Malasezzia species. Copyright © 2015 Triana et al.

  2. Misidentification of Streptococcus uberis as a Human Pathogen: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Gino Di Domenico

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus uberis is an environmental bacterium responsible for bovine mastitis. It is occasionally described as a human pathogen, though in most cases the identification was based on biochemical phenotyping techniques. This report shows that the biochemical phenotyping may incorrectly identify Enterococcus faecium as S. uberis.

  3. Misidentification of Streptococcus uberis as a human pathogen: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Prignano, Grazia; Pelagalli, Lorella; Police, Andrea; Cavallotti, Claudia; Torelli, Riccardo; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus uberis is an environmental bacterium responsible for bovine mastitis. It is occasionally described as a human pathogen, though in most cases the identification was based on biochemical phenotyping techniques. This report shows that the biochemical phenotyping may incorrectly identify Enterococcus faecium as S. uberis.

  4. Rhizobium pusense is the main human pathogen in the genus Agrobacterium/Rhizobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujoulat, F; Marchandin, H; Zorgniotti, I; Masnou, A; Jumas-Bilak, E

    2015-05-01

    Rhizobium pusense was recently described after isolation from the rhizosphere of chickpea. Multilocus sequence-based analysis of clinical isolates identified as Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) radiobacter demonstrated that R. pusense is the main human pathogen within Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) spp. Clinical microbiology of Agrobacterium (Rhizobium) should be considered in the light of recent taxonomic changes.

  5. The dose-response relation in human volunteers for gastro-intestinal pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis PFM; van der Heijden OG; van der Giessen JWB; Havelaar AH; MGB

    1996-01-01

    Gepubliceerde gegevens omtrent infectie van humane proefpersonen met pathogene micro-organismen die gastro-enteritis veroorzaken (protozoa, bacterien en virussen), worden gebruikt om een kwantitatieve relatie vast te stellen tussen de ingenomen dosis en het risico op infectie. Voor alle bestudeerde

  6. Potential human pathogenic bacteria in a mixed urban watershed as revealed by pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current microbial source tracking (MST) methods for water depend on testing for fecal indicator bacterial counts or specific marker gene sequences to identify fecal contamination where potential human pathogenic bacteria could be present. In this study, we applied 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing ...

  7. The arable ecosystem as battleground for emergence of new human pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, van L.S.; Doorn, van J.; Wichers, J.H.; Amerongen, van A.; Roermund, van H.J.W.; Willemsen, P.T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Disease incidences related to Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica infections by consumption of (fresh) vegetables, sprouts, and occasionally fruits made clear that these pathogens are not only transmitted to humans via the “classical” routes of meat, eggs, and dairy products, but also can be tr

  8. wKinMut-2: Identification and Interpretation of Pathogenic Variants in Human Protein Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez, Miguel; Pons, Tirso; Brunak, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    is often scattered across different sources, which makes the integrative analysis complex and laborious. wKinMut-2 constitutes a solution to facilitate the interpretation of the consequences of human protein kinase variation. Nine methods predict their pathogenicity, including a kinase-specific random...... forest approach. To understand the biological mechanisms causative of human diseases and cancer, information from pertinent reference knowledgebases and the literature is automatically mined, digested and homogenized. Variants are visualized in their structural contexts and residues affecting catalytic...

  9. wKinMut-2: Identification and Interpretation of Pathogenic Variants in Human Protein Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez, Miguel; Pons, Tirso; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    is often scattered across different sources, which makes the integrative analysis complex and laborious. wKinMut-2 constitutes a solution to facilitate the interpretation of the consequences of human protein kinase variation. Nine methods predict their pathogenicity, including a kinase-specific random...... forest approach. To understand the biological mechanisms causative of human diseases and cancer, information from pertinent reference knowledgebases and the literature is automatically mined, digested and homogenized. Variants are visualized in their structural contexts and residues affecting catalytic...

  10. Killing in More-than-human Spaces: Pasteurisation, Fungi, and the Metabolic Lives of Wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice, Jeremy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available What place might killing occupy in a more-than-human world, where human life is always-already entangled among nonhumans? In this article I attempt to unsettle the assumption that only individual organisms can be killed, and to render other sites and spaces of killing visible. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork among winemakers in South Australia I examine pasteurisation, a killing practice that acts not on organisms but on the fluids within which they live. Examining the pasteurisation of wine damaged by the fungus Botrytis cinerea, I argue that this practice shifts the locus of killing from botrytis’ body to metabolic life processes which embrace extracellular enzymes diffused throughout the wine. I suggest that pasteurisation thus displaces killing into spaces, such as wine-in-the-making, within which many metabolic lives coexist and interpenetrate. Pasteurisation therefore renders killing an intervention into the metabolic relationships that tie together numerous species of microbes living within wine. In acting on wine as a whole it kills rather indiscriminately, simultaneously terminating multiple lives that relate to humans in different ways. Pasteurisation therefore both protects and spoils wine, reconfiguring multiple human-nonhuman relationships in conflicting and sometimes economically costly ways. In so doing, it illustrates that in a more-than-human world killing becomes difficult to confine to a single unwanted organism or species. Killing instead becomes disturbingly mobile and communicable, prone to rebound upon the valued human lives of those who kill in unsettling and potentially harmful ways.

  11. Exserohilum rostratum: characterization of a cross-kingdom pathogen of plants and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Sharma

    Full Text Available Pathogen host shifts represent a major source of new infectious diseases. There are several examples of cross-genus host jumps that have caused catastrophic epidemics in animal and plant species worldwide. Cross-kingdom jumps are rare, and are often associated with nosocomial infections. Here we provide an example of human-mediated cross-kingdom jumping of Exserohilum rostratum isolated from a patient who had received a corticosteroid injection and died of fungal meningitis in a Florida hospital in 2012. The clinical isolate of E. rostratum was compared with two plant pathogenic isolates of E. rostratum and an isolate of the closely related genus Bipolaris in terms of morphology, phylogeny, and pathogenicity on one C3 grass, Gulf annual rye grass (Lolium multiflorum, and two C4 grasses, Japanese stilt grass (Microstegium vimineum and bahia grass (Paspalum notatum. Colony growth and color, as well as conidia shape and size were the same for the clinical and plant isolates of E. rostratum, while these characteristics differed slightly for the Bipolaris sp. isolate. The plant pathogenic and clinical isolates of E. rostratum were indistinguishable based on morphology and ITS and 28S rDNA sequence analysis. The clinical isolate was as pathogenic to all grass species tested as the plant pathogenic strains that were originally isolated from plant hosts. The clinical isolate induced more severe symptoms on stilt grass than on rye grass, while this was the reverse for the plant isolates of E. rostratum. The phylogenetic similarity between the clinical and plant-associated E. rostratum isolates and the ability of the clinical isolate to infect plants suggests that a plant pathogenic strain of E. rostratum contaminated the corticosteroid injection fluid and was able to cause systemic disease in the affected patient. This is the first proof that a clinical isolate of E. rostratum is also an effective plant pathogen.

  12. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Tanganuchitcharnchai, Ampai; Smith, Derek J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Paris, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation), in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera. Conclusions/Significance Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes. PMID:27248711

  13. Antigenic Relationships among Human Pathogenic Orientia tsutsugamushi Isolates from Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L James

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a common cause of undiagnosed febrile illness in certain tropical regions, but can be easily treated with antibiotics. The causative agent, Orientia tsutsugamushi, is antigenically variable which complicates diagnosis and efforts towards vaccine development.This study aimed to dissect the antigenic and genetic relatedness of O. tsutsugamushi strains and investigate sero-diagnostic reactivities by titrating individual patient sera against their O. tsutsugamushi isolates (whole-cell antigen preparation, in homologous and heterologous serum-isolate pairs from the same endemic region in NE Thailand. The indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to titrate Orientia tsutsugamushi isolates and human sera, and a mathematical technique, antigenic cartography, was applied to these data to visualise the antigenic differences and cross-reactivity between strains and sera. No functional or antigen-specific analyses were performed. The antigenic variation found in clinical isolates was much less pronounced than the genetic differences found in the 56kDa type-specific antigen genes. The Karp-like sera were more broadly reactive than the Gilliam-like sera.Antigenic cartography worked well with scrub typhus indirect immunofluorescence titres. The data from humoral responses suggest that a Karp-like strain would provide broader antibody cross-reactivity than a Gilliam-like strain. Although previous exposure to O. tsutsugamushi could not be ruled out, scrub typhus patient serum antibody responses were characterised by strong homologous, but weak heterologous antibody titres, with little evidence for cross-reactivity by Gilliam-like sera, but a broader response from some Karp-like sera. This work highlights the importance of antigenic variation in O. tsutsugamushi diagnosis and determination of new serotypes.

  14. Molecular epidemiology and pathogenic potential of underdiagnosed human papillomavirus types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sisti Stefano

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV tests are crucial diagnostic tools for the prevention of neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix. However most commercial methods are designed to detect high-risk (HR HPV types and a limited selection of low-risk ones, thus missing a fair number of intermediate/low-risk types. As a result, many HPV infections remain undiagnosed, generating distrust in virological diagnosis among gynaecologists, who continue to rely preferentially on cytological and colposcopic findings. Results In this study, we tested 6,335 consecutive clinical samples, most of them from Italian patients with cytological abnormalities. The samples, collected in 2000–2007, were analyzed using PCR amplification of a 173–206 bp (depending on HPV type conserved region in the L1 open reading frame, restriction endonuclease analysis and, where required, sequence analysis for type determination. Analysis of a smaller male sample and long term follow-up of a few female subjects was also performed. A total of 2,161 samples tested positive for HPV DNA (32.1%; 21.3% of them were mixed infections. Overall, 59 known and 2 unknown HPV types were detected. Their relative prevalence was calculated; notably, types not clearly identifiable using the most common commercial method accounted for 36% of infections. Clinical findings associated with the underdiagnosed types ranged from H-SIL to low-grade abnormalities, although none of these infections resulted in invasive cancer. Conclusion Given the high prevalence of some underdiagnosed HPV types in the population (principally HPV53, HPV66, HPV84, and HPV87 and their frequent association with cytological abnormalities, techniques capable of detecting and typing them would prove extremely useful.

  15. The Dust at Altitude Recovery Technology (DART) System was Developed to Recover Plant, Human, and Animal Pathogens in Asian and African Dust Storms over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Tench, B.; Nehr, A.; Emmons, T.; Valbuena, F.; Palaia, J.; Sugars, C.

    2014-12-01

    Dust emanates year-round from Africa and Asia and impacts air quality in North America. Asian dust plumes deliver up to 64 million tonnes of dust over the NW of the USA, and African dust storms deliver over 50 million tonnes of dust over Florida each year. Several recent studies have demonstrated that human and plant pathogens from Asian [1] African [2] aerosols can be transported to N. America in naturally occurring dust storms. What is unknown is whether these 'presumptive pathogens' impact human, plant, or animal health in the USA. In order to initiate a long-term monitoring program of pathogens in Asian and African dust plumes, we have developed a dust collection system called DART (Dust at Altitude Recovery Technology) (figure). The DART dust sampler can be mounted on a F104 Starfighter jet (figure) and a T6 Texan propeller driven airplane (not shown), and was test flown over FL in Dec. 2013 on the F104 and on the T6 in the summer of 2014. The DART system utilizes a high-volume pump to pass air through 6 separate filtration units where both aerosols and microbial cells are captured. The filtration systems exhibit flow rates from 25-142 L/min depending on the pore size and brand of filters used. Flow rates are directly correlated to increased air speed, and are inversely correlated to increased altitude. Filtration units can be turned on and off individually as required for specific science flight objectives. The DART dust sampler has performed nominally up to 7600 m, 0.92 Mach, and 3.5 +G's. During initial test flights in Dec. 2013, 5 of 8 genera of fungi recovered from the lower atmosphere over FL contained plant pathogens including species in the genera: Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Curvularia, and Fusarium. Numbers of recovered fungi, but not bacteria, increased significantly when 5 or 10 µm filters were used in the DART system compared to filter pore sizes ≤ 1.2 µm. Future sampling programs for both Asian and African dust events will be

  16. 农抗702对植物病原真菌的抑制效果及抑菌机理%Inhibition effect of Ag-antibiotic 702 on plant pathogenic fungi and related mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏赛金; 杜亚楠; 倪国荣; 张慧雯; 涂国全; 潘晓华

    2012-01-01

    To explore the practical application value and action mechanisms of Ag-antibiotic 702 against pathogenic fungi, the inhibition spectrum of Ag-antibiotic 702 was studied by measuring the mycelium growth rate of pathogenic fungi, and the effects of Ag-antibiotic 702 on the membrane permeability of Rhizoctonia solani, a typical pathogenic fungus, were investigated, with the variations of mycelium electrolyte leakage and protein, nucleic acid, and Mg2+ and K+ contents under the action of Ag-antibiotic 702 determined, and the effects of Ag-antibiotic 702 on the cell membrane ergosterol biosynthesis and ultramicrostructure observed. The results showed that the active products of Ag-antibiotic 702 had stronger inhibition effect on 13 test pathogens, among which, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum was most sensitive, with the EC50 being 0. 23 μg·ml-1. As compared with the control, the relative electric conductivity of R. solani treated with Ag-antibiotic 702 was increased by 72. 2% , the contents of protein, nucleic acid, and Mg2+ and K+ leaked from the R. solani cells were all increased, while the ergosterol content was decreased by 92.0%. The cell membrane outline was not clear, organelles were badly damaged, and vacuole appeared. It was suggested that the inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis and the increase of membrane permeability could be the main action mechanisms of Ag-antibiotic 702 against pathogenic fungi.%为探索农抗702在植物病害生物防治中的实际应用价值及对病原真菌的作用机理,采用生长速率法测定其抑菌谱,并以水稻纹枯病菌为研究对象,测定其作用下菌丝的电解质渗漏、蛋白质、核酸、Mg2+、K+含量的变化,及其对细胞膜麦角甾醇生物合成和水稻纹枯病菌超显微结构的影响.结果表明:农抗702对供试13种病原真菌均有较强的抑制作用,其中对油菜菌核病菌的作用最强,EC50为0.23 μg·mL-1;农抗702作用水稻纹枯病菌菌体后相对电导率增加72.2

  17. Bed bugs and possible transmission of human pathogens: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Olivia; Ho, Derek; Glick, Sharon; Jagdeo, Jared

    2016-10-01

    The global population of bed bugs (Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus, family Cimicidae) has undergone a significant resurgence since the late 1990s. This is likely due to an increase in global travel, trade, and the number of insecticide-resistant bed bugs. The global bed bug population is estimated to be increasing by 100-500 % annually. The worldwide spread of bed bugs is concerning, because they are a significant socioeconomic burden and a major concern to public health. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, bed bugs are "a pest of significant health importance." Additionally, 68 % of U.S. pest professionals reported that bed bugs are the most challenging pest to treat. Upwards of 45 disease pathogens have been reported in bed bugs. Recent studies report that bed bugs may be competent vectors for pathogens, such as Bartonella quintana and Trypanosoma cruzi. However, public health reports have thus far failed to produce evidence that major infectious disease outbreaks have been associated with bed bugs. Since many disease pathogens have previously been reported in bed bugs and the worldwide bed bug population is now drastically increasing, it stands to reason to wonder if bed bugs might transmit human pathogens. This review includes a literature search on recently published clinical and laboratory studies (1990-2016) investigating bed bugs as potential vectors of infectious disease, and reports the significant findings and limitations of the reviewed studies. To date, no published study has demonstrated a causal relationship between bed bugs and infectious disease transmission in humans. Also, we present and propose to expand on previous hypotheses as to why bed bugs do not transmit human pathogens. Bed bugs may contain "neutralizing factors" that attenuate pathogen virulence and, thereby, decrease the ability of bed bugs to transmit infectious disease.

  18. Galleria mellonella as a model host for human pathogens: recent studies and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2012-10-01

    The number of studies using G. mellonella as a model host for human pathogens has increased significantly in the last few years. Important studies were published from different countries for evaluating the pathogenesis of bacterial and fungal infections and for exploring the host defenses against pathogens. Therefore, standardized conditions for the use of G. melonella larvae need to be established. Recent research showed that the deprivation of G. mellonella larvae of food during the experiment caused a reduction in immune responses and an increased susceptibility to infection, suggesting that incubating of larvae in the presence or absence of nutrition may affect the results and comparisons among different laboratories.

  19. [ASSESSMENT OF POTENTIAL RISK FOR CONTAMINATION OF SURFACE WATER RESERVOIRS BY PATHOGENS OF HUMAN PARASITIC DISEASES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khromenkova, E P; Dimidova, L L; Dumbadze, O S; Aidinov, G T; Shendo, G L; Agirov, A Kh; Batchaev, Kh Kh

    2015-01-01

    Sanitary and parasitological studies of the waste effluents and surface reservoir waters were conducted in the south of Russia. The efficiency of purification of waste effluents from the pathogens of parasitic diseases was investigated in the region's sewage-purification facilities. The water of the surface water reservoirs was found to contain helminthic eggs and larvae and intestinal protozoan cysts because of the poor purification and disinfection of service fecal sewage waters. The poor purification and disinvasion of waste effluents in the region determine the potential risk of contamination of the surface water reservoirs and infection of the population with the pathogens of human parasitic diseases.

  20. 76 FR 30705 - Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... AGENCY Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids... the availability of a final report titled, ``Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of... health risk assessments on potential pathogens in land-applied biosolids. The document does not represent...

  1. Phytotoxicity analysis of extracts from compost and their ability to inhibit soil-borne pathogenic fungi and reduce root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dabing; Raza, Waseem; Yu, Guanghui; Zhao, Qingyun; Shen, Qirong; Huang, Qiwei

    2012-03-01

    Compost extracts are novel organic amendments, typically applied to suppress soil-borne diseases. This research evaluated the phytotoxicity of compost extracts and analyzed their ability to inhibit pathogenic fungal growth and reduce root-knot nematodes. The physical, chemical and biological characteristics of extracts from a pig manure and straw compost were analyzed. Three types of extracts were tested: direct extracts of compost (DEC), aerated fermentation extracts of compost (AFEC) and non-aerated fermentation extracts of compost (NAFEC). All compost extracts showed low phytotoxicity against lettuce and cress, but AFEC and NAFEC were more phytotoxic than DEC. All compost extracts significantly inhibited pathogenic fungal growth except for the fungus Rhizoctonia solania AG4. For two seasons, tomato root biomass of three compost extracts was 1.25-5.67 times greater than CK (water control), and AFEC and NAFEC showed the best tomato root growth promotion. The reduction ratio of root egg mass and density of soil nematodes were 34.51-87.77% and 30.92-51.37%, when applied with three compost extracts. The microbial population in compost extracts was considered to be the most significant factor of inhibition pathogenic fungal growth. No markedly correlations among bacterial community diversity, the inhibition of pathogenic fungal growth and the reduction of root-knot nematodes were observed. This information adds to the understanding of the growth-promoting and suppression effects of compost extracts and will help to enhance crop production.

  2. New insight into bacterial zoonotic pathogens posing health hazards to humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Ciszewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the problem of evolutionary changes of zoonotic pathogens responsible for human diseases. Everyone is exposed to the risk of zoonotic infection, particularly employees having direct contact with animals, i.e. veterinarians, breeders, butchers and workers of animal products’ processing industry. The article focuses on pathogens monitored by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC, which has been collecting statistical data on zoonoses from all European Union countries for 19 years and publishing collected data in annual epidemiological reports. Currently, the most important 11 pathogens responsible for causing human zoonotic diseases are being monitored, of which seven are bacteria: Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium bovis, Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetti and Verotoxin- producing E. coli (VTEC / Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli (STEC. As particularly important are considered foodborne pathogens. The article also includes new emerging zoonotic bacteria, which are not currently monitored by ECDC but might pose a serious epidemiological problem in a foreseeable future: Streptococcus iniae, S. suis, S. dysgalactiae and staphylococci: Staphylococcus intermedius, S. pseudintermedius. Those species have just crossed the animal-human interspecies barrier. The exact mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown, it is connected, however, with genetic variability, capability to survive in changing environment. These abilities derive from DNA rearrangement and horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells. Substantial increase in the number of scientific publications on this subject, observed over the last few years, illustrates the importance of the problem. Med Pr 2014;65(6:819–829

  3. Molecular epidemiology of mastitis pathogens of dairy cattle and comparative relevance to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadoks, Ruth N; Middleton, John R; McDougall, Scott; Katholm, Jorgen; Schukken, Ynte H

    2011-12-01

    Mastitis, inflammation of the mammary gland, can be caused by a wide range of organisms, including gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, mycoplasmas and algae. Many microbial species that are common causes of bovine mastitis, such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus also occur as commensals or pathogens of humans whereas other causative species, such as Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae or Staphylococcus chromogenes, are almost exclusively found in animals. A wide range of molecular typing methods have been used in the past two decades to investigate the epidemiology of bovine mastitis at the subspecies level. These include comparative typing methods that are based on electrophoretic banding patterns, library typing methods that are based on the sequence of selected genes, virulence gene arrays and whole genome sequencing projects. The strain distribution of mastitis pathogens has been investigated within individual animals and across animals, herds, countries and host species, with consideration of the mammary gland, other animal or human body sites, and environmental sources. Molecular epidemiological studies have contributed considerably to our understanding of sources, transmission routes, and prognosis for many bovine mastitis pathogens and to our understanding of mechanisms of host-adaptation and disease causation. In this review, we summarize knowledge gleaned from two decades of molecular epidemiological studies of mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle and discuss aspects of comparative relevance to human medicine.

  4. Dissection of the host-pathogen interaction in human tuberculosis using a bioengineered 3-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezera, Liku B; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Chancellor, Andrew; Reichmann, Michaela T; Shammari, Basim Al; Brace, Patience; Batty, Alex; Tocheva, Annie; Jogai, Sanjay; Marshall, Ben G; Tebruegge, Marc; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Mansour, Salah; Elkington, Paul T

    2017-01-01

    Cell biology differs between traditional cell culture and 3-dimensional (3-D) systems, and is modulated by the extracellular matrix. Experimentation in 3-D presents challenges, especially with virulent pathogens. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) kills more humans than any other infection and is characterised by a spatially organised immune response and extracellular matrix remodelling. We developed a 3-D system incorporating virulent mycobacteria, primary human blood mononuclear cells and collagen–alginate matrix to dissect the host-pathogen interaction. Infection in 3-D led to greater cellular survival and permitted longitudinal analysis over 21 days. Key features of human tuberculosis develop, and extracellular matrix integrity favours the host over the pathogen. We optimised multiparameter readouts to study emerging therapeutic interventions: cytokine supplementation, host-directed therapy and immunoaugmentation. Each intervention modulates the host-pathogen interaction, but has both beneficial and harmful effects. This methodology has wide applicability to investigate infectious, inflammatory and neoplastic diseases and develop novel drug regimes and vaccination approaches. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21283.001 PMID:28063256

  5. Experimental and clinical study on the diagnosis for pathogenic fungi of fungal rhinosinusitis bv multiplex PCR%多重PCR诊断真菌性鼻-鼻窦炎的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志远; 徐美玲; 张剑

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To develop a multiplex PCR method used to fast diagnose pathogenic fungi of fungal rhinosinusitis. Method:Three pairs of primers (universal fungus-specific primers, aspergillus specific primers, mucor specific primers)were used to establish multiplex PCR system. Detected six important medical fungi species strains to examine the applicability of the system and explore the optimum conditions. Multiplex PCR system was also used to identify pathogenic fungi of fungal rhinosinusitis,and used to comparethe sensitivity with fungal culture.Result:Three pairs of primers of the multiplex PCR system had high versatility and specificity, and could amplify the corresponding DNA fragments in the appropriate conditions. Sensitivity of the reaction system was 10μg/L.Twenty clinical specimens of fungal sinusitis were tested by fungal culture and the multiplex PCR system,7(35 %)cases were culture positive whereas 15 (75%) cases were positive by the multiplex PCR system, the difference was statistically significant between the two methods(P<0. 05). Conclusion: The multiplex PCR system was proved to be a rapid, sensitive and specific technology, it could be used to detect and identify clinical pathogenic fungi of fungal rhinosinusitis.%目的:构建一多重PCR反应体系,并探讨其对真菌性鼻-鼻窦炎(FRS)快速诊断和同时鉴定常见致病菌的临床应用.方法:选择3对引物(真菌通用引物、曲霉特异性引物、毛霉特异性引物)建立多重PCR反应体系,采用曲霉菌、毛霉菌、链格孢菌、白色念珠菌等标准菌株DNA验证体系的适用性和摸索反应条件,同时将多重PCR、真菌培养2种方法用于FRS的鼻窦内容物的真菌检测,比较二者敏感性.结果:3对引物具有较好的通用性和特异性,在适宜的反应条件下均能扩增出目的片段.该反应体系的检测灵敏度为10 μg/L.20例FRS标本,真菌培养检测阳性7例,阳性率35%;多重PCR体系检测阳性15例,阳性率75

  6. An efficient method for DNA extraction from Cladosporioid fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moslem, M.A.; Bahkali, A.H.; Abd-Elsalam, K.A.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an efficient method for DNA extraction from Cladosporioid fungi, which are important fungal plant pathogens. The cell wall of Cladosporioid fungi is often melanized, which makes it difficult to extract DNA from their cells. In order to overcome this we grew these fungi for three days on

  7. An efficient method for DNA extraction from Cladosporioid fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moslem, M.A.; Bahkali, A.H.; Abd-Elsalam, K.A.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an efficient method for DNA extraction from Cladosporioid fungi, which are important fungal plant pathogens. The cell wall of Cladosporioid fungi is often melanized, which makes it difficult to extract DNA from their cells. In order to overcome this we grew these fungi for three days on

  8. Human milk blocks DC-SIGN - pathogen interaction via MUC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie eKoning

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects of breastfeeding are well-recognized and include both immediate neonatal protection against pathogens, as well as long term protection against allergies and autoimmune diseases. Although several proteins have been identified to have anti-viral or anti-bacterial effects like secretory IgA or lactoferrin, the mechanisms of immune modulation are not fully understood. Recent studies identified important beneficial effects of glycans in human milk, such as those expressed in oligosaccharides or on glycoproteins. Glycans are recognized by the carbohydrate receptors C-type lectins on DC and specific tissue macrophages, which exert important functions in immune modulation and immune homeostasis. A well-characterized C-type lectin is DC-SIGN, which binds terminal fucose. The present study shows that in human milk, MUC1 is the major milk glycoprotein that binds to the lectin domain of DC-SIGN and prevents pathogen interaction through the presence of Lewis x-type oligosaccharides. Surprisingly, this was specific for human milk, as formula, bovine or camel milk did not show any presence of proteins that interacted with DC-SIGN. The expression of DC-SIGN is found in young infants along the entire gastro-intestinal tract. Our data thus suggest the importance of human milk glycoproteins for blocking pathogen interaction to DC in young children. Moreover, a potential benefit of human milk later in life in shaping the infants immune system through DC-SIGN cannot be ruled out.

  9. Fungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambou, Karine; Tharreau, Didier; Kohler, Annegret; Sirven, Catherine; Marguerettaz, Mélanie; Barbisan, Crystel; Sexton, Adrienne C; Kellner, Ellen M; Martin, Francis; Howlett, Barbara J; Orbach, Marc J; Lebrun, Marc-Henri

    2008-01-01

    Background Tetraspanins are small membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily encompassing 33 members in human and mouse. These proteins act as organizers of membrane-signalling complexes. So far only two tetraspanin families have been identified in fungi. These are Pls1, which is required for pathogenicity of the plant pathogenic ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Tsp2, whose function is unknown. In this report, we describe a third family of tetraspanins (Tsp3) and a new family of tetraspanin-like proteins (Tpl1) in fungi. We also describe expression of some of these genes in M. grisea and a basidiomycete, Laccaria bicolor, and also their functional analysis in M. grisea. Results The exhaustive search for tetraspanins in fungal genomes reveals that higher fungi (basidiomycetes and ascomycetes) contain three families of tetraspanins (Pls1, Tsp2 and Tsp3) with different distribution amongst phyla. Pls1 is found in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, whereas Tsp2 is restricted to basidiomycetes and Tsp3 to ascomycetes. A unique copy of each of PLS1 and TSP3 was found in ascomycetes in contrast to TSP2, which has several paralogs in the basidiomycetes, Coprinus cinereus and Laccaria bicolor. A tetraspanin-like family (Tpl1) was also identified in ascomycetes. Transcriptional analyses in various tissues of L. bicolor and M. grisea showed that PLS1 and TSP2 are expressed in all tissues in L. bicolor and that TSP3 and TPL1 are overexpressed in the sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia) and mycelia of M. grisea, suggesting that these genes are not pseudogenes. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacementmutants Δtsp3 and Δtpl1 of M. grisea revealed a reduction of the pathogenicity only on rice, in contrast to Δpls1 mutants, which are completely non-pathogenic on barley and rice. Conclusion A new tetraspanin family (Tsp3) and a tetraspanin-like protein family (Tpl1) have been identified in fungi. Functional analysis by gene

  10. Fungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functions

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    Martin Francis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetraspanins are small membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily encompassing 33 members in human and mouse. These proteins act as organizers of membrane-signalling complexes. So far only two tetraspanin families have been identified in fungi. These are Pls1, which is required for pathogenicity of the plant pathogenic ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Tsp2, whose function is unknown. In this report, we describe a third family of tetraspanins (Tsp3 and a new family of tetraspanin-like proteins (Tpl1 in fungi. We also describe expression of some of these genes in M. grisea and a basidiomycete, Laccaria bicolor, and also their functional analysis in M. grisea. Results The exhaustive search for tetraspanins in fungal genomes reveals that higher fungi (basidiomycetes and ascomycetes contain three families of tetraspanins (Pls1, Tsp2 and Tsp3 with different distribution amongst phyla. Pls1 is found in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, whereas Tsp2 is restricted to basidiomycetes and Tsp3 to ascomycetes. A unique copy of each of PLS1 and TSP3 was found in ascomycetes in contrast to TSP2, which has several paralogs in the basidiomycetes, Coprinus cinereus and Laccaria bicolor. A tetraspanin-like family (Tpl1 was also identified in ascomycetes. Transcriptional analyses in various tissues of L. bicolor and M. grisea showed that PLS1 and TSP2 are expressed in all tissues in L. bicolor and that TSP3 and TPL1 are overexpressed in the sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia and mycelia of M. grisea, suggesting that these genes are not pseudogenes. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacementmutants Δtsp3 and Δtpl1 of M. grisea revealed a reduction of the pathogenicity only on rice, in contrast to Δpls1 mutants, which are completely non-pathogenic on barley and rice. Conclusion A new tetraspanin family (Tsp3 and a tetraspanin-like protein family (Tpl1 have been identified in fungi

  11. Contaminação do leite humano ordenhado por fungos miceliais Contamination of expressed human milk by mycelial fungi

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    Franz Reis Novak

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: caracterizar os gêneros de fungos miceliais encontrados em amostras de leite humano ordenhado, recebidas a partir de coleta domiciliar, pelo Banco de Leite Humano do Instituto Fernandes Figueira. Métodos: foram estudadas 821 amostras de leite humano ordenhado, obtidas ao acaso, a partir de frascos coletados nos domicílios pelas próprias doadoras. Foram realizadas pesquisas de bolores e leveduras e de microorganismos mesófilos. A partir das amostras de leite humano ordenhado, foram isoladas 48 cepas de fungos miceliais, que foram identificadas por técnicas-padrão de laboratório. Resultados: as análises microbiológicas revelaram a ocorrência de bolores e leveduras em 43 (5,2% das amostras, com contagens atingindo a ordem de 103 UFC/ml, e foram identificados os microorganismos Aspergillus Grupo Niger (6,3%, Aspergillus sp . (4,2%, Paecilomyces sp . (12,6%, Penicillium sp . (60,4%, Rhizopus sp . (2,0% e Syncephalastrum sp . (14,5%. Quatro amostras apresentavam mais de um tipo de fungo micelial. Conclusão: a presença de bolores e leveduras no leite humano ordenhado nos domicílios sugere que as condições higiênicas do local de coleta podem contaminar o leite. Portanto, quando se trata do repasse do produto cru para bebês prematuros hospitalizados, é fundamental observar as condições de coleta, estocagem e transporte para evitar a presença e as conseqüências da multiplicação de contaminante.Objective: To characterize the genera of mycelial fungi detected in expressed human milk received at the human milk bank of Instituto Fernandes Figueira after home collection. Methods: We studied 821 expressed human milk samples randomly obtained from flasks filled by the donors at home. The possible presence of molds, yeasts and mesophilic microorganisms was investigated. A total of 48 strains of mycelial fungi were isolated from the human milk bank samples and identified through standard laboratory techniques. Results

  12. Assessing microbial decontamination of indoor air with particular focus on human pathogenic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchaine, Caroline

    2016-09-01

    Transmission of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens is of primary importance in public and occupational health and infection control. Although several standardized protocols have been proposed to target microbes on fomites through surface decontamination, use of microbicidal agents, and cleaning processes, only limited guidance is available on microbial decontamination of indoor air to reduce the risk of pathogen transmission between individuals. This article reviews the salient aspects of airborne transmission of infectious agents, exposure assessment, in vitro assessment of microbicidal agents, and processes for air decontamination for infection prevention and control. Laboratory-scale testing (eg, rotating chambers, wind tunnels) and promising field-scale methodologies to decontaminate indoor air are also presented. The potential of bacteriophages as potential surrogates for the study of airborne human pathogenic viruses is also discussed.

  13. Phage display-based strategies for cloning and optimization of monoclonal antibodies directed against human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Solforosi, Laura; Castelli, Matteo; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, several phage display-selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described in the literature and a few of them have managed to reach the clinics. Among these, the anti-respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) Palivizumab, a phage-display optimized mAb, is the only marketed mAb directed against microbial pathogens. Palivizumab is a clear example of the importance of choosing the most appropriate strategy when selecting or optimizing an anti-infectious mAb. From this perspective, the extreme versatility of phage-display technology makes it a useful tool when setting up different strategies for the selection of mAbs directed against human pathogens, especially when their possible clinical use is considered. In this paper, we review the principal phage display strategies used to select anti-infectious mAbs, with particular attention focused on those used against hypervariable pathogens, such as HCV and influenza viruses.

  14. UV Light Inactivation of Human and Plant Pathogens in Unfiltered Surface Irrigation Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa A.; Worobo, Randy W.

    2014-01-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 108 or 109 CFU/liter for bacteria or 104 or 105 zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively. PMID:24242253

  15. UV light inactivation of human and plant pathogens in unfiltered surface irrigation water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa A; Worobo, Randy W; Smart, Christine D

    2014-02-01

    Fruit and vegetable growers continually battle plant diseases and food safety concerns. Surface water is commonly used in the production of fruits and vegetables and can harbor both human- and plant-pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate crops when used for irrigation or other agricultural purposes. Treatment methods for surface water are currently limited, and there is a need for suitable treatment options. A liquid-processing unit that uses UV light for the decontamination of turbid juices was analyzed for its efficacy in the treatment of surface waters contaminated with bacterial or oomycete pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, and Phytophthora capsici. Five-strain cocktails of each pathogen, containing approximately 10(8) or 10(9) CFU/liter for bacteria or 10(4) or 10(5) zoospores/liter for Ph. capsici, were inoculated into aliquots of two turbid surface water irrigation sources and processed with the UV unit. Pathogens were enumerated before and after treatment. In general, as the turbidity of the water source increased, the effectiveness of the UV treatment decreased, but in all cases, 99.9% or higher inactivation was achieved. Log reductions ranged from 10.0 to 6.1 and from 5.0 to 4.2 for bacterial pathogens and Ph. capsici, respectively.

  16. Recognizing filamentous basidiomycetes as agents of human disease: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chowdhary, A.; Kathuria, S.; Agarwal, K.; Meis, J.F.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous basidiomycetes (BM) are common environmental fungi that have recently emerged as important human pathogens, inciting a wide array of clinical manifestations that include allergic and invasive diseases. We reviewed 218 reported global cases of BM fungi. The most common etiologic agent was

  17. Identification of tick-borne pathogens in ticks feeding on humans in Turkey.

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    Ömer Orkun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Turkey. The tick-borne disease outbreaks reported in recent years and the abundance of tick species and the existence of suitable habitats increase the importance of studies related to the epidemiology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of and to determine the infection rates of some tick-borne pathogens, including Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae in the ticks removed from humans in different parts of Ankara.A total of 169 ticks belonging to the genus Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus were collected by removing from humans in different parts of Ankara. Ticks were molecularly screened for Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae by PCR and sequencing analysis. We detected 4 Babesia spp.; B. crassa, B. major, B. occultans and B. rossi, one Borrelia spp.; B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and 3 spotted fever group rickettsiae; R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca and R. hoogstraalii in the tick specimens analyzed. This is the report showing the presence of B. rossi in a region that is out of Africa and in the host species Ha. parva. In addition, B. crassa, for which limited information is available on its distribution and vector species, and B. occultans, for which no conclusive information is available on its presence in Turkey, were identified in Ha. parva and H. marginatum, respectively. Two human pathogenic rickettsia species (R. aeschlimannii and R. slovaca were detected with a high prevalence in ticks. Additionally, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto was detected in unusual tick species (H. marginatum, H. excavatum, Hyalomma spp. (nymph and Ha. parva.This study investigates both the distribution of several tick-borne pathogens affecting humans and animals, and the presence of new tick-borne pathogens in Turkey

  18. Identification of tick-borne pathogens in ticks feeding on humans in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkun, Ömer; Karaer, Zafer; Çakmak, Ayşe; Nalbantoğlu, Serpil

    2014-08-01

    The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Turkey. The tick-borne disease outbreaks reported in recent years and the abundance of tick species and the existence of suitable habitats increase the importance of studies related to the epidemiology of ticks and tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of and to determine the infection rates of some tick-borne pathogens, including Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae in the ticks removed from humans in different parts of Ankara. A total of 169 ticks belonging to the genus Haemaphysalis, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus were collected by removing from humans in different parts of Ankara. Ticks were molecularly screened for Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato and spotted fever group rickettsiae by PCR and sequencing analysis. We detected 4 Babesia spp.; B. crassa, B. major, B. occultans and B. rossi, one Borrelia spp.; B. burgdorferi sensu stricto and 3 spotted fever group rickettsiae; R. aeschlimannii, R. slovaca and R. hoogstraalii in the tick specimens analyzed. This is the report showing the presence of B. rossi in a region that is out of Africa and in the host species Ha. parva. In addition, B. crassa, for which limited information is available on its distribution and vector species, and B. occultans, for which no conclusive information is available on its presence in Turkey, were identified in Ha. parva and H. marginatum, respectively. Two human pathogenic rickettsia species (R. aeschlimannii and R. slovaca) were detected with a high prevalence in ticks. Additionally, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto was detected in unusual tick species (H. marginatum, H. excavatum, Hyalomma spp. (nymph) and Ha. parva). This study investigates both the distribution of several tick-borne pathogens affecting humans and animals, and the presence of new tick-borne pathogens in Turkey. More

  19. In Vitro Assessment of Extracts of the Lingzhi or Reishi Medicinal Mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (Higher Basidiomycetes) Against Different Plant Pathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Nabeel; Shahid, Ahmad Ali; Ali, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Five isolates of the lingzhi or reishi medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GL-1, GL-2, GL-3, GL-4, GL-5) were collected from different locations within and surrounding Lahore, Pakistan, to study the antifungal potential of their bioactive compounds. After studying morphology, different concentrations of the extracts were prepared in methanol and water using a Soxhlet extractor. Different cultures of fungal pathogens were acquired from the First Fungal Culture Bank of Pakistan, University of the Punjab, Lahore. The antimicrobial potential of 5 G. lucidum samples against 5 fungal pathogens (Fusarium oxysporum, Aspergillus niger, A. flavus, Penicillium sp., and Alternaria alternata) was observed. The lowest biomass reduction (7%) was observed in 1% and 2% concentrations of a methanolic extract and 6% in the case of a water extract. Major inhibition was observed using higher concentrations of the methanolic extract (3% and 4%). These extracts significantly suppressed fungal biomass up to 38% and 56% in A. niger, 47% in A. flavus, 58% in ,i>Penicillium sp., 46% in A. alternaria, and 45% in F. oxysporum compared with the control. It was concluded from these studies that methanolic extracts of G. lucidum showed better activity against all plant fungal pathogens when compared with the water extracts.

  20. Advances in Genomics of Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J B; St Leger, R J; Wang, C

    2016-01-01

    Fungi are the commonest pathogens of insects and crucial regulators of insect populations. The rapid advance of genome technologies has revolutionized our understanding of entomopathogenic fungi with multiple Metarhizium spp. sequenced, as well as Beauveria bassiana, Cordyceps militaris, and Ophiocordyceps sinensis among others. Phylogenomic analysis suggests that the ancestors of many of these fungi were plant endophytes or pathogens, with entomopathogenicity being an acquired characteristic. These fungi now occupy a wide range of habitats and hosts, and their genomes have provided a wealth of information on the evolution of virulence-related characteristics, as well as the protein families and genomic structure associated with ecological and econutritional heterogeneity, genome evolution, and host range diversification. In particular, their evolutionary transition from plant pathogens or endophytes to insect pathogens provides a novel perspective on how new functional mechanisms important for host switching and virulence are acquired. Importantly, genomic resources have helped make entomopathogenic fungi ideal model systems for answering basic questions in parasitology, entomology, and speciation. At the same time, identifying the selective forces that act upon entomopathogen fitness traits could underpin both the development of new mycoinsecticides and further our understanding of the natural roles of these fungi in nature. These roles frequently include mutualistic relationships with plants. Genomics has also facilitated the rapid identification of genes encoding biologically useful molecules, with implications for the development of pharmaceuticals and the use of these fungi as bioreactors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Horizontal gene transfers link a human MRSA pathogen to contagious bovine mastitis bacteria.

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    Thomas Brody

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acquisition of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance by many clinically important bacteria can be traced to horizontal gene transfer (HGT between related or evolutionarily distant microflora. Comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT DNA in emerging pathogens. We have adapted the multi-genome alignment tool EvoPrinter to facilitate discovery of HGT DNA sequences within bacterial genomes and within their mobile genetic elements. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: EvoPrinter analysis of 13 different Staphylococcus aureus genomes revealed that one of the human isolates, the hospital epidemic methicillin-resistant MRSA252 strain, uniquely shares multiple putative HGT DNA sequences with different causative agents of bovine mastitis that are not found in the other human S. aureus isolates. MRSA252 shares over 14 different DNA sequence blocks with the bovine mastitis ET3 S. aureus strain RF122, and many of the HGT DNAs encode virulence factors. EvoPrinter analysis of the MRSA252 chromosome also uncovered virulence-factor encoding HGT events with the genome of Listeria monocytogenes and a Staphylococcus saprophyticus associated plasmid. Both bacteria are also causal agents of contagious bovine mastitis. CONCLUSIONS: EvoPrinter analysis reveals that the human MRSA252 strain uniquely shares multiple DNA sequence blocks with different causative agents of bovine mastitis, suggesting that HGT events may be occurring between these pathogens. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that inadvertently enhance the contact of human and livestock bacterial pathogens.

  2. Signatures of environmental genetic adaptation pinpoint pathogens as the main selective pressure through human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Matteo; Sironi, Manuela; Pozzoli, Uberto; Ferrer-Admetlla, Anna; Ferrer-Admettla, Anna; Pattini, Linda; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2011-11-01

    Previous genome-wide scans of positive natural selection in humans have identified a number of non-neutrally evolving genes that play important roles in skin pigmentation, metabolism, or immune function. Recent studies have also shown that a genome-wide pattern of local adaptation can be detected by identifying correlations between patterns of allele frequencies and environmental variables. Despite these observations, the degree to which natural selection is primarily driven by adaptation to local environments, and the role of pathogens or other ecological factors as selective agents, is still under debate. To address this issue, we correlated the spatial allele frequency distribution of a large sample of SNPs from 55 distinct human populations to a set of environmental factors that describe local geographical features such as climate, diet regimes, and pathogen loads. In concordance with previous studies, we detected a significant enrichment of genic SNPs, and particularly non-synonymous SNPs associated with local adaptation. Furthermore, we show that the diversity of the local pathogenic environment is the predominant driver of local adaptation, and that climate, at least as measured here, only plays a relatively minor role. While background demography by far makes the strongest contribution in explaining the genetic variance among populations, we detected about 100 genes which show an unexpectedly strong correlation between allele frequencies and pathogenic environment, after correcting for demography. Conversely, for diet regimes and climatic conditions, no genes show a similar correlation between the environmental factor and allele frequencies. This result is validated using low-coverage sequencing data for multiple populations. Among the loci targeted by pathogen-driven selection, we found an enrichment of genes associated to autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, and multiples sclerosis, which lends credence to the hypothesis that some

  3. Signatures of environmental genetic adaptation pinpoint pathogens as the main selective pressure through human evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Fumagalli

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous genome-wide scans of positive natural selection in humans have identified a number of non-neutrally evolving genes that play important roles in skin pigmentation, metabolism, or immune function. Recent studies have also shown that a genome-wide pattern of local adaptation can be detected by identifying correlations between patterns of allele frequencies and environmental variables. Despite these observations, the degree to which natural selection is primarily driven by adaptation to local environments, and the role of pathogens or other ecological factors as selective agents, is still under debate. To address this issue, we correlated the spatial allele frequency distribution of a large sample of SNPs from 55 distinct human populations to a set of environmental factors that describe local geographical features such as climate, diet regimes, and pathogen loads. In concordance with previous studies, we detected a significant enrichment of genic SNPs, and particularly non-synonymous SNPs associated with local adaptation. Furthermore, we show that the diversity of the local pathogenic environment is the predominant driver of local adaptation, and that climate, at least as measured here, only plays a relatively minor role. While background demography by far makes the strongest contribution in explaining the genetic variance among populations, we detected about 100 genes which show an unexpectedly strong correlation between allele frequencies and pathogenic environment, after correcting for demography. Conversely, for diet regimes and climatic conditions, no genes show a similar correlation between the environmental factor and allele frequencies. This result is validated using low-coverage sequencing data for multiple populations. Among the loci targeted by pathogen-driven selection, we found an enrichment of genes associated to autoimmune diseases, such as celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, and multiples sclerosis, which lends credence to the

  4. Oral pathogens change proliferation properties of oral tumor cells by affecting gene expression of human defensins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, T; Kraus, D; Novak, N; Probstmeier, R; Frentzen, M; Wenghoefer, M; Jepsen, S; Winter, J

    2016-10-01

    The impact of oral pathogens onto the generation and variability of oral tumors has only recently been investigated. To get further insights, oral cancer cells were treated with pathogens and additionally, as a result of this bacterial cellular infection, with human defensins, which are as anti-microbial peptide members of the innate immune system. After cell stimulation, proliferation behavior, expression analysis of oncogenic relevant defensin genes, and effects on EGFR signaling were investigated. The expression of oncogenic relevant anti-microbial peptides was analyzed with real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. Cell culture experiments were performed to examine cellular impacts caused by stimulation, i.e., altered gene expression, proliferation rate, and EGF receptor-dependent signaling. Incubation of oral tumor cells with an oral pathogen (Porphyromonas gingivalis) and human α-defensins led to an increase in cell proliferation. In contrast, another oral bacterium used, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, enhanced cell death. The bacteria and anti-microbial peptides exhibited diverse effects on the transcript levels of oncogenic relevant defensin genes and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These two oral pathogens exhibited opposite primary effects on the proliferation behavior of oral tumor cells. Nevertheless, both microbe species led to similar secondary impacts on the proliferation rate by modifying expression levels of oncogenic relevant α-defensin genes. In this respect, oral pathogens exerted multiplying effects on tumor cell proliferation. Additionally, human defensins were shown to differently influence epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, supporting the hypothesis that these anti-microbial peptides serve as ligands of EGFR, thus modifying the proliferation behavior of oral tumor cells.

  5. Phlebotomine sand fly-borne pathogens in the Mediterranean Basin: Human leishmaniasis and phlebovirus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriconi, Martina; Rugna, Gianluca; Calzolari, Mattia; Bellini, Romeo; Albieri, Alessandro; Angelini, Paola; Cagarelli, Roberto; Landini, Maria P; Charrel, Remi N; Varani, Stefania

    2017-08-01

    Pathogens transmitted to humans by phlebotomine sand flies are neglected, as they cause infectious diseases that are not on the priority list of national and international public health systems. However, the infections caused by protozoa of the Leishmania genus and viruses belonging to the Phlebovirus genus (family Phenuiviridae)-the most significant group of viruses transmitted by sand flies-have a relevant role for human pathology. These infections are emerging in the Mediterranean region and will likely spread in forthcoming decades, posing a complex threat to human health. Four species and 2 hybrid strains of Leishmania are pathogenic for humans in the Mediterranean Basin, with an estimated annual incidence of 239,500-393,600 cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis and 1,200-2,000 cases of visceral leishmaniasis. Among the phleboviruses, Toscana virus can cause neuroinvasive infections, while other phleboviruses are responsible for a typical "3-day fever"; the actual incidence of Phlebovirus infections in the Mediterranean area is unknown, although at least 250 million people are exposed. Here, we reviewed the current literature on epidemiology of sand fly-borne infections in the Mediterranean Basin, with a focus on humans. Our analysis indicates the need for increased public health activities directed to determine the disease burden of these infections as well as to improve their surveillance. Among the emerging challenges concerning sand fly-borne pathogens, the relationships between sand fly-borne protozoa and viruses should be considered in future studies, including epidemiological links between Leishmania and phleboviruses as well as the conditional capacity for these pathogens to be involved in interactions that may evolve towards increased virulence.

  6. Human and Pathogen Factors Associated with Chlamydia trachomatis-Related Infertility in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, S.; Timms, P.; Allan, J. A.; Alexander, K.; Rombauts, L.; Horner, P.; Keltz, M.; Hocking, J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted pathogen worldwide. Infection can result in serious reproductive pathologies, including pelvic inflammatory disease, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility, in women. However, the processes that result in these reproductive pathologies have not been well defined. Here we review the evidence for the human disease burden of these chlamydial reproductive pathologies. We then review human-based evidence that links Chlamydia with reproductive pathologies in women. We present data supporting the idea that host, immunological, epidemiological, and pathogen factors may all contribute to the development of infertility. Specifically, we review the existing evidence that host and pathogen genotypes, host hormone status, age of sexual debut, sexual behavior, coinfections, and repeat infections are all likely to be contributory factors in development of infertility. Pathogen factors such as infectious burden, treatment failure, and tissue tropisms or ascension capacity are also potential contributory factors. We present four possible processes of pathology development and how these processes are supported by the published data. We highlight the limitations of the evidence and propose future studies that could improve our understanding of how chlamydial infertility in women occurs and possible future interventions to reduce this disease burden. PMID:26310245

  7. [Human plague and pneumonic plague : pathogenicity, epidemiology, clinical presentations and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehm, Julia M; Löscher, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Yersinia pestis is a highly pathogenic gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of human plague. In the last 1500 years and during three dreaded pandemics, millions of people became victims of Justinian's plague, the Black Death, or modern plague. Today,