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Sample records for human parasite schistosoma

  1. Schistosoma mansoni and Host-Parasite Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M-C.A. de Walick (Saskia)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Blood-dwelling parasitic trematodes (flatworms) of the genus Schistosoma cause the disease schistosomiasis or Bilharzia. There are 5 different Schistosoma species that infect humans and many other infecting different mammals. Over 200 million people worldwide are

  2. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  3. Optimal sample storage and extraction procotols for reliable multilocus genotyping of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, F; Geldof, S; Polman, K; Volckaert, F A M; Huyse, T

    2011-08-01

    Genotyping individual larval stages and eggs of natural parasite populations is complicated by the difficulty of obtaining reliable genotypes from low quantity DNA template. A suitable storage and extraction protocol, together with a thorough quantification of genotyping errors are therefore crucial for molecular epidemiological studies. Here we test the robustness, handling time, ease of use, cost effectiveness and success rate of various fixation (Whatman FTA(®) Classic and Elute Cards, 70% EtOH and RNAlater(®)) and subsequent DNA extraction methods (commercial kits and proteinase K protocol). None of these methods require a cooling chain and are therefore suitable for field collection. Based on a multiplex microsatellite PCR with nine loci the success and reliability of each technique is evaluated by the proportion of samples with at least eight scored loci and the proportion of genotyping errors. If only the former is taken into account, FTA(®) Elute is recommended (83% success; 44% genotyping error; 0.2 €/sample; 1h 20 m handling time). However, when also considering the genotyping errors, handling time and ease of use, we opt for 70% EtOH with the 96-well plate technology followed by a simple proteinase K extraction (73% success; 0% genotyping error; 0.2 €/sample; 15m handling time). For eggs we suggest (1) to pool all eggs per person in 1.5 ml tubes filled with 70% EtOH for transport and (2) to identify each egg to species level prior to genotyping. To this end we extended the Rapid diagnostic PCR developed by Webster et al. (2010) with a S. mansoni-specific primer to discriminate between S. mansoni, S. haematobium and S. bovis in a single PCR reaction. The success rate of genotyping eggs was 75% (0% genotyping error). This is the first study to incorporate genotyping errors through re-amplification for the evaluation of schistosome sampling protocols and the identification of error-prone loci. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Specific glycan elements determine differential binding of individual egg glycoproteins of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni by host C-type lectin receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meevissen, M.H.J.; Driessen, N.N.; Smits, H.H.; Versteegh, R.; van Vliet, S.J.; van Kooijk, Y.; Schramm, G.; Deelder, A.M.; de Haas, H.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; Hokke, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    During infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni, glycan motifs present on glycoproteins of the parasite's eggs mediate immunomodulatory effects on the host. The recognition of these glycan motifs is primarily mediated by C-type lectin receptors on dendritic cells and other cells of the

  5. The repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and the model organism Schmidtea mediterranea

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    Zamanian Mostafa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute one of the largest groupings of eukaryotic proteins, and represent a particularly lucrative set of pharmaceutical targets. They play an important role in eukaryotic signal transduction and physiology, mediating cellular responses to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. The phylum Platyhelminthes is of considerable medical and biological importance, housing major pathogens as well as established model organisms. The recent availability of genomic data for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and the model planarian Schmidtea mediterranea paves the way for the first comprehensive effort to identify and analyze GPCRs in this important phylum. Results Application of a novel transmembrane-oriented approach to receptor mining led to the discovery of 117 S. mansoni GPCRs, representing all of the major families; 105 Rhodopsin, 2 Glutamate, 3 Adhesion, 2 Secretin and 5 Frizzled. Similarly, 418 Rhodopsin, 9 Glutamate, 21 Adhesion, 1 Secretin and 11 Frizzled S. mediterranea receptors were identified. Among these, we report the identification of novel receptor groupings, including a large and highly-diverged Platyhelminth-specific Rhodopsin subfamily, a planarian-specific Adhesion-like family, and atypical Glutamate-like receptors. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out following extensive gene curation. Support vector machines (SVMs were trained and used for ligand-based classification of full-length Rhodopsin GPCRs, complementing phylogenetic and homology-based classification. Conclusions Genome-wide investigation of GPCRs in two platyhelminth genomes reveals an extensive and complex receptor signaling repertoire with many unique features. This work provides important sequence and functional leads for understanding basic flatworm receptor biology, and sheds light on a lucrative set of anthelmintic drug targets.

  6. The repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and the model organism Schmidtea mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian, Mostafa; Kimber, Michael J; McVeigh, Paul; Carlson, Steve A; Maule, Aaron G; Day, Tim A

    2011-12-06

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute one of the largest groupings of eukaryotic proteins, and represent a particularly lucrative set of pharmaceutical targets. They play an important role in eukaryotic signal transduction and physiology, mediating cellular responses to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. The phylum Platyhelminthes is of considerable medical and biological importance, housing major pathogens as well as established model organisms. The recent availability of genomic data for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and the model planarian Schmidtea mediterranea paves the way for the first comprehensive effort to identify and analyze GPCRs in this important phylum. Application of a novel transmembrane-oriented approach to receptor mining led to the discovery of 117 S. mansoni GPCRs, representing all of the major families; 105 Rhodopsin, 2 Glutamate, 3 Adhesion, 2 Secretin and 5 Frizzled. Similarly, 418 Rhodopsin, 9 Glutamate, 21 Adhesion, 1 Secretin and 11 Frizzled S. mediterranea receptors were identified. Among these, we report the identification of novel receptor groupings, including a large and highly-diverged Platyhelminth-specific Rhodopsin subfamily, a planarian-specific Adhesion-like family, and atypical Glutamate-like receptors. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out following extensive gene curation. Support vector machines (SVMs) were trained and used for ligand-based classification of full-length Rhodopsin GPCRs, complementing phylogenetic and homology-based classification. Genome-wide investigation of GPCRs in two platyhelminth genomes reveals an extensive and complex receptor signaling repertoire with many unique features. This work provides important sequence and functional leads for understanding basic flatworm receptor biology, and sheds light on a lucrative set of anthelmintic drug targets.

  7. Differentiating Schistosoma haematobium from related animal schistosomes by PCR amplifying inter-repeat sequences flanking newly selected repeated sequences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abbasi, Ibrahim; Hamburger, Joseph; Kariuki, Curtis; Mungai, Peter L; Muchiri, Eric M; King, Charles H

    2012-01-01

    In schistosomiasis elimination programs, successful discrimination of Schistosoma haematobium from the related animal Schistosoma parasites will be essential for accurate detection of human parasite transmission...

  8. Immuno-epidemiology of human Schistosoma haematobium infection: preferential IgG3 antibody responsiveness to a recombinant antigen dependent on age and parasite burden

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    Fernandez Cecilia

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomiasis is a major parasitic disease affecting over 200 million people in the developing world with a further 400 million people at risk of infection. The aim of this study was to identify a single antigen from adult Schistosoma haematobium worms and subsequently use this antigen to study the development of schistosome-acquired immunity in a human population. Methods The full-length cDNA sequence of a S. haematobium protein, a putative orthologue of the S. mansoni tegumental antigen Sm13, was obtained from a cDNA library of adult S. haematobium worms and named Sh13 following a small-scale expressed sequence tags (EST project. The recombinant Sh13 protein expressed in E. coli, was used to investigate immuno-epidemiological patterns in 147 Zimbabweans (7–18 years old exposed to S. haematobium. Results Sequence analysis of the full-length cDNA sequence of the S. haematobium protein Sh13, indicated that the protein has an N-terminal signal peptide and encodes an 85-amino acid mature protein with a highly conserved predicted transmembrane domain (86 % identity with the S. mansoni tegumental antigen Sm13. The recombinant Sh13 protein was used in ELISA assays to determine the reactivity of sera from the study participants. Antibody responses against Sh13 were predominantly IgG3 isotype compared to responses against crude worm antigens which were predominantly IgG1 and IgG4. The relationship between anti-Sh13 IgG3 levels and infection intensity varied significantly with host age. The youngest children (7–10 years old had relatively low levels of both infection and anti-Sh13 IgG3. In older children (11–12 years old rising infection levels were accompanied by a significant increase in anti-Sh13 IgG3 levels. Subsequently, infection intensity declined significantly in 13–18 year olds but levels of the antibody continued to rise. The changing relationship between infection intensity and anti-Sh13 IgG3 levels with host age

  9. [Arguments for the modification of the genome (introgression) of the human parasite Schistosoma haematobium by genes from S. bovis, in Niger].

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    Brémond, P; Sellin, B; Sellin, E; Naméoua, B; Labbo, R; Théron, A; Combes, C

    1993-07-01

    Characterization of schistosome populations from human in eastern Niger, through intra-uterine egg morphology of female parasites and phenotopic analyses of worms observed for acid phosphatase using electrophoretic separation, renders results that suggest an intogression of S. haematobium from man by genes of S. bovis, a parasite of domestic livestock. The origin of this introgression, that could implicate S. curassoni as well, another livestock parasite that hybridize with S. bovis, is discussed.

  10. In vitro cultivation of Schistosoma japonicum-parasites and cells.

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    Ye, Qing; Dong, Hui-Fen; Grevelding, Christoph G; Hu, Min

    2013-12-01

    Schistosomiasis is a serious parasitic zoonosis caused by blood-dwelling flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Understanding functions of genes and proteins of this parasite is important for uncovering this pathogen's complex biology, which will provide valuable information to design new strategies for schistosomiasis control. Effective applications of molecular tools reported to investigate schistosome gene function, such as inhibitor studies and transgenesis, rely on the developments of in vitro cultivation system of this parasite and cells. Besides the in vitro culture studies dealing with Schistosoma mansoni, there are also numerous excellent studies about the in vitro cultivation of Schistosoma japonicum, which were performed by Chinese researchers and published in Chinese journals. Nearly every stage of the life-cycle of S. japonicum, including miracidia, mother sporocysts, cercariae, schistosomula, and egg-laying adult worms, was employed for developing in vitro cultivation methods, being accompanied by the introduction of several media and supplements that helped to improve culture conditions. It was not only possible to generate mother sporocysts from miracidia in vitro, but also to obtain adult worms from cercariae through in vitro cultivation. The main obstacles to complete the life cycle of S. japonicum in the lab are the transition from mother sporocysts to cercariae, and the production of fertilized and completely developed eggs by adult worms generated in vitro. With regard to cells from S. japonicum, besides established isolation protocols and morphological observations, media optimizations were conducted by using different chemical reagents, biological supplements and physical treatment. Among these, mutagens like N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and the addition of extracellular matrix were found to be able to induce mitogenic activities. Although enzyme activities or the level of silver-stained nucleolar region associated protein in cultured cells

  11. Anti-Schistosoma IgG responses in Schistosoma haematobium single and concomitant infection with malaria parasites.

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    Morenikeji, Olajumoke A; Adeleye, Olumide; Omoruyi, Ewean C; Oyeyemi, Oyetunde T

    2016-03-01

    Areas prone to schistosomiasis are also at risk of malaria transmission. The interaction between the causal agents of the two diseases could modulate immune responses tailored toward protecting or aggravating morbidity dynamics and impair Schistosoma diagnostic precision. This study aimed at assessing the effect of Plasmodium spp. in concomitant infection with Schistosoma haematobium in modulation of anti-Schistosoma IgG antibodies. The school-based cross-sectional study recruited a total of 322 children screened for S. haematobium and Plasmodium spp. Levels of IgG against S. haematobium-soluble egg antigen (SEA) in single S. haematobium/malaria parasites infection and co-infection of the two parasites in schoolchildren were determined. Data were analyzed using χ(2), Fisher's exact test, and Tukey's multiple comparison test analyses. The prevalence of single infection by S. haematobium, Plasmodium spp., and concurrent infection due to the two pathogens was 27.7, 41.0, and 9.3%, respectively (p Schistosoma IgG production during co-infection of the two pathogens (1.950 ± 0.742 AU) was significantly higher than the value recorded for single malaria parasites' infection (1.402 ± 0.670 AU) (p  0.05). The anti-Schistosoma IgG production in co-infection status was however dependent on the intensity of Plasmodium spp. with individuals having high intensity of malaria parasites recording lower anti-Schistosoma IgG. This study has implication for diagnosis of schistosomiasis where anti-Schistosoma IgG is used as an indicator of infection. Efforts should be made to control the two infections simultaneously in order not to undermine the efforts targeted toward the control of one.

  12. The complete mitochondrial genomes of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma spindale and the evolutionary history of mitochondrial genome changes among parasitic flatworms.

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    Littlewood, D Timothy J; Lockyer, Anne E; Webster, Bonnie L; Johnston, David A; Le, Thanh Hoa

    2006-05-01

    Complete mitochondrial genome sequences for the schistosomes Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma. spindale have been characterized. S. haematobium is the causative agent of urinary schistosomiasis in humans and S. spindale uses ruminants as its definitive host; both are transmitted by freshwater snail intermediate hosts. Results confirm a major gene order rearrangement among schistosomes in all traditional Schistosoma species groups other than Schistosoma japonicum; i.e., species groups S. mansoni, S. haematobium, and S. indicum. These data lend support to the 'out of Asia' (East and Southeast Asia) hypothesis for Schistosoma. The gene order change involves translocation of atp6-nad2-trnA and a rearrangement of nad3-nad1 relative to other parasitic flatworm mt genomes so far sequenced. Gene order and tRNA secondary structure changes (loss and acquisition of the DHU and/or TPsiC arms of trnC, trnF, and trnR) between mitochondrial genomes of these and other (digenean and cestode) flatworms were inferred by character mapping onto a phylogeny estimated from nuclear small subunit rRNA gene sequences of these same species, in order to find additional rare genomic changes suitable as synapomorphies. Denser and wider taxon sampling of mt genomes across the Platyhelminthes will validate these putative characters.

  13. Uncovering Notch pathway in the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni.

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    Magalhães, Lizandra G; Morais, Enyara R; Machado, Carla B; Gomes, Matheus S; Cabral, Fernanda J; Souza, Julia M; Soares, Cláudia S; Sá, Renata G; Castro-Borges, William; Rodrigues, Vanderlei

    2016-10-01

    Several signaling molecules that govern development in higher animals have been identified in the parasite Schistosoma mansoni, including the transforming growth factor β, protein tyrosine kinases, nuclear hormone receptors, among others. The Notch pathway is a highly conserved signaling mechanism which is involved in a wide variety of developmental processes including embryogenesis and oogenesis in worms and flies. Here we aimed to provide the molecular reconstitution of the Notch pathway in S. mansoni using the available transcriptome and genome databases. Our results also revealed the presence of the transcripts coded for SmNotch, SmSu(H), SmHes, and the gamma-secretase complex (SmNicastrin, SmAph-1, and SmPen-2), throughout all the life stages analyzed. Besides, it was observed that the viability and separation of adult worm pairs were not affected by treatment with N-[N(3,5)-difluorophenacetyl)-L-Alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT), a Notch pathway inhibitor. Moreover, DAPT treatment decreased the production of phenotypically normal eggs and arrested their development in culture. Our results also showed a significant decrease in SmHes transcript levels in both adult worms and eggs treated with DAPT. These results provide, for the first time, functional validation of the Notch pathway in S. mansoni and suggest its involvement in parasite oogenesis and embryogenesis. Given the complexity of the Notch pathway, further experiments shall highlight the full repertoire of Notch-mediated cellular processes throughout the S. mansoni life cycle.

  14. Murine Schistosoma bovis infection: analysis of parasitic and immune parameters.

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    Viana da Costa, A; Gaubert, S; Fontaine, J; Lafitte, S; Seixas, A; De Lourdes Sampaio Silva, M; Capron, A; Grzych, J M

    1998-03-01

    Humoral and cellular responses to Schistosoma bovis antigens have been evaluated over a period of 11 weeks in mice exposed to S. bovis cercariae and data analysed in the context of the parasitic parameters (worm and egg loads) recorded at days 30, 60 and 80 of the ongoing infection. Results revealed a decrease of worm burden, particularly marked for female worms, between day 60 and day 80 of infection suggesting a higher susceptibility of female schistosomes to attrition mechanisms. The B-cell response, studied by measuring the production of different isotypes, was directed against different stage specific antigens, with a predominance of IgG1 antibodies associated with a significant increase of IgA and IgE antibodies after egg deposition. The T-cell response, assessed after in vitro stimulation of splenocytes, showed a predominant production of Th-2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10) occurring after egg laying. Interestingly in contrast to S. mansoni infection the Th-2 polarization did not seem to be exclusively triggered by egg-associated antigens since significant amounts of IL-10 were produced after stimulation with adult worm antigen preparation (SWAP) before the beginning of egg deposition.

  15. The tegumental surface membranes of Schistosoma mansoni are enriched in parasite-specific phospholipid species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Retra, Kim; deWalick, Saskia; Schmitz, Marion; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Brouwers, Jos F H M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    2015-01-01

    The complex surface structure of adult Schistosoma mansoni, the tegument, is essential for survival of the parasite. This tegument is syncytial and is covered by two closely-apposed lipid bilayers that form the interactive surface with the host. In order to identify parasite-specific phospholipids

  16. Human Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Ryan S.; Hodgson, Erin W.

    2008-01-01

    Entomologists often get “bug” samples for identification, including those that accidentally infest residences. In the United States, we are fortunate to have very few arthropods (e.g., insects, spiders, mites, ticks, etc.) that actually infest or feed on humans.

  17. Schistosoma mansoni: migration potential of normal and radiation attenuated parasites in naive guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, H.; McLaren, D.J.

    1987-02-01

    Compressed tissue autoradiography using (75Se)selenomethionine labelled parasites has been used to investigate the migration potential of normal and radiation attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni in naive guinea pigs. By Day 14 after infection. 44% of normal parasites were detected as reduced silver foci in the liver; this value corresponded well with the number of liver parasites recovered by retrograde perfusion of the hepatic portal system on Day 42 (42% of the challenge). In contrast, cercariae subjected to 50 krad of gamma irradiation failed to migrate out of the skin. The migration capacity of 20 krad irradiated parasites was less severely affected in that about half of the challenge parasites reached the lungs, but virtually none moved to the liver. These data are discussed in relation to the kinetics of immunity induced in guinea pigs by infection or vaccination with normal or radiation attenuated parasites.

  18. The tegument of the human parasitic worm Schistosoma mansoni as an excretory organ: the surface aquaporin SmAQP is a lactate transporter.

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    Zahra Faghiri

    Full Text Available Adult schistosomes are intravascular parasites that metabolize imported glucose largely via glycolysis. How the parasites get rid of the large amounts of lactic acid this generates is unknown at the molecular level. Here, we report that worms whose aquaporin gene (SmAQP has been suppressed using RNAi fail to rapidly acidify their culture medium and excrete less lactate compared to controls. Functional expression of SmAQP in Xenopus oocytes demonstrates that this protein can transport lactate following Michaelis-Menten kinetics with low apparent affinity (Km = 41+/-5. 8 mM and with a low energy of activation (E(a = 7.18+/-0.7 kcal/mol. Phloretin, a known inhibitor of lactate release from schistosomes, also inhibits lactate movement in SmAQP-expressing oocytes. In keeping with the substrate promiscuity of other aquaporins, SmAQP is shown here to be also capable of transporting water, mannitol, fructose and alanine but not glucose. Using immunofluorescent and immuno-EM, we confirm that SmAQP is localized in the tegument of adult worms. These findings extend the proposed functions of the schistosome tegument beyond its known capacity as an organ of nutrient uptake to include a role in metabolic waste excretion.

  19. Two sequential PCR amplifications for detection of Schistosoma mansoni in stool samples with low parasite load

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    Maria Cristina Carvalho do Espírito-Santo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis constitutes a major public health problem, with an estimated 200 million individuals infected worldwide and 700 million people living in risk areas. In Brazil there are areas of high, medium and low endemicity. Studies have shown that in endemic areas with a low prevalence of Schistosoma infection the sensitivity of parasitological methods is clearly reduced. Consequently diagnosis is often impeded due to the presence of false-negative results. The aim of this study is to present the PCR reamplification (Re-PCR protocol for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni in samples with low parasite load (with less than 100 eggs per gram (epg of feces. Three methods were used for the lysis of the envelopes of the S. mansoni eggs and two techniques of DNA extraction were carried out. Extracted DNA was quantified, and the results suggested that the extraction technique, which mixed glass beads with a guanidine isothiocyanate/phenol/chloroform (GT solution, produced good results. PCR reamplification was conducted and detection sensitivity was found to be five eggs per 500 mg of artificially marked feces. The results achieved using these methods suggest that they are potentially viable for the detection of Schistosoma infection with low parasite load.

  20. Two sequential PCR amplifications for detection of Schistosoma mansoni in stool samples with low parasite load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espírito-Santo, Maria Cristina Carvalho do; Alvarado-Mora, Mónica Viviana; Pinto, Pedro Luiz Silva; Carrilho, Flair José; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Gryschek, Ronaldo Cesar Borges

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis constitutes a major public health problem, with an estimated 200 million individuals infected worldwide and 700 million people living in risk areas. In Brazil there are areas of high, medium and low endemicity. Studies have shown that in endemic areas with a low prevalence of Schistosoma infection the sensitivity of parasitological methods is clearly reduced. Consequently diagnosis is often impeded due to the presence of false-negative results. The aim of this study is to present the PCR reamplification (Re-PCR) protocol for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni in samples with low parasite load (with less than 100 eggs per gram (epg) of feces). Three methods were used for the lysis of the envelopes of the S. mansoni eggs and two techniques of DNA extraction were carried out. Extracted DNA was quantified, and the results suggested that the extraction technique, which mixed glass beads with a guanidine isothiocyanate/phenol/chloroform (GT) solution, produced good results. PCR reamplification was conducted and detection sensitivity was found to be five eggs per 500 mg of artificially marked feces. The results achieved using these methods suggest that they are potentially viable for the detection of Schistosoma infection with low parasite load.

  1. Effects of proteasome inhibitor MG-132 on the parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

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    Enyara R Morais

    Full Text Available Proteasome is a proteolytic complex responsible for intracellular protein turnover in eukaryotes, archaea and in some actinobacteria species. Previous work has demonstrated that in Schistosoma mansoni parasites, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 affects parasite development. However, the molecular targets affected by MG-132 in S. mansoni are not entirely known. Here, we used expression microarrays to measure the genome-wide changes in gene expression of S. mansoni adult worms exposed in vitro to MG-132, followed by in silico functional analyses of the affected genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA. Scanning electron microscopy was used to document changes in the parasites' tegument. We identified 1,919 genes with a statistically significant (q-value ≤ 0.025 differential expression in parasites treated for 24 h with MG-132, when compared with control. Of these, a total of 1,130 genes were up-regulated and 790 genes were down-regulated. A functional gene interaction network comprised of MG-132 and its target genes, known from the literature to be affected by the compound in humans, was identified here as affected by MG-132. While MG-132 activated the expression of the 26S proteasome genes, it also decreased the expression of 19S chaperones assembly, 20S proteasome maturation, ubiquitin-like NEDD8 and its partner cullin-3 ubiquitin ligase genes. Interestingly, genes that encode proteins related to potassium ion binding, integral membrane component, ATPase and potassium channel activities were significantly down-regulated, whereas genes encoding proteins related to actin binding and microtubule motor activity were significantly up-regulated. MG-132 caused important changes in the worm tegument; peeling, outbreaks and swelling in the tegument tubercles could be observed, which is consistent with interference on the ionic homeostasis in S. mansoni. Finally, we showed the down-regulation of Bax pro-apoptotic gene, as well as up-regulation of two

  2. Effects of proteasome inhibitor MG-132 on the parasite Schistosoma mansoni

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    de Paula, Renato G.; Ornelas, Alice M. M.; Moreira, Érika B. C.; Badoco, Fernanda Rafacho; Magalhães, Lizandra G.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Rodrigues, Vanderlei

    2017-01-01

    Proteasome is a proteolytic complex responsible for intracellular protein turnover in eukaryotes, archaea and in some actinobacteria species. Previous work has demonstrated that in Schistosoma mansoni parasites, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 affects parasite development. However, the molecular targets affected by MG-132 in S. mansoni are not entirely known. Here, we used expression microarrays to measure the genome-wide changes in gene expression of S. mansoni adult worms exposed in vitro to MG-132, followed by in silico functional analyses of the affected genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Scanning electron microscopy was used to document changes in the parasites’ tegument. We identified 1,919 genes with a statistically significant (q-value ≤ 0.025) differential expression in parasites treated for 24 h with MG-132, when compared with control. Of these, a total of 1,130 genes were up-regulated and 790 genes were down-regulated. A functional gene interaction network comprised of MG-132 and its target genes, known from the literature to be affected by the compound in humans, was identified here as affected by MG-132. While MG-132 activated the expression of the 26S proteasome genes, it also decreased the expression of 19S chaperones assembly, 20S proteasome maturation, ubiquitin-like NEDD8 and its partner cullin-3 ubiquitin ligase genes. Interestingly, genes that encode proteins related to potassium ion binding, integral membrane component, ATPase and potassium channel activities were significantly down-regulated, whereas genes encoding proteins related to actin binding and microtubule motor activity were significantly up-regulated. MG-132 caused important changes in the worm tegument; peeling, outbreaks and swelling in the tegument tubercles could be observed, which is consistent with interference on the ionic homeostasis in S. mansoni. Finally, we showed the down-regulation of Bax pro-apoptotic gene, as well as up-regulation of two apoptosis

  3. Metabonomic investigation of human Schistosoma mansoni infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Crina I.A.; Meissner, Axel; Göraler, Sibel

    2011-01-01

    involving a well-characterized cohort of 447 individuals from a rural area in Uganda near Lake Victoria with a high prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni, a species predominantly occurring in Africa including Madagascar and parts of South America. Cohort samples were collected from individuals at five time...

  4. Schistosoma comparative genomics: integrating genome structure, parasite biology and anthelmintic discovery

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    Swain, Martin T.; Larkin, Denis M.; Caffrey, Conor R.; Davies, Stephen J.; Loukas, Alex; Skelly, Patrick J.; Hoffmann, Karl F.

    2011-01-01

    Schistosoma genomes provide a comprehensive resource for identifying the molecular processes that shape parasite evolution and for discovering novel chemotherapeutic or immunoprophylactic targets. Here, we demonstrate how intra- and intergenus comparative genomics can be used to drive these investigations forward, illustrate the advantages and limitations of these approaches and review how post genomic technologies offer complementary strategies for genome characterisation. While sequencing and functional characterisation of other schistosome/platyhelminth genomes continues to expedite anthelmintic discovery, we contend that future priorities should equally focus on improving assembly quality, and chromosomal assignment, of existing schistosome/platyhelminth genomes. PMID:22024648

  5. New Perspectives on Host-Parasite Interplay by Comparative Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analyses of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with an estimated 200 million people infected in 76 countries. Here we isolated ~ 8,400 potential protein-encoding cDNA contigs from Schistosoma japonicum after sequencing circa 84,000 expressed sequence tags. In tandem, we undertook a high-throughput proteomics approach to characterize the protein expression profiles of a number of developmental stages (cercariae, hepatic schistosomula, female and male adults, eggs, and miracidia and tissues at the host-parasite interface (eggshell and tegument by interrogating the protein database deduced from the contigs. Comparative analysis of these transcriptomic and proteomic data, the latter including 3,260 proteins with putative identities, revealed differential expression of genes among the various developmental stages and sexes of S. japonicum and localization of putative secretory and membrane antigens, enzymes, and other gene products on the adult tegument and eggshell, many of which displayed genetic polymorphisms. Numerous S. japonicum genes exhibited high levels of identity with those of their mammalian hosts, whereas many others appeared to be conserved only across the genus Schistosoma or Phylum Platyhelminthes. These findings are expected to provide new insights into the pathophysiology of schistosomiasis and for the development of improved interventions for disease control and will facilitate a more fundamental understanding of schistosome biology, evolution, and the host-parasite interplay.

  6. New perspectives on host-parasite interplay by comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Schistosoma japonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Liu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis remains a serious public health problem with an estimated 200 million people infected in 76 countries. Here we isolated ~ 8,400 potential protein-encoding cDNA contigs from Schistosoma japonicum after sequencing circa 84,000 expressed sequence tags. In tandem, we undertook a high-throughput proteomics approach to characterize the protein expression profiles of a number of developmental stages (cercariae, hepatic schistosomula, female and male adults, eggs, and miracidia and tissues at the host-parasite interface (eggshell and tegument by interrogating the protein database deduced from the contigs. Comparative analysis of these transcriptomic and proteomic data, the latter including 3,260 proteins with putative identities, revealed differential expression of genes among the various developmental stages and sexes of S. japonicum and localization of putative secretory and membrane antigens, enzymes, and other gene products on the adult tegument and eggshell, many of which displayed genetic polymorphisms. Numerous S. japonicum genes exhibited high levels of identity with those of their mammalian hosts, whereas many others appeared to be conserved only across the genus Schistosoma or Phylum Platyhelminthes. These findings are expected to provide new insights into the pathophysiology of schistosomiasis and for the development of improved interventions for disease control and will facilitate a more fundamental understanding of schistosome biology, evolution, and the host-parasite interplay.

  7. The Schistosoma mansoni phylome: using evolutionary genomics to gain insight into a parasite's biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Larissa Lopes; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Nahum, Laila Alves; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Gabaldón, Toni; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2012-11-13

    Schistosoma mansoni is one of the causative agents of schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that affects about 237 million people worldwide. Despite recent efforts, we still lack a general understanding of the relevant host-parasite interactions, and the possible treatments are limited by the emergence of resistant strains and the absence of a vaccine. The S. mansoni genome was completely sequenced and still under continuous annotation. Nevertheless, more than 45% of the encoded proteins remain without experimental characterization or even functional prediction. To improve our knowledge regarding the biology of this parasite, we conducted a proteome-wide evolutionary analysis to provide a broad view of the S. mansoni's proteome evolution and to improve its functional annotation. Using a phylogenomic approach, we reconstructed the S. mansoni phylome, which comprises the evolutionary histories of all parasite proteins and their homologs across 12 other organisms. The analysis of a total of 7,964 phylogenies allowed a deeper understanding of genomic complexity and evolutionary adaptations to a parasitic lifestyle. In particular, the identification of lineage-specific gene duplications pointed to the diversification of several protein families that are relevant for host-parasite interaction, including proteases, tetraspanins, fucosyltransferases, venom allergen-like proteins, and tegumental-allergen-like proteins. In addition to the evolutionary knowledge, the phylome data enabled us to automatically re-annotate 3,451 proteins through a phylogenetic-based approach rather than solely sequence similarity searches. To allow further exploitation of this valuable data, all information has been made available at PhylomeDB (http://www.phylomedb.org). In this study, we used an evolutionary approach to assess S. mansoni parasite biology, improve genome/proteome functional annotation, and provide insights into host-parasite interactions. Taking advantage of a proteome

  8. The distribution of Schistosoma bovis Sonsino, 1876 in relation to intermediate host mollusc-parasite relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moné, H; Mouahid, G; Morand, S

    1999-01-01

    Schistosoma bovis is a digenean platyhelminth that is responsible for a parasitic disease called schistosomiasis or bilharziasis in bovines. It has a natural wide mollusc intermediate host spectrum and is compatible, experimentally, with a wide range of species. Our working hypothesis is that the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara were two physical barriers that could have separated the populations of S. bovis in three parts and may have played a role in gene flow. Experimental data were collected from earlier published studies, and the different intermediate host spectra and the mollusc-parasite geographical compatibilities were compared between the North Mediterranean zone, the South Mediterranean zone and the South Saharan zone. From our results, the three major groups of S. bovis populations that could be determined were the Iberian, the Mediterranean and the South Saharan populations. Our tested hypothesis was thus not confirmed concerning the Mediterranean sea barrier but was confirmed with the Saharan one. A paleogeographical scenario of S. bovis is proposed following three major steps from a South Saharan origin to a possible local adaptation of the parasite in the Iberian Peninsula.

  9. A late IL-33 response after exposure to Schistosoma haematobium antigen is associated with an up-regulation of IL-13 in human eosinophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, S.; Jones, F. M.; Fofana, H. K. M.

    2013-01-01

    IL-33, a proposed alarmin, stimulates innate immune cells and Th2 cells to produce IL-13 and is rapidly upregulated upon antigen exposure in murine helminth infection. The human IL-33 response to helminth antigen was analysed in Malians infected with Schistosoma haematobium by disrupting parasite...

  10. Eukaryotic Protein Kinases (ePKs of the Helminth Parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerlotini Adhemar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomiasis remains an important parasitic disease and a major economic problem in many countries. The Schistosoma mansoni genome and predicted proteome sequences were recently published providing the opportunity to identify new drug candidates. Eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs play a central role in mediating signal transduction through complex networks and are considered druggable targets from the medical and chemical viewpoints. Our work aimed at analyzing the S. mansoni predicted proteome in order to identify and classify all ePKs of this parasite through combined computational approaches. Functional annotation was performed mainly to yield insights into the parasite signaling processes relevant to its complex lifestyle and to select some ePKs as potential drug targets. Results We have identified 252 ePKs, which corresponds to 1.9% of the S. mansoni predicted proteome, through sequence similarity searches using HMMs (Hidden Markov Models. Amino acid sequences corresponding to the conserved catalytic domain of ePKs were aligned by MAFFT and further used in distance-based phylogenetic analysis as implemented in PHYLIP. Our analysis also included the ePK homologs from six other eukaryotes. The results show that S. mansoni has proteins in all ePK groups. Most of them are clearly clustered with known ePKs in other eukaryotes according to the phylogenetic analysis. None of the ePKs are exclusively found in S. mansoni or belong to an expanded family in this parasite. Only 16 S. mansoni ePKs were experimentally studied, 12 proteins are predicted to be catalytically inactive and approximately 2% of the parasite ePKs remain unclassified. Some proteins were mentioned as good target for drug development since they have a predicted essential function for the parasite. Conclusions Our approach has improved the functional annotation of 40% of S. mansoni ePKs through combined similarity and phylogenetic-based approaches. As we

  11. Cysteine protease inhibitor of Schistosoma japonicum - A parasite-derived negative immunoregulatory factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; He, Baohua; Hou, Wei; He, Li

    2017-03-01

    Studies have shown that cysteine protease inhibitors from some parasites have immunosuppressive effects on the host. We previously have cloned a novel cysteine protease inhibitor from Schistosoma japonicum and purified its recombinant version (protein named rSj-C). Its possible inhibitory effect on the host immune response has not been described.This study shows that rSj-C inhibits lysosomal cysteine protease of murine dendritic cells (DCs). After DCs were incubated with rSj-C and then with soluble adult worm antigen (AWA) of S. japonicum, the mean fluorescence intensity of MHC class II antigens on the surface of DCs decreased significantly by flow cytometry. These results indirectly proved that rSj-C can suppress exogenous-antigen presentation by DCs. The flow cytometric assay revealed that in comparison with control groups, the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells among CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells of Schistosom-infected mice increased significantly 8 weeks after the infected mice were injected with rSj-C (p ˂ 0.05). Additionally, the expression levels of cytokines IL-4 and TGF-β produced by T cells increased significantly as compared with these levels in the normal group (p ˂ 0.05). These results clearly show that the cysteine protease inhibitor from S. japonicum is a new parasite-derived immunosuppressive factor.

  12. Schistosoma mansoni Polo-like kinases and their function in control of mitosis and parasite reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissous, Colette; Grevelding, Christoph G; Long, Thavy

    2011-06-01

    Polo-like kinases are important regulators of cell cycle progression and mitosis. They constitute a family of conserved serine/threonine kinases which are highly related in their catalytic domains and contain polo boxes involved in protein-protein interactions and subcellular localization. In mammals, five Plks (Plk 1-5) encompass diverse roles in centrosome dynamics, spindle formation, intra S-phase and G2/M checkpoints and DNA damage response. Plk1 is a key positive regulator of mitosis and is overexpressed in various types of cancers. Plk4 is a divergent member of the Plk family, with essential functions in centriole duplication. Homozygous disruption of Plk1 or Plk4 in mice is lethal in embryos. Two Plk members SmPlk1 and SmSak, homologous to Plk1 and Plk4 respectively, are present in the parasitic platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. Structural and functional analyses of SmPlk1 have demonstrated its conserved function in the regulation of cell cycle G2/M transition in Xenopus oocytes. The anti-cancer drug BI 2536 (the most potent and selective Plk1 inhibitor) inhibits specifically the catalytic activity of SmPlk1 and induced profound alterations in schistosome gonads, indicating a role of SmPlk1 in parasite gametogenesis and its potential as a novel chemotherapeutic target against schistosomiasis. Functions of SmSak in cell cycle regulation and schistosome gonad development are currently investigated.

  13. Reductions in genetic diversity of Schistosoma mansoni populations under chemotherapeutic pressure: the effect of sampling approach and parasite population definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Michael D; Churcher, Thomas S; Basáñez, María-Gloria; Norton, Alice J; Lwambo, Nicholas J S; Webster, Joanne P

    2013-11-01

    Detecting potential changes in genetic diversity in schistosome populations following chemotherapy with praziquantel (PZQ) is crucial if we are to fully understand the impact of such chemotherapy with respect to the potential emergence of resistance and/or other evolutionary outcomes of interventions. Doing so by implementing effective, and cost-efficient sampling protocols will help to optimise time and financial resources, particularly relevant to a disease such as schistosomiasis currently reliant on a single available drug. Here we explore the effect on measures of parasite genetic diversity of applying various field sampling approaches, both in terms of the number of (human) hosts sampled and the number of transmission stages (miracidia) sampled per host for a Schistosoma mansoni population in Tanzania pre- and post-treatment with PZQ. In addition, we explore population structuring within and between hosts by comparing the estimates of genetic diversity obtained assuming a 'component population' approach with those using an 'infrapopulation' approach. We found that increasing the number of hosts sampled, rather than the number of miracidia per host, gives more robust estimates of genetic diversity. We also found statistically significant population structuring (using Wright's F-statistics) and significant differences in the measures of genetic diversity depending on the parasite population definition. The relative advantages, disadvantages and, hence, subsequent reliability of these metrics for parasites with complex life-cycles are discussed, both for the specific epidemiological and ecological scenario under study here and for their future application to other areas and schistosome species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-equilibrium plasma prevention of Schistosoma japonicum transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Xing-Quan Wang; Feng-Peng Wang; Wei Chen; Jun Huang; Kateryna Bazaka; Kostya (Ken) Ostrikov

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a widespread human and animal parasite that causes intestinal and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis linked to colon, liver and bladder cancers, and anemia. Estimated 230 million people are currently infected with Schistosoma spp, with 779 million people at risk of contracting the parasite. Infection occurs when a host comes into contact with cercariae, a planktonic larval stage of the parasite, and can be prevented by inactivating the larvae, commonly by chemical treatmen...

  15. Pattern of cercarial emergence of Schistosoma curassoni from Niger and comparison with three sympatric species of schistosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, F; Théron, A; Brémond, P; Sellin, E; Sellin, B

    1992-02-01

    The emergence pattern of Schistosoma curassoni cercariae from Bulinus umbilicatus, whose adult worms parasitize bovine, caprine, and ovine ungulates in Niger, is of a circadian type with a mean emission time at 0855 hr +/- 1 hr 6 min, characteristic of the schistosome species parasitizing domestic or wild cattle. The comparison of this cercarial emergence pattern with those of the other 3 sympatric species of schistosomes (Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma bovis, and Schistosoma mansoni) shows a significant difference between the chronobiology of the cercariae infective for human and those infective for bovine hosts. This difference may improve epidemiological surveys based on snail prevalences by allowing the distinction between bulinids infected with human and bovine parasites.

  16. Schistosoma mansoni polo-like kinases and their function in control of mitosis and parasite reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Dissous

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinases are important regulators of cell cycle progression and mitosis. They constitute a family of conserved serine/threonine kinases which are highly related in their catalytic domains and contain polo boxes involved in protein-protein interactions and subcellular localization. In mammals, five Plks (Plk 1-5 encompass diverse roles in centrosome dynamics, spindle formation, intra S-phase and G2/M checkpoints and DNA damage response. Plk1 is a key positive regulator of mitosis and is overexpressed in various types of cancers. Plk4 is a divergent member of the Plk family, with essential functions in centriole duplication. Homozygous disruption of Plk1 or Plk4 in mice is lethal in embryos. Two Plk members SmPlk1 and SmSak, homologous to Plk1 and Plk4 respectively, are present in the parasitic platyhelminth Schistosoma mansoni. Structural and functional analyses of SmPlk1 have demonstrated its conserved function in the regulation of cell cycle G2/M transition in Xenopus oocytes. The anti-cancer drug BI 2536 (the most potent and selective Plk1 inhibitor inhibits specifically the catalytic activity of SmPlk1 and induced profound alterations in schistosome gonads, indicating a role of SmPlk1 in parasite gametogenesis and its potential as a novel chemotherapeutic target against schistosomiasis. Functions of SmSak in cell cycle regulation and schistosome gonad development are currently investigatedQuinases do tipo Polo ("polo-like" são importantes reguladores da progressão do ciclo celular e da mitose. Elas constituem uma família de serina/treonina quinases que são altamente relacionadas entre si no seu domínio catalítico e contêm blocos "polo" envolvidos com interações proteína-proteína e com localização subcelular. Em mamíferos, cinco Plks (Plk 1-5 englobam diversos papéis na dinâmica do centrossomo, formação do fuso, "checkpoints" dentro da fase S e da transição G2/M, e na resposta aos danos do DNA. Plk1 é um regulador

  17. Studies on the interaction of Schistosoma mansoni and Leishmania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schistosoma mansoni and Leishmania major are important tropical human parasites. It is crucial to know the effect of the two infecting man concurrently. Two groups of BALB/c mice were infected with each of the parasites separately; another group was co-infected with both parasites and there was a naïve control. Draining ...

  18. Studies on the interaction of Schistosoma mansoni and Leishmania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    Introduction. Schistosomiasis and leishmaniasis are two parasitic diseases associated with great human suffering in the endemic areas. The two diseases are widespread and double infection is not an uncommon feature [1, 2]. Interestingly, some infections with Schistosoma (a parasitic helminth) and Leishmania (a parasitic.

  19. Venus kinase receptors control reproduction in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Vanderstraete

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Venus kinase receptor (VKR is a single transmembrane molecule composed of an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptor and an extracellular Venus Flytrap (VFT structure similar to the ligand binding domain of many class C G protein coupled receptors. This receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK was first discovered in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, then in a large variety of invertebrates. A single vkr gene is found in most genomes, except in S. mansoni in which two genes Smvkr1 and Smvkr2 exist. VKRs form a unique family of RTKs present only in invertebrates and their biological functions are still to be discovered. In this work, we show that SmVKRs are expressed in the reproductive organs of S. mansoni, particularly in the ovaries of female worms. By transcriptional analyses evidence was obtained that both SmVKRs fulfill different roles during oocyte maturation. Suppression of Smvkr expression by RNA interference induced spectacular morphological changes in female worms with a strong disorganization of the ovary, which was dominated by the presence of primary oocytes, and a defect of egg formation. Following expression in Xenopus oocytes, SmVKR1 and SmVKR2 receptors were shown to be activated by distinct ligands which are L-Arginine and calcium ions, respectively. Signalling analysis in Xenopus oocytes revealed the capacity of SmVKRs to activate the PI3K/Akt/p70S6K and Erk MAPK pathways involved in cellular growth and proliferation. Additionally, SmVKR1 induced phosphorylation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Activation of JNK by SmVKR1 was supported by the results of yeast two-hybrid experiments identifying several components of the JNK pathway as specific interacting partners of SmVKR1. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the functions of SmVKR in gametogenesis, and particularly in oogenesis and egg formation. By eliciting signalling pathways potentially involved in oocyte proliferation, growth

  20. Venus kinase receptors control reproduction in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Gouignard, Nadège; Cailliau, Katia; Morel, Marion; Hahnel, Steffen; Leutner, Silke; Beckmann, Svenja; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dissous, Colette

    2014-05-01

    The Venus kinase receptor (VKR) is a single transmembrane molecule composed of an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain close to that of insulin receptor and an extracellular Venus Flytrap (VFT) structure similar to the ligand binding domain of many class C G protein coupled receptors. This receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) was first discovered in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, then in a large variety of invertebrates. A single vkr gene is found in most genomes, except in S. mansoni in which two genes Smvkr1 and Smvkr2 exist. VKRs form a unique family of RTKs present only in invertebrates and their biological functions are still to be discovered. In this work, we show that SmVKRs are expressed in the reproductive organs of S. mansoni, particularly in the ovaries of female worms. By transcriptional analyses evidence was obtained that both SmVKRs fulfill different roles during oocyte maturation. Suppression of Smvkr expression by RNA interference induced spectacular morphological changes in female worms with a strong disorganization of the ovary, which was dominated by the presence of primary oocytes, and a defect of egg formation. Following expression in Xenopus oocytes, SmVKR1 and SmVKR2 receptors were shown to be activated by distinct ligands which are L-Arginine and calcium ions, respectively. Signalling analysis in Xenopus oocytes revealed the capacity of SmVKRs to activate the PI3K/Akt/p70S6K and Erk MAPK pathways involved in cellular growth and proliferation. Additionally, SmVKR1 induced phosphorylation of JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). Activation of JNK by SmVKR1 was supported by the results of yeast two-hybrid experiments identifying several components of the JNK pathway as specific interacting partners of SmVKR1. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the functions of SmVKR in gametogenesis, and particularly in oogenesis and egg formation. By eliciting signalling pathways potentially involved in oocyte proliferation, growth and migration

  1. Sex-Biased Transcriptome of Schistosoma mansoni: Host-Parasite Interaction, Genetic Determinants and Epigenetic Regulators Are Associated with Sexual Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Marion A L; Boissier, Jérôme; Roquis, David; Grunau, Christoph; Allienne, Jean-François; Duval, David; Toulza, Eve; Arancibia, Nathalie; Caffrey, Conor R; Long, Thavy; Nidelet, Sabine; Rohmer, Marine; Cosseau, Céline

    2016-09-01

    Among more than 20,000 species of hermaphroditic trematodes, Schistosomatidae are unusual since they have evolved gonochorism. In schistosomes, sex is determined by a female heterogametic system, but phenotypic sexual dimorphism appears only after infection of the vertebrate definitive host. The completion of gonad maturation occurs even later, after pairing. To date, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the sexual differentiation in these species remain unknown, and in vivo studies on the developing schistosomulum stages are lacking. To study the molecular basis of sex determination and sexual differentiation in schistosomes, we investigated the whole transcriptome of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni in a stage- and sex-comparative manner. We performed a RNA-seq on males and females for five developmental stages: cercariae larvae, three in vivo schistosomulum stages and adults. We detected 7,168 genes differentially expressed between sexes in at least one of the developmental stages, and 4,065 of them were functionally annotated. Transcriptome data were completed with H3K27me3 histone modification analysis using ChIP-Seq before (in cercariae) and after (in adults) the phenotypic sexual dimorphism appearance. In this paper we present (i) candidate determinants of the sexual differentiation, (ii) sex-biased players of the interaction with the vertebrate host, and (iii) different dynamic of the H3K27me3 histone mark between sexes as an illustration of sex-biased epigenetic landscapes. Our work presents evidence that sexual differentiation in S. mansoni is accompanied by distinct male and female transcriptional landscapes of known players of the host-parasite crosstalk, genetic determinants and epigenetic regulators. Our results suggest that such combination could lead to the optimized sexual dimorphism of this parasitic species. As S. mansoni is pathogenic for humans, this study represents a promising source of therapeutic targets, providing not only data on

  2. Sex-Biased Transcriptome of Schistosoma mansoni: Host-Parasite Interaction, Genetic Determinants and Epigenetic Regulators Are Associated with Sexual Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion A L Picard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Among more than 20,000 species of hermaphroditic trematodes, Schistosomatidae are unusual since they have evolved gonochorism. In schistosomes, sex is determined by a female heterogametic system, but phenotypic sexual dimorphism appears only after infection of the vertebrate definitive host. The completion of gonad maturation occurs even later, after pairing. To date, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the sexual differentiation in these species remain unknown, and in vivo studies on the developing schistosomulum stages are lacking. To study the molecular basis of sex determination and sexual differentiation in schistosomes, we investigated the whole transcriptome of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni in a stage- and sex-comparative manner.We performed a RNA-seq on males and females for five developmental stages: cercariae larvae, three in vivo schistosomulum stages and adults. We detected 7,168 genes differentially expressed between sexes in at least one of the developmental stages, and 4,065 of them were functionally annotated. Transcriptome data were completed with H3K27me3 histone modification analysis using ChIP-Seq before (in cercariae and after (in adults the phenotypic sexual dimorphism appearance. In this paper we present (i candidate determinants of the sexual differentiation, (ii sex-biased players of the interaction with the vertebrate host, and (iii different dynamic of the H3K27me3 histone mark between sexes as an illustration of sex-biased epigenetic landscapes.Our work presents evidence that sexual differentiation in S. mansoni is accompanied by distinct male and female transcriptional landscapes of known players of the host-parasite crosstalk, genetic determinants and epigenetic regulators. Our results suggest that such combination could lead to the optimized sexual dimorphism of this parasitic species. As S. mansoni is pathogenic for humans, this study represents a promising source of therapeutic targets, providing not

  3. Paleoparasitology: the origin of human parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adauto Araujo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasitism is composed by three subsystems: the parasite, the host, and the environment. There are no organisms that cannot be parasitized. The relationship between a parasite and its host species most of the time do not result in damage or disease to the host. However, in a parasitic disease the presence of a given parasite is always necessary, at least in a given moment of the infection. Some parasite species that infect humans were inherited from pre-hominids, and were shared with other phylogenetically close host species, but other parasite species were acquired from the environment as humans evolved. Human migration spread inherited parasites throughout the globe. To recover and trace the origin and evolution of infectious diseases, paleoparasitology was created. Paleoparasitology is the study of parasites in ancient material, which provided new information on the evolution, paleoepidemiology, ecology and phylogenetics of infectious diseases.

  4. Genetic diversity of Schistosoma haematobium parasite IS NOT associated with severity of disease in an endemic area in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmelseed, Nagla; Karamino, Nhashal E; Abdelwahed, Mohammed O; Hamdoun, Anas O; Elmadani, Ahmed E

    2014-08-27

    Over 650 million people globally are at risk of schistosomiasis infection, while more than 200 million people are infected of which the higher disease rates occur in children. Eighty three students between 6-20 years (mean 12.45 ± 3.2) from Quran School for boys in Radwan village, Gezira state were recruited to investigate for the relationship between the genetic diversity of Schistosoma haematobium strains and the severity of the disease. Schistosoma haematobium infection was detected by filtration of urine. Ultrasonography was done on each study subject, while PCR technique was used for genotyping via random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) with A01, A02, A12, Y20 and A13 primers. A01 primer gave three different genotypes (A01-1, A01-2 and A01-3). About 54.2% (45/83) were S. haematobium egg positive by urine filtration. On assessment of the upper and lower urinary tract by ultrasound technique, 61.4% (51/83) were positiveand73.3% (60/83) samples were PCR positive. No significant difference was found when comparing the three different genotypes with severity of the disease. This study concludes that no association was found between the different genotypes of S.haemtobium and the severity of the disease. Examination of more samples from different areas to identify any possible differences between the parasites genes and disease severity was recommended.

  5. Evolutionary analysis of the cystatin family in three Schistosoma species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Astroz, Yesid; Scholte, Larissa L. S.; Pais, Fabiano Sviatopolk-Mirsky; Oliveira, Guilherme; Nahum, Laila A.

    2014-01-01

    The cystatin family comprises cysteine protease inhibitors distributed in 3 subfamilies (I25A–C). Family members lacking cystatin activity are currently unclassified. Little is known about the evolution of Schistosoma cystatins, their physiological roles, and expression patterns in the parasite life cycle. The present study aimed to identify cystatin homologs in the predicted proteome of three Schistosoma species and other Platyhelminthes. We analyzed the amino acid sequence diversity focused in the identification of protein signatures and to establish evolutionary relationships among Schistosoma and experimentally validated human cystatins. Gene expression patterns were obtained from different developmental stages in Schistosoma mansoni using microarray data. In Schistosoma, only I25A and I25B proteins were identified, reflecting little functional diversification. I25C and unclassified subfamily members were not identified in platyhelminth species here analyzed. The resulting phylogeny placed cystatins in different clades, reflecting their molecular diversity. Our findings suggest that Schistosoma cystatins are very divergent from their human homologs, especially regarding the I25B subfamily. Schistosoma cystatins also differ significantly from other platyhelminth homologs. Finally, transcriptome data publicly available indicated that I25A and I25B genes are constitutively expressed thus could be essential for schistosome life cycle progression. In summary, this study provides insights into the evolution, classification, and functional diversification of cystatins in Schistosoma and other Platyhelminthes, improving our understanding of parasite biology and opening new frontiers in the identification of novel therapeutic targets against helminthiases. PMID:25071834

  6. Human TNF-α induces differential protein phosphorylation in Schistosoma mansoni adult male worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Katia C; Carvalho, Mariana L P; Bonatto, José Matheus C; Schechtman, Debora; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Schistosoma mansoni and its vertebrate host have a complex and intimate connection in which several molecular stimuli are exchanged and affect both organisms. Human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-α), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is known to induce large-scale gene expression changes in the parasite and to affect several parasite biological processes such as metabolism, egg laying, and worm development. Until now, the molecular mechanisms for TNF-α activity in worms are not completely understood. Here, we aimed at exploring the effect of hTNF-α on S. mansoni protein phosphorylation by 2D gel electrophoresis followed by a quantitative analysis of phosphoprotein staining and protein identification by mass spectrometry. We analyzed three biological replicates of adult male worms exposed to hTNF-α and successfully identified 32 protein spots with a statistically significant increase in phosphorylation upon in vitro exposure to hTNF-α. Among the differentially phosphorylated proteins, we found proteins involved in metabolism, such as glycolysis, galactose metabolism, urea cycle, and aldehyde metabolism, as well as proteins related to muscle contraction and to cytoskeleton remodeling. The most differentially phosphorylated protein (30-fold increase in phosphorylation) was 14-3-3, whose function is known to be modulated by phosphorylation, belonging to a signal transduction protein family that regulates a variety of processes in all eukaryotic cells. Further, 75% of the identified proteins are known in mammals to be related to TNF-α signaling, thus suggesting that TNF-α response may be conserved in the parasite. We propose that this work opens new perspectives to be explored in the study of the molecular crosstalk between host and pathogen.

  7. Immunological system and Schistosoma mansoni: co-evolutionary immunobiology. What is the eosinophil role in parasite-host relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique L Lenzi

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes, ancestors and recent species, have pervaded many hosts and several phylogenetic levels of immunity, causing an evolutionary pressure to eosinophil lineage expression and response. Schistosoma mansoni adult worms have capitalized on the apparent adversity of living within the mesenteric veins, using the dispersion of eggs and antigens to other tissues besides intestines to set a systemic activation of several haematopoietic lineages, specially eosinophils and monocytes/macrophages. This activation occurs in bone marrow, spleen, liver, lymph nodes, omental and mesenteric milky spots (activation of the old or primordial and recent or new lymphomyeloid tissue, increasing and making easy the migration of eosinophils, monocytes and other cells to the intestinal periovular granulomas. The exudative perigranulomatous stage of the periovular reaction, which present hystolitic characteristics, is then exploited by the parasites, to release the eggs into the intestinal lumen. The authors hypothesize here that eosinophils, which have a long phylogenic story, could participate in the parasite - host co-evolution, specially with S. mansoni, operating together with monocytes/ macrophages, upon parasite transmission.

  8. Cross-sectional associations between intensity of animal and human infection with Schistosoma japonicum in Western Samar province, Philippines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGarvey, Stephen T.; Carabin, Hélène; Batalong, Ernesto Jr.

    2006-01-01

    To estimate the association between the intensity of animal infection with Schistosoma japonicum and human infection in Western Samar province, the Philippines......To estimate the association between the intensity of animal infection with Schistosoma japonicum and human infection in Western Samar province, the Philippines...

  9. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Detection of Schistosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite decades of prevention and control efforts, the water-borne parasitic disease schistosomiasis is still endemic in 74 countries of the developing nations of the world. It is known that five species of the Schistosoma trematode are pathogenic to humans; S. haematobium is one of these infective agents of schistosomiasis ...

  10. Differential distribution and biochemical characteristics of hydrolases among developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni may offer new anti-parasite targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Delgado, Milagro; Cortez, Jackeline; Sulbarán, Guiden; Matos, César; Incani, Renzo Nino; Ballén, Diana E; Cesari, Italo M

    2017-02-01

    Schistosoma mansoni enzymes play important roles in host-parasite interactions and are potential targets for immunological and/or pharmacological attack. The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the presence of hydrolytic activities (phosphatases, glycosidases, aminopeptidases) in soluble (SF) and membrane (MF) fractions from different S. mansoni developmental stages (schistosomula 0 and 3h, juveniles, and adult worms of 28 and 45days-old, respectively), by using simple enzyme-substrate microassays. Our results show and confirm the prominent presence of alkaline phosphatase (AlP) activity in the MF of all the above parasite stages, highlighting also the relevant presence of MF-associated α-mannosidase (α-MAN) activity in juveniles. A soluble AlP activity, together with β-N-D-acetylglucosaminidase (β-NAG), and α-MAN activities, was detected in SF of schistosomulum 0h. Soluble β-NAG, α-MAN, acid phosphatase (AcP), leucin (LAP) and alanine (AAP) aminopeptidase activities were also seen in the SF of the other different developmental stages. This work shows different soluble and membrane-associated hydrolytic capacities in each S. mansoni developmental stage from schistosomula to adults that might be exploitable as potential new targets for immune and/or chemoprophylactic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Schistosoma mansoni: changes in the albumen gland of Biomphalaria glabrata snails selected for nonsusceptibility to the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, C; Ofori, K; Acholonu, S; Miller, A; Richards, C; Lewis, F; Knight, M

    1995-12-01

    The LAC-line strain of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata has very low susceptibility to the parasite Schistosoma mansoni and a very low reproductive potential. Upon examination of the reproductive tract of these snails, light and electron microscopy revealed obvious abnormalities in the albumen gland. Secretory cells that are normally cuboidal in susceptible NMRI (F0) snails were squamous in LAC-line snails. These LAC-line cells contained small secretory granules and negligible rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi, compared to large granules and an extensive array of both organelles in F0 albumen gland cells. Comparative analyses of soluble protein extracts of F0 and LAC-line albumen glands showed several qualitative differences. Among the most prominent was an 18-kDa protein in F0 snails that was remarkably reduced in the soluble protein extracts of LAC-line snails. Also, metabolic incorporation of [35S]-methionine was impaired in LAC-line albumen glands. Whether these albumen gland changes are caused by decreased susceptibility to parasitism is yet to determined.

  12. HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses induced by Listeria vector vaccines are maintained in mice subsequently infected with a model helminth parasite, Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shollenberger, Lisa M; Bui, Cac T; Paterson, Yvonne; Nyhoff, Lindsay; Harn, Donald A

    2013-11-19

    In areas co-endemic for helminth parasites and HIV/AIDS, infants are often administered vaccines prior to infection with immune modulatory helminth parasites. Systemic Th2 biasing and immune suppression caused by helminth infection reduces cell-mediated responses to vaccines such as tetanus toxoid and BCG. Therefore, we asked if infection with helminthes post-vaccination, alters already established vaccine induced immune responses. In our model, mice are vaccinated against HIV-1 Gag using a Listeria vaccine vector (Lm-Gag) in a prime-boost manner, then infected with the human helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. This allows us to determine if established vaccine responses are maintained or altered after helminth infection. Our second objective asked if helminth infection post-vaccination alters the recipient's ability to respond to a second boost. Here we compared responses between uninfected mice, schistosome infected mice, and infected mice that were given an anthelminthic, which occurred coincident with the boost or four weeks prior, as well as comparing to un-boosted mice. We report that HIV-1 vaccine-specific responses generated by Listeria vector HIV-1 vaccines are maintained following subsequent chronic schistosome infection, providing further evidence that Listeria vector vaccines induce potent vaccine-specific responses that can withstand helminth infection. We also were able to demonstrate that administration of a second Listeria boost, which markedly enhanced the immune response, was minimally impacted by schistosome infection, or anthelminthic therapy. Surprisingly, we also observed enhanced antibody responses to HIV Gag in vaccinated mice subsequently infected with schistosomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Host-parasite relationship of Bulinus truncatus and Schistosoma haematobium in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, K. Y.; Massoud, J.; Sabbaghian, H.

    1966-01-01

    Studies were conducted each month for one year to determine the cercarial-incubation periods of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma bovis in Bulinus truncatus for different months of infection. The snails were kept in outdoor aquaria in order to simulate the natural temperature conditions in the endemic bilharziasis areas of Iran. The results showed that the cercarial-incubation periods of these two schistosome species varied with the environmental water temperature. Snails exposed in August had the shortest incubation period, and snails exposed in November the longest. The cercarial-incubation period for S. haematobium was longer than that for S. bovis in all months. The difference between the cercarial-incubation period of these two species varied from three to 18 days, being greater in the winter than in the summer. It has been concluded that the low temperature of the water in the winter retards the development of miracidia into cercariae and that the winter is therefore the poorest season for potential transmission. In summer, in spite of the hot weather, snails may still shed cercariae, but spring and autumn are the optimum seasons for cercariae transmission. PMID:5295560

  14. Serotonin Signaling in Schistosoma mansoni: A Serotonin–Activated G Protein-Coupled Receptor Controls Parasite Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mohammed; Ribeiro, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neuroactive substance in all the parasitic helminths. In Schistosoma mansoni, serotonin is strongly myoexcitatory; it potentiates contraction of the body wall muscles and stimulates motor activity. This is considered to be a critical mechanism of motor control in the parasite, but the mode of action of serotonin is poorly understood. Here we provide the first molecular evidence of a functional serotonin receptor (Sm5HTR) in S. mansoni. The schistosome receptor belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily and is distantly related to serotonergic type 7 (5HT7) receptors from other species. Functional expression studies in transfected HEK 293 cells showed that Sm5HTR is a specific serotonin receptor and it signals through an increase in intracellular cAMP, consistent with a 5HT7 signaling mechanism. Immunolocalization studies with a specific anti-Sm5HTR antibody revealed that the receptor is abundantly distributed in the worm's nervous system, including the cerebral ganglia and main nerve cords of the central nervous system and the peripheral innervation of the body wall muscles and tegument. RNA interference (RNAi) was performed both in schistosomulae and adult worms to test whether the receptor is required for parasite motility. The RNAi-suppressed adults and larvae were markedly hypoactive compared to the corresponding controls and they were also resistant to exogenous serotonin treatment. These results show that Sm5HTR is at least one of the receptors responsible for the motor effects of serotonin in S. mansoni. The fact that Sm5HTR is expressed in nerve tissue further suggests that serotonin stimulates movement via this receptor by modulating neuronal output to the musculature. Together, the evidence identifies Sm5HTR as an important neuronal protein and a key component of the motor control apparatus in S. mansoni. PMID:24453972

  15. Do all human urinary infections with Schistosoma mattheei represent hybridization between S. haematobium and S. mattheei?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, F J; Evans, A C

    1990-12-01

    Enzyme electrophoresis indicated that all Schistosoma mattheei eggs passed in the urine of humans derive from S. mattheei females in copula with S. haematobium males. It appears that S. mattheei males do not reach sexual maturity in man; however, S. haematobiumxS. mattheei males possibly do.

  16. Effect of different stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection on the parasite burden and immune response to Strongyloides venezuelensis in co-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rezende, Michelle Carvalho; Araújo, Emília Souza; Moreira, João Marcelo Peixoto; Rodrigues, Vanessa Fernandes; Rodrigues, Jailza Lima; Pereira, Cíntia A de Jesus; Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Multiple schistosome and soil-transmitted nematode infections are frequently reported in human populations living in tropical areas of developing countries. In addition to exposure factors, the host immune response plays an important role in helminth control and morbidity in hosts with multiple infections; however, these aspects are difficult to evaluate in human populations. In the current study, female Swiss mice were simultaneously co-infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis and Schistosoma mansoni or infected with St. venezuelensis at 2, 4, or 14 weeks after Sc. mansoni infection. The simultaneously infected mice showed a similar parasite burden for St. venezuelensis compared with mono-infected mice. In contrast, there was a significant reduction of St. venezuelensis burden (primarily during the migration of the larvae) in mice that were previously infected with Sc. mansoni at the acute or chronic phase. Independent of the stage of Sc. mansoni infection, the St. venezuelensis co-infection was capable of inducing IL-4 production in the small intestine, increasing the IgE concentration in the serum and increasing eosinophilia in the lungs and intestine. This result suggests that the nematode infection stimulates local type 2 immune responses independently of the schistosomiasis stage. Moreover, previous Sc. mansoni infection stimulated early granulocyte infiltration in the lungs and trematode-specific IgM and IgG1 production that recognized antigens from St. venezuelensis infective larvae; these immune responses would act in the early control of St. venezuelensis larvae. Our data suggest that the effect of multiple helminth infections on host susceptibility and morbidity largely depends on the species of parasite and the immune response.

  17. Introgressive hybridization of Schistosoma haematobium group species in Senegal: species barrier break down between ruminant and human schistosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L Webster

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomes are dioecious parasitic flatworms, which live in the vasculature of their mammalian definitive hosts. They are the causative agent of schistosomiasis, a disease of considerable medical and veterinary importance in tropical and subtropical regions. Schistosomes undergo a sexual reproductive stage within their mammalian host enabling interactions between different species, which may result in hybridization if the species involved are phylogenetically close. In Senegal, three closely related species in the Schistosoma haematobium group are endemic: S. haematobium, which causes urogenital schistosomiasis in humans, and S. bovis and S. curassoni, which cause intestinal schistosomiasis in cows, sheep and goats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Large-scale multi-loci molecular analysis of parasite samples collected from children and domestic livestock across Senegal revealed that interactions and hybridization were taking place between all three species. Evidence of hybridization between S. haematobium/S. curassoni and S. haematobium/S. bovis was commonly found in children from across Senegal, with 88% of the children surveyed in areas of suspected species overlap excreting hybrid miracidia. No S. haematobium worms or hybrids thereof were found in ruminants, although S. bovis and S. curassoni hybrid worms were found in cows. Complementary experimental mixed species infections in laboratory rodents confirmed that males and females of each species readily pair and produce viable hybrid offspring. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: THESE DATA PROVIDE INDISPUTABLE EVIDENCE FOR: the high occurrence of bidirectional hybridization between these Schistosoma species; the first conclusive evidence for the natural hybridisation between S. haematobium and S. curassoni; and demonstrate that the transmission of the different species and their hybrids appears focal. Hybridization between schistosomes has been known to influence the disease epidemiology

  18. Introgressive hybridization of Schistosoma haematobium group species in Senegal: species barrier break down between ruminant and human schistosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Bonnie L; Diaw, Oumar T; Seye, Mohmoudane M; Webster, Joanne P; Rollinson, David

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomes are dioecious parasitic flatworms, which live in the vasculature of their mammalian definitive hosts. They are the causative agent of schistosomiasis, a disease of considerable medical and veterinary importance in tropical and subtropical regions. Schistosomes undergo a sexual reproductive stage within their mammalian host enabling interactions between different species, which may result in hybridization if the species involved are phylogenetically close. In Senegal, three closely related species in the Schistosoma haematobium group are endemic: S. haematobium, which causes urogenital schistosomiasis in humans, and S. bovis and S. curassoni, which cause intestinal schistosomiasis in cows, sheep and goats. Large-scale multi-loci molecular analysis of parasite samples collected from children and domestic livestock across Senegal revealed that interactions and hybridization were taking place between all three species. Evidence of hybridization between S. haematobium/S. curassoni and S. haematobium/S. bovis was commonly found in children from across Senegal, with 88% of the children surveyed in areas of suspected species overlap excreting hybrid miracidia. No S. haematobium worms or hybrids thereof were found in ruminants, although S. bovis and S. curassoni hybrid worms were found in cows. Complementary experimental mixed species infections in laboratory rodents confirmed that males and females of each species readily pair and produce viable hybrid offspring. THESE DATA PROVIDE INDISPUTABLE EVIDENCE FOR: the high occurrence of bidirectional hybridization between these Schistosoma species; the first conclusive evidence for the natural hybridisation between S. haematobium and S. curassoni; and demonstrate that the transmission of the different species and their hybrids appears focal. Hybridization between schistosomes has been known to influence the disease epidemiology and enhance phenotypic characteristics affecting transmission, morbidity and drug

  19. Schistosoma mansoni: interactive effects of irradiation and cryopreservation on parasite maturation and immunization of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, E.R.; Dobinson, A.R.

    1984-06-01

    Mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni were irradiated with levels of 60Co irradiation between 2.5 and 54 krad, cryopreserved by the two-step addition of ethanediol and rapid cooling technique, and were injected intramuscularly into groups of mice which were perfused 40 days later. The schistosomula were either irradiated and then cryopreserved (IC) or cryopreserved and then irradiated in the frozen state (CI). Development into adult worms was prevented with 4 krad for IC schistosomula, but for CI schistosomula a small number of worms (1.6%) was recovered using 8.8 krad. A dose of 4 krad was sufficient to prevent development of unfrozen controls (I), but for schistosomula irradiated while exposed to ethanediol (EI), a dose of 7 krad was required. Using the different protocols, the peak levels of protection against a challenge infection were achieved with 9 (IC) and 16 krad (CI), compared to 20 krad for unfrozen schistosomula (I) reported previously. The highest level of protection (65%) was achieved with CI schistosomula. Possible interactions between the radioprotective and damaging effects of cryopreservation are discussed.

  20. Modification of the pathogenicity of Schistosoma mattheei for sheep by passage of the parasite in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M G; James, E R; Nelson, G S; Bickle, Q; Dunne, D W; Dobinson, A R; Dargie, J D; Berry, C I; Hussein, M F

    1977-01-01

    Border Leicester X Suffolk sheep infected with a strain of S. mattheei maintained in hamsters do not develop the same pathological changes as Romney Marsh sheep infected with the same strain of parasite before hamster passage. To determine the cause of this reduced pathogenicity, five Romney Marsh sheep were each infected with 10 000 cercariae of the hamster-passaged parasite and five with 10 000 cercariae of a S. mattheei strain from Onderstepoort, South Africa, passaged exclusively through sheep. Striking pathological and parasitological differences were found between the two strains. Infection with the "sheep" strain was lethal, whereas infection with the "hamster" strain produced little evidence of clinical disease. By 13 weeks post-infection the mean body weight of the sheep infected with the sheep strain had declined by 15% compared with both the uninfected controls and the sheep infected with the hamster strain, and the mean PCV was lowered to 20% in the sheep strain infected animals. Egg production began at seven weeks with the sheep strain, faecal counts rising to more than 300 e.p.g., whereas only two of the sheep infected with the hamster strain passed eggs in the faeces (at nine weeks) and the maximum egg count was 50 e.p.g. Twice as many adult worms of the sheep strain were recovered, and, although the number of eggs found in the tissues "per worm pair" was not significantly different, overall egg production was higher for the sheep strain; also more of the sheep strain eggs were deposited in the intestines. Similar parasite differences were seen in a supplementary study in mice and it seemed that "attenuation" of the parasite had occurred, presumably due to its maintenance in hamsters. Histopathological observations and faecal egg counts both indicated an inability of hamster strain eggs to penetrate the intestinal lumen; this was probably important in reducing the pathogenicity of the hamster strain.

  1. A new PCR-based approach for the specific amplification of DNA from different Schistosoma species applicable to human urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, N; Siles-Lucas, M; Pérez-Arellano, J L; Carranza, C; Puente, S; López-Abán, J; Muro, A

    2006-11-01

    Currently available methods for the diagnosis of human schistosomiasis often lack enough sensitivity and specificity. Recently, several authors have developed more specific and sensitive diagnostic methods, mainly based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Nevertheless, these have been only applied for the diagnosis of 1 out of 4 Schistosoma species affecting man (S. mansoni). Additionally, application of specific PCR has been exclusively used for blood or faecal patients' samples. Here, we develop a new, high sensitive PCR approach that allows the genus- and species-specific amplification of the main 4 Schistosoma species causing disease in man plus S. bovis. We further successfully apply this technique for the detection of parasite DNA in easy-to-handle urine samples from patients with schistosomiasis. With these samples, we have found 94.4% sensitivity and 99.9% specificity when applying a genus-specific (Schistosoma spp.) primer pair, and 100% sensitivity and 98.9% specificity in a species-specific (S. mansoni) PCR.

  2. Differentiating Schistosoma haematobium from Related Animal Schistosomes by PCR Amplifying Inter-Repeat Sequences Flanking Newly Selected Repeated Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Abbasi, Ibrahim; HAMBURGER, JOSEPH; Kariuki, Curtis; Peter L Mungai; Muchiri, Eric M.; King, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    In schistosomiasis elimination programs, successful discrimination of Schistosoma haematobium from the related animal Schistosoma parasites will be essential for accurate detection of human parasite transmission. Polymerase chain reaction assays employing primers from two newly selected repeated sequences, named Sh73 and Sh77, did not discriminate S. haematobium when amplifying Sh73-77 intra- or inter-repeats. However, amplification between Sh73 and the previously described DraI repeat exhibi...

  3. Fatty acid oxidation is essential for egg production by the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Ching-Cheng Huang

    Full Text Available Schistosomes, parasitic flatworms that cause the neglected tropical disease schistosomiasis, have been considered to have an entirely carbohydrate based metabolism, with glycolysis playing a dominant role in the adult parasites. However, we have discovered a close link between mitochondrial oxygen consumption by female schistosomes and their ability to produce eggs. We show that oxygen consumption rates (OCR and egg production are significantly diminished by pharmacologic inhibition of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1, which catalyzes a rate limiting step in fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO and by genetic loss of function of acyl CoA synthetase, which complexes with CPT1 and activates long chain FA for use in FAO, and of acyl CoA dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the first step in FAO within mitochondria. Declines in OCR and egg production correlate with changes in a network of lipid droplets within cells in a specialized reproductive organ, the vitellarium. Our data point to the importance of regulated lipid stores and FAO for the compartmentalized process of egg production in schistosomes.

  4. Diagnosing schistosomiasis by detection of cell-free parasite DNA in human plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Wichmann

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Schistosomiasis (bilharzia, one of the most relevant parasitoses of humans, is confirmed by microscopic detection of eggs in stool, urine, or organ biopsies. The sensitivity of these procedures is variable due to fluctuation of egg shedding. Serological tests on the other hand do not distinguish between active and past disease. In patients with acute disease (Katayama syndrome, both serology and direct detection may produce false negative results. To overcome these obstacles, we developed a novel diagnostic strategy, following the rationale that Schistosoma DNA may be liberated as a result of parasite turnover and reach the blood. Cell-free parasite DNA (CFPD was detected in plasma by PCR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Real-time PCR with internal control was developed and optimized for detection of CFPD in human plasma. Distribution was studied in a mouse model for Schistosoma replication and elimination, as well as in human patients seen before and after treatment. CFPD was detectable in mouse plasma, and its concentration correlated with the course of anti-Schistosoma treatment. Humans with chronic disease and eggs in stool or urine (n = 14 showed a 100% rate of CFPD detection. CFPD was also detected in all (n = 8 patients with Katayama syndrome. Patients in whom no viable eggs could be detected and who had been treated for schistomiasis in the past (n = 30 showed lower detection rates (33.3% and significantly lower CFPD concentrations. The duration from treatment to total elimination of CFPD from plasma was projected to exceed one year. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PCR for detection of CFPD in human plasma may provide a new laboratory tool for diagnosing schistosomiasis in all phases of clinical disease, including the capacity to rule out Katayama syndrome and active disease. Further studies are needed to confirm the clinical usefulness of CFPD quantification in therapy monitoring.

  5. Palaeoparasitology - Human Parasites in Ancient Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Adauto; Reinhard, Karl; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Parasite finds in ancient material launched a new field of science: palaeoparasitology. Ever since the pioneering studies, parasites were identified in archaeological and palaeontological remains, some preserved for millions of years by fossilization. However, the palaeoparasitological record consists mainly of parasites found specifically in human archaeological material, preserved in ancient occupation sites, from prehistory until closer to 2015. The results include some helminth intestinal parasites still commonly found in 2015, such as Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworms, besides others such as Amoebidae and Giardia intestinalis, as well as viruses, bacteria, fungi and arthropods. These parasites as a whole provide important data on health, diet, climate and living conditions among ancient populations. This chapter describes the principal findings and their importance for knowledge on the origin and dispersal of infectious diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SmCL3, a gastrodermal cysteine protease of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Dvorák

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma are platyhelminth parasites that infect 200 million people worldwide. Digestion of nutrients from the host bloodstream is essential for parasite development and reproduction. A network of proteolytic enzymes (proteases facilitates hydrolysis of host hemoglobin and serum proteins.We identified a new cathepsin L termed SmCL3 using PCR strategies based on S. mansoni EST sequence data. An ortholog is present in Schistosoma japonicum. SmCL3 was heterologously expressed as an active enzyme in the yeast, Pichia pastoris. Recombinant SmCL3 has a broad pH activity range against peptidyl substrates and is inhibited by Clan CA protease inhibitors. Consistent with a function in degrading host proteins, SmCL3 hydrolyzes serum albumin and hemoglobin, is localized to the adult gastrodermis, and is expressed mainly in those life stages infecting the mammalian host. The predominant form of SmCL3 in the parasite exists as a zymogen, which is unusual for proteases. This zymogen includes an unusually long prodomain with alpha helical secondary structure motifs. The striking specificity of SmCL3 for amino acids with large aromatic side chains (Trp and Tyr at the P2 substrate position, as determined with positional scanning-synthetic combinatorial library, is consistent with a molecular model that shows a large and deep S2 pocket. A sequence similarity network (SSN view clusters SmCL3 and other cathepsins L in accordance with previous large-scale phylogenetic analyses that identify six super kingdoms.SmCL3 is a gut-associated cathepsin L that may contribute to the network of proteases involved in degrading host blood proteins as nutrients. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibits some unusual sequence and biophysical features that may result in additional functions. The visualization of network inter-relationships among cathepsins L suggests that these enzymes are suitable 'marker sequences' for inclusion in future phylogenetic analyses.

  7. Rapid detection and identification of four major Schistosoma species by high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Lin, RuiQing; Blair, David; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-11-01

    Schistosomiasis, caused by blood flukes belonging to several species of the genus Schistosoma, is a serious and widespread parasitic disease. Accurate and rapid differentiation of these etiological agents of animal and human schistosomiasis to species level can be difficult. We report a real-time PCR assay coupled with a high-resolution melt (HRM) assay targeting a portion of the nuclear 18S rDNA to detect, identify, and distinguish between four major blood fluke species (Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium, and Schistosoma mekongi). Using this system, the Schistosoma spp. was accurately identified and could also be distinguished from all other trematode species with which they were compared. As little as 10(-5) ng genomic DNA from a Schistosoma sp. could be detected. This process is inexpensive, easy, and can be completed within 3 h. Examination of 21 representative Schistosoma samples from 15 geographical localities in seven endemic countries validated the value of the HRM detection assay and proved its reliability. The melting curves were characterized by peaks of 83.65 °C for S. japonicum and S. mekongi, 85.65 °C for S. mansoni, and 85.85 °C for S. haematobium. The present study developed a real-time PCR coupled with HRM analysis assay for detection and differential identification of S. mansoni, S. haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mekongi. This method is rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive. It has important implications for epidemiological studies of Schistosoma.

  8. Treatment for Schistosoma japonicum, reduction of intestinal parasite load, and cognitive test score improvements in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeamama, Amara E; McGarvey, Stephen T; Hogan, Joseph; Lapane, Kate L; Bellinger, David C; Acosta, Luz P; Leenstra, Tjalling; Olveda, Remigio M; Kurtis, Jonathan D; Friedman, Jennifer F

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether treatment of intestinal parasitic infections improves cognitive function in school-aged children, we examined changes in cognitive testscores over 18 months in relation to: (i) treatment-related Schistosoma japonicum intensity decline, (ii) spontaneous reduction of single soil-transmitted helminth (STH) species, and (iii) ≥2 STH infections among 253 S. japonicum-infected children. Helminth infections were assessed at baseline and quarterly by the Kato-Katz method. S. japonicum infection was treated at baseline using praziquantel. An intensity-based indicator of lower vs. no change/higher infection was defined separately for each helminth species and joint intensity declines of ≥2 STH species. In addition, S. japonicum infection-free duration was defined in four categories based on time of schistosome re-infection: >18 (i.e. cured), >12 to ≤18, 6 to ≤12 and ≤6 (persistently infected) months. There was no baseline treatment for STHs but their intensity varied possibly due to spontaneous infection clearance/acquisition. Four cognitive tests were administered at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months following S. japonicum treatment: learning and memory domains of Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning (WRAML), verbal fluency (VF), and Philippine nonverbal intelligence test (PNIT). Linear regression models were used to relate changes in respective infections to test performance with adjustment for sociodemographic confounders and coincident helminth infections. Children cured (β = 5.8; P = 0.02) and those schistosome-free for >12 months (β = 1.5; P = 0.03) scored higher in WRAML memory and VF tests compared to persistently infected children independent of STH infections. A decline vs. no change/increase of any individual STH species (β:11.5-14.5; all Ptest independent of schistosome infection. Hookworm and Trichuris trichiura declines were independently associated with improvements in WRAML memory scores as was the joint

  9. Whole-genome sequence of Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Neil D; Jex, Aaron R; Li, Bo; Liu, Shiping; Yang, Linfeng; Xiong, Zijun; Li, Yingrui; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Hall, Ross S; Xu, Xun; Chen, Fangyuan; Wu, Xuan; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Oliveira, Guilherme; Hofmann, Andreas; Zhang, Guojie; Fang, Xiaodong; Kang, Yi; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Loukas, Alex; Ranganathan, Shoba; Rollinson, David; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Gasser, Robin B

    2012-01-15

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by blood flukes (genus Schistosoma; schistosomes) and affecting 200 million people worldwide. No vaccines are available, and treatment relies on one drug, praziquantel. Schistosoma haematobium has come into the spotlight as a major cause of urogenital disease, as an agent linked to bladder cancer and as a predisposing factor for HIV/AIDS. The parasite is transmitted to humans from freshwater snails. Worms dwell in blood vessels and release eggs that become embedded in the bladder wall to elicit chronic immune-mediated disease and induce squamous cell carcinoma. Here we sequenced the 385-Mb genome of S. haematobium using Illumina-based technology at 74-fold coverage and compared it to sequences from related parasites. We included genome annotation based on function, gene ontology, networking and pathway mapping. This genome now provides an unprecedented resource for many fundamental research areas and shows great promise for the design of new disease interventions.

  10. Specific anti-glycan antibodies are sustained during and after parasite clearance in Schistosoma japonicum-infected rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Y Michelle Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human immunity to Schistosoma infection requires many years of exposure, and multiple infections and treatments to develop. Unlike humans, rhesus macaques clear an established schistosome infection naturally at the same time acquiring immunity towards re-infection. In macaques, schistosome egg production decreases after 8 weeks post-infection and by week 22, physiological impairment of the worm caused by unclarified antibody-mediated processes is observed. Since strong antibody responses have been observed against schistosome glycan antigens in human and animal infections, we here investigate if anti-glycan antibodies are associated with immunity against schistosome infections in macaques.We used a microarray containing a large repertoire of glycoprotein- and glycolipid-derived glycans from different schistosome life stages to analyse anti-glycan serum IgG and IgM from S. japonicum-infected macaques during the course of infection and self-cure. We also used an in vitro schistosomula assay to investigate whether macaque sera containing anti-glycan antibodies can kill schistosomula.Antibody responses towards schistosome glycans at week 4 post-infection were dominated by IgM while IgG was high at week 8. The profound increase in IgG was observed mainly for antibodies towards a large subset of glycans that contain (multi-fucosylated terminal GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN, and Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3GlcNAc (LeX motifs. In general, glycans with a higher degree of fucosylation gave rise to stronger antibody responses than non-fucosylated glycans. Interestingly, even though many IgG and IgM responses had declined by week 22 post-infection, IgG towards O-glycans with highly fucosylated LDN motifs remained. When incubating macaque serum with schistosomula in vitro, schistosomula death was positively correlated with the duration of infection of macaques; macaque serum taken 22 weeks post-infection caused most schistosomula to die, suggesting the presence of potentially

  11. Functional expression of parasite drug targets and their human orthologs in yeast.

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    Elizabeth Bilsland

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The exacting nutritional requirements and complicated life cycles of parasites mean that they are not always amenable to high-throughput drug screening using automated procedures. Therefore, we have engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to act as a surrogate for expressing anti-parasitic targets from a range of biomedically important pathogens, to facilitate the rapid identification of new therapeutic agents.Using pyrimethamine/dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR as a model parasite drug/drug target system, we explore the potential of engineered yeast strains (expressing DHFR enzymes from Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, Homo sapiens, Schistosoma mansoni, Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi to exhibit appropriate differential sensitivity to pyrimethamine. Here, we demonstrate that yeast strains (lacking the major drug efflux pump, Pdr5p expressing yeast ((ScDFR1, human ((HsDHFR, Schistosoma ((SmDHFR, and Trypanosoma ((TbDHFR and (TcDHFR DHFRs are insensitive to pyrimethamine treatment, whereas yeast strains producing Plasmodium ((PfDHFR and (PvDHFR DHFRs are hypersensitive. Reassuringly, yeast strains expressing field-verified, drug-resistant mutants of P. falciparum DHFR ((Pfdhfr(51I,59R,108N are completely insensitive to pyrimethamine, further validating our approach to drug screening. We further show the versatility of the approach by replacing yeast essential genes with other potential drug targets, namely phosphoglycerate kinases (PGKs and N-myristoyl transferases (NMTs.We have generated a number of yeast strains that can be successfully harnessed for the rapid and selective identification of urgently needed anti-parasitic agents.

  12. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among children under five years of age with emphasis on Schistosoma mansoni in Wonji Shoa Sugar Estate, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yirgalem G/hiwot

    Full Text Available Intestinal parasite infections are major public health problems of children in developing countries causing undernutrition, anemia, intestinal obstruction and mental and physical growth retardation. This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of intestinal helminthic infections among children under five years of age with emphasis on Schistosoma mansoni in Wonji Shoa Sugar Estate, Ethiopia. A cross-sectional parasitological survey was conducted in under-five children living in Wonji Shoa Sugar Estate Ethiopia, April, 2013. Stool samples were collected and examined for intestinal parasites using single Kato-Katz and single Sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF solution concentration methods. Out of 374 children examined using single Kato-Katz and single SAF-concentration methods, 24.3% were infected with at least one intestinal parasite species. About 10.4%, 8.8%, 4.6%, 2.9%, 1.6% and 0.8% of the children were infected with Hymenolepis nana, Schistosoma mansoni, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis and hookworm, respectively. Prevalence of double, triple and quadruple intestinal helminthic infection was 6.4%, 0.54% and 1.1%, respectively. A significant increase in prevalence of S. mansoni (8.3% versus 3.2% and T. trichiura (2.7% versus 0.5% infection was observed when determined via the single Kato-Katz method compared to the prevalence of the parasites determined via the single SAF-concentration method. On the other hand, the single SAF-concentration method (9.1% revealed a significantly higher prevalence of H. nana infection than the single Kato-Katz (1.6% does. In conclusion, intestinal helminths infections particularly S. mansoni and H. nana were prevalent in under-five children of Wonji Shoa Sugar Estate. Including praziquantel treatment in the deworming program as per the World Health Organization guidelines would be vital to reduce the burden of these diseases in areas where S. mansoni and H. nana

  13. Genetic Diversity of Schistosoma haematobium Eggs Isolated from Human Urine in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Juan-Hua; Choi, In-Wook; Ismail, Hassan Ahmed Hassan Ahmed; Mohamed, Abdoelohab Saed; Jeong, Hoo-Gn; Lee, Jin-Su; Hong, Sung-Tae; Yong, Tai-Soon; Cha, Guang-Ho; Lee, Young-Ha

    2015-06-01

    The genetic diversity of Schistosoma haematobium remains largely unstudied in comparison to that of Schistosoma mansoni. To characterize the extent of genetic diversity in S. haematobium among its definitive host (humans), we collected S. haematobium eggs from the urine of 73 infected schoolchildren at 5 primary schools in White Nile State, Sudan, and then performed a randomly amplified polymorphic DNA marker ITS2 by PCR-RFLP analysis. Among 73 S. haematobium egg-positive cases, 13 were selected based on the presence of the S. haematobium satellite markers A4 and B2 in their genomic DNA, and used for RFLP analysis. The 13 samples were subjected to an RFLP analysis of the S. haematobium ITS2 region; however, there was no variation in size among the fragments. Compared to the ITS2 sequences obtained for S. haematobium from Kenya, the nucleotide sequences of the ITS2 regions of S. haematobium from 4 areas in Sudan were consistent with those from Kenya (> 99%). In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that most of the S. haematobium population in Sudan consists of a pan-African S. haematobium genotype; however, we also report the discovery of Kenyan strain inflow into White Nile, Sudan.

  14. CA88, a nuclear repetitive DNA sequence identified in Schistosoma mansoni, aids in the genotyping of nine Schistosoma species of medical and veterinary importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Diana; Rodrigues, Nilton B; Araújo, Flávio Marcos G; Romanha, Alvaro José; Ruiz, Jerônimo C; Johnston, David A; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2010-07-01

    CA88 is the first long nuclear repetitive DNA sequence identified in the blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni. The assembled S. mansoni sequence, which contains the CA88 repeat, has 8,887 nucleotides and at least three repeat units of approximately 360 bp. In addition, CA88 also possesses an internal CA microsatellite, identified as SmBr18. Both PCR and BLAST analysis have been used to analyse and confirm the CA88 sequence in other S. mansoni sequences in the public database. PCR-acquired nuclear repetitive DNA sequence profiles from nine Schistosoma species were used to classify this organism into four genotypes. Included among the nine species analysed were five sequences of both African and Asian lineages that are known to infect humans. Within these genotypes, three of them refer to recognised species groups. A panel of four microsatellite loci, including SmBr18 and three previously published loci, has been used to characterise the nine Schistosoma species. Each species has been identified and classified based on its CA88 DNA fingerprint profile. Furthermore, microsatellite sequences and intra-specific variation have also been observed within the nine Schistosoma species sequences. Taken together, these results support the use of these markers in studying the population dynamics of Schistosoma isolates from endemic areas and also provide new methods for investigating the relationships between different populations of parasites. In addition, these data also indicate that Schistosoma magrebowiei is not a sister taxon to Schistosoma mattheei, prompting a new designation to a basal clade.

  15. Schistosoma mansoni eggs excrete specific free oligosaccharides that are detectable in the urine of the human host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robijn, Marjolein L M; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M

    2007-02-01

    In infections with Schistosoma mansoni the paired adult worms produce hundreds of eggs daily, of which many get trapped in various organs of the human host. The eggs produce complex and unique protein- and lipid-linked glycans, which are important activators and modulators of the host's immune response. The same parasite-derived glycoconjugates are also attractive immunodiagnostic targets in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), which detect circulating antigens in serum or urine of the host. Here, we report for the first time that in addition to glycoprotein and glycolipid antigens, schistosome eggs also excrete unique unconjugated oligosaccharides. Employing the schistosome-specific anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibody 114-4D12 in an affinity purification approach, a specific set of free oligosaccharides was detected by matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in human S. mansoni infection urine as well as in egg-incubation medium, but not in worm-culture medium. Nano-scale reverse-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (nano-RP-LC-MS) analysis of the purified egg-derived oligosaccharides indicated that the captured compounds form a series of multi-fucosylated multimeric N-acetylhexosamine chains with a non-reducing terminal Fucalpha1-2Fucalpha1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-2Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAcbeta1- (DF-LDN-DF) sequence which forms the epitope of mAb 114-4D12. Since fucosylated (egg) glycoconjugates have been shown to harbour immunogenic properties, we anticipate that these unconjugated oligosaccharides also play a role in the immunobiology associated with schistosome eggs. Moreover, our data indicate that mass spectrometric detection of a set of signature molecules in urine has potential as a new approach for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and possibly other helminth infections.

  16. Human Schistosoma haematobium antifecundity immunity is dependent on transmission intensity and associated with immunoglobulin G1 to worm-derived antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Shona; Jones, Frances M.; van Dam, Govert J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunity that reduces worm fecundity and, in turn, reduces morbidity is proposed for Schistosoma haematobium, a parasite of major public health importance. Mathematical models of epidemiological trends suggest that antifecundity immunity is dependent on antibody responses to adult-wor...

  17. Human U6 promoter drives stronger shRNA activity than its schistosome orthologue in Schistosoma mansoni and human fibrosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvoisin, Raphaël; Ayuk, Mary A.; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Suttiprapa, Sutas; Mann, Victoria H.; Lee, Clarence M.; Harris, Nicola; Brindley, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Blood flukes or schistosomes are the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, one of the major neglected tropical diseases. Draft genome sequences have been reported for schistosomes, but functional genomics tools are needed to investigate the role and essentiality of the newly reported genes. Vector based RNA interference can contribute to functional genomics analysis for schistosomes. Using mRNA encoding reporter firefly luciferase as a model target, we compared the performance of a schistosome and a human promoter from the U6 gene in driving shRNA in human fibrosarcoma cells and in cultured schistosomes. Further, both a retroviral (Murine leukemia virus [MLV]) and plasmid (piggyBac, pXL-Bac II) vector were utilized. The schistosome U6 gene promoter was 270 bp in length, the human U6 gene promoter was 264 bp; they shared 41% identity. Following transduction of both HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and schistosomules of Schistosoma mansoni with pseudotyped MLV virions, stronger knockdown of luciferase activity was seen with the virions encoding the human U6 promoter driven shRNA than the schistosome U6 promoter. A similar trend was seen after transfection of HT1080 cells and schistosomules with the pXL-Bac-II constructs – stronger knockdown of luciferase activity was seen with constructs encoding the human compared to schistosome U6 promoter. The findings indicate that a human U6 gene promoter drives stronger shRNA activity than its schistosome orthologue, not only in a human cancer cell line but also in larval schistosomes. This RNA polymerase III promoter represents a potentially valuable component for vector based RNA interference studies in schistosomes and related platyhelminth parasites. PMID:21953124

  18. Effects of garlic on Schistosoma mansoni harbored in albino mice: molecular characterization of the host and parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad, Nahed H A; Taha, Hoda A; Mahmoud, Yomna I

    2013-04-15

    Garlic has been used for its health benefits for thousands of years. Modern research confirmed many of the healing properties of garlic, including its antiparasitic activity. This study was designed to evaluate the antischistosomal action of garlic through detecting the changes in DNA profile of Schistosoma mansoni worms and the infected mouse. Forty mice were subcutaneously infected with ~200 Schistosoma mansoni cercariae/mouse. Infected mice were divided into four equal groups: non-treated, prophylactic, therapeutic, and continuously-treated. Non-infected control and garlic-treated groups were assigned for the sake of comparison. Garlic extract (50mg/kg bw/mouse) was given orally, day after day, at a fixed daytime. Seven weeks post-infection, adult schistosomes were recovered by perfusion and the livers of the mice were excised out and were processed for DNA extraction and Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RAPD-PCR). The results showed that garlic exerted no major changes in the genome of schistosomes. Nevertheless, that schistosomal infection induced genetic alterations in the DNA of mice, and garlic was able to ameliorate such alterations to a great extent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of the Schistosoma mansoni Molecular Target for the Antimalarial Drug Artemether

    KAUST Repository

    Lepore, Rosalba

    2011-11-28

    Plasmodium falciparum and Schistosoma mansonii are the parasites responsible for most of the malaria and schistosomiasis cases in the world. Notwithstanding their many differences, the two agents have striking similarities in that they both are blood feeders and are targets of an overlapping set of drugs, including the well-known artemether molecule. Here we explore the possibility of using the known information about the mode of action of artemether in Plasmodium to identify the molecular target of the drug in Schistosoma and provide evidence that artemether binds to SmSERCA, a putative Ca2+-ATPase of Schistosoma. We also predict the putative binding mode of the molecule for both its Plasmodium and Schistosoma targets. Our analysis of the mode of binding of artemether to Ca2+-ATPases also provides an explanation for the apparent paradox that, although the molecule has no side effect in humans, it has been shown to possess antitumoral activity. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Differentiating Schistosoma haematobium from related animal schistosomes by PCR amplifying inter-repeat sequences flanking newly selected repeated sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Ibrahim; Hamburger, Joseph; Kariuki, Curtis; Mungai, Peter L; Muchiri, Eric M; King, Charles H

    2012-12-01

    In schistosomiasis elimination programs, successful discrimination of Schistosoma haematobium from the related animal Schistosoma parasites will be essential for accurate detection of human parasite transmission. Polymerase chain reaction assays employing primers from two newly selected repeated sequences, named Sh73 and Sh77, did not discriminate S. haematobium when amplifying Sh73-77 intra- or inter-repeats. However, amplification between Sh73 and the previously described DraI repeat exhibited discriminative banding patterns for S. haematobium and Schistosoma bovis (sensitivity 1 pg and 10 pg, respectively). It also enabled banding pattern discrimination of Schistosoma curassoni and Schistosoma intercalatum, but Schistosoma mattheei and Schistosoma margrebowiei did not yield amplicons. Similar inter-repeat amplification between Sh77 and DraI yielded amplicons with discriminative banding for S. haematobium, and S. bovis; however, S. mattheei was detected only at low sensitivity (1 ng). The Sh73/DraI assay detected snails infected with S. haematobium, S. bovis, or both, and should prove useful for screening snails where discrimination of S. haematobium from related schistosomes is required.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy and applicability of a PCR system for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni DNA in human urine samples from an endemic area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Johannes Enk

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni, one of the most neglected human parasitoses in Latin America and Africa, is routinely confirmed by microscopic visualization of eggs in stool. The main limitation of this diagnostic approach is its lack of sensitivity in detecting individual low worm burdens and consequently data on infection rates in low transmission settings are little reliable. According to the scientific literature, PCR assays are characterized by high sensitivity and specificity in detecting parasite DNA in biological samples. A simple and cost effective extraction method for DNA of Schistosoma mansoni from urine samples in combination with a conventional PCR assay was developed and applied in an endemic area. This urine based PCR system was tested for diagnostic accuracy among a population of a small village in an endemic area, comparing it to a reference test composed of three different parasitological techniques. The diagnostic parameters revealed a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 91.20%, positive and negative predictive values of 86.25% and 100%, respectively, and a test accuracy of 94.33%. Further statistical analysis showed a k index of 0.8806, indicating an excellent agreement between the reference test and the PCR system. Data obtained from the mouse model indicate the infection can be detected one week after cercariae penetration, opening a new perspective for early detection and patient management during this stage of the disease. The data indicate that this innovative PCR system provides a simple to handle and robust diagnostic tool for the detection of S. mansoni DNA from urine samples and a promising approach to overcome the diagnostic obstacles in low transmission settings. Furthermore the principals of this molecular technique, based on the examination of human urine samples may be useful for the diagnosis of other neglected tropical diseases that can be detected by trans-renal DNA.

  2. Utility of Schistosoma bovis Adult Worm Antigens for Diagnosis of Human Schistosomiasis by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Electroimmunotransfer Blot Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, J; Carranza, C.; Turrientes, M.C.; Arellano, J.L.Pérez; Vélez, R. López; Ramajo, V.; Muro, A.

    2004-01-01

    Immunodiagnostic methods based on the detection of antibodies continue to be the most effective and practical methods for the diagnosis of imported schistosomiasis. Schistosoma bovis is a species whose final natural hosts are bovines, ovines, caprines, and small wild ruminants. Different studies have demonstrated the analogies existing between S. bovis and other Schistosoma species which affect humans. The objective of this work was to evaluate the utility of S. bovis adult worm antigens (AWA...

  3. Interaction between primary and secondary sporocysts of Schistosoma mansoni and the internal defence system of Biomphalaria resistant and susceptible to the parasite

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    Ana Carolina Alves de Mattos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of the interaction between Biomphalaria and Schistosoma mansoni depends on the response of the host internal defence system (IDS and the escape mechanisms of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of the IDS (haemocytes and soluble haemolymph factors of resistant and susceptible Biomphalaria tenagophila lineages and Biomphalaria glabrata lineages in the presence of in vitro-transformed primary sporocysts and secondary sporocysts obtained from infected B. glabrata. To do this, we assayed the cellular adhesion index (CAI, analysed viability/mortality, used fluorescent markers to evaluate the tegumental damage and transplanted secondary sporocysts. B. tenagophila Taim was more effective against primary and secondary sporocystes than the susceptible lineage and B. glabrata. Compared with secondary sporocysts exposed to B. tenagophila, primary sporocysts showed a higher CAI, a greater percentage of dead sporocysts and were labelled by lectin from Glycine max and Alexa-Fluor 488 fluorescent probes at a higher rate than the secondary sporocysts. However, the two B. tenagophila lineages showed no cercarial shedding after inoculation with secondary sporocysts. Our hypothesis that secondary sporocysts can escape the B. tenagophila IDS cannot be confirmed by the transplantation experiments. These data suggest that there are additional mechanisms involved in the lower susceptibilty of B. tenagophila to S. mansoni infection.

  4. SmSak, the second Polo-like kinase of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni: conserved and unexpected roles in meiosis.

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    Thavy Long

    Full Text Available Polo-like kinases (Plks are a family of conserved regulators of a variety of events throughout the cell cycle, expanded from one Plk in yeast to five Plks in mammals (Plk1-5. Plk1 is the best characterized member of the Plk family, homolog to the founding member Polo of Drosophila, and plays a major role in cell cycle progression by triggering G2/M transition. Plk4/Sak (for Snk (Serum-inducible kinase akin kinase is a unique member of the family, structurally distinct from other Plk members, with essential functions in centriole duplication. The genome of the trematode parasite Schistosoma mansoni contains only two Plk genes encoding SmPlk1 and SmSak. SmPlk1 has been shown already to be required for gametogenesis and parasite reproduction. In this work, in situ hybridization indicated that the structurally conserved Plk4 protein, SmSak, was largely expressed in schistosome female ovary and vitellarium. Expression of SmSak in Xenopus oocytes confirmed its Plk4 conserved function in centriole amplification. Moreover, analysis of the function of SmSak in meiosis progression of G2-blocked Xenopus oocytes indicated that, in contrast to SmPlk1, SmSak cannot induce G2/M transition in the absence of endogenous Plk1 (Plx1. Unexpectedly, meiosis progression was spontaneously observed in Plx1-depleted oocytes co-expressing SmSak and SmPlk1. Molecular interaction between SmSak and SmPlk1 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation of both proteins. These data indicate that Plk1 and Plk4 proteins have the potential to interact and cross-activate in cells, thus attributing for the first time a potential role of Plk4 proteins in meiosis/mitosis entry. This unexpected role of SmSak in meiosis could be relevant to further consider the function of this novel Plk in schistosome reproduction.

  5. Detection of the circulating antigens CAA and CCA in human Schistosoma infections : immunodiagnostic and epidemiological applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout, Elisabeth Antoinette van

    1996-01-01

    Schistosomiasis (bilharzia) is one of the major parasitic infections in tropical areas. It is caused by blood-dwelling flukes, residing in the mesenteric and pelvic veins of the human host. Over 200 million individuals are estimated to be infected with these worms, while at least 700 million people

  6. A cyclohexanecarboxamide derivative with inhibitory effects on Schistosoma mansoni cercarial serine protease and penetration of mice skin by the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahgat, Mahmoud; Aboul-Enein, Mohamed N; El Azzouny, Aida A; Maghraby, Amany; Ruppel, Andreas; Soliman, Wael M

    2009-01-01

    A cyclohexanecarboxamide derivative, N-phenyl-N-[1-(piperidine-1-carbonyl)cyclohexyl] benzamide (MNRC-5), was evaluated for its inhibitory effects on Schistosoma mansoni cercarial serine protease activity and cercarial penetration. MNRC-5 exerted an inhibitory effect on S. mansoni cercarial serine protease at serial concentrations of the specific chromogenic substrate Boc-Val-Leu-Gly-Arg-PNA for such enzyme family and the inhibitory coefficient (Ki) value was deduced. Moreover, topical treatment of mice tails with the most potent inhibitory concentration of MNRC-5 formulated in jojoba oil successfully blocked cercarial penetration as demonstrated by a significant reduction (75%; p jojoba oil base containing no MNRC-5. In addition, the IgM and IgG reactivities to crude S. mansoni cercarial, worm and egg antigens were generally lower in sera from treated infected mice than untreated infected mice. In conclusion, we report on a new serine protease inhibitor capable for blocking penetration of host skin by S. mansoni cercariae as measured by lowering worm burden and decrease in the levels of both IgM and IgG towards different bilharzial antigens upon topical treatment.

  7. New insights into the reaction of Schistosoma mansoni cercaria to the human complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da'dara, Akram A; Krautz-Peterson, Greice

    2014-10-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic worms that have a complex life cycle. The larval stage cercaria, infectious to mammals, is described as highly susceptible to the complement system, largely due to the glycocalyx that covers the cercarial membrane. In an attempt to have a more complete understanding of cercaria reaction to the complement system, three different approaches were used. Live cercariae exposed to normal human serum (NHS) as source of complement factors were assessed for (i) membrane attack complex (MAC) deposition on the parasite surface, (ii) cercaria survival rate by Hoechst staining of parasite DNA, and (iii) transformation into schistosomula by detection of the glucose transporter protein 4 (SGTP4), a marker for new tegument formation. We found that 82-95% of cercariae directly exposed to NHS for 18 h were viable and retained their ability to shed the glycocalyx, suggesting minimal tegument damage. In contrast, inhibition of glycocalyx shedding using eserine caused significant MAC binding and parasite death. Culturing complement-exposed cercariae to measure long-term survival showed that more parasites died over time, reaching a survival rate of 18-31% by day 6 in culture. The reason for this slow death is unknown, but the surviving parasites were able to form a new tegument as shown by detection of SGTP4 on the parasite surface. Furthermore, we found that complement activation significantly damaged the acetabular gland ducts and lysed secretory vesicles released by transforming cercariae. These findings should contribute for future in vivo studies of the effects of the complement system in skin migrating cercariae.

  8. Spatial distribution of human Schistosoma japonicum infections in the Dongting Lake Region, China.

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    Giovanna Raso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to spatially model the effect of demographic, reservoir hosts and environmental factors on human Schistosoma japonicum infection prevalence in the Dongting Lake area of Hunan Province, China and to determine the potential of each indicator in targeting schistosomiasis control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cross-sectional serological, coprological and demographic data were obtained from the 2004 nationwide periodic epidemiologic survey for Hunan Province. Environmental data were downloaded from the USGS EROS data centre. Bayesian geostatistical models were employed for spatial analysis of the infection prevalence among study participants. A total of 47,139 participants from 47 administrative villages were selected. Age, sex and occupation of residents and the presence of infected buffaloes and environmental factors, i.e. NDVI, distance to the lake and endemic type of setting, were significantly associated with S. japonicum infection prevalence. After taking into account spatial correlation, however, only demographic factors (age, sex and occupation and the presence of infected buffaloes remained significant indicators. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Long established demographic factors, as well presence of host reservoirs rather than environmental factors are driving human transmission. Findings of this work can be used for epidemiologic surveillance and for the future planning of interventions in the Dongting Lake area of Hunan Province.

  9. HUMAN PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN BALI : A REVIEW

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    Putu Sutisna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections in humans in Bali are well documented, especially in the population who lived in rural areas. The most common infections are those of the soil-transmitted helminthiasis which are caused by Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm showing prevalence rates of 40 - 95%, 25 - 90% and 20 - 70% respectively. Enterobius vermicularis prevalence rate has been reported to be 18 - 53%. Taenniasis prevalence rate has been documented to be 0.8 - 23% in some villages, where Taenia saginata was found to be more prevalent than Taenia solium, and this might be due to the eating habit of the Balinese people who consumed both pork and beef lawar. Malaria is still found in Bali especially in regions along the coasts of some regencies, although generally the infection rate is low. The prevalence rates of intestinal protozoa such as Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Balantidium coli have been occasionally reported in low percentages.

  10. Utility of Schistosoma bovis adult worm antigens for diagnosis of human schistosomiasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and electroimmunotransfer blot techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, J; Carranza, C; Turrientes, M C; Pérez Arellano, J L; López Vélez, R; Ramajo, V; Muro, A

    2004-11-01

    Immunodiagnostic methods based on the detection of antibodies continue to be the most effective and practical methods for the diagnosis of imported schistosomiasis. Schistosoma bovis is a species whose final natural hosts are bovines, ovines, caprines, and small wild ruminants. Different studies have demonstrated the analogies existing between S. bovis and other Schistosoma species which affect humans. The objective of this work was to evaluate the utility of S. bovis adult worm antigens (AWA) for the diagnosis of imported human schistosomiasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and electroimmunotransfer blotting (EITB) techniques. By detecting eggs, the ELISA for S. bovis AWA was able to definitively detect imported cases with a sensitivity of 94%. The specificity of the ELISA for S. bovis AWA was 97%. There were no differences between the results of the S. bovis AWA ELISA for patients infected with Schistosoma mansoni and those infected with Schistosoma haematobium. The EITB technique showed bands of 85, 37, and 20 kDa, which are characteristic of infections with Schistosoma spp. Specific bands to indicate infection by different species of Schistosoma have not been detected. The combined use of the ELISA for S. bovis AWA and EITB increased the global sensitivity of the study to 97%. Our findings suggest that the ELISA for S. bovis AWA is a useful test for the immunodiagnosis of imported schistosomiasis and that EITB for detecting S. bovis AWA permits the confirmation of diagnosis when the ELISA for S. bovis AWA is positive.

  11. HIV-1 Integrates Widely throughout the Genome of the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutas Suttiprapa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is the most important helminthic disease of humanity in terms of morbidity and mortality. Facile manipulation of schistosomes using lentiviruses would enable advances in functional genomics in these and related neglected tropical diseases pathogens including tapeworms, and including their non-dividing cells. Such approaches have hitherto been unavailable. Blood stream forms of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, the causative agent of the hepatointestinal schistosomiasis, were infected with the human HIV-1 isolate NL4-3 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The appearance of strong stop and positive strand cDNAs indicated that virions fused to schistosome cells, the nucleocapsid internalized and the RNA genome reverse transcribed. Anchored PCR analysis, sequencing HIV-1-specific anchored Illumina libraries and Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS of schistosomes confirmed chromosomal integration; >8,000 integrations were mapped, distributed throughout the eight pairs of chromosomes including the sex chromosomes. The rate of integrations in the genome exceeded five per 1,000 kb and HIV-1 integrated into protein-encoding loci and elsewhere with integration bias dissimilar to that of human T cells. We estimated ~ 2,100 integrations per schistosomulum based on WGS, i.e. about two or three events per cell, comparable to integration rates in human cells. Accomplishment in schistosomes of post-entry processes essential for HIV-1replication, including integrase-catalyzed integration, was remarkable given the phylogenetic distance between schistosomes and primates, the natural hosts of the genus Lentivirus. These enigmatic findings revealed that HIV-1 was active within cells of S. mansoni, and provided the first demonstration that HIV-1 can integrate into the genome of an invertebrate.

  12. Intestinal schistosomiasis caused by both Schistosoma intercalatum and Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanetou, Konstantina; Astriti, Myrto; Delis, Vassilios; Moustakas, George; Choreftaki, Theodosia; Papaliodi, Eugenia; Sarri, Katerina; Adamis, George

    2010-05-01

    A case is presented of intestinal schistosomiasis due to both Schistosoma intercalatum and Schistosoma mansoni in a 30-year-old man from Senegal with discussion of diagnostic approach, species identification and determination of the effect of treatment. The patient was admitted to hospital for investigation of renal failure, arterial hypertension and hypereosinophilia. Repeated stool examinations for ova and parasites were negative. Ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed no abnormalities. US of the urinary tract showed kidneys of borderline size with increased echogenicity. Cystoscopy and histopathological examination of bladder biopsy specimens were normal. Flexible colonoscopy revealed numerous nodular lesions in the rectosigmoid region and a few similar lesions in the transverse colon, the histopathological examination of which showed deposition of Schistosoma ova with granuloma formation. Examination of multiple crush biopsy specimens from the rectosigmoid region revealed numerous granulomas formed around Schistosoma eggs which had a terminal spine and were identified as S. intercalatum (longer than Schistosoma haematobium and with a slightly curved terminal spine) and a very few S. mansoni eggs. Crush biopsies from the lesions in the transverse colon showed only S. mansoni eggs. In conclusion, the examination of multiple crush biopsy specimens is a very sensitive and specific technique for species identification of Schistosoma, especially in mixed infections, and for defining the location and extent of the granulomas evoked by each species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Schistosoma mansoni cercariae exploit an elastohydrodynamic coupling to swim efficiently

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Bhargava, Arjun; Prakash, Manu

    2016-01-01

    The motility of many parasites is critical for the infection process of their host, as exemplified by the transmission cycle of the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. In their human infectious stage, immature, submillimetre-scale forms of the parasite known as cercariae swim in freshwater and infect humans by penetrating through the skin. This infection causes Schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease that is comparable to malaria in its global socio-economic impact. Given that cercariae do not feed and hence have a finite lifetime of around 12 hours, efficient motility is crucial for the parasite's survival and transmission of Schistosomiasis. However, a first-principles understanding of how cercariae swim is lacking. Via a combined experimental, theoretical and robotics based approach, we demonstrate that cercariae propel themselves against gravity by exploiting a unique elastohydrodynamic coupling. We show that cercariae beat their tail in a periodic fashion while maintaining a fixed flexibility near their poster...

  14. Cholinergic components of nervous system of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium (Digenea: Schistosomatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Enayat S; El-Shabasy, Eman A; Said, Ashraf E; Mansour, Mohamed F A; Saleh, Mai A

    2016-08-01

    A comparison has been made for the first time between the cholinergic components of the nervous system of important human digeneans namely Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium from infected hamster (Cricentus auratus) in Egypt. In each parasite, the central nervous system consists of two cerebral ganglia and three pairs of nerve cords (ventral, lateral, and dorsal) linked together by some transverse connectives and numerous ring commissures. Peripheral cholinergic innervation was detected in oral and ventral suckers and in some parts of female reproductive system in both species, but there were some differences. The possible functions of some of these nervous components are discussed.

  15. Host-Parasite Interaction: Parasite-Derived and -Induced Proteases That Degrade Human Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Piña-Vázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic protozoa are among the most important pathogens worldwide. Diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, amoebiasis, giardiasis, trichomoniasis, and trypanosomiasis affect millions of people. Humans are constantly threatened by infections caused by these pathogens. Parasites engage a plethora of surface and secreted molecules to attach to and enter mammalian cells. The secretion of lytic enzymes by parasites into host organs mediates critical interactions because of the invasion and destruction of interstitial tissues, enabling parasite migration to other sites within the hosts. Extracellular matrix is a complex, cross-linked structure that holds cells together in an organized assembly and that forms the basement membrane lining (basal lamina. The extracellular matrix represents a major barrier to parasites. Therefore, the evolution of mechanisms for connective-tissue degradation may be of great importance for parasite survival. Recent advances have been achieved in our understanding of the biochemistry and molecular biology of proteases from parasitic protozoa. The focus of this paper is to discuss the role of protozoan parasitic proteases in the degradation of host ECM proteins and the participation of these molecules as virulence factors. We divide the paper into two sections, extracellular and intracellular protozoa.

  16. Mosquitoes as potential bridge vectors of malaria parasites from non-human primates to humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, N.O.; Smallegange, R.C.; Takken, W.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is caused by Plasmodium parasites which are transmitted by mosquitoes. Until recently, human malaria was considered to be caused by human-specific Plasmodium species. Studies on Plasmodium parasites in non-human primates (NHPs), however, have identified parasite species in gorillas and

  17. Human Schistosomiasis, And Nigerian Environment And Climate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human schistosomiasis, commonly called “bilharziasis” after a German pathologist, Theodor Bilharz (who first discovered the parasitic agent in Egypt in 1851) is caused by parasitic trematode of the genus, Schistosoma. There are at least 19 varieties of schistosomes, of which five are pathogenic parasites of man: S.

  18. Human IgG1 Responses to Surface Localised Schistosoma mansoni Ly6 Family Members Drop following Praziquantel Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain W Chalmers

    Full Text Available The heptalaminate-covered, syncytial tegument is an important anatomical adaptation that enables schistosome parasites to maintain long-term, intravascular residence in definitive hosts. Investigation of the proteins present in this surface layer and the immune responses elicited by them during infection is crucial to our understanding of host/parasite interactions. Recent studies have revealed a number of novel tegumental surface proteins including three (SmCD59a, SmCD59b and Sm29 containing uPAR/Ly6 domains (renamed SmLy6A SmLy6B and SmLy6D in this study. While vaccination with SmLy6A (SmCD59a and SmLy6D (Sm29 induces protective immunity in experimental models, human immunoglobulin responses to representative SmLy6 family members have yet to be thoroughly explored.Using a PSI-BLAST-based search, we present a comprehensive reanalysis of the Schistosoma mansoni Ly6 family (SmLy6A-K. Our examination extends the number of members to eleven (including three novel proteins and provides strong evidence that the previously identified vaccine candidate Sm29 (renamed SmLy6D is a unique double uPAR/Ly6 domain-containing representative. Presence of canonical cysteine residues, signal peptides and GPI-anchor sites strongly suggest that all SmLy6 proteins are cell surface-bound. To provide evidence that SmLy6 members are immunogenic in human populations, we report IgG1 (as well as IgG4 and IgE responses against two surface-bound representatives (SmLy6A and SmLy6B within a cohort of S. mansoni-infected Ugandan males before and after praziquantel treatment. While pre-treatment IgG1 prevalence for SmLy6A and SmLy6B differs amongst the studied population (7.4% and 25.3% of the cohort, respectively, these values are both higher than IgG1 prevalence (2.7% for a sub-surface tegumental antigen, SmTAL1. Further, post-treatment IgG1 levels against surface-associated SmLy6A and SmLy6B significantly drop (p = 0.020 and p < 0.001, respectively when compared to rising Ig

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Orientobilharzia turkestanicum supports its affinity with African Schistosoma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Gao, Jun-Feng; Li, Ming-Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2011-12-01

    Orientobilharzia turkestanicum is a blood fluke of many mammals and causes orientobilharziasis that is also a neglected parasitic zoonosis because the cercaria of O. turkestanicum can infect humans and cause cercarial dermatitis. The present study determined the complete sequence of mt genome of O. turkestanicum and revised its phylogenetic position based on mt gene content and arrangement. The complete mtDNA sequence of O. turkestanicum was 14,755 bp in length, which is slightly larger than the mtDNA genomes of three species of the blood flukes, Schistosoma mekongi (14,072 bp), Schistosoma japonicum (14,085 bp) and Schistosoma mansoni (14,415 bp), but smaller than Schistosoma haematobium (15,003 bp) and Schistosoma spindale (16,901 bp). The mt genome of O. turkestanicum contains 12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and two ribosomal RNA genes, but lacks an atp8 gene, consistent with that of Schistosoma species. The mt genome arrangement of O. turkestanicum contains an AT-rich region and two non-coding regions (NCRs), including long non-coding region (LNR) and short non-coding region (SNR). Phylogenetic analysis based on amino acids sequences showed that O. turkestanicum belonged to the genus Schistosoma, and is phylogenetically closer to the African schistosome group (S. haematobium, S. spindale and S. mansoni) than to the Asian group (S. mekongi and S. japonicum). But the arrangement of mtDNA protein-coding genes for O. turkestanicum is the same as Asian group, and distinct from the African species. Combining content and arrangement of mtDNA for O. turkestanicum, we conclude that O. turkestanicum should be considered a member of the Schistosoma genus, which shares a closer affinity to the African schistosomes than the Asian species, and gene order of mt genome in O. turkestanicum would be considered sympleisiomorphic (perhaps retained from the ancestor). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Schistosoma mansoni antigen detects Schistosoma mekongi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Beatrice; Sayasone, Somphou; Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Odermatt, Peter; Marti, Hanspeter

    2015-01-01

    Northern Cambodia and Southern Laos are highly endemic for Schistosoma mekongi. However, there is currently no immunological assay available that is specific for this form of schistosomiasis. We have validated Schistosoma mansoni antigens to detect S. mekongi-directed antibodies in human sera collected from a highly S. mekongi endemic region in Laos. On two consecutive days stool samples of 234 individuals were analyzed by Kato-Katz for presence of S. mekongi eggs and the results were correlated with serology. A sensitivity of 94.5% was calculated for a combination of ELISA and indirect fluorescence assay (IFA) as compared to the detection of S. mekongi eggs in stool samples as gold standard. The results demonstrate that S. mansoni antigens can be used for the diagnosis of S. mekongi infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bioactivity of miltefosine against aquatic stages of Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma haematobium and their snail hosts, supported by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Bardicy Samia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Miltefosine, which is the first oral drug licensed for the treatment of leishmaniasis, was recently reported to be a promising lead compound for the synthesis of novel antischistosomal derivatives with potent activity in vivo against different developmental stages of Schistosoma mansoni. In this paper an in vitro study was carried out to investigate whether it has a biocidal activity against the aquatic stages of Schistosoma mansoni and its snail intermediate host, Biomphalaria alexandrina , thus being also a molluscicide. Additionally, to see whether miltefosine can have a broad spectrum antischistosomal activity, a similar in vitro study was carried out on the adult stage of Schistosoma haematobium, the second major human species, its larval stages and snail intermediate host, Bulinus truncutes. This was checked by scanning electron microscopy. Results Miltefosine proved to have in vitro ovicidal, schistolarvicidal and lethal activity on adult worms of both Schistosoma species and has considerable molluscicidal activity on their snail hosts. Scanning electron microscopy revealed several morphological changes on the different stages of the parasite and on the soft body of the snail, which further strengthens the current evidence of miltefosine's activity. This is the first report of mollusicidal activity of miltefosine and its in vitro schistosomicidal activity against S.haematobium. Conclusions This study highlights miltefosine not only as a potential promising lead compound for the synthesis of novel broad spectrum schistosomicidal derivatives, but also for molluscicidals.

  2. Recent advances in Schistosoma genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, M M; Grunau, C; LoVerde, P T; Jones, M K; Oliveira, G

    2012-01-01

    Schistosome research has entered the genomic era with the publications reporting the Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum genomes. Schistosome genomics is motivated by the need for new control tools. However, much can also be learned about the biology of Schistosoma, which is a tractable experimental model. In this article, we review the recent achievements in the field of schistosome research and discuss future perspectives on genomics and how it can be integrated in a usable format, on the genetic mapping and how it has improved the genome assembly and provided new research approaches, on how epigenetics provides interesting insights into the biology of the species and on new functional genomics tools that will contribute to the understanding of the function of genes, many of which are parasite- or taxon specific. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. CA88, a nuclear repetitive DNA sequence identified in Schistosoma mansoni, aids in the genotyping of nine Schistosoma species of medical and veterinary importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bahia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available CA88 is the first long nuclear repetitive DNA sequence identified in the blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni. The assembled S. mansoni sequence, which contains the CA88 repeat, has 8,887 nucleotides and at least three repeat units of approximately 360 bp. In addition, CA88 also possesses an internal CA microsatellite, identified as SmBr18. Both PCR and BLAST analysis have been used to analyse and confirm the CA88 sequence in other S. mansoni sequences in the public database. PCR-acquired nuclear repetitive DNA sequence profiles from nine Schistosoma species were used to classify this organism into four genotypes. Included among the nine species analysed were five sequences of both African and Asian lineages that are known to infect humans. Within these genotypes, three of them refer to recognised species groups. A panel of four microsatellite loci, including SmBr18 and three previously published loci, has been used to characterise the nine Schistosoma species. Each species has been identified and classified based on its CA88 DNA fingerprint profile. Furthermore, microsatellite sequences and intra-specific variation have also been observed within the nine Schistosoma species sequences. Taken together, these results support the use of these markers in studying the population dynamics of Schistosoma isolates from endemic areas and also provide new methods for investigating the relationships between different populations of parasites. In addition, these data also indicate that Schistosoma magrebowiei is not a sister taxon to Schistosoma mattheei, prompting a new designation to a basal clade.

  4. Modeling the Dynamics and Control of Transmission of Schistosoma japonicum and S. mekongi in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIKAWA, Hirofumi; Ohmae, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model for transmission of schistosomes is useful to predict effects of various control measures on suppression of these parasites. This review focuses on epidemiological and environmental factors in Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mekongi infections and recent advances in mathematical models of Schistosoma transmission.

  5. Urinary tract pathology in some Schistosoma haematobium infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2007-01-18

    Jan 18, 2007 ... intensity of infection. Key words: Urinary tract pathology, Schistosoma haematobium, rural volunteers, Nigerian, Ultrasound, Light infection, heavy infection. INTRODUCTION. Urinary Schistosomiasis is a chronic parasitic infection of circulatory system caused by Schistosoma haematobium which affects the ...

  6. Screening trematodes for novel intervention targets: a proteomic and immunological comparison of Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma bovis and Echinostoma caproni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higón, Melissa; Cowan, Graeme; Nausch, Norman; Cavanagh, David; Oleaga, Ana; Toledo, Rafael; Stothard, J Russell; Antúnez, Oreto; Marcilla, Antonio; Burchmore, Richard; Mutapi, Francisca

    2011-10-01

    With the current paucity of vaccine targets for parasitic diseases, particularly those in childhood, the aim of this study was to compare protein expression and immune cross-reactivity between the trematodes Schistosoma haematobium, S. bovis and Echinostoma caproni in the hope of identifying novel intervention targets. Native adult parasite proteins were separated by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified through electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry to produce a reference gel. Proteins from differential gel electrophoresis analyses of the three parasite proteomes were compared and screened against sera from hamsters infected with S. haematobium and E. caproni following 2-dimensional Western blotting. Differential protein expression between the three species was observed with circa 5% of proteins from S. haematobium showing expression up-regulation compared to the other two species. There was 91% similarity between the proteomes of the two Schistosoma species and 81% and 78·6% similarity between S. haematobium and S. bovis versus E. caproni, respectively. Although there were some common cross-species antigens, species-species targets were revealed which, despite evolutionary homology, could be due to phenotypic plasticity arising from different host-parasite relationships. Nevertheless, this approach helps to identify novel intervention targets which could be used as broad-spectrum candidates for future use in human and veterinary vaccines.

  7. Hyperdiverse gene cluster in snail host conveys resistance to human schistosome parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A Tennessen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, a neglected global pandemic, may be curtailed by blocking transmission of the parasite via its intermediate hosts, aquatic snails. Elucidating the genetic basis of snail-schistosome interaction is a key to this strategy. Here we map a natural parasite-resistance polymorphism from a Caribbean population of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata. In independent experimental evolution lines, RAD genotyping shows that the same genomic region responds to selection for resistance to the parasite Schistosoma mansoni. A dominant allele in this region conveys an 8-fold decrease in the odds of infection. Fine-mapping and RNA-Seq characterization reveal a 25% haplotypes across the GRC, a significantly non-neutral pattern, suggests that balancing selection maintains diversity at the GRC. Thus, the GRC resembles immune gene complexes seen in other taxa and is likely involved in parasite recognition. The GRC is a potential target for controlling transmission of schistosomiasis, including via genetic manipulation of snails.

  8. Schistosoma mansoni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Byskov, Jens

    1987-01-01

    Recent surveys in Ngamiland, Botswana, indicate increasing prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni infections. With the introduction of a schistosomiasis control programme, 354 of 373 schoolchildren were examined quantitatively for eggs of S. mansoni, and 317 were examined clinically for hepato- and sp...... with enlarged spleen. 21 of these had schistosomiasis. The prevalence of hepatomegaly was highest among those excreting above 1600 epg. Also the mean size of the enlarged livers increased with intensity of infection....

  9. Epidemiological survey on schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the current state of schistosomiasis (Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni) in Taïbong Sub Division, in Mayo-Kani Division, an epidemiological survey was conducted from September to November 2014 in four government primary schools, to determine the prevalence of these human ...

  10. Biology and Control of Snail Intermediate Host of Schistosoma japonicum in The People's Republic of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Z.J.; Ge, J; Dai, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum is a severe parasitic disease in The People's Republic of China and imposed considerable burden on human and domestic animal health and socioeconomic development. The significant achievement in schistosomiasis control has been made in last 60years. ....... Oncomelania hupensis as the only intermediate host of S. japonicum plays a key role in disease transmission. The habitat complexity of the snails challenges to effective control. In this review we share the experiences in control and research of O. hupensis....

  11. Invasive plants as catalysts for the spread of human parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mack

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As serious as are the consequences of invasive species that directly cause human afflictions through their production of lethal protease inhibitors (Bryonia alba, allergens (Parthenium hysterophorus or furanocoumarins (Hercaleum mantegazzianum, other introduced species may cause even greater risks to human health by enhancing the proliferation of vectors of virulent human parasites. The dense, floating mats of Eichhornia crassipes (water hyacinth create habitat for larvae of the dipteran vectors of Plasmodium spp., the causative agents of malaria, and other parasites. Facilitation of a human parasite is not restricted to aquatic systems. In Africa, the tropical American shrub Lantana camara (lantana provides essential habitat for dipteran vectors (Glossina spp. of protozoans (Trypanosoma spp. that cause trypanosomiasis. Unanticipated health consequences will likely continue to emerge from new plant introductions. Sin Nombre Virus (SNV is a rodent-borne parasite that causes Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome, an often-lethal disease in humans. Populations of rodent vectors of SNV in South America increase rapidly in response to synchronous fruit availability among masting, native bamboos. With depletion of this temporary food source, the rodents seek food near human settlements, increasing the risk of human infections with SNV. In the United States the omnivorous deer mouse Peromyscus maniculatus is also a SNV carrier. The escape of Asian cold-tolerant bamboos from cultivation raises the possibility of invasions (several have already become naturalized and providing a temporary boost to populations of infected native rodents. Proposed introductions of aquatic vascular species, species with masting reproduction and those that would occupy an unfilled niche in the proposed new range deserve careful evaluation for their possible roles as unforeseen catalysts of species interactions, especially of human parasites.

  12. Parasites

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-06

    In this podcast, a listener wants to know what to do if he thinks he has a parasite or parasitic disease.  Created: 5/6/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/6/2010.

  13. Mapping and sequencing of acetylcholinesterase genes from the platyhelminth blood fluke Schistosoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Geoffrey N; Jones, Andrew K; Agnew, Alison

    2003-09-18

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on the surface of the parasitic blood fluke Schistosoma is the likely target for schistosomicidal anticholinesterases. Determination of the molecular structure of this drug target is key for the development of improved anticholinesterase drugs and potentially a novel vaccine. We have recently cloned the cDNA encoding the AChE from the human parasite Schistosoma haematobium and succeeded in expressing functional recombinant protein. We now describe the cloning and molecular characterisation of homologues from two other schistosome species-Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma bovis, which are important parasites of man and cattle, respectively, but which differ in their sensitivity to the therapeutic anticholinesterase metrifonate. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the AChE from all three species posses a high degree of identity, with conservation of all of the residues known to be important for substrate binding and catalytic activity. Also conserved is a unique C-terminal domain which is unusual in that it lacks the consensus for GPI modification, even though the native protein is considered to be GPI-anchored. We have also established the AChE gene structures for all three species and cloned the complete gene for S. haematobium AChE. The gene structure is relatively complex, comprising nine coding exons; the location of the splice sites is identical in all three species, but the size of the introns varies considerably. The two C-terminal splicing sites that are conserved in all species are also present in Schistosoma, but a third C-terminal conserved splicing site which is located 11-13 amino acids upstream of the histidine of the catalytic triad in all invertebrate AChE genes characterised to date is absent. We discuss our findings in the context of the molecular phylogeny of the AChE genes and the potential application to the control of schistosomiasis.

  14. New Frontiers in Schistosoma Genomics and Transcriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Laila A.; Mourão, Marina M.; Oliveira, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomes are digenean blood flukes of aves and mammals comprising 23 species. Some species are causative agents of human schistosomiasis, the second major neglected disease affecting over 230 million people worldwide. Modern technologies including the sequencing and characterization of nucleic acids and proteins have allowed large-scale analyses of parasites and hosts, opening new frontiers in biological research with potential biomedical and biotechnological applications. Nuclear genomes of the three most socioeconomically important species (S. haematobium, S. japonicum, and S. mansoni) have been sequenced and are under intense investigation. Mitochondrial genomes of six Schistosoma species have also been completely sequenced and analysed from an evolutionary perspective. Furthermore, DNA barcoding of mitochondrial sequences is used for biodiversity assessment of schistosomes. Despite the efforts in the characterization of Schistosoma genomes and transcriptomes, many questions regarding the biology and evolution of this important taxon remain unanswered. This paper aims to discuss some advances in the schistosome research with emphasis on genomics and transcriptomics. It also aims to discuss the main challenges of the current research and to point out some future directions in schistosome studies. PMID:23227308

  15. Control of human parasitic diseases: Context and overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, David H

    2006-01-01

    The control of parasitic diseases of humans has been undertaken since the aetiology and natural history of the infections was recognized and the deleterious effects on human health and well-being appreciated by policy makers, medical practitioners and public health specialists. However, while some parasitic infections such as malaria have proved difficult to control, as defined by a sustained reduction in incidence, others, particularly helminth infections can be effectively controlled. The different approaches to control from diagnosis, to treatment and cure of the clinically sick patient, to control the transmission within the community by preventative chemotherapy and vector control are outlined. The concepts of eradication, elimination and control are defined and examples of success summarized. Overviews of the health policy and financing environment in which programmes to control or eliminate parasitic diseases are positioned and the development of public-private partnerships as vehicles for product development or access to drugs for parasite disease control are discussed. Failure to sustain control of parasites may be due to development of drug resistance or the failure to implement proven strategies as a result of decreased resources within the health system, decentralization of health management through health-sector reform and the lack of financial and human resources in settings where per capita government expenditure on health may be less than $US 5 per year. However, success has been achieved in several large-scale programmes through sustained national government investment and/or committed donor support. It is also widely accepted that the level of investment in drug development for the parasitic diseases of poor populations is an unattractive option for pharmaceutical companies. The development of partnerships to specifically address this need provides some hope that the intractable problems of the treatment regimens for the trypanosomiases and

  16. Intestinal parasites: a study of human appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L; Schrottenbaum, M; Kliment, V

    1991-01-01

    Histological sections of 414 appendices were examined parasitologically. Enterobius vermicularis was found in 8.7%, eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides in 0.5%, trophozites of Dientamoeba fragilis in 4.8%, Endolimax nana in 2.2%, Entamoeba coli in 1% and cysts of Giardia intestinalis in 1.9% of cases. Appendicopathies associated with Enterobius were most frequent in the age group from 6 to 10 years (24.3%) and from 21 to 25 years (12.2%). Patients older than 15 years were practically women only. Dientamoeba was most frequent in the age group from 11 to 15 years (11.3%). In women D. fragilis was three times more frequent than in men. The coincidence of D. fragilis and E. vermicularis infections was 50%. No interactions were seen between the protozoans in the contents of the appendix and its mucous membrane. Statistical evaluation indicates possible etiologic role of E. vermicularis in the occurrence of acute appendicities. D. fragilis appears to be the most common intestinal protozoan parasite in Bohemia.

  17. Tapeworm Diphyllobothrium dendriticum (Cestoda)--neglected or emerging human parasite?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, Roman; Brabec, Jan; Kubáčková, Petra; Scholz, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    A total number of 14 valid species of Diphyllobothrium tapeworms have been described in literature to be capable of causing diphyllobothriosis, with D. latum being the major causative agent of all human infections. However, recent data indicate that some of these infections, especially when diagnosed solely on the basis of morphology, have been identified with this causative agent incorrectly, confusing other Diphyllobothrium species with D. latum. Another widely distributed species, D. dendriticum, has never been considered as a frequent parasite of man, even though it is found commonly throughout arctic and subarctic regions parasitizing piscivorous birds and mammals. Recent cases of Europeans infected with this cestode called into question the actual geographic distribution of this tapeworm, largely ignored by medical parasitologists. On the basis of revision of more than 900 available references and a description and revision of recent European human cases using morphological and molecular (cox1) data supplemented by newly characterized D. dendriticum sequences, we updated the current knowledge of the life-cycle, geographic distribution, epidemiological status, and molecular diagnostics of this emerging causal agent of zoonotic disease of man. The tapeworm D. dendriticum represents an example of a previously neglected, probably underdiagnosed parasite of man with a potential to spread globally. Recent cases of diphyllobothriosis caused by D. dendriticum in Europe (Netherlands, Switzerland and Czech Republic), where the parasite has not been reported previously, point out that causative agents of diphyllobothriosis and other zoonoses can be imported throughout the world. Molecular tools should be used for specific and reliable parasite diagnostics, and also rare or non-native species should be considered. This will considerably help improve our knowledge of the distribution and epidemiology of these human parasites.

  18. Tapeworm Diphyllobothrium dendriticum (Cestoda--neglected or emerging human parasite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Kuchta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A total number of 14 valid species of Diphyllobothrium tapeworms have been described in literature to be capable of causing diphyllobothriosis, with D. latum being the major causative agent of all human infections. However, recent data indicate that some of these infections, especially when diagnosed solely on the basis of morphology, have been identified with this causative agent incorrectly, confusing other Diphyllobothrium species with D. latum. Another widely distributed species, D. dendriticum, has never been considered as a frequent parasite of man, even though it is found commonly throughout arctic and subarctic regions parasitizing piscivorous birds and mammals. Recent cases of Europeans infected with this cestode called into question the actual geographic distribution of this tapeworm, largely ignored by medical parasitologists. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: On the basis of revision of more than 900 available references and a description and revision of recent European human cases using morphological and molecular (cox1 data supplemented by newly characterized D. dendriticum sequences, we updated the current knowledge of the life-cycle, geographic distribution, epidemiological status, and molecular diagnostics of this emerging causal agent of zoonotic disease of man. CONCLUSIONS: The tapeworm D. dendriticum represents an example of a previously neglected, probably underdiagnosed parasite of man with a potential to spread globally. Recent cases of diphyllobothriosis caused by D. dendriticum in Europe (Netherlands, Switzerland and Czech Republic, where the parasite has not been reported previously, point out that causative agents of diphyllobothriosis and other zoonoses can be imported throughout the world. Molecular tools should be used for specific and reliable parasite diagnostics, and also rare or non-native species should be considered. This will considerably help improve our knowledge of the distribution and epidemiology of

  19. Non-equilibrium plasma prevention of Schistosoma japonicum transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Quan; Wang, Feng-Peng; Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Bazaka, Kateryna; Ostrikov, Kostya (Ken)

    2016-10-01

    Schistosoma japonicum is a widespread human and animal parasite that causes intestinal and hepatosplenic schistosomiasis linked to colon, liver and bladder cancers, and anemia. Estimated 230 million people are currently infected with Schistosoma spp, with 779 million people at risk of contracting the parasite. Infection occurs when a host comes into contact with cercariae, a planktonic larval stage of the parasite, and can be prevented by inactivating the larvae, commonly by chemical treatment. We investigated the use of physical non-equilibrium plasma generated at atmospheric pressure using custom-made dielectric barrier discharge reactor to kill S. japonicum cercariae. Survival rate decreased with treatment time and applied power. Plasmas generated in O2 and air gas discharges were more effective in killing S. japonicum cercariae than that generated in He, which is directly related to the mechanism by which cercariae are inactivated. Reactive oxygen species, such as O atoms, abundant in O2 plasma and NO in air plasma play a major role in killing of S. japonicum cercariae via oxidation mechanisms. Similar level of efficacy is also shown for a gliding arc discharge plasma jet generated in ambient air, a system that may be more appropriate for scale-up and integration into existing water treatment processes.

  20. Parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Mehlum, Halvor; Moene, Karl O.; Torvik, Ragnar

    2003-01-01

    Unproductive enterprises that feed on productive businesses, are rampant in developing countries. These parasitic enterprises take divergent forms, some headed by violent bandits and brutal mafia bosses, others by organized middlemen or smart political insiders. All of them seem to have the profit motive in common. A consequence of parasitic enterprises is that societies may be locked into a self enforcing configuration of beliefs and practices that result in persistent poverty. In some insta...

  1. Comparative genomics of the neglected human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Jane M.; Adams, John H.; Silva, Joana C.; Bidwell, Shelby L.; Lorenzi, Hernan; Caler, Elisabet; Crabtree, Jonathan; Angiuoli, Samuel V.; Merino, Emilio F.; Amedeo, Paolo; Cheng, Qin; Coulson, Richard M. R.; Crabb, Brendan S.; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Essien, Kobby; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Gilson, Paul R.; Gueye, Amy H.; Guo, Xiang; Kang’a, Simon; Kooij, Taco W. A.; Korsinczky, Michael; Meyer, Esmeralda V.-S.; Nene, Vish; Paulsen, Ian; White, Owen; Ralph, Stuart A.; Ren, Qinghu; Sargeant, Tobias J.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Sullivan, Steven A.; Yamamoto, Marcio Massao; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Galinski, Mary R.; Barnwell, John W.; Fraser-Liggett, Claire M.

    2008-01-01

    The human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax is responsible for 25-40% of the ~515 million annual cases of malaria worldwide. Although seldom fatal, the parasite elicits severe and incapacitating clinical symptoms and often relapses months after a primary infection has cleared. Despite its importance as a major human pathogen, P. vivax is little studied because it cannot be propagated in the laboratory except in non-human primates. We determined the genome sequence of P. vivax in order to shed light on its distinctive biologic features, and as a means to drive development of new drugs and vaccines. Here we describe the synteny and isochore structure of P. vivax chromosomes, and show that the parasite resembles other malaria parasites in gene content and metabolic potential, but possesses novel gene families and potential alternate invasion pathways not recognized previously. Completion of the P. vivax genome provides the scientific community with a valuable resource that can be used to advance scientific investigation into this neglected species. PMID:18843361

  2. Origin of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in gorillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weimin; Li, Yingying; Learn, Gerald H; Rudicell, Rebecca S; Robertson, Joel D; Keele, Brandon F; Ndjango, Jean-Bosco N; Sanz, Crickette M; Morgan, David B; Locatelli, Sabrina; Gonder, Mary K; Kranzusch, Philip J; Walsh, Peter D; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Georgiev, Alexander V; Muller, Martin N; Shaw, George M; Peeters, Martine; Sharp, Paul M; Rayner, Julian C; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2010-09-23

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most prevalent and lethal of the malaria parasites infecting humans, yet the origin and evolutionary history of this important pathogen remain controversial. Here we develop a single-genome amplification strategy to identify and characterize Plasmodium spp. DNA sequences in faecal samples from wild-living apes. Among nearly 3,000 specimens collected from field sites throughout central Africa, we found Plasmodium infection in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), but not in eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei) or bonobos (Pan paniscus). Ape plasmodial infections were highly prevalent, widely distributed and almost always made up of mixed parasite species. Analysis of more than 1,100 mitochondrial, apicoplast and nuclear gene sequences from chimpanzees and gorillas revealed that 99% grouped within one of six host-specific lineages representing distinct Plasmodium species within the subgenus Laverania. One of these from western gorillas comprised parasites that were nearly identical to P. falciparum. In phylogenetic analyses of full-length mitochondrial sequences, human P. falciparum formed a monophyletic lineage within the gorilla parasite radiation. These findings indicate that P. falciparum is of gorilla origin and not of chimpanzee, bonobo or ancient human origin.

  3. Origin of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in gorillas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weimin; Li, Yingying; Learn, Gerald H.; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Robertson, Joel D.; Keele, Brandon F.; Ndjango, Jean-Bosco N.; Sanz, Crickette M.; Morgan, David B.; Locatelli, Sabrina; Gonder, Mary K.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Walsh, Peter D.; Delaporte, Eric; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Georgiev, Alexander V.; Muller, Martin N.; Shaw, George M.; Peeters, Martine; Sharp, Paul M.; Rayner, Julian C.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is the most prevalent and lethal of the malaria parasites infecting humans, yet the origin and evolutionary history of this important pathogen remain controversial. Here, we developed a novel polymerase chain reaction based single genome amplification strategy to identify and characterize Plasmodium spp. DNA sequences in fecal samples of wild-living apes. Among nearly 3,000 specimens collected from field sites throughout central Africa, we found Plasmodium infection in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), but not in eastern gorillas (Gorilla beringei) or bonobos (Pan paniscus). Ape plasmodial infections were highly prevalent, widely distributed, and almost always comprised of mixed parasite species. Analysis of more than 1,100 mitochondrial, apicoplast and nuclear gene sequences from chimpanzees and gorillas revealed that 99% grouped within one of six host-specific lineages representing distinct Plasmodium species within the subgenus Laverania. One of these from western gorillas was comprised of parasites that were nearly identical to P. falciparum. In phylogenetic analyses of full-length mitochondrial sequences, human P. falciparum formed a monophyletic lineage within the gorilla parasite radiation. These findings indicate that P. falciparum is of gorilla and not of chimpanzee, bonobo or ancient human origin. PMID:20864995

  4. Targeting NAD+ metabolism in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica K O'Hara

    Full Text Available Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ is an essential metabolite utilized as a redox cofactor and enzyme substrate in numerous cellular processes. Elevated NAD+ levels have been observed in red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, but little is known regarding how the parasite generates NAD+. Here, we employed a mass spectrometry-based metabolomic approach to confirm that P. falciparum lacks the ability to synthesize NAD+ de novo and is reliant on the uptake of exogenous niacin. We characterized several enzymes in the NAD+ pathway and demonstrate cytoplasmic localization for all except the parasite nicotinamidase, which concentrates in the nucleus. One of these enzymes, the P. falciparum nicotinate mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (PfNMNAT, is essential for NAD+ metabolism and is highly diverged from the human homolog, but genetically similar to bacterial NMNATs. Our results demonstrate the enzymatic activity of PfNMNAT in vitro and demonstrate its ability to genetically complement the closely related Escherichia coli NMNAT. Due to the similarity of PfNMNAT to the bacterial enzyme, we tested a panel of previously identified bacterial NMNAT inhibitors and synthesized and screened twenty new derivatives, which demonstrate a range of potency against live parasite culture. These results highlight the importance of the parasite NAD+ metabolic pathway and provide both novel therapeutic targets and promising lead antimalarial compounds.

  5. Multiplication rate variation in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Lee; Stewart, Lindsay B; Tarr, Sarah J; Ahouidi, Ambroise D; Diakite, Mahamadou; Amambua-Ngwa, Alfred; Conway, David J

    2017-07-25

    It is important to understand intrinsic variation in asexual blood stage multiplication rates of the most virulent human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Here, multiplication rates of long-term laboratory adapted parasite clones and new clinical isolates were measured, using a newly standardised assay of growth from low starting density in replicate parallel cultures with erythrocytes from multiple different donors, across multiple cycles. Multiplication rates of long-term established clones were between 7.6 and 10.5 fold per 48 hours, with clone Dd2 having a higher rate than others (clones 3D7, HB3 and D10). Parasite clone-specific growth was then analysed in co-culture assays with all possible heterologous pairwise combinations. This showed that co-culture of different parasites did not affect their replication rates, indicating that there were no suppressive interactions operating between parasites. Multiplication rates of eleven new clinical isolates were measured after a few weeks of culture, and showed a spectrum of replication rates between 2.3 and 6.0 fold per 48 hours, the entire range being lower than for the long-term laboratory adapted clones. Multiplication rate estimates remained stable over time for several isolates tested repeatedly up to three months after culture initiation, indicating considerable persistence of this important trait variation.

  6. Schistosoma bovis-host interplay: Proteomics for knowing and acting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Oleaga, Ana

    2017-07-01

    Schistosoma bovis is a parasite of ruminants that causes significant economic losses to farmers throughout Africa, Southwestern Asia and the Mediterranean. Additionally, recent studies have reported its zoonotic potential through the formation of S. bovis×Schistosoma haematobium hybrids. As observed in the Schistosoma species infecting humans, it is assumed that S. bovis has also evolved host regulatory molecules that ensure its long-term survival in the bloodstream of its host. Since these molecules could be potential targets for the development of new drugs and anti-schistosome vaccines, their identification and functional characterization were undertaken. With this aim in mind, the molecular interface between S. bovis and its vertebrate host was subjected to a series of proteomic studies, which started with the analysis of the proteomes of the S. bovis moieties exposed to the host, namely, the excretory/secretory products and the tegument surface. Thus, a wealth of novel molecular information of S. bovis was obtained, which in turn allowed the identification of several parasite proteins with fibrinolytic and anticoagulant activities that could be used by S. bovis to regulate the host defensive systems. Following on, the host interface was investigated by studying the proteome of the host vascular endothelium surface at two points along the infection: in the lung vessels during the schistosomula migration and in the portal vein after the parasites have reached adulthood and sexual maturity. These studies have provided original data regarding the proteomes of the endothelial cell surface of pulmonary vasculature and portal vein in S. bovis-infected animals, and have shown significant changes in these proteomes associated with infection. This review compiles current information and the analyses of all the proteomic data from S. bovis and the S. bovis-host interface, including the molecular and functional characterization of S. bovis proteins that were found to

  7. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiadeh, Malihe Nourollahpour; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic

  8. Functional Diversity of the Schistosoma mansoni Tyrosine Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia G. A. Avelar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of schistosomiasis, has a complex life cycle infecting over 200 million people worldwide. Such a successful and prolific parasite life cycle has been shown to be dependent on the adaptive interaction between the parasite and hosts. Tyrosine kinases (TKs play a key role in signaling pathways as demonstrated by a large body of experimental work in eukaryotes. Furthermore, comparative genomics have allowed the identification of TK homologs and provided insights into the functional role of TKs in several biological systems. Finally, TK structural biology has provided a rational basis for obtaining selective inhibitors directed to the treatment of human diseases. This paper covers the important aspects of the phospho-tyrosine signaling network in S. mansoni, Caenorhabditis elegans, and humans, the main process of functional diversification of TKs, that is, protein-domain shuffling, and also discusses TKs as targets for the development of new anti-schistosome drugs.

  9. Affinities between Asian non-human Schistosoma species, the S. indicum group, and the African human schistosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatsuma, T; Iwagami, M; Liu, C X; Rajapakse, R P V J; Mondal, M M H; Kitikoon, V; Ambu, S; Agatsuma, Y; Blair, D; Higuchi, T

    2002-03-01

    Schistosoma species have traditionally been arranged in groups based on egg morphology, geographical origins, and the genus or family of snail intermediate host. One of these groups is the 'S. indicum group' comprising species from Asia that use pulmonate snails as intermediate hosts. DNA sequences were obtained from the four members of this group (S. indicum, S. spindale, S. nasale and S. incognitum) to provide information concerning their phylogenetic relationships with other Asian and African species and species groups. The sequences came from the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of the ribosomal gene repeat, part of the 28S ribosomal RNA gene (28S), and part of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene. Tree analyses using both distance and parsimony methods showed the S. indicum group not to be monophyletic. Schistosoma indicum, S. spindale and S. nasale were clustered among African schistosomes, while S. incognitum was placed as sister to the African species (using ITS2 and 28S nucleotide sequences and CO1 amino acid sequences), or as sister to all other species of Schistosoma (CO1 nucleotide sequences). Based on the present molecular data, a scenario for the evolution of the S. indicum group is discussed.

  10. A revision of the interrelationships of Schistosoma including the recently described Schistosoma guineensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Bonnie L; Southgate, Vaughan R; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2006-07-01

    In light of the recently described human schistosome Schistosoma guineensis and recent phylogenetic studies of the genus Schistosoma, a revision of the interrelationships of the members of this genus is needed. This paper adds to previous phylogenetic studies on the family Schistosomatidae and offers the most up to date and robust phylogeny of the group based on complete small and large nuclear subunit rRNA genes and partial mitochondrial cox1, incorporating most of the 21 species of Schistosoma. Our findings show that the group retains the same topology as that resolved in previous studies except Schistosoma margrebowiei was resolved as the sister taxon to all others in the Schistosoma haematobium species group and S. guineensis was placed as sister species to both Schistosoma bovis and Schistosoma curassoni. The S. haematobium species group contains eight species of which many are of significant medical and veterinary importance. Additionally, many of these species have been shown to hybridise both in the wild and experimentally, making the correct identification and recognition of species very important. A pairwise comparison of cox1 among Schistosoma species suggests this gene alone would fail as a reliable barcode for species identification. Phylogenetic results clearly treat Schistosoma intercalatum and S. guineensis as separate taxa with each more closely related evolutionarily to S. haematobium than to each other. The study also highlights the problems associated with wrongly attributed sequences on public databases such as GenBank.

  11. The origin and dispersion of human parasitic diseases in the Old World (Africa, Europe and Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nozais Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The ancestors of present-day man (Homo sapiens sapiens appeared in East Africa some three and a half million years ago (Australopithecs, and then migrated to Europe, Asia, and later to the Americas, thus beginning the differentiation process. The passage from nomadic to sedentary life took place in the Middle East in around 8000 BC. Wars, spontaneous migrations and forced migrations (slave trade led to enormous mixtures of populations in Europe and Africa and favoured the spread of numerous parasitic diseases with specific strains according to geographic area. The three human plasmodia (Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, and P. malariae were imported from Africa into the Mediterranean region with the first human migrations, but it was the Neolithic revolution (sedentarisation, irrigation, population increase which brought about actual foci for malaria. The reservoir for Leishmania infantum and L. donovani - the dog - has been domesticated for thousands of years. Wild rodents as reservoirs of L. major have also long been in contact with man and probably were imported from tropical Africa across the Sahara. L. tropica, by contrast, followed the migrations of man, its only reservoir. L. infantum and L. donovani spread with man and his dogs from West Africa. Likewise, for thousands of years, the dog has played an important role in the spread and the endemic character of hydatidosis through sheep (in Europe and North Africa and dromadary (in the Sahara and North Africa. Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni have existed since prehistoric times in populations living in or passing through the Sahara. These populations then transported them to countries of Northern Africa where the specific, intermediary hosts were already present. Madagascar was inhabited by populations of Indonesian origin who imported lymphatic filariosis across the Indian Ocean (possibly of African origin since the Indonesian sailors had spent time on the African coast before

  12. Efficacy of Parazoquantel against Schistosoma Heamatobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic debilitating infection due to Schistosoma species belonging to parasitic trematode worms. It continues to threaten millions of people, particularly the rural poor in the developing countries. A study was carried out to determine the prevalence of urinary Schistosomiasis among dwellers of Wasai ...

  13. Schistosoma-associated Salmonella resist antibiotics via specific fimbrial attachments to the flatworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhill, Alison E; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Day, Tim A; Carlson, Steve A

    2011-06-28

    Schistosomes are parasitic helminths that infect humans through dermo-invasion while in contaminated water. Salmonella are also a common water-borne human pathogen that infects the gastrointestinal tract via the oral route. Both pathogens eventually enter the systemic circulation as part of their respective disease processes. Concurrent Schistosoma-Salmonella infections are common and are complicated by the bacteria adhering to adult schistosomes present in the mesenteric vasculature. This interaction provides a refuge in which the bacterium can putatively evade antibiotic therapy and anthelmintic monotherapy can lead to a massive release of occult Salmonella. Using a novel antibiotic protection assay, our results reveal that Schistosoma-associated Salmonella are refractory to eight different antibiotics commonly used to treat salmonellosis. The efficacy of these antibiotics was decreased by a factor of 4 to 16 due to this association. Salmonella binding to schistosomes occurs via a specific fimbrial protein (FimH) present on the surface on the bacterium. This same fimbrial protein confers the ability of Salmonella to bind to mammalian cells. Salmonella can evade certain antibiotics by binding to Schistosoma. As a result, effective bactericidal concentrations of antibiotics are unfortunately above the achievable therapeutic levels of the drugs in co-infected individuals. Salmonella-Schistosoma binding is analogous to the adherence of Salmonella to cells lining the mammalian intestine. Perturbing this binding is the key to eliminating Salmonella that complicate schistosomiasis.

  14. Human behaviour and the epidemiology of parasitic zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Calum N L

    2005-10-01

    The behaviour of Homo sapiens has a pivotal role to play in the macro and microepidemiology of emerging or re-emerging parasitic zoonoses. Changing demographics and the concomitant alterations to the environment, climate, technology, land use and changes in human behavior, converge to favour the emergence and spread of parasitic zoonoses. The recent unprecedented movements of people, their animals and their parasites around the world, introduce and mix genes, cultural preferences, customs, and behavioral patterns. The increasing proclivity for eating meat, fish, crabs, shrimp, molluscs raw, undercooked, smoked, pickled or dried facilitates a number of protozoan (Toxoplasma), trematode (Fasciola sp., Paragonimus spp., Clonorchis sp., Opisthorchis spp., Heterophyes sp., Metagonimus sp., Echinostoma spp., Nanophyetus sp.) cestode (Taenia spp, Diphyllobothrum sp.) and nematode (Trichinella spp., Capillaria spp., Gnathostoma spp., Anisakis sp., Parastrongylus spp.) caused zoonoses. The increasing world population and the inability to keep pace with the provision of adequate sanitation and clean, safe drinking water, has led to an increased importance of waterborne zoonoses, such as those caused by Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma. Our close relationship with and the numerous uses to which we put companion animals and their ubiquitous distribution has resulted in dogs and cats unwitting participation in sharing over 60 parasite species including: Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, most foodborne trematode species, Diphyllobothrum, Echinococcus spp., Ancylostoma and Toxocara. Changing human behaviour through education, to encourage the proper cooking of food, which may have cultural and social significance, will remain as challenging as controlling stray and feral pet populations, improving hygiene levels and the provision of safe drinking water and the proper use of sanctuary facilities. Long pre-patent periods and the normally insidious sub-clinical nature of

  15. Epidemiology and history of human parasitic diseases in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neghina, Raul; Neghina, Adriana M; Marincu, Iosif; Iacobiciu, Ioan

    2011-06-01

    Intestinal parasitic diseases such as enterobiasis, giardiasis, and ascariasis are detected most frequently in Romania, but their importance is definitely surpassed by trichinellosis, cystic echinococcosis, and toxoplasmosis. Malaria was common until its eradication in 1963, and only imported cases are reported nowadays. The aim of this review was to bring together essential data on the epidemiology and history of human parasitoses in Romania. Information on 43 parasitic diseases was collected from numerous sources, most of them unavailable abroad or inaccessible to the international scientific community. Over time, Romanian people of all ages have paid a significant tribute to the pathogenic influences exerted by the parasites. Sanitary and socio-economical consequences of the parasites diseases have great negative impact on the quality of life of affected individuals and the overall well-being of the population. Implementation of efficient public health measures and informative campaigns for the masses as well as changing the inadequate habits that are deeply rooted in the population are mandatory for cutting successfully this Gordian knot.

  16. Inferences on the biochemical and environmental regulation of universal stress proteins from Schistosomiasis parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbah AN

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreas N Mbah,1,2 Ousman Mahmud,1 Omotayo R Awofolu,2 Raphael D Isokpehi11Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Department of Biology, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA; 2Department of Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South AfricaBackground: Human schistosomiasis is a freshwater snail-transmitted disease caused by parasitic flatworms of the Schistosoma genus. Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma mansoni, and Schistosoma japonicum are the three major species infecting humans. These parasites undergo a complex developmental life cycle, in which they encounter a plethora of environmental signals. The presence of genes encoding the universal stress protein (USP domain in the genomes of Schistosoma spp. suggests these flatworms are equipped to respond to unfavorable conditions. Though data on gene expression is available for USP genes, their biochemical and environmental regulation are incompletely understood. The identification of additional regulatory molecules for Schistosoma. USPs, which may be present in the human, snail, or water environments, could also be useful for schistosomiasis interventions.Methods: We developed a protocol that includes a visual analytics stage to facilitate integration, visualization, and decision making, from the results of sequence analyses and data collection on a set of 13 USPs from S. mansoni and S. japonicum.Results: Multiple sequence alignment identified conserved sites that could be key residues regulating the function of USPs of the Schistosoma spp. Based on the consistency and completeness of sequence annotation, we prioritized for further research the gene for a 184-amino-acid-long USP that is present in the genomes of the three human-infecting Schistosoma spp. Calcium, zinc, and magnesium ions were predicted to interact with the protein product of the gene.Conclusion: Given that the initial effects of

  17. Schistosoma Infection and Schistosoma-Derived Products Modulate the Immune Responses Associated with Protection against Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lian Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on parasite-induced immunoregulatory mechanisms could contribute to the development of new therapies for inflammatory diseases such as type 2 diabetes (T2D, which is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by persistent elevated glucose levels due to insulin resistance. The association between previous Schistosoma infection and T2D has been confirmed—Schistosoma infection and Schistosoma-derived products modulate the immune system, including innate and acquired immune responses, contributing to T2D disease control. Schistosoma infections and Schistosoma-derived molecules affect the immune cell composition in adipose tissue, dampening inflammation and improving glucose tolerance. This protective role includes the polarization of immune cells to alternatively activated macrophages, dendritic cells, eosinophils, and group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Furthermore, Schistosoma infection and Schistosoma products are effective for the treatment of T2D, as they increase the number of type 2 helper T cells (Th2 and regulatory T cells (Tregs and decrease type 1 helper T cells (Th1 and type 17 helper T cells (Th17 cells. Thus, our aim was to comprehensively review the mechanism through which Schistosoma infection and Schistosoma products modulate the immune response against T2D.

  18. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious blood-borne human parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Matthews, James Lester

    1995-05-01

    Blood-borne viruses and protozoan parasites that are infectious to humans pose risk world-wide of infection transmission through blood and blood product transfusion. Blood-borne infectious viruses include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-I), which causes AIDS; hepatitis C virus, which can cause chronic hepatitis; and cytomegalovirus, which can be dangerous to immunocompromised patients, e.g., the newborn, transplant recipients, and AIDS patients. Infectious blood-borne protozoan parasites include Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas' disease, endemic throughout Central and South America; the Trypanosoma species causing African sleeping sickness endemic in Central Africa; and Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malignant and increasingly drug- resistant human malaria prevalent throughout the tropics. Some researchers have focused on using photosensitizers to inactivate HIV-I and other viruses in whole blood, packed red cells, and platelet concentrates without compromising blood product function. Our group previously has reported photosensitized in vitro inactivation of P. falciparum and the mouse malaria organism Plasmodium berghei in whole blood using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and of T. cruzi using benzoporphyrin derivatives BPDMA and BPDDA, dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE), and hydroxyethylvinyldeuteroporphyrin (HEVD). These results suggest that continued investigation is warranted to evaluate the potential for photosensitized inactivation of blood-borne parasites in blood banking.

  19. Quality control of the slides by Kato-Katz method for the parasitological diagnosis of schistosomiasis infection by Schistosoma mansoni

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, Constança S.; Gomes, Elainne Christine S.; Marcelino, Jeann Marie R.; Cavalcante, Karina R. L. J.; Nascimento, Wheverton Ricardo C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Kato-Katz is a laboratory method recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Health (BMH) and the World Health Organization (WHO) as the gold standard for the diagnosis of human infection by Schistosoma mansoni. The method has great clinical and epidemiological relevance because it allows the parasite load quantification of the infected patient by calculating the number of eggs per gram (EPG) of feces. This classification may also be used to estimate the intensity of infe...

  20. HUMAN PARASITE SURVEY ON NASI AND BERAS ISLANDS ACEH PROVINCE, SUMATRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Stafford

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Survey parasit usus dan darah manusia terhadap penduduk pulau-pulau Nasi/Beras Propinsi Aceh, Sumatra, telah diadakan dihulan Januari, 1975. Sebanyak 83 pulasan darah dari 67 pria dan 16 wanita, serta 87 contoh tinja diperoleh dari 52 pria dan 35 wanita. Brugia malayi microfilaria ditemukan dalam 3 atau 3 persen dari darah yang diperiksa dan juga parasitemia yang disebabkan oleh Plasmodium malariae 1 atau 1 persen dan P. falciparum 2 atau 2 persen. Trichuris trichiura (86 persen , merupakan parasit usus yang paling banyak ditemukan, diikuti oleh cacing tambang (77 persen, Ascaris lumbricoides (60 persen, Entamoeba histolyrica (11 per sen, H. coli (10 persen . Endolimax nana hanya 5 atau 6 persen dan Iodamoeba butschlii dan Giardia lamblia, masing-masing 3 persen. Tidak ada ditemukan Schistosoma japonicum atau pun ova cestoda diantara penduduk yang diperiksa.

  1. Identification of the Boudicca and Sinbad retrotransposons in the genome of the human blood fluke Schistosoma haematobium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia S Copeland

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes have a comparatively large genome, estimated for Schistosoma mansoni to be about 270 megabase pairs (haploid genome. Recent findings have shown that mobile genetic elements constitute significant proportions of the genomes of S. mansoni and S. japonicum. Much less information is available on the genome of the third major human schistosome, S. haematobium. In order to investigate the possible evolutionary origins of the S. mansoni long terminal repeat retrotransposons Boudicca and Sinbad, several genomes were searched by Southern blot for the presence of these retrotransposons. These included three species of schistosomes, S. mansoni, S. japonicum, and S. haematobium, and three related platyhelminth genomes, the liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fascioloides magna and the planarian, Dugesia dorotocephala. In addition, Homo sapiens and three snail host genomes, Biomphalaria glabrata, Oncomelania hupensis, and Bulinus truncatus, were examined for possible indications of a horizontal origin for these retrotransposons. Southern hybridization analysis indicated that both Boudicca and Sinbad were present in the genome of S. haematobium. Furthermore, low stringency Southern hybridization analyses suggested that a Boudicca-like retrotransposon was present in the genome of B. truncatus, the snail host of S. haematobium.

  2. Parasites Cryptosporidium parvum, Leishmania, Plasmodium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Parasites Cryptosporidium parvum, Leishmania, Plasmodium falciparum (malaria), Schistosoma. Cancer-associated antigens Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), melanoma-associated antigen, the MHC molecule HLA-B7.

  3. Food-borne human parasitic pathogens associated with household cockroaches and houseflies in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyetunde T. Oyeyemi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cockroaches and houseflies pose significant public health threat owning to their ability to mechanically transmit human intestinal parasites and other disease-causing microorganisms. This study aims at assessing the vectoral capacity of cockroaches and houseflies in the transmission of human intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasite external surface contamination of 130 cockroaches and 150 houseflies caught within dwelling places in Ilishan-Remo town, Ogun State, Nigeria was determined. Cockroaches (six parasite species were more contaminated than houseflies (four parasite species. The most prevalent parasites were Trichuris trichiura (74.0% and hookworm (63.0% in houseflies and cockroaches respectively. There were significant differences in the prevalence of hookworm, T. trichiura and Taenia spp. isolated from cockroaches and houseflies (P < 0.05. There is high contamination of human intestinal parasites in cockroaches and houseflies in human dwelling places in the study area, thus they have the ability to transmit these parasites to unkempt food materials.

  4. Mitochondrial gene order change in Schistosoma (Platyhelminthes: Digenea: Schistosomatidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Bonnie L; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    In the flatworm genus Schistosoma, species of which include parasites of biomedical and veterinary importance, mitochondrial gene order is radically different in some species. A PCR-based survey of 19 schistosomatid spp. established which of 14 Schistosoma spp. have the ancestral (plesiomorphic) or derived gene order condition. A phylogeny for Schistosoma was estimated and used to infer the origin of the gene order change which is present in all members of a clade containing Schistosoma incognitum and members of the traditionally recognised Schistosoma indicum, Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosomahaematobium spp. groups. Schistosoma turkestanicum, with the plesiomorphic gene order state, is sister to this clade. Common interval analysis suggests change in gene order, from ancestral to derived, consisted of two sequential transposition events: (a) nad1_nad3 to nad3_nad1 and (b) [atp6,nad2]_[nad3,-nad1,cox1,rrnL,rrnS,cox2,nad6] to [nad3,nad1,cox1,rrnL,rrnS,cox2,nad6]_[atp6,nad2], where gene order offragments within square brackets remain unchanged. Gene order change is rare in parasitic flatworms and is a robust synapomorphy for schistosome spp. that exhibit it. The schistosomatid phylogeny casts some doubt on the origin of Schistosoma (Asian or African), highlights the propensity for species to hosts witch amongst mammalian (definitive) hosts, and indicates the likely importance of snail (intermediate)hosts in determining and defining patterns of schistosome radiation and continental invasion. Mitogenomic sampling of Schistosoma dattai and Schistosoma harinasutai to determine gene order, and within key species, especially S. turkestanicum and S. incognitum, to determine ancestral ranges, may help discover the geographic origins of gene order change in the genus. Samples of S. incognitum from India and Thailand suggest this taxon may include cryptic species. Crown Copyright 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Allrights

  5. Parasitic lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vannan Kandi

    2009-05-01

    Global climate change and population explosion leading to changes in natural ecosystem and travel across the continents have resulted in an increase in the transmission of parasites to human beings. This review focuses on recent advancements in parasitic lung infections. Invasive parasitic diseases including lung infections are increasingly being reported in patients with immunodeficiency syndromes. A recombinant kinesin-related antigen of Leishmania donovani has been validated with ELISA using urine samples for the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. Pyruvate kinase deficiency has been shown to provide protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection. Intravenous artesunate is an alternative drug for the treatment of severe malaria. The best way to protect from malaria is the use of long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets. Biennial treatment with praziquantel has been found to be cost-effective treatment for control of infection with Schistosoma haematobium. Pulmonary paragonimiasis can be diagnosed by fine needle aspiration biopsy of pulmonary nodules. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection can mimic accelerated idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Migratory nodular shadows with halos are important chest computed tomographic findings in human toxocariasis. Patients with immunodeficiency syndromes (HIV infection, organ transplantation and immunosuppressive drugs, including corticosteroids) should be evaluated for early detection of parasitic lung infections.

  6. Genome sequence of the stramenopile Blastocystis, a human anaerobic parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Blastocystis is a highly prevalent anaerobic eukaryotic parasite of humans and animals that is associated with various gastrointestinal and extraintestinal disorders. Epidemiological studies have identified different subtypes but no one subtype has been definitively correlated with disease. Results Here we report the 18.8 Mb genome sequence of a Blastocystis subtype 7 isolate, which is the smallest stramenopile genome sequenced to date. The genome is highly compact and contains intriguing rearrangements. Comparisons with other available stramenopile genomes (plant pathogenic oomycete and diatom genomes) revealed effector proteins potentially involved in the adaptation to the intestinal environment, which were likely acquired via horizontal gene transfer. Moreover, Blastocystis living in anaerobic conditions harbors mitochondria-like organelles. An incomplete oxidative phosphorylation chain, a partial Krebs cycle, amino acid and fatty acid metabolisms and an iron-sulfur cluster assembly are all predicted to occur in these organelles. Predicted secretory proteins possess putative activities that may alter host physiology, such as proteases, protease-inhibitors, immunophilins and glycosyltransferases. This parasite also possesses the enzymatic machinery to tolerate oxidative bursts resulting from its own metabolism or induced by the host immune system. Conclusions This study provides insights into the genome architecture of this unusual stramenopile. It also proposes candidate genes with which to study the physiopathology of this parasite and thus may lead to further investigations into Blastocystis-host interactions. PMID:21439036

  7. Molecular identification of Schistosoma mattheei from feces of Kinda (Papio cynocephalus kindae) and grayfoot baboons (Papio ursinus griseipes) in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyher, Anna H; Phillips-Conroy, Jane E; Fischer, Kerstin; Weil, Gary J; Chansa, Wilbroad; Fischer, Peter U

    2010-02-01

    Terminal-spined Schistosoma sp. eggs were detected in several groups of baboons living in Kafue National Park in central Zambia. A total of 166 fecal samples was screened; egg prevalence overall ranged between 7% and 10%, while infection intensities were low. Formalin-fixed eggs had an average length of 144.5 microm and a breadth of 48.3 microm, but the schistosome species could not be unambiguously identified by size or morphology. We used molecular methods to definitively identify the parasite species. Parasite DNA was amplified from stools by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sequence analysis of fragments of the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1), mitochondrial 12S rDNA, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (nad6), and cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) from 3 egg-positive samples revealed the presence of S. mattheei in these samples. This is the first molecular identification of S. mattheei from free-ranging baboons. Schistosoma mattheei is typically a parasite of bovids, but it can also infect humans. Schistosoma mattheei in baboons in Zambia may affect other wildlife species and humans that live in close proximity to baboons.

  8. Phenotypic differences in Schistosoma mattheei ova from populations sympatric and allopatric to S. haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, F J; Schutte, C H; Visser, P S; Evans, A C

    1986-06-01

    Schistosoma mattheei ova were collected from cattle in different localities in South Africa and after hatching, miracidia were used to infest Bulinus (Physopsis) globosus. Cercariae harvested from these snails were used to infest the definitive host Praomys (Mastomys) coucha and eggs from the resulting female S. mattheei were collected. These ova were compared with a Schistosoma haematobium X S. mattheei hybrid similarly collected from an infested P. (M.) coucha. The results indicate that S. mattheei populations which are sympatric to S. haematobium possess S. haematobium characteristics. It is suggested that the gene pools of populations of the parasite in these areas are infiltrated with S. haematobium genes via the S. mattheei X S. haematobium hybrid originating from human hosts.

  9. Migration and survival of gamma-irradiated Schistosoma mansoni larvae and the duration of host-parasite contact in relation to the induction of resistance in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangold, B.L.; Dean, D.A. (Naval Medical Research Inst., Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1984-04-01

    The migration in mice of 20, 50 and 90 krad /sup 60/Co-irradiated Schistosoma mansoni larvae, labelled with /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine, was evaluated by autoradiography. The migration of 20 krad-irradiated schistosomula between skin and lungs was slightly delayed at first but by day 8 over 90% of both non-irradiated organisms were located in the lungs. Only a small proportion of 20 krad organisms migrated to the liver. The delay in migration between skin and lungs was more pronounced with 50 krad-irradiated schistosomula. Nevertheless, 45-93% of 50 krad-irradiated organisms migrated to the lungs by 8 days post-exposure. Over 90% of the 50 krad larvae detected on day 21 were in the lungs. In three experiments, over 85% of the 90 krad-irradiated organisms were retained in the skin; in a fourth experiment about half of the 90 krad-irradiated organisms migrated as far as the lungs. Only occasional 50 krad and 90 krad organisms were ever detected in the liver. Mice had to be in contact with the irradiated larvae for a minimum of 8-11 days to stimulate a level of resistance comparable to that of mice whose immunization site was not removed.

  10. Degradation of extracellular matrix by larvae of Schistosoma mansoni. I. Degradation by cercariae as a model for initial parasite invasion of host

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKerrow, J.H.; Keene, W.E.; Jeong, K.H.; Werb, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni to degrade a model extracellular connective tissue matrix produced by rat vascular smooth muscle cells in culture was investigated. In this model, connective tissue macromolecules are present in the interactive framework that characterizes their structure in vivo. Cercariae were stimulated to degrade the matrix by skin lipid or linoleic acid. At the maximally stimulating concentration of linoleic acid (25 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/), 68% of the total matrix was degraded, including 57% of the glycoprotein, 79% of the elastin, and 8% of the collagen. Degradation of matrix was inhibited by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor and soybean trypsin inhibitor. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid inhibited degradation by unstimulated but not linoleic acid-stimulated cercariae. Preacetabular gland secretions collected from cercariae also degraded the matrix with an activity 86% of that of live cercariae. Preacetabular gland proteolytic activity was also inhibited by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The similar characteristics of matrix degradation by both live cercariae and cercarial preacetabular gland secretions support the idea that a proteinase secreted from cercarial preacetabular glands facilitates invasion of skin and connective tissue by these larvae. Degradation of elastin and glycoprotein constituentes of extracellular matrix is probably essential for skin penetration.

  11. A Genome Wide Comparison to Identify Markers to Differentiate the Sex of Larval Stages of Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma bovis and their Respective Hybrids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kincaid-Smith, Julien; Boissier, Jérôme; Allienne, Jean-François; Oleaga, Ana; Djuikwo-Teukeng, Félicité; Toulza, Eve

    2016-01-01

    ..., particularly when no sexual dimorphism is visible or cannot be directly observed. In metazoan parasites of the genus Schistosoma responsible for schistosomiasis, sex is genetically determined in the zygote with a female heterogametic ZW/ZZ system...

  12. An in-depth analysis of a piece of shit: distribution of Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm eggs in human stool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie J Krauth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An accurate diagnosis of helminth infection is important to improve patient management. However, there is considerable intra- and inter-specimen variation of helminth egg counts in human feces. Homogenization of stool samples has been suggested to improve diagnostic accuracy, but there are no detailed investigations. Rapid disintegration of hookworm eggs constitutes another problem in epidemiological surveys. We studied the spatial distribution of Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm eggs in stool samples, the effect of homogenization, and determined egg counts over time in stool samples stored under different conditions. METHODOLOGY: Whole-stool samples were collected from 222 individuals in a rural part of south Côte d'Ivoire. Samples were cut into four pieces and helminth egg locations from the front to the back and from the center to the surface were analyzed. Some samples were homogenized and fecal egg counts (FECs compared before and after homogenization. The effect of stool storing methods on FECs was investigated over time, comparing stool storage on ice, covering stool samples with a water-soaked tissue, or keeping stool samples in the shade. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found no clear spatial pattern of S. mansoni and hookworm eggs in fecal samples. Homogenization decreased S. mansoni FECs (p = 0.026, while no effect was observed for hookworm and other soil-transmitted helminths. Hookworm FECs decreased over time. Storing stool samples on ice or covered with a moist tissue slowed down hookworm egg decay (p<0.005. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings have important implications for helminth diagnosis at the individual patient level and for epidemiological surveys, anthelmintic drug efficacy studies and monitoring of control programs. Specifically, homogenization of fecal samples is recommended for an accurate detection of S. mansoni eggs, while keeping collected stool samples cool and moist delayed the disintegration of

  13. A Review of Schistosomiasis in Indonesia with Reference to Schistosoma Japonicum

    OpenAIRE

    Liat, Lim Boo; M. Sudomo

    1987-01-01

    Tinjauan tentang Schistosoma di Indonesia ini mencakup Schistosoma japonicum, S. incognitum, S. spindale dan Trichohilharzia brevis. Tinjauan dibuat atas dasar laporan-laporan penelitian yang telah diterbitkan. Di dalamnya dapat dijumpai uraian singkat tentang S. spinale dan T. brevis. Dari banyak publikasi tentang S. japonicum dan S. incoganitum dapat disajikan uraian tentang peranan kedua parasit tersebut sebagai penyebab penyakit baik manusia maupun hewan.

  14. A REVIEW OF SCHISTOSOMIASIS IN INDONESIA WITH REFERENCE TO SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM

    OpenAIRE

    Lim Boo Liat; M. Sudomo

    2012-01-01

    Tinjauan tentang Schistosoma di Indonesia ini mencakup Schistosoma japonicum, S. incognitum, S. spindale dan Trichohilharzia brevis. Tinjauan dibuat atas dasar laporan-laporan penelitian yang telah diterbitkan. Di dalamnya dapat dijumpai uraian singkat tentang S. spinale dan T. brevis. Dari banyak publikasi tentang S. japonicum dan S. incoganitum dapat disajikan uraian tentang peranan kedua parasit tersebut sebagai penyebab penyakit baik manusia maupun hewan.

  15. Schistosoma mansoni tegument protein Sm29 is able to induce a Th1-type of immune response and protection against parasite infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C Cardoso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis continues to be a significant public health problem. This disease affects 200 million people worldwide and almost 800 million people are at risk of acquiring the infection. Although vaccine development against this disease has experienced more failures than successes, encouraging results have recently been obtained using membrane-spanning protein antigens from the tegument of Schistosoma mansoni. Our group recently identified Sm29, another antigen that is present at the adult worm tegument surface. In this study, we investigated murine cellular immune responses to recombinant (r Sm29 and tested this protein as a vaccine candidate. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We first show that Sm29 is located on the surface of adult worms and lung-stage schistosomula through confocal microscopy. Next, immunization of mice with rSm29 engendered 51%, 60% and 50% reduction in adult worm burdens, in intestinal eggs and in liver granuloma counts, respectively (p<0.05. Protective immunity in mice was associated with high titers of specific anti-Sm29 IgG1 and IgG2a and elevated production of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-12, a typical Th1 response. Gene expression analysis of worms recovered from rSm29 vaccinated mice relative to worms from control mice revealed a significant (q<0.01 down-regulation of 495 genes and up-regulation of only 22 genes. Among down-regulated genes, many of them encode surface antigens and proteins associated with immune signals, suggesting that under immune attack schistosomes reduce the expression of critical surface proteins. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that Sm29 surface protein is a new vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis and suggests that Sm29 vaccination associated with other protective critical surface antigens is the next logical strategy for improving protection.

  16. Baboons as potential reservoirs of zoonotic gastrointestinal parasite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    , Strongyloides stercoralis, Fasciola sp, Schistosoma mansoni, Hymenolepis nana, and Trichostrongylus sp, and cysts of protozoan parasites Entomoeba histolytica, E. coli, and Iodamoeba butschii. Conclusion: Most of the parasites identified ...

  17. Evolutionary and biomedical implications of a Schistosoma japonicum complementary DNA resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Yan, Qing; Shen, Da-Kang; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Song, Huai-Dong; Xu, Xiang-Ru; Wang, Zhao-Jun; Rong, Yi-Ping; Zeng, Ling-Chun; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Ju-Jun; Xu, Xue-Nian; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Fu, Gang; Zhang, Xiang-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Qin; Brindley, Paul J; McManus, Donald P; Xue, Chun-Liang; Feng, Zheng; Chen, Zhu; Han, Ze-Guang

    2003-10-01

    Schistosoma japonicum causes schistosomiasis in humans and livestock in the Asia-Pacific region. Knowledge of the genome of this parasite should improve understanding of schistosome-host interactions, biomedical aspects of schistosomiasis and invertebrate evolution. We assigned 43,707 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from adult S. japonicum and their eggs to 13,131 gene clusters. Of these, 35% shared no similarity with known genes and 75% had not been reported previously in schistosomes. Notably, S. japonicum encoded mammalian-like receptors for insulin, progesterone, cytokines and neuropeptides, suggesting that host hormones, or endogenous parasite homologs, could orchestrate schistosome development and maturation and that schistosomes modulate anti-parasite immune responses through inhibitors, molecular mimicry and other evasion strategies.

  18. How does human-induced environmental change influence host-parasite interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budria, Alexandre; Candolin, Ulrika

    2014-04-01

    Host-parasite interactions are an integral part of ecosystems that influence both ecological and evolutionary processes. Humans are currently altering environments the world over, often with drastic consequences for host-parasite interactions and the prevalence of parasites. The mechanisms behind the changes are, however, poorly known. Here, we explain how host-parasite interactions depend on two crucial steps--encounter rate and host-parasite compatibility--and how human activities are altering them and thereby host-parasite interactions. By drawing on examples from the literature, we show that changes in the two steps depend on the influence of human activities on a range of factors, such as the density and diversity of hosts and parasites, the search strategy of the parasite, and the avoidance strategy of the host. Thus, to unravel the mechanisms behind human-induced changes in host-parasite interactions, we have to consider the characteristics of all three parts of the interaction: the host, the parasite and the environment. More attention should now be directed to unfold these mechanisms, focusing on effects of environmental change on the factors that determine encounter rate and compatibility. We end with identifying several areas in urgent need of more investigations.

  19. Further evaluation of an updated PCR assay for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni DNA in human stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Luciana I; Marques, Letícia H S; Enk, Martin J; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Z; Rabello, Ana

    2009-12-01

    A previously reported sensitive PCR assay for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni DNA was updated and evaluated. Changes in the DNA extraction method, including the use of a worldwide available commercial kit and the inclusion of additional quality control measures, increased the robustness of the test, as confirmed by the analysis of 67 faecal samples from an endemic area in Brazil. The PCR assay is at hand as a proven, reliable diagnostic test for the control of schistosomiasis in specific settings.

  20. A survey of intestinal parasites including associated risk factors in humans in Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Nidia R; Ríos, Nivia; Mena, Alberto; Fernández, Rigoberto; Perea, Milixa; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Santa-Quiteria, José A Ruiz; Hernández-Gonzalez, Ana; Siles-Lucas, Mar

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common infections worldwide, leading to illness with serious and long lasting implications in children and immunocompromised people. Transmission of intestinal parasites is more frequent in tropical and sub-tropical areas where sanitation is poor and socioeconomic conditions are deficient. Panama is a country where climate and social conditions could be reflected in a high number of people infected with intestinal parasites. The presence, prevalence, and distribution of intestinal parasites in this country have been approached to date only in very restricted areas and population groups, but the impact of intestinal parasite infections at the national level is unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey between 2008 and 2010 to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites across Panama. Overall, 14 municipalities in seven provinces of Panama were surveyed. The presence of eggs, cysts, and larvae was assessed by microscopy in 1123 human fecal samples using a concentration technique. A questionnaire to identify risk factors associated with the frequency of intestinal parasites in the study population was also prepared and performed. Overall, 47.4% of human samples presented parasites. Variables including community type, age group, occupation, co-presence of commensals and socioeconomic factors (use of shoes and type of sanitation) were significantly associated with intestinal parasites (pPanama, place intestinal parasitism as a major health problem in this country. Specific interventions should be planned for the indigenous population, the group most afflicted by intestinal parasites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of serum levels of IL-9 and IL-17 in human Schistosoma mansoni infection and their relationship with periportal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Ana Virgínia Matos Sá; Lacerda, Glaucia Alyne Nunes de; Figueiredo, Anna Lígia de Castro; Diniz, George Tadeu Nunes; Gomes, Elainne Christine Souza; Domingues, Ana Lúcia Coutinho; Barbosa, Constança Simões; Montengro, Silvia Maria Lucena; Morais, Clarice Neuenschwander Lins de

    2016-12-01

    Serum levels of IL-9 and IL-17 cytokines were evaluated in patients in the acute, chronic phases and clinical forms of human schistosomiasis and in different classifications of periportal fibrosis. No significant differences between the groups of the disease with serum levels of cytokine were found. However, this study discusses the results of some cytokines that have not fully defined roles in the pathology of human schistosomiasis. Furthermore, an examination was made of subjects in the acute phase. This is an important group that is difficult to identify in areas where the disease is endemic. More studies are being undertaken to study the role of IL-9 and IL-17 in human Schistosoma mansoni infection and their relationship with the immunopathogenesis of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Schistosoma mansoni cercariae swim efficiently by exploiting an elastohydrodynamic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Katsikis, Georgios; Bhargava, Arjun; Prakash, Manu

    2017-03-01

    The motility of many parasites is critical for infecting their host, as exemplified in the transmission cycle of the parasite Schistosoma mansoni. In its human infectious stage, submillimetre-scale forms of the parasite known as cercariae swim in freshwater and infect humans by penetrating the skin. This infection causes schistosomiasis, a disease comparable to malaria in global socio-economic impact. Given that cercariae do not feed and hence have a lifetime of around 12 hours, efficient motility is crucial for schistosomiasis transmission. Despite this, a first-principles understanding of how cercariae swim is lacking. Combining biological experiments, a novel theoretical model and its robotic realization, we show that cercariae use their forked tail to swim against gravity using a novel swimming gait, described here as a `T-swimmer gait'. During this gait, cercariae beat their tail periodically while maintaining an increased flexibility near their posterior and anterior ends. This flexibility allows an interaction between fluid drag and bending resistance--an elastohydrodynamic coupling, to naturally break time-reversal symmetry and enable locomotion at small length scales. Finally, we find that cercariae maintain this flexibility at an optimal regime for efficient swimming. We anticipate that our work sets the ground for linking the swimming of cercariae to disease transmission, and could potentially enable explorations of novel strategies for schistosomiasis control and prevention.

  3. Cross-species protection: Schistosoma mansoni Sm-p80 vaccine confers protection against Schistosoma haematobium in hamsters and baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Souvik; Zhang, Weidong; Ahmad, Gul; Torben, Workineh; Alam, Mayeen U; Le, Loc; Damian, Raymond T; Wolf, Roman F; White, Gary L; Carey, David W; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G; Siddiqui, Afzal A

    2014-03-05

    The ability of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen, Sm-p80, to provide cross-species protection against Schistosoma haematobium challenge was evaluated in hamster and baboon models. Pronounced reduction in worm burden (48%) and in tissue egg load (64%) was observed in hamsters vaccinated with recombinant Sm-p80 admixed with glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion (GLA-SE). Similarly, in baboons, the Sm-p80/GLA-SE vaccine produced a 25% reduction in S. haematobium adult worms and decreased the egg load in the urinary bladder by 64%. A 40% and 53% reduction in fecal and urine egg output, respectively, was observed in vaccinated baboons. A balanced pro-inflammatory (Th17 and Th1) and Th2 type of response was generated after vaccination and appears indicative of augmented prophylactic efficacy. These data on cross-species protection coupled with the prophylactic, therapeutic and antifecundity efficacy against the homologous parasite, S. mansoni, reinforces Sm-p80 as a promising vaccine candidate. It is currently being prepared for GMP-compliant manufacture and for further pre-clinical development leading to human clinical trials. These results solidify the expectation that the Sm-p80 vaccine will provide relief for both the intestinal and the urinary schistosomiasis and thus will be greatly beneficial in reducing the overall burden of schistosomiasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Intestinal Parasites of the Grasscutter (Thryonomys swinderianus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ., Ascaris sp., Hymenolepis sp. and Schistosoma haematobium, and protozoans such as Giardia sp. and Entamoeba sp. Almost all (95.2%) of the grasscutters were infected with Ancylostoma sp., the most prevalent parasite species in the study ...

  5. Schistosoma mansoni Infection of Mice, Rats and Humans Elicits a Strong Antibody Response to a Limited Number of Reduction-Sensitive Epitopes on Five Major Tegumental Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krautz-Peterson, Greice; Debatis, Michelle; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Oliveira, Sergio C; Da'dara, Akram A; Skelly, Patrick J; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2017-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major disease of the developing world for which no vaccine has been successfully commercialized. While numerous Schistosoma mansoni worm antigens have been identified that elicit antibody responses during natural infections, little is known as to the identities of the schistosome antigens that are most prominently recognized by antibodies generated through natural infection. Non-reducing western blots probed with serum from schistosome-infected mice, rats and humans on total extracts of larval or adult schistosomes revealed that a small number of antigen bands predominate in all cases. Recognition of each of these major bands was lost when the blots were run under reducing condition. We expressed a rationally selected group of schistosome tegumental membrane antigens in insect host cells, and used the membrane extracts of these cells to unambiguously identify the major antigens recognized by S. mansoni infected mouse, rat and human serum. These results revealed that a limited number of dominant, reduction-sensitive conformational epitopes on five major tegumental surface membrane proteins: SmTsp2, Sm23, Sm29, SmLy6B and SmLy6F, are primary targets of mouse, rat and human S. mansoni infection sera antibodies. We conclude that, Schistosoma mansoni infection of both permissive (mouse) and non-permissive (rat) rodent models, as well as humans, elicit a dominant antibody response recognizing a limited number of conformational epitopes on the same five tegumental membrane proteins. Thus it appears that neither infecting schistosomula nor mature adult schistosomes are substantively impacted by the robust circulating anti-tegumental antibody response they elicit to these antigens. Importantly, our data suggest a need to re-evaluate host immune responses to many schistosome antigens and has important implications regarding schistosome immune evasion mechanisms and schistosomiasis vaccine development.

  6. Schistosoma mansoni Infection of Mice, Rats and Humans Elicits a Strong Antibody Response to a Limited Number of Reduction-Sensitive Epitopes on Five Major Tegumental Membrane Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greice Krautz-Peterson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a major disease of the developing world for which no vaccine has been successfully commercialized. While numerous Schistosoma mansoni worm antigens have been identified that elicit antibody responses during natural infections, little is known as to the identities of the schistosome antigens that are most prominently recognized by antibodies generated through natural infection. Non-reducing western blots probed with serum from schistosome-infected mice, rats and humans on total extracts of larval or adult schistosomes revealed that a small number of antigen bands predominate in all cases. Recognition of each of these major bands was lost when the blots were run under reducing condition. We expressed a rationally selected group of schistosome tegumental membrane antigens in insect host cells, and used the membrane extracts of these cells to unambiguously identify the major antigens recognized by S. mansoni infected mouse, rat and human serum. These results revealed that a limited number of dominant, reduction-sensitive conformational epitopes on five major tegumental surface membrane proteins: SmTsp2, Sm23, Sm29, SmLy6B and SmLy6F, are primary targets of mouse, rat and human S. mansoni infection sera antibodies. We conclude that, Schistosoma mansoni infection of both permissive (mouse and non-permissive (rat rodent models, as well as humans, elicit a dominant antibody response recognizing a limited number of conformational epitopes on the same five tegumental membrane proteins. Thus it appears that neither infecting schistosomula nor mature adult schistosomes are substantively impacted by the robust circulating anti-tegumental antibody response they elicit to these antigens. Importantly, our data suggest a need to re-evaluate host immune responses to many schistosome antigens and has important implications regarding schistosome immune evasion mechanisms and schistosomiasis vaccine development.

  7. Study of Human Gastro-Intestinal Parasites Among Primary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four different intestinal parasites were encountered. The respective infection rates of each parasite were; Ascaris lumbricoides (14.9%), Entamoeba histolytica (13.7%), Trichuris trichiura (6.9%) and hookworms (5.4%). Infections cut across the different age groups and sexes. Infection in males (40.6%) was comparable to ...

  8. Host-Parasite Interactions in Human Malaria: Clinical Implications of Basic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Pragyan; Garg, Manika; Kumar, Praveen; Munjal, Akshay; Raja, K D

    2017-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, is one of the oldest parasites documented to infect humans and has proven particularly hard to eradicate. One of the major hurdles in designing an effective subunit vaccine against the malaria parasite is the insufficient understanding of host-parasite interactions within the human host during infections. The success of the parasite lies in its ability to evade the human immune system and recruit host responses as physiological cues to regulate its life cycle, leading to rapid acclimatization of the parasite to its immediate host environment. Hence understanding the environmental niche of the parasite is crucial in developing strategies to combat this deadly infectious disease. It has been increasingly recognized that interactions between parasite proteins and host factors are essential to establishing infection and virulence at every stage of the parasite life cycle. This review reassesses all of these interactions and discusses their clinical importance in designing therapeutic approaches such as design of novel vaccines. The interactions have been followed from the initial stages of introduction of the parasite under the human dermis until asexual and sexual blood stages which are essential for transmission of malaria. We further classify the interactions as "direct" or "indirect" depending upon their demonstrated ability to mediate direct physical interactions of the parasite with host factors or their indirect manipulation of the host immune system since both forms of interactions are known to have a crucial role during infections. We also discuss the many ways in which this understanding has been taken to the field and the success of these strategies in controlling human malaria.

  9. Trace elements in the human scalp hair and finger nails as affected by infection with Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khatib, Ahmed M.; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.; Denton, M.

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of 13 elements has been determined in finger nail and scalp hair of 4 groups representing normal and infected Schistosoma mansoni subjects. Samples were irradiated by thermal neutrons from a Triga Mark III Reactor, for 10 min. Measurements were made using a HPGe detector coupled with ADC and PDP {11}/{34} data processing equipment. The results showed significant increases of Al, Cl, I and Br in both finger nails and scalp hair of bilharzial patients above those of normal subjects while Mg, Ca, V, Mn, Cu, Sr, K, S and Na showed significant decreases. Most of the elements showed a higher concentration in finger nails than in hair.

  10. Trace elements in the human scalp hair and finger nails as affected by infection with Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khatib, A.M. (Alexandria Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Physics); Bahnassy, A.A. (King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Medicine); Denton, M. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of 13 elements has been determined in finger nail and scalp hair of 4 groups representing normal and infected Schistosoma mansoni subjects. Samples were irradiated by thermal neutrons from a Triga Mark III Reactor, for 10 min. Measurements were made using a HPGe detector coupled with ADC and PDP 11/34 data processing equipment. The results showed significant increases of Al, Cl, I and Br in both finger nails and scalp hair of bilharzial patients above those of normal subjects while Mg, Ca, V, Mn, Cu, Sr, K, S and Na showed significant decreases. Most of the elements showed a higher concentration in finger nails than in hair. (author).

  11. Further evaluation of an updated PCR assay for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni DNA in human stool samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana I Gomes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A previously reported sensitive PCR assay for the detection of Schistosoma mansoni DNA was updated and evaluated. Changes in the DNA extraction method, including the use of a worldwide available commercial kit and the inclusion of additional quality control measures, increased the robustness of the test, as confirmed by the analysis of 67 faecal samples from an endemic area in Brazil. The PCR assay is at hand as a proven, reliable diagnostic test for the control of schistosomiasis in specific settings.

  12. Identification of Schistosoma mansoni candidate antigens for diagnosis of schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardenia Braz Figueiredo Carvalho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of a more sensitive diagnostic test for schistosomiasis is needed to overcome the limitations of the use of stool examination in low endemic areas. Using parasite antigens in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay is a promising strategy, however a more rational selection of parasite antigens is necessary. In this study we performed in silico analysis of the Schistosoma mansoni genome, using SchistoDB database and bioinformatic tools for screening immunogenic antigens. Based on evidence of expression in all parasite life stage within the definitive host, extracellular or plasmatic membrane localization, low similarity to human and other helminthic proteins and presence of predicted B cell epitopes, six candidates were selected: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored 200 kDa protein, two putative cytochrome oxidase subunits, two expressed proteins and one hypothetical protein. The recognition in unidimensional and bidimensional Western blot of protein with similar molecular weight and isoelectric point to the selected antigens by sera from S. mansoni infected mice indicate a good correlation between these two approaches in selecting immunogenic proteins.

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Schistosoma japonicum [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum Schistosoma japonicum Platyhelminthes Schistosoma_japonicum_L.png Schistosoma_japon...icum_NL.png Schistosoma_japonicum_S.png Schistosoma_japonicum_NS.png http://bioscience...dbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japon...icum&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japon...icum&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Schistosoma+japonicum&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=132 ...

  14. Mitosis in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Noel; Mahajan, Babita; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites belonging to Plasmodium spp. (phylum Apicomplexa) that produce significant morbidity and mortality, mostly in developing countries. Plasmodium parasites have a complex life cycle that includes multiple stages in anopheline mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. During the life cycle, the parasites undergo several cycles of extreme population growth within a brief span, and this is critical for their continued transmission and a contributing factor for their pathogenesis in the host. As with other eukaryotes, successful mitosis is an essential requirement for Plasmodium reproduction; however, some aspects of Plasmodium mitosis are quite distinct and not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of the architecture and key events of mitosis in Plasmodium falciparum and related parasites and compare them with the traditional mitotic events described for other eukaryotes. PMID:21317311

  15. Human Intestinal Parasite Infections In Ishiagu, A Lead Mining Area ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Abstract. A survey of intestinal parasite infections in a heavy metal (Pb) mining area of Abia State (Ishiagu) was carried out using both direct wet preparation and formal/ether concentration methods.

  16. Anthropogenics: human influence on global and genetic homogenization of parasite populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarlenga, Dante S; Hoberg, Eric; Rosenthal, Benjamin; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Nascetti, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    The distribution, abundance, and diversity of life on Earth have been greatly shaped by human activities. This includes the geographic expansion of parasites; however, measuring the extent to which humans have influenced the dissemination and population structure of parasites has been challenging. In-depth comparisons among parasite populations extending to landscape-level processes affecting disease emergence have remained elusive. New research methods have enhanced our capacity to discern human impact, where the tools of population genetics and molecular epidemiology have begun to shed light on our historical and ongoing influence. Only since the 1990s have parasitologists coupled morphological diagnosis, long considered the basis of surveillance and biodiversity studies, with state-of-the-art tools enabling variation to be examined among, and within, parasite populations. Prior to this time, populations were characterized only by phenotypic attributes such as virulence, infectivity, host range, and geographical location. The advent of genetic/molecular methodologies (multilocus allozyme electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction-DNA [PCR-DNA] fragments analysis, DNA sequencing, DNA microsatellites, single nucleotide polymorphisms, etc.) have transformed our abilities to reveal variation among, and within, populations at local, regional, landscape, and global scales, and thereby enhanced our understanding of the biosphere. Numerous factors can affect population structure among parasites, e.g., evolutionary and ecological history, mode of reproduction and transmission, host dispersal, and life-cycle complexity. Although such influences can vary considerably among parasite taxa, anthropogenic factors are demonstrably perturbing parasite fauna. Minimal genetic structure among many geographically distinct (isolated) populations is a hallmark of human activity, hastened by geographic introductions, environmental perturbation, and global warming. Accelerating

  17. Differentiating Schistosoma haematobium from Schistosoma magrebowiei and other closely related schistosomes by polymerase chain reaction amplification of a species specific mitochondrial gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olaoluwa Akinwale; Tang Hock; Fan Chia-Kwung; Qi Zheng; Shen Haimo; Charles Ezeh; Pam Gyang

    2014-01-01

    .... In many endemic areas, S. haematobium is sympatric with Schistosoma bovis, Schistosoma mattheei, Schistosoma curassoni, Schistosoma intercalatum and Schistosoma magrebowiei, its closely related species...

  18. Homology-based annotation of non-coding RNAs in the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santana Clara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schistosomes are trematode parasites of the phylum Platyhelminthes. They are considered the most important of the human helminth parasites in terms of morbidity and mortality. Draft genome sequences are now available for Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum. Non-coding RNA (ncRNA plays a crucial role in gene expression regulation, cellular function and defense, homeostasis, and pathogenesis. The genome-wide annotation of ncRNAs is a non-trivial task unless well-annotated genomes of closely related species are already available. Results A homology search for structured ncRNA in the genome of S. mansoni resulted in 23 types of ncRNAs with conserved primary and secondary structure. Among these, we identified rRNA, snRNA, SL RNA, SRP, tRNAs and RNase P, and also possibly MRP and 7SK RNAs. In addition, we confirmed five miRNAs that have recently been reported in S. japonicum and found two additional homologs of known miRNAs. The tRNA complement of S. mansoni is comparable to that of the free-living planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, although for some amino acids differences of more than a factor of two are observed: Leu, Ser, and His are overrepresented, while Cys, Meth, and Ile are underrepresented in S. mansoni. On the other hand, the number of tRNAs in the genome of S. japonicum is reduced by more than a factor of four. Both schistosomes have a complete set of minor spliceosomal snRNAs. Several ncRNAs that are expected to exist in the S. mansoni genome were not found, among them the telomerase RNA, vault RNAs, and Y RNAs. Conclusion The ncRNA sequences and structures presented here represent the most complete dataset of ncRNA from any lophotrochozoan reported so far. This data set provides an important reference for further analysis of the genomes of schistosomes and indeed eukaryotic genomes at large.

  19. Evidences of endemic Schistosoma haematobium infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried to determine the presence, level of endemicity and the intensity of human Schistosoma haematobium infection in Shonga community of Edu Local Government Area in Kwara State, Nigeria. For permission and maximum cooperation, intensive advocacy and mobilization of the community leaders, school ...

  20. Dichotomy in the human CD4+ T-cell response to Leishmania parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemp, M; Kurtzhals, J A; Kharazmi, A

    1994-01-01

    Leishmania parasites cause human diseases ranging from self-healing cutaneous ulcers to fatal systemic infections. In addition, many individuals become infected without developing disease. In mice the two subsets of CD4+ T cells, Th1 and Th2, have different effects on the outcome of experimental...... in humans, and that the balance between subsets of parasite-specific T cells may play an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of the infections....

  1. Disentangling hybridization and host colonization in parasitic roundworms of humans and pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Criscione, Charles D.; Anderson, Joel D; Sudimack, Dan; Peng, Weidong; Jha, Bharat; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Anderson, Timothy J. C.

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of cross-transmission and hybridization between parasites of humans and reservoir hosts is critical for understanding the evolution of the parasite and for implementing control programmes. There is now a consensus that populations of pig and human Ascaris (roundworms) show significant genetic subdivision. However, it is unclear whether this has resulted from a single or multiple host shift(s). Furthermore, previous molecular data have not been sufficient to determine whether sympatr...

  2. The vulnerability of animal and human health to parasites under global change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherst, R W

    2001-07-01

    The term 'global change' is used to encompass all of the significant drivers of environmental change as experienced by hosts, parasites and parasite managers. The term includes changes in climate and climate variability, atmospheric composition, land use and land cover including deforestation and urbanisation, bio-geochemistry, globalisation of trade and transport, the spread of alien species, human health and technology. A subset of land use issues relates to the management of protective technologies in relation to residues in food and the environment and the emergence of resistance. Another is the question of changing biodiversity of both parasites and their associated natural enemies, and the effects on the host--parasite relationship and on parasite management. A framework for studying impacts of global change is proposed and illustrated with field data, and CLIMEX and simulation modelling of the cattle tick Boophilus microplus in Australia. Parasitology suffers from the perception that the key impacts of global change will be driven by changes at lower trophic levels, with parasitic interactions being treated as secondary effects. This is incorrect because the environment mediates host-parasite interactions as much as it affects parasites directly. Parasitologists need to strive for holistic solutions to the management of animal and human health, within a wider context of overall management of those systems, if they are to make a meaningful contribution to global efforts aimed at coping with global change.

  3. Chlorophyllin as a possible measure against vectors of human parasites and fish parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rolf Richter

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Water soluble chlorophyll (chlorophyllin exerts pronounced photodynamic activity. Chlorophyllin is a potential remedy against mosquito larvae and aquatic stages in the life cycle of parasites as well as against ectoparasites in fish. In the recent years it was found that mosquito larvae and other pest organisms can be killed by means of photodynamic substances such as different porphyrin derivates (e.g. hematoporphyrin, meso-tri(N-methylpyridyl, meso-mono(N-tetra-decylpyridyl porphyrine, hematoporphyrin IX, or hermatoporphyrin formula (HPF. It was found that incubation of mosquito larvae in chlorophyllin solution and subsequent irradiation results in photodynamic destruction of the larvae. Incorporation of about 8 ng chlorophyllin per larvae was sufficient to induce its death. In fish mass cultivation ichthyophthiriosis is a severe parasitic protozoan disease caused by the ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. It was found that incubation of infected fishes in chlorophyllin and subsequent illumination reduced the number of trophonts significantly (more than 50 %. The fishes were not impaired. Chlorophyllin and other photodynamic substances may become a possible countermeasure against I. multifiliis and other ectoparasites in aquaculture. The effectiveness of chlorophyllin depends on light attenuation in the water body.

  4. Pattern of Cercarial Emergence of Schistosoma curassoni from Niger and Comparison with Three Sympatric Species of Schistosomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    F. Mouchet; A. Théron; P. Brémond; E. Sellin; B. Sellin

    1992-01-01

    The emergence pattern of Schistosoma curassoni cercariae from Bulinus umbilicatus, whose adult worms parasitize bovine, caprine, and ovine ungulates in Niger, is of a circadian type with a mean emission time at 0855 hr...

  5. Investigation of the proteolytic functions of an expanded cercarial elastase gene family in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R Ingram

    Full Text Available Cercarial elastase is the major invasive larval protease in Schistosoma mansoni, a parasitic blood fluke, and is essential for host skin invasion. Genome sequence analysis reveals a greatly expanded family of cercarial elastase gene isoforms in Schistosoma mansoni. This expansion appears to be unique to S. mansoni, and it is unknown whether gene duplication has led to divergent protease function.Profiling of transcript and protein expression patterns reveals that cercarial elastase isoforms are similarly expressed throughout the S. mansoni life cycle. Computational modeling predicts key differences in the substrate-binding pockets of various cercarial elastase isoforms, suggesting a diversification of substrate preferences compared with the ancestral gene of the family. In addition, active site labeling of SmCE reveals that it is activated prior to exit of the parasite from its intermediate snail host.The expansion of the cercarial gene family in S. mansoni is likely to be an example of gene dosage. In addition to its critical role in human skin penetration, data presented here suggests a novel role for the protease in egress from the intermediate snail host. This study demonstrates how enzyme activity-based analysis complements genomic and proteomic studies, and is key in elucidating proteolytic function.

  6. In silico analysis of the fucosylation-associated genome of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni: cloning and characterization of the fucosyltransferase multigene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Nathan A; Anderson, Tavis K; Yoshino, Timothy P

    2013-01-01

    Fucosylated glycans of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni play key roles in its development and immunobiology. In the present study we used a genome-wide homology-based bioinformatics approach to search for genes that contribute to fucosylated glycan expression in S. mansoni, specifically the α2-, α3-, and α6-fucosyltransferases (FucTs), which transfer L-fucose from a GDP-L-fucose donor to an oligosaccharide acceptor. We identified and in silico characterized several novel schistosome FucT homologs, including six α3-FucTs and six α6-FucTs, as well as two protein O-FucTs that catalyze the unrelated transfer of L-fucose to serine and threonine residues of epidermal growth factor- and thrombospondin-type repeats. No α2-FucTs were observed. Primary sequence analyses identified key conserved FucT motifs as well as characteristic transmembrane domains, consistent with their putative roles as fucosyltransferases. Most genes exhibit alternative splicing, with multiple transcript variants generated. A phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that schistosome α3- and α6-FucTs form monophyletic clades within their respective gene families, suggesting multiple gene duplications following the separation of the schistosome lineage from the main evolutionary tree. Quantitative decreases in steady-state transcript levels of some FucTs during early larval development suggest a possible mechanism for differential expression of fucosylated glycans in schistosomes. This study systematically identifies the complete repertoire of FucT homologs in S. mansoni and provides fundamental information regarding their genomic organization, genetic variation, developmental expression, and evolutionary history.

  7. In Silico Analysis of the Fucosylation-Associated Genome of the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni: Cloning and Characterization of the Fucosyltransferase Multigene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Nathan A.; Anderson, Tavis K.; Yoshino, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Fucosylated glycans of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni play key roles in its development and immunobiology. In the present study we used a genome-wide homology-based bioinformatics approach to search for genes that contribute to fucosylated glycan expression in S. mansoni, specifically the α2-, α3-, and α6-fucosyltransferases (FucTs), which transfer L-fucose from a GDP-L-fucose donor to an oligosaccharide acceptor. We identified and in silico characterized several novel schistosome FucT homologs, including six α3-FucTs and six α6-FucTs, as well as two protein O-FucTs that catalyze the unrelated transfer of L-fucose to serine and threonine residues of epidermal growth factor- and thrombospondin-type repeats. No α2-FucTs were observed. Primary sequence analyses identified key conserved FucT motifs as well as characteristic transmembrane domains, consistent with their putative roles as fucosyltransferases. Most genes exhibit alternative splicing, with multiple transcript variants generated. A phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that schistosome α3- and α6-FucTs form monophyletic clades within their respective gene families, suggesting multiple gene duplications following the separation of the schistosome lineage from the main evolutionary tree. Quantitative decreases in steady-state transcript levels of some FucTs during early larval development suggest a possible mechanism for differential expression of fucosylated glycans in schistosomes. This study systematically identifies the complete repertoire of FucT homologs in S. mansoni and provides fundamental information regarding their genomic organization, genetic variation, developmental expression, and evolutionary history. PMID:23696810

  8. Biomphalaria species distribution and its effect on human Schistosoma mansoni infection in an irrigated area used for rice cultivation in northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delmany Moitinho Barboza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of irrigated areas for the spread of schistosomiasis is of worldwide concern. The aim of the present study was to investigate the spatial distribution of the intermediate snail host Biomphalaria in an area highly endemic for schistosomiasis due to Schistosoma mansoni, evaluating the relationship between irrigation and types of natural water sources on one hand, and the influence of place and time of water exposure on the intensity of human infection on the other. A geographical information system (GIS was used to map the distribution of the intermediate snail hosts in Ilha das Flores, Sergipe, Brazil, combined with a clinical/epidemiological survey. We observed a direct correlation between the intensity of human infection with S. mansoni and irrigation projects. Malacological studies to identify snail species and infection rates showed that B. glabrata is the main species responsible for human schistosomiasis in the municipality, but that B. straminea also plays a role. Our results provide evidence for a competitive selection between the two snail species in rice fields with a predominance of B. glabrata in irrigation systems and B. straminea in natural water sources.

  9. Genome sequencing of chimpanzee malaria parasites reveals possible pathways of adaptation to human hosts

    KAUST Repository

    Otto, Thomas D.

    2014-09-09

    Plasmodium falciparum causes most human malaria deaths, having prehistorically evolved from parasites of African Great Apes. Here we explore the genomic basis of P. falciparum adaptation to human hosts by fully sequencing the genome of the closely related chimpanzee parasite species P. reichenowi, and obtaining partial sequence data from a more distantly related chimpanzee parasite (P. gaboni). The close relationship between P. reichenowi and P. falciparum is emphasized by almost complete conservation of genomic synteny, but against this strikingly conserved background we observe major differences at loci involved in erythrocyte invasion. The organization of most virulence-associated multigene families, including the hypervariable var genes, is broadly conserved, but P. falciparum has a smaller subset of rif and stevor genes whose products are expressed on the infected erythrocyte surface. Genome-wide analysis identifies other loci under recent positive selection, but a limited number of changes at the host–parasite interface may have mediated host switching.

  10. The genome of the simian and human malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pain, A; Böhme, U; Berry, A E

    2008-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is an intracellular malaria parasite whose natural vertebrate host is Macaca fascicularis (the 'kra' monkey); however, it is now increasingly recognized as a significant cause of human malaria, particularly in southeast Asia. Plasmodium knowlesi was the first malaria parasite...... species in which antigenic variation was demonstrated, and it has a close phylogenetic relationship to Plasmodium vivax, the second most important species of human malaria parasite (reviewed in ref. 4). Despite their relatedness, there are important phenotypic differences between them, such as host blood...... cell preference, absence of a dormant liver stage or 'hypnozoite' in P. knowlesi, and length of the asexual cycle (reviewed in ref. 4). Here we present an analysis of the P. knowlesi (H strain, Pk1(A+) clone) nuclear genome sequence. This is the first monkey malaria parasite genome to be described...

  11. Human Intestinal Parasite Burden and Poor Sanitation in Rural Alabama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Megan L; McAtee, Shannon; Bryan, Patricia E; Jeun, Rebecca; Ward, Tabitha; Kraus, Jacob; Bottazzi, Maria E; Hotez, Peter J; Flowers, Catherine C; Mejia, Rojelio

    2017-11-01

    Hookworm infection affects 430 million people worldwide, causing iron deficiency, impaired cognitive development, and stunting in children. Because of the environmental conditions needed for the hookworm life-cycle, this parasite is endemic to resource-limited countries. Necator americanus was endemic in the southern United States before improvement of sewage disposal systems and eradication programs. With continued poverty, poor sanitation, and an environment suitable for the hookworm life-cycle in some regions of the southern United States, a current prevalence study using modern molecular diagnostics is warranted. Lowndes County, Alabama, was chosen as the study site given previous high hookworm burdens, degree of poverty, and use of open-sewage systems. Participants were interviewed, and stool, serum, and soil samples were tested for nine intestinal parasites using a multiparallel quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We found that, among 24 households, 42.4% reported exposure to raw sewage within their home, and from 55 stool samples, 19 (34.5%) tested positive for N. americanus, four (7.3%) for Strongyloides stercoralis, and one (1.8%) for Entamoeba histolytica. Stool tested positive for N. americanus contained low levels of parasite DNA (geometric mean 0.0302 fg/μL). Soil studies detected one (2.9%) Cryptosporidium species, and Toxocara serology assay detected one (5.2%) positive in this population. Individuals living in this high-risk environment within the United States continue to have stool samples positive for N. americanus. Gastrointestinal parasites known to be endemic to developing countries are identifiable in American poverty regions, and areas with lower disease burden are more likely to be identified by using qPCR.

  12. Can the common brain parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, influence human culture?

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin D Lafferty

    2006-01-01

    The latent prevalence of a long-lived and common brain parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, explains a statistically significant portion of the variance in aggregate neuroticism among populations, as well as in the ‘neurotic’ cultural dimensions of sex roles and uncertainty avoidance. Spurious or non-causal correlations between aggregate personality and aspects of climate and culture that influence T. gondii transmission could also drive these patterns. A link between culture and T. gondii hypothetic...

  13. Human intestinal parasites in non-biting synanthropic flies in Ogun State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenusi, Adedotun Adesegun; Adewoga, Thomas O Sunday

    2013-01-01

    Filth-feeding and breeding, non-biting synanthropic flies have been incriminated in the dissemination of human enteropathogens in the environment. This study determined the species of non-biting synanthropic flies associated with four filthy sites in Ilishan, Ogun State, southwest Nigeria, and assessed their potentials for mechanical transmission of human intestinal parasites. 7190 flies identified as Musca domestica (33.94%), Chrysomya megacephala (26.01%), Musca sorbens (23.23%), Lucilia cuprina (8.76%), Calliphora vicina (4.59%), Sarcophaga sp. (2.78%) and Fannia scalaris (0.70%) were examined for human intestinal parasites by the formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Eggs of the following parasites: Ascaris lumbricoides (34.08%), Trichuris trichiura (25.87%), hookworms (20.45%), Taenia sp. (2.36%), Hymenolepis nana (1.11%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.56%), Strongyloides stercoralis (larvae; 3.89%) and cysts of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (27.26%), Entamoeba coli (22.67%), Giardia lamblia (3.34%) and Cryptosporidium sp. (1.81%) were isolated from the body surfaces and or gut contents of 75.24% of 719 pooled fly batches. The helminths A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura and the protozoans, E. histolytica/dispar and E. coli were the dominant parasites detected, both on body surfaces and in the gut contents of flies. C. megacephala was the highest carrier of parasites (diversity and number). More parasites were isolated from the gut than from body surfaces (P < 0.05). Flies from soiled ground often carried more parasites than those from abattoir, garbage or open-air market. Synanthropic fly species identified in this study can be of potential epidemiological importance as mechanical transmitters of human intestinal parasites acquired naturally from filth and carried on their body surfaces and or in the gut, because of their vagility and feeding mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modelling control of Schistosoma haematobium infection: predictions of the long-term impact of mass drug administration in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurarie, David; Yoon, Nara; Li, Emily; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial; Durham, David; Phillips, Anna E; Aurelio, H Osvaldo; Ferro, Josefo; Galvani, Alison P; King, Charles H

    2015-10-22

    Effective control of schistosomiasis remains a challenging problem for endemic areas of the world. Given knowledge of the biology of transmission and past experience with mass drug administration (MDA) programs, it is important to critically evaluate the likelihood that MDA programs will achieve substantial reductions in Schistosoma prevalence. In implementing the World Health Organization Roadmap for Neglected Tropical Diseases it would useful for policymaking to model projections of the status of Schistosoma control in MDA-treated areas in the next 5-10 years. Calibrated mathematical models were used to project the effects of different frequency and coverage of MDA for schistosomiasis haematobia control in present-day endemic communities, taking into account uncertainties of parasite biology and input data. The modeling approach in this analysis was the Stratified Worm Burden model developed in our earlier works, calibrated using data from longitudinal S. haematobium control trials in Kenya. Model-based simulations of MDA control in typical low-risk and higher-risk communities indicated that infection prevalence can be substantially reduced within 10 years only when there is a high degree of community participation (>70 %) with at least annual MDA. Significant risk for re-emergence of infection remains if MDA is suspended. In a stable (stationary) ecosystem, Schistosoma reproduction and transmission are sufficiently robust that the process of human infection continues, even under pressure from aggressive MDA. MDA alone is unlikely to interrupt transmission, and once mass treatment is suspended, the prevalence of human infection is likely to rebound to pre-control levels over a period of 25-30 years. MDA success in achieving very low levels of infection prevalence is highly dependent on treatment coverage and frequency within the local human population, and requires that both adults and children be included in drug delivery coverage. Ultimately, supplemental

  15. Schistosoma bovis as an immunological analogue of S. haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, A M; Murare, H M; Lucas, S B; Doenhoff, M J

    1989-07-01

    The host-parasite relationships of Schistosoma bovis and S. haematobium have been compared in normal and T-cell-deprived mice, and have been found to contrast with that of S. mansoni. Deprived mice infected with either of the former two schistosome species survived as long as, or longer than, comparably infected immunologically intact controls, and hepatocytes of infected deprived mice were not damaged in the absence of granuloma formation. S. mansoni-infected deprived mice, however, die earlier than intact controls, and suffer extensive hepatocellular abnormalities. A high degree of cross-reactivity between S. bovis, S. haematobium and S. mansoni antibodies and antigens was noted in immunoprecipitation but a greater degree of homology between S. haematobium and S. bovis egg antigens was demonstrated by enzyme immunoassay (ELISA). S. haematobium and S. bovis thus resemble each other more closely than either resembles S. mansoni, and in view of the apparent antigenic similarities between S. haematobium and S. bovis and the relatively greater ease with which the S. bovis life-cycle can be maintained in the laboratory, the animal parasite may be useful in providing material for further immunological studies of the human infection.

  16. A REVIEW OF SCHISTOSOMIASIS IN INDONESIA WITH REFERENCE TO SCHISTOSOMA JAPONICUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Boo Liat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinjauan tentang Schistosoma di Indonesia ini mencakup Schistosoma japonicum, S. incognitum, S. spindale dan Trichohilharzia brevis. Tinjauan dibuat atas dasar laporan-laporan penelitian yang telah diterbitkan. Di dalamnya dapat dijumpai uraian singkat tentang S. spinale dan T. brevis. Dari banyak publikasi tentang S. japonicum dan S. incoganitum dapat disajikan uraian tentang peranan kedua parasit tersebut sebagai penyebab penyakit baik manusia maupun hewan.

  17. Normocyte-binding protein required for human erythrocyte invasion by the zoonotic malaria parasitePlasmodium knowlesi

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Robert W.

    2016-06-15

    The dominant cause of malaria in Malaysia is now Plasmodium knowlesi, a zoonotic parasite of cynomolgus macaque monkeys found throughout South East Asia. Comparative genomic analysis of parasites adapted to in vitro growth in either cynomolgus or human RBCs identified a genomic deletion that includes the gene encoding normocyte-binding protein Xa (NBPXa) in parasites growing in cynomolgus RBCs but not in human RBCs. Experimental deletion of the NBPXa gene in parasites adapted to growth in human RBCs (which retain the ability to grow in cynomolgus RBCs) restricted them to cynomolgus RBCs, demonstrating that this gene is selectively required for parasite multiplication and growth in human RBCs. NBPXa-null parasites could bind to human RBCs, but invasion of these cells was severely impaired. Therefore, NBPXa is identified as a key mediator of P. knowlesi human infection and may be a target for vaccine development against this emerging pathogen.

  18. Human intestinal parasites in the past: new findings and a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Luiz Carvalho Gonçalves

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all known human specific parasites have been found in ancient feces. A review of the paleoparasitological helminth and intestinal protozoa findings available in the literature is presented. We also report the new paleoparasitologic findings from the examination performed in samples collected in New and Old World archaeological sites. New finds of ancylostomid, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichostrongylus spp., Diphyllobothrium latum, Hymenolepis nana and Acantocephalan eggs are reported. According to the findings, it is probable that A. lumbricoides was originally a human parasite. Human ancylostomids, A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura, found in the New World in pre-Columbian times, have not been introduced into the Americas by land via Beringia. These parasites could not supported the cold climate of the region. Nomadic prehistoric humans that have crossed the Bering Land Bridge from Asia to the Americas in the last glaciation, probably during generations, would have lost these parasites, which life cycles need warm temperatures in the soil to be transmitted from host to host. Alternative routes are discussed for human parasite introduction into the Americas.

  19. Schistosoma bovis in western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothard, J R; Lockyer, A E; Kabatereine, N B; Tukahebwa, E M; Kazibwe, F; Rollinson, D; Fenwick, A

    2004-09-01

    During routine parasitological surveillance and monitoring activities within a National Control Programme for control of human schistosomiasis in Uganda, it was noted that cattle grazing in a water meadow immediately adjacent to Tonya primary school, where the prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis in children was in excess of 90%, were unusually emaciated. To test the hypothesis that there may have been an anthropozoonotic focus of Schistosoma mansoni within the local herd, a young female heifer, clearly emaciated and c. 8 months old, was slaughtered from which schistosome worms were later recovered by dissection. As female worms inspected by microscopy were not gravid, morphological identification proved inconclusive but analysis of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA sequences from these worms identified them as Schistosoma bovis Sonsino, 1876. This is the first substantiated report of S. bovis from Lake Albert, western Uganda. Further epidemiological surveys are needed to clarify the extent of bovine schistosomiasis within this region, particularly so since this lakeside plain has been earmarked as a future game reserve.

  20. Analysis of Antibodies Directed against Merozoite Surface Protein 1 of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehlbier, Ute; Epp, Christian; Kauth, Christian W.; Lutz, Rolf; Long, Carole A.; Coulibaly, Boubacar; Kouyaté, Bocar; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates; Bujard, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    The 190-kDa merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) of Plasmodium falciparum, an essential component in the parasite's life cycle, is a primary candidate for a malaria vaccine. Rabbit antibodies elicited by the heterologously produced MSP-1 processing products p83, p30, p38, and p42, derived from strain 3D7, were analyzed for the potential to inhibit in vitro erythrocyte invasion by the parasite and parasite growth. Our data show that (i) epitopes recognized by antibodies, which inhibit parasite replication, are distributed throughout the entire MSP-1 molecule; (ii) when combined, antibodies specific for different regions of MSP-1 inhibit in a strictly additive manner; (iii) anti-MSP-1 antibodies interfere with erythrocyte invasion as well as with the intraerythrocytic growth of the parasite; and (iv) antibodies raised against MSP-1 of strain 3D7 strongly cross-inhibit replication of the heterologous strain FCB-1. Accordingly, anti-MSP-1 antibodies appear to be capable of interfering with parasite multiplication at more than one level. Since the overall immunogenicity profile of MSP-1 in rabbits closely resembles that found in sera of Aotus monkeys immunized with parasite-derived MSP-1 and of humans semi-immune to malaria from whom highly inhibiting antigen-specific antibodies were recovered, we consider the findings reported here to be relevant for the development of MSP-1-based vaccines against malaria. PMID:16428781

  1. GPCR and IR genes in Schistosoma mansoni miracidia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Zhao, Min; Wang, Tianfang; McManus, Donald P; Cummins, Scott F

    2016-10-26

    Schistosoma species are responsible for the disease schistosomiasis, a highly prevalent helminthic disease that requires a freshwater snail as intermediate host. The S. mansoni free-living miracidium must utilize olfaction to find a suitable snail host, and certain types of rhodopsin G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs) have been identified as olfactory receptors in other animal phyla. The Schistosoma genome project, together with the recent availability of proteomic databases, allowed for studies to explore receptors within S. mansoni, some of which may contribute to host finding. We have identified 17 rhodopsin-type GPCR sequences in S. mansoni belonging to four subclasses, including ligand-specific GPCRs (i.e. neuropeptide and opsin). RT-PCR demonstrated the expression of nine out of the 17 GPCRs in the free-living miracidia, each of which have been characterized for homology to S. haematobium. Among the nine GPCRs, two are predicted as Gq-opsins. We also describe the characterization of a Schistosoma-encoded IR based on similarity with other species IR and conservation of IR-like domains. Schistosoma mansoni IR is expressed in miracidia at 3 and 6 h post-hatch. The identification of receptors in S. mansoni miracidia, presented here, contributes not only to further understanding of Schistosoma biology and signal transduction but also provides a basis for approaches that may modify parasite behaviour.

  2. [Schistosoma species in Senegal with special reference to the biology, epidemiology and pathology of Schistosoma curassoni Brumpt, 1931].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, J

    1990-01-01

    By combining field and experimental investigations, we were able to study several new aspects of fundamental problems concerning human and animal schistosomiasis in Senegal. Because of the controversy about the identity of Schistosoma curassoni and the possibly connected zoonosis, this parasite has been described once more. A great variety of experimental techniques were used. The eggs of S. curassoni are significantly smaller than those of the two other African species of Schistosoma we know of in ruminants (S. bovis and S. mattheei). But eggs of S. curassoni cannot be distinguished from those of the human, pathogenic S. haematobium. The study of the tegument of adult male worms shows a clear difference between S. bovis on one hand, and S. curassoni and S. haematobium on the other hand. S. bovis' tubercles are well formed, but have no stings at all. The tubercles of S. haematobium and of S. curassoni definitely possess stings. S. curassoni, S. haematobium and S. bovis are also clearly different as to their development in hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). S. curassoni develops more rapidly and gets bigger than S. bovis and S. haematobium. Finally, different enzymatic systems allow us to distinguish S. curassoni from other schistosoma's of the haematobium group. S. curassoni has a typical pattern for phosphoglucomutase and hexokinase, differing from S. haematobium's patterns. In S. bovis, it differs by the patterns of phosphoglucomutase, glucosephosphate-isomerase, hexokinase and acid phosphatase. Epidemiological studies proved that, in Senegal, Bulinus guernei is the main vector of S. bovis, Bulinus senegalensis of S. haematobium (Northern Senegal) and Bulinus umbilicatus of S. curassoni and S. haematobium (Southern Senegal). There is no indication to consider S. curassoni as a zoonosis. When ruminants are infested by S. curassoni, the symptoms are light and the most important lesions can be found in the liver, the intestines and, in a lesser degree, in the bladder

  3. Dogs, cats, parasites, and humans in Brazil: opening the black box

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Dogs and cats in Brazil serve as primary hosts for a considerable number of parasites, which may affect their health and wellbeing. These may include endoparasites (e.g., protozoa, cestodes, trematodes, and nematodes) and ectoparasites (i.e., fleas, lice, mites, and ticks). While some dog and cat parasites are highly host-specific (e.g., Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Felicola subrostratus for cats, and Angiostrongylus vasorum and Trichodectes canis for dogs), others may easily switch to other hosts, including humans. In fact, several dog and cat parasites (e.g., Toxoplasma gondii, Dipylidium caninum, Ancylostoma caninum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara canis) are important not only from a veterinary perspective but also from a medical standpoint. In addition, some of them (e.g., Lynxacarus radovskyi on cats and Rangelia vitalii in dogs) are little known to most veterinary practitioners working in Brazil. This article is a compendium on dog and cat parasites in Brazil and a call for a One Health approach towards a better management of some of these parasites, which may potentially affect humans. Practical aspects related to the diagnosis, treatment, and control of parasitic diseases of dogs and cats in Brazil are discussed. PMID:24423244

  4. Scanning electron microscope studies of miracidia suggest introgressive hybridization between Schistosoma haematobium and S. haematobium x S. mattheei in the Eastern Transvaal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, F J; Hamilton-Attwell, V L

    1988-06-01

    Schistosoma haematobium miracidia were collected from a locality with a high prevalence of human infection with the animal parasite, S. mattheei, which hybridizes with S. haematobium, and from 2 localities with negligible infection rates. The terebratoria of the miracidia from these localities were compared with each other, with laboratory maintained S. haematobium and with four populations of S. mattheei by means of scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the terebratorial membrane of certain of the S. haematobium miracidia from the locality with a high S. mattheei prevalence in humans, resembled the more intricate membrane of S. mattheei. This suggests introgressive hybridization between S. haematobium and S. haematobium x S. mattheei.

  5. Genetic recombination between human and animal parasites creates novel strains of human pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Gibson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic recombination between pathogens derived from humans and livestock has the potential to create novel pathogen strains, highlighted by the influenza pandemic H1N1/09, which was derived from a re-assortment of swine, avian and human influenza A viruses. Here we investigated whether genetic recombination between subspecies of the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, from humans and animals can generate new strains of human pathogen, T. b. rhodesiense (Tbr responsible for sleeping sickness (Human African Trypanosomiasis, HAT in East Africa. The trait of human infectivity in Tbr is conferred by a single gene, SRA, which is potentially transferable to the animal pathogen Tbb by sexual reproduction. We tracked the inheritance of SRA in crosses of Tbr and Tbb set up by co-transmitting genetically-engineered fluorescent parental trypanosome lines through tsetse flies. SRA was readily transferred into new genetic backgrounds by sexual reproduction between Tbr and Tbb, thus creating new strains of the human pathogen, Tbr. There was no evidence of diminished growth or transmissibility of hybrid trypanosomes carrying SRA. Although expression of SRA is critical to survival of Tbr in the human host, we show that the gene exists as a single copy in a representative collection of Tbr strains. SRA was found on one homologue of chromosome IV in the majority of Tbr isolates examined, but some Ugandan Tbr had SRA on both homologues. The mobility of SRA by genetic recombination readily explains the observed genetic variability of Tbr in East Africa. We conclude that new strains of the human pathogen Tbr are being generated continuously by recombination with the much larger pool of animal-infective trypanosomes. Such novel recombinants present a risk for future outbreaks of HAT.

  6. Introgressive Hybridization of Schistosoma haematobium Group Species in Senegal: Species Barrier Break Down between Ruminant and Human Schistosomes

    OpenAIRE

    WEBSTER, B. L.; Diaw, O. T.; Seye, M M; Webster, J. P.; Rollinson, D

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schistosomes are dioecious parasitic flatworms, which live in the vasculature of their mammalian definitive hosts. They are the causative agent of schistosomiasis, a disease of considerable medical and veterinary importance in tropical and subtropical regions. Schistosomes undergo a sexual reproductive stage within their mammalian host enabling interactions between different species, which may result in hybridization if the species involved are phylogenetically close. In Senegal, ...

  7. Functional characterisation of Schistosoma japonicum acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hong; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Du, Xiaofeng; Pali, Gabor; Cai, Pengfei; Jones, Malcolm K; McManus, Donald P

    2016-06-10

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important metabolic enzyme of schistosomes present in the musculature and on the surface of the blood stage where it has been implicated in the modulation of glucose scavenging from mammalian host blood. As both a target for the antischistosomal drug metrifonate and as a potential vaccine candidate, AChE has been characterised in the schistosome species Schistosoma mansoni, S. haematobium and S. bovis, but not in S. japonicum. Recently, using a schistosome protein microarray, a predicted S. japonicum acetylcholinesterase precursor was significantly targeted by protective IgG1 immune responses in S. haematobium-exposed individuals that had acquired drug-induced resistance to schistosomiasis after praziquantel treatment. We report the full-length cDNA sequence and describe phylogenetic and molecular structural analysis to facilitate understanding of the biological function of AChE (SjAChE) in S. japonicum. The protein has high sequence identity (88 %) with the AChEs in S. mansoni, S. haematobium and S. bovis and has 25 % sequence similarity with human AChE, suggestive of a highly specialised role for the enzyme in both parasite and host. We immunolocalized SjAChE and demonstrated its presence on the surface of adult worms and schistosomula, as well as its lower expression in parenchymal regions. The relatively abundance of AChE activity (90 %) present on the surface of adult S. japonicum when compared with that reported in other schistosomes suggests SjAChE may be a more effective drug or immunological target against this species. We also demonstrate that the classical inhibitor of AChE, BW285c51, inhibited AChE activity in tegumental extracts of paired worms, single males and single females by 59, 22 and 50 %, respectively, after 24 h incubation with 200 μM BW284c51. These results build on previous studies in other schistosome species indicating major differences in the enzyme between parasite and mammalian host, and provide

  8. Targeting kinases in Plasmodium and Schistosoma: Same goals, different challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerig, Christian; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2015-10-01

    With respect to parasite-induced infectious diseases of worldwide importance, members of the genera Plasmodium and Schistosoma are top pathogens. Nearly half a billion people suffer from malaria caused by Plasmodium spp. and schistosomiasis (bilharzia) induced by Schistosoma spp. Resistance against essentially all drugs used for malaria treatment has been reported. For schistosomiasis justified fear of upcoming resistance is discussed against the background of only one widely used drug for treatment. Research of the recent decade has demonstrated that essential steps of the biology of these and other parasites are controlled by kinases, which represent attractive targets for new-generation antiparasitic compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. New insights into the genetic diversity of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobiumin Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sady, Hany; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Webster, Bonnie L; Ngui, Romano; Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Nasr, Nabil A; Chua, Kek Heng; Lim, Yvonne A L; Surin, Johari

    2015-10-20

    Human schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease of great importance that remains highly prevalent in Yemen, especially amongst rural communities. In order to investigate the genetic diversity of human Schistosoma species, a DNA barcoding study was conducted on S. mansoni and S. haematobium in Yemen. A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect urine and faecal samples from 400 children from five provinces in Yemen. The samples were examined for the presence of Schistosoma eggs. A partial fragment of the schistosome cox1 mitochondrial gene was analysed from each individual sample to evaluate the genetic diversity of the S. mansoni and S. haematobium infections. The data was also analysed together with previous published cox1 data for S. mansoni and S. haematobium from Africa and the Indian Ocean Islands. Overall, 31.8 % of participants were found to be excreting schistosome eggs in either the urine or faeces (8.0 % S. mansoni and 22.5 % S. haematobium). Nineteen unique haplotypes of S. mansoni were detected and split into four lineages. Furthermore, nine unique haplotypes of S. haematobium were identified that could be split into two distinct groups. This study provides novel and interesting insights into the population diversity and structure of S. mansoni and S. haematobium in Yemen. The data adds to our understanding of the evolutionary history and phylogeography of these devastating parasites whilst the genetic information could support the control and monitoring of urogenital and intestinal schistosomiasis in these endemic areas.

  10. Tissue specific profiling of females of Schistosoma japonicum by integrated laser microdissection microscopy and microarray analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey N Gobert

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The functions of many schistosome gene products remain to be characterized. A major step towards elucidating function of these genes would be in defining their sites of expression. This goal is rendered difficult to achieve by the generally small size of the parasites and the lack of a body cavity, which precludes analysis of transcriptional profiles of the tissues in isolation.Here, we describe a combined laser microdissection microscopy (LMM and microarray analysis approach to expedite tissue specific profiling and gene atlasing for tissues of adult female Schistosoma japonicum. This approach helps to solve the gene characterization "bottle-neck" brought about by acoelomy and the size of these parasites. Complementary RNA obtained after isolation from gastrodermis (parasite gut mucosa, vitelline glands and ovary by LMM were subjected to microarray analyses, resulting in identification of 147 genes upregulated in the gastrodermis, 4,149 genes in the ovary and 2,553 in the vitellaria.This work will help to shed light on the molecular pathobiology of this debilitating human parasite and aid in the discovery of new targets for the development of anti-schistosome vaccines and drugs.

  11. Tegumental proteins of Schistosoma mansoni: complex biomolecules and potent antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Andrew J.G.

    1992-01-01

    The passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies, direct vaccination and in vitro assays have all shown that antigens associated with the tegumental membranes of Schistosoma mansoni are capable of mediating protective immune responses against the parasite in animal models. Furthermore, the principal antigens are highly antigenic during natural infection in man and stimulate strong humoral and cellular responses although, at present, their role in mediating protective immune responses in man rema...

  12. Cytometric quantification of singlet oxygen in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butzloff, Sabine; Groves, Matthew R; Wrenger, Carsten; Müller, Ingrid B

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum proliferates within human erythrocytes and is thereby exposed to a variety of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion, and highly reactive singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). While most ROS are already well studied

  13. The role of the immunological background of mice in the genetic variability of Schistosoma mansoni as detected by random amplification of polymorphic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossa-Moiane, I L; Mendes, T; Ferreira, T M; Mauricio, I; Calado, M; Afonso, A; Belo, S

    2015-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. Among the Schistosoma species known to infect humans, S. mansoni is the most frequent cause of intestinal schistosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa and South America: the World Health Organization estimates that about 200,000 deaths per year result from schistosomiasis in sub-Saharan Africa alone. The Schistosoma life cycle requires two different hosts: a snail as intermediate host and a mammal as definitive host. People become infected when they come into contact with water contaminated with free-living larvae (e.g. when swimming, fishing, washing). Although S. mansoni has mechanisms for escaping the host immune system, only a minority of infecting larvae develop into adults, suggesting that strain selection occurs at the host level. To test this hypothesis, we compared the Belo Horizonte (BH) strain of S. mansoni recovered from definitive hosts with different immunological backgrounds using random amplification of polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Schistosoma mansoni DNA profiles of worms obtained from wild-type (CD1 and C57BL/6J) and mutant (Jα18- / - and TGFβRIIdn) mice were analysed. Four primers produced polymorphic profiles, which can therefore potentially be used as reference biomarkers. All male worms were genetically distinct from females isolated from the same host, with female worms showing more specific fragments than males. Of the four host-derived schistosome populations, female and male adults recovered from TGFβRIIdn mice showed RAPD-PCR profiles that were most similar to each other. Altogether, these data indicate that host immunological backgrounds can influence the genetic diversity of parasite populations.

  14. Tapeworm Diphyllobothrium dendriticum (Cestoda)—Neglected or Emerging Human Parasite?

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    Kuchta, Roman; Brabec, Jan; Kubáčková, Petra; Scholz, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Background A total number of 14 valid species of Diphyllobothrium tapeworms have been described in literature to be capable of causing diphyllobothriosis, with D. latum being the major causative agent of all human infections. However, recent data indicate that some of these infections, especially when diagnosed solely on the basis of morphology, have been identified with this causative agent incorrectly, confusing other Diphyllobothrium species with D. latum. Another widely distributed species, D. dendriticum, has never been considered as a frequent parasite of man, even though it is found commonly throughout arctic and subarctic regions parasitizing piscivorous birds and mammals. Recent cases of Europeans infected with this cestode called into question the actual geographic distribution of this tapeworm, largely ignored by medical parasitologists. Methodology and Results On the basis of revision of more than 900 available references and a description and revision of recent European human cases using morphological and molecular (cox1) data supplemented by newly characterized D. dendriticum sequences, we updated the current knowledge of the life-cycle, geographic distribution, epidemiological status, and molecular diagnostics of this emerging causal agent of zoonotic disease of man. Conclusions The tapeworm D. dendriticum represents an example of a previously neglected, probably underdiagnosed parasite of man with a potential to spread globally. Recent cases of diphyllobothriosis caused by D. dendriticum in Europe (Netherlands, Switzerland and Czech Republic), where the parasite has not been reported previously, point out that causative agents of diphyllobothriosis and other zoonoses can be imported throughout the world. Molecular tools should be used for specific and reliable parasite diagnostics, and also rare or non-native species should be considered. This will considerably help improve our knowledge of the distribution and epidemiology of these human parasites

  15. [SWOT Analysis of the National Survey on Current Status of Major Human Parasitic Diseases in China].

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    ZHU, Hui-hui; ZHOU, Chang-hai; CHEN, Ying-dan; ZANG, Wei; XIAO, Ning; ZHOU, Xiao-nong

    2015-10-01

    The National Survey on Current Status of Major Human Parasitic Diseases in China has been carried out since 2014 under the organization of the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China. The National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (NIPD, China CDC) provided technical support and was responsible for quality control in this survey. This study used SWOT method to analyze the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that were encountered by he NIPD, China CDC during the completion of the survey. Accordingly, working strategies were proposed to facilitate the future field work.

  16. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase as a novel drug target: evidence from Schistosoma japonicum.

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    LiJun Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis remains a major public health concern affecting billions of people around the world. Currently, praziquantel is the only drug of choice for treatment of human schistosomiasis. The emergence of drug resistance to praziquantel in schistosomes makes the development of novel drugs an urgent task. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR enzymes in Schistosoma mansoni and some other platyhelminths have been identified as alternative targets. The present study was designed to confirm the existense and the potential value of TGR as a target for development of novel antischistosomal agents in Schistosoma japonicum, a platyhelminth endemic in Asia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: After cloning the S. japonicum TGR (SjTGR gene, the recombinant SjTGR selenoprotein was purified and characterized in enzymatic assays as a multifunctional enzyme with thioredoxin reductase (TrxR, glutathione reductase (GR and glutaredoxin (Grx activities. Immunological and bioinformatic analyses confirmed that instead of having separate TrxR and GR proteins in mammalian, S. japonicum only encodes TGR, which performs the functions of both enzymes and plays a critical role in maintaining the redox balance in this parasite. These results were in good agreement with previous findings in Schistosoma mansoni and some other platyhelminths. Auranofin, a known inhibitor against TGR, caused fatal toxicity in S. japonicum adult worms in vitro and reduced worm and egg burdens in S. japonicum infected mice. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our study confirms that a multifunctional enzyme SjTGR selenoprotein, instead of separate TrxR and GR enzymes, exists in S. japonicum. Furthermore, TGR may be a potential target for development of novel agents against schistosomes. This assumption is strengthened by our demonstration that the SjTGR is an essential enzyme for maintaining the thiol-disulfide redox homeostasis of S. japonicum.

  17. Schistosoma mansoni enhances host susceptibility to mucosal but not intravenous challenge by R5 Clade C SHIV.

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    Nagadenahalli B Siddappa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The high prevalence of HIV-1/AIDS in areas endemic for schistosomiasis and other helminthic infections has led to the hypothesis that parasites increase host susceptibility to immunodeficiency virus infection. We previously showed that rhesus macaques (RM with active schistosomiasis were significantly more likely to become systemically infected after intrarectal (i.r. exposure to an R5-tropic clade C simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-C than were parasite-free controls. However, we could not address whether this was due to systemic or mucosal effects. If systemic immunoactivation resulted in increased susceptibility to SHIV-C acquisition, a similarly large difference in host susceptibility would be seen after intravenous (i.v. SHIV-C challenge. Conversely, if increased host susceptibility was due to parasite-induced immunoactivation at the mucosal level, i.v. SHIV-C challenge would not result in significant differences between parasitized and parasite-free monkeys.We enrolled two groups of RM and infected one group with Schistosoma mansoni; the other group was left parasite-free. Both groups were challenged i.v. with decreasing doses of SHIV-C. No statistically significant differences in 50% animal infectious doses (AID(50 or peak viremia were seen between the two groups. These data strongly contrast the earlier i.r. SHIV-C challenge (using the same virus stock in the presence/absence of parasites, where we noted a 17-fold difference in AID(50 and one log higher peak viremia in parasitized monkeys (P90% of all new HIV-1 infections worldwide are acquired through mucosal contact, parasitic infections that inflame mucosae may play an important role in the spread of HIV-1.

  18. Orientobilharzia species: neglected parasitic zoonotic agents.

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    Wang, C R; Chen, J; Zhao, J P; Chen, A H; Zhai, Y Q; Li, L; Zhu, X Q

    2009-03-01

    Parasites of the genus Orientobilharzia belong to Platyhelminthes, Trematoda, Digenea, Schistosomatidae, and the type species is Orientobilharzia turkestanicum. O. turkestanicum was first described by Skrjabin from cattle in Russian Turkestan in 1913. Adult worms of Orientobilharzia species live in the portal veins or intestinal veins of cattle, sheep and other mammals, and often cause orientobilharziasis in China, India, Mongolia, Pakistan, Iraq, Iran in Asia, and Russia and Turkey in Europe. More importantly, the cercariae of Orientobilharzia species can infect humans and often cause cercarial dermatitis. Though Orientobilharzia species have been confirmed as zoonotic agents, they have been largely neglected, compared with other pathogens causing cercarial dermatitis, such as Trichobilharzia spp., Schistosoma spindale and Bilharziella sp., which have attracted considerable attention. Here we review the current status of knowledge on the taxonomy of Orientobilharzia spp., human and animal infections with Orientobilharzia spp., and address some considerations for further work on the systematics and pathogenesis of these organisms.

  19. Study of opportunistic intestinal parasitic infections in human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients

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    Manish Kumar Mathur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intestinal parasites predominantly coccidian parasites are a common cause for diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted during January 2009-December 2010. A total of 1,088 stool samples from 544 seropositive HIV positive cases were examined microscopically for ova and cyst using wet mount preparations and stained smears. Out of 544 patients, 343 had prolonged diarrhea for more than 4 weeks, 57 had acute diarrhea of lesser than 7 days and 144 were asymptomatic cases who attended out-patient department; included in this study after taking consent from patients. Enteric pathogens were detected in 274 (50.36% of the 544 patients. Results and Conclusions: The parasites identified were Cryptosporidium (135, Isospora belli (42, Cyclospora (12, Microsporidia (02, Entamoeba histolytica (49, Hookworm (34. Intestinal parasites in chronic diarrhea were significantly higher than the acute diarrhea (63.05% vs. 7.35%; P < 0.05. Parasitic pathogens were frequently associated with HIV-positive patients with diarrhea in Western India. Stools of all HIV-positive patients with diarrhea should thoroughly be investigated to identify etiologic agents for proper management.

  20. Association of Parasitic Infections and Cancers

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    Khurana S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the fields of molecular biology, epidemiology and infectious diseases have led to significant revelations to clarify the relationship between cancer and infective agents. This article reviews the relationship between parasitic infections and carcinogenesis and the possible mechanisms involved. Few parasites, e.g., Schistosoma haematobium and Opisthorchis viverrini have been found to be strongly associated with bladder cancer and cholangiocarcinoma respectively. The evidence for the association of several other parasites and cancers has also been postulated.

  1. Mechanisms of evasion of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula to the lethal activity of complement

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    F. Juarez Ramalho-Pinto

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni became resistant to antibody-dependent complement damage in vitro after pre-incubation with normal human erythrocytes (NHuE whatever the ABO or Rh blood group. Resistant parasites were shown to acquire host decay accelerating factor (DAF , a 70 kDa glycoprotein attached to the membrane of NHue by a GPI anchor. IgG2a mAb anti-human DAF (IA10 immunoprecipitated a 70 kDa molecule from 125I-labeled schistosomula pre-incubated with NHuE and inhibited their resistance to complement-dependent killing in vtro. Incubationof schistosomula with erytrocytes from patients with paroxsimal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNHE or SRBC, wich are DAF-deficient, did not protect the parasites from complement lesion. Supernatant of 100,000 x g collected from NHuE incubated for 24 h in defined medium was shown to contain a soluble form of DAF and to protect schistosomula from complement killing. Schistosomula treated with trypsin before incubation with NHuE ghosts did not become resistant to complement damage. On the other hand, pre-treatment with chymotrypsin did not interfere with the acquisition of resistance by the schistosomula. These results indicate that, in vitro, NHuE DAF can be transferred to schistosomula in a soluble form and that the binding of this molecule to the parasite surface is dependent upon trypsin-sensitive chymotrypsin-insensitive polipeptide(s present on the surface of the worm.

  2. A comparative chemogenomics strategy to predict potential drug targets in the metazoan pathogen, Schistosoma mansoni.

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    Conor R Caffrey

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a prevalent and chronic helmintic disease in tropical regions. Treatment and control relies on chemotherapy with just one drug, praziquantel and this reliance is of concern should clinically relevant drug resistance emerge and spread. Therefore, to identify potential target proteins for new avenues of drug discovery we have taken a comparative chemogenomics approach utilizing the putative proteome of Schistosoma mansoni compared to the proteomes of two model organisms, the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans and the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster. Using the genome comparison software Genlight, two separate in silico workflows were implemented to derive a set of parasite proteins for which gene disruption of the orthologs in both the model organisms yielded deleterious phenotypes (e.g., lethal, impairment of motility, i.e., are essential genes/proteins. Of the 67 and 68 sequences generated for each workflow, 63 were identical in both sets, leading to a final set of 72 parasite proteins. All but one of these were expressed in the relevant developmental stages of the parasite infecting humans. Subsequent in depth manual curation of the combined workflow output revealed 57 candidate proteins. Scrutiny of these for 'druggable' protein homologs in the literature identified 35 S. mansoni sequences, 18 of which were homologous to proteins with 3D structures including co-crystallized ligands that will allow further structure-based drug design studies. The comparative chemogenomics strategy presented generates a tractable set of S. mansoni proteins for experimental validation as drug targets against this insidious human pathogen.

  3. Immunization of pigs against infection with Schistosoma japonicum using ultraviolet-attenuated cercariae

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    Shi, Y.-E.; Jiang, C.-F.; Han, J.-J.; Li, Y.-L. (Tongji Medical Univ., Wuhan (China). Dept. of Parasitology); Ruppel, A. (Institute for Tropical Hygiene, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1993-06-01

    Since pigs are important in the zoonotic transmission of schistosomiasis japonica in China, a veterinary vaccine might contribute to the control of the disease in humans. Pigs were immunized with three doses each of 10 000 cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum attenuated with ultraviolet light (400 [mu]Watt.min/cm[sup 2]). The experiment was performed with portable irradiation equipment in a rural area of the Hubei Province (P.R. China). A challenge infection of 1000 untreated cercariae was given 2.5 or 6 months after the last immunization, and age-matched naive pigs were challenged as a control. Immunized pigs developed about 90% resistance against the challenge. The liver egg load of these animals was reduced by over 90%. Less than 0.01% of the immunizing cercariae developed to adult parasites and the vaccination had no apparent adverse influence on the pig's health. (Author).

  4. Hybrids between Schistosoma haematobium and S. mattheei and their identification by isoelectric focusing of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C A; Ross, G C

    1980-01-01

    Some biological features of F1 hybrids between South African strains of Schistosoma haematobium and S. mattheei are described and compared with those of both parental species. The distinctive patterns of the G6PD and PGM isoenzymes, resolved by isoelectric focusing, of both species and of the hybrid are defined and the results of enzyme analyses of parasites isolated from human infections in the Transvaal are reported. These show that hybridization does occur naturally in man and that the shape of the eggs produced is not necessarily a guide to the genetic constitution of the enclosed larvae. The experimentally produced F1 hybrids exhibit heterosis in their increased infectivity to both snails and hamsters, in their more rapid growth and earlier maturation and in the increased daily egg production per female worm when compared with both of the parental species. The possible practical implications of this are discussed.

  5. Zoonotic gastrointestinal parasite burden of local dogs in Zaria, Northern Nigeria: Implications for human health

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    Christopher I. Ogbaje

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zoonotic gastrointestinal parasites of dogs are of the global problem particularly in the developing countries. Dogs are the most common pet animals worldwide and have been reported to be hosts of many intestinal parasites of zoonotic importance globally. In Nigeria, gastrointestinal helminthes of dogs is currently endemic in 20 of the 36 states. Aim: In general, dogs are the closest animals to humans and for that reason we decided to carry out a survey study to check the incidence of these parasites in dogs and to ascertain the level of environmental contamination in the study area. Materials and Methods: Fecal samples were collected from dog patients presented to small animal clinic of Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, dog’s fecal droppings from the streets, and residential Quarters of the University and gastrointestinal tracts (GIT of dogs from dogs slaughtering house at Basawa Barrack, Zaria. Three methods were used in the analysis of the samples; simple flotation, sedimentation, and GIT processing methods within 48 h of collection. Results: Out of 224 samples analyzed 76(33.9% were positive of at least one of the parasites. Of the 101 samples from streets and residential quarters of ABU, Zaria, Isospora spp. 12(11.9% recorded the highest prevalence rate followed by Taenia spp. 6(5.9%, then Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum, and Dipylidium caninum were 5.0%, 4.0%, and 1.0%, respectively. Isospora spp. (19.0% recorded the highest prevalence rate for the 100 samples collected from small animal clinic. Other parasites encountered were T. canis (8.0%, A. caninum (8.0% and Taenia spp. (5.0%. Parasites observed from the 23 gastrointestinal contents from “dog slaughtered houses” were T. canis (17.3%, Isospora spp.(13.1% and A. caninum (4.3. Conclusion: The study revealed that zoonotic gastrointestinal parasites of dogs are endemic in Zaria and the general public in the

  6. IMMUNODIAGNOSIS OF HUMAN STRONGYLOIDIASIS: USE OF SIX DIFFERENT ANTIGENIC FRACTIONS FROM Strongyloides venezuelensis PARASITIC FEMALES

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    Marcelo Andreetta CORRAL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY The aim of this study was to evaluate six different antigenic fractions from Strongyloides venezuelensis parasitic females for the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. Soluble and membrane fractions from S. venezuelensis parasitic females were prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (SSF and SMF, respectively, Tris-HCl (TSF and TMF, respectively, and an alkaline buffer (ASF and AMF, respectively. Serum samples obtained from patients with strongyloidiasis or, other parasitic diseases, and healthy individuals were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Soluble fractions SSF, TSF, and ASF showed 85.0%, 75.0%, and 80.0% sensitivity and 93.1%, 93.1%, and 87.5% specificity, respectively. Membrane fractions SMF, TMF, and AMF showed 80.0%, 75.0%, and 85.0% sensitivity, and 95.8%, 90.3%, and 91.7% specificity, respectively. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the fractions obtained from parasitic females, especially the SSF and SMF, could be used as alternative antigen sources in the serodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

  7. IMMUNODIAGNOSIS OF HUMAN STRONGYLOIDIASIS: USE OF SIX DIFFERENT ANTIGENIC FRACTIONS FROM Strongyloides venezuelensis PARASITIC FEMALES.

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    Corral, Marcelo Andreetta; Paula, Fabiana Martins de; Gottardi, Maiara; Meisel, Dirce Mary Correia Lima; Castilho, Vera Lucia Pagliusi; Gonçalves, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Gryschek, Ronaldo Cesar Borges

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate six different antigenic fractions from Strongyloides venezuelensis parasitic females for the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. Soluble and membrane fractions from S. venezuelensis parasitic females were prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (SSF and SMF, respectively), Tris-HCl (TSF and TMF, respectively), and an alkaline buffer (ASF and AMF, respectively). Serum samples obtained from patients with strongyloidiasis or, other parasitic diseases, and healthy individuals were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Soluble fractions SSF, TSF, and ASF showed 85.0%, 75.0%, and 80.0% sensitivity and 93.1%, 93.1%, and 87.5% specificity, respectively. Membrane fractions SMF, TMF, and AMF showed 80.0%, 75.0%, and 85.0% sensitivity, and 95.8%, 90.3%, and 91.7% specificity, respectively. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the fractions obtained from parasitic females, especially the SSF and SMF, could be used as alternative antigen sources in the serodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

  8. Molecular Paleoparasitological Hybridization Approach as Effective Tool for Diagnosing Human Intestinal Parasites from Scarce Archaeological Remains

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    Jaeger, Lauren Hubert; Iñiguez, Alena Mayo

    2014-01-01

    Paleoparasitology is the science that uses parasitological techniques for diagnosing parasitic diseases in the past. Advances in molecular biology brought new insights into this field allowing the study of archaeological material. However, due to technical limitations a proper diagnosis and confirmation of the presence of parasites is not always possible, especially in scarce and degraded archaeological remains. In this study, we developed a Molecular Paleoparasitological Hybridization (MPH) approach using ancient DNA (aDNA) hybridization to confirm and complement paleoparasitological diagnosis. Eight molecular targets from four helminth parasites were included: Ascaris sp., Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, and Strongyloides stercoralis. The MPH analysis using 18th century human remains from Praça XV cemetery (CPXV), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, revealed for the first time the presence E. vermicularis aDNA (50%) in archaeological sites of Brazil. Besides, the results confirmed T. trichiura and Ascaris sp. infections. The prevalence of infection by Ascaris sp. and E. vermicularis increased considerably when MPH was applied. However, a lower aDNA detection of T. trichiura (40%) was observed when compared to the diagnosis by paleoparasitological analysis (70%). Therefore, based on these data, we suggest a combination of Paleoparasitological and MPH approaches to verify the real panorama of intestinal parasite infection in human archeological samples. PMID:25162694

  9. Proteins involved in invasion of human red blood cells by malaria parasites

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    Ewa Jaśkiewicz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a disease caused by parasites of Plasmodium species. It is responsible for around 1-2 million deaths annually, mainly children under the age of 5. It occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical areas.Malaria is caused by five Plasmodium species:[i] P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. vivax, P. knowlesi[/i] and [i]P. ovale[/i]. Mosquitoes spread the disease by biting humans. The malaria parasite has two stages of development: the human stage and the mosquito stage. The first stage occurs in the human body and is divided into two phases: the liver phase and the blood phase.The invasion of erythrocytes by [i]Plasmodium[/i] merozoites is a multistep process of specific protein interactions between the parasite and red blood cell. The first step is the reversible merozoite attachment to the erythrocyte followed by its apical reorientation, then formation of an irreversible “tight” junction and finally entry into the red cell in a parasitophorous vacuole.The blood phase is supported by a number of proteins produced by the parasite. The merozoite surface GPI-anchored proteins (MSP-1, 2, 4, 5, 8 and 10 assist in the process of recognition of susceptible erythrocytes, apical membrane antigen (AMA-1 may be directly responsible for apical reorientation of the merozoite and apical proteins which function in tight junction formation. These ligands are members of two families: Duffy binding-like (DBL and reticulocyte binding-like (RBL proteins. In [i]Plasmodium[/i] [i]falciparum[/i] the DBL family includes: EBA-175, EBA-140 (BAEBL, EBA-181 (JESEBL, EBA-165 (PEBL and EBL-1 ligands.To date, no effective antimalarial vaccine has been developed, but there are several studies for this purpose. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the molecular basis of host cells invasion by parasites. Major efforts are focused on developing a multiantigenic and multiepitope vaccine preventing all steps of [i]Plasmodium[/i] invasion.

  10. [Proteins involved in invasion of human red blood cells by malaria parasites].

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    Jaśkiewicz, Ewa; Graczyk, Jakub; Rydzak, Joanna

    2010-11-30

    Malaria is a disease caused by parasites of Plasmodium species. It is responsible for around 1-2 million deaths annually, mainly children under the age of 5. It occurs mainly in tropical and subtropical areas. Malaria is caused by five Plasmodium species: P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. vivax, P. knowlesi and P. ovale. Mosquitoes spread the disease by biting humans. The malaria parasite has two stages of development: the human stage and the mosquito stage. The first stage occurs in the human body and is divided into two phases: the liver phase and the blood phase. The invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium merozoites is a multistep process of specific protein interactions between the parasite and red blood cell. The first step is the reversible merozoite attachment to the erythrocyte followed by its apical reorientation, then formation of an irreversible "tight" junction and finally entry into the red cell in a parasitophorous vacuole. The blood phase is supported by a number of proteins produced by the parasite. The merozoite surface GPI-anchored proteins (MSP-1, 2, 4, 5, 8 and 10) assist in the process of recognition of susceptible erythrocytes, apical membrane antigen (AMA-1) may be directly responsible for apical reorientation of the merozoite and apical proteins which function in tight junction formation. These ligands are members of two families: Duffy binding-like (DBL) and reticulocyte binding-like (RBL) proteins. In Plasmodium falciparum the DBL family includes: EBA-175, EBA-140 (BAEBL), EBA-181 (JESEBL), EBA-165 (PEBL) and EBL-1 ligands. To date, no effective antimalarial vaccine has been developed, but there are several studies for this purpose. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the molecular basis of host cells invasion by parasites. Major efforts are focused on developing a multiantigenic and multiepitope vaccine preventing all steps of Plasmodium invasion.

  11. Presence of gastrointestinal parasites in swine and human of four swine production farms in Cundinamarca- Colombia

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    María F Mendoza-Gómez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Determine the presence and the type of endoparasites with zoonotic potential in swine and human of two technified and two semi-technified farms in the department of Cundinamarca, Colombia. Materials and methods. Three serial samplings of feces were taken in a pen row within intervals of 15 days, in two technified and two semi-technified farms in different age groups distributed as follows: pregnant-sows, nursing-females, boars, weaners, suckling-piglets, and growing-pig. By means of informed consent thirty-three people agreed to enter the study. Thirty-three samples from men and women of different ages were received. The pool and individual samples of fecal were evaluated by direct analysis, qualitative flotation and sedimentation techniques and modified ZiehlNeelsen stain. Results. For the porcine population, on the average, the results obtained from both technified farms showed that Balantidium coli (42%, Endolimax nana (21.9% and Iodamoeba bütschlii (7.8% were the most common parasites. In semi-technified farms they were: Entamoeba coli (40%, Endolimax nana (35%, Iodamoeba bütschlii (25% and Balantidium coli (5%. By means of the test chi2 it is possible to conclude that there is a significant difference between the parasites species and the type of farm. The results obtained in human showed the presence of parasites as: E. coli (42.2%, Entamoeba hystolitica/dispar (12.1%, E. nana (9.1%, B. coli (9.1%, I. bütschlii (3.0% and Blastocystis hominis (3.0%. Conclusions. The presence of parasites such as Balantidium coli, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba bütschlii and Entamoeba coli in swine and human suggests a possible rotation of parasitic species between hosts.

  12. Acute Schistosoma mansoni infection increases susceptibility to systemic SHIV clade C infection in rhesus macaques after mucosal virus exposure.

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    Agnès-Laurence Chenine

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals living in sub-Saharan Africa represent 10% of the world's population but almost 2/3 of all HIV-1/AIDS cases. The disproportionate HIV-1 infection rates in this region may be linked to helminthic parasite infections that affect many individuals in the developing world. However, the hypothesis that parasite infection increases an individual's susceptibility to HIV-1 has never been prospectively tested in a relevant in vivo model.We measured whether pre-existing infection of rhesus monkeys with a parasitic worm would facilitate systemic infection after mucosal AIDS virus exposure. Two groups of animals, one consisting of normal monkeys and the other harboring Schistosoma mansoni, were challenged intrarectally with decreasing doses of R5-tropic clade C simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-C. Systemic infection occurred in parasitized monkeys at viral doses that remained sub-infectious in normal hosts. In fact, the 50% animal infectious (AID(50 SHIV-C dose was 17-fold lower in parasitized animals compared to controls (P<0.001. Coinfected animals also had significantly higher peak viral RNA loads than controls (P<0.001, as well as increased viral replication in CD4(+ central memory cells (P = 0.03.Our data provide the first direct evidence that acute schistosomiasis significantly increases the risk of de novo AIDS virus acquisition, and the magnitude of the effect suggests that control of helminth infections may be a useful public health intervention to help decrease the spread of HIV-1.

  13. Glucose uptake rates by Schistosoma mansoni, S. haematobium, and S. bovis adults using a flow in vitro culture system.

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    Camacho, M; Agnew, A

    1995-08-01

    A simple flow culture apparatus was designed for the short-term in vitro culture of adult schistosomes. The use of this system allowed sensitive estimation of relative rates of glucose uptake by different species of schistosome. These data suggest that in parasites maintained carefully in conditions within the physiological range of glucose concentration, uptake of glucose is entirely carrier mediated. The rates of glucose uptake by Schistosoma haematobium and its close relative Schistosoma bovis were more than twice that recorded for Schistosoma mansoni. The relationship between reproductive output, glucose requirements, and susceptibility to immune attrition as adults is considered.

  14. Ultrastructural alterations in adult Schistosoma mansoni caused by artemether

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    Xiao Shuhua

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress has been made over the last decade with the development and clinical use of artemether as an agent against major human schistosome parasites. The tegument has been identified as a key target of artemether, implying detailed studies on ultrastructural damage induced by this compound. We performed a temporal examination, employing a transmission electron microscope to assess the pattern and extent of ultrastructural alterations in adult Schistosoma mansoni harboured in mice treated with a single dose of 400 mg/kg artemether. Eight hours post-treatment, damage to the tegument and subtegumental structures was seen. Tegumental alterations reached a peak 3 days after treatment and were characterized by swelling, fusion of distal cytoplasma, focal lysis of the tegumental matrix and vacuolisation. Tubercles and sensory organelles frequently degenerated or collapsed. Typical features of subtegumental alterations, including muscle fibres, syncytium and parenchyma tissues, were focal or extensive lysis, vacuolisation and degeneration of mitochondria. Severe alterations were also observed in gut epithelial cells and vitelline cells of female worms. Our findings of artemether-induced ultrastructural alterations in adult S. mansoni confirm previous results obtained with juvenile S. mansoni and S. japonicum of different ages.

  15. Evaluation of a polyclonal antibody based sandwich ELISA for the detection of faecal antigens in Schistosoma spindale infection in bovines

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasa Murthy, G. S.; D’Souza, Placid E.; Shrikrishna Isloor, K.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomosis is a common parasitic infection in animals prevalent in cattle in Asia and Africa, where it is estimated that at least 165 million animals are infected. Out of the 10 species reported to naturally infect cattle only Schistosoma nasale and Schistosoma spindale have received particular attention, because of their recognized veterinary significance. Although animal schistosomes may, under rare conditions favouring intensive transmission, act as important pathogens in endemic areas...

  16. Ligand tunnels in T. brucei and human CYP51: Insights for parasite-specific drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaofeng; Nandekar, Prajwal; Mustafa, Ghulam; Cojocaru, Vlad; Lepesheva, Galina I; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) is an essential enzyme for sterol biosynthesis and a target for anti-parasitic drug design. However, the design of parasite-specific drugs that inhibit parasitic CYP51 without severe side effects remains challenging. The active site of CYP51 is situated in the interior of the protein. Here, we characterize the potential ligand egress routes and mechanisms in Trypanosoma brucei and human CYP51 enzymes. We performed Random Acceleration Molecular Dynamics simulations of the egress of four different ligands from the active site of models of soluble and membrane-bound T. brucei CYP51 and of soluble human CYP51. In the simulations, tunnel 2f, which leads to the membrane, was found to be the predominant ligand egress tunnel for all the ligands studied. Tunnels S, 1 and W, which lead to the cytosol, were also used in T. brucei CYP51, whereas tunnel 1 was the only other tunnel used significantly in human CYP51. The common tunnels found previously in other CYPs were barely used. The ligand egress times were shorter for human than T. brucei CYP51, suggesting lower barriers to ligand passage. Two gating residues, F105 and M460, in T. brucei CYP51 that modulate the opening of tunnels 2f and S were identified. Although the main egress tunnel was the same, differences in the tunnel-lining residues, ligand passage and tunnel usage were found between T. brucei and human CYP51s. The results provide a basis for the design of selective anti-parasitic agents targeting the ligand tunnels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Epidemiology of infections with intestinal parasites and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among sugar-estate residents in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanet, A. L.; Sahlu, T.; Rinke de Wit, T.; Messele, T.; Masho, W.; Woldemichael, T.; Yeneneh, H.; Coutinho, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections could play an important role in the progression of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), by further disturbing the immune system whilst it is already engaged in the fight against HIV. HIV and intestinal parasitic infections were investigated in 1239,

  18. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi.

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    Kriti Tyagi

    Full Text Available The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites.Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively.Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1 showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3 showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1 utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite.Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host.

  19. Lack of human awareness and the need for increased public education regarding the zoonotic parasite, Baylisascaris procyonis

    OpenAIRE

    Ogdee, Jacob L.; Henke, Scott E.; Wester, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis is a large parasitic nematode found in the small intestines of raccoons (Procyon lotor), the definitive host, and causes larva migrans in humans and other animals. Humans can become infected by ingesting B. procyonis eggs, which can remain viable in the environment for years and adhere to vegetation, soil, water, raccoon feces, or hands. Parasitic infections manifest in humans with neural and ocular larva migrans, characterized by clinical symptoms of head and body til...

  20. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Kriti; Gupta, Deepali; Saini, Ekta; Choudhary, Shilpa; Jamwal, Abhishek; Alam, Mohd. Shoeb; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh K.; Sharma, Yagya D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs) to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites. Methods Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively. Results Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1) showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3) showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1) utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s) as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite. Conclusions Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s) by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host. PMID:26393350

  1. A cluster-randomised intervention trial against Schistosoma japonicum in the Peoples' Republic of China: bovine and human transmission.

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    Darren J Gray

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Zoonotic schistosomiasis japonica is a major public health problem in China. Bovines, particularly water buffaloes, are thought to play a major role in the transmission of schistosomiasis to humans in China. Preliminary results (1998-2003 of a praziquantel (PZQ-based pilot intervention study we undertook provided proof of principle that water buffaloes are major reservoir hosts for S. japonicum in the Poyang Lake region, Jiangxi Province.Here we present the results of a cluster-randomised intervention trial (2004-2007 undertaken in Hunan and Jiangxi Provinces, with increased power and more general applicability to the lake and marshlands regions of southern China. The trial involved four matched pairs of villages with one village within each pair randomly selected as a control (human PZQ treatment only, leaving the other as the intervention (human and bovine PZQ treatment. A sentinel cohort of people to be monitored for new infections for the duration of the study was selected from each village. Results showed that combined human and bovine chemotherapy with PZQ had a greater effect on human incidence than human PZQ treatment alone.The results from this study, supported by previous experimental evidence, confirms that bovines are the major reservoir host of human schistosomiasis in the lake and marshland regions of southern China, and reinforce the rationale for the development and deployment of a transmission blocking anti-S. japonicum vaccine targeting bovines.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000263291.

  2. Schistosome serine protease inhibitors: parasite defense or homeostasis?

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    Landys A. Lopez Quezada

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Serpins are a structurally conserved family of macromolecular inhibitors found in numerous biological systems. The completion and annotation of the genomes of Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum has enabled the identification by phylogenetic analysis of two major serpin clades. S. mansoni shows a greater multiplicity of serpin genes, perhaps reflecting adaptation to infection of a human host. Putative targets of schistosome serpins can be predicted from the sequence of the reactive center loop (RCL. Schistosome serpins may play important roles in both post-translational regulation of schistosome-derived proteases, as well as parasite defense mechanisms against the action of host proteases.Serpinas são uma família de inibidores macromoleculares estruturalmente conservados encontrados em inúmeros sistemas biológicos. O término e a anotação dos genomas de Schistosoma mansoni e de Schistosoma japonicum permitiram a identificação por análise filogenética de dois principais clados de serpinas. S. mansoni mostra uma multiplicidade maior de genes de serpinas, talvez refletindo uma adaptação à infecção de um hospedeiro humano. Alvos putativos das serpinas de esquistossomos podem ser preditos a partir da sequência do "loop" do centro reativo. Serpinas de esquistossomos podem ter importantes papeis tanto na regulação pós-traducional de proteases derivadas do esquistossoma, quanto nos mecanismos de defesa contra a ação de proteases do hospedeiro.

  3. Human parasitic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Chen, Yao-Shen; Yen, Chuan-Min

    2013-06-01

    The major cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Taiwan is Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Humans are infected by ingesting terrestrial and freshwater snails and slugs. In 1998 and 1999, two outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection were reported among 17 adult male immigrant Thai laborers who had eaten raw golden apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata). Another outbreak associated with consuming a health drink consisting of raw vegetable juice was reported in 2001. These adult cases differed from reports in the 1970s and 1980s, in which most of the cases were in children. With improvements in public health and education of foreign laborers, there have since been only sporadic cases in Taiwan. Review of clinical research indicates inconsistent association of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) results with clinical features of eosinophilic meningitis. MRI features were nonspecific but there was an association between the presence of high brain MRI signal intensities and severity of peripheral and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) eosinophilia. Inflammatory markers have been identified in the CSF of patients with eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and the matrix metalloproteinase system may be associated with blood-brain barrier disruption. Eosinophilic meningitis caused by A. cantonensis infection is not a reportable disease in Taiwan. It is important that a public advisory and education program be developed to reduce future accidental infection.

  4. On the longevity of Schistosoma curassoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, J; Rollinson, D; van Heerden, M; Southgate, V R

    2003-03-01

    It is demonstrated that Schistosoma curassoni, a parasite of sheep, cattle and goats in parts of West Africa, will live for at least 8 years 5 months in a sheep. The sheep was exposed to 500 cercariae of S. curassoni liberated from infected Bulinus wrighti. The sheep died of natural causes, and at post-mortem 28 pairs of adult S. curassoni were removed from the mesenteric and rectal veins. All female worms were gravid, and eggs were hatched from faeces to produce miracidia. The development of immune responses of the host had apparently little or no effect on the viability of the eggs. Histological studies of the liver, small and large intestines revealed mild pathological symptoms. The longevity of S. curassoni is the first record of longevity of schistosomes to be based on worm counts.

  5. Intestinal parasitic infections and eosinophilia in an human immunedeficiency virus positive population in Honduras

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    Rina G Kaminsky

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of intestinal parasites, their regional distribution and their relations to eosinophilia were studied in 133 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive individuals from Honduras. After signing an informed consent, participants answered a socio-demographic and risk factor questionnaire, a complete physical examination, medical history, and a series of laboratory tests. All participants were HIV positive but not acquired immunodeficiency syndrome positive. Of them, 67% were co-infected with pathogen and non pathogen parasites. Overall occurrence of nematodes was: 44.3% for Trichuris trichiura, 24% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 12% for Hookworm and 7.5% for Strongyloides stercoralis. No cases of Giardia lamblia, acute amebiasis or cryptosporidiasis were diagnosed. Mean eosinophil percents for participants were consistently and significantly higher in infected than in non infected individuals: 22% for Hookworm vs 7.2% (p < 0.001, 11% for Trichuris compared to 5.2% (p < 0.001, 13.2% compared to 7.5% for S. stercoralis (p < 0.05, and 12% compared to 6% for Ascaris cases (p < 0.05. Helminths and non pathogenic protozoa, as single or mixed infections, occurred among the participants. There was a strong correlation between eosinophilia and helminthiasis infections; however, none was identified between CD4 levels and eosinophilia. Because parasitic infections aggravate malnutrition and promote a disbalanced Th2 response in a potentially immuno-compromised host, their effect on HIV disease progression needs further study, mainly in countries were HIV and parasitic infections are highly prevalent.

  6. Proteomic profiling of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea and its mucous reveals similarities with human secretions and those predicted for parasitic flatworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchinfuso, Donald G; Taylor, Paul; Ross, Eric; Ignatchenko, Alex; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Kislinger, Thomas; Pearson, Bret J; Moran, Michael F

    2012-09-01

    The freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea has been used in research for over 100 years, and is an emerging stem cell model because of its capability of regenerating large portions of missing body parts. Exteriorly, planarians are covered in mucous secretions of unknown composition, implicated in locomotion, predation, innate immunity, and substrate adhesion. Although the planarian genome has been sequenced, it remains mostly unannotated, challenging both genomic and proteomic analyses. The goal of the current study was to annotate the proteome of the whole planarian and its mucous fraction. The S. mediterranea proteome was analyzed via mass spectrometry by using multidimensional protein identification technology with whole-worm tryptic digests. By using a proteogenomics approach, MS data were searched against an in silico translated planarian transcript database, and by using the Swiss-Prot BLAST algorithm to identify proteins similar to planarian queries. A total of 1604 proteins were identified. The mucous subproteome was defined through analysis of a mucous trail fraction and an extract obtained by treating whole worms with the mucolytic agent N-acetylcysteine. Gene Ontology analysis confirmed that the mucous fractions were enriched with secreted proteins. The S. mediterranea proteome is highly similar to that predicted for the trematode Schistosoma mansoni associated with intestinal schistosomiasis, with the mucous subproteome particularly highly conserved. Remarkably, orthologs of 119 planarian mucous proteins are present in human mucosal secretions and tear fluid. We suggest planarians have potential to be a model system for the characterization of mucous protein function and relevant to parasitic flatworm infections and diseases underlined by mucous aberrancies, such as cystic fibrosis, asthma, and other lung diseases.

  7. Schistosoma kisumuensis n. sp. (Digenea: Schistosomatidae) from murid rodents in the Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya and its phylogenetic position within the S. haematobium species group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanelt, B; Brant, S V; Steinauer, M L; Maina, G M; Kinuthia, J M; Agola, L E; Mwangi, I N; Mungai, B N; Mutuku, M W; Mkoji, G M; Loker, E S

    2009-08-01

    Schistosoma kisumuensis n. sp. is described based on 6 adult males and 2 adult females collected from the circulatory system of 3 murid rodent species, Pelomys isseli, Mastomys natalensis, and Dasymys incomtus. Specimens were collected from a single location, Nyabera Swamp, in Kisumu, Kenya in the Lake Victoria Basin. This new species is morphologically similar to members of the S. haematobium group, currently represented by 8 species parasitizing artiodactyls and primates, including humans. Schistosoma kisumuensis differs from these species by producing relatively small Schistosoma intercalatum-like eggs (135.2 x 52.9 microm) with a relatively small length to width ratio (2.55). Comparison of approximately 3000-base-pair sequences of nuclear rDNA (partial 28S) and mtDNA (partial cox1, nad6, 12S) strongly supports the status of S. kisumuensis as a new species and as a sister species of S. intercalatum. The cox1 genetic distance between these two species (6.3%) is comparable to other pairwise comparisons within the S. haematobium group. Separation of the Congo River and Lake Victoria drainage basins is discussed as a possible factor favoring the origin of this species.

  8. Development of a real time polymerase chain reaction for quantitation of Schistosoma mansoni DNA

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    Ana Lisa do Vale Gomes

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the development of a SYBR Green I based real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR protocol for detection on the ABI Prism 7000 instrument. Primers targeting the gene encoding the SSU rRNA were designed to amplify with high specificity DNA from Schistosoma mansoni, in a real time quantitative PCR system. The limit of detection of parasite DNA for the system was 10 fg of purified genomic DNA, that means less than the equivalent to one parasite cell (genome ~580 fg DNA. The efficiency was 0.99 and the correlation coefficient (R² was 0.97. When different copy numbers of the target amplicon were used as standards, the assay could detect at least 10 copies of the specific target. The primers used were designed to amplify a 106 bp DNA fragment (Tm 83ºC. The assay was highly specific for S. mansoni, and did not recognize DNA from closely related non-schistosome trematodes. The real time PCR allowed for accurate quantification of S. mansoni DNA and no time-consuming post-PCR detection of amplification products by gel electrophoresis was required. The assay is potentially able to quantify S. mansoni DNA (and indirectly parasite burden in a number of samples, such as snail tissue, serum and feces from patients, and cercaria infested water. Thus, these PCR protocols have potential to be used as tools for monitoring of schistosome transmission and quantitative diagnosis of human infection.

  9. One stimulus-Two responses: Host and parasite life-history variation in response to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichsner, Alyssa M; Cleveland, Jessica A; Minchella, Dennis J

    2016-11-01

    Climate change stressors will place different selective pressures on both parasites and their hosts, forcing individuals to modify their life-history strategies and altering the distribution and prevalence of disease. Few studies have investigated whether parasites are able to respond to host stress and respond by varying their reproductive schedules. Additionally, multiple environmental stressors can limit the ability of a host to respond adaptively to parasite infection. This study compared both host and parasite life-history parameters in unstressed and drought-stressed environments using the human parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, in its freshwater snail intermediate host. Snail hosts infected with the parasite demonstrated a significant reproductive burst during the prepatent period (fecundity compensation), but that response was absent in a drought-stressed environment. This is the first report of the elimination of host fecundity compensation to parasitism when exposed to additional environmental stress. More surprisingly, we found that infections in drought-stressed snails had significantly higher parasite reproductive outputs than infections in unstressed snails. The finding suggests that climate change may alter the infection dynamics of this human parasite. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Association of Schistosoma mansoni-Specific IgG and IgE Antibody Production and Clinical Schistosomiasis Status in a Rural Area of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah; Fittipaldi, Juliana F.; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Antunes, Carlos Maurício de Figueiredo; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies in murine models and human populations have indicated that the collagen-rich granulomatous response against parasite eggs trapped in the liver is associated with the development of severe hepatosplenic schistosomiasis, characterized by periportal fibrosis and portal hypertension. The role of the humoral response in parasite susceptibility has been well established, but its participation in disease severity remains poorly understood. In this work, we evaluated the relationship between parasite-reactive IgE and IgG levels and schistosomiasis morbidity in infected patients with similar parasite burdens. Methodology/Principal Findings Ninety-seven Schistosoma mansoni-infected individuals were subjected to clinical examination and abdominal ultrasound analysis. IgG reactivity and IgE concentration against Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens (SEA) and adult worm antigen preparation (SWAP) were evaluated by ELISA assay. Multivariable linear regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between parasite-reactive antibodies and the co-variables investigated. The study population showed low parasite burden (median 30 eggs/g feces), constant re-infection, and signs of fibrosis was detected in more than 30% of individuals. Most infected individuals showed IgG reactivity, and the median concentrations of IgE anti-SEA and anti-SWAP antibodies were 1,870 and 1,375 ng/mL, respectively. There was no association between parasite burden and antibody response or any parameter of disease severity. However, IgG anti-SWAP level was positively associated with morbidity parameters, such as spleen size and thickness of portal vein at the entrance and secondary branch. In contrast, the data also revealed independent inverse correlations between concentration of parasite-reactive IgE and gallbladder wall thickness, a marker of fibrosis in schistosomiasis. Conclusions/Significance The data indicate that IgG anti-SWAP is positively associated with severe

  11. Differential expression of small RNA pathway genes associated with the Biomphalaria glabrata/Schistosoma mansoni interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babá, Élio Hideo; Caldeira, Roberta Lima

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that approximately 240 million people in 78 countries require treatment for schistosomiasis, an endemic disease caused by trematodes of the genus Schistosoma. In Brazil, Schistosoma mansoni is the only species representative of the genus whose passage through an invertebrate host, snails of the genus Biomphalaria, is obligatory before infecting a mammalian host, including humans. The availability of the genome and transcriptome of B. glabrata makes studying the regulation of gene expression, particularly the regulation of miRNA and piRNA processing pathway genes, possible. This might assist in better understanding the biology of B. glabrata as well as its relationship to the parasite S. mansoni. Some aspects of this interaction are still poorly explored, including the participation of non-coding small RNAs, such as miRNAs and piRNAs, with lengths varying from 18 to 30 nucleotides in mature form, which are potent regulators of gene expression. Using bioinformatics tools and quantitative PCR, we characterized and validated the miRNA and piRNA processing pathway genes in B. glabrata. In silico analyses showed that genes involved in miRNA and piRNA pathways were highly conserved in protein domain distribution, catalytic site residue conservation and phylogenetic analysis. Our study showed differential expression of putative Argonaute, Drosha, Piwi, Exportin-5 and Tudor genes at different snail developmental stages and during infection with S. mansoni, suggesting that the machinery is required for miRNA and piRNA processing in B. glabrata at all stages. These data suggested that the silencing pathway mediated by miRNAs and piRNAs can interfere in snail biology throughout the life cycle of the snail, thereby influencing the B. glabrata/S. mansoni interaction. Further studies are needed to confirm the participation of the small RNA processing pathway proteins in the parasite/host relationship, mainly the effective

  12. A comparative parasitologic study on Biomphalaria glabrata snail and C3H/He mice infected with human and murine isolates of Schistosoma mansoni derived from Sumidouro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilcéa Freire

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out to analyze the biological characteristics of two sympatric isolates of Schistosoma mansoni derived from humans and murines in a low endemic transmission area (Sumidouro county, state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Sympatric reared-laboratory Biomphalaria glabrata and C3H/He mice were used as experimental hosts. Parameters assessed comprised: precercarial period, infectivity and mortality (snails, prepatent period, infectivity (percentage of cercariae maturation into adult worm and intestinal egg count (mice. The murine isolate showed a shorter precercarial period and higher infectivity than human isolate (p 0.05. These data suggest that both isolates are local sub-populations, providing support for the hypotheses that in a same biotope mixed populations or sub-populations circulate among their main host (human beings and/or rodent as an anfixenous infection.

  13. The Sinbad retrotransposon from the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni, and the distribution of related Pao-like elements

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    Morales Maria E

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Of the major families of long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons, the Pao/BEL family is probably the least well studied. It is becoming apparent that numerous LTR retrotransposons and other mobile genetic elements have colonized the genome of the human blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni. Results A proviral form of Sinbad, a new LTR retrotransposon, was identified in the genome of S. mansoni. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Sinbad belongs to one of five discreet subfamilies of Pao/BEL like elements. BLAST searches of whole genomes and EST databases indicated that members of this clade occurred in species of the Insecta, Nematoda, Echinodermata and Chordata, as well as Platyhelminthes, but were absent from all plants, fungi and lower eukaryotes examined. Among the deuterostomes examined, only aquatic species harbored these types of elements. All four species of nematode examined were positive for Sinbad sequences, although among insect and vertebrate genomes, some were positive and some negative. The full length, consensus Sinbad retrotransposon was 6,287 bp long and was flanked at its 5'- and 3'-ends by identical LTRs of 386 bp. Sinbad displayed a triple Cys-His RNA binding motif characteristic of Gag of Pao/BEL-like elements, followed by the enzymatic domains of protease, reverse transcriptase (RT, RNAseH, and integrase, in that order. A phylogenetic tree of deduced RT sequences from 26 elements revealed that Sinbad was most closely related to an unnamed element from the zebrafish Danio rerio and to Saci-1, also from S. mansoni. It was also closely related to Pao from Bombyx mori and to Ninja of Drosophila simulans. Sinbad was only distantly related to the other schistosome LTR retrotransposons Boudicca, Gulliver, Saci-2, Saci-3, and Fugitive, which are gypsy-like. Southern hybridization and bioinformatics analyses indicated that there were about 50 copies of Sinbad in the S. mansoni genome. The presence of ESTs

  14. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

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    Michael J. Brumlik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known.

  15. Parasitic Zoonoses in Humans and Their Dogs from a Rural Community of Tropical Mexico

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    Antonio Ortega-Pacheco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was made on 89 inhabitants and their dogs from a rural community of Yucatan, Mexico, to determine the serological prevalence of some zoonotic parasitic agents. Samples were taken to monitor the presence and intensity of infection with gastrointestinal parasites in dogs. In humans, the serological prevalence of T. canis, T. gondii, and T. spiralis was 29.2%, 91.0%, and 6.7%, respectively. No associations were found between positive cases and studied variables. From the total of blood samples taken from dogs, 87 (97.6% were seropositive to T. gondii; only 52 viable fecal samples were collected from dogs of which 46.2% had the presence of gastrointestinal parasites with low to moderate intensity; from those, 12% had the presence of T. canis. This study demonstrates the presence of the studied zoonotic agents in the area particularly T. gondii which suggest a common source of infection in dogs and humans and a high number of oocyts present in the environment. Preventive measures must be designed towards good prophylactic practices in domestic and backyard animals (T. canis and T. spiralis. Contaminated sources with T. gondii (food and water should be further investigated in order to design effective control measures.

  16. Characterization of two cysteine proteases secreted by Blastocystis ST7, a human intestinal parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Ivan; Texier, Catherine; Poirier, Philippe; Viscogliosi, Eric; Tan, Kevin S W; Delbac, Frédéric; El Alaoui, Hicham

    2012-09-01

    Blastocystis spp. are unicellular anaerobic intestinal parasites of both humans and animals and the most prevalent ones found in human stool samples. Their association with various gastrointestinal disorders raises the questions of its pathogenicity and of the molecular mechanisms involved. Since secreted proteases are well-known to be implicated in intestinal parasite virulence, we intended to determine whether Blastocystis spp. possess such pathogenic factors. In silico analysis of the Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7) genome sequence highlighted 22 genes coding proteases which were predicted to be secreted. We characterized the proteolytic activities in the secretory products of Blastocystis ST7 using specific protease inhibitors. Two cysteine proteases, a cathepsin B and a legumain, were identified in the parasite culture supernatant by gelatin zymographic SDS-PAGE gel and MS/MS analysis. These proteases might act on intestinal cells and disturb gut function. This work provides serious molecular candidates to link Blastocystis spp. and intestinal disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-inflammatory Properties Of Menthol And Menthone In Schistosoma Mansoni Infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaia, Mauricio G.; Cagnazzo, Túlio di Orlando; Feitosa, Karina A.; Soares,Edson G.; Faccioli, Lúcia H.; Silmara M. Allegretti; Afonso, Ana; Anibal,Fernanda de Freitas

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by several species of trematode worms and it is believed that more than 261 million people are affected worldwide. New drug development has become essential because there is a risk of the parasite becoming resistant to Praziquantel, the only drug available for this infection. This study evaluated parasitological, immunological and histological parameters in mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni and treated with an herbal commercial medicine. This...

  18. Genetic diversity within Schistosoma haematobium: DNA barcoding reveals two distinct groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L Webster

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis in one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases, affecting millions of people and animals in developing countries. Amongst the human-infective species S. haematobium is one of the most widespread causing urogenital schistosomiasis, a major human health problem across Africa, however in terms of research this human pathogen has been severely neglected.To elucidate the genetic diversity of Schistosoma haematobium, a DNA 'barcoding' study was performed on parasite material collected from 41 localities representing 18 countries across Africa and the Indian Ocean Islands. Surprisingly low sequence variation was found within the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (cox1 and the NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 1 snad1. The 61 haplotypes found within 1978 individual samples split into two distinct groups; one (Group 1 that is predominately made up of parasites from the African mainland and the other (Group 2 that is made up of samples exclusively from the Indian Ocean Islands and the neighbouring African coastal regions. Within Group 1 there was a dominance of one particular haplotype (H1 representing 1574 (80% of the samples analyzed. Population genetic diversity increased in samples collected from the East African coastal regions and the data suggest that there has been movement of parasites between these areas and the Indian Ocean Islands.The high occurrence of the haplotype (H1 suggests that at some point in the recent evolutionary history of S. haematobium in Africa the population may have passed through a genetic 'bottleneck' followed by a population expansion. This study provides novel and extremely interesting insights into the population genetics of S. haematobium on a large geographic scale, which may have consequence for control and monitoring of urogenital schistosomiasis.

  19. Use of larval, parasitic female and egg antigens from Strongyloides venezuelensis to detect parasite-specific IgG and immune complexes in immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A L R; Nunes, D S; Gonçalves-Pires, M R F; Ueta, M T; Costa-Cruz, J M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to use larval, parasitic female and egg antigens from Strongyloides venezuelensis to detect parasite-specific IgG and immune complexes in human serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In total, 95 serum samples were analysed, consisting of 30 patients harbouring S. stercoralis larvae, 30 healthy subjects and 35 patients with other parasites. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic efficiency were calculated. A significant statistical difference was found in the detection of immune complexes and antibodies in patients harbouring S. stercoralis larvae from larval and eggs antigens, with higher positivity using larval antigen. The larval antigen showed the highest values for sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic efficiency in ELISA from detection of immune complexes. For the first time we used IgG anti-larvae, IgG anti-parasitic females or IgG anti-eggs for immune complex detection. We concluded that the association of antibody and immune complex detection could be used in the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

  20. PCR-RFLP analysis of the ITS2 region to identify Schistosoma haematobium and S. bovis from Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, K E; Mkoji, G M; Loker, E S

    2000-04-01

    Schistosoma haematobium, primarily a human parasite, and the closely related Schistosoma bovis from ruminants, are sympatric in many African countries such as Kenya. Because these two species 1) can inhabit the same Bulinus snails, 2) may be found in the same freshwater habitat, and 3) have morphologically similar cercariae, better means are needed to tell them apart. The second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region of the ribosomal gene complex (rDNA) of recent Kenyan isolates of both species was sequenced and found to be a 98% match. The S. bovis sequences were nearly identical (99%) to conspecific sequences from Niger; the S. haematobium sequences were nearly identical (99%) to conspecific sequences from Egypt, Mali, and Niger. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of a 480 base pair (bp) PCR product containing the ITS2 region using two restriction enzymes, Taq1 and Sau3A1, yielded species-specific fragment patterns that allowed successful identification of a single S. haematobium cercaria. The protocol outlined here is useful in providing a rapid, one-day identification of S. haematobium (and likely S. bovis) cercariae (the infective larval stage) and/or other life cycle stages in a basic molecular biology laboratory. By helping to determine whether schistosome-infected bulinid snails in a particular body of water are transmitting a human or an animal schistosome, or both, this analysis will aid in disease control and in ongoing epidemiological studies.

  1. The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Inpankaew, Tawin; Traub, Rebecca J; Khieu, Virak; Dalsgaard, Anders; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Chhoun, Chamnan; Sok, Daream; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In Cambodia, intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent in humans and particularly in children. Yet, information on potentially zoonotic parasites in animal reservoir hosts is lacking. In May 2012, faecal samples from 218 humans, 94 dogs and 76 pigs were collected from 67 households in Dong village, Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. Faecal samples were examined microscopically using sodium nitrate and zinc sulphate flotation methods, the Baermann method, Koga Agar plate culture, formalin-ether concentration technique and Kato Katz technique. PCR was used to confirm hookworm, Ascaris spp., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species and genotypes and allow further insight into the potential for zoonotic cross transmission of parasites in this community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An experimental Schistosoma mattheei infection in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolmarans, C T; de Kock, K N; van der Walt, M P

    1990-12-01

    Certain aspects of the immune response of a male experimentally infected with 3-day old cercariae of a pure field strain of Schistosoma matheei were investigated. Among others, aspects such as the reaction of eosinophils, neutrophils and blood platelets after infection, were included in the study. The involvement of IgG and the cross reaction between these antibodies and S. haematobium and S. mansoni were also investigated. The phenomenon that the cercariae were, 3 days after shedding, still capable of penetrating the skin causing an inflammatory response was studied. The results lend some support to the surmise that a pure S. mattheei infection in humans is incapable of any egg production.

  3. Parasitic infections associated with febrile conditions in Imo State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastrointestinal parasites such as Ascaris lumbricoides, Hookworm, Trichuris trichuria, Entamoeba histolytica, Taenia spp, Giardia intestinalis, Enterobius vermicularis and Balantidium coli were found in 1065(22.18%) of the study population. Urinary tract parasites, which included Trichomonas. vaginalis and Schistosoma ...

  4. Species-specific escape of Plasmodium sporozoites from oocysts of avian, rodent, and human malarial parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfano, Alessandra S; Nacif-Pimenta, Rafael; Duarte, Ana P M; Villegas, Luis M; Rodrigues, Nilton B; Pinto, Luciana C; Campos, Keillen M M; Pinilla, Yudi T; Chaves, Bárbara; Barbosa Guerra, Maria G V; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Smith, Ryan C; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Lacerda, Marcus V G; Secundino, Nágila F C; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Pimenta, Paulo F P

    2016-08-02

    Malaria is transmitted when an infected mosquito delivers Plasmodium sporozoites into a vertebrate host. There are many species of Plasmodium and, in general, the infection is host-specific. For example, Plasmodium gallinaceum is an avian parasite, while Plasmodium berghei infects mice. These two parasites have been extensively used as experimental models of malaria transmission. Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are the most important agents of human malaria, a life-threatening disease of global importance. To complete their life cycle, Plasmodium parasites must traverse the mosquito midgut and form an oocyst that will divide continuously. Mature oocysts release thousands of sporozoites into the mosquito haemolymph that must reach the salivary gland to infect a new vertebrate host. The current understanding of the biology of oocyst formation and sporozoite release is mostly based on experimental infections with P. berghei, and the conclusions are generalized to other Plasmodium species that infect humans without further morphological analyses. Here, it is described the microanatomy of sporozoite escape from oocysts of four Plasmodium species: the two laboratory models, P. gallinaceum and P. berghei, and the two main species that cause malaria in humans, P. vivax and P. falciparum. It was found that sporozoites have species-specific mechanisms of escape from the oocyst. The two model species of Plasmodium had a common mechanism, in which the oocyst wall breaks down before sporozoites emerge. In contrast, P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoites show a dynamic escape mechanism from the oocyst via polarized propulsion. This study demonstrated that Plasmodium species do not share a common mechanism of sporozoite escape, as previously thought, but show complex and species-specific mechanisms. In addition, the knowledge of this phenomenon in human Plasmodium can facilitate transmission-blocking studies and not those ones only based on the murine and avian models.

  5. Look what the cat dragged in: do parasites contribute to human cultural diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2005-01-01

    If human culture emerges from the modal personality of a population, can global variation in parasitism that affects personality lead to cultural diversity among nations? The answer could help explain why people seem to vary so much from one land to another. Thomas et al. (2005) review how parasites manipulate behaviour, including human behaviour. To quote them, “The rabies virus lives in the brain, affording the virus ample opportunity to directly affect host behaviour. Rabid animals do show changes in behaviour, including increased aggression and biting.” Rabies affects a wide range of mammals and the aggressive biting associated with furious rabies appears to increase transmission. The personality transformation of infected humans can be horrifying, transforming loved ones into thrashing, baying beasts. Not coincidentally, in Europe, past periods of rabies outbreaks correspond to increases in werewolf trials. Although rabies can have a dramatic effect, the present rarity of human rabies cases and the availability of a vaccine, means that the behavioural effects of rabies are primarily an illustrative curiosity.

  6. Crystal structure of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H; Certa, U; Döbeli, H; Jakob, P; Hol, W G

    1998-03-31

    The structure of the glycolytic enzyme class I fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Homotetrameric P. falciparum aldolase (PfALDO) crystallizes in space group P3221 with one 80 kDa dimer per asymmetric unit. The final refined PfALDO model has an R-factor of 0.239 and an R-free of 0.329 with respect to data from 8 to 3.0 A resolution. PfALDO is potentially a target for antimalarial drug design as the intraerythrocytic merozoite lifestage of P. falciparum is completely dependent upon glycolysis for its ATP production. Thus, inhibitors directed against the glycolytic enzymes in P. falciparum may be effective in killing the parasite. The structure of PfALDO is compared with the previously determined structure of human aldolase in order to determine possible targets for the structure-based design of selective PfALDO ligands. The salient structural differences include a hydrophobic pocket on the surface of PfALDO, which results from some amino acid changes and a single residue deletion compared with human aldolase, and the overall quaternary structure of the PfALDO tetramer, which buries less surface area than human aldolase.

  7. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A. (McMaster U.); (Melbourne); (Toronto); (Deakin); (HWMRI)

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  8. Detection of intestinal parasites on field-grown strawberries in the Federal District of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina Morais da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This study evaluated the presence of pathogenic human parasites on field-grown strawberries in the Federal District of Brazil. Methods A total of 48 samples of strawberries and 48 soil samples from 16 properties were analyzed. Results Contaminated strawberries were detected in 56% of the properties. Schistosoma mansoni, Ascaris lumbricoides or Ascaris suum, Balantidium coli, Endolimax nana, and Entamoeba spp. were detected. Soil was contaminated with Entamoeba spp., Entamoeba coli, Strongyloides spp., Ancylostomatidae, and Hymenolepis nana. Conclusions Producers should be instructed on the safe handling of strawberries in order to reduce the incidence of strawberries that are contaminated with enteroparasites.

  9. Toxic effects of chromium on Schistosoma haematobium miracidia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolmarans, C.T.; Yssel, E.; Hamilton-Attwell, V.L.

    1988-12-01

    Various heavy metals have recently been evaluated as molluscicides for freshwater snails, which act as intermediate hosts of trematode parasites of medical or veterinary importance. Very little information, however, is available on heavy metals that may be suitable to eliminate the parasites as such. Suitable compounds should also inhibit the penetration ability of parasites as well as stunt the development of those who do not penetrate their hosts. In the light of these requirements, the present study evaluated the effect of chromium on the miracidia of Schistosoma haematobium, which causes urinary bilharzia. Attention was mainly focused on (1) the chromium concentration which resulted in 100% mortality (2) the effect of chromium on the external and internal morphology of the miracidia, and (3) the ability of the miracidia to form sporocytes in vitro and in vivo and to penetrate their intermediate host snail, Bulinus africanus.

  10. Functional characterization of peroxiredoxins from the human protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mastronicola

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis, causative of one of the most common human intestinal diseases worldwide, infects the mucosa of the proximal small intestine, where it has to cope with O2 and nitric oxide (NO. Elucidating the antioxidant defense system of this pathogen lacking catalase and other conventional antioxidant enzymes is thus important to unveil novel potential drug targets. Enzymes metabolizing O2, NO and superoxide anion (O2 (-• have been recently reported for Giardia, but it is yet unknown how the parasite copes with H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-. Giardia encodes two yet uncharacterized 2-cys peroxiredoxins (Prxs, GiPrx1a and GiPrx1b. Peroxiredoxins are peroxidases implicated in virulence and drug resistance in several parasitic protozoa, able to protect from nitroxidative stress and repair oxidatively damaged molecules. GiPrx1a and a truncated form of GiPrx1b (deltaGiPrx1b were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and functionally characterized. Both Prxs effectively metabolize H2O2 and alkyl-hydroperoxides (cumyl- and tert-butyl-hydroperoxide in the presence of NADPH and E. coli thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin as the reducing system. Stopped-flow experiments show that both proteins in the reduced state react with ONOO(- rapidly (k = 4×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 and 2×10(5 M(-1 s(-1 at 4°C, for GiPrx1a and deltaGiPrx1b, respectively. Consistent with a protective role against oxidative stress, expression of GiPrx1a (but not deltaGiPrx1b is induced in parasitic cells exposed to air O2 for 24 h. Based on these results, GiPrx1a and deltaGiPrx1b are suggested to play an important role in the antioxidant defense of Giardia, possibly contributing to pathogenesis.

  11. [A rare zoonosis in Hungary: cercarial dermatitis caused by Schistosoma turkestanicum blood-fluke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Alexandra; Dán, Ádám; Dénes, Béla; Kucsera, István; Danka, József; Majoros, Gábor

    2016-10-01

    Several trematodes that parasitize vertebrate animals utilize swimming aquatic larvae to infect the host percutaneously. The most important ones among these parasites are the blood-flukes of birds and mammals comprising species that are also zoonotic. Within this latter group are species that cause the bilharziasis or schistosomiasis of inhabitants of the tropical countries, and other trematode species that are able to penetrate human skin, but do not develop to an adult form of the worm in the body. In temperate climates this latter type of infection occurs mainly in the form of an unpleasant inflammation of the skin and is often called "swimmer's itch". In most of these cases, the origin of the larvae remains unexplored, the source of the infection is neglected by the medical or veterinarian practitioners. Herein we report for the first time in Hungary that the cause of such dermatitis was the cercariae of Schistosoma turkestanicum, which infected red deer (Cervus elaphus) in this country. The local name of this pristine disease is "water mange" and it occurs only in one of the floodplains of the Danube. On the basis of informal communication this symptom seems to be rather regular among people who do fishing or have a bath in the habitat of the blood-fluke. In the case of adequate anamnesis it is worth examining the origin of the cercarial dermatitis which may give cross-reactions with human schistosomiasis during serological tests. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(40), 1579-1586.

  12. Natural infection of Plasmodium brasilianum in humans: Man and monkey share quartan malaria parasites in the Venezuelan Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalremruata, Albert; Magris, Magda; Vivas-Martínez, Sarai; Koehler, Maike; Esen, Meral; Kempaiah, Prakasha; Jeyaraj, Sankarganesh; Perkins, Douglas Jay; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Metzger, Wolfram G

    2015-09-01

    The quartan malaria parasite Plasmodium malariae is the widest spread and best adapted human malaria parasite. The simian Plasmodium brasilianum causes quartan fever in New World monkeys and resembles P. malariae morphologically. Since the genetics of the two parasites are nearly identical, differing only in a range of mutations expected within a species, it has long been speculated that the two are the same. However, no naturally acquired infection with parasites termed as P. brasilianum has been found in humans until now. We investigated malaria cases from remote Yanomami indigenous communities of the Venezuelan Amazon and analyzed the genes coding for the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and the small subunit of ribosomes (18S) by species-specific PCR and capillary based-DNA sequencing. Based on 18S rRNA gene sequencing, we identified 12 patients harboring malaria parasites which were 100% identical with P. brasilianum isolated from the monkey, Alouatta seniculus. Translated amino acid sequences of the CS protein gene showed identical immunodominant repeat units between quartan malaria parasites isolated from both humans and monkeys. This study reports, for the first time, naturally acquired infections in humans with parasites termed as P. brasilianum. We conclude that quartan malaria parasites are easily exchanged between humans and monkeys in Latin America. We hypothesize a lack of host specificity in mammalian hosts and consider quartan malaria to be a true anthropozoonosis. Since the name P. brasilianum suggests a malaria species distinct from P. malariae, we propose that P. brasilianum should have a nomenclatorial revision in case further research confirms our findings. The expansive reservoir of mammalian hosts discriminates quartan malaria from other Plasmodium spp. and requires particular research efforts.

  13. Progesterone Induces Scolex Evagination of the Human Parasite Taenia solium: Evolutionary Implications to the Host-Parasite Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Galileo; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Hernández-Hernández, Olivia Tania; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; García-Varela, Martín; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is a health problem in underdeveloped and developed countries. Sex hormones are involved in cysticercosis prevalence in female and male pigs. Here, we evaluated the effects of progesterone and its antagonist RU486 on scolex evagination, which is the initial step in the development of the adult worm. Interestingly, progesterone increased T. solium scolex evagination and worm growth, in a concentration-independent pattern. Progesterone effects could be mediated by a novel T. solium progesterone receptor (TsPR), since RU486 inhibits both scolex evagination and worm development induced by progesterone. Using RT-PCR and western blot, sequences related to progesterone receptor were detected in the parasite. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that TsPR is highly related to fish and amphibian progesterone receptors, whereas it has a distant relation with birds and mammals. Conclusively, progesterone directly acts upon T. solium cysticerci, possibly through its binding to a progesterone receptor synthesized by the parasite. PMID:20037735

  14. Progesterone Induces Scolex Evagination of the Human Parasite Taenia solium: Evolutionary Implications to the Host-Parasite Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galileo Escobedo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Taenia solium cysticercosis is a health problem in underdeveloped and developed countries. Sex hormones are involved in cysticercosis prevalence in female and male pigs. Here, we evaluated the effects of progesterone and its antagonist RU486 on scolex evagination, which is the initial step in the development of the adult worm. Interestingly, progesterone increased T. solium scolex evagination and worm growth, in a concentration-independent pattern. Progesterone effects could be mediated by a novel T. solium progesterone receptor (TsPR, since RU486 inhibits both scolex evagination and worm development induced by progesterone. Using RT-PCR and western blot, sequences related to progesterone receptor were detected in the parasite. A phylogenetic analysis reveals that TsPR is highly related to fish and amphibian progesterone receptors, whereas it has a distant relation with birds and mammals. Conclusively, progesterone directly acts upon T. solium cysticerci, possibly through its binding to a progesterone receptor synthesized by the parasite.

  15. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Brien Andersen, L.; Karim, A. B.; Roager, Henrik Munch

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we...... set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis...

  16. Biotechnological advances in the diagnosis, species differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of Schistosoma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guang-Hui; Li, Juan; Blair, David; Li, Xiao-Yan; Elsheikha, Hany M; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zou, Feng-Cai; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a serious parasitic disease caused by blood-dwelling flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Throughout the world, schistosomiasis is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, with close to 800 million people at risk of infection. Precise methods for identification of Schistosoma species and diagnosis of schistosomiasis are crucial for an enhanced understanding of parasite epidemiology that informs effective antiparasitic treatment and preventive measures. Traditional approaches for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis include etiological, immunological and imaging techniques. Diagnosis of schistosomiasis has been revolutionized by the advent of new molecular technologies to amplify parasite nucleic acids. Among these, polymerase chain reaction-based methods have been useful in the analysis of genetic variation among Schistosoma spp. Mass spectrometry is now extending the range of biological molecules that can be detected. In this review, we summarize traditional, non-DNA-based diagnostic methods and then describe and discuss the current and developing molecular techniques for the diagnosis, species differentiation and phylogenetic analysis of Schistosoma spp. These exciting techniques provide foundations for further development of more effective and precise approaches to differentiate schistosomes and diagnose schistosomiasis in the clinic, and also have important implication for exploring novel measures to control schistosomiasis in the near future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Photodynamic therapy for Schistosoma mansoni: Promising outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Nathália Bandeira; Dos Santos, Letícia Fernanda Moreira; de Castro, Mayara Santos; Souza, Raquel Lopes Martins; Marques, Marcos José; Castro, Aline Pereira; de Castro, Andreísa Teixeira; de Carli, Marina Lara; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa; Silva, Matheus Siqueira; Moraes, Gabriel de Oliveira Isac; Beijo, Luiz Alberto; Brigagão, Maísa Ribeiro Pereira Lima; Sperandio, Felipe Fornias

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, for the very first time, the effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT) on Schistosoma mansoni in vitro by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation throughout the treatment, as well as the behavior of the parasites (mating, motility and contraction/shortening), and damage to their tegument and excretory systems. The parasites were divided into 4 groups: control, photosensitizer, laser and PDT. Light irradiation was delivered with an InGaAlP low-level laser device operating at 660nm, with 40mW and 100J/cm(2). For PDT, different toluidine blue dye (TBO) concentrations and times of exposure were utilized. Interestingly, TBO-mediated PDT was able to kill S. mansoni (P<0.001) due to the significant amount of ROS released that inflicted damages in the tegument and excretory system, as well as contraction and cessation of motility. In addition, males of S. mansoni were shown to be more sensitive to PDT if compared to their corresponding females when the optimal TBO concentration of 31.2μL was considered (P=0.0126). PDT presents two major advantages: not inducing microbial resistance and also lacking adverse effects. Therefore, PDT may become a promising therapeutic alternative for schistosomiasis in the near future, especially for cases of allergy and resistance to praziquantel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Discovery by organism based high-throughput screening of new multi-stage compounds affecting Schistosoma mansoni viability, egg formation and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Alessandra; Lalli, Cristiana; Gimmelli, Roberto; Nizi, Emanuela; Andreini, Matteo; Gennari, Nadia; Saccoccia, Fulvio; Harper, Steven; Bresciani, Alberto; Ruberti, Giovina

    2017-10-01

    Schistosomiasis, one of the most prevalent neglected parasitic diseases affecting humans and animals, is caused by the Platyhelminthes of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomes are the only trematodes to have evolved sexual dimorphism and the constant pairing with a male is essential for the sexual maturation of the female. Pairing is required for the full development of the two major female organs, ovary and vitellarium that are involved in the production of different cell types such as oocytes and vitellocytes, which represent the core elements of the whole egg machinery. Sexually mature females can produce a large number of eggs each day. Due to the importance of egg production for both life cycle and pathogenesis, there is significant interest in the search for new strategies and compounds not only affecting parasite viability but also egg production. Here we use a recently developed high-throughput organism-based approach, based on ATP quantitation in the schistosomula larval stage of Schistosoma mansoni for the screening of a large compound library, and describe a pharmacophore-based drug selection approach and phenotypic analyses to identify novel multi-stage schistosomicidal compounds. Interestingly, worm pairs treated with seven of the eight compounds identified show a phenotype characterized by defects in eggshell assemblage within the ootype and egg formation with degenerated oocytes and vitelline cells engulfment in the uterus and/or oviduct. We describe promising new molecules that not only impair the schistosomula larval stage but also impact juvenile and adult worm viability and egg formation and production in vitro.

  19. Human Intestinal Microbiota: Interaction Between Parasites and the Host Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partida-Rodríguez, Oswaldo; Serrano-Vázquez, Angélica; Nieves-Ramírez, Miriam E; Moran, Patricia; Rojas, Liliana; Portillo, Tobias; González, Enrique; Hernández, Eric; Finlay, B Brett; Ximenez, Cecilia

    2017-12-28

    The human gut is a highly complex ecosystem with an extensive microbial community, and the influence of the intestinal microbiota reaches the entire host organism. For example, the microbiome regulates fat storage, stimulates or renews epithelial cells, and influences the development and maturation of the brain and the immune system. Intestinal microbes can protect against infection by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Hence, the maintenance of homeostasis between the gut microbiota and the rest of the body is crucial for health, with dysbiosis affecting disease. This review focuses on intestinal protozoa, especially those still representing a public health problem in Mexico, and their interactions with the microbiome and the host. The decrease in prevalence of intestinal helminthes in humans left a vacant ecological niche that was quickly occupied by protozoa. Although the mechanisms governing the interaction between intestinal microbiota and protozoa are poorly understood, it is known that the composition of the intestinal bacterial populations modulates the progression of protozoan infection and the outcome of parasitic disease. Most reports on the complex interactions between intestinal bacteria, protozoa and the immune system emphasize the protective role of the microbiota against protozoan infection. Insights into such protection may facilitate the manipulation of microbiota components to prevent and treat intestinal protozoan infections. Here we discuss recent findings about the immunoregulatory effect of intestinal microbiota with regards to intestinal colonization by protozoa, focusing on infections by Entamoeba histolytica, Blastocystis spp, Giardia duodenalis, Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. The possible consequences of the microbiota on parasitic, allergic and autoimmune disorders are also considered. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Study of the gastrointestinal parasitic fauna of captive non-human primates (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzani, Sergio Aurelio; Gazzonis, Alessia Libera; Epis, Sara; Manfredi, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine helminths and protozoans in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) imported from registered breeding facilities in China and their relation to health risks for non-human primate handlers in biomedical research centers and in breeding facilities. Fresh fecal samples were collected from a total of 443 M. fascicularis and analyzed by copromicroscopical analysis, immunoenzymatic, or molecular assays. As to helminths, whose eggs were shed in 2.03% of the samples, Trichuris and Oesophagostomum were the only two taxa found, with low prevalence and low eggs per gram (EPG) values. Protozoans were more frequently detected (87.40%), with Entamoeba coli (85.19%) and Endolimax nana (79.26%) as the most prevalent species shed. Other parasites found by fecal smear examination were uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoebas (78.52%), Iodamoeba bütschlii (42.96%), and Chilomastix mesnili (24.44%), while cysts of Balantidium coli (22.2%) were only observed by sedimentation. No coproantigens of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba histolytica complex were detected. Blastocystis sp. infection was noticed in 87.63% of macaques by PCR. These cynomolgus monkeys were infected with many subtypes (ST1, ST2, ST3, ST5, and ST7), where the predominant Blastocystis sp. subtypes were ST2 (77.5%), followed by ST1 (63.5%). Data collected confirmed the presence of potentially zoonotic parasites and a high parasite diversity, suggesting the need for appropriate and sensitive techniques to adequately control them and related health risks for handlers of non-human primates in biomedical research centers and in breeding facilities.

  1. Leukocyte Lysis and Cytokine Induction by the Human Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Mercer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv is an extracellular protozoan parasite that causes the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection: trichomoniasis. While acute symptoms in women may include vaginitis, infections are often asymptomatic, but can persist and are associated with medical complications including increased HIV susceptibility, infertility, pre-term labor, and higher incidence of cervical cancer. Heightened inflammation resulting from Tv infection could account for these complications. Effective cellular immune responses to Tv have not been characterized, and re-infection is common, suggesting a dysfunctional adaptive immune response. Using primary human leukocyte components, we have established an in vitro co-culture system to assess the interaction between Tv and the cells of the human immune system. We determined that in vitro, Tv is able to lyse T-cells and B-cells, showing a preference for B-cells. We also found that Tv lysis of lymphocytes was mediated by contact-dependent and soluble factors. Tv lysis of monocytes is far less efficient, and almost entirely contact-dependent. Interestingly, a common symbiont of Tv, Mycoplasma hominis, did not affect cytolytic activity of the parasite, but had a major impact on cytokine responses. M. hominis enabled more diverse inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to Tv and, of the cytokines tested, Tv strains cleared of M. hominis induced only IL-8 secretion from monocytes. The quality of the adaptive immune response to Tv is therefore likely influenced by Tv symbionts, commensals, and concomitant infections, and may be further complicated by direct parasite lysis of effector immune cells.

  2. Leukocyte Lysis and Cytokine Induction by the Human Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Frances; Diala, Fitz Gerald I; Chen, Yi-Pei; Molgora, Brenda M; Ng, Shek Hang; Johnson, Patricia J

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv) is an extracellular protozoan parasite that causes the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection: trichomoniasis. While acute symptoms in women may include vaginitis, infections are often asymptomatic, but can persist and are associated with medical complications including increased HIV susceptibility, infertility, pre-term labor, and higher incidence of cervical cancer. Heightened inflammation resulting from Tv infection could account for these complications. Effective cellular immune responses to Tv have not been characterized, and re-infection is common, suggesting a dysfunctional adaptive immune response. Using primary human leukocyte components, we have established an in vitro co-culture system to assess the interaction between Tv and the cells of the human immune system. We determined that in vitro, Tv is able to lyse T-cells and B-cells, showing a preference for B-cells. We also found that Tv lysis of lymphocytes was mediated by contact-dependent and soluble factors. Tv lysis of monocytes is far less efficient, and almost entirely contact-dependent. Interestingly, a common symbiont of Tv, Mycoplasma hominis, did not affect cytolytic activity of the parasite, but had a major impact on cytokine responses. M. hominis enabled more diverse inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to Tv and, of the cytokines tested, Tv strains cleared of M. hominis induced only IL-8 secretion from monocytes. The quality of the adaptive immune response to Tv is therefore likely influenced by Tv symbionts, commensals, and concomitant infections, and may be further complicated by direct parasite lysis of effector immune cells.

  3. RNA interference in Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula: selectivity, sensitivity and operation for larger-scale screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Stefanić

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The possible emergence of resistance to the only available drug for schistosomiasis spurs drug discovery that has been recently incentivized by the availability of improved transcriptome and genome sequence information. Transient RNAi has emerged as a straightforward and important technique to interrogate that information through decreased or loss of gene function and identify potential drug targets. To date, RNAi studies in schistosome stages infecting humans have focused on single (or up to 3 genes of interest. Therefore, in the context of standardizing larger RNAi screens, data are limited on the extent of possible off-targeting effects, gene-to-gene variability in RNAi efficiency and the operational capabilities and limits of RNAi. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated in vitro the sensitivity and selectivity of RNAi using double-stranded (dsRNA (approximately 500 bp designed to target 11 Schistosoma mansoni genes that are expressed in different tissues; the gut, tegument and otherwise. Among the genes investigated were 5 that had been previously predicted to be essential for parasite survival. We employed mechanically transformed schistosomula that are relevant to parasitism in humans, amenable to screen automation and easier to obtain in greater numbers than adult parasites. The operational parameters investigated included defined culture media for optimal parasite maintenance, transfection strategy, time- and dose-dependency of RNAi, and dosing limits. Of 7 defined culture media tested, Basch Medium 169 was optimal for parasite maintenance. RNAi was best achieved by co-incubating parasites and dsRNA (standardized to 30 µg/ml for 6 days; electroporation provided no added benefit. RNAi, including interference of more than one transcript, was selective to the gene target(s within the pools of transcripts representative of each tissue. Concentrations of dsRNA above 90 µg/ml were directly toxic. RNAi efficiency was

  4. Immunoblot analysis of membrane antigens of Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma intercalatum, and Schistosoma haematobium against Schistosoma-infected patient sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, Italo M; Ballen, Diana E; Mendoza, L; Ferrer, Alain; Pointier, Jean-Pierre; Kombila, Maryvonne; Richard-Lenoble, Dominique; Théron, Andre

    2010-04-01

    Antigens present in aqueous n-butanolic extracts (BE) of Schistosoma mansoni (Venezuelan JL strain), Schistosoma intercalatum (Cameroon EDEA strain), and Schistosoma haematobium (Yemen strain) adult worm membranes were compared in immunoblot against sera of patients infected with S. mansoni, S. intercalatum, S. haematobium, Schistosoma japonicum, or Schistosoma mekongi looking for similarities (common antigens) and differences (species-specific antigens). About 17 S. mansoni BE polypeptides (M (r) approximately 8 to >80 kDa) were commonly recognized by S. mansoni-infected patient sera from Venezuela, Senegal, and Ethiopia. S. intercalatum-, S. haematobium-, or S. japonicum-infected sera were almost unreactive with S. mansoni BE. Nonetheless, S. mekongi-infected sera weakly cross-reacted with a approximately 10-15-kDa subset of S. mansoni BE. About 72.7% of S. intercalatum-infected patient sera reacted with a approximately 19-21-kDa complex in S. intercalatum BE and cross-reacted with a similar complex in S. haematobium BE. Conversely, all S. haematobium-infected patient sera reacted with a approximately 19-21-kDa complex in S. haematobium BE and cross-reacted with the approximately 19-21-kDa complex in S. intercalatum BE; S. mansoni- and S. japonicum-infected patient sera did not react with S. intercalatum or S. haematobium BE. Results showed the presence of a common membrane antigen between African schistosome species and species-specific antigens in S. mansoni BE that could be useful to discriminate between species and/or to detect Schistosoma infections.

  5. Frequency and possible consequences of hybridization between Schistosoma haematobium and S. mattheei in the Eastern Transvaal Lowveld.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, F J

    1990-12-01

    A survey was conducted at a locality in the Eastern Transvaal Lowveld where the prevalence of human infection with the bovine parasite, Schistosoma mattheei, is relatively high. It was found that, when compared to the number of S. haematobium eggs released into the environment, the number of S. mattheei eggs, with enclosed hybrid miracidia, is small. The consequences of backcrossing between the hybrids and S. haematobium was considered; a mathematical model indicated that a high percentage of the S. haematobium population should contain a small proportion of S. mattheei genes. The results indicate that it is highly unlikely that the two species will evolve into a single species, neither does it seem that the virulence of the parental species will be influenced.

  6. Tissue-specific transcriptome analyses provide new insights into GPCR signalling in adult Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnel, Steffen; Wheeler, Nic; Lu, Zhigang; Wangwiwatsin, Arporn; McVeigh, Paul; Maule, Aaron; Berriman, Matthew; Day, Timothy; Ribeiro, Paula; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2018-01-01

    Schistosomes are blood-dwelling trematodes with global impact on human and animal health. Because medical treatment is currently based on a single drug, praziquantel, there is urgent need for the development of alternative control strategies. The Schistosoma mansoni genome project provides a platform to study and connect the genetic repertoire of schistosomes to specific biological functions essential for successful parasitism. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest superfamily of transmembrane receptors throughout the Eumetazoan phyla, including platyhelminths. Due to their involvement in diverse biological processes, their pharmacological importance, and proven druggability, GPCRs are promising targets for new anthelmintics. However, to identify candidate receptors, a more detailed understanding of the roles of GPCR signalling in schistosome biology is essential. An updated phylogenetic analysis of the S. mansoni GPCR genome (GPCRome) is presented, facilitated by updated genome data that allowed a more precise annotation of GPCRs. Additionally, we review the current knowledge on GPCR signalling in this parasite and provide new insights into the potential roles of GPCRs in schistosome reproduction based on the findings of a recent tissue-specific transcriptomic study in paired and unpaired S. mansoni. According to the current analysis, GPCRs contribute to gonad-specific functions but also to nongonad, pairing-dependent processes. The latter may regulate gonad-unrelated functions during the multifaceted male-female interaction. Finally, we compare the schistosome GPCRome to that of another parasitic trematode, Fasciola, and discuss the importance of GPCRs to basic and applied research. Phylogenetic analyses display GPCR diversity in free-living and parasitic platyhelminths and suggest diverse functions in schistosomes. Although their roles need to be substantiated by functional studies in the future, the data support the selection of GPCR candidates

  7. Schistosoma mekongi cathepsin B and its use in the development of an immunodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangfuang, Manaw; Chusongsang, Yupa; Limpanont, Yanin; Vanichviriyakit, Rapeepun; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Sobhon, Prasert; Preyavichyapugdee, Narin

    2016-03-01

    Schistosomiasis mekongi is one of the most important human parasitic diseases caused by Schistosoma mekongi in South-east Asia. The endemic area is the Mekong River sub-region from Laos to Cambodia. This parasite also infects dogs and pigs which are its alternative host species. Currently, the lack of reliable rapid diagnosis makes it difficult to monitor the infection and spreading of the disease. In this study, we screened the antigens of the parasite with sera of infected mice using Western blotting and identified proteins of interest with LC-MS/MS to obtain potential candidate proteins for diagnostic development. This assay yielded 2 immunoreactive bands at molecular masses of 31 and 22kDa. The 31kDa protein was the major band identified as cathepsin B, and its gene was cloned to obtain a full cDNA sequence (SmekCatB). The cDNA consisted of 1123bp and its longest reading frame encoded for 342 amino acids with some putative post translation modifications. The recombinant SmekCatB (rSmekCatB) with hexahistidine tag at the C-terminus was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions. The rSmekCatB reacted with sera of S. mekongi-infected mice. Indirect ELISA using rSmekCatB as the antigen to detect mouse antibodies, revealed a sensitivity of 91.67% for schistosomiasis mekongi and the specificity of 100%. Our data suggested that SmekCatB is one of the most promising parasitic antigens that could be used for the diagnosis of S. mekongi infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A meta-analysis of experimental studies of attenuated Schistosoma mansoni vaccines in the mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuho eFukushige

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a water-borne, parasitic disease of major public health importance. There has been considerable effort for several decades towards the development of a vaccine against the disease. Numerous mouse experimental studies using attenuated Schistosoma mansoni parasites for vaccination have been published since the 1960s. However, to date, there has been no systematic review or meta-analysis of these data. The aim of this study is to identify measurable experimental conditions that affect the level of protection against re-infection with S. mansoni in mice vaccinated with radiation attenuated cercariae. Following a systematic review, a total of 755 observations were extracted from 105 articles (published 1963-2007 meeting the searching criteria. Random effects meta-regression models were used to identify the influential predictors.Three predictors were found to have statistically significant effects on the level of protection from vaccination: increasing numbers of immunizing parasites had a positive effect on fraction of protection whereas increasing radiation dose and time to challenge infection had negative effects. Models showed that the irradiated cercariae vaccine has the potential to achieve protection as high as 78% with a single dose vaccination. This declines slowly over time but remains high for at least 8 months after the last immunization. These findings provide insights into the optimal delivery of attenuated parasite vaccination and into the nature and development of protective vaccine induced immunity against schistosomiasis which may inform the formulation of human vaccines and the predicted duration of protection and thus frequency of booster vaccines.

  9. Cloning, sequence and expression of the lactate dehydrogenase gene from the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium vivax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut-Balik, Dilek; Akbulut, Ekrem; Shoemark, Debbie K; Celik, Venhar; Moreton, Kathleen M; Sessions, Richard B; Holbrook, J John; Brady, R Leo

    2004-07-01

    Increased drug resistance to anti-malarials highlights the need for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of malaria. To this end, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) gene was cloned and sequenced from genomic DNA of Plasmodium vivax ( PvLDH) Belem strain. The 316 amino acid protein-coding region of the PvLDH gene was inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pKK223-3 and a 34 kDa protein with LDH activity was expressed in E. coli. Structural differences between human LDHs and PfLDH make the latter an attractive target for inhibitors leading to novel anti-malarial drugs. The sequence similarity between PvLDH and PfLDH (90% residue identity and no insertions or deletions) indicate that the same approach could be applied to Plasmodium vivax, the most common human malaria parasite in the world.

  10. Thermostability of heterophile antibodies from human sera infected with Schistosoma mansoni and geo-helminths: an immuno-metric statistical analysis Termo estabilidade de anticorpos líticos heterófilos de soro de pacientes infectados com Schistosoma mansoni e geo-helmintos: uma análise estatística imuno-métrica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Chamone

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibody in human sera that induces lysis of sheep erythrocytes in hemolytic assay was investigated. The present study showed that the presence in serum of the thermostable cytolytic anti-sheep red blood cells antibodies is dependent on the Schistosoma mansoni infection, and this is more frequent in adults than in children. The thermostable characteristic of hemolysins in normal sera was not dependent on the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura or hookworm geo-helminths. Further, thermostable complement-activating heterophile antibodies were noticed in children in association with massive number of S. mansoni eggs. The results were obtained by using the z- and the chi-square tests. The z-test allows us to formulate a one-sided alternative, i.e., a tendency of one of the attributes. On the other hand, the chi-square test analyzes the independence between attributes by using a contingency table. Besides the obtained results being interesting in the field of schistosomiasis mansoni, they can provide a new insight into the use of statistics in medical science.Foram investigados anticorpos de soro humano que provocam lise de eritrócitos de carneiro em ensaios hemolíticos. O presente estudo mostra que a presença de anticorpos citolíticos termoestáveis contra hemácias de carneiro é dependente da infecção por Schistosoma mansoni e é mais freqüente em adultos do que em crianças. A característica termo estável da hemolisina em soros normais não é dependente da presença de Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura ou ancilostomídeos. Além disto, anticorpos heterófilos hemolíticos termo estáveis ativadores de complemento foram demonstrados em crianças com associação de altas cargas de ovos de S. mansoni. Os resultados foram obtidos usando-se os testes z- e o qui quadrado. O teste z- nos permite formular uma alternativa "one side", isto é, a tendência de um dos atributos. Por outro lado o teste do qui quadrado

  11. DNA typing of ancient parasite eggs from environmental samples identifies human and animal worm infections in Viking-age settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Nejsum, Peter

    Human worm infections have, to a large extent, been eradicated in countries with high sanitary standards by preventing the fecal-oral transmission of infective eggs. It is possible to study parasite infections among past populations by retrieving and analyzing parasite eggs using...... paleoparasitological techniques such as morphological examination and molecular identification. Hard-shelled parasite eggs can be recovered from the environment even after extended periods of time and they have shown to be excellent reservoirs of ancient DNA (aDNA). aDNA analysis has enabled identifying which species...... of parasite an egg originates from. This is impossible solely using morphological examination. One example is the whipworm, Trichuris spp. that is known to have narrow host ranges, which makes it particularly suited to determine from which host an egg originates. A case study will be presented, in which...

  12. The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schär, Fabian; Inpankaew, Tawin; Traub, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    ., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs...... Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp......., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species...

  13. The Clp chaperones and proteases of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkouri, Majida; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L Y; Artz, Jennifer D; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Goodman, C Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A

    2010-12-03

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clp chaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DNA typing of ancient parasite eggs from environmental samples identifies human and animal worm infections in viking-age settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Nejsum, Peter; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    Ancient parasite eggs were recovered from environmental samples collected at a Viking-age settlement in Viborg, Denmark, dated 1018-1030 A.D. Morphological examination identified Ascaris sp., Trichuris sp., and Fasciola sp. eggs, but size and shape did not allow species identification. By carefully...... the Ascaris sp. 18S rRNA gene in recent isolates from humans and pigs of global distribution and show that this is not a suited marker for species-specific identification. Finally, we discuss ancient parasitism in Denmark and the implementation of aDNA analysis methods in paleoparasitological studies. We...... argue that when employing species-specific identification, soil samples offer excellent opportunities for studies of human parasite infections and of human and animal interactions of the past....

  15. Endomyocardial Fibrosis Associated With Schistosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-01

    Dec 1, 2014 ... SUMMARY. Endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) is a form of restrictive cardiomyopathy common in the tropics and subtropics. The aetiology of EMF is unknown but helminth infes- tations such as schistosomiasis have been implicated. Two boys aged 8 and 10 years with EMF associated with Schistosoma ...

  16. Investigation of intestinal parasites in pig feces that are also human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Hayriye Kirkoyun; Boral, Ozden; Metiner, Kemal; Ilgaz, Atilla

    2009-01-01

    A total of 238 pig fecal specimens were collected from pig farms in Corlu (Tekirdağ), Ayazma, and Arnavutköy (Istanbul) during the summer. Out of the 238 pig specimens, 105 were from pigs younger than 6 months and 133 from pigs older than 6 months. These were investigated for intestine parasites in particular the ones that are human pathogens. Cryptosporidium spp. was detected In 21 fecal specimens (8.8%), Giardia spp. in 9 (3.7%), Balantidium coli cysts in 4 (1.6%) and Ascaris suum eggs in 9 (4.1%). Giardia lamblia were found in 8 (7.6%) of 105 pigs younger than 6 months, Cryptosporidium spp. in 12 (11.4%), Balantidium coli cysts in 2 (1.5%). In the pigs older than 6 months Giardia lamblia were found in 1 (0.7%), Cryptosporidium spp. in 9 (6.7%), Balantidium coli cysts in 2 (1.5%). and Ascaris suum eggs in 9 (6.7%). The difference in the rate of G. lamblia (p=0.01) in pigs less than 6 months and of A. suum in those over 6 months was found to be statistically significant (p=0.005). Our results revealed that pigs are important sources of these parasites.

  17. Autophagy-related Atg8 localizes to the apicoplast of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kitamura

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a membrane-mediated degradation process, which is governed by sequential functions of Atg proteins. Although Atg proteins are highly conserved in eukaryotes, protozoa possess only a partial set of Atg proteins. Nonetheless, almost all protozoa have the complete factors belonging to the Atg8 conjugation system, namely, Atg3, Atg4, Atg7, and Atg8. Here, we report the biochemical properties and subcellular localization of the Atg8 protein of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfAtg8. PfAtg8 is expressed during intra-erythrocytic development and associates with membranes likely as a lipid-conjugated form. Fluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy show that PfAtg8 localizes to the apicoplast, a four membrane-bound non-photosynthetic plastid. Autophagosome-like structures are not observed in the erythrocytic stages. These data suggest that, although Plasmodium parasites have lost most Atg proteins during evolution, they use the Atg8 conjugation system for the unique organelle, the apicoplast.

  18. Proteolytic activity in the adult and larval stages of the human roundworm parasite Angiostrongylus costaricensis

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    Karina Mastropasqua Rebello

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiostrongylus costaricensis is a nematode that causes abdominal angiostrongyliasis, a widespread human parasitism in Latin America. This study aimed to characterize the protease profiles of different developmental stages of this helminth. First-stage larvae (L1 were obtained from the faeces of infected Sigmodon hispidus rodents and third-stage larvae (L3 were collected from mollusks Biomphalaria glabrata previously infected with L1. Adult worms were recovered from rodent mesenteric arteries. Protein extraction was performed after repeated freeze-thaw cycles followed by maceration of the nematodes in 40 mM Tris base. Proteolysis of gelatin was observed by zymography and found only in the larval stages. In L3, the gelatinolytic activity was effectively inhibited by orthophenanthroline, indicating the involvement of metalloproteases. The mechanistic class of the gelatinases from L1 could not be precisely determined using traditional class-specific inhibitors. Adult worm extracts were able to hydrolyze haemoglobin in solution, although no activity was observed by zymography. This haemoglobinolytic activity was ascribed to aspartic proteases following its effective inhibition by pepstatin, which also inhibited the haemoglobinolytic activity of L1 and L3 extracts. The characterization of protease expression throughout the A. costaricensis life cycle may reveal key factors influencing the process of parasitic infection and thus foster our understanding of the disease pathogenesis.

  19. The protein-phosphatome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doerig Christian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria, caused by the parasitic protist Plasmodium falciparum, represents a major public health problem in the developing world. The P. falciparum genome has been sequenced, which provides new opportunities for the identification of novel drug targets. We report an exhaustive analysis of the P. falciparum genomic database (PlasmoDB aimed at identifying and classifying all protein phosphatases (PP in this organism. Results Using a variety of bioinformatics tools, we identified 27 malarial putative PP sequences within the four major established PP families, plus 7 sequences that we predict to dephosphorylate "non-protein" substrates. We constructed phylogenetic trees to position these sequences relative to PPs from other organisms representing all major eukaryotic phyla except Cercozoans (for which no full genome sequence is available. Predominant observations were: (i P. falciparum possessed the smallest phosphatome of any of the organisms investigated in this study; (ii no malarial PP clustered with the tyrosine-specific subfamily of the PTP group (iii a cluster of 7 closely related members of the PPM/PP2C family is present, and (iv some P. falciparum protein phosphatases are present in clades lacking any human homologue. Conclusion The considerable phylogenetic distance between Apicomplexa and other Eukaryotes is reflected by profound divergences between the phosphatome of malaria parasites and those of representative organisms from all major eukaryotic phyla, which might be exploited in the context of efforts for the discovery of novel targets for antimalarial chemotherapy.

  20. Transcriptionally Driven DNA Replication Program of the Human Parasite Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombraña, Rodrigo; Álvarez, Alba; Fernández-Justel, José Miguel; Almeida, Ricardo; Poza-Carrión, César; Gomes, Fábia; Calzada, Arturo; Requena, José María; Gómez, María

    2016-08-09

    Faithful inheritance of eukaryotic genomes requires the orchestrated activation of multiple DNA replication origins (ORIs). Although origin firing is mechanistically conserved, how origins are specified and selected for activation varies across different model systems. Here, we provide a complete analysis of the nucleosomal landscape and replication program of the human parasite Leishmania major, building on a better evolutionary understanding of replication organization in Eukarya. We found that active transcription is a driving force for the nucleosomal organization of the L. major genome and that both the spatial and the temporal program of DNA replication can be explained as associated to RNA polymerase kinetics. This simple scenario likely provides flexibility and robustness to deal with the environmental changes that impose alterations in the genetic programs during parasitic life cycle stages. Our findings also suggest that coupling replication initiation to transcription elongation could be an ancient solution used by eukaryotic cells for origin maintenance. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Natural infection of Plasmodium brasilianum in humans: Man and monkey share quartan malaria parasites in the Venezuelan Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lalremruata

    2015-09-01

    Interpretation: This study reports, for the first time, naturally acquired infections in humans with parasites termed as P. brasilianum. We conclude that quartan malaria parasites are easily exchanged between humans and monkeys in Latin America. We hypothesize a lack of host specificity in mammalian hosts and consider quartan malaria to be a true anthropozoonosis. Since the name P. brasilianum suggests a malaria species distinct from P. malariae, we propose that P. brasilianum should have a nomenclatorial revision in case further research confirms our findings. The expansive reservoir of mammalian hosts discriminates quartan malaria from other Plasmodium spp. and requires particular research efforts.

  2. Expression, purification and characterization of two leucine aminopeptidases of the blood fluke, Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioli, Gabriela; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Giaudrone, Ines; Berasain, Patricia; Tort, José F; Brindley, Paul J; Carmona, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease (NTD) and considered the most important of the human helminthiases in terms of morbidity and mortality. Whereas treatment with praziquantel has been effective since the 1980s, the potential for the emergence of drug resistance has propelled the search for new interventions. Studies have revealed key roles of proteases in parasitic helminths during establishment of infection, tissue invasion, immune evasion, parasite feeding and development throughout the different developmental stages, pinpointing them as possible candidates. The leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs), members of the M17 family of Zn-metalloproteases, preferentially cleave leucine (Leu) residues at the N-terminal end of proteins and short peptides. These enzymes display broad proteolytic activities beyond Leu hydrolysis and are involved in processing, maturation, activation and/or degradation of substrates. As a vaccine immunogen, LAP induces protection against infection with the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. Herein, two LAPs, SmLAP1 (Smp_030000) and SmLAP2 (Smp_083870) of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni were cloned, expressed, purified and biochemically characterized. The enzymes differed in activity against diagnostic substrates, including leucine, methionine and arginine, with an optimal pH of 8.0. The activity increased in the presence of Mg+2 and Mn+2, and was inhibited by bestatin, a specific inhibitor of aminopeptidase. In addition, 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA inhibited the enzymatic activity of SmLAP2. Finally, immunolocalization using antibodies specific for SmLAP1 and SmLAP2 identified the expression of these proteases in the egg and adult developmental stages of S. mansoni, and in intestinal epithelia, vitelline cells and sub-tegumental regions of the parasite. Characterization of schistosome proteases not only enhances understanding of the biology of schistosomes and schistosomiasis, but may also provide novel intervention

  3. Zoonotic and Non-Zoonotic Diseases in Relation to Human Personality and Societal Values: Support for the Parasite-Stress Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Thornhill

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The parasite-stress model of human sociality proposes that humans' ontogenetic experiences with infectious diseases as well as their evolutionary historical interactions with these diseases exert causal influences on human psychology and social behavior. This model has been supported by cross-national relationships between parasite prevalence and human personality traits, and between parasite prevalence and societal values. Importantly, the parasite-stress model emphasizes the causal role of non-zoonotic parasites (which have the capacity for human-to-human transmission, rather than zoonotic parasites (which do not, but previous studies failed to distinguish between these conceptually distinct categories. The present investigation directly tested the differential predictive effects of zoonotic and non-zoonotic (both human-specific and multihost parasite prevalence on personality traits and societal values. Supporting the parasite-stress model, cross-national differences in personality traits (unrestricted sexuality, extraversion, openness to experiences and in societal values (individualism, collectivism, gender equality, democratization are predicted specifically by non-zoonotic parasite prevalence.

  4. Monocyte-Derived Signals Activate Human Natural Killer Cells in Response to Leishmania Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Messlinger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated natural killer (NK cells release interferon (IFN-γ, which is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens such as Leishmania. In contrast to experimental murine leishmaniasis, the human NK cell response to Leishmania is still poorly characterized. Here, we investigated the interaction of human blood NK cells with promastigotes of different Leishmania species (Leishmania major, Leishmania mexicana, Leishmania infantum, and Leishmania donovani. When peripheral blood mononuclear cells or purified NK cells and monocytes (all derived from healthy blood donors from Germany without a history of leishmaniasis were exposed to promastigotes, NK cells showed increased surface expression of the activation marker CD69. The extent of this effect varied depending on the Leishmania species; differences between dermotropic and viscerotropic L. infantum strains were not observed. Upregulation of CD69 required direct contact between monocytes and Leishmania and was partly inhibitable by anti-interleukin (IL-18. Unexpectedly, IL-18 was undetectable in most of the supernatants (SNs of monocyte/parasite cocultures. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of non-permeabilized cells revealed that Leishmania-infected monocytes trans-presented IL-18 to NK cells. Native, but not heat-treated SNs of monocyte/Leishmania cocultures also induced CD69 on NK cells, indicating the involvement of a soluble heat-labile factor other than IL-18. A role for the NK cell-activating cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-21, and IFN-α/β was excluded. The increase of CD69 was not paralleled by NK cell IFN-γ production or enhanced cytotoxicity. However, prior exposure of NK cells to Leishmania parasites synergistically increased their IFN-γ release in response to IL-12, which was dependent on endogenous IL-18. CD1c+ dendritic cells were identified as possible source of Leishmania-induced IL-12. Finally, we observed that direct contact between Leishmania and NK cells

  5. Modeling the distribution of Schistosoma mansoni and host snails in Uganda using satellite sensor data and Geographical Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Jørgensen, A; Kabatereine, N B

    2005-01-01

    The potential value of MODIS satellite sensor data on Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and land surface temperatures (LST) for describing the distribution of the Schistosoma mansoni-"Biomphalaria pfeifferi"/Biomphalaria sudanica parasite-snail system in inland Uganda, were tested by ...

  6. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [Pathology and Microbiology Department, 986495 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  7. Schistosoma mansoni infection reduces the incidence of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyfets Alina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium and Schistosoma are two of the most common parasites in tropical areas. Deregulation of the immune response to Plasmodium falciparum, characterized by a Th1 response, leads to cerebral malaria (CM, while a Th2 response accompanies chronic schistosomiasis. Methods The development of CM was examined in mice with concomitant Schistosoma mansoni and Plasmodium berghei ANKA infections. The effect of S. mansoni egg antigen injection on disease development and survival was also determined. Cytokine serum levels were estimated using ELISA. Statistical analysis was performed using t-test. Results The results demonstrate that concomitant S. mansoni and P. berghei ANKA infection leads to a reduction in CM. This effect is dependent on infection schedule and infecting cercariae number, and is correlated with a Th2 response. Schistosomal egg antigen injection delays the death of Plasmodium-infected mice, indicating immune involvement. Conclusions This research supports previous claims of a protective effect of helminth infection on CM development. The presence of multiple parasitic infections in patients from endemic areas should therefore be carefully noted in clinical trials, and in the development of standard treatment protocols for malaria. Defined helminth antigens may be considered for alleviation of immunopathological symptoms.

  8. The repertoire of G protein-coupled receptors in the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and the model organism Schmidtea mediterranea

    OpenAIRE

    Zamanian Mostafa; Kimber Michael J; McVeigh Paul; Carlson Steve A; Maule Aaron G; Day Tim A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute one of the largest groupings of eukaryotic proteins, and represent a particularly lucrative set of pharmaceutical targets. They play an important role in eukaryotic signal transduction and physiology, mediating cellular responses to a diverse range of extracellular stimuli. The phylum Platyhelminthes is of considerable medical and biological importance, housing major pathogens as well as established model organisms. The recent...

  9. The motility of a human parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, is regulated by a novel lysine methyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife T Heaslip

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Protozoa in the phylum Apicomplexa are a large group of obligate intracellular parasites. Toxoplasma gondii and other apicomplexan parasites, such as Plasmodium falciparum, cause diseases by reiterating their lytic cycle, comprising host cell invasion, parasite replication, and parasite egress. The successful completion of the lytic cycle requires that the parasite senses changes in its environment and switches between the non-motile (for intracellular replication and motile (for invasion and egress states appropriately. Although the signaling pathway that regulates the motile state switch is critical to the pathogenesis of the diseases caused by these parasites, it is not well understood. Here we report a previously unknown mechanism of regulating the motility activation in Toxoplasma, mediated by a protein lysine methyltransferase, AKMT (for Apical complex lysine (K methyltransferase. AKMT depletion greatly inhibits activation of motility, compromises parasite invasion and egress, and thus severely impairs the lytic cycle. Interestingly, AKMT redistributes from the apical complex to the parasite body rapidly in the presence of egress-stimulating signals that increase [Ca²⁺] in the parasite cytoplasm, suggesting that AKMT regulation of parasite motility might be accomplished by the precise temporal control of its localization in response to environmental changes.

  10. Observations on the transmission of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma bovis in the Lake Region of Tanganyika

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoti, George

    1964-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that in the Lake Region of Sukumaland, Tanganyika, where Schistosoma haematobium is highly endemic, Bulinus (Physopsis) nasutus is responsible for the transmission of that schistosome in small, temporary rain pools. This area is one of low rainfall, and large artificial reservoirs are the chief source of water in the dry season. The role of these reservoirs in S. haematobium transmission was studied over a period of about a year. Previous work in South Africa had indicated the potential danger of bovine schistosomes to man. S. bovis is a very common parasite in cattle in the Lake Region, and a search for its intermediate host or hosts, previously unidentified, was therefore also made. The results of this double investigation suggest that large bodies of water are relatively unimportant in the transmission of both S. haematobium and S. bovis. Bulinus (Physopsis) africanus is shown to be a second intermediate of S. haematobium and a vector of S. bovis as well. Transmission of these parasites by this snail takes place principally in streams. PMID:14277260

  11. Lactate as a novel quantitative measure of viability in Schistosoma mansoni drug sensitivity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Stephanie; Zöphel, Dorina; Subbaraman, Harini; Unger, Clemens; Held, Jana; Engleitner, Thomas; Hoffmann, Wolfgang H; Kreidenweiss, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    Whole-organism compound sensitivity assays are a valuable strategy in infectious diseases to identify active molecules. In schistosomiasis drug discovery, larval-stage Schistosoma allows the use of a certain degree of automation in the screening of compounds. Unfortunately, the throughput is limited, as drug activity is determined by manual assessment of Schistosoma viability by microscopy. To develop a simple and quantifiable surrogate marker for viability, we targeted glucose metabolism, which is central to Schistosoma survival. Lactate is the end product of glycolysis in human Schistosoma stages and can be detected in the supernatant. We assessed lactate as a surrogate marker for viability in Schistosoma drug screening assays. We thoroughly investigated parameters of lactate measurement and performed drug sensitivity assays by applying schistosomula and adult worms to establish a proof of concept. Lactate levels clearly reflected the viability of schistosomula and correlated with schistosomulum numbers. Compounds with reported potencies were tested, and activities were determined by lactate assay and by microscopy. We conclude that lactate is a sensitive and simple surrogate marker to be measured to determine Schistosoma viability in compound screening assays. Low numbers of schistosomula and the commercial availability of lactate assay reagents make the assay particularly attractive to throughput approaches. Furthermore, standardization of procedures and quantitative evaluation of compound activities facilitate interassay comparisons of potencies and, thus, concerted drug discovery approaches. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Structural studies of Schistosoma mansoni adenylate kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, I.A. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil); Pereira, H.M.; Garrat, R.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP-SC), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Parasitic diseases are a major cause of death in developing countries, however receive little or no attention from pharmaceutical companies for the development of novel therapies. In this respect, the Center for Structural Molecular Biology (CBME) of the Institute of Physics of Sao Carlos (IFSC / USP) has developed expertise in all stages of the development of active compounds against target enzymes from parasitic diseases. The present work focuses on the adenylate kinase enzymes (ADK's) from Schistosoma mansoni. These enzymes are widely distributed and catalyze the reaction of phosphoryl exchange between nucleotides in the reaction 2ADP to ATP + AMP, which is critical for the cells life cycle. Due to the particular property of the reaction catalyzed, the ADK's are recognized as reporters of the cells energetic state, translating small changes in the balance between ATP and ADP into a large change in concentration of AMP. The genome of S. mansoni was recently sequenced by the Sanger Center in England. On performing searches for genes encoding adenylate kinases we found two such genes. The corresponding gene products were named ADK1 (197 residues) and ADK2 (239 residues), and the two sequences share only 28 percent identity. Both have been cloned into the pET-28a(+)vector, expressed in E. coli and purified. Preliminary tests of activity have been performed only for ADK1 showing it to be catalytically active. Crystallization trials were performed for both proteins and thus far, crystals of ADK1 have been obtained which diffract to 2.05 at the LNLS beamline MX2 and the structure solved by molecular replacement. Understanding, at the atomic level, the function of these enzymes may help in the development of specific inhibitors and may provide tools for developing diagnostic tests for schistosomiasis. (author)

  13. Biological material for microslides to diagnose human infectious and parasitic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Arakelian

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The material for microscopic examination were blood, bone marrow, cerebrospinal fluid, lymph node puncture, feces, duodenal contents and bile, urine, sputum, urogenital tract secretions, tissue biopsies, smears from the mucous membranes of the mouth, tonsils, nose, etc. The final diagnosis of helminth infections can be established only on the basis of the positive findings of laboratory research. The basic method of laboratory diagnosis of these invasions is the detection of helminth eggs or larvae. The material for the research is the feces, the contents of the duodenum, blood, sputum, tissue biopsies, and other materials. Slides of blood microscopy are usually prepared on glass slides, their quality and purity greatly impact the effectiveness of detection and identification of blood parasites. The material from leishmaniasis patients is studied under immersion; Leishmania locate mainly outside the cell, but often they are found in the cytoplasm of mononuclear cells and neutrophils. The number of Leishmania in a single cell can reach several tens. They are in the form of small round or oval cells ranging in size from 2.5 to 5 microns. The cytoplasm is gray-blue co­lored, the nucleus are red or red-purple, kinetoplasts are dark purple color. The presence of a nucleus and kinetoplasts is the main feature that distinguishes Leishmania from platelets, cocci, and yeast cells. In a laboratory study (painting by Romanovsky — ­Giemsa, microfilaria are colored in dark blue and resemble crimped fibers. Inside the larvae nuclear grain is easy visible. The causative agents of parasitic and infectious diseases can also be found in other biological substances of the human body: the urine, cerebrospinal fluid, bone marrow, secretion of urinary organs, duodenal contents, bile, and phlegm.

  14. Draft genome of neurotropic nematode parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis, causative agent of human eosinophilic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Hoi-Sen; Eamsobhana, Praphathip; Lim, Phaik-Eem; Razali, Rozaimi; Aziz, Farhanah Abdul; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Poole-Johnson, Johan; Anwar, Arif

    2015-08-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a bursate nematode parasite that causes eosinophilic meningitis (or meningoencephalitis) in humans in many parts of the world. The genomic data from A. cantonensis will form a useful resource for comparative genomic and chemogenomic studies to aid the development of diagnostics and therapeutics. We have sequenced, assembled and annotated the genome of A. cantonensis. The genome size is estimated to be ∼260 Mb, with 17,280 genomic scaffolds, 91X coverage, 81.45% for complete and 93.95% for partial score based on CEGMA analysis of genome completeness. The number of predicted genes of ≥300 bp was 17,482. A total of 7737 predicted protein-coding genes of ≥50 amino acids were identified in the assembled genome. Among the proteins of known function, kinases are the most abundant followed by transferases. The draft genome contains 34 excretory-secretory proteins (ES), a minimum of 44 Nematode Astacin (NAS) metalloproteases, 12 Homeobox (HOX) genes, and 30 neurotransmitters. The assembled genome size (260 Mb) is larger than those of Pristionchus pacificus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Necator americanus, Caenorhabditis briggsae, Trichinella spiralis, Brugia malayi and Loa loa, but smaller than Haemonchus contortus and Ascaris suum. The repeat content (25%) is similar to H. contortus. The GC content (41.17%) is lower compared to P. pacificus (42.7%) and H. contortus (43.1%) but higher compared to C. briggsae (37.69%), A. suum (37.9%) and N. americanus (40.2%) while the scaffold N50 is 42,191. This draft genome will facilitate the understanding of many unresolved issues on the parasite and the disorder it causes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Salmonella typhimurium Infection Reduces Schistosoma japonicum Worm Burden in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyang Zhu; Lu Chen; Junfang Wu; Huiru Tang; Yulan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Coinfection of microorganisms is a common phenomenon in humans and animals. In order to further our understanding of the progress of coinfection and the possible interaction between different pathogens, we have built a coinfection mouse model with Schistosoma japonicum and Salmonella typhimurium, and used this model to investigate the systemic metabolic and immune responses using NMR-based metabonomics and immunological techniques. Our results show that Salmonella typhimurium (ATCC14028) infe...

  16. Schistosoma haematobium infections acquired in Corsica, France, August 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtfreter, M C; Moné, H; Müller-Stöver, I; Mouahid, G; Richter, J

    2014-06-05

    A 12 year-old boy in Germany developed urinary schistosomiasis in January 2014. He had bathed in rivers in south-eastern Corsica five months earlier. Before this case, human schistomiasis had not been reported on the island, although its vector, the snail Bulinus truncatus, locally transmitted the zoonotic Schistosoma bovis. The boy’s father excreted S. haematobium ova that were not viable; the boy’s three siblings had a positive serology against schistosomes.

  17. Lymphatics in Human Lymphatic Filariasis: In Vitro Models of Parasite-Induced Lymphatic Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Thomas B Nutman

    2009-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis characterized by the dysfunction of the lymphatics can lead to severe (and often) irreversible lymphedema and elephantiasis. Decades of research in the field shows that the establishment of the adult parasites in the lymphatics triggers a cascade of events that ultimately results in tissue scarring and fibrosis. In this minireview, we focus on the studies addressing the mechanisms underlying the parasite-induced lymphatic dilatation that suggests parasite-induced lymphati...

  18. A novel PCR-based system for the detection of four species of human malaria parasites and Plasmodium knowlesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaki-Yasuda, Kanako; Vincent, Jeanne Perpétue; Nakatsu, Masami; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio

    2018-01-01

    A microscopy-based diagnosis is the gold standard for the detection and identification of malaria parasites in a patient’s blood. However, the detection of cases involving a low number of parasites and the differentiation of species sometimes requires a skilled microscopist. Although PCR-based diagnostic methods are already known to be very powerful tools, the time required to apply such methods is still much longer in comparison to traditional microscopic observation. Thus, improvements to PCR systems are sought to facilitate the more rapid and accurate detection of human malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, and P. malariae, as well as P. knowlesi, which is a simian malaria parasite that is currently widely distributed in Southeast Asia. A nested PCR that targets the small subunit ribosomal RNA genes of malaria parasites was performed using a “fast PCR enzyme”. In the first PCR, universal primers for all parasite species were used. In the second PCR, inner-specific primers, which targeted sequences from P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae, and P. knowlesi, were used. The PCR reaction time was reduced with the use of the “fast PCR enzyme”, with only 65 minutes required to perform the first and second PCRs. The specific primers only reacted with the sequences of their targeted parasite species and never cross-reacted with sequences from other species under the defined PCR conditions. The diagnoses of 36 clinical samples that were obtained using this new PCR system were highly consistent with the microscopic diagnoses. PMID:29370297

  19. Schistosome syntenin partially protects vaccinated mice against Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara C Figueiredo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by several species of trematode of the genus Schistosoma. The disease affects more than 200 million people in the world and causes up to 280,000 deaths per year, besides having high morbidity due to chronic illness that damages internal organs. Current schistosomiasis control strategies are mainly based on chemotherapy, but many researchers believe that the best long-term strategy to control disease is a combination of drug treatment and immunization with an anti-schistosome vaccine. Among the most promising molecules as vaccine candidates are the proteins present in the tegument and digestive tract of the parasite.In this study, we describe for the first time Schistosoma mansoni syntenin (SmSynt and we evaluate its potential as a recombinant vaccine. We demonstrate by real-time PCR that syntenin is mainly expressed in intravascular life stages (schistosomula and adult worms of the parasite life cycle and, by confocal microscopy, we localize it in digestive epithelia in adult worms and schistosomula. Administration of siRNAs targeting SmSynt leads to the knock-down of syntenin gene and protein levels, but this has no demonstrable impact on parasite morphology or viability, suggesting that high SmSynt gene expression is not essential for the parasites in vitro. Mice immunization with rSmSynt, formulated with Freund's adjuvant, induces a Th1-type response, as suggested by the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α by rSmSynt-stimulated cultured splenocytes. The protective effect conferred by vaccination with rSmSynt was demonstrated by 30-37% reduction of worm burden, 38-43% reduction in the number, and 35-37% reduction in the area, of liver granulomas.Our report is the first characterization of syntenin in Schistosoma mansoni and our data suggest that this protein is a potential candidate for the development of a multi-antigen vaccine to control schistosomiasis.

  20. Potency of Allium sativum and Allium cepa Oils against Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Metwally, Nadia S

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: It has been reported that garlic (Allium sativum) and onion (Allium cepa) are used all over the world in different diseases, such as infections, injuries, gastrointestinal dysfunctions and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, our aim in this work was to study the ability of garlic and onion oils to offset the infectivity as well as the metabolic disturbances induced by Schistosoma mansoni parasitism. Methods: The two current drugs were given in a dosage of 5ml / kg body weight/ d...

  1. Bladder morbidity and hepatic fibrosis in mixed Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni Infections: a population-wide study in Northern Senegal.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, L.; Mbow, M.; Vereecken, K.M.; Menten, J.; Mboup, S.; Polman, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The global distribution map of schistosomiasis shows a large overlap of Schistosoma haematobium- and S. mansoni-endemic areas in Africa. Yet, little is known about the consequences of mixed Schistosoma infections for the human host. A recent study in two neighboring co-endemic

  2. Proteomic analysis of the tegument and excretory-secretory products of adult Schistosoma bovis worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Ramajo-Hernández, Alicia; Ramajo-Martín, Vicente; Oleaga, Ana

    2006-04-01

    Schistosoma bovis is a ruminant pathogen that is poorly known at a molecular level. With an aim of identifying the parasite proteins involved in host-parasite interplay, we studied two protein extracts that contain, respectively, the proteins excreted/secreted by the adult worm (ES) and the tegumental proteins exposed to the host (TG). The 2-DE, 2-D immunoblot and MS were employed to separate and identify the antigenic proteins and the most abundant non-antigenic proteins in each extract. There were some 400 and 600 spots detected in the ES and the TG extracts, respectively. Ninety-six spots were subjected to MS analysis and 64 of them were identified. Overall, we identified 18 S. bovis proteins located at the host-parasite interface, 16 of which have not been identified previously in this parasite, and one of which -lysozyme- has never been reported in a Schistosoma species. Of the proteins identified, at least 4 can counteract host defence mechanisms. The other proteins are also likely to play some role in the host-parasite relationships. Therefore, studies in grater depth on all these proteins will provide a better understanding of how this parasite interacts with its host and new strategies for anti-schistosome drug or vaccine design.

  3. Solution structure, membrane interactions, and protein binding partners of the tetraspanin Sm-TSP-2, a vaccine antigen from the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xinying; Schulte, Leigh; Loukas, Alex; Pickering, Darren; Pearson, Mark; Mobli, Mehdi; Jones, Alun; Rosengren, Karl J; Daly, Norelle L; Gobert, Geoffrey N; Jones, Malcolm K; Craik, David J; Mulvenna, Jason

    2014-03-07

    The tetraspanins (TSPs) are a family of integral membrane proteins that are ubiquitously expressed at the surface of eukaryotic cells. TSPs mediate a range of processes at the surface of the plasma membrane by providing a scaffold for the assembly of protein complexes known as tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs). We report here the structure of the surface-exposed EC2 domain from Sm-TSP-2, a TSP from Schistosoma mansoni and one of the better prospects for the development of a vaccine against schistosomiasis. This is the first solution structure of this domain, and our investigations of its interactions with lipid micelles provide a general model for interactions between TSPs, membranes, and other proteins. Using chemical cross-linking, eight potential protein constituents of Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs were also identified. These include proteins important for membrane maintenance and repair, providing further evidence for the functional role of Sm-TSP-2- and Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs. The identification of calpain, Sm29, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, themselves potential vaccine antigens, suggests that the Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs could be disrupted via multiple targets. The identification of further Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEM proteins increases the available candidates for multiplex vaccines and/or novel drugs targeting TEMs in the schistosome tegument.

  4. Solution Structure, Membrane Interactions, and Protein Binding Partners of the Tetraspanin Sm-TSP-2, a Vaccine Antigen from the Human Blood Fluke Schistosoma mansoni*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xinying; Schulte, Leigh; Loukas, Alex; Pickering, Darren; Pearson, Mark; Mobli, Mehdi; Jones, Alun; Rosengren, Karl J.; Daly, Norelle L.; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; Jones, Malcolm K.; Craik, David J.; Mulvenna, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The tetraspanins (TSPs) are a family of integral membrane proteins that are ubiquitously expressed at the surface of eukaryotic cells. TSPs mediate a range of processes at the surface of the plasma membrane by providing a scaffold for the assembly of protein complexes known as tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs). We report here the structure of the surface-exposed EC2 domain from Sm-TSP-2, a TSP from Schistosoma mansoni and one of the better prospects for the development of a vaccine against schistosomiasis. This is the first solution structure of this domain, and our investigations of its interactions with lipid micelles provide a general model for interactions between TSPs, membranes, and other proteins. Using chemical cross-linking, eight potential protein constituents of Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs were also identified. These include proteins important for membrane maintenance and repair, providing further evidence for the functional role of Sm-TSP-2- and Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs. The identification of calpain, Sm29, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, themselves potential vaccine antigens, suggests that the Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEMs could be disrupted via multiple targets. The identification of further Sm-TSP-2-mediated TEM proteins increases the available candidates for multiplex vaccines and/or novel drugs targeting TEMs in the schistosome tegument. PMID:24429291

  5. Structure-Bioactivity Relationship for Benzimidazole Thiophene Inhibitors of Polo-Like Kinase 1 (PLK1, a Potential Drug Target in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavy Long

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma flatworm parasites cause schistosomiasis, a chronic and debilitating disease of poverty in developing countries. Praziquantel is employed for treatment and disease control. However, its efficacy spectrum is incomplete (less active or inactive against immature stages of the parasite and there is a concern of drug resistance. Thus, there is a need to identify new drugs and drug targets.We show that RNA interference (RNAi of the Schistosoma mansoni ortholog of human polo-like kinase (huPLK1 elicits a deleterious phenotypic alteration in post-infective larvae (schistosomula or somules. Phenotypic screening and analysis of schistosomula and adult S. mansoni with small molecule inhibitors of huPLK1 identified a number of potent anti-schistosomals. Among these was a GlaxoSmithKline (GSK benzimidazole thiophene inhibitor that has completed Phase I clinical trials for treatment of solid tumor malignancies. We then obtained GSKs Published Kinase Inhibitor Sets (PKIS 1 and 2, and phenotypically screened an expanded series of 38 benzimidazole thiophene PLK1 inhibitors. Computational analysis of controls and PLK1 inhibitor-treated populations of somules demonstrated a distinctive phenotype distribution. Using principal component analysis (PCA, the phenotypes exhibited by these populations were mapped, visualized and analyzed through projection to a low-dimensional space. The phenotype distribution was found to have a distinct shape and topology, which could be elicited using cluster analysis. A structure-activity relationship (SAR was identified for the benzimidazole thiophenes that held for both somules and adult parasites. The most potent inhibitors produced marked phenotypic alterations at 1-2 μM within 1 h. Among these were compounds previously characterized as potent inhibitors of huPLK1 in cell assays.The reverse genetic and chemical SAR data support a continued investigation of SmPLK1 as a possible drug target and/or the prosecution of

  6. Fast evolutionary rates associated with functional loss in class I glucose transporters of Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Lancelot, Julien; Pierce, Raymond J

    2015-11-19

    The trematode parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, has evolved to switch from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis in the presence of glucose immediately after invading the human host. This metabolic switch is dependent on extracellular glucose concentration. Four glucose transporters are encoded in the genome of S. mansoni, however, only two were shown to facilitate glucose diffusion. By modeling the phase of human host infection, we showed that transporter transcript expression profiles of recently transformed schistosomula have two opposing responses to increased glucose concentrations. Concurring with the transcription profiles, our phylogenetic analyses revealed that S. mansoni glucose transporters belong to two separate clusters, one associated with class I glucose transporters from vertebrates and insects, and the other specific to parasitic Platyhelminthes. To study the evolutionary paths of both groups and their functional implications, we determined evolutionary rates, relative divergence times, genomic organization and performed structural analyses with the protein sequences. We finally used the modelled structures of the S. mansoni glucose transporters to biophysically (i) analyze the dynamics of key residues during glucose binding, (ii) test glucose stability within the active site, and (iii) demonstrate glucose diffusion. The two S. mansoni Platyhelminthes-specific glucose transporters, which seem to be younger than the other two, exhibit slower rates of molecular evolution, are encoded by intron-poor genes, and transport glucose. Interestingly, our molecular dynamic analyses suggest that S. mansoni class I glucose transporters are not able to transport glucose. The glucose transporter family in S. mansoni exhibit different evolutionary histories. Our results suggested that S. mansoni class I glucose transporters lost their capacity to transport glucose and that this function evolved independently in the Platyhelminthes-specific glucose transporters

  7. A Genome Wide Comparison to Identify Markers to Differentiate the Sex of Larval Stages of Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma bovis and their Respective Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid-Smith, Julien; Boissier, Jérôme; Allienne, Jean-François; Oleaga, Ana; Djuikwo-Teukeng, Félicité; Toulza, Eve

    2016-11-01

    For scientists working on gonochoric organisms, determining sex can be crucial for many biological questions and experimental studies, such as crossbreeding, but it can also be a challenging task, particularly when no sexual dimorphism is visible or cannot be directly observed. In metazoan parasites of the genus Schistosoma responsible for schistosomiasis, sex is genetically determined in the zygote with a female heterogametic ZW/ZZ system. Adult flukes have a pronounced sexual dimorphism, whereas the sexes of the larval stages are morphologically indistinguishable but can be distinguished uniquely by using molecular methods. Therefore, reliable methods are needed to identify the sex of larvae individuals. Here, we present an endpoint PCR-based assay using female-specific sequences identified using a genome-wide comparative analysis between males and females. This work allowed us to identify sex-markers for Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma bovis but also the hybrid between both species that has recently emerged in Corsica (France). Five molecular sex-markers were identified and are female-specific in S. haematobium and the hybrid parasite, whereas three of them are also female-specific in S. bovis. These molecular markers will be useful to conduct studies, such as experimental crosses on these disease-causing blood flukes, which are still largely neglected but no longer restricted to tropical areas.

  8. A Genome Wide Comparison to Identify Markers to Differentiate the Sex of Larval Stages of Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma bovis and their Respective Hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Kincaid-Smith

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available For scientists working on gonochoric organisms, determining sex can be crucial for many biological questions and experimental studies, such as crossbreeding, but it can also be a challenging task, particularly when no sexual dimorphism is visible or cannot be directly observed. In metazoan parasites of the genus Schistosoma responsible for schistosomiasis, sex is genetically determined in the zygote with a female heterogametic ZW/ZZ system. Adult flukes have a pronounced sexual dimorphism, whereas the sexes of the larval stages are morphologically indistinguishable but can be distinguished uniquely by using molecular methods. Therefore, reliable methods are needed to identify the sex of larvae individuals. Here, we present an endpoint PCR-based assay using female-specific sequences identified using a genome-wide comparative analysis between males and females. This work allowed us to identify sex-markers for Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma bovis but also the hybrid between both species that has recently emerged in Corsica (France. Five molecular sex-markers were identified and are female-specific in S. haematobium and the hybrid parasite, whereas three of them are also female-specific in S. bovis. These molecular markers will be useful to conduct studies, such as experimental crosses on these disease-causing blood flukes, which are still largely neglected but no longer restricted to tropical areas.

  9. Aparasitemic serological suspects in Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis : a potential human reservoir of parasites ?

    OpenAIRE

    Koffi, Mathurin; Solano, Philippe; Denizot, M.; Courtin, D.; Garcia, André; Lejon, V.; Buscher, P.; Cuny, Gérard; Jamonneau, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The serological and parasitological tests used for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) diagnosis have low specificity and sensitivity, respectively, and in the field, control program teams are faced with subjects with positive serology but negative parasitology who remain untreated. The aim of this work was to explore, using PCR tool, the significance of these aparasitemic serological suspects. Since discordant PCR results have been observed earlier with different...

  10. Parasites of importance for human health in Nigerian dogs: high prevalence and limited knowledge of pet owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugbomoiko, Uade Samuel; Ariza, Liana; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2008-12-09

    Dogs are the most common pet animals worldwide. They may harbour a wide range of parasites with zoonotic potential, thus causing a health risk to humans. In Nigeria, epidemiological knowledge on these parasites is limited. In a community-based study, we examined 396 dogs in urban and rural areas of Ilorin (Kwara State, Central Nigeria) for ectoparasites and intestinal helminths. In addition, a questionnaire regarding knowledge and practices was applied to pet owners. Nine ectoparasite species belonging to four taxa and six intestinal helminth species were identified: fleas (Ctenocephalides canis, Pulex irritans, Tunga penetrans), mites (Demodex canis, Otodectes sp., Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis), ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes sp.), and lice (Trichodectes canis); and Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma sp., Trichuris vulpis, Dipylidium caninum, Taenidae and Strongyloides sp. Overall prevalence of ectoparasites was 60.4% and of intestinal helminths 68.4%. The occurrence of C. canis, R. sanguineus, T. canis, Ancylostoma sp. and T. vulpis was most common (prevalence 14.4% to 41.7%). Prevalence patterns in helminths were age-dependent, with T. canis showing a decreasing prevalence with age of host, and a reverse trend in other parasite species. Knowledge regarding zoonoses was very limited and the diseases not considered a major health problem. Treatment with antiparasitic drugs was more frequent in urban areas. Parasites of importance for human health were highly prevalent in Nigerian dogs. Interventions should include health education provided to dog owners and the establishment of a program focusing on zoonotic diseases.

  11. Genome-wide identification of Schistosoma japonicum microRNAs using a deep-sequencing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent and serious parasitic diseases worldwide. Schistosoma japonicum is one of important pathogens of this disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a large group of non-coding RNAs that play important roles in regulating gene expression and protein translation in animals. Genome-wide identification of miRNAs in a given organism is a critical step to facilitating our understanding of genome organization, genome biology, evolution, and posttranscriptional regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced two small RNA libraries prepared from different stages of the life cycle of S. japonicum, immature schistosomula and mature pairing adults, through a deep DNA sequencing approach, which yielded approximately 12 million high-quality short sequence reads containing a total of approximately 2 million non-redundant tags. Based on a bioinformatics pipeline, we identified 176 new S. japonicum miRNAs, of which some exhibited a differential pattern of expression between the two stages. Although 21 S. japonicum miRNAs are orthologs of known miRNAs within the metazoans, some nucleotides at many positions of Schistosoma miRNAs, such as miR-8, let-7, miR-10, miR-31, miR-92, miR-124, and miR-125, are indeed significantly distinct from other bilaterian orthologs. In addition, both miR-71 and some miR-2 family members in tandem are found to be clustered in a reversal direction model on two genomic loci, and two pairs of novel S. japonicum miRNAs were derived from sense and antisense DNA strands at the same genomic loci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The collection of S. japonicum miRNAs could be used as a new platform to study the genomic structure, gene regulation and networks, evolutionary processes, development, and host-parasite interactions. Some S. japonicum miRNAs and their clusters could represent the ancestral forms of the conserved orthologues and a model for the genesis of novel miRNAs.

  12. Molecular differentiation of Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mekongi by real-time PCR with high resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongklieng, Amornmas; Kaewkong, Worasak; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Limpanont, Yanin; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    Human schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mekongi is a chronic and debilitating helminthic disease still prevalent in several countries of Asia. Due to morphological similarities of cercariae and eggs of these 2 species, microscopic differentiation is difficult. High resolution melting (HRM) real-time PCR is developed as an alternative tool for the detection and differentiation of these 2 species. A primer pair was designed for targeting the 18S ribosomal RNA gene to generate PCR products of 156 base pairs for both species. The melting points of S. japonicum and S. mekongi PCR products were 84.5±0.07℃ and 85.7±0.07℃, respectively. The method permits amplification from a single cercaria or an egg. The HRM real-time PCR is a rapid and simple tool for differentiation of S. japonicum and S. mekongi in the intermediate and final hosts.

  13. Quantifying the effects of temperature on mosquito and parasite traits that determine the transmission potential of human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian L M Shapiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Malaria transmission is known to be strongly impacted by temperature. The current understanding of how temperature affects mosquito and parasite life history traits derives from a limited number of empirical studies. These studies, some dating back to the early part of last century, are often poorly controlled, have limited replication, explore a narrow range of temperatures, and use a mixture of parasite and mosquito species. Here, we use a single pairing of the Asian mosquito vector, An. stephensi and the human malaria parasite, P. falciparum to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the thermal performance curves of a range of mosquito and parasite traits relevant to transmission. We show that biting rate, adult mortality rate, parasite development rate, and vector competence are temperature sensitive. Importantly, we find qualitative and quantitative differences to the assumed temperature-dependent relationships. To explore the overall implications of temperature for transmission, we first use a standard model of relative vectorial capacity. This approach suggests a temperature optimum for transmission of 29°C, with minimum and maximum temperatures of 12°C and 38°C, respectively. However, the robustness of the vectorial capacity approach is challenged by the fact that the empirical data violate several of the model's simplifying assumptions. Accordingly, we present an alternative model of relative force of infection that better captures the observed biology of the vector-parasite interaction. This model suggests a temperature optimum for transmission of 26°C, with a minimum and maximum of 17°C and 35°C, respectively. The differences between the models lead to potentially divergent predictions for the potential impacts of current and future climate change on malaria transmission. The study provides a framework for more detailed, system-specific studies that are essential to develop an improved understanding on the effects of temperature

  14. Associations between common intestinal parasites and bacteria in humans as revealed by qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien Andersen, L; Karim, A B; Roager, H M; Vigsnæs, L K; Krogfelt, K A; Licht, T R; Stensvold, C R

    2016-09-01

    Several studies have shown associations between groups of intestinal bacterial or specific ratios between bacterial groups and various disease traits. Meanwhile, little is known about interactions and associations between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms in the human gut. In this work, we set out to investigate potential associations between common single-celled parasites such as Blastocystis spp. and Dientamoeba fragilis and intestinal bacteria. Stool DNA from patients with intestinal symptoms were selected based on being Blastocystis spp.-positive (B+)/negative (B-) and D. fragilis-positive (D+)/negative (D-), and split into four groups of 21 samples (B+ D+, B+ D-, B- D+, and B- D-). Quantitative PCR targeting the six bacterial taxa Bacteroides, Prevotella, the butyrate-producing clostridial clusters IV and XIVa, the mucin-degrading Akkermansia muciniphila, and the indigenous group of Bifidobacterium was subsequently performed, and the relative abundance of these bacteria across the four groups was compared. The relative abundance of Bacteroides in B- D- samples was significantly higher compared with B+ D- and B+ D+ samples (P Blastocystis alone or combined with D. fragilis is associated with gut microbiota characterized by low relative abundances of Bacteroides and Clostridial cluster XIVa and high levels of Prevotella.

  15. Identification of thioredoxin glutathione reductase inhibitors that kill cestode and trematode parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Ross

    Full Text Available Parasitic flatworms are responsible for serious infectious diseases that affect humans as well as livestock animals in vast regions of the world. Yet, the drug armamentarium available for treatment of these infections is limited: praziquantel is the single drug currently available for 200 million people infected with Schistosoma spp. and there is justified concern about emergence of drug resistance. Thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR is an essential core enzyme for redox homeostasis in flatworm parasites. In this work, we searched for flatworm TGR inhibitors testing compounds belonging to various families known to inhibit thioredoxin reductase or TGR and also additional electrophilic compounds. Several furoxans and one thiadiazole potently inhibited TGRs from both classes of parasitic flatworms: cestoda (tapeworms and trematoda (flukes, while several benzofuroxans and a quinoxaline moderately inhibited TGRs. Remarkably, five active compounds from diverse families possessed a phenylsulfonyl group, strongly suggesting that this moiety is a new pharmacophore. The most active inhibitors were further characterized and displayed slow and nearly irreversible binding to TGR. These compounds efficiently killed Echinococcus granulosus larval worms and Fasciola hepatica newly excysted juveniles in vitro at a 20 µM concentration. Our results support the concept that the redox metabolism of flatworm parasites is precarious and particularly susceptible to destabilization, show that furoxans can be used to target both flukes and tapeworms, and identified phenylsulfonyl as a new drug-hit moiety for both classes of flatworm parasites.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of Fasciola hepatica juveniles and Schistosoma bovis schistosomula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Torre Escudero, E; Manzano-Román, R; Valero, L; Oleaga, A; Pérez-Sánchez, R; Hernández-González, A; Siles-Lucas, M

    2011-08-24

    Protein interactions between host and parasites can influence the infection success and severity. The aim of this investigation was to identify the proteins from two trematodes potentially localized at the host-parasite interface. We performed the proteomic profiles from in vivo obtained immature lung stage Schistosoma bovis schistosomula and in vitro excysted juveniles from Fasciola hepatica, parasites of ruminants and man usually giving rise to chronic infections. Proteomes from those parasites were obtained after digestion with trypsin and the peptides generated were identified by mass spectrometry, both before and after parasites' treatment with 70% methanol. The comparison of the two proteome sets from each parasite and between them, the analysis of their relative abundance and of their potential exposure to the host from living parasites, together with the specific immunolocalization of two of the identified molecules, show that this approach could assist in the identification of parasite exposed proteins and in the definition of molecules common for the two parasites with potential interaction with the host. Further characterization of these molecules could guide to define new common anti-parasitic targets and potential vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lymphatics in human lymphatic filariasis: in vitro models of parasite-induced lymphatic remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Nutman, Thomas B

    2009-12-01

    Lymphatic filariasis characterized by the dysfunction of the lymphatics can lead to severe (and often) irreversible lymphedema and elephantiasis. Decades of research in the field shows that the establishment of the adult parasites in the lymphatics triggers a cascade of events that ultimately results in tissue scarring and fibrosis. In this minireview, we focus on the studies addressing the mechanisms underlying the parasite-induced lymphatic dilatation that suggests parasite-induced lymphatic remodeling and lymphangiogenesis may be the prelude towards developing chronic and irreversible filarial pathology.

  18. Status of intestinal parasites infection in schoolchildren at Yauri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Status of intestinal parasites infection in schoolchildren at Yauri Emirate of Kebbi state, northwestern Nigeria. ... Strongyloides stercoralis (1.22%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.31%), Schistosoma mansoni (1.22%), Fasciola gigantica (0.92%), Taenia saginata (0.31%), Entamoeba coli (1.53%), Balantidium coli (2.14%).

  19. Vectorial Potential of Cockroaches in Transmitting Parasites of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six medically important parasites were encountered in the following order Entamoeba histolytica (40.83%), Ascaris lumbricoides (28.40%), Enterobius Vermicularis (15.98%), Schistosoma mansoni (9.48%), S. haematobium (2.95%) and Trichuris trichura (2.36%). There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in ...

  20. Sero-prevalence study of parasitic infections among HIV positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This was a cross-sectional study to determine the sero prevalence of serum antibodies to three parasitic infections namely Entamoeba histolytica, Schistosoma sp. and Toxoplasma gondii, which are opportunistic infections among HIV/AIDS patients. Methods: One thousand and eighty patients that attended three ...

  1. Plasmodium falciparum-like parasites infecting wild apes in southern Cameroon do not represent a recurrent source of human malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Sesh A.; Liu, Weimin; Keele, Brandon F.; Learn, Gerald H.; Bittinger, Kyle; Mouacha, Fatima; Ahuka-Mundeke, Steve; Manske, Magnus; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Li, Yingying; Malenke, Jordan A.; Delaporte, Eric; Laurent, Christian; Mpoudi Ngole, Eitel; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Shaw, George M.; Rayner, Julian C.; Peeters, Martine; Sharp, Paul M.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2013-01-01

    Wild-living chimpanzees and gorillas harbor a multitude of Plasmodium species, including six of the subgenus Laverania, one of which served as the progenitor of Plasmodium falciparum. Despite the magnitude of this reservoir, it is unknown whether apes represent a source of human infections. Here, we used Plasmodium species-specific PCR, single-genome amplification, and 454 sequencing to screen humans from remote areas of southern Cameroon for ape Laverania infections. Among 1,402 blood samples, we found 1,000 to be Plasmodium mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) positive, all of which contained human parasites as determined by sequencing and/or restriction enzyme digestion. To exclude low-abundance infections, we subjected 514 of these samples to 454 sequencing, targeting a region of the mtDNA genome that distinguishes ape from human Laverania species. Using algorithms specifically developed to differentiate rare Plasmodium variants from 454-sequencing error, we identified single and mixed-species infections with P. falciparum, Plasmodium malariae, and/or Plasmodium ovale. However, none of the human samples contained ape Laverania parasites, including the gorilla precursor of P. falciparum. To characterize further the diversity of P. falciparum in Cameroon, we used single-genome amplification to amplify 3.4-kb mtDNA fragments from 229 infected humans. Phylogenetic analysis identified 62 new variants, all of which clustered with extant P. falciparum, providing further evidence that P. falciparum emerged following a single gorilla-to-human transmission. Thus, unlike Plasmodium knowlesi-infected macaques in southeast Asia, African apes harboring Laverania parasites do not seem to serve as a recurrent source of human malaria, a finding of import to ongoing control and eradication measures. PMID:23569255

  2. Foodborne parasites from wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, Christian Moliin Outzen; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    The majority of wild foods consumed by humans are sourced from intensively managed or semi-farmed populations. Management practices inevitably affect wildlife density and habitat characteristics, which are key elements in the transmission of parasites. We consider the risk of transmission...... of foodborne parasites to humans from wildlife maintained under natural or semi-natural conditions. A deeper understanding will be useful in counteracting foodborne parasites arising from the growing industry of novel and exotic foods....

  3. Parasitismo de Amblyomma fuscum (Acari: Ixodidae em humanos Parasitism of Amblyomma fuscum (Acari: Ixodidae on humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Marques

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Amblyomma fuscum é uma espécie rara de carrapato, recentemente revalidada, com poucos registros de ocorrência na literatura. Neste trabalho, são informados dois registros de parasitismo de A. fuscum em seres humanos: um no Estado de São Paulo (SP e outro possivelmente oriundo do Estado de Santa Catarina (SC, Brasil. Tratam-se dos primeiros registros de parasitismo em humano por esta espécie de carrapato. Um espécime adulto fêmea de A. fuscum foi coletado quando encontrava-se fixado à palma da mão de um dos autores deste trabalho, no município de Guarujá, SP. O segundo espécime, também adulto fêmea, foi coletado quando se encontrava fixado ao tornozelo de uma cidadã da cidade de São Paulo, que havia retornado de Lagoa da Conceição, em Florianópolis, SC, três dias antes. O presente registro de A. fuscum no município de Guarujá, SP, e outro possivelmente oriundo de Florianópolis, SC, reforça os achados prévios deste carrapato nesses dois Estados, especialmente em região costeira. Embora o estágio adulto de A. fuscum tenha sido associado primariamente com répteis, os vários registros em mamíferos (Carnivora e Edentata e o presente registro em seres humanos sugerem uma baixa especificidade parasitária.Amblyomma fuscum is a rare, recently revalidated tick species, with few records in the literature. The present study reports two records of human parasitism by A. fuscum, one in the state of São Paulo (SP, and the other possibly from the state of Santa Catarina (SC, Brazil. These are the first reports of A. fuscum on humans. An adult female specimen of A. fuscum was collected while attached to the palmar area of the hand of one of the authors of the present study, in Guarujá, SP. The second specimen, also an adult female, was collected while attached to the ankle of a resident of São Paulo city, who had returned three days before from Lagoa da Conceição, Florianópolis Municipality, SC. The present report of A

  4. Sex Steroids Effects on the Molting Process of the Helminth Human Parasite Trichinella spiralis

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    Romel Hernández-Bello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the in vitro effects of estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone on the molting process, which is the initial and crucial step in the development of the muscular larvae (ML or L1 to adult worm. Testosterone had no significative effect on the molting rate of the parasite, however, progesterone decreased the molting rate about a 50% in a concentration- and time-independent pattern, while estradiol had a slight effect (10%. The gene expression of caveolin-1, a specific gene used as a marker of parasite development, showed that progesterone and estradiol downregulated its expression, while protein expression was unaffected. By using flow citometry, a possible protein that is recognized by a commercial antiprogesterone receptor antibody was detected. These findings may have strong implications in the host-parasite coevolution, in the sex-associated susceptibility to this infection and could point out to possibilities to use antihormones to inhibit parasite development.

  5. A Novel ADP/ATP Transporter in the Mitosome of the Microaerophilic Human Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, Ka Wai; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Cox, Sian; Embley, T. Martin; Fabre, Olivier; Giezen, Mark van der; Harding, Marilyn; Horner, David S.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.; León-Avila, Gloria; Tovar, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Recent data suggest that microaerophilic and parasitic protozoa, which lack oxidative phosphorylation, nevertheless contain mitochondrial homologs, organelles that share common ancestry with mitochondria. Such widespread retention suggests there may be a common function for mitochondrial homologs

  6. Infection with schistosome parasites in snails leads to increased predation by prawns: implications for human schistosomiasis control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Scott J; De Leo, Giulio A; Wood, Chelsea L; Sokolow, Susanne H

    2015-12-01

    Schistosomiasis - a parasitic disease that affects over 200 million people across the globe - is primarily transmitted between human definitive hosts and snail intermediate hosts. To reduce schistosomiasis transmission, some have advocated disrupting the schistosome life cycle through biological control of snails, achieved by boosting the abundance of snails' natural predators. But little is known about the effect of parasitic infection on predator-prey interactions, especially in the case of schistosomiasis. Here, we present the results of laboratory experiments performed on Bulinus truncatus and Biomphalaria glabrata snails to investigate: (i) rates of predation on schistosome-infected versus uninfected snails by a sympatric native river prawn, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii, and (ii) differences in snail behavior (including movement, refuge-seeking and anti-predator behavior) between infected and uninfected snails. In predation trials, prawns showed a preference for consuming snails infected with schistosome larvae. In behavioral trials, infected snails moved less quickly and less often than uninfected snails, and were less likely to avoid predation by exiting the water or hiding under substrate. Although the mechanism by which the parasite alters snail behavior remains unknown, these results provide insight into the effects of parasitic infection on predator-prey dynamics and suggest that boosting natural rates of predation on snails may be a useful strategy for reducing transmission in schistosomiasis hotspots. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

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    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  8. Identification of a molecular marker for genotyping human lymphatic filarial nematode parasite Wuchereria bancrofti.

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    Patra, K P; Ramu, Thangadurai; Hoti, S L; Pragasam, G Siva; Das, P K

    2007-05-01

    In India, Mass Drug Administration is on going towards elimination of lymphatic filariasis in many areas, which might lead to intense selection pressure on the parasite populations and their genetic restructuring. This calls for molecular finger printing of Wuchereria bancrofti parasite populations at national level and monitoring genetic changes in the future. For this purpose a reliable, less expensive, rapid, and reproducible molecular tool is necessary, which is not available for W. bancrofti at this time. We identified robust molecular markers based on the comparison of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiles and the genetic data generated from parasite populations collected from areas in Northern (Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh state), Southern (Kozhikode, Kerala State) and Central regions (Jagdalpur, Chattisgarh state) of India, where lymphatic filariasis is endemic for many decades. RAPD profiles for these parasite populations were generated using three different primers and the dendrograms constructed using the profiles were all different. In order to identify appropriate RAPD primer(s), we compared the results of RAPD with the fingerprint profile and genetic data obtained by the more reliable AFLP technique, using the parasite populations from the same areas. RAPD marker (OP8) primer produced phylogenetic data almost similar to that of AFLP analysis. The marker was able to reveal variations between the parasite populations collected from Varanasi, Kozhikode, and Jagdalpur. Most importantly, RAPD primer OP8 produced reproducible results, when tested in three different trials. In view of the limited availability of W. bancrofti parasite DNA, along with a lower cost and ease of performance, RAPD appears to be more suitable compared to AFLP at the present juncture, since complete genome information of this parasite is still not available. Thus, RAPD primer OP8 can be a very useful molecular maker for DNA

  9. Human presence increases parasitic load in endangered lion-tailed macaques (Macaca silenus in its fragmented rainforest habitats in Southern India.

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    Shaik Hussain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding changes in the host-parasite relationship due to habitat fragmentation is necessary for better management and conservation of endangered species in fragmented landscapes. Pathogens and parasites can pose severe threat to species in restricted environments such as forest fragments where there is increased contact of wildlife with human and livestock populations. Environmental stress and reduced nutritional level in forest fragments can influence parasite infection and intensity on the native species. In this study, we examine the impact of habitat fragmentation on the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in lion-tailed macaques in a fragmented rainforest in Western Ghats. METHODS: The prevalence of different gastrointestinal parasites was estimated from 91 fecal samples collected from 9 lion-tailed macaque groups in nine forest fragments. The parasites were identified up to genus level on the basis of the morphology and coloration of the egg, larva and cyst. The covariates included forest fragment area, group size and the presence/absence of human settlements and livestock in proximity. We used a linear regression model to identify the covariates that significantly influenced the prevalence of different parasite taxa. RESULTS: Nine gastrointestinal parasite taxa were detected in lion-tailed macaque groups. The groups near human settlements had greater prevalence and number of taxa, and these variables also had significant positive correlations with group size. We found that these parameters were also greater in groups near human settlements after controlling for group size. Livestock were present in all five fragments that had human settlements in proximity. CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that high prevalence and species richness of gastrointestinal parasites in lion-tailed macaque groups are directly related to habitat fragmentation, high anthropogenic activities and high host density. The parasite load

  10. Human presence increases parasitic load in endangered lion-tailed macaques (Macaca silenus) in its fragmented rainforest habitats in Southern India.

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    Hussain, Shaik; Ram, Muthuvarmadam Subramanian; Kumar, Ajith; Shivaji, Sisinthy; Umapathy, Govindhaswamy

    2013-01-01

    Understanding changes in the host-parasite relationship due to habitat fragmentation is necessary for better management and conservation of endangered species in fragmented landscapes. Pathogens and parasites can pose severe threat to species in restricted environments such as forest fragments where there is increased contact of wildlife with human and livestock populations. Environmental stress and reduced nutritional level in forest fragments can influence parasite infection and intensity on the native species. In this study, we examine the impact of habitat fragmentation on the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in lion-tailed macaques in a fragmented rainforest in Western Ghats. The prevalence of different gastrointestinal parasites was estimated from 91 fecal samples collected from 9 lion-tailed macaque groups in nine forest fragments. The parasites were identified up to genus level on the basis of the morphology and coloration of the egg, larva and cyst. The covariates included forest fragment area, group size and the presence/absence of human settlements and livestock in proximity. We used a linear regression model to identify the covariates that significantly influenced the prevalence of different parasite taxa. Nine gastrointestinal parasite taxa were detected in lion-tailed macaque groups. The groups near human settlements had greater prevalence and number of taxa, and these variables also had significant positive correlations with group size. We found that these parameters were also greater in groups near human settlements after controlling for group size. Livestock were present in all five fragments that had human settlements in proximity. The present study suggests that high prevalence and species richness of gastrointestinal parasites in lion-tailed macaque groups are directly related to habitat fragmentation, high anthropogenic activities and high host density. The parasite load partially explains the reason for the decline in immature survival

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Human Intestinal Parasites in Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran.

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    Hemmati, Nasrin; Razmjou, Elham; Hashemi-Hafshejani, Saeideh; Motevalian, Abbas; Akhlaghi, Lameh; Meamar, Ahmad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common infections and health problems worldwide. Due to the lack of epidemiologic information of such infections, the prevalence of, and the risk factors for, enteric parasites were investigated in residents of Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, 561 triple fecal samples were collected through a two-stage cluster-sampling protocol from Jun to Dec 2014. The samples were examined by formalin-ether concentration, culture, and with molecular methods. The prevalence of enteric parasites was 32.7% (95% CI 27.3-38). Blastocystis sp. was the most common intestinal protozoan (28.4%; 95% CI 23.7-33.0). The formalin-ether concentration and culture methods detected Blastocystis sp., Entamoeba coli , Giardia intestinalis , Dientamoeba fragilis , Iodamoeba butschlii , Entamoeba complex cysts or trophozoite , Chilomastix mesnilii , and Enterobius vermicularis . Single-round PCR assay for Entamoeba complex were identified Entamoeba dispar and E. moshkovskii . E. histolytica was not observed in any specimen. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of parasites with water source and close animal contact. There was no correlation between infections and gender, age, occupation, education, or travel history. Protozoan infections were more common than helminth infections. This study revealed a high prevalence of enteric protozoan parasite infection among citizens of Rodehen. As most of the species detected are transmitted through a water-resistant cyst, public and individual education on personal hygiene should be considered to reduce transmission of intestinal parasites in the population.

  12. Human-induced eutrophication maintains high parasite prevalence in breeding threespine stickleback populations.

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    Budria, Alexandre; Candolin, Ulrika

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities are having profound impacts on species interactions, with further consequences for populations and communities. We investigated the influence that anthropogenic eutrophication has on the prevalence of the parasitic tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus in threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus populations. We caught stickleback from four areas along the coast of Finland, and within each area from one undisturbed and one eutrophied habitat. We found the prevalence of the parasite to be lower in the eutrophied habitats at the start of the breeding season, probably because of fewer piscivorous birds that transmit the parasite. However, while the prevalence of the parasite declined across the season in the undisturbed habitat, it did less so in eutrophied habitats. We discuss different processes that could be behind the differences, such as lower predation rate on infected fish, higher food availability and less dispersal in eutrophied habitats. We found no effect of eutrophication on the proportion of infected stickleback that entered reproductive condition. Together with earlier findings, this suggests that eutrophication increases the proportion of infected stickleback that reproduce. This could promote the evolution of less parasite resistant populations, with potential consequences for the viability of the interacting parties of the host-parasite system.

  13. Genetic variability in the compatibility between Schistosoma haematobium and its potential vectors in Niger. Epidemiological implications.

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    Véra, C; Jourdane, J; Sellin, B; Combes, C

    1990-06-01

    A populational study of the compatibility between Schistosoma haematobium and its potential vectors has been carried out in the Niger, confronting samples of S. haematobium populations from three epidemiologic foci with Bulinus populations originating from the same focus (sympatric infection) and with Bulinus populations from other foci (allopatric infections). The three transmission foci selected were irrigation canals in ricefields along the Niger river where one finds: Bulinus truncatus rohlfsi, Bulinus globosus, Bulinus forskalii and Bulinus senegalensis; temporary pools in the Sahel area where one finds B. truncatus and B. senegalensis; permanent pools of the "guelta" type in Sahara area where only B. truncatus occurs. As a compatibility test, the snail infection test was selected, with particular emphasis on optimising its reliability. Snail-infection experiments showed that B. truncatus and B. senegalensis are very good potential vectors, with infection rates ranging between 71.5 and 85.9%. B. globosus and B. forskalii, on the other hand, are totally incompatible. The mean infection percentages in the sympatric and allopatric combinations carried out with the S. haematobium-B. truncatus couple were very similar. This character strongly suggests a lack of isolation in schistosome populations and a circulation of the parasite genome through the mobility of infected human populations (Peuls and Touaregs) in Sahel zone. This study, in relation with snail surveys carried out in parallel, shows that the main types of aquatic environments on the Niger act as high risk areas for schistosome transmission.

  14. Comparative analysis of codon usage pattern and its influencing factors in Schistosoma japonicum and Ascaris suum.

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    Mazumder, Gulshana A; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-12-20

    Schistosoma japonicum and Ascaris suum are considered as the major parasites of human which cause various life threatening diseases such as schistomiasis and ascariasis. The codon usage bias (CUB) is known as the phenomenon of more usage of a specific codon than the other synonymous codons for an amino acid. The factors that influence the codon usage bias are mutation pressure, natural selection, gene expression, gene length, GC content, RNA stability, recombination rates, codon position etc. Here we had used various bioinformatic tools and statistical analyses to understand the compositional features, expression level and codon usage bias in the genes of these two species.After estimating the effective number of codon (ENC) in both the species, codon usage bias was found to be low and gene expression was high. The nucleobase A and T were used most often than C and G. From neutrality plot and correspondence analysis it was found that both natural selection and mutation pressure played an important role in shaping the codon usage pattern of both species. Moreover, natural selection played a major role while mutation pressure played a minor role in shaping the codon usage bias in S. japonicum and A.suum. This is the first report on the codon usage biology in S. japonicum and A.suum, and the factors influencing their codon usage bias. These results are expected to be useful for genetic engineering and evolutionary studies.

  15. Chronic Schistosoma japonicum infection reduces immune response to vaccine against hepatitis B in mice.

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    Lin Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B and schistosomiasis are most prevalent in Africa and Asia, and co-infections of both are frequent in these areas. The immunomodulation reported to be induced by schistosome infections might restrict immune control of hepatitis B virus (HBV leading to more severe viral infection. Vaccination is the most effective measure to control and prevent HBV infection, but there is evidence for a reduced immune response to the vaccine in patients with chronic schistosomiasis japonica. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we demonstrate in a mouse model that a chronic Schistosoma japonicum infection can inhibit the immune response to hepatitis B vaccine (HBV vaccine and lead to lower production of anti-HBs antibodies, interferon-γ (IFN-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2. After deworming with Praziquantel (PZQ, the level of anti-HBs antibodies gradually increased and the Th2-biased profile slowly tapered. At 16 weeks after deworming, the levels of anti-HBs antibodies and Th1/Th2 cytokines returned to the normal levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the preexisting Th2-dominated immune profile in the host infected with the parasite may down-regulate levels of anti-HBs antibodies and Th1 cytokines. To improve the efficacy of HBV vaccination in schistosome infected humans it may be valuable to treat them with praziquantel (PZQ some time prior to HBV vaccination.

  16. A piezoelectric immunosensor using hybrid self-assembled monolayers for detection of Schistosoma japonicum.

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    Shiping Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The parasite Schistosoma japonicum causes schistosomiasis disease, which threatens human life and hampers economic and social development in some Asian countries. An important lesson learned from efforts to reduce the occurrence of schistosomiasis is that the diagnostic approach must be altered as further progress is made towards the control and ultimate elimination of the disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using mixed self-assembled monolayer membrane (mixed SAM technology, a mixture of mercaptopropionic acid (MPA and mercaptoethanol (ME was self-assembled on the surface of quartz crystals by gold-sulphur-bonds. Soluble egg antigens (SEA of S. japonicum were then cross-linked to the quartz crystal using a special coupling agent. As compared with the traditional single self-assembled monolayer immobilization method, S. japonicum antigen (SjAg immobilization using mixed self-assembled monolayers exhibits much greater immunoreactivity. Under optimal experimental conditions, the detection range is 1:1500 to 1:60 (infected rabbit serum dilution ratios. We measured several infected rabbit serum samples with varying S. japonicum antibody (SjAb concentrations using both immunosensor and ELISA techniques and then produced a correlation analysis. The correlation coefficients reached 0.973. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have developed a new, simple, sensitive, and reusable piezoelectric immunosensor that directly detects SjAb in the serum. This method may represent an alternative to the current diagnostic methods for S. japonicum infection in the clinical laboratory or for analysis outside the laboratory.

  17. Development and evaluation of a sensitive PCR-ELISA system for detection of schistosoma infection in feces.

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    Luciana Inácia Gomes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA was developed to overcome the need for sensitive techniques for the efficient diagnosis of Schistosoma infection in endemic settings with low parasitic burden. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This system amplifies a 121-base pair tandem repeat DNA sequence, immobilizes the resultant 5' biotinylated product on streptavidin-coated strip-well microplates and uses anti-fluorescein antibodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase to detect the hybridized fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The detection limit of the Schistosoma PCR-ELISA system was determined to be 1.3 fg of S. mansoni genomic DNA (less than the amount found in a single cell and estimated to be 0.15 S. mansoni eggs per gram of feces (fractions of an egg. The system showed good precision and genus specificity since the DNA target was found in seven Schistosoma DNA samples: S. mansoni, S. haematobium, S. bovis, S. intercalatum, S. japonicum, S. magrebowiei and S. rhodaini. By evaluating 206 patients living in an endemic area in Brazil, the prevalence of S. mansoni infection was determined to be 18% by examining 12 Kato-Katz slides (41.7 mg/smear, 500 mg total of a single fecal sample from each person, while the Schistosoma PCR-ELISA identified a 30% rate of infection using 500-mg of the same fecal sample. When considering the Kato-Katz method as the reference test, artificial sensitivity and specificity rates of the PCR-ELISA system were 97.4% and 85.1%, respectively. The potential for estimating parasitic load by DNA detection in feces was assessed by comparing absorbance values and eggs per gram of feces, with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.700 (P<0.0001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reports the development and field evaluation of a sensitive Schistosoma PCR-ELISA, a system that may serve as an alternative for diagnosing Schistosoma infection.

  18. Effects of Goyazensolide during in Vitro Cultivation of Schistosoma mansoni

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    Barth Léo Roberto

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Goyazensolide, a component extracted of Eremanthus goyazensis showed a significant inhibitory effect on egg-laying of Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro cultivation of this parasite. Motility of the worms was also reduced under treatment with goyazensolide and 90% of mortality was reached with concentrations up to 4mg/ml. It has found that separated worms were more susceptible than worms pairing during drug exposition and female alone was significantly more susceptible than male worm in the same conditions of in vitro cultivation. Natural products isolated from plants represent potential sources for the identification of structures useful for the design of alternative molecules to be used as new drug substances against several infectious diseases

  19. A highly sensitive TaqMan real-time PCR assay for early detection of Schistosoma species.

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    Zhou, Li; Tang, Jingfeng; Zhao, Youyun; Gong, Rui; Lu, Xuan; Gong, Lulu; Wang, Yefu

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major infectious disease and a public health concern in many areas in China and other countries. Sensitive method for detection of the parasite is critical for early diagnosis and for monitoring of effective treatment of the disease. In this study, we developed a highly sensitive TaqMan real-time PCR assay for the detection of Schistosoma japonicum DNA in mouse feces and serum samples. This assay was based on the DNA sequence of the S. japonicum 18S rRNA gene and was able to detect 10 fg of S. japonicum genomic DNA, which is 100 times more sensitive than conventional PCR. We were able to detect the S. japonicum DNA one week post-infection in mouse sera and 4 weeks post-infection in feces, which was one week earlier than egg detection by microscopy in feces. This assay was also highly specific for Asian Schistosomes which are causative species of human Schistosomiasis. In single sex male cercariae infected mice, parasite DNA was only detected in the first 4 weeks post-infection, suggesting that the DNA was derived from decaying worms' corpse in the first 4 weeks whereas the DNA was mainly from decaying parasite eggs afterwards. Therefore we conclude that the established TaqMan real-time PCR assay is a sensitive, specific and convenient method that could be used for the early diagnostic evaluation of S. japonicum infection in humans and for monitoring outbreaks in endemic areas with low prevalence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular phylogeny of Schistosoma species supports traditional groupings within the genus.

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    Barker, S C; Blair, D

    1996-04-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among 9 blood flukes (7 schistosome species, a spirorchid, and a sanguinicolid) were inferred from nucleotide sequences of the D1 domain of large subunit rRNA and the V4 region of small subunit rRNA. These sequences were more conserved than those examined by previous authors and thus may provide insight into deeper-level relationships. Analyzed separately and combined by 3 methods, these data yielded congruent trees that were well supported by bootstrap resampling. The traditional groups of schistosome species based on egg type were supported. Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mekongi were distinct from the remaining Schistosoma species. Schistosoma spindale (from India and southeast Asia) clustered strongly with the African species to the exclusion of the other Asian species, S. japonicum and S. mekongi. Schistosoma spindale may have been brought to India and southeast Asia from Africa by early humans. Statistical tests revealed only weak evidence for the operation of a molecular clock in the V4 sequence; no evidence was found for this in the D1 domain.

  1. Population transcriptomics of human malaria parasites reveals the mechanism of artemisinin resistance

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    Mok, Sachel; Ashley, Elizabeth A.; Ferreira, Pedro E.; Zhu, Lei; Lin, Zhaoting; Yeo, Tomas; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Imwong, Mallika; Pukrittayakamee, Sasithon; Dhorda, Mehul; Nguon, Chea; Lim, Pharath; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Suon, Seila; Hien, Tran Tinh; Htut, Ye; Faiz, M. Abul; Onyamboko, Marie A.; Mayxay, Mayfong; Newton, Paul N.; Tripura, Rupam; Woodrow, Charles J.; Miotto, Olivo; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Nosten, François; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Preiser, Peter R.; White, Nicholas J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Bozdech, Zbynek

    2017-01-01

    Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum threatens global efforts to control and eliminate malaria. Polymorphisms in the kelch domain–carrying protein K13 are associated with artemisinin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. We analyzed the in vivo transcriptomes of 1043 P. falciparum isolates from patients with acute malaria and found that artemisinin resistance is associated with increased expression of unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways involving the major PROSC and TRiC chaperone complexes. Artemisinin-resistant parasites also exhibit decelerated progression through the first part of the asexual intraerythrocytic development cycle. These findings suggest that artemisinin-resistant parasites remain in a state of decelerated development at the young ring stage, whereas their up-regulated UPR pathways mitigate protein damage caused by artemisinin. The expression profiles of UPR-related genes also associate with the geographical origin of parasite isolates, further suggesting their role in emerging artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion. PMID:25502316

  2. Expression profile of the Schistosoma japonicum degradome reveals differential protease expression patterns and potential anti-schistosomal intervention targets.

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    Liu, Shuai; Cai, Pengfei; Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Zhou, Xiaosu; Wu, Chuang; Wang, Heng; Chen, Qijun

    2014-10-01

    Blood fluke proteases play pivotal roles in the processes of invasion, nutrition acquisition, immune evasion, and other host-parasite interactions. Hundreds of genes encoding putative proteases have been identified in the recently published schistosome genomes. However, the expression profiles of these proteases in Schistosoma species have not yet been systematically analyzed. We retrieved and culled the redundant protease sequences of Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, Echinococcus multilocularis, and Clonorchis sinensis from public databases utilizing bioinformatic approaches. The degradomes of the four parasitic organisms and Homo sapiens were then comparatively analyzed. A total of 262 S. japonicum protease sequences were obtained and the expression profiles generated using whole-genome microarray. Four main clusters of protease genes with different expression patterns were identified: proteases up-regulated in hepatic schistosomula and adult worms, egg-specific or predominantly expressed proteases, cercaria-specific or predominantly expressed proteases, and constantly expressed proteases. A subset of protease genes with different expression patterns were further validated using real-time quantitative PCR. The present study represents the most comprehensive analysis of a degradome in Schistosoma species to date. These results provide a firm foundation for future research on the specific function(s) of individual proteases and may help to refine anti-proteolytic strategies in blood flukes.

  3. Marine actinomycetes: a new source of compounds against the human malaria parasite.

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    Jacques Prudhomme

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria continues to be a devastating parasitic disease that causes the death of 2 million individuals annually. The increase in multi-drug resistance together with the absence of an efficient vaccine hastens the need for speedy and comprehensive antimalarial drug discovery and development. Throughout history, traditional herbal remedies or natural products have been a reliable source of antimalarial agents, e.g. quinine and artemisinin. Today, one emerging source of small molecule drug leads is the world's oceans. Included among the source of marine natural products are marine microorganisms such as the recently described actinomycete. Members of the genus Salinispora have yielded a wealth of new secondary metabolites including salinosporamide A, a molecule currently advancing through clinical trials as an anticancer agent. Because of the biological activity of metabolites being isolated from marine microorganisms, our group became interested in exploring the potential efficacy of these compounds against the malaria parasite.We screened 80 bacterial crude extracts for their activity against malaria growth. We established that the pure compound, salinosporamide A, produced by the marine actinomycete, Salinispora tropica, shows strong inhibitory activity against the erythrocytic stages of the parasite cycle. Biochemical experiments support the likely inhibition of the parasite 20S proteasome. Crystal structure modeling of salinosporamide A and the parasite catalytic 20S subunit further confirm this hypothesis. Ultimately we showed that salinosporamide A protected mice against deadly malaria infection when administered at an extremely low dosage.These findings underline the potential of secondary metabolites, derived from marine microorganisms, to inhibit Plasmodium growth. More specifically, we highlight the effect of proteasome inhibitors such as salinosporamide A on in vitro and in vivo parasite development. Salinosporamide A (NPI-0052 now

  4. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Human Intestinal Parasites in Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran

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    Nasrin HEMMATI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal parasitic infections are among the most common infections and health problems worldwide. Due to the lack of epidemiologic information of such infections, the prevalence of, and the risk factors for, enteric parasites were investigated in residents of Roudehen, Tehran Province, Iran.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 561 triple fecal samples were collected through a two-stage cluster-sampling protocol from Jun to Dec 2014. The samples were examined by formalin-ether concentration, culture, and with molecular methods.Results: The prevalence of enteric parasites was 32.7% (95% CI 27.3–38. Blastocystis sp. was the most common intestinal protozoan (28.4%; 95% CI 23.7–33.0. The formalin-ether concentration and culture methods detected Blastocystis sp., Entamoeba coli, Giardia intestinalis, Dientamoeba fragilis, Iodamoeba butschlii, Entamoeba complex cysts or trophozoite, Chilomastix mesnilii, and Enterobius vermicularis. Single-round PCR assay for Entamoeba complex were identified Entamoeba dispar and E. moshkovskii. E. histolytica was not observed in any specimen. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association of parasites with water source and close animal contact. There was no correlation between infections and gender, age, occupation, education, or travel history. Protozoan infections were more common than helminth infections.Conclusion: This study revealed a high prevalence of enteric protozoan parasite infection among citizens of Rodehen. As most of the species detected are transmitted through a water-resistant cyst, public and individual education on personal hygiene should be considered to reduce transmission of intestinal parasites in the population. 

  5. Parasites of importance for human health in Nigerian dogs: high prevalence and limited knowledge of pet owners

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    Heukelbach Jorg

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dogs are the most common pet animals worldwide. They may harbour a wide range of parasites with zoonotic potential, thus causing a health risk to humans. In Nigeria, epidemiological knowledge on these parasites is limited. Methods In a community-based study, we examined 396 dogs in urban and rural areas of Ilorin (Kwara State, Central Nigeria for ectoparasites and intestinal helminths. In addition, a questionnaire regarding knowledge and practices was applied to pet owners. Results Nine ectoparasite species belonging to four taxa and six intestinal helminth species were identified: fleas (Ctenocephalides canis, Pulex irritans, Tunga penetrans, mites (Demodex canis, Otodectes sp., Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis, ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus, Ixodes sp., and lice (Trichodectes canis; and Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma sp., Trichuris vulpis, Dipylidium caninum, Taenidae and Strongyloides sp. Overall prevalence of ectoparasites was 60.4% and of intestinal helminths 68.4%. The occurrence of C. canis, R. sanguineus, T. canis, Ancylostoma sp. and T. vulpis was most common (prevalence 14.4% to 41.7%. Prevalence patterns in helminths were age-dependent, with T. canis showing a decreasing prevalence with age of host, and a reverse trend in other parasite species. Knowledge regarding zoonoses was very limited and the diseases not considered a major health problem. Treatment with antiparasitic drugs was more frequent in urban areas. Conclusion Parasites of importance for human health were highly prevalent in Nigerian dogs. Interventions should include health education provided to dog owners and the establishment of a program focusing on zoonotic diseases.

  6. THE CURRENT SITUATION OF PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN INDONESIA

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    Sri Oemijati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are highly prevalent in Indonesia, especially in rural areas, suburbs and slums of big cities. Twenty two species of protozoa and 32 species of helminths have been reported infecting man in Indonesia. Among the 16 species of intestinal protozoa, nine are constantly found in stool surveys, but only Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia are real pathogens. Among the blood and tissue protozoa, the most important are the malaria parasites. The most frequently encountered and widely distributed species are Plasmodium falciparum, and P. vivax. P. malariae is at present more difficult to find, while P. ovale has been reported only from Flores, Timor and Irian Jaya. The non human parasites so far has not been diagnosed in human. Among the 80 species of Anopheline mosquitoes in Indonesia, 16 have been reconfirmed as vectors. Among the other tissue protozoa, Trichomonas vaginalis is frequenUy found in the Gynaecological clinic, while Toxolasma gondii is found only in special studies. Among the 13 species of intestinal nematodes, five are highly prevalent namely : Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura and Oxyuris vermicularis, while Strongyloides stercoralis is getting more difficult to find. Filariasis is widely distributed and is still highly endemic in certain areas. Both urban and rural Wuchereria bancrofti are prevalent, but B. malayi is causing more public health problems in rural areas. Both the human and the zoonotic type are prevalent. B. timori so far has been described only from the south eastern part of Indonesia. The filarial worms have different vectors and are therefore different in epidemiology and distribution. Non human filarial worms have not been reported infecting man in Indonesia. Among the 12 species of Trematodes, only Schistosoma japonicum is endemic in Central Sulawesi, and recently an endemic area oiFasciolopsis buski was discovered in a restricted area in

  7. A Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay for Early Detection of Schistosoma mansoni in Stool Samples: A Diagnostic Approach in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Gandasegui Arahuetes, Javier; Sánchez Hernández, Alicia; López Abán, Julio; Vicente Santiago, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background Human schistosomiasis, mainly due to Schistosoma mansoni species, is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases worldwide. To overcome the drawbacks of classical parasitological and serological methods in detecting S. mansoni infections, especially in acute stage of the disease, development of cost-effective, simple and rapid molecular methods is still needed for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis. A promising approach is the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technology. Compared to PCR-based assays, LAMP has the advantages of reaction simplicity, rapidity, specificity, cost-effectiveness and higher amplification efficiency. Additionally, as results can be inspected by the naked eye, the technique has great potential for use in low-income countries. Methodology/Principal findings A sequence corresponding to a mitochondrial S. mansoni minisatellite DNA region was selected as a target for designing a LAMP-based method to detect S. mansoni DNA in stool samples. We used a S. mansoni murine model to obtain well defined stool and sera samples from infected mice with S. mansoni cercariae. Samples were taken weekly from week 0 to 8 post-infection and the Kato-Katz and ELISA techniques were used for monitoring the infection. Primer set designed were tested using a commercial reaction mixture for LAMP assay and an in house mixture to compare results. Specificity of LAMP was tested using 16 DNA samples from different parasites, including several Schistosoma species, and no cross-reactions were found. The detection limit of our LAMP assay (SmMIT-LAMP) was 1 fg of S. mansoni DNA. When testing stool samples from infected mice the SmMIT-LAMP detected S. mansoni DNA as soon as 1 week post-infection. Conclusions/Significance We have developed, for the first time, a cost-effective, easy to perform, specific and sensitive LAMP assay for early detection of S. mansoni in stool samples. The method is potentially and readily adaptable for field diagnosis and

  8. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for early detection of Schistosoma mansoni in stool samples: a diagnostic approach in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernández-Soto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human schistosomiasis, mainly due to Schistosoma mansoni species, is one of the most prevalent parasitic diseases worldwide. To overcome the drawbacks of classical parasitological and serological methods in detecting S. mansoni infections, especially in acute stage of the disease, development of cost-effective, simple and rapid molecular methods is still needed for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis. A promising approach is the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP technology. Compared to PCR-based assays, LAMP has the advantages of reaction simplicity, rapidity, specificity, cost-effectiveness and higher amplification efficiency. Additionally, as results can be inspected by the naked eye, the technique has great potential for use in low-income countries.A sequence corresponding to a mitochondrial S. mansoni minisatellite DNA region was selected as a target for designing a LAMP-based method to detect S. mansoni DNA in stool samples. We used a S. mansoni murine model to obtain well defined stool and sera samples from infected mice with S. mansoni cercariae. Samples were taken weekly from week 0 to 8 post-infection and the Kato-Katz and ELISA techniques were used for monitoring the infection. Primer set designed were tested using a commercial reaction mixture for LAMP assay and an in house mixture to compare results. Specificity of LAMP was tested using 16 DNA samples from different parasites, including several Schistosoma species, and no cross-reactions were found. The detection limit of our LAMP assay (SmMIT-LAMP was 1 fg of S. mansoni DNA. When testing stool samples from infected mice the SmMIT-LAMP detected S. mansoni DNA as soon as 1 week post-infection.We have developed, for the first time, a cost-effective, easy to perform, specific and sensitive LAMP assay for early detection of S. mansoni in stool samples. The method is potentially and readily adaptable for field diagnosis and disease surveillance in schistosomiasis-endemic areas.

  9. Parasites, Plants, and People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marion; Moore, Tony

    2016-06-01

    Anthelminthic resistance is acknowledged worldwide and is a major problem in Aotearoa New Zealand, thus alternative parasite management strategies are imperative. One Health is an initiative linking animal, human, and environmental health. Parasites, plants, and people illustrate the possibilities of providing diverse diets for stock thereby lowering parasite burdens, improving the cultural wellbeing of a local community, and protecting the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein export marks the early phase of gametocytogenesis of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrini, F.; Lasonder, E.; Olivieri, A.; Camarda, G.; Schaijk, B.C.L. van; Sanchez, M.; Younis Younis, S.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Alano, P.

    2010-01-01

    Despite over a century of study of malaria parasites, parts of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle remain virtually unknown. One of these is the early gametocyte stage, a round shaped cell morphologically similar to an asexual trophozoite in which major cellular transformations ensure subsequent

  11. An Infectious Topic in Reticulate Evolution: Introgression and Hybridization in Animal Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian T. Detwiler

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been given to the role that introgression and hybridization have played in the evolution of parasites. Most studies are host-centric and ask if the hybrid of a free-living species is more or less susceptible to parasite infection. Here we focus on what is known about how introgression and hybridization have influenced the evolution of protozoan and helminth parasites of animals. There are reports of genome or gene introgression from distantly related taxa into apicomplexans and filarial nematodes. Most common are genetic based reports of potential hybridization among congeneric taxa, but in several cases, more work is needed to definitively conclude current hybridization. In the medically important Trypanosoma it is clear that some clonal lineages are the product of past hybridization events. Similarly, strong evidence exists for current hybridization in human helminths such as Schistosoma and Ascaris. There remain topics that warrant further examination such as the potential hybrid origin of polyploid platyhelminths. Furthermore, little work has investigated the phenotype or fitness, and even less the epidemiological significance of hybrid parasites.

  12. Comparative evaluation of Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma intercalatum, and Schistosoma haematobium alkaline phosphatase antigenicity by the alkaline phosphatase immunoassay (APIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, I M; Ballén, D E; Mendoza, L; Ferrer, A; Pointier, J-P; Kombila, M; Richard-Lenoble, D; Théron, A

    2014-04-01

    To know if alkaline phosphatase (AP) from schistosomes other than Schistosoma mansoni can be used as diagnostic marker for schistosomiasis in alkaline phosphatase immunocapture assay (APIA), we comparatively tested n-butanol extracts of adult worm membranes from a Venezuelan (JL) strain of S. mansoni (Ven/AWBE/Sm); a Cameroonian (EDEN) strain of Schistosoma intercalatum (Cam/AWBE/Si) and a Yemeni strain of Schistosoma haematobium (Yem/AWBE/Sh). APIA was evaluated with sera of patients from Venezuela, Senegal, and Gabon infected with S. mansoni, from Gabon infected with S. intercalatum or S. haematobium, from Chine infected with Schistosoma japonicum and from Cambodian patients infected with Schistosoma mekongi. Results indicate that 92.5% (37/40) of Venezuela sera, 75% (15/20) of Senegal sera, 39.5% (17/43) of S. haematobium sera, and 19.2% (5/26) S. intercalatum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm preparation. APIA with the Cam/AWBE/Si preparation showed that 53.8% of S. intercalatum-positive sera had anti-AP antibodies, and 51.2% S. haematobium-positive sera cross-immunocapturing the S. intercalatum AP. APIA performed with Yem/AWBE/Sh showed that 55.8% S. haematobium sera were positive. Only two out of nine S. japonicum sera were APIA-positive with the Ven/AWBE/Sm and Cam/AWBE/Si, and no reaction was observed with Cambodian S. mekongi-positive sera. AP activity was shown to be present in all the schistosome species/strains studied. The use of APIA as a tool to explore the APs antigenicity and the presence of Schistosoma sp. infections through the detection of anti-Schistosoma sp. AP antibodies in a host, allowed us to demonstrate the antigenicity of APs of S. mansoni, S. intercalatum, and S. haematobium.

  13. Molecular systematics of five Onchocerca species (Nematoda: Filarioidea) including the human parasite, O. volvulus, suggest sympatric speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Hojas, R; Cheke, R A; Post, R J

    2006-09-01

    The genus Onchocerca (Nematoda: Filarioidea) consists of parasites of ungulate mammals with the exception of O. volvulus, which is a human parasite. The relationship between O. volvulus, O. ochengi and O. gibsoni remains unresolved. Based on morphology of the microfilariae and infective larvae, vector transmission and geographical distribution, O. ochengi and O. volvulus have been placed as sister species. Nevertheless, the cuticle morphology and chromosomal data (O. volvulus and O. gibsoni have n=4 while O. ochengi is n=5) suggest that O. gibsoni could be more closely related to O. volvulus than O. ochengi. Sequences from the 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA and ND5 mitochondrial genes have been used to reconstruct the phylogeny of five Onchocerca species including O. volvulus. Analyses with maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony showed that O. ochengi is the sister species of O. volvulus, in accordance with the classification based on morphology and geographical location. The separate specific status of the species O. gutturosa and O. lienalis was supported, although their phylogenetic relationship was not well resolved. The analyses indicated that the basal species was O. gibsoni, a South-East Asian and Australasian species, but this result was not statistically significant. The possible involvement of sympatric speciation in the evolution of this group of parasites is discussed.

  14. Identification of New Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium Falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase Inhibitors by Pharmacophore and Structure-Based Virtual Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavadai, Elumalai; El Mazouni, Farah; Wittlin, Sergio; de Kock, Carmen; Phillips, Margaret A.; Chibale, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (PfDHODH), a key enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway, which the Plasmodium falciparum relies on exclusively for survival, has emerged as a promising target for antimalarial drugs. In an effort to discover new and potent PfDHODH inhibitors, 3D-QSAR pharmacophore models were developed based on the structures of known PfDHODH inhibitors and the validated Hypo1 model was used as a 3D search query for virtual screening of the National Cancer Institute database. The virtual hit compounds were further filtered based on molecular docking and Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area binding energy calculations. The combination of the pharmacophore and structure-based virtual screening resulted in the identification of nine new compounds that showed >25% inhibition of PfDHODH at a concentration of 10 μM, three of which exhibited IC50 values in the range of 0.38–20 μM. The most active compound, NSC336047, displayed species-selectivity for PfDHODH over human DHODH and inhibited parasite growth with an IC50 of 26 μM. In addition to this, thirteen compounds inhibited parasite growth with IC50 values of ≤ 50 μM, four of which showed IC50 values in the range of 5–12 μM. These compounds could be further explored in the identification and development of more potent PfDHODH and parasite growth inhibitors. PMID:26915022

  15. O2-Dependent Efficacy of Novel Piperidine- and Piperazine-Based Chalcones against the Human Parasite Giardia intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, Vijay; Mastronicola, Daniela; Tiwari, Hemandra Kumar; Kumar, Yogesh; Falabella, Micol; Pucillo, Leopoldo Paolo; Sarti, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Giardia intestinalis is the most frequent protozoan agent of intestinal diseases worldwide. Though commonly regarded as an anaerobic pathogen, it preferentially colonizes the fairly oxygen-rich mucosa of the proximal small intestine. Therefore, when testing new potential antigiardial drugs, O2 should be taken into account, since it also reduces the efficacy of metronidazole, the gold standard drug against giardiasis. In this study, 46 novel chalcones were synthesized by microwave-assisted Claisen-Schmidt condensation, purified, characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, and infrared spectroscopy, and tested for their toxicity against G. intestinalis under standard anaerobic conditions. As a novel approach, compounds showing antigiardial activity under anaerobiosis were also assayed under microaerobic conditions, and their selectivity against parasitic cells was assessed in a counterscreen on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Among the tested compounds, three [30(a), 31(e), and 33] were more effective in the presence of O2 than under anaerobic conditions and killed the parasite 2 to 4 times more efficiently than metronidazole under anaerobiosis. Two of them [30(a) and 31(e)] proved to be selective against parasitic cells, thus representing potential candidates for the design of novel antigiardial drugs. This study highlights the importance of testing new potential antigiardial agents not only under anaerobic conditions but also at low, more physiological O2 concentrations. PMID:24217695

  16. SmTRC1, a novel Schistosoma mansoni DNA transposon, discloses new families of animal and fungi transposons belonging to the CACTA superfamily

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeMarco, Ricardo; Venancio, Thiago M; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    ...) and so far have only been described in plants. Large transcriptome and genome sequence data have recently become publicly available for Schistosoma mansoni, a digenetic blood fluke that is a major causative agent of schistosomiasis in humans...

  17. Species and prevalence determination of Human Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten parasites species, namely Ascaris lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni, Ancylostoma duodenale, Strongyloides stercoralis, Fasciola hepatica, Hymenolepis nana, Enterobius vermicularis, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba coli, and Giardia lamblia were observed in the stool samples. The distribution of species in ...

  18. Cytokine mRNA profiles in pigs exposed prenatally and postnatally to Schistosoma japonicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Techau, Michala E.; Johansen, Maria V.; Aasted, Bent

    2007-01-01

    The pig is a natural host for Schistosoma japonicum and a useful animal model of human infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the differences between the cytokine profiles in prenatally or postnatally S. japonicum exposed pigs. Seven prenatally exposed pigs, 7 postnatally exposed...

  19. Optimization of an in vitro system to study the exo-erythrocytic stage of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rossouw, C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Rossouw_2010.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 13329 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Rossouw_2010.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 INTRODUCTION Much research remains... scaffold and harvesting cells via the temperature change is currently being scaled up and a prototype bioreactor has been developed. Optimization of an in vitro system to study the exo-erythrocytic stage of the human Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3600 - Schistosoma spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. 866.3600... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3600 Schistosoma spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Schistosoma spp. serological reagents are devices that...

  1. A global comparison of the human and T. brucei degradomes gives insights about possible parasite drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan T Mashiyama

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-level computational study of sequence and structure similarity, the latter using crystal structures and models, of the proteases of Homo sapiens and the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Using sequence and structure similarity networks to summarize the results, we constructed global views that show visually the relative abundance and variety of proteases in the degradome landscapes of these two species, and provide insights into evolutionary relationships between proteases. The results also indicate how broadly these sequence sets are covered by three-dimensional structures. These views facilitate cross-species comparisons and offer clues for drug design from knowledge about the sequences and structures of potential drug targets and their homologs. Two protease groups ("M32" and "C51" that are very different in sequence from human proteases are examined in structural detail, illustrating the application of this global approach in mining new pathogen genomes for potential drug targets. Based on our analyses, a human ACE2 inhibitor was selected for experimental testing on one of these parasite proteases, TbM32, and was shown to inhibit it. These sequence and structure data, along with interactive versions of the protein similarity networks generated in this study, are available at http://babbittlab.ucsf.edu/resources.html.

  2. Identification and functional characterisation of a Schistosoma japonicum insulin-like peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaofeng; McManus, Donald P; Cai, Pengfei; Hu, Wei; You, Hong

    2017-04-14

    Previous studies have shown that insulin receptors in schistosomes, triggered by host insulin, play an important role in parasite growth, development and fecundity by regulating glucose metabolism. However, limited information is available on the recently identified endogenous insulin-like peptide (ILP) in blood flukes. We isolated ILPs from Schistosoma japonicum (SjILP) and S. recognised (SmILP) and present results of their molecular and structural analysis. SjILP shares 63% amino acid identity with SmILP, but only 18% identity with human insulin. There is high cross immunological reactivity between the S. japonicum and S. mansoni ILPs as observed in western blots using an anti-SjILP polyclonal antibody. ADP binding/hydrolysis ability was observed in both SjILP and SmILP, but not in human insulin, suggesting a parasite-specific role for ILP compared with host insulin. Protein binding assays using the Octet-RED system showed SjILP binds S. japonicum IRs (SjIR1 and SjIR2) strongly. An anti-phospho antibody against extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) recognised a 44-kDa target band in an extract of adult worms after stimulation by rSjILP in vitro, suggesting an important role for SjILP in activating SjIRs and in regulating downstream signal transduction. Immunolocalisation showed SjILP is located on the tegument and the underlying musculature, similar to that observed for SjIR1, but it is also present throughout the parenchyma of males and in the vitelline cells of females, the same locations as SjIR2 described in an earlier published study of ours. The same localisation of SjILP and the SjIRs is suggestive of an interaction between the insulin-like peptide and the IRs. In addition to binding host insulin, schistosomes also can express their own endogenous ILPs, which can activate the parasite insulin signal pathway, thereby playing a critical role in worm growth, development and fertility. These findings shed new light on ILPs in schistosomes, providing

  3. Cytokine responses to Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium in relation to infection in a co-endemic focus in northern Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurs, Lynn; Mbow, Moustapha; Boon, Nele; Vereecken, Kim; Amoah, Abena Serwaa; Labuda, Lucja A; Dièye, Tandakha Ndiaye; Mboup, Souleymane; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Polman, Katja

    2014-08-01

    In Africa, many areas are co-endemic for the two major Schistosoma species, S. mansoni and S. haematobium. Epidemiological studies have suggested that host immunological factors may play an important role in co-endemic areas. As yet, little is known about differences in host immune responses and possible immunological interactions between S. mansoni and S. haematobium in humans. The aim of this study was to analyze host cytokine responses to antigens from either species in a population from a co-endemic focus, and relate these to S. mansoni and S. haematobium infection. Whole blood cytokine responses were investigated in a population in the north of Senegal (n = 200). Blood was stimulated for 72 h with schistosomal egg and adult worm antigens of either Schistosoma species. IL-10, IL-5, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 production was determined in culture supernatants. A multivariate (i.e. multi-response) approach was used to allow a joint analysis of all cytokines in relation to Schistosoma infection. Schistosoma haematobium egg and worm antigens induced higher cytokine production, suggesting that S. haematobium may be more immunogenic than S. mansoni. However, both infections were strongly associated with similar, modified Th2 cytokine profiles. This study is the first to compare S. mansoni and S. haematobium cytokine responses in one population residing in a co-endemic area. These findings are in line with previous epidemiological studies that also suggested S. haematobium egg and worm stages to be more immunogenic than those of S. mansoni.

  4. Gibberellin biosynthetic inhibitors make human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum cells swell and rupture to death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Toyama

    Full Text Available Malaria remains as one of the most devastating infectious disease, and continues to exact an enormous toll in medical cost and days of labor lost especially in the tropics. Effective malaria control and eventual eradication remain a huge challenge, with efficacious antimalarials as important intervention/management tool. Clearly new alternative drugs that are more affordable and with fewer side effects are desirable. After preliminary in vitro assays with plant growth regulators and inhibitors, here, we focus on biosynthetic inhibitors of gibberellin, a plant hormone with many important roles in plant growth, and show their inhibitory effect on the growth of both apicomplexa, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with the gibberellin biosynthetic inhibitors resulted in marked morphological changes that can be reversed to a certain degree under hyperosmotic environment. These unique observations suggest that changes in the parasite membrane permeability may explain the pleiotropic effects observed within the intracellular parasites.

  5. Gibberellin Biosynthetic Inhibitors Make Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum Cells Swell and Rupture to Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Tomoko; Tahara, Michiru; Nagamune, Kisaburo; Arimitsu, Kenji; Hamashima, Yoshio; Palacpac, Nirianne M. Q.; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Horii, Toshihiro; Tanabe, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains as one of the most devastating infectious disease, and continues to exact an enormous toll in medical cost and days of labor lost especially in the tropics. Effective malaria control and eventual eradication remain a huge challenge, with efficacious antimalarials as important intervention/management tool. Clearly new alternative drugs that are more affordable and with fewer side effects are desirable. After preliminary in vitro assays with plant growth regulators and inhibitors, here, we focus on biosynthetic inhibitors of gibberellin, a plant hormone with many important roles in plant growth, and show their inhibitory effect on the growth of both apicomplexa, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with the gibberellin biosynthetic inhibitors resulted in marked morphological changes that can be reversed to a certain degree under hyperosmotic environment. These unique observations suggest that changes in the parasite membrane permeability may explain the pleiotropic effects observed within the intracellular parasites. PMID:22412858

  6. Helminth allergens, parasite-specific IgE and its protective role in human immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Matthew Fitzsimmons

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Th2 immune response, culminating in eosinophilia and IgE production, is not only characteristic of allergy but also of infection by parasitic worms (helminths. Anti-parasite IgE has been associated with immunity against a range of helminth infections and many believe that IgE and its receptors evolved to help counter metazoan parasites. Allergens (IgE-antigens are present in only a small minority of protein families and known IgE targets in helminths belong to these same families (e.g. EF-hand proteins, tropomyosin, and PR-1 proteins.During some helminth infection, especially with the well adapted hookworm, the Th2 response is moderated by parasite-expressed molecules. This has been associated with reduced allergy in helminth endemic areas and worm infection or products have been proposed as treatments for allergic conditions. However some infections (especially Ascaris are associated with increased allergy and this has been linked to cross-reactivity between worm proteins (e.g., tropomyosins and highly similar molecules in dust mites and insects. The overlap between allergy and helminth infection is best illustrated in Anisakis simplex, a nematode that when consumed in under-cooked fish can be both an infective helminth and a food allergen. Nearly 20 molecular allergens have been isolated from this species, including tropomyosin (Ani s3 and the EF-hand protein, Ani s troponin.In this review, we highlight aspects of the biology and biochemistry of helminths that may have influenced the evolution of the IgE response. We compare dominant IgE antigens in worms with clinically important environmental allergens and suggest that arrays of such molecules will provide important information on anti-worm immunity as well as allergy.

  7. Parasitic diseases of zoonotic importance in humans of northeast India, with special reference to ocular involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das D

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dipankar Das,1 Saidul Islam,2 Harsha Bhattacharjee,1 Angshuman Deka,1 Dinakumar Yambem,1 Prerana Sushil Tahiliani,1 Panna Deka,1 Pankaj Bhattacharyya,1 Satyen Deka,1 Kalyan Das,1 Gayatri Bharali,1 Apurba Deka,1 Rajashree Paul1 1Sri Sankaradeva Nethralaya, Guwahati, 2Department of Parasitology, College of Veterinary Science, Assam Agricultural University, Guwahati, Assam, India Abstract: Parasitic zoonotic diseases are prevalent in India, including the northeastern states. Proper epidemiological data are lacking from this part of the country on zoonotic parasitic diseases, and newer diseases are emerging in the current scenario. Systemic manifestation of such diseases as cysticercosis, paragonimiasis, hydatidosis, and toxoplasmosis are fairly common. The incidence of acquired toxoplasmal infection is showing an increasing trend in association with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Among the ocular parasitic diseases, toxoplasmosis, cysticercosis, toxocariasis, dirofilariasis, gnathostomiasis, hydatidosis, amebiasis, giardiasis, etc, are the real problems that are seen in this subset of the population. Therefore, proper coordination between various medical specialities, including veterinary science and other governing bodies, is needed for better and more effective strategic planning to control zoonoses. Keywords: zoonoses, regional infections, toxoplasmosis, cysticercosis, toxocariasis, hydatidosis 

  8. Ultrastructural and physiological changes induced by different stress conditions on the human parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Hernández, Karla Daniela Rodríguez; Martínez, Ignacio; Agredano-Moreno, Lourdes Teresa; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Espinoza, Bertha

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The life cycle of this protozoan parasite is digenetic because it alternates its different developmental forms through two hosts, a vector insect and a vertebrate host. As a result, the parasites are exposed to sudden and drastic environmental changes causing cellular stress. The stress response to some types of stress has been studied in T. cruzi, mainly at the molecular level; however, data about ultrastructure and physiological state of the cells in stress conditions are scarce or null. In this work, we analyzed the morphological, ultrastructural, and physiological changes produced on T. cruzi epimastigotes when they were exposed to acid, nutritional, heat, and oxidative stress. Clear morphological changes were observed, but the physiological conditions varied depending on the type of stress. The maintenance of the physiological state was severely affected by heat shock, acidic, nutritional, and oxidative stress. According to the surprising observed growth recovery after damage by stress alterations, different adaptations from the parasite to these harsh conditions were suggested. Particular cellular death pathways are discussed.

  9. Differentiating Schistosoma haematobium from Schistosoma magrebowiei and other closely related schistosomes by polymerase chain reaction amplification of a species specific mitochondrial gene

    OpenAIRE

    Olaoluwa P Akinwale; Hock, Tang T.; Chia-Kwung, Fan; ZHENG Qi; Haimo, Shen; Ezeh, Charles; Gyang, Pam V

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Schistosoma haematobium infection afflicts about 150 million people in 53 countries in Africa and the Middle East. In many endemic areas, S. haematobium is sympatric with Schistosoma bovis, Schistosoma mattheei, Schistosoma curassoni, Schistosoma intercalatum and Schistosoma magrebowiei, its closely related species. In addition, they also develop in the same intermediate snail hosts. Since these schistosome species often infect snails inhabiting the same bodies of water, examini...

  10. The regulation of mortality and fecundity in Schistosoma mattheei following a single experimental infection in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, M J; Smith, G

    1991-12-01

    The regulation of mortality and fecundity of Schistosoma mattheei in sheep was examined using a series of mathematical models applied to data culled from the literature. Parasite mortality (mu) was found to be an increasing linear function of the magnitude of the initial infection over the ranges of doses examined (200-91,000 cercariae) where mu = 9.78 x 10(-3) + 3.476 x 10(-7) infection dose. Parasite fecundity (lambda) was found to be inversely related to the duration of the infection. The best fit model for parasite fecundity was one in which fecundity decreased exponentially with time since initial infection, lambda = lambda 0e-delta(t-tau). There was no evidence for density-dependent regulation of fecundity.

  11. Genetic and immunological characterization of the 14-3-3xi molecule from Schistosoma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, N; Muro, A; Vieira, C; Lopez-Aban, J; del Olmo, E; Suárez, L; Martínez-Fernández, A R; Siles-Lucas, M

    2007-08-01

    Currently available candidate vaccines against schistosomiasis elicit only partial protection. In addition, the type of immune response that could lead to the highest level of protection against schistosomes has not yet been described. Thus, efforts should be made in both the identification of novel proteins essential for the parasite cycle and in the modulation of immune responses against these novel candidates through the combined use of immunomodulatory molecules. Several parasites have 14-3-3 proteins, and these proteins are known to play a key role in parasite biology. In the present work, we report the isolation and characterization of a new 14-3-3 gene from Schistosoma bovis and offer new information regarding the genetic structure of the gene. In addition, we have produced the corresponding recombinant protein. Finally, we describe the immune responses elicited by this protein when combined with 4 different immunomodulators in immunized mice.

  12. Genome-wide diversity and differentiation in New World populations of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais C de Oliveira

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Americas were the last continent colonized by humans carrying malaria parasites. Plasmodium falciparum from the New World shows very little genetic diversity and greater linkage disequilibrium, compared with its African counterparts, and is clearly subdivided into local, highly divergent populations. However, limited available data have revealed extensive genetic diversity in American populations of another major human malaria parasite, P. vivax.We used an improved sample preparation strategy and next-generation sequencing to characterize 9 high-quality P. vivax genome sequences from northwestern Brazil. These new data were compared with publicly available sequences from recently sampled clinical P. vivax isolates from Brazil (BRA, total n = 11 sequences, Peru (PER, n = 23, Colombia (COL, n = 31, and Mexico (MEX, n = 19.We found that New World populations of P. vivax are as diverse (nucleotide diversity π between 5.2 × 10-4 and 6.2 × 10-4 as P. vivax populations from Southeast Asia, where malaria transmission is substantially more intense. They display several non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions (some of them previously undescribed in genes known or suspected to be involved in antimalarial drug resistance, such as dhfr, dhps, mdr1, mrp1, and mrp-2, but not in the chloroquine resistance transporter ortholog (crt-o gene. Moreover, P. vivax in the Americas is much less geographically substructured than local P. falciparum populations, with relatively little between-population genome-wide differentiation (pairwise FST values ranging between 0.025 and 0.092. Finally, P. vivax populations show a rapid decline in linkage disequilibrium with increasing distance between pairs of polymorphic sites, consistent with very frequent outcrossing. We hypothesize that the high diversity of present-day P. vivax lineages in the Americas originated from successive migratory waves and subsequent admixture between parasite lineages from geographically

  13. PARASITES OF MAN IN SERANG, WEST JAVA

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    W. P. Carney

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Survey penyakit menular didesa Cikurai dan Barengkok, Jawa Barat pada bulan Juni 1974 ini adalah merupakan salah satu dari serangkaian survey yang dilakukan oleh Direktorat Jenderal P3.M. Dep. Kes. dan US Namru-2 guna menentukan distribusi dan prevalensi penyakit terutama malaria, filariasis dan penyakit parasit perut. Khususnya didaerah Cikurai dimana dilaporkan adanya Schistosoma in­cognitum secara hyperenzootik maka perlulah dilihat apakah parasit ini ditemukan pula diantara pend-duk setempat. Dari hasil survey didesa Cikurai dan Barengkok, Jawa Barat ini dilihat bahwa Plasmodium falciparum ditemukan pada 8 atau 3 persen dari sediaan darah 261 penduduk yang diperiksa dan tidak terlihat adanya microfilariae. Parasit perut yang menonjol terlihat pada sediaan tinja dari 335 penduduk yang diperiksa adalah Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura dan cacing tambang masing-masing sebesar 89 persen, 87 persen dan 65 persen ; parasit lainnya adalah Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba hart manni, Entamoeba coli, Endolinuu nana, lodamoeba butschlii, Giardia lamblia, Chilomastvc mesnili, Enterobius vermicularis, dan Echinostoma sp. Tidak terlihat adanya Schistosoma incognitum pada sediaan tinja dari 335 penduduk yang diperiksa dikedua desa ini.

  14. Schistosoma hemozoin and its possible roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-Hua; Sun, Jun

    2017-03-01

    More than 95years ago Schistosoma pigment had been deemed as a degradation product of haemoglobin. Until the 1950s, scientists initiated to pay attention to understand the hematophagous habit of schistosomes, and to study the degradation of haemoglobin as well as the formation of hemozoin inside the gut of the worms. For a long time, the formation of hemozoin in both Plasmodium and in Schistosoma was considered to be the major route of heme detoxification, and hemozoin served a role in waste disposal. At the beginning of this century, the chemical structure of Schistosoma pigment was confirmed to be identical to that of malarial pigment (hemozoin) and its synthetic analogue, β-hematin. Since then, studies on Schistosoma hemozoin have been investigated by some workers and the results showed that Schistosoma hemozoin may play important roles in pathogenicity, immune modulation, iron supply for egg formation, and interaction with some anti-schistosomal drugs. In this review, we briefly review and discuss the hematophagous habit of schistosomes, degradation of haemoglobin, formation of hemozoin in the worm gut, and possible roles of hemozoin. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and evaluation of a sensitive PCR-ELISA system for detection of schistosoma infection in feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Luciana Inácia; Dos Santos Marques, Letícia Helena; Enk, Martin Johannes; de Oliveira, Maria Cláudia; Coelho, Paulo Marcos Zech; Rabello, Ana

    2010-04-20

    A PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) was developed to overcome the need for sensitive techniques for the efficient diagnosis of Schistosoma infection in endemic settings with low parasitic burden. This system amplifies a 121-base pair tandem repeat DNA sequence, immobilizes the resultant 5' biotinylated product on streptavidin-coated strip-well microplates and uses anti-fluorescein antibodies conjugated to horseradish peroxidase to detect the hybridized fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotide probe. The detection limit of the Schistosoma PCR-ELISA system was determined to be 1.3 fg of S. mansoni genomic DNA (less than the amount found in a single cell) and estimated to be 0.15 S. mansoni eggs per gram of feces (fractions of an egg). The system showed good precision and genus specificity since the DNA target was found in seven Schistosoma DNA samples: S. mansoni, S. haematobium, S. bovis, S. intercalatum, S. japonicum, S. magrebowiei and S. rhodaini. By evaluating 206 patients living in an endemic area in Brazil, the prevalence of S. mansoni infection was determined to be 18% by examining 12 Kato-Katz slides (41.7 mg/smear, 500 mg total) of a single fecal sample from each person, while the Schistosoma PCR-ELISA identified a 30% rate of infection using 500-mg of the same fecal sample. When considering the Kato-Katz method as the reference test, artificial sensitivity and specificity rates of the PCR-ELISA system were 97.4% and 85.1%, respectively. The potential for estimating parasitic load by DNA detection in feces was assessed by comparing absorbance values and eggs per gram of feces, with a Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.700 (PSchistosoma PCR-ELISA, a system that may serve as an alternative for diagnosing Schistosoma infection.

  16. Characterization of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase SmcGK1 of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Leutner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes are trematode parasites and of worldwide medical importance for humans and animals. Growth and development of these parasites require a specific host environment, but also permanent communication processes between the two genders. Accumulating molecular evidence indicates that the responsible interactions are mediated by signal transduction processes. Conserved signaling molecules were identified, and first approaches made for their characterization. However, no representative of the conserved family of cGMP-dependent protein kinases (cGKs has been described in this parasite yet. Within the Schistosoma mansoni genome data-set we identified cGK homologs, of which one was investigated in more detail in this study. We present the cloning of SmcGK1, whose sequence shows homology to cGKs of higher eukaryotes. SmcGK1 was found to be gender-independently transcribed in adult schistosomes. The occurrence of SmcGK1 sense and antisense transcripts suggests that the expression of this gene is controlled at the post-transcriptional level. In situ hybridization experiments demonstrated a gonad-preferential expression profile in both genders indicating a role of SmcGK1, at least during sexual development of schistosomes. Using a cGK-specific inhibitor to treat adult schistosomes in vitro finally resulted in a multifaceted phenotype including slow motion, oocyte congestion, and reduced egg production.Esquistossomos são parasitas trematodos de importância médica em todo o mundo para o homem e os animais. O crescimento e o desenvolvimento destes parasitas requerem um ambiente específico do hospedeiro, mas também um processo de comunicação permanente entre parasitas dos dois sexos. Evidência molecular tem se acumulado e indica que as interações são mediadas por processos de transdução de sinal. Moléculas sinalizadoras conservadas foram identificadas, e as primeiras abordagens têm sido feitas para sua caracterização. Contudo, não foi

  17. AIDS - associated parasitic diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of human immunodeficiency virus infection, with its profound and progressive effect on the cellular immune system, a group of human opportunistic pathogens has come into prominence. Opportunistic parasitic infection can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Because many of these infections are treatable, an early and accurate diagnosis is important. This can be accomplished by a variety of methods such as direct demonstration of parasites and by serological tests to detect antigen and/or specific antibodies. However, antibody response may be poor in these patients and therefore immunodiagnostic tests have to be interpreted with caution. Cryptosporidium parvum , Isospora belli , Cyclospora cayetanensis , Microsporidia, Entamoeba histolytica and Strongyloides stercoralis are the commonly detected parasites. Detection of these parasites will help in proper management of these patients because drugs are available for most of these parasitic infections.

  18. Exploring molecular variation in Schistosoma japonicum in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Neil D.; Chan, Kok-Gan; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Min Chong, Teik; Ee, Robson; Mohandas, Namitha; Koehler, Anson V.; Lim, Yan-Lue; Hofmann, Andreas; Jex, Aaron R.; Qian, Baozhen; Chilton, Neil B.; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; McManus, Donald P.; Tan, Patrick; Webster, Bonnie L.; Rollinson, David; Gasser, Robin B.

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that affects more than 200 million people worldwide. The main disease-causing agents, Schistosoma japonicum, S. mansoni and S. haematobium, are blood flukes that have complex life cycles involving a snail intermediate host. In Asia, S. japonicum causes hepatointestinal disease (schistosomiasis japonica) and is challenging to control due to a broad distribution of its snail hosts and range of animal reservoir hosts. In China, extensive efforts have been underway to control this parasite, but genetic variability in S. japonicum populations could represent an obstacle to eliminating schistosomiasis japonica. Although a draft genome sequence is available for S. japonicum, there has been no previous study of molecular variation in this parasite on a genome-wide scale. In this study, we conducted the first deep genomic exploration of seven S. japonicum populations from mainland China, constructed phylogenies using mitochondrial and nuclear genomic data sets, and established considerable variation between some of the populations in genes inferred to be linked to key cellular processes and/or pathogen-host interactions. Based on the findings from this study, we propose that verifying intraspecific conservation in vaccine or drug target candidates is an important first step toward developing effective vaccines and chemotherapies against schistosomiasis. PMID:26621075

  19. Tegumental proteins of Schistosoma mansoni: complex biomolecules and potent antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. G. Simpson

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies, direct vaccination and in vitro assays have all shown that antigens associated with the tegumental membranes of Schistosoma mansoni are capable of mediating protective immune responses against the parasite in animal models. Furthermore, the principal antigens are highly antigenic during natural infection in man and stimulate strong humoral and cellular responses although, at present, their role in mediating protective immune responses in man remains equivocal. This presentation will review the current state of knowledge of the structure and expression of the major antigenic tegumental proteins of the schistosome and will attempt to relate the relevance of their structural features to possible function both in terms of protective immunity and parasite's ability to survive within the definitive host. A focus will be recent advances that have been made in the identification of means of anchoring of the antigenic proteins to the tegumental membrane. In addition, the implications of the structural complexity of the tegumental proteins in terms of their possible utility in vaccination and diagnosis will be considered.

  20. Basophil depletion downregulates Schistosoma mansoni egg-induced granuloma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyan, William K; Seki, Takenori; Kumagai, Takashi; Obata-Ninomiya, Kazushige; Furushima-Shimogawara, Rieko; Kwansa-Bentum, Bethel; Akao, Nobuaki; Bosompem, Kwabena M; Boakye, Daniel A; Wilson, Michael D; Karasuyama, Hajime; Ohta, Nobuo

    2013-12-01

    Granuloma formation around parasite eggs during schistosomal infection is considered to be controlled by Th2 cytokines. However, it is still controversial which cell populations are responsible for the host Th2 cytokine-dependent granuloma formation. Basophils have recently attracted attention because of their ability to produce large amounts of IL-4. Therefore, we investigated whether basophils play an essential role in the induction of granuloma formation induced by Schistosoma mansoni eggs. Together with our previous observation that basophil numbers increased markedly in the spleen at 7 weeks postinfection, immunohistochemical staining using anti-mMCP8 monoclonal antibody (mAb) showed basophil infiltration in the granulomatous lesions formed around parasite eggs. To examine the roles of basophils more directly, we treated mice with anti-CD200R3 mAb to deplete basophils. Depletion of basophils resulted in a reduction of basophil number with concomitant downregulation of egg granuloma formation at 7 weeks postinfection. Moreover, we observed a significant reduction in the size of egg granulomas formed in basophil-depleted mice in the pulmonary granuloma model. Taken together, these findings indicated that basophils are essential for S. mansoni egg-induced granuloma formation, and this may serve as a novel therapeutic target in ameliorating the pathology of schistosomiasis. © 2013.

  1. De novo transcriptomic analysis of the female and male adults of the blood fluke Schistosoma turkestanicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Hua; Xu, Min-Jun; Chang, Qiao-Cheng; Gao, Jun-Feng; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-03-11

    Schistosoma turkestanicum is a parasite of considerable veterinary importance as an agent of animal schistosomiasis in many countries, including China. The S. turkestanicum cercariae can also infect humans, causing cercarial dermatitis in many countries and regions of the world. In spite of its significance as a pathogen of animals and humans, there is little transcriptomic and genomic data in the public databases. Herein, we performed the transcriptome Illumina RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of adult males and females of S. turkestanicum and de novo transcriptome assembly. Approximately 81.1 (female) and 80.5 (male) million high-quality clean reads were obtained and then 29,526 (female) and 41,346 (male) unigenes were assembled. A total of 34,624 unigenes were produced from S. turkestanicum females and males, with an average length of 878 nucleotides (nt) and N50 of 1480 nt. Of these unigenes, 25,158 (72.7 %) were annotated by blast searches against the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Among these, 21,995 (63.5 %), 22,189 (64.1 %) and 13,754 (39.7 %) of the unigenes had significant similarity in the NCBI non-redundant protein (NR), non-redundant nucleotide (NT) and Swiss-Prot databases, respectively. In addition, 3150 unigenes were identified to be expressed specifically in females and 1014 unigenes were identified to be expressed specifically in males. Interestingly, several pathways associated with gonadal development and sex maintenance were found, including the Wnt signaling pathway (103; 2 %) and progesterone-mediated oocyte maturation (77; 1.5 %). The present study characterized and compared the transcriptomes of adult female and male blood fluke, S. turkestanicum. These results will not only serve as valuable resources for future functional genomics studies to understand the molecular aspects of S. turkestanicum, but also will provide essential information for ongoing whole genome sequencing efforts on this pathogenic blood fluke.

  2. Schistosoma real-time PCR as diagnostic tool for international travellers and migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnops, Lieselotte; Tannich, Egbert; Polman, Katja; Clerinx, Jan; Van Esbroeck, Marjan

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the use of a genus-specific PCR that combines high sensitivity with the detection of different Schistosoma species for diagnosis in international travellers and migrants in comparison to standard microscopy. The genus-specific real-time PCR was developed to target the 28S ribosomal RNA gene of the major human Schistosoma species. It was validated for analytical specificity and reproducibility and demonstrated an analytical sensitivity of 0.2 eggs per gram of faeces. Its diagnostic performance was further evaluated on 152 faecal, 32 urine and 38 serum samples from patients presenting at the outpatient clinic of the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp (Belgium). We detected Schistosoma DNA in 76 faecal (50.0%) and five urine (15.6%) samples of which, respectively, nine and one were not detected by standard microscopy. Only two of the 38 serum samples of patients with confirmed schistosomiasis were positive with the presently developed PCR. Sequence analysis on positive faecal samples allowed identification of the Schistosoma species complex. The real-time PCR is highly sensitive and may offer added value in diagnosing imported schistosomiasis. The genus-specific PCR can detect all schistosome species that are infectious to humans and performs very well with faeces and urine, but not in serum. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. [Identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein from Schistosoma japonicum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qin-Yan; Xue, Yan-Feng; Shen, Li

    2012-10-30

    To identify glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored protein of Schistosoma japonicum. Based on the gene sequence of Schistosoma mansoni GPI anchored protein Sm200 (GenBank Assess No: XM_002569560.1), bioinformatics analysis was performed to find out its homologous gene sequence in S. japonicum, then a selected partial coding sequence (SjGPIs, about 933 bp) from the homologous gene sequence were amplified, and cloned into PET-28a(+) vector. The recombinant plasmid pET-28a(+)SjGPIs were transformed into E. coli Top10 cells and induced with IPTG for protein expression. The recombinant protein SjGPIs was purified with Ni-NTA resin, and the purified recombinant SjGPIs protein was used as antigen to prepare antiserum in New Zealand rabbit. The antiserum was used to detect S. japonicum GPI-anchored protein. To identify a GPI-anchored protein, the detected protein were identified by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) digestion. White blood cells from S. japonicum-infected mice was examined whether they endocytosed GPI-anchored proteins by Western blotting. The homologous gene sequence of S. mansoni GPI Sm200 gene was found in S. japonicum genome. A 3 495 bp coding sequence was obtained, containing the complete C-terminal sequence. The selected gene sequence (SjGPIs) were amplified and the recombinant plasmid pET-28a(+)-SjGPIs was established. According to the analysis of C-terminal sequence, Western blotting and enzyme digestion of PI-PLC, a GPI-anchored protein was present in S. japonicum tegument (about 1M(r)200000), named SjGPI200. The protein was detected in white blood cells of infected mice. SjGPI200 protein exists in S. japonicum, and anchored to parasite tegument via GPI.

  4. Probability of Transmission of Malaria from Mosquito to Human Is Regulated by Mosquito Parasite Density in Naïve and Vaccinated Hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Churcher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over a century since Ronald Ross discovered that malaria is caused by the bite of an infectious mosquito it is still unclear how the number of parasites injected influences disease transmission. Currently it is assumed that all mosquitoes with salivary gland sporozoites are equally infectious irrespective of the number of parasites they harbour, though this has never been rigorously tested. Here we analyse >1000 experimental infections of humans and mice and demonstrate a dose-dependency for probability of infection and the length of the host pre-patent period. Mosquitoes with a higher numbers of sporozoites in their salivary glands following blood-feeding are more likely to have caused infection (and have done so quicker than mosquitoes with fewer parasites. A similar dose response for the probability of infection was seen for humans given a pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate targeting circumsporozoite protein (CSP, and in mice with and without transfusion of anti-CSP antibodies. These interventions prevented infection more efficiently from bites made by mosquitoes with fewer parasites. The importance of parasite number has widespread implications across malariology, ranging from our basic understanding of the parasite, how vaccines are evaluated and the way in which transmission should be measured in the field. It also provides direct evidence for why the only registered malaria vaccine RTS,S was partially effective in recent clinical trials.

  5. A subset of group A-like var genes encodes the malaria parasite ligands for binding to human brain endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claessens, Antoine; Adams, Yvonne; Ghumra, Ashfaq

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is the most deadly manifestation of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. The pathology of cerebral malaria is characterized by the accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IEs) in the microvasculature of the brain caused by parasite adhesins on the surface of IEs binding to human...... of these variants. The clinical in vivo relevance of the HBEC-selected parasites was supported by significantly higher surface recognition of HBEC-selected parasites compared with unselected parasites by antibodies from young African children suffering cerebral malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.......029) but not by antibodies from controls with uncomplicated malaria (Mann-Whitney test, P = 0.58). This work describes a binding phenotype for virulence-associated group A P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variants and identifies targets for interventions to treat or prevent cerebral malaria....

  6. Cell Death of Gamma Interferon-Stimulated Human Fibroblasts upon Toxoplasma gondii Infection Induces Early Parasite Egress and Limits Parasite Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niedelman, Wendy; Sprokholt, Joris K.; Clough, Barbara; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Saeij, Jeroen P. J.

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is a major food-borne illness and opportunistic infection for the immunosuppressed. Resistance to Toxoplasma is dependent on gamma interferon (IFN-γ) activation of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Although IFN-γ-induced innate

  7. Asexual populations of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, use a two-step genomic strategy to acquire accurate, beneficial DNA amplifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Guler

    Full Text Available Malaria drug resistance contributes to up to a million annual deaths. Judicious deployment of new antimalarials and vaccines could benefit from an understanding of early molecular events that promote the evolution of parasites. Continuous in vitro challenge of Plasmodium falciparum parasites with a novel dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH inhibitor reproducibly selected for resistant parasites. Genome-wide analysis of independently-derived resistant clones revealed a two-step strategy to evolutionary success. Some haploid blood-stage parasites first survive antimalarial pressure through fortuitous DNA duplications that always included the DHODH gene. Independently-selected parasites had different sized amplification units but they were always flanked by distant A/T tracks. Higher level amplification and resistance was attained using a second, more efficient and more accurate, mechanism for head-to-tail expansion of the founder unit. This second homology-based process could faithfully tune DNA copy numbers in either direction, always retaining the unique DNA amplification sequence from the original A/T-mediated duplication for that parasite line. Pseudo-polyploidy at relevant genomic loci sets the stage for gaining additional mutations at the locus of interest. Overall, we reveal a population-based genomic strategy for mutagenesis that operates in human stages of P. falciparum to efficiently yield resistance-causing genetic changes at the correct locus in a successful parasite. Importantly, these founding events arise with precision; no other new amplifications are seen in the resistant haploid blood stage parasite. This minimizes the need for meiotic genetic cleansing that can only occur in sexual stage development of the parasite in mosquitoes.

  8. Asexual populations of the human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, use a two-step genomic strategy to acquire accurate, beneficial DNA amplifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Jennifer L; Freeman, Daniel L; Ahyong, Vida; Patrapuvich, Rapatbhorn; White, John; Gujjar, Ramesh; Phillips, Margaret A; DeRisi, Joseph; Rathod, Pradipsinh K

    2013-01-01

    Malaria drug resistance contributes to up to a million annual deaths. Judicious deployment of new antimalarials and vaccines could benefit from an understanding of early molecular events that promote the evolution of parasites. Continuous in vitro challenge of Plasmodium falciparum parasites with a novel dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitor reproducibly selected for resistant parasites. Genome-wide analysis of independently-derived resistant clones revealed a two-step strategy to evolutionary success. Some haploid blood-stage parasites first survive antimalarial pressure through fortuitous DNA duplications that always included the DHODH gene. Independently-selected parasites had different sized amplification units but they were always flanked by distant A/T tracks. Higher level amplification and resistance was attained using a second, more efficient and more accurate, mechanism for head-to-tail expansion of the founder unit. This second homology-based process could faithfully tune DNA copy numbers in either direction, always retaining the unique DNA amplification sequence from the original A/T-mediated duplication for that parasite line. Pseudo-polyploidy at relevant genomic loci sets the stage for gaining additional mutations at the locus of interest. Overall, we reveal a population-based genomic strategy for mutagenesis that operates in human stages of P. falciparum to efficiently yield resistance-causing genetic changes at the correct locus in a successful parasite. Importantly, these founding events arise with precision; no other new amplifications are seen in the resistant haploid blood stage parasite. This minimizes the need for meiotic genetic cleansing that can only occur in sexual stage development of the parasite in mosquitoes.

  9. Sj-FABPc fatty-acid-binding protein of the human blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum: structural and functional characterization and unusual solvent exposure of a portal-proximal tryptophan residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, M W; Scott, J C; Lo, S; Beauchamp, J; McManus, D P

    2000-07-01

    Sj-FABPc of the blood fluke of humans, Schistosoma japonicum, is a member of the FABP/P2/CRBP/CRABP family of beta-barrel cytosolic fatty-acid-binding and retinoid-binding proteins. Sj-FABPc has at least eight different variants encoded by a single-copy polymorphic gene. In fluorescence-based assays, recombinant Sj-FABPc was found to bind 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA), inducing a shift in peak fluorescence emission from 543 to 493 nm. A similar spectral change was observed in dansyl-amino-octanoic acid (in which the dansyl fluorophore is attached at the alpha-carbon rather than the omega-carbon of DAUDA), indicating that the ligand enters entirely into the binding site. Sj-FABPc also bound the naturally fluorescent cis-parinaric acid, as well as oleic acid and arachidonic acid, by competition, but not all-trans-retinol. Dissociation constants were, for cis-parinaric acid, K(d)=2.5+/-0.1 microM (mean+/-S.E.M.) and an apparent stoichiometry consistent with one binding site per molecule of Sj-FABPc and, for oleic acid, K(i) approximately 80 nM. A deletion mutant from which alpha-II was absent failed to bind ligand. Sj-FABPc modelled well to known structures of the protein family; an unusually solvent-exposed Trp side chain was evident adjacent to the presumptive portal through which ligand is thought to enter and leave. Intrinsic fluorescence analyses of Sj-FABPc and of the deletion mutant (from which Trp-27 is absent) confirmed the unusual disposition of this side chain. Virtually all members of the FABP/P2/CRBP/CRABP protein family have prominent hydrophobic side chains in this position, with the exception of liver FABP and ileal FABP, which instead have charged side chains. Liver FABP is known to be distinct from other members of the protein family in that it does not seem to contact membranes to collect and deposit its ligand. It is therefore postulated that the unusually positioned apolar side chains in Sj-FABPc and others in the family are important in

  10. Sex-Specific Biology of the Human Malaria Parasite Revealed from the Proteomes of Mature Male and Female Gametocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Jun; Chen, Zhao; Wang, Zenglei; Shrestha, Sony; Li, Xiaolian; Li, Runze; Cui, Liwang

    2017-04-01

    The gametocytes of the malaria parasites are obligate for perpetuating the parasite's life cycle through mosquitoes, but the sex-specific biology of gametocytes is poorly understood. We generated a transgenic line in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum , which allowed us to accurately separate male and female gametocytes by flow cytometry. In-depth analysis of the proteomes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified 1244 and 1387 proteins in mature male and female gametocytes, respectively. GFP-tagging of nine selected proteins confirmed their sex-partitions to be agreeable with the results from the proteomic analysis. The sex-specific proteomes showed significant differences that are consistent with the divergent functions of the two sexes. Although the male-specific proteome (119 proteins) is enriched in proteins associated with the flagella and genome replication, the female-specific proteome (262 proteins) is more abundant in proteins involved in metabolism, translation and organellar functions. Compared with the Plasmodium berghei sex-specific proteomes, this study revealed both extensive conservation and considerable divergence between these two species, which reflect the disparities between the two species in proteins involved in cytoskeleton, lipid metabolism and protein degradation. Comparison with three sex-specific proteomes allowed us to obtain high-confidence lists of 73 and 89 core male- and female-specific/biased proteins conserved in Plasmodium The identification of sex-specific/biased proteomes in Plasmodium lays a solid foundation for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique sex-specific biology in this early-branching eukaryote. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The Plasmodium PHIST and RESA-Like Protein Families of Human and Rodent Malaria Parasites.

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    Cristina K Moreira

    Full Text Available The phist gene family has members identified across the Plasmodium genus, defined by the presence of a domain of roughly 150 amino acids having conserved aromatic residues and an all alpha-helical structure. The family is highly amplified in P. falciparum, with 65 predicted genes in the genome of the 3D7 isolate. In contrast, in the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei 3 genes are identified, one of which is an apparent pseudogene. Transcripts of the P. berghei phist genes are predominant in schizonts, whereas in P. falciparum transcript profiles span different asexual blood stages and gametocytes. We pursued targeted disruption of P. berghei phist genes in order to characterize a simplistic model for the expanded phist gene repertoire in P. falciparum. Unsuccessful attempts to disrupt P. berghei PBANKA_114540 suggest that this phist gene is essential, while knockout of phist PBANKA_122900 shows an apparent normal progression and non-essential function throughout the life cycle. Epitope-tagging of P. falciparum and P. berghei phist genes confirmed protein export to the erythrocyte cytoplasm and localization with a punctate pattern. Three P. berghei PEXEL/HT-positive exported proteins exhibit at least partial co-localization, in support of a common vesicular compartment in the cytoplasm of erythrocytes infected with rodent malaria parasites.

  12. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M El Bakkouri; A Pow; A Mulichak; K Cheung; J Artz; M Amani; S Fell; T de Koning-Ward; C Goodman; et al.

    2011-12-31

    The Clpchaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clpchaperones and proteases in the humanmalariaparasitePlasmodiumfalciparum. The parasite contains four Clp ATPases, which we term PfClpB1, PfClpB2, PfClpC and PfClpM. One PfClpP, the proteolytic subunit, and one PfClpR, which is an inactive version of the protease, were also identified. Expression of all Clpchaperones and proteases was confirmed in blood-stage parasites. The proteins were localized to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic organelle that accommodates several important metabolic pathways in P. falciparum, with the exception of PfClpB2 (also known as Hsp101), which was found in the parasitophorous vacuole. Both PfClpP and PfClpR form mostly homoheptameric rings as observed by size-exclusion chromatography, analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy. The X-ray structure of PfClpP showed the protein as a compacted tetradecamer similar to that observed for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ClpPs. Our data suggest the presence of a ClpCRP complex in the apicoplast of P. falciparum.

  13. The pathology of experimental Schistosoma curassoni infections in mice and hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, J; Fransen, J; Southgate, V R; Rollinson, D

    1986-11-01

    The histopathology of experimental Schistosoma curassoni infections in white mice and hamsters was studied. In mice, hepatic lesions were severe with characteristic extensive perilobular fibrosis and large perilobular granulomas throughout the parenchyma. Only a few granulomas were detected in the lung, small intestine, and rectum of mice. In hamsters, lesions in the liver were limited. Few granulomas were found but the giant cell reaction was pronounced. Lesions in the lung and small intestine were minimal. Many subserosal and submucosal epithelioid cell granulomas were in the colon and rectum of hamsters. Parasites were not detected in the bladder of either mice or hamsters.

  14. The occurrence of Schistosoma mattheei in the south-western Transvaal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, P H; Hamilton-Attwell, V L; Kruger, F J

    1987-12-01

    To determine whether Schistosoma mattheei is present in the south-western Transvaal, sixty habitats were searched for the intermediate host snail, Bulinus africanus. Ten populations of this snail were located, 2 of which were infected with S. mattheei. Eggs of one of these isolates, originating from a spring in the Mooi River, were examined with an optical microscope. Scanning electron micrographs of the teguments of adult male worms and the terebratorial membranes of miracidia are described. These parasites are morphologically similar to some previously described from another habitat in the same geographical area and both populations can be regarded as typical S. mattheei.

  15. Parasites: Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tropical Diseases Laboratory Diagnostic Assistance [DPDx] Parasites Home Water Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Parasites can live in natural water sources. When outdoors, treat your water before drinking ...

  16. Sex-Biased Expression of MicroRNAs in Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, Antonio; Kozomara, Ana; Hui, Jerome H. L.; Emery, Aidan M.; Rollinson, David; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Ronshaugen, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an important neglected tropical disease caused by digenean helminth parasites of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomes are unusual in that they are dioecious and the adult worms live in the blood system. MicroRNAs play crucial roles during gene regulation and are likely to be important in sex differentiation in dioecious species. Here we characterize 112 microRNAs from adult Schistosoma mansoni individuals, including 84 novel microRNA families, and investigate the expression pattern in different sexes. By deep sequencing, we measured the relative expression levels of conserved and newly identified microRNAs between male and female samples. We observed that 13 microRNAs exhibited sex-biased expression, 10 of which are more abundant in females than in males. Sex chromosomes showed a paucity of female-biased genes, as predicted by theoretical evolutionary models. We propose that the recent emergence of separate sexes in Schistosoma had an effect on the chromosomal distribution and evolution of microRNAs, and that microRNAs are likely to participate in the sex differentiation/maintenance process. PMID:24069470

  17. Evaluation of portable microscopic devices for the diagnosis of Schistosoma and soil-transmitted helminth infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Coulibaly, Jean T; Andrews, Jason R; Speich, Benjamin; Keiser, Jennifer; Stothard, J Russell; N'goran, Eliézer K; Utzinger, Jürg

    2014-12-01

    The diagnosis of parasitic worm (helminth) infections requires specialized laboratory settings, but most affected individuals reside in locations without access to such facilities. We tested two portable microscopic devices for the diagnosis of helminth infections in a cross-sectional survey in rural Côte d'Ivoire. We examined 164 stool samples under a light microscope and then re-examined with a commercial portable light microscope and an experimental mobile phone microscope for the diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni and soil-transmitted helminths. Additionally, 180 filtered urine samples were examined by standard microscopy and compared with the portable light microscope for detection of Schistosoma haematobium eggs. Conventional microscopy was considered the diagnostic reference standard. For S. mansoni, S. haematobium and Trichuris trichiura, the portable light microscope showed sensitivities of 84.8%, 78.6% and 81.5%, respectively, and specificities of 85.7%, 91.0% and 93.0%, respectively. For S. mansoni and T. trichiura, we found sensitivities for the mobile phone microscope of 68.2% and 30.8%, respectively, and specificities of 64.3% and 71.0%, respectively. We conclude that the portable light microscope has sufficient diagnostic yield for Schistosoma and T. trichiura infections, while the mobile phone microscope has only modest sensitivity in its current experimental set-up. Development of portable diagnostic technologies that can be used at point-of-sample collection will enhance diagnostic coverage in clinical and epidemiological settings.

  18. Atypical presentation of cerebral schistosomiasis four years after exposure to Schistosoma mansoni

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    Matthew F. Rose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is the second most socioeconomically devastating parasitic disease worldwide, affecting over 240 million people in 77 countries on 5 continents and killing 300,000 people annually in sub-Saharan Africa alone. Neuroschistosomiasis is caused by granuloma formation around eggs that lodge in the CNS, with Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium usually affecting the spinal cord and Schistosoma japonicum causing most reported cerebral disease. We report a case of a previously healthy 25-year-old woman native to the United States who presented with a single generalized tonic–clonic seizure without other neurologic symptoms four years after spending a semester in Ghana where she went swimming once in a river. Brain MRI showed areas of signal abnormality and mottled nodular linear enhancement in the left temporal and right posterior temporal/parietal lobes and right cerebellum without mass effect. A biopsy of the left temporal lesion showed prominent granulomas with dense mixed inflammatory infiltrates composed of eosinophils, plasma cells, and lymphocytes surrounding refractile egg shells containing characteristic embryonal cells and von Lichtenberg's envelope and displaying the pathognomonic spine shape of S. mansoni. Serum ELISA and antibody immunoblots confirmed exposure to S. mansoni. In summary, we describe the atypical combination of cerebral schistosomiasis due to S. mansoni, after a prolonged interval of four years, from a single known exposure.

  19. Morphological Characteristics of Schistosoma mansoni PZQ-resistant and -susceptible Strains are Different in Presence of Praziquantel

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    António ePinto-Almeida

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is one of the most common human parasitic diseases whose socioeconomic impact is only surpassed by malaria. Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug commercially available for the treatment of all schistosome species causing disease in humans. However, there has been stronger evidences of PZQ-resistance on Schistosoma mansoni and thus it is very important to study the phenotypic characteristics associated with it. The aim of this study was to evaluate morphological alterations in S. mansoni PZQ-resistant adult worms and eggs, by comparing a PZQ-resistant strain obtained under PZQ drug pressure with a PZQ-susceptible strain. For this, scanning electronic microscopy was used to assess tegumental responsiveness of both strains under PZQ exposure, and optical microscopy allowed the monitoring of worms and eggs in the presence of the drug. Those assays showed that PZQ-susceptible worms exposed to the drug had more severe tegumental damages than the resistant one, which had only minor alterations. Moreover, contrary to what occurred in the susceptible strain, resistant worms were viable after PZQ exposure and gradually regaining full motility after removal of the drug. Eggs from resistant strain parasites are considerably smaller than those from susceptible strain. Our results suggest that there might be a difference in the tegument composition of the resistant strain and that worms are less responsive to PZQ. Changes observed in egg morphology might imply alterations in the biology of schistosomes associated to PZQ-resistance, which could impact on transmission and pathology of the disease. Moreover, we propose a hypothetical scenario where there is a different egg tropism of the S. mansoni resistant strain. This study is the first comparing two strains that only differ in their resistance characteristics, which makes it a relevant step in the search for resistance determinants.

  20. Endogenous growth factor stimulation of hemocyte proliferation induces resistance to Schistosoma mansoni challenge in the snail host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pila, Emmanuel A; Gordy, Michelle A; Phillips, Valerie K; Kabore, Alethe L; Rudko, Sydney P; Hanington, Patrick C

    2016-05-10

    Digenean trematodes are a large, complex group of parasitic flatworms that infect an incredible diversity of organisms, including humans. Larval development of most digeneans takes place within a snail (Gastropoda). Compatibility between snails and digeneans is often very specific, such that suitable snail hosts define the geographical ranges of diseases caused by these worms. The immune cells (hemocytes) of a snail are sentinels that act as a crucial barrier to infection by larval digeneans. Hemocytes coordinate a robust and specific immunological response, participating directly in parasite killing by encapsulating and clearing the infection. Hemocyte proliferation and differentiation are influenced by unknown digenean-specific exogenous factors. However, we know nothing about the endogenous control of hemocyte development in any gastropod model. Here, we identify and functionally characterize a progranulin [Biomphalaria glabrata granulin (BgGRN)] from the snail B. glabrata, a natural host for the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni Granulins are growth factors that drive proliferation of immune cells in organisms, spanning the animal kingdom. We demonstrate that BgGRN induces proliferation of B. glabrata hemocytes, and specifically drives the production of an adherent hemocyte subset that participates centrally in the anti-digenean defense response. Additionally, we demonstrate that susceptible B. glabrata snails can be made resistant to infection with S. mansoni by first inducing hemocyte proliferation with BgGRN. This marks the functional characterization of an endogenous growth factor of a gastropod mollusc, and provides direct evidence of gain of resistance in a snail-digenean infection model using a defined factor to induce snail resistance to infection.

  1. Identification of Host Insulin Binding Sites on Schistosoma japonicum Insulin Receptors.

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    Rachel J Stephenson

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum insulin receptors (SjIRs have been identified as encouraging vaccine candidates. Interrupting or blocking the binding between host insulin and the schistosome insulin receptors (IRs may result in reduced glucose uptake leading to starvation and stunting of worms with a reduction in egg output. To further understand how schistosomes are able to exploit host insulin for development and growth, and whether these parasites and their mammalian hosts compete for the same insulin source, we identified insulin binding sites on the SjIRs. Based on sequence analysis and the predicted antigenic structure of the primary sequences of the SjIRs, we designed nine and eleven peptide analogues from SjIR-1 and SjIR-2, respectively. Using the Octet RED system, we identified analogues derived from SjIR-1 (10 and SjIR-2 (20, 21 and 22 with insulin-binding sequences specific for S. japonicum. Nevertheless, the human insulin receptor (HIR may compete with the SjIRs in binding human insulin in other positions which are important for HIR binding to insulin. However, no binding occurred between insulin and parasite analogues derived from SjIR-1 (2, 7 and 8 and SjIR-2 (14, 16 and 18 at the same locations as HIR sequences which have been shown to have strong insulin binding affinities. Importantly, we found two analogues (1 and 3, derived from SjIR-1, and two analogues (13 and 15 derived from SjIR-2, were responsible for the major insulin binding affinity in S. japonicum. These peptide analogues were shown to have more than 10 times (in KD value stronger binding capacity for human insulin compared with peptides derived from the HIR in the same sequence positions. Paradoxically, analogues 1, 3, 13 and 15 do not appear to contain major antigenic determinants which resulted in poor antibody responses to native S. japonicum protein. This argues against their future development as peptide-vaccine candidates.

  2. Schistosoma mansoni INFECTIONS AMONGST SCHOOL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    In a different study in Mexico, no correlation was observed between the reliable drinking water and parasitic infections (Quihui et al., 2006). Many have also suggested that the domestic water network in Jos needed to be upgraded. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. To the Department of Zoology, University of Jos for the use of their.

  3. The Streamlined Genome of Phytomonas spp. Relative to Human Pathogenic Kinetoplastids Reveals a Parasite Tailored for Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcel, Betina M.; Denoeud, France; Opperdoes, Fred; Noel, Benjamin; Madoui, Mohammed-Amine; Hammarton, Tansy C.; Field, Mark C.; Da Silva, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Poulain, Julie; Katinka, Michael; Jabbari, Kamel; Aury, Jean-Marc; Campbell, David A.; Cintron, Roxana; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Docampo, Roberto; Sturm, Nancy R.; Koumandou, V. Lila; Fabre, Sandrine; Flegontov, Pavel; Lukeš, Julius; Michaeli, Shulamit; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Szöőr, Balázs; Zilberstein, Dan; Bringaud, Frédéric; Wincker, Patrick; Dollet, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Members of the family Trypanosomatidae infect many organisms, including animals, plants and humans. Plant-infecting trypanosomes are grouped under the single genus Phytomonas, failing to reflect the wide biological and pathological diversity of these protists. While some Phytomonas spp. multiply in the latex of plants, or in fruit or seeds without apparent pathogenicity, others colonize the phloem sap and afflict plants of substantial economic value, including the coffee tree, coconut and oil palms. Plant trypanosomes have not been studied extensively at the genome level, a major gap in understanding and controlling pathogenesis. We describe the genome sequences of two plant trypanosomatids, one pathogenic isolate from a Guianan coconut and one non-symptomatic isolate from Euphorbia collected in France. Although these parasites have extremely distinct pathogenic impacts, very few genes are unique to either, with the vast majority of genes shared by both isolates. Significantly, both Phytomonas spp. genomes consist essentially of single copy genes for the bulk of their metabolic enzymes, whereas other trypanosomatids e.g. Leishmania and Trypanosoma possess multiple paralogous genes or families. Indeed, comparison with other trypanosomatid genomes revealed a highly streamlined genome, encoding for a minimized metabolic system while conserving the major pathways, and with retention of a full complement of endomembrane organelles, but with no evidence for functional complexity. Identification of the metabolic genes of Phytomonas provides opportunities for establishing in vitro culturing of these fastidious parasites and new tools for the control of agricultural plant disease. PMID:24516393

  4. Balantidium coli and other gastrointestinal parasites in captives non-human primates of the Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Barbosa, Alynne; Pissinatti, Alcides; Dib, Laís Verdan; de Siqueira, Mayara Perlingeiro; Cardozo, Matheus Lessa; Fonseca, Ana Beatriz Monteiro; de Barros Oliveira, Anderson; da Silva, Fábio Alves; Uchôa, Claudia M Antunes; Bastos, Otilio Machado Pereira; Amendoeira, Maria Regina Reis

    2015-02-01

    Parasites are agents of diarrhea in captive non-human primates (NHP). To broaden information about those etiological agents in captive animals in Brazil, gastrointestinal parasites in captive NHP were researched in nurturing Centers of Rio de Janeiro State. Fecal samples were collected from primates, of which 960 came from the Research Center (Cecal/Fiocruz) and 115 from the Primate Center (CPRJ/Inea). The study involved species of the New World (NW) primates and of the Old World (OW). The estimated prevalence was 56.7%, of which 91.3% presented protozoans and 7.4% presented helminths. Statistical difference between the nurturing centers occurred in the overall value of parasitosis and in the isolated frequency of Balantidium coli and Entamoeba sp., especially in the samples of OW primates living in Cecal. These results demonstrated the need for implements of sanitation programs in the sites for captive primates nurturing. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Notes on the occurrence of tubercular spines in Schistosoma margrebowiei and Schistosoma mattheei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, F J; Hamilton-Attwell, V L; Tiedt, L; Visser, P S; Joubert, P H

    1988-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopical (SEM) studies on the tegument of the bovid schistosomes, Schistosoma margrebowiei and Schistosoma mattheei have yielded conflicting results; certain authors observed the tubercles on the tegument of these species to be spined, while others reported that they are spineless. The present study indicates that the protrusion of tubercular spines is subject to phenotypic plasticity regulated by external factors such as the identity of the host species and whether or not the schistosome is paired.

  6. Host-seeking behaviors of mosquitoes experimentally infected with sympatric field isolates of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum: no evidence for host manipulation

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    Amélie eVantaux

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that Plasmodium parasites can manipulate mosquito feeding behaviours such as motivation and avidity to feed on vertebrate hosts, in ways that increase the probability of parasite transmission. These studies, however, have been mainly carried out on non-natural and/or laboratory based model systems and hence may not reflect what occurs in the field. We now need to move closer to the natural setting, if we are to fully capture the ecological and evolutionary consequences of these parasite-induced behavioral changes. As part of this effort, we conducted a series of experiments to investigate the long and short-range behavioural responses to human stimuli in the mosquito Anopheles coluzzii during different stages of infection with sympatric field isolates of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in Burkina Faso. First, we used a dual-port olfactometer designed to take advantage of the whole body odor to gauge mosquito long-range host-seeking behaviors. Second, we used a locomotor activity monitor system to assess mosquito short-range behaviors. Compared to control uninfected mosquitoes, P. falciparum infection had no significant effect neither on long-range nor on short-range behaviors both at the immature and mature stages. This study, using a natural mosquito-malaria parasite association, indicates that manipulation of vector behavior may not be a general phenomenon. We speculate that the observed contrasting phenotypes with model systems might result from coevolution of the human parasite and its natural vector. Future experiments, using other sympatric malaria mosquito populations or species are required to test this hypothesis. In conclusion, our results highlight the importance of following up discoveries in laboratory model systems with studies on natural parasite–mosquito interactions to accurately predict the epidemiological, ecological and evolutionary consequences of parasite manipulation of vector

  7. Defining the protein interaction network of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    KAUST Repository

    Ramaprasad, Abhinay

    2012-02-01

    Malaria, caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum, affects around 225. million people yearly and a huge international effort is directed towards combating this grave threat to world health and economic development. Considerable advances have been made in malaria research triggered by the sequencing of its genome in 2002, followed by several high-throughput studies defining the malaria transcriptome and proteome. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network seeks to trace the dynamic interactions between proteins, thereby elucidating their local and global functional relationships. Experimentally derived PPI network from high-throughput methods such as yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens are inherently noisy, but combining these independent datasets by computational methods tends to give a greater accuracy and coverage. This review aims to discuss the computational approaches used till date to construct a malaria protein interaction network and to catalog the functional predictions and biological inferences made from analysis of the PPI network. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Low transformation growth factor-β1 production and collagen synthesis correlate with the lack of hepatic periportal fibrosis development in undernourished mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni

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    Andreia Ferreira Barros

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Undernourished mice infected (UI submitted to low and long-lasting infections by Schistosoma mansoni are unable to develop the hepatic periportal fibrosis that is equivalent to Symmers’ fibrosis in humans. In this report, the effects of the host’s nutritional status on parasite (worm load, egg viability and maturation and host (growth curves, biology, collagen synthesis and characteristics of the immunological response were studied and these are considered as interdependent factors influencing the amount and distribution of fibrous tissue in hepatic periovular granulomas and portal spaces. The nutritional status of the host influenced the low body weight and low parasite burden detected in UI mice as well as the number, viability and maturation of released eggs. The reduced oviposition and increased number of degenerated or dead eggs were associated with low protein synthesis detected in deficient hosts, which likely induced the observed decrease in transformation growth factor (TGF-β1 and liver collagen. Despite the reduced number of mature eggs in UI mice, the activation of TGF-β1 and hepatic stellate cells occurred regardless of the unviability of most miracidia, due to stimulation by fibrogenic proteins and eggshell glycoproteins. However, changes in the repair mechanisms influenced by the nutritional status in deficient animals may account for the decreased liver collagen detected in the present study.

  9. Transmission dynamics of Schistosoma japonicum in the lakes and marshlands of China.

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    Darren J Gray

    Full Text Available Schistosoma japonicum is a major public health concern in China, with over one million people infected and another 40 million living in areas at risk of infection. Unlike the disease caused by S. mansoni and S. haematobium, schistosomiasis japonica is a zoonosis, involving a number of different mammalian species as reservoir hosts. As a result of a number of published reports from China, it has long been considered that bovines, particularly water buffaloes, play a major role in human S. japonicum transmission there, and a drug-based intervention study (1998-2003 around the Poyang Lake in Jiangxi Province provided proof of concept that water buffaloes are, indeed, major reservoirs of human infection in this setting.In this study we incorporated recently obtained epidemiological information to model the steady-state S. japonicum transmission as well as the impact of the removal of S. japonicum transmission attributable to water buffaloes on human infection rates across six different endemic scenarios within three villages in the Dongting (Hunan and Poyang (Jiangxi lakes of southern China. Similar results were obtained for all scenarios. Steady-state S. japonicum infection rates remained constant and human prevalence and incidence were predicted to fall considerably over time. The model showed that the contribution of S. japonicum water buffalo transmission to human infection ranged from 39.1% to 99.1% and predicted that the removal of water buffalo transmission would reduce parasite reproductive rates below 1. This indicates that without the contribution of water buffaloes, S. japonicum transmission is interrupted and unsustainable. These scenarios are generalizable to other endemic villages in the lake and marshland areas of China where a similar cycle of snail infection and infection/reinfection of humans and bovines occurs.Along with previous epidemiological data, our findings strongly support water buffaloes as an important component of the

  10. Ionotropic Receptors Identified within the Tentacle of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria glabrata, an Intermediate Host of Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Di; Wang, Tianfang; Rotgans, Bronwyn A.; McManus, Donald P.; Cummins, Scott F.

    2016-01-01

    Biomphalaria glabrata (B. glabrata) is an air-breathing aquatic mollusc found in freshwater habitats across the Western Hemisphere. It is most well-known for its recognized capacity to act as a major intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, the human blood fluke parasite. Ionotropic receptors (IRs), a variant family of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR), have an evolutionary ancient function in detecting odors to initiate chemosensory signaling. In this study, we applied an array of methods towards the goal of identifying IR-like family members in B. glabrata, ultimately revealing two types, the iGluR and IR. Sequence alignment showed that three ligand-binding residues are conserved in most Biomphalaria iGluR sequences, while the IRs did exhibit a variable pattern, lacking some or all known glutamate-interactingresidues, supporting their distinct classification from the iGluRs. We show that B. glabrata contains 7 putative IRs, some of which are expressed within its chemosensory organs. To further investigate a role for the more ancient IR25a type in chemoreception, we tested its spatial distribution pattern within the snail cephalic tentacle by in situ hybridization. The presence of IR25a within presumptive sensory neurons supports a role for this receptor in olfactory processing, contributing to our understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in Biomphalaria olfactory processing. PMID:27253696

  11. Ionotropic Receptors Identified within the Tentacle of the Freshwater Snail Biomphalaria glabrata, an Intermediate Host of Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Liang

    Full Text Available Biomphalaria glabrata (B. glabrata is an air-breathing aquatic mollusc found in freshwater habitats across the Western Hemisphere. It is most well-known for its recognized capacity to act as a major intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni, the human blood fluke parasite. Ionotropic receptors (IRs, a variant family of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR, have an evolutionary ancient function in detecting odors to initiate chemosensory signaling. In this study, we applied an array of methods towards the goal of identifying IR-like family members in B. glabrata, ultimately revealing two types, the iGluR and IR. Sequence alignment showed that three ligand-binding residues are conserved in most Biomphalaria iGluR sequences, while the IRs did exhibit a variable pattern, lacking some or all known glutamate-interactingresidues, supporting their distinct classification from the iGluRs. We show that B. glabrata contains 7 putative IRs, some of which are expressed within its chemosensory organs. To further investigate a role for the more ancient IR25a type in chemoreception, we tested its spatial distribution pattern within the snail cephalic tentacle by in situ hybridization. The presence of IR25a within presumptive sensory neurons supports a role for this receptor in olfactory processing, contributing to our understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in Biomphalaria olfactory processing.

  12. Praziquantel treatment decreases Schistosoma mansoni genetic diversity in experimental infections.

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    Regina Coeli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis has a considerable impact on public health in many tropical and subtropical areas. In the new world, schistosomiasis is caused by the digenetic trematode Schistosoma mansoni. Chemotherapy is the main measure for controlling schistosomiasis, and the current drug of choice for treatment is praziquantel (PZQ. Although PZQ is efficient and safe, its repetitive large-scale use in endemic areas may lead to the selection of resistant strains. Isolates less susceptible to PZQ have been found in the field and selected for in the laboratory. The impact of selecting strains with a decreased susceptibility phenotype on disease dynamics and parasite population genetics is not fully understood. This study addresses the impact of PZQ pressure on the genetics of a laboratory population by analyzing frequency variations of polymorphic genetic markers. METHODOLOGY: Infected mice were treated with increasing PZQ doses until the highest dose of 3 × 300 mg/Kg was reached. The effect of PZQ treatment on the parasite population was assessed using five polymorphic microsatellite markers. Parasitological and genetic data were compared with those of the untreated control. After six parasite generations submitted to treatment, it was possible to obtain a S. mansoni population with decreased susceptibility to PZQ. In our experiments we also observed that female worms were more susceptible to PZQ than male worms. CONCLUSIONS: The selective pressure exerted by PZQ led to decreased genetic variability in S. mansoni and increased endogamy. The understanding of how S. mansoni populations respond to successive drug pressure has important implications on the appearance and maintenance of a PZQ resistance phenotype in endemic regions.

  13. Parasitic Nematode Interactions with Mammals and Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jasmer, D.P.; Goverse, A.; Smant, G.

    2003-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes that infect humans, animals, and plants cause serious diseases that are deleterious to human health and agricultural productivity. Chemical and biological control methods have reduced the impact of these parasites. However, surviving environmental stages lead to persistent

  14. Ocular pathological changes in hamsters experimentally infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, H I H; Ashour, D S; Abou Rayia, D M; Ali, A L

    2016-11-01

    Ocular lesions have been reported in patients with schistosomiasis; however, the problem with studying schistosomal infection of the human eye is that biopsies are almost impossible to take, and histopathological examination of suspicious lesions can only be undertaken post-mortem or after enucleation. This work aimed to study the possible effects and pathogenesis of schistosomiasis on the eye. This study involved 55 hamsters; five hamsters remained non-infected and the remaining 50 hamsters were infected with Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Infected hamsters were sacrificed on weeks 8, 12, 16 and 20 post-infection (pi). Eye sections were prepared and stained for histopathological and immunohistochemical studies. Histopathological changes detected in hamsters infected after 16 and 20 weeks included looseness and oedema of the innermost retinal layers together with hyperplastic polypoid growth. Neither eggs nor granulomata were detected in eye sections throughout the experimental period. Deposition of S. mansoni antigen was revealed in 35% of infected hamsters. Later, on weeks 16 and 20 pi, moderate subepithelial conjuctival deposits and marked subchoroidal and scleral deposition were detected. In conclusion, the deposition of schistosomal antigen and immune complexes may play a pivotal role in the ocular changes that occur in schistosomiasis, even in the absence of detectable Schistosoma eggs. Schistosomiasis should be suspected in cases with unexplained ophthalmological findings, especially in endemic areas.

  15. Functions of the Vasa gene in Schistosoma japonicum as assessed by RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Siyu; Zhu, Lulu; Liu, Fengchun; Liu, Quan; Shao, Yanjing; Hua, Mengqing; Ding, Han; Shao, Wei; Du, Yinan; Hou, Xin; Ren, Cuiping; Liu, Miao; Shen, Jijia

    2018-01-05

    Vasa, an enzyme belonging to the helicase family, contributes to the regulation of reproductive system development in many species. Thus, we hypothesized that the Vasa3 gene may function in the reproductive system of the parasite Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum), which is a major causative agent of schistosomiasis. It is a severe disease globally affecting humans and animals. To test this hypothesis, we firstly conducted whole mount in situ hybridization analyses and found that the S. japonicum Vasa3 (SjVasa3) gene was expressed mainly in the reproductive organs. We then explored the reproductive functions of Vasa3 in S. japonicum using RNA interference (RNAi) techniques. Coupled schistosomes collected from mice 28days post infection (dpi) were transfected three times with SjVasa3-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and cultured in vitro for up to 10days. As measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Western blot analysis, levels of SjVasa3 mRNA and protein in Vasa siRNA treated worms were significantly reduced compared with untreated and scrambled siRNA treated worms. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images showed markedly siRNA induced changes in the morphology of the reproductive organs, especially in the female ovary, vitellarium and the male testes. SjVasa3 gene silencing also significantly reduced egg production. These data demonstrate that SjVasa3 is essential in reproductive organ development and egg production in S. japonicum, and could be a potential target for developing novel compounds to treat schistosomiasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Schistosoma mansoni histones: from transcription to chromatin regulation; an in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Letícia; Pierce, Raymond J; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Schistosoma mansoni is a human endoparasite with a complex life cycle that also infects an invertebrate mollusk intermediate host and exhibits many diverse phenotypes. Its complexity is reflected in a large genome and different transcriptome profiles specific to each life cycle stage. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression such as the post-translational modification of histones has a significant impact on phenotypes, and this information storage function resides primarily at histone tails, which results in a varied histone code. Evidence of transcription of the different histone families at all life stages of the parasite was detected by a survey of transcriptome databases; manual curation of each gene prediction at the genome sequence level showed errors in the coding sequences of three of them. The biogenesis of histones is coupled to DNA replication, and a detailed in silico analysis of the specialized machinery of histone mRNA processing in the S. mansoni genome reveals that it is as conserved as in other eukaryotes, consisting in transcription factors and stem-loop binding proteins which recognize the stem loop structure at the histone mRNA 3'UTR. Histone modifying enzymes (HMEs) such as histone acetyltransferases, methyltransferases and deacetylases (HDACs) have been described in S. mansoni, and their potential as new therapeutic targets was evidenced with the apoptotic phenotype that resulted from HDAC inhibition. However, the overall regulation of transcription coupled with gene expression profiles correlated to histone modifications has not yet been characterized. Besides the interaction of HMEs with histones, many factors involved in cellular processes are known to bind to histones, and were identified here by an in silico analysis of the S. mansoni genome. Knowledge of the histone families opens up perspectives for further studies that will lead to a better identification of their post-translational modifications, their gene regulation and to the

  17. Repeated Schistosoma japonicum infection following treatment in two cohorts: evidence for host susceptibility to helminthiasis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Carlton

    Full Text Available In light of multinational efforts to reduce helminthiasis, we evaluated whether there exist high-risk subpopulations for helminth infection. Such individuals are not only at risk of morbidity, but may be important parasite reservoirs and appropriate targets for disease control interventions.We followed two longitudinal cohorts in Sichuan, China to determine whether there exist persistent human reservoirs for the water-borne helminth, Schistosoma japonicum, in areas where treatment is ongoing. Participants were tested for S. japonicum infection at enrollment and two follow-up points. All infections were promptly treated with praziquantel. We estimated the ratio of the observed to expected proportion of the population with two consecutive infections at follow-up. The expected proportion was estimated using a prevalence-based model and, as highly exposed individuals may be most likely to be repeatedly infected, a second model that accounted for exposure using a data adaptive, machine learning algorithm. Using the prevalence-based model, there were 1.5 and 5.8 times more individuals with two consecutive infections than expected in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively (p<0.001 in both cohorts. When we accounted for exposure, the ratio was 1.3 (p = 0.013 and 2.1 (p<0.001 in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively.We found clustering of infections within a limited number of hosts that was not fully explained by host exposure. This suggests some hosts may be particularly susceptible to S. japonicum infection, or that uncured infections persist despite treatment. We propose an explanatory model that suggests that as cercarial exposure declines, so too does the size of the vulnerable subpopulation. In low-prevalence settings, interventions targeting individuals with a history of S. japonicum infection may efficiently advance disease control efforts.

  18. Endomyocardial fibrosis associated with Schistosoma Haematobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) is a form of restrictive cardiomyopathy common in the tropics and subtropics. The aetiology of EMF is unknown but helminth infestations such as schistosomiasis have been implicated. Two boys aged 8 and 10 years with EMF associated with Schistosoma haematobium, are described.

  19. presumptive diagnosis of schistosoma haematobium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    ABSTRACT. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Ilie community of Olorunda Local Government Area in Osun state, southwestern. Nigeria to comparatively evaluate the presumptive diagnosis of schistosoma infections using microscopy as gold standard. One hundred and thirty seven consented primary school ...

  20. SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI OF THE CONUS MEDULARIS: CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    , P.O Box 20723, Nairobi, Kenya. Request for reprints to: Dr. P.K. Wanyoike, Kenyatta National Hospital, P.O Box 20723, Nairobi, Kenya. SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI OF THE CONUS MEDULARIS: CASE REPORT. P. K. WANYOIKE and M. M. ...

  1. Epidemiological survey on schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-06-30

    Jun 30, 2015 ... haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni in primary schools in the Sub-Division of Taïbong-Dziguilao, Cameroon. 8397 ... and stool tests. The examination of urinary sediment and stool samples under the microscope revealed a prevalence of .... education of the population and environmental remediation ...

  2. THE EFFECT OF SCHISTOSOMA MOM CERCARIA INFECTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.J. DAFUR, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical Sciences,. University of Jos, PMB 2084, Jos Nigeria. E-mail: datuEQuniiosedu.ng,dafurs@yahoo.com. The testicular histology of mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni (S.mans0nr) cercaria and treated with. Niridazole was examined. The results reveal that infection ...

  3. Prevalence and distribution of Schistosoma haematobium infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and distribution of Schistosoma haematobium infection among school children living in southwestern shores of Lake Malawi. ... Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in primary schools. School ... Consistent and uniform interventions can reduce prevalence further and sustain control.

  4. Schistosoma haematobium Infection in Relation to Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out to investigate how infections with Schistosoma haematobium influences Plasmodium parasitaemia level in school children in Ijebu East L.G.A. of Ogun State, south west Nigeria between August and November 2008. One hundred and thirty (130) primary school children, aged between 6 and 15 ...

  5. Cofactors Influencing Prevalence and Intensity of Schistosoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An epidemiological study of sedentary Fulani settlements in Dumbi, Igabi Local Government Area of Kaduna State was undertaken to determine cofactors of Schistosoma haematobium prevalence and intensity of infection. Consenting individuals were recruited after sensitization from six settlements and administered a ...

  6. Differential Evolutionary Selection and Natural Evolvability Observed in ALT Proteins of Human Filarial Parasites.

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    Neil C Devoe

    Full Text Available The abundant larval transcript (ALT-2 protein is present in all members of the Filarioidea, and has been reported as a potential candidate antigen for a subunit vaccine against lymphatic filariasis. To assess the potential for vaccine escape or heterologous protection, we examined the evolutionary selection acting on ALT-2. The ratios of nonsynonymous (K(a to synonymous (K(s mutation frequencies (ω were calculated for the alt-2 genes of the lymphatic filariasis agents Brugia malayi and Wuchereria bancrofti and the agents of river blindness and African eyeworm disease Onchocerca volvulus and Loa loa. Two distinct Bayesian models of sequence evolution showed that ALT-2 of W. bancrofti and L. loa were under significant (P<0.05; P < 0.001 diversifying selection, while ALT-2 of B. malayi and O. volvulus were under neutral to stabilizing selection. Diversifying selection as measured by ω values was notably strongest on the region of ALT-2 encoding the signal peptide of L. loa and was elevated in the variable acidic domain of L. loa and W. bancrofti. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the ALT-2 consensus sequences formed three clades: the first consisting of B. malayi, the second consisting of W. bancrofti, and the third containing both O. volvulus and L. loa. ALT-2 selection was therefore not predictable by phylogeny or pathology, as the two species parasitizing the eye were selected differently, as were the two species parasitizing the lymphatic system. The most immunogenic regions of L. loa and W. bancrofti ALT-2 sequence as modeled by antigenicity prediction analysis did not correspond with elevated levels of diversifying selection, and were not selected differently than predicted antigenic epitopes in B. malayi and O. volvulus. Measurements of ALT-2 evolvability made by χ2 analysis between alleles that were stable (O. volvulus and B. malayi and those that were under diversifying selection (W. bancrofti and L. loa indicated significant (P<0

  7. Parasitic Helminths: New Weapons against Immunological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Osada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of allergic and autoimmune diseases is increasing in developed countries, possibly due to reduced exposure to microorganisms in childhood (hygiene hypothesis. Epidemiological and experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis is accumulating. In this context, parasitic helminths are now important candidates for antiallergic/anti-inflammatory agents. Here we summarize antiallergic/anti-inflammatory effects of helminths together along with our own study of the effects of Schistosoma mansoni on Th17-dependent experimental arthritis. We also discuss possible mechanisms of helminth-induced suppression according to the recent advances of immunology.

  8. An atlas for Schistosoma mansoni organs and life-cycle stages using cell type-specific markers and confocal microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Collins

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis (bilharzia is a tropical disease caused by trematode parasites (Schistosoma that affects hundreds of millions of people in the developing world. Currently only a single drug (praziquantel is available to treat this disease, highlighting the importance of developing new techniques to study Schistosoma. While molecular advances, including RNA interference and the availability of complete genome sequences for two Schistosoma species, will help to revolutionize studies of these animals, an array of tools for visualizing the consequences of experimental perturbations on tissue integrity and development needs to be made widely available. To this end, we screened a battery of commercially available stains, antibodies and fluorescently labeled lectins, many of which have not been described previously for analyzing schistosomes, for their ability to label various cell and tissue types in the cercarial stage of S. mansoni. This analysis uncovered more than 20 new markers that label most cercarial tissues, including the tegument, the musculature, the protonephridia, the secretory system and the nervous system. Using these markers we present a high-resolution visual depiction of cercarial anatomy. Examining the effectiveness of a subset of these markers in S. mansoni adults and miracidia, we demonstrate the value of these tools for labeling tissues in a variety of life-cycle stages. The methodologies described here will facilitate functional analyses aimed at understanding fundamental biological processes in these parasites.

  9. Evaluation of the Schistosoma mansoni Y-box-binding protein (SMYB1 potential as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Regina Costa Dias

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, and after malaria, is the second most important tropical disease in public health. A vaccine that reduces parasitemia is desirable to achieve mass treatment with a low cost. Although potential antigens have been identified and tested in clinical trials, no effective vaccine against schistosomiasis is available. Y-box-binding proteins (YBPs regulate gene expression and participate in a variety of cellular processes, including transcriptional and translational regulation, DNA repair, cellular proliferation, drug resistance and stress responses. The Schistosoma mansoni ortholog of the human YB-1, SMYB1, is expressed in all stages of the parasite life cycle. Although SMYB1 binds to DNA or RNA oligonucleotides, immunohistochemistry assays demonstrated that it is primarily localized in the cytoplasm of parasite cells. In addition, SMYB1 interacts with a protein involved in mRNA processing, suggesting that SMYB1 functions in the turnover, transport and/or stabilization of RNA molecules during post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here we report the potential of SMYB1 as a vaccine candidate. We demonstrate that recombinant SMYB1 stimulates the production of high levels of specific IgG1 antibodies in a mouse model. The observed levels of specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies indicate an actual protection against cercariae challenge. Animals immunized with rSMYB1 exhibited a 26% reduction in adult worm burden and a 28% reduction in eggs retained in the liver. Although proteins from the worm tegument are considered optimal targets for vaccine development, this study demonstrates that unexposed cytoplasmic proteins can reduce the load of intestinal worms and the number of eggs retained in the liver.

  10. Evaluation of the Schistosoma mansoni Y-box-binding protein (SMYB1) potential as a vaccine candidate against schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Sílvia R C; Boroni, Mariana; Rocha, Elizângela A; Dias, Thomaz L; de Laet Souza, Daniela; Oliveira, Fabrício M S; Bitar, Mainá; Macedo, Andrea M; Machado, Carlos R; Caliari, Marcelo V; Franco, Glória R

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease, and after malaria, is the second most important tropical disease in public health. A vaccine that reduces parasitemia is desirable to achieve mass treatment with a low cost. Although potential antigens have been identified and tested in clinical trials, no effective vaccine against schistosomiasis is available. Y-box-binding proteins (YBPs) regulate gene expression and participate in a variety of cellular processes, including transcriptional and translational regulation, DNA repair, cellular proliferation, drug resistance, and stress responses. The Schistosoma mansoni ortholog of the human YB-1, SMYB1, is expressed in all stages of the parasite life cycle. Although SMYB1 binds to DNA or RNA oligonucleotides, immunohistochemistry assays demonstrated that it is primarily localized in the cytoplasm of parasite cells. In addition, SMYB1 interacts with a protein involved in mRNA processing, suggesting that SMYB1 functions in the turnover, transport, and/or stabilization of RNA molecules during post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here we report the potential of SMYB1 as a vaccine candidate. We demonstrate that recombinant SMYB1 stimulates the production of high levels of specific IgG1 antibodies in a mouse model. The observed levels of specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies indicate an actual protection against cercariae challenge. Animals immunized with rSMYB1 exhibited a 26% reduction in adult worm burden and a 28% reduction in eggs retained in the liver. Although proteins from the worm tegument are considered optimal targets for vaccine development, this study demonstrates that unexposed cytoplasmic proteins can reduce the load of intestinal worms and the number of eggs retained in the liver.

  11. Development and validation of a quantitative, high-throughput, fluorescent-based bioassay to detect schistosoma viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Peak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, caused by infection with the blood fluke Schistosoma, is responsible for greater than 200,000 human deaths per annum. Objective high-throughput screens for detecting novel anti-schistosomal targets will drive 'genome to drug' lead translational science at an unprecedented rate. Current methods for detecting schistosome viability rely on qualitative microscopic criteria, which require an understanding of parasite morphology, and most importantly, must be subjectively interpreted. These limitations, in the current state of the art, have significantly impeded progress into whole schistosome screening for next generation chemotherapies.We present here a microtiter plate-based method for reproducibly detecting schistosomula viability that takes advantage of the differential uptake of fluorophores (propidium iodide and fluorescein diacetate by living organisms. We validate this high-throughput system in detecting schistosomula viability using auranofin (a known inhibitor of thioredoxin glutathione reductase, praziquantel and a range of small compounds with previously-described (gambogic acid, sodium salinomycin, ethinyl estradiol, fluoxetidine hydrochloride, miconazole nitrate, chlorpromazine hydrochloride, amphotericin b, niclosamide or suggested (bepridil, ciclopirox, rescinnamine, flucytosine, vinblastine and carbidopa anti-schistosomal activities. This developed method is sensitive (200 schistosomula/well can be assayed, relevant to industrial (384-well microtiter plate compatibility and academic (96-well microtiter plate compatibility settings, translatable to functional genomics screens and drug assays, does not require a priori knowledge of schistosome biology and is quantitative.The wide-scale application of this fluorescence-based bioassay will greatly accelerate the objective identification of novel therapeutic lead targets/compounds to combat schistosomiasis. Adapting this bioassay for use with other parasitic worm species

  12. Carbohydrate profiling and protein identification of tegumental and excreted/secreted glycoproteins of adult Schistosoma bovis worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramajo-Hernández, Alicia; Oleaga, Ana; Ramajo-Martín, Vicente; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo

    2007-03-15

    Schistosoma bovis is a parasite of wild and domestic ruminants that is broadly distributed throughout many tropical and temperate regions of the old world. S. bovis causes severe health problems and significant economic losses in livestock, but in contrast to human schistosomes, S. bovis has been little investigated at a molecular level. Since schistosome glycans and glycoproteins can play important roles in the host-parasite interplay, the aims of the present work were: (i) to characterize the glycans expressed by adult S. bovis worms on their excreted/secreted (ES) and tegumental (TG) glycoproteins and (ii) to identify their carrier protein backbones by mass spectrometry. Using a panel of lectins and monoclonal and polyclonal anti-glycan antibodies, we observed: (i) the absence of sialic acid in S. bovis; (ii) the presence of complex-type N-glycans and LDN antennae on ES glycoproteins; (iii) the presence of glycans containing the Fucalpha1-2Galbeta motif in many TG glycoproteins, and (iv) the presence of glycans containing the Fucalpha1-3GlcNAc motif on many ES and TG glycoproteins but, simultaneously, the absence of the F-LDN(-F) glycans from both the ES and TG glycoproteins. Interestingly, we also found the Lewis(X) and Lewis(Y) antigens co-expressed on several TG isoforms of ATP:guanidino kinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Finally, by ELISA we observed the presence of antibodies against Lewis(X), Lewis(Y) and F-LDN(-F) in the sera of sheep experimentally infected with S. bovis.

  13. [Comparative analysis of parasite detection methods in vegetables for human consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabé, Anderson Sena; Ferraz, Renato Ribeiro Nogueira; Pincinato, Eder de Carvalho; Gomes, Ronnie Clayton Ferreira; Galleguillos, Tatiana Gabriela Brassea; Cerqueira, Mayara Zabeu; Soares, Elislando Gean Lima; Lage, Paula Souza; Araújo, Célia Xavier; Szamszoryk, Michel; Massara, Cristiano Lara

    2010-01-01

    vegetable contamination is a persistent health problem. The different methods of processing and diagnosis make it difficult to determine the most effective and sensitive technique. a comparative analysis of parasitological technique sensitivity in vegetable samples. a total of 30 samples were harvested -lettuce (Lactuca sativa), rocket (Eruca sativa) and watercress (Nasturtium officinale)--and later analyzed using Hoffman, Pons, and Janer (HPJ) and Faust (f) techniques. Data were analyzed, using the Bland-Altman test to evaluate the correlation and the Mann-Whitney test to compare the medians. of the analyzed samples, 46.6% were positive for intestinal parasites; Balantidium coli, accounting for 20% of contamination, Entamoeba coli (21.6) and Entamoeba histolityca (5%), Trichuris trichiura (3.3%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (2.5%) The Bland-Altman test showed significant correlation between the analyzed methods. When evaluating the averages separately, there was significant difference (p = 0.05) among the results. this study proved that the HPJ technique was more effective for the detection of eggs, helminth larvae and protozoan cysts in the plants under study.

  14. State-space forecasting of Schistosoma haematobium time-series in Niono, Mali.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C Medina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Much of the developing world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa, exhibits high levels of morbidity and mortality associated with infectious diseases. The incidence of Schistosoma sp.-which are neglected tropical diseases exposing and infecting more than 500 and 200 million individuals in 77 countries, respectively-is rising because of 1 numerous irrigation and hydro-electric projects, 2 steady shifts from nomadic to sedentary existence, and 3 ineffective control programs. Notwithstanding the colossal scope of these parasitic infections, less than 0.5% of Schistosoma sp. investigations have attempted to predict their spatial and or temporal distributions. Undoubtedly, public health programs in developing countries could benefit from parsimonious forecasting and early warning systems to enhance management of these parasitic diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this longitudinal retrospective (01/1996-06/2004 investigation, the Schistosoma haematobium time-series for the district of Niono, Mali, was fitted with general-purpose exponential smoothing methods to generate contemporaneous on-line forecasts. These methods, which are encapsulated within a state-space framework, accommodate seasonal and inter-annual time-series fluctuations. Mean absolute percentage error values were circa 25% for 1- to 5-month horizon forecasts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The exponential smoothing state-space framework employed herein produced reasonably accurate forecasts for this time-series, which reflects the incidence of S. haematobium-induced terminal hematuria. It obliquely captured prior non-linear interactions between disease dynamics and exogenous covariates (e.g., climate, irrigation, and public health interventions, thus obviating the need for more complex forecasting methods in the district of Niono, Mali. Therefore, this framework could assist with managing and assessing S. haematobium transmission and intervention impact, respectively, in

  15. Ultrastructural study of morphological changes in Schistosoma mansoni after in vitro exposure to the monoterpene rotundifolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Rocha, Thiago José; Cavalcanti, Marília Gabriela Dos Santos; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lúcio, Ana Silvia Suassuna Carneiro; Veras, Dyana Leal; Marques, Márcia Ortiz Mayo; Alves, Luiz Carlos; Brayner, Fábio André

    2017-01-01

    Schistosomiasis, a parasitic disease caused by trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, affects more than 200 million people worldwide, and its control is dependent on a single drug, praziquantel. Here, we report the in vitro effect of rotundifolone, a monoterpene isolated from Mentha x villosa (Lamiaceae), on Schistosoma mansoni adult worms. The in vitro effect of rotundifolone on adult Schistosoma mansoni was evaluated by analysis of behavior and mortality and through a scanning electron microscopic analysis of ultrastructural changes in the tegument of the worms. At concentrations of 3.54 and 7.09μg/mL-1 rotundifolone, no worm mortality was observed at any of the sampling intervals. A minor reduction in movement of the tail, suckers, and gynecophoral canal membrane was observed after 96 h of exposure to 7.09μg/mL-1 rotundifolone. At 70.96μg/mL-1, a lack of movement was observed from 72h onwards and all worms were deemed dead; similar effects were observed at 48h with 177.4μg/mL-1, and at 24h with 354.8μg/mL-1 and 700.96μg/mL-1. Rotundifolone also caused death of all parasites and separation of coupled pairs into individual males and females after 24h at 354.8μg/mL-1. The main changes in the tegument induced by the different ROT treatments were: after 24h incubation, bubble lesions spread over the entire body and loss of tubercles occurred in some regions of the ventral region.

  16. Pathoecology of Chiribaya parasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinson Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The excavations of Chiribaya culture sites in the Osmore drainage of southern Peru focused on the recovery of information about prehistoric disease, including parasitism. The archaeologists excavated human, dog, guinea pig, and llama mummies. These mummies were analyzed for internal and external parasites. The results of the analysis and reconstruction of prehistoric life from the excavations allows us to interpret the pathoecology of the Chiribaya culture.

  17. Imaging of parasitic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Maurice C. [American Univ. of Beirut Medical Center (Lebanon). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Abd El Bagi, Mohamed E. [Riyadh Military Hospital (Saudi Arabia). Radiology and Imaging Dept. 920W; Tamraz, Jean C. (eds.) [CHU Hotel-Dieu de France, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2008-07-01

    This book provides an overview of the imaging findings of parasitic diseases using modern imaging equipment. The chapters consist of short descriptions of causative pathogens, epidemiology, modes of transmission, pathology, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, and imaging findings, with illustrative examples of parasitic diseases that can affect various systems of the human body. Tables summarizing key diagnostic features and clinical data pertinent to diagnosis are also included. This book is intended for radiologists worldwide. (orig.)

  18. [Research progress of molecular genetic analysis in Schistosoma variation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Su-Yue; Li, Fei

    2014-02-01

    The development of molecular biology techniques makes important contributions to the researches of heritable variation of Schistosoma. In recent years, the molecular genetic analysis in the Schistosoma variation researches mainly includes the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), random amplified polymorphism technology (RAPD), microsatellite anchored PCR (SSR-PCR), and polymerase reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). This article reviews the research progress of molecular genetic analysis in Schistosoma variation in recent years.

  19. The growth and development of Schistosoma mansoni in mice exposed to sublethal doses of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitken, R.; Wilson, R.A. (Univ. of York, Heslington (England))

    1989-12-01

    The maturation of Schistosoma mansoni was studied in mice exposed to various sublethal doses of radiation. Although the treatment of mice with 500 rads of radiation prior to infection did not alter parasite maturation, doses in excess of 500 rads led to a reduction in worm burden. This could not be attributed to a delay in the arrival of parasites in the hepatic portal system. Worms developing in mice treated with 800 rads commenced egg-laying about 1 wk later than worms in intact mice, and the rate of egg deposition appeared to be lower in irradiated hosts. The data demonstrate that exposure of C57BL/6 mice to doses of radiation in excess of 500 rads impairs their ability to carry infections of S. mansoni. The findings do not support the hypothesis that primary worm burdens in the mouse are controlled by a host immune response.

  20. Simultaneous genome-wide gene expression and transcript isoform profiling in the human malaria parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Lindsey B; Siwo, Geoffrey H; Button-Simons, Katrina A; Tan, Asako; Checkley, Lisa A; Painter, Heather J; Llinás, Manuel; Ferdig, Michael T

    2017-01-01

    Gene expression DNA microarrays have been vital for characterizing whole-genome transcriptional profiles. Nevertheless, their effectiveness relies heavily on the accuracy of genome sequences, the annotation of gene structures, and the sequence-dependent performance of individual probes. Currently available gene expression arrays for the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum rely on an average of 2 probes per gene, usually positioned near the 3' end of genes; consequently, existing designs are prone to measurement bias and cannot capture complexities such as the occurrence of transcript isoforms arising from alternative splicing or alternative start/ stop sites. Here, we describe two novel gene expression arrays with exon-focused probes designed with an average of 12 and 20 probes spanning each gene. This high probe density minimizes signal noise inherent in probe-to-probe sequence-dependent hybridization intensity. We demonstrate that these exon arrays accurately profile genome-wide expression, comparing favorably to currently available arrays and RNA-seq profiling, and can detect alternatively spliced transcript isoforms as well as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Of the 964 candidate alternate splicing events from published RNA-seq studies, 162 are confirmed using the exon array. Furthermore, the exon array predicted 330 previously unidentified alternate splicing events. Gene expression microarrays continue to offer a cost-effective alternative to RNA-seq for the simultaneous monitoring of gene expression and alternative splicing events. Microarrays may even be preferred in some cases due to their affordability and the rapid turn-around of results when hundreds of samples are required for fine-scale systems biology investigations, including the monitoring of the networks of gene co-expression in the emergence of drug resistance.

  1. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication in human monocyte-derived macrophages by parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Andreani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the major targets of HIV-1 infection and serve as reservoirs for viral persistence in vivo. These cells are also the target of the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, being one of the most important endemic protozoonoses in Latin America. It has been demonstrated in vitro that co-infection with other pathogens can modulate HIV replication. However, no studies at cellular level have suggested an interaction between T. cruzi and HIV-1 to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a fully replicative wild-type virus, our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 antigen production by nearly 100% (p99% being stronger than HIV-T. cruzi (approximately 90% for BaL and approximately 85% for VSV-G infection. In MDM with established HIV-1 infection, T. cruzi significantly inhibited luciferate activity (p<0.01. By quantifying R-U5 and U5-gag transcripts by real time PCR, our study showed the expression of both transcripts significantly diminished in the presence of trypomastigotes (p<0.05. Thus, T. cruzi inhibits viral post-integration steps, early post-entry steps and entry into MDM. Trypomastigotes also caused a approximately 60-70% decrease of surface CCR5 expression on MDM. Multiplication of T. cruzi inside the MDM does not seem to be required for inhibiting HIV-1 replication since soluble factors secreted by trypomastigotes have shown similar effects. Moreover, the major parasite antigen cruzipain, which is secreted by the trypomastigote form, was able to inhibit viral production in MDM over 90% (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 replication at several replication stages in macrophages, a major cell target for both pathogens.

  2. Boosting of DNA Vaccine-Elicited Gamma Interferon Responses in Humans by Exposure to Malaria Parasites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Ruobing; Richie, Thomas L; Baraceros, Maria F; Rahardjo, Nancy; Gay, Tanya; Banania, Jo-Glenna; Charoenvit, Yupin; Epstein, Judith E; Luke, Thomas; Freilich, Daniel A; Norman, Jon; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2004-01-01

    A mixture of DNA plasmids expressing five Plasmodium falciparum pre-erythrocyte-stage antigens was administered with or without a DNA plasmid encoding human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF...

  3. Schistosoma bovis: plasminogen binding in adults and the identification of plasminogen-binding proteins from the worm tegument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramajo-Hernández, Alicia; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Ramajo-Martín, Vicente; Oleaga, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Schistosoma bovis is a ruminant haematic parasite that lives for years in the mesenteric vessels of the host. The aim of this work was to investigate the ability of adult S. bovis worms to interact with plasminogen, a central component in the host fibrinolytic system. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed that plasminogen bound to the tegument surface of the male-but not female-S. bovis worms and that this binding was strongly dependent on lysine residues. It was also observed that a protein extract of the worm tegument (TG) had the capacity to generate plasmin and to enhance the plasmin generation by the tissue-type plasminogen activator. Proteomic analysis of the TG extract identified 10 plasminogen-binding proteins, among which the major ones were enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and actin. This study represents the first report about the binding of plasminogen to Schistosoma sp. proteins.

  4. Imatinib treatment causes substantial transcriptional changes in adult Schistosoma mansoni in vitro exhibiting pleiotropic effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Buro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosome parasites cause schistosomiasis, one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. For decades Praziquantel (PZQ is the only drug widely used for controlling schistosomiasis. The absence of a vaccine and fear of PZQ resistance have motivated the search for alternatives. Studies on protein kinases (PKs demonstrated their importance for diverse physiological processes in schistosomes. Among others two Abl tyrosine kinases, SmAbl1 and SmAbl2, were identified in Schistosoma mansoni and shown to be transcribed in the gonads and the gastrodermis. SmAbl1 activity was blocked by Imatinib, a known Abl-TK inhibitor used in human cancer therapy (Gleevec/Glivec. Imatinib exhibited dramatic effects on the morphology and physiology of adult schistosomes in vitro causing the death of the parasites.Here we show modeling data supporting the targeting of SmAbl1/2 by Imatinib. A biochemical assay confirmed that SmAbl2 activity is also inhibited by Imatinib. Microarray analyses and qRT-PCR experiments were done to unravel transcriptional processes influenced by Imatinib in adult schistosomes in vitro demonstrating a wide influence on worm physiology. Surface-, muscle-, gut and gonad-associated processes were affected as evidenced by the differential transcription of e.g. the gynecophoral canal protein gene GCP, paramyosin, titin, hemoglobinase, and cathepsins. Furthermore, transcript levels of VAL-7 and egg formation-associated genes such as tyrosinase 1, p14, and fs800-like were affected as well as those of signaling genes including a ribosomal protein S6 kinase and a glutamate receptor. Finally, a comparative in silico analysis of the obtained microarray data sets and previous data analyzing the effect of a TGFβR1 inhibitor on transcription provided first evidence for an association of TGFβ and Abl kinase signaling. Among others GCP and egg formation-associated genes were identified as common targets.The data affirm broad negative effects of

  5. A European network for food-borne parasites (Euro-FBP: meeting report on ‘Analytical methods for food-borne parasites in human and veterinary diagnostics and in food matrices’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Klotz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Food-borne parasites (FBPs are a neglected topic in food safety, partly due to a lack of awareness of their importance for public health, especially as symptoms tend not to develop immediately after exposure. In addition, methodological difficulties with both diagnosis in infected patients and detection in food matrices result in under-detection and therefore the potential for underestimation of their burden on our societies. This, in consequence, leads to lower prioritization for basic research, e.g. for development new and more advanced detection methods for different food matrices and diagnostic samples, and thus a vicious circle of neglect and lack of progress is propagated. The COST Action FA1408, A European Network for Foodborne Parasites (Euro-FBP aims to combat the impact of FBP on public health by facilitating the multidisciplinary cooperation and partnership between groups of researchers and between researchers and stakeholders. The COST Action TD1302, the European Network for cysticercosis/taeniosis, CYSTINET, has a specific focus on Taenia solium and T. saginata, two neglected FBPs, and aims to advance knowledge and understanding of these zoonotic disease complexes via collaborations in a multidisciplinary scientific network. This report summarizes the results of a meeting within the Euro-FBP consortium entitled ‘Analytical methods for food-borne parasites in human and veterinary diagnostics and in food matrices’ and of the joined Euro-FBP and CYSTINET meeting.

  6. Risk factors for gastrointestinal parasite infections of dogs living around protected areas of the Atlantic Forest: implications for human and wildlife health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. A. Curi

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the ubiquity of domestic dogs, their role as zoonotic reservoirs and the large number of studies concerning parasites in urban dogs, rural areas in Brazil, especially those at the wildlife-domestic animal-human interface, have received little attention from scientists and public health managers. This paper reports a cross-sectional epidemiological survey of gastrointestinal parasites of rural dogs living in farms around Atlantic Forest fragments. Through standard parasitological methods (flotation and sedimentation, 13 parasite taxa (11 helminths and two protozoans were found in feces samples from dogs. The most prevalent were the nematode Ancylostoma (47% followed by Toxocara (18% and Trichuris (8%. Other less prevalent (<2% parasites found were Capillaria, Ascaridia, Spirocerca, Taeniidae, Acantocephala, Ascaris, Dipylidium caninum, Toxascaris, and the protozoans Cystoisospora and Eimeria. Mixed infections were found in 36% of samples, mostly by Ancylostoma and Toxocara. Previous deworming had no association with infections, meaning that this preventive measure is being incorrectly performed by owners. Regarding risk factors, dogs younger than one year were more likely to be infected with Toxocara, and purebred dogs with Trichuris. The number of cats in the households was positively associated with Trichuris infection, while male dogs and low body scores were associated with mixed infections. The lack of associations with dog free-ranging behavior and access to forest or villages indicates that infections are mostly acquired around the households. The results highlight the risk of zoonotic and wildlife parasite infections from dogs and the need for monitoring and controlling parasites of domestic animals in human-wildlife interface areas.

  7. UVB-induced immune suppression and infection with Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, F.P.; Lewis, F.A. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). School of Medicine]|[Biomedical Research Inst., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Irradiation with ultraviolet B (UVB, 290-320 nm) causes a systematic immunosuppression of cell-mediated immunity. The question of whether UV immunosuppression modulates the course of infectious diseases is important because UVB levels in sunlight are sufficient to predict significant UV-induced immunosuppression at most latitudes. We have investigated the effect of immunosuppressive doses of UVB on the disease caused by the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated once or three times weekly over 60-80 days with UV from a bank of FS40 sunlamps. Each UV treatment consisted of an immunosuppressive UV dose, as determined by suppression of contact hypersensitivity to trinitrochlorobenzene, corresponding to about 15-30 min of noonday tropical sunlight exposure under ideal clear sky conditions. Cumulative UV doses were between 80 and 170 kJ/m{sup 2}. Worm and egg burdens, liver granuloma diameters and liver fibrosis showed minimal changes (< 20%) compared with parameters in unirradiated animals. Ultraviolet irradiation (a total of 55 kJ/m{sup 2} administered in six treatments) did not impair the resistance to rechallenge conferred by vaccination with {sup 60}Co-irradiated cercariae. We have observed a dichotomy between UV immnosuppression and both disease and vaccination in this helminth infection, in contrast to the effects of UVB shown in other infectious diseases. (author).

  8. Effects of praziquantel on experimental Schistosoma bovis infection in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, M V; Monrad, J; Christensen, N O

    1996-03-01

    The effect of praziquantel against experimental Schistosoma bovis infection in West African Dwarf goats was investigated. Thirty goats were exposed to 2000 cercariae each and 15 of those received a praziquantel treatment (60 mg kg-1) 13 weeks post-infection. One day, 1 week and 4 weeks post-treatment representative goats from each group were killed and worms were recovered by perfusion. For comparison, parasite-free control animals were monitored, some of which were given praziquantel. Every second week during the study, faecal samples were collected. The cure rate was 100% 1 day, 99.4% 1 week and 95.7% 4 weeks post-treatment. Tissue egg counts were significantly reduced (P < 0.001) 4 weeks post-treatment in all parts of the intestines, but not in the liver. Faecal egg counts were reduced by 84.1% 1 week and by 98.3% 3 weeks after treatment, the reduction being highly significant both 1 week 3 weeks after treatment (P < 0.001). Overall strong correlations between the number of worm pairs, tissue egg counts and the final faecal egg count were observed, indicating that the faecal egg counts during infection and following treatment can be used as a guideline for the pathology associated with the infection.

  9. Fish parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems......This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems...

  10. Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to live. You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not. Parasites range in size from tiny, one-celled organisms called protozoa to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. ...

  11. A case report of an uncommon parasitic infection of human balantidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manochitra; Rajkumari, Nonika; Mandal, Jharna; Parija, SC

    2016-01-01

    Balantidium coli, a large, ciliated pathogen, is known to cause balantidiasis in humans. We report a case of B. coli infection in a 37-year-old male with tuberculosis and presenting with fever, anorexia, mild abdominal pain, and episodes of loose stools for 1 week. PMID:26998438