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Sample records for human nonmuscle myosin

  1. Genes influenced by the non-muscle isoform of Myosin light chain kinase impact human cancer prognosis.

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    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available The multifunctional non-muscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK is critical to the rapid dynamic coordination of the cytoskeleton involved in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We identified 45 nmMLCK-influenced genes by bioinformatic filtering of genome-wide expression in wild type and nmMLCK knockout (KO mice exposed to preclinical models of murine acute inflammatory lung injury, pathologies that are well established to include nmMLCK as an essential participant. To determine whether these nmMLCK-influenced genes were relevant to human cancers, the 45 mouse genes were matched to 38 distinct human orthologs (M38 signature (GeneCards definition and underwent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in training and validation cohorts. These studies revealed that in training cohorts, the M38 signature successfully identified cancer patients with poor overall survival in breast cancer (P<0.001, colon cancer (P<0.001, glioma (P<0.001, and lung cancer (P<0.001. In validation cohorts, the M38 signature demonstrated significantly reduced overall survival for high-score patients of breast cancer (P = 0.002, colon cancer (P = 0.035, glioma (P = 0.023, and lung cancer (P = 0.023. The association between M38 risk score and overall survival was confirmed by univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis of overall survival in the both training and validation cohorts. This study, providing a novel prognostic cancer gene signature derived from a murine model of nmMLCK-associated lung inflammation, strongly supports nmMLCK-involved pathways in tumor growth and progression in human cancers and nmMLCK as an attractive candidate molecular target in both inflammatory and neoplastic processes.

  2. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

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    Venkaiah eBetapudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  3. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

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    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  4. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

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    Qiu Xinping

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic vesicle traffic within Drosophila larval neuromuscular boutons. Nonmuscle Myosin II was found to be localized at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction; genetics and pharmacology combined with the time-lapse imaging technique FRAP were used to reveal a contribution of Nonmuscle Myosin II to synaptic vesicle movement. FRAP analysis showed that vesicle dynamics were highly dependent on the expression level of Nonmuscle Myosin II. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that Nonmuscle Myosin II is present presynaptically, is important for synaptic vesicle mobility and suggests a role for Nonmuscle Myosin II in shuttling vesicles at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work begins to reveal the process by which synaptic vesicles traverse within the bouton.

  5. Subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP through Hsc70.

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    Hideshi Yagi

    Full Text Available The neuronal spine is a small, actin-rich dendritic or somatic protrusion that serves as the postsynaptic compartment of the excitatory synapse. The morphology of the spine reflects the activity of the synapse and is regulated by the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton inside, which is controlled by actin binding proteins such as non-muscle myosin. Previously, we demonstrated that the subcellular localization and function of myosin IIb are regulated by its binding partner, filamin-A interacting protein (FILIP. However, how the subcellular distribution of myosin IIb is controlled by FILIP is not yet known. The objective of this study was to identify potential binding partners of FILIP that contribute to its regulation of non-muscle myosin IIb. Pull-down assays detected a 70-kDa protein that was identified by mass spectrometry to be the chaperone protein Hsc70. The binding of Hsc70 to FILIP was controlled by the adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase activity of Hsc70. Further, FILIP bound to Hsc70 via a domain that was not required for binding non-muscle myosin IIb. Inhibition of ATPase activity of Hsc70 impaired the effect of FILIP on the subcellular distribution of non-muscle myosin IIb. Further, in primary cultured neurons, an inhibitor of Hsc70 impeded the morphological change in spines induced by FILIP. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Hsc70 interacts with FILIP to mediate its effects on non-muscle myosin IIb and to regulate spine morphology.

  6. Drosophila non-muscle myosin II motor activity determines the rate of tissue folding

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    Vasquez, Claudia G; Heissler, Sarah M; Billington, Neil; Sellers, James R; Martin, Adam C

    2016-01-01

    Non-muscle cell contractility is critical for tissues to adopt shape changes. Although, the non-muscle myosin II holoenzyme (myosin) is a molecular motor that powers contraction of actin cytoskeleton networks, recent studies have questioned the importance of myosin motor activity cell and tissue shape changes. Here, combining the biochemical analysis of enzymatic and motile properties for purified myosin mutants with in vivo measurements of apical constriction for the same mutants, we show that in vivo constriction rate scales with myosin motor activity. We show that so-called phosphomimetic mutants of the Drosophila regulatory light chain (RLC) do not mimic the phosphorylated RLC state in vitro. The defect in the myosin motor activity in these mutants is evident in developing Drosophila embryos where tissue recoil following laser ablation is decreased compared to wild-type tissue. Overall, our data highlights that myosin activity is required for rapid cell contraction and tissue folding in developing Drosophila embryos. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20828.001 PMID:28035903

  7. Non-muscle (NM) myosin heavy chain phosphorylation regulates the formation of NM myosin filaments, adhesome assembly and smooth muscle contraction.

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    Zhang, Wenwu; Gunst, Susan J

    2017-07-01

    Non-muscle (NM) and smooth muscle (SM) myosin II are both expressed in smooth muscle tissues, however the role of NM myosin in SM contraction is unknown. Contractile stimulation of tracheal smooth muscle tissues stimulates phosphorylation of the NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 and causes NM myosin filament assembly at the SM cell cortex. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable NM myosin mutant, NM myosin S1943A, in SM tissues inhibits ACh-induced NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction, and also inhibits the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes during contractile stimulation. NM myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) phosphorylation but not SM myosin RLC phosphorylation is regulated by RhoA GTPase during ACh stimulation, and NM RLC phosphorylation is required for NM myosin filament assembly and SM contraction. NM myosin II plays a critical role in airway SM contraction that is independent and distinct from the function of SM myosin. The molecular function of non-muscle (NM) isoforms of myosin II in smooth muscle (SM) tissues and their possible role in contraction are largely unknown. We evaluated the function of NM myosin during contractile stimulation of canine tracheal SM tissues. Stimulation with ACh caused NM myosin filament assembly, as assessed by a Triton solubility assay and a proximity ligation assay aiming to measure interactions between NM myosin monomers. ACh stimulated the phosphorylation of NM myosin heavy chain on Ser1943 in tracheal SM tissues, which can regulate NM myosin IIA filament assembly in vitro. Expression of the non-phosphorylatable mutant NM myosin S1943A in SM tissues inhibited ACh-induced endogenous NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation, NM myosin filament formation, the assembly of membrane adhesome complexes and tension development. The NM myosin cross-bridge cycling inhibitor blebbistatin suppressed adhesome complex assembly and SM contraction without inhibiting NM myosin Ser1943 phosphorylation or NM myosin filament assembly. Rho

  8. Block the function of nonmuscle myosin II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida.

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    Wang, Xueqian; Chong, Mei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Hongkui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Jingjing; Liu, Dong

    2015-03-01

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) is the name given to the multi-subunit protein product of three genes encoding different nonmuscle myosin heavy chains including NM II-A, NM II-B, and NM II-C. Blebbistatin is a small molecule that has been shown to be a relatively specific inhibitor of NM II. Blocking the function of NM II by blebbistatin induces zebrafish embryo cardia bifida at a dose-dependent manner. In situ hybridization analysis with ventricular marker ventricular myosin heavy chain (vmhc) and atrial marker atrial myosin heavy chain (amhc) showed each of the heart contained both distinct atria and ventricle. However, the cardia bifida embryos had highly variable distance between two separate ventricles. We also provided evidence that time window from 12 to 20 h post fertilization (hpf) is necessary and sufficient for cardia bifida formation caused by blebbistatin treatment. Expression of spinster homolog 2 (spns2) was decreased in blebbistatin-treated embryos, suggesting the cardia bifida phenotype caused by NM II inhibition was relevant to precardiac mesoderm migration defects. Through in situ hybridization analysis, we showed that foxa1 was expressed in endoderm of blebbistatin-treated embryos at 24-hpf stage, suggesting the endoderm formation is normal in cardia bifida embryos caused by blebbistatin treatment. In addition, we demonstrated that blebbistatin treatment resulted in morphology alteration of zebrafish cardiomyocytes in vivo and neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes in vitro.

  9. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

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    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  10. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

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    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S., E-mail: bcssj@iacs.res.in

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  11. Septin 7 reduces nonmuscle myosin IIA activity in the SNAP23 complex and hinders GLUT4 storage vesicle docking and fusion

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    Wasik, Anita A.; Dumont, Vincent [Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tienari, Jukka [Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, 00290 Helsinki, 05850 Hyvinkää (Finland); Nyman, Tuula A. [Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Fogarty, Christopher L.; Forsblom, Carol; Lehto, Markku [Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Abdominal Center Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, 000290 Helsinki (Finland); Diabetes& Obesity Research Program, Research Program´s Unit, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Lehtonen, Eero [Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Laboratory Animal Centre, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Groop, Per-Henrik [Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Abdominal Center Nephrology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, 000290 Helsinki (Finland); Diabetes& Obesity Research Program, Research Program´s Unit, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute, 3004 Melbourne (Australia); Lehtonen, Sanna, E-mail: sanna.h.lehtonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Pathology, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-01-15

    Glomerular epithelial cells, podocytes, are insulin responsive and can develop insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the small GTPase septin 7 forms a complex with nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC-IIA; encoded by MYH9), a component of the nonmuscle myosin IIA (NM-IIA) hexameric complex. We observed that knockdown of NMHC-IIA decreases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into podocytes. Both septin 7 and NM-IIA associate with SNAP23, a SNARE protein involved in GLUT4 storage vesicle (GSV) docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. We observed that insulin decreases the level of septin 7 and increases the activity of NM-IIA in the SNAP23 complex, as visualized by increased phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain. Also knockdown of septin 7 increases the activity of NM-IIA in the complex. The activity of NM-IIA is increased in diabetic rat glomeruli and cultured human podocytes exposed to macroalbuminuric sera from patients with type 1 diabetes. Collectively, the data suggest that the activity of NM-IIA in the SNAP23 complex plays a key role in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into podocytes. Furthermore, we observed that septin 7 reduces the activity of NM-IIA in the SNAP23 complex and thereby hinders GSV docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. - Highlights: • Septin 7, nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC-IIA) and SNAP23 form a complex. • Knockdown of septin 7 increases NM-IIA activity in the SNAP23 complex. • Insulin decreases septin 7 level and increases NM-IIA activity in the SNAP23 complex. • Septin 7 hinders GSV docking/fusion by reducing NM-IIA activity in the SNAP23 complex.

  12. Nonmuscle myosin II exerts tension but does not translocate actin in vertebrate cytokinesis.

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    Ma, Xuefei; Kovács, Mihály; Conti, Mary Anne; Wang, Aibing; Zhang, Yingfan; Sellers, James R; Adelstein, Robert S

    2012-03-20

    During vertebrate cytokinesis it is thought that contractile ring constriction is driven by nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) translocation of antiparallel actin filaments. Here we report in situ, in vitro, and in vivo observations that challenge this hypothesis. Graded knockdown of NM II in cultured COS-7 cells reveals that the amount of NM II limits ring constriction. Restoration of the constriction rate with motor-impaired NM II mutants shows that the ability of NM II to translocate actin is not required for cytokinesis. Blebbistatin inhibition of cytokinesis indicates the importance of myosin strongly binding to actin and exerting tension during cytokinesis. This role is substantiated by transient kinetic experiments showing that the load-dependent mechanochemical properties of mutant NM II support efficient tension maintenance despite the inability to translocate actin. Under loaded conditions, mutant NM II exhibits a prolonged actin attachment in which a single mechanoenzymatic cycle spans most of the time of cytokinesis. This prolonged attachment promotes simultaneous binding of NM II heads to actin, thereby increasing tension and resisting expansion of the ring. The detachment of mutant NM II heads from actin is enhanced by assisting loads, which prevent mutant NM II from hampering furrow ingression during cytokinesis. In the 3D context of mouse hearts, mutant NM II-B R709C that cannot translocate actin filaments can rescue multinucleation in NM II-B ablated cardiomyocytes. We propose that the major roles of NM II in vertebrate cell cytokinesis are to bind and cross-link actin filaments and to exert tension on actin during contractile ring constriction.

  13. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

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    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  14. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

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    Karen A. Newell-Litwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies.

  15. Cdc42 and formin activity control non-muscle myosin dynamics during Drosophila heart morphogenesis

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    Vogler, Georg; Liu, Jiandong; Iafe, Timothy W.; Migh, Ede; Mihály, József

    2014-01-01

    During heart formation, a network of transcription factors and signaling pathways guide cardiac cell fate and differentiation, but the genetic mechanisms orchestrating heart assembly and lumen formation remain unclear. Here, we show that the small GTPase Cdc42 is essential for Drosophila melanogaster heart morphogenesis and lumen formation. Cdc42 genetically interacts with the cardiogenic transcription factor tinman; with dDAAM which belongs to the family of actin organizing formins; and with zipper, which encodes nonmuscle myosin II. Zipper is required for heart lumen formation, and its spatiotemporal activity at the prospective luminal surface is controlled by Cdc42. Heart-specific expression of activated Cdc42, or the regulatory formins dDAAM and Diaphanous caused mislocalization of Zipper and induced ectopic heart lumina, as characterized by luminal markers such as the extracellular matrix protein Slit. Placement of Slit at the lumen surface depends on Cdc42 and formin function. Thus, Cdc42 and formins play pivotal roles in heart lumen formation through the spatiotemporal regulation of the actomyosin network. PMID:25267295

  16. Loss of Cell Adhesion Causes Hydrocephalus in Nonmuscle Myosin II-B–ablated and Mutated Mice

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    Bao, Jianjun; Adelstein, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Ablation of nonmuscle myosin (NM) II-B in mice during embryonic development leads to marked enlargement of the cerebral ventricles and destruction of brain tissue, due to hydrocephalus. We have identified a transient mesh-like structure present at the apical border of cells lining the spinal canal of mice during development. This structure, which only contains the II-B isoform of NM, also contains β-catenin and N-cadherin, consistent with a role in cell adhesion. Ablation of NM II-B or replacement of NM II-B with decreased amounts of a mutant (R709C), motor-impaired NM II-B in mice results in collapse of the mesh-like structure and loss of cell adhesion. This permits the underlying neuroepithelial cells to invade the spinal canal and obstruct cerebral spinal fluid flow. These defects in the CNS of NM II-B–ablated mice seem to be the cause of hydrocephalus. Interestingly, the mesh-like structure and patency of the spinal canal can be restored by increasing expression of the motor-impaired NM II-B, which also rescues hydrocephalus. However, the mutant isoform cannot completely rescue neuronal cell migration. These studies show that the scaffolding properties of NM II-B play an important role in cell adhesion, thereby preventing hydrocephalus during mouse brain development. PMID:17429076

  17. Non-muscle myosin II regulates neuronal actin dynamics by interacting with guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

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    Eun-Young Shin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-muscle myosin II (NM II regulates a wide range of cellular functions, including neuronal differentiation, which requires precise spatio-temporal activation of Rho GTPases. The molecular mechanism underlying the NM II-mediated activation of Rho GTPases is poorly understood. The present study explored the possibility that NM II regulates neuronal differentiation, particularly morphological changes in growth cones and the distal axon, through guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs of the Dbl family. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: NM II colocalized with GEFs, such as βPIX, kalirin and intersectin, in growth cones. Inactivation of NM II by blebbistatin (BBS led to the increased formation of short and thick filopodial actin structures at the periphery of growth cones. In line with these observations, FRET analysis revealed enhanced Cdc42 activity in BBS-treated growth cones. BBS treatment also induced aberrant targeting of various GEFs to the distal axon where GEFs were seldom observed under physiological conditions. As a result, numerous protrusions and branches were generated on the shaft of the distal axon. The disruption of the NM II-GEF interactions by overexpression of the DH domains of βPIX or Tiam1, or by βPIX depletion with specific siRNAs inhibited growth cone formation and induced slender axons concomitant with multiple branches in cultured hippocampal neurons. Finally, stimulation with nerve growth factor induced transient dissociation of the NM II-GEF complex, which was closely correlated with the kinetics of Cdc42 and Rac1 activation. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that NM II maintains proper morphology of neuronal growth cones and the distal axon by regulating actin dynamics through the GEF-Rho GTPase signaling pathway.

  18. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

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    Dayraud Cyrielle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb. Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa… and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2 has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular

  19. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective.

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    Dayraud, Cyrielle; Alié, Alexandre; Jager, Muriel; Chang, Patrick; Le Guyader, Hervé; Manuel, Michaël; Quéinnec, Eric

    2012-07-02

    Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII) is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa) and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb). Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa) has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa…) and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2) has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular expression of the other paralogue, PpiMHCIIb1, was

  20. Position of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) mutations predicts the natural history of MYH9-related disease

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    Pecci, A.; Panza, E.; Pujol-Moix, N.

    2008-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene for the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMHC-IIA). All patients present from birth with macrothrombocytopenia, but in infancy or adult life, some of them develop sensorineural deafness......, presenile cataracts, and/or progressive nephritis leading to end-stage renal failure. No consistent correlations have been identified between the 27 different MYH9 mutations identified so far and the variable clinical evolution of the disease. We have evaluated 108 consecutive MYH9-RD patients belonging...... or 1841 result in intermediate clinical pictures. These findings are relevant not only to patients' clinical management but also to the elucidation of the pathogenesis of the disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008/3...

  1. Expansion and concatenation of nonmuscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis

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    Fenix, Aidan M.; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A.; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, nonmuscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks), but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non–mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-Fs/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found that NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II–based contractile systems are assembled. PMID:26960797

  2. Expansion and concatenation of non-muscle myosin IIA filaments drive cellular contractile system formation during interphase and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenix, Aidan M; Taneja, Nilay; Buttler, Carmen A; Lewis, John; Van Engelenburg, Schuyler B; Ohi, Ryoma; Burnette, Dylan T

    2016-03-09

    Cell movement and cytokinesis are facilitated by contractile forces generated by the molecular motor, non-muscle myosin II (NMII). NMII molecules form a filament (NMII-F) through interactions of their C-terminal rod domains, positioning groups of N-terminal motor domains on opposite sides. The NMII motors then bind and pull actin filaments toward the NMII-F, thus driving contraction. Inside of crawling cells, NMIIA-Fs form large macromolecular ensembles (i.e., NMIIA-F stacks) but how this occurs is unknown. Here we show NMIIA-F stacks are formed through two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms: expansion and concatenation. During expansion, NMIIA molecules within the NMIIA-F spread out concurrent with addition of new NMIIA molecules. Concatenation occurs when multiple NMIIA-F/NMIIA-F stacks move together and align. We found NMIIA-F stack formation was regulated by both motor-activity and the availability of surrounding actin filaments. Furthermore, our data showed expansion and concatenation also formed the contractile ring in dividing cells. Thus, interphase and mitotic cells share similar mechanisms for creating large contractile units, and these are likely to underlie how other myosin II-based contractile systems are assembled. © 2016 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  3. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Hindman

    Full Text Available The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa, parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa. These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling.

  4. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindman, Bridget; Goeckeler, Zoe; Sierros, Kostas; Wysolmerski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM) in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa), parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa). These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling. PMID:26136073

  5. A non-enzymatic function of Golgi glycosyltransferases: mediation of Golgi fragmentation by interaction with non-muscle myosin IIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Armen; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2013-06-01

    The Golgi apparatus undergoes morphological changes under stress or malignant transformation, but the precise mechanisms are not known. We recently showed that non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) binds to the cytoplasmic tail of Core 2 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase mucus-type (C2GnT-M) and transports it to the endoplasmic reticulum for recycling. Here, we report that Golgi fragmentation induced by brefeldin A (BFA) or coatomer protein (β-COP) knockdown (KD) in Panc1-bC2GnT-M (c-Myc) cells is accompanied by the increased association of NMIIA with C2GnT-M and its degradation by proteasomes. Golgi fragmentation is prevented by inhibition or KD of NMIIA. Using multiple approaches, we have shown that the speed of BFA-induced Golgi fragmentation is positively correlated with the levels of this enzyme in the Golgi. The observation is reproduced in LNCaP cells which express high levels of two endogenous glycosyltransferases--C2GnT-L and β-galactoside α2,3 sialyltransferase 1. NMIIA is found to form complexes with these two enzymes but not Golgi matrix proteins. The KD of both enzymes or the prevention of Golgi glycosyltransferases from exiting endoplasmic reticulum reduced Golgi-associated NMIIA and decreased the BFA-induced fragmentation. Interestingly, the fragmented Golgi detected in colon cancer HT-29 cells can be restored to a compact morphology after inhibition or KD of NMIIA. The Golgi disorganization induced by the microtubule or actin destructive agent is NMIIA-independent and does not affect the levels of glycosyltransferases. We conclude that NMIIA interacts with Golgi residential but not matrix proteins, and this interaction is responsible for Golgi fragmentation induced by β-COP KD or BFA treatment. This is a novel non-enzymatic function of Golgi glycosyltransferases.

  6. A non-enzymatic function of Golgi glycosyltransferases: Mediation of Golgi fragmentation by interaction with non-muscle myosin IIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Armen; Cheng, Pi-Wan

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus undergoes morphological changes under stress or malignant transformation, but the precise mechanisms are not known. We recently showed that non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) binds to the cytoplasmic tail of Core 2 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase mucus-type (C2GnT-M) and transports it to the endoplasmic reticulum for recycling. Here, we report that Golgi fragmentation induced by brefeldin A (BFA) or coatomer protein (β-COP) knockdown (KD) in Panc1-bC2GnT-M (c-Myc) cells is accompanied by the increased association of NMIIA with C2GnT-M and its degradation by proteasomes. Golgi fragmentation is prevented by inhibition or KD of NMIIA. Using multiple approaches, we have shown that the speed of BFA-induced Golgi fragmentation is positively correlated with the levels of this enzyme in the Golgi. The observation is reproduced in LNCaP cells which express high levels of two endogenous glycosyltransferases—C2GnT-L and β-galactoside α2,3 sialyltransferase 1. NMIIA is found to form complexes with these two enzymes but not Golgi matrix proteins. The KD of both enzymes or the prevention of Golgi glycosyltransferases from exiting endoplasmic reticulum reduced Golgi-associated NMIIA and decreased the BFA-induced fragmentation. Interestingly, the fragmented Golgi detected in colon cancer HT-29 cells can be restored to a compact morphology after inhibition or KD of NMIIA. The Golgi disorganization induced by the microtubule or actin destructive agent is NMIIA-independent and does not affect the levels of glycosyltransferases. We conclude that NMIIA interacts with Golgi residential but not matrix proteins, and this interaction is responsible for Golgi fragmentation induced by β-COP KD or BFA treatment. This is a novel non-enzymatic function of Golgi glycosyltransferases. PMID:23396488

  7. Identification of an FHL1 protein complex containing gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB by analysis of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    Full Text Available FHL1 is multifunctional and serves as a modular protein binding interface to mediate protein-protein interactions. In skeletal muscle, FHL1 is involved in sarcomere assembly, differentiation, growth, and biomechanical stress. Muscle abnormalities may play a major role in congenital clubfoot (CCF deformity during fetal development. Thus, identifying the interactions of FHL1 could provide important new insights into its functional role in both skeletal muscle development and CCF pathogenesis. Using proteins derived from rat L6GNR4 myoblastocytes, we detected FHL1 interacting proteins by immunoprecipitation. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Dynamic gene expression of FHL1 was studied. Additionally, the expression of the possible interacting proteins gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB, which were isolated from the lower limbs of E14, E15, E17, E18, E20 rat embryos or from adult skeletal muscle was analyzed. Potential interacting proteins isolated from E17 lower limbs were verified by immunoprecipitation, and co-localization in adult gastrocnemius muscle was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. FHL1 expression was associated with skeletal muscle differentiation. E17 was found to be the critical time-point for skeletal muscle differentiation in the lower limbs of rat embryos. We also identified gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB as potential binding partners of FHL1, and both were expressed in adult skeletal muscle. We then demonstrated that FHL1 exists as part of a complex, which binds gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB.

  8. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  9. Metastasis-associated protein Mts1 (S100A4) inhibits CK2-mediated phosphorylation and self-assembly of the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriajevska, M; Bronstein, I B; Scott, D J

    2000-01-01

    of Mts1. The short C-terminal fragment of the myosin heavy chain was totally soluble in the presence of an equimolar amount of Mts1 at low ionic conditions (50 mM NaCl). Depolymerization was found to be calcium-dependent and could be blocked by EGTA. Our data suggest that Mts1 can increase myosin...... a regulatory role in the myosin assembly. In the presence of calcium, Mts1 binds at the C-terminal end of the myosin heavy chain close to the site of phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2 (Ser1944). In the present study, we have shown that interaction of Mts1 with the human platelet myosin or C......-terminal fragment of the myosin heavy chain inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin heavy chain by protein kinase CK2 in vitro. Mts1 might also bind directly the beta subunit of protein kinase CK2, thereby modifying the enzyme activity. Our results indicate that myosin oligomers were disassembled in the presence...

  10. Critical Role of Non-Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase in Thrombin-Induced Endothelial Cell Inflammation and Lung PMN Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Fabeha; Bijli, Kaiser M.; Murrill, Matthew; Leonard, Antony; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Anwar, Khandaker N.; Finkelstein, Jacob N.; Watterson, D. Martin; Rahman, Arshad

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) involves bidirectional cooperation and close interaction between inflammatory and coagulation pathways. A key molecule linking coagulation and inflammation is the procoagulant thrombin, a serine protease whose concentration is elevated in plasma and lavage fluids of patients with ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the mechanism by which thrombin contributes to lung inflammatory response. In this study, we developed a new mouse model that permits investigation of lung inflammation associated with intravascular coagulation. Using this mouse model and in vitro approaches, we addressed the role of non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) in thrombin-induced endothelial cell (EC) inflammation and lung neutrophil (PMN) infiltration. Our in vitro experiments revealed a key role of nmMLCK in ICAM-1 expression by its ability to control nuclear translocation and transcriptional capacity of RelA/p65 in EC. When subjected to intraperitoneal thrombin challenge, wild type mice showed a marked increase in lung PMN infiltration via expression of ICAM-1. However, these responses were markedly attenuated in mice deficient in nmMLCK. These results provide mechanistic insight into lung inflammatory response associated with intravascular coagulation and identify nmMLCK as a critical target for modulation of lung inflammation. PMID:23555849

  11. Collagen remodeling by phagocytosis is determined by collagen substrate topology and calcium-dependent interactions of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA in cell adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, P. D.; Wang, Y.; Bresnick, A.; Dawson, J.; Janmey, P. A.; McCulloch, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    We examine how collagen substrate topography, free intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i, and the association of gelsolin with nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMIIA) at collagen adhesions are regulated to enable collagen phagocytosis. Fibroblasts plated on planar, collagen-coated substrates show minimal increase of [Ca2+]i, minimal colocalization of gelsolin and NMMIIA in focal adhesions, and minimal intracellular collagen degradation. In fibroblasts plated on collagen-coated latex beads there are large increases of [Ca2+]i, time- and Ca2+-dependent enrichment of NMMIIA and gelsolin at collagen adhesions, and abundant intracellular collagen degradation. NMMIIA knockdown retards gelsolin recruitment to adhesions and blocks collagen phagocytosis. Gelsolin exhibits tight, Ca2+-dependent binding to full-length NMMIIA. Gelsolin domains G4–G6 selectively require Ca2+ to interact with NMMIIA, which is restricted to residues 1339–1899 of NMMIIA. We conclude that cell adhesion to collagen presented on beads activates Ca2+ entry and promotes the formation of phagosomes enriched with NMMIIA and gelsolin. The Ca2+ -dependent interaction of gelsolin and NMMIIA in turn enables actin remodeling and enhances collagen degradation by phagocytosis. PMID:23325791

  12. Myosin VIIA, important for human auditory function, is necessary for Drosophila auditory organ development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol V Todi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myosin VIIA (MyoVIIA is an unconventional myosin necessary for vertebrate audition [1]-[5]. Human auditory transduction occurs in sensory hair cells with a staircase-like arrangement of apical protrusions called stereocilia. In these hair cells, MyoVIIA maintains stereocilia organization [6]. Severe mutations in the Drosophila MyoVIIA orthologue, crinkled (ck, are semi-lethal [7] and lead to deafness by disrupting antennal auditory organ (Johnston's Organ, JO organization [8]. ck/MyoVIIA mutations result in apical detachment of auditory transduction units (scolopidia from the cuticle that transmits antennal vibrations as mechanical stimuli to JO. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using flies expressing GFP-tagged NompA, a protein required for auditory organ organization in Drosophila, we examined the role of ck/MyoVIIA in JO development and maintenance through confocal microscopy and extracellular electrophysiology. Here we show that ck/MyoVIIA is necessary early in the developing antenna for initial apical attachment of the scolopidia to the articulating joint. ck/MyoVIIA is also necessary to maintain scolopidial attachment throughout adulthood. Moreover, in the adult JO, ck/MyoVIIA genetically interacts with the non-muscle myosin II (through its regulatory light chain protein and the myosin binding subunit of myosin II phosphatase. Such genetic interactions have not previously been observed in scolopidia. These factors are therefore candidates for modulating MyoVIIA activity in vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that MyoVIIA plays evolutionarily conserved roles in auditory organ development and maintenance in invertebrates and vertebrates, enhancing our understanding of auditory organ development and function, as well as providing significant clues for future research.

  13. Polymorphisms in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain gene (MYH9 are associated with lower glomerular filtration rate in mixed ancestry diabetic subjects from South Africa.

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    Tandi Edith Matsha

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Though single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the non-muscle myosin gene (MYH9 have been reported to explain most of the excess risk of nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD, in African-Americans, some studies have also shown associations with diabetic end-stage renal disease. We investigated the association of MYH9 SNPs with renal traits in a mixed-ancestry South African population prone to diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Three SNPs known to be associated with CKD (rs4821480, rs5756152 and rs12107 were genotyped using Taqman assay in 716 adults (198 with diabetes from the Bellville-South community, Cape Town. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR assessed. Multivariable regressions were used to relate the SNPs with renal traits. RESULTS: Mean age was 53.6 years, with the expected differences observed in characteristics by diabetic status. Significant associations were found between rs575152 and serum creatinine, and eGFR in the total population, and in diabetic participants (all p≤0.003, but not in non-diabetics (all p≥0.16, with significant interactions by diabetes status (interaction-p≤0.009. The association with ACR was borderline in diabetic participants (p = 0.05 and non-significant in non-diabetics (p = 0.85, with significant interaction (interaction p = 0.02. rs12107 was associated with fasting-, 2-hour glucose and HbA1c in diabetic participants only (interaction-p≤0.003, but not with renal traits. CONCLUSION: MYH9 SNPs were associated with renal traits only in diabetic participants in this population. Our findings and other studies suggest that MYH9 may have a broader genetic risk effect on kidney diseases.

  14. A Role for Myosin Va in Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Adrian R; Sharma, Mayuri; Pesola, Jean M; Ericsson, Maria; Fernandez, Rosio; Coen, Donald M

    2018-03-15

    Herpesviruses replicate and package their genomes into capsids in replication compartments within the nuclear interior. Capsids then move to the inner nuclear membrane for envelopment and release into the cytoplasm in a process called nuclear egress. We previously found that nuclear F-actin is induced upon infection with the betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and is important for nuclear egress and capsid localization away from replication compartment-like inclusions toward the nuclear rim. Despite these and related findings, it has not been shown that any specific motor protein is involved in herpesvirus nuclear egress. In this study, we have investigated whether the host motor protein, myosin Va, could be fulfilling this role. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation, we observed associations between a nuclear population of myosin Va and the viral major capsid protein, with both concentrating at the periphery of replication compartments. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that nearly 40% of assembled nuclear capsids associate with myosin Va. We also found that myosin Va and major capsid protein colocalize with nuclear F-actin. Importantly, antagonism of myosin Va with RNA interference or a dominant negative mutant revealed that myosin Va is important for the efficient production of infectious virus, capsid accumulation in the cytoplasm, and capsid localization away from replication compartment-like inclusions toward the nuclear rim. Our results lead us to suggest a working model whereby human cytomegalovirus capsids associate with myosin Va for movement from replication compartments to the nuclear periphery during nuclear egress. IMPORTANCE Little is known regarding how newly assembled and packaged herpesvirus capsids move from the nuclear interior to the periphery during nuclear egress. While it has been proposed that an actomyosin-based mechanism facilitates intranuclear movement of alphaherpesvirus capsids, a functional role for

  15. Comparative Statistical Mechanics of Muscle and Non-Muscle Contractile Systems: Stationary States of Near-Equilibrium Systems in A Linear Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Lecarpentier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A. Huxley’s equations were used to determine the mechanical properties of muscle myosin II (MII at the molecular level, as well as the probability of the occurrence of the different stages in the actin–myosin cycle. It was then possible to use the formalism of statistical mechanics with the grand canonical ensemble to calculate numerous thermodynamic parameters such as entropy, internal energy, affinity, thermodynamic flow, thermodynamic force, and entropy production rate. This allows us to compare the thermodynamic parameters of a non-muscle contractile system, such as the normal human placenta, with those of different striated skeletal muscles (soleus and extensor digitalis longus as well as the heart muscle and smooth muscles (trachea and uterus in the rat. In the human placental tissues, it was observed that the kinetics of the actin–myosin crossbridges were considerably slow compared with those of smooth and striated muscular systems. The entropy production rate was also particularly low in the human placental tissues, as compared with that observed in smooth and striated muscular systems. This is partly due to the low thermodynamic flow found in the human placental tissues. However, the unitary force of non-muscle myosin (NMII generated by each crossbridge cycle in the myofibroblasts of the human placental tissues was similar in magnitude to that of MII in the myocytes of both smooth and striated muscle cells. Statistical mechanics represents a powerful tool for studying the thermodynamics of all contractile muscle and non-muscle systems.

  16. Myosin content of individual human muscle fibers isolated by laser capture microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles A; Stone, William L; Howell, Mary E A; Brannon, Marianne F; Hall, H Kenton; Gibson, Andrew L; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Muscle fiber composition correlates with insulin resistance, and exercise training can increase slow-twitch (type I) fibers and, thereby, mitigate diabetes risk. Human skeletal muscle is made up of three distinct fiber types, but muscle contains many more isoforms of myosin heavy and light chains, which are coded by 15 and 11 different genes, respectively. Laser capture microdissection techniques allow assessment of mRNA and protein content in individual fibers. We found that specific human fiber types contain different mixtures of myosin heavy and light chains. Fast-twitch (type IIx) fibers consistently contained myosin heavy chains 1, 2, and 4 and myosin light chain 1. Type I fibers always contained myosin heavy chains 6 and 7 (MYH6 and MYH7) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), whereas MYH6, MYH7, and MYL3 were nearly absent from type IIx fibers. In contrast to cardiomyocytes, where MYH6 (also known as α-myosin heavy chain) is seen solely in fast-twitch cells, only slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle contained MYH6. Classical fast myosin heavy chains (MHC1, MHC2, and MHC4) were present in variable proportions in all fiber types, but significant MYH6 and MYH7 expression indicated slow-twitch phenotype, and the absence of these two isoforms determined a fast-twitch phenotype. The mixed myosin heavy and light chain content of type IIa fibers was consistent with its role as a transition between fast and slow phenotypes. These new observations suggest that the presence or absence of MYH6 and MYH7 proteins dictates the slow- or fast-twitch phenotype in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Cloning of the genes encoding two murine and human cochlear unconventional type I myosins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crozet, F.; El Amraoui, Z.; Blanchard, S. [Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate a crucial role for unconventional myosins in the function of the sensory hair cells of the inner ear. We report here the characterization of the cDNAs encoding two unconventional type I myosins from a mouse cochlear cDNA library. The first cDNA encodes a putative protein named Myo1c, which is likely to be the murine orthologue of the bullfrog myosin I{beta} and which may be involved in the gating of the mechanotransduction channel of the sensory hair cells. This myosin belongs to the group of short-tailed myosins I, with its tail ending shortly after a polybasic, TH-1-like domain. The second cDNA encodes a novel type I myosin Myo1f which displays three regions: a head domain with the conserved ATP- and actin-binding sites, a neck domain with a single IQ motif, and a tail domain with the tripartite structure initially described in protozoan myosins I. The tail of Myo1f includes (1) a TH-1 region rich in basic residues, which may interact with anionic membrane phospholipids; (2) a TH-2 proline-rich region, expected to contain an ATP-insensitive actin-binding site; and (3) an SH-3 domain found in a variety of cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that the genes encoding Myo1c and Myo1f display a widespread tissue expression in the adult mouse. Myo1c and Myo1f were mapped by in situ hybridization to the chromosomal regions 11D-11E and 17B-17C, respectively. The human orthologuous genes MYO1C and MYO1F were also characterized, and mapped to the human chromosomal regions 17p13 and 19p13.2- 19p1.3.3, respectively. 45 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Multidimensional structure-function relationships in human β-cardiac myosin from population-scale genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homburger, J.R. (Julian R.); Green, E.M. (Eric M.); Caleshu, C. (Colleen); Sunitha, M.S. (Margaret S.); Taylor, R.E. (Rebecca E.); Ruppel, K.M. (Kathleen M.); Metpally, R.P.R. (Raghu Prasad Rao); S.D. Colan (Steven); M. Michels (Michelle); Day, S.M. (Sharlene M.); I. Olivotto (Iacopo); Bustamante, C.D. (Carlos D.); Dewey, F.E. (Frederick E.); Ho, C.Y. (Carolyn Y.); Spudich, J.A. (James A.); Ashley, E.A. (Euan A.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMyosin motors are the fundamental force-generating elements of muscle contraction. Variation in the human β-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heritable disease characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and sudden cardiac

  19. Multidimensional structure-function relationships in human β-cardiac myosin from population-scale genetic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homburger, Julian R.; Green, Eric M.; Caleshu, Colleen; Sunitha, Margaret S.; Taylor, Rebecca E.; Ruppel, Kathleen M.; Metpally, Raghu Prasad Rao; Colan, Steven D.; Michels, Michelle; Day, Sharlene M.; Olivotto, Iacopo; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Dewey, Frederick E.; Ho, Carolyn Y.; Spudich, James A.; Ashley, Euan A.

    2016-01-01

    Myosin motors are the fundamental force-generating elements of muscle contraction. Variation in the human β-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heritable disease characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. How specific myosin variants alter motor function or clinical expression of disease remains incompletely understood. Here, we combine structural models of myosin from multiple stages of its chemomechanical cycle, exome sequencing data from two population cohorts of 60,706 and 42,930 individuals, and genetic and phenotypic data from 2,913 patients with HCM to identify regions of disease enrichment within β-cardiac myosin. We first developed computational models of the human β-cardiac myosin protein before and after the myosin power stroke. Then, using a spatial scan statistic modified to analyze genetic variation in protein 3D space, we found significant enrichment of disease-associated variants in the converter, a kinetic domain that transduces force from the catalytic domain to the lever arm to accomplish the power stroke. Focusing our analysis on surface-exposed residues, we identified a larger region significantly enriched for disease-associated variants that contains both the converter domain and residues on a single flat surface on the myosin head described as the myosin mesa. Notably, patients with HCM with variants in the enriched regions have earlier disease onset than patients who have HCM with variants elsewhere. Our study provides a model for integrating protein structure, large-scale genetic sequencing, and detailed phenotypic data to reveal insight into time-shifted protein structures and genetic disease. PMID:27247418

  20. The characteristics of antibodies of mice immunized by human unconventional myosin 1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Myronovskij

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Specific antibodies produced against a protein of interest are invaluable tools for monitoring the protein structure, intracellular location and biological activity. Inoculation of murine lymphoma cells into the peritoneal cavity of immunized mice provides generation of ascitic fluid containing a significant amount of antibody with desired antigen specificity. Here we demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of murine lymphoma NK/Ly cells in mice immunized with 48 kDa isoform of human blood serum unconventional myosin 1c leads to generation of ascitic fluid that contained specific IgG-antibodies. These antibodies were capable of binding of the unconventional myosin 1c isolated from blood serum of patients with multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosis, and could be used for diagnostics of several autoimmune diseases, the multiple sclerosis in particular.

  1. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Genioglossus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Megan; Luo, Qingwei; Sokoloff, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The human tongue muscle genioglossus (GG) is active in speech, swallowing, respiration, and oral transport, behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue shapes and movement speeds. Studies demonstrate substantial diversity in patterns of human GG motor unit activation, but whether this is accompanied by complex expression of muscle…

  2. Pulsed actin-myosin network contractions drive apical constriction

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Adam C.; Kaschube, Matthias; Eric F Wieschaus

    2008-01-01

    Apical constriction facilitates epithelial sheet bending and invagination during morphogenesis1, 2. Apical constriction is conventionally thought to be driven by the continuous purse-string-like contraction of a circumferential actin and Non-Muscle Myosin-II (myosin) belt underlying adherens junctions3–7. However, it is unclear whether other force-generating mechanisms can drive this process. Here, we use real-time imaging and quantitative image analysis of Drosophila gastrulation to show tha...

  3. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

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    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  4. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy Reveals a Force-Velocity Curve from a Single Human Beta Cardiac Myosin Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    in thin filaments in the sarcomere, cycling between a strongly bound state (force producing state) and a weakly bound state (relaxed state). Huxley and Simmons have previously proposed that the transition from the strong to the weak interaction can be modulated by an external load, i.e., the transition......A muscle contracts rapidly under low load, but slowly under high load. This load-dependent muscle shortening has been described with a hyperbolic load-velocity curve. Its molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated, however. During muscle contraction, myosins in thick filaments interact with actin...... is slow under high load and fast under low load. We use a new, simple method we call "harmonic force spectroscopy" to extract a load-velocity relationship from a single human beta cardiac myosin II motor (S1). With a dual-beam optical trap, we hold an actin dumbbell over a single myosin molecule...

  5. Papaverine Prevents Vasospasm by Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Actin Polymerization in Human Saphenous Vein.

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    Kyle M Hocking

    Full Text Available Papaverine is used to prevent vasospasm in human saphenous veins (HSV during vein graft preparation prior to implantation as a bypass conduit. Papaverine is a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases, leading to increases in both intracellular cGMP and cAMP. We hypothesized that papaverine reduces force by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and increasing actin depolymerization via regulation of actin regulatory protein phosphorylation.HSV was equilibrated in a muscle bath, pre-treated with 1 mM papaverine followed by 5 μM norepinephrine, and force along with [Ca2+]i levels were concurrently measured. Filamentous actin (F-actin level was measured by an in vitro actin assay. Tissue was snap frozen to measure myosin light chain and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with papaverine completely inhibited norepinephrine-induced force generation, blocked increases in [Ca2+]i and led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Papaverine pre-treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of the heat shock-related protein 20 (HSPB6 and the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP, as well as decreased filamentous actin (F-actin levels suggesting depolymerization of actin.These results suggest that papaverine-induced force inhibition of HSV involves [Ca2+]i-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation-mediated actin depolymerization. Thus, papaverine induces sustained inhibition of contraction of HSV by the modulation of both myosin cross-bridge formation and actin cytoskeletal dynamics and is a pharmacological alternative to high pressure distention to prevent vasospasm.

  6. Phos-tag-based analysis of myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation in human uterine myocytes.

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    Hector N Aguilar

    Full Text Available The 'phosphate-binding tag' (phos-tag reagent enables separation of phospho-proteins during SDS-PAGE by impeding migration proportional to their phosphorylation stoichiometry. Western blotting can then be used to detect and quantify the bands corresponding to the phospho-states of a target protein. We present a method for quantification of data regarding phospho-states derived from phos-tag SDS-PAGE. The method incorporates corrections for lane-to-lane loading variability and for the effects of drug vehicles thus enabling the comparison of multiple treatments by using the untreated cellular set-point as a reference. This method is exemplified by quantifying the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC in cultured human uterine myocytes.We have evaluated and validated the concept that, when using an antibody (Ab against the total-protein, the sum of all phosphorylation states in a single lane represents a 'closed system' since all possible phospho-states and phosphoisotypes are detected. Using this approach, we demonstrate that oxytocin (OT and calpeptin (Calp induce RLC kinase (MLCK- and rho-kinase (ROK-dependent enhancements in phosphorylation of RLC at T18 and S19. Treatment of myocytes with a phorbol ester (PMA induced phosphorylation of S1-RLC, which caused a mobility shift in the phos-tag matrices distinct from phosphorylation at S19.We have presented a method for analysis of phospho-state data that facilitates quantitative comparison to a reference control without the use of a traditional 'loading' or 'reference' standard. This analysis is useful for assessing effects of putative agonists and antagonists where all phospho-states are represented in control and experimental samples. We also demonstrated that phosphorylation of RLC at S1 is inducible in intact uterine myocytes, though the signal in the resting samples was not sufficiently abundant to allow quantification by the approach used here.

  7. Dual role of myosin II during Drosophila imaginal disc metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaz, Silvia; Escudero, Luis M; Freeman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein non-muscle myosin II is a major driver of the movements that sculpt three-dimensional organs from two-dimensional epithelia. The machinery of morphogenesis is well established but the logic of its control remains unclear in complex organs. Here we use live imaging and ex vivo culture to report a dual role of myosin II in regulating the development of the Drosophila wing. First, myosin II drives the contraction of a ring of cells that surround the squamous peripodial epithelium, providing the force to fold the whole disc through about 90°. Second, myosin II is needed to allow the squamous cells to expand and then retract at the end of eversion. The combination of genetics and live imaging allows us to describe and understand the tissue dynamics, and the logic of force generation needed to transform a relatively simple imaginal disc into a more complex and three-dimensional adult wing.

  8. Interaction of c-Cbl with myosin IIA regulates Bleb associated macropinocytosis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiya Veettil, Mohanan; Sadagopan, Sathish; Kerur, Nagaraj; Chakraborty, Sayan; Chandran, Bala

    2010-12-23

    KSHV is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), an angioproliferative endothelial cell malignancy. Macropinocytosis is the predominant mode of in vitro entry of KSHV into its natural target cells, human dermal microvascular endothelial (HMVEC-d) cells. Although macropinocytosis is known to be a major route of entry for many viruses, the molecule(s) involved in the recruitment and integration of signaling early during macropinosome formation is less well studied. Here we demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor protein c-Cbl is required for KSHV induced membrane blebbing and macropinocytosis. KSHV induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl as early as 1 min post-infection and was recruited to the sites of bleb formation. Infection also led to an increase in the interaction of c-Cbl with PI3-K p85 in a time dependent manner. c-Cbl shRNA decreased the formation of KSHV induced membrane blebs and macropinocytosis as well as virus entry. Immunoprecipitation of c-Cbl followed by mass spectrometry identified the interaction of c-Cbl with a novel molecular partner, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (myosin IIA), in bleb associated macropinocytosis. Phosphorylated c-Cbl colocalized with phospho-myosin light chain II in the interior of blebs of infected cells and this interaction was abolished by c-Cbl shRNA. Studies with the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin demonstrated that myosin IIA is a biologically significant component of the c-Cbl signaling pathway and c-Cbl plays a new role in the recruitment of myosin IIA to the blebs during KSHV infection. Myosin II associates with actin in KSHV induced blebs and the absence of actin and myosin ubiquitination in c-Cbl ShRNA cells suggested that c-Cbl is also responsible for the ubiquitination of these proteins in the infected cells. This is the first study demonstrating the role of c-Cbl in viral entry as well as macropinocytosis, and provides the evidence that a signaling complex containing c

  9. Interaction of c-Cbl with myosin IIA regulates Bleb associated macropinocytosis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available KSHV is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, an angioproliferative endothelial cell malignancy. Macropinocytosis is the predominant mode of in vitro entry of KSHV into its natural target cells, human dermal microvascular endothelial (HMVEC-d cells. Although macropinocytosis is known to be a major route of entry for many viruses, the molecule(s involved in the recruitment and integration of signaling early during macropinosome formation is less well studied. Here we demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor protein c-Cbl is required for KSHV induced membrane blebbing and macropinocytosis. KSHV induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl as early as 1 min post-infection and was recruited to the sites of bleb formation. Infection also led to an increase in the interaction of c-Cbl with PI3-K p85 in a time dependent manner. c-Cbl shRNA decreased the formation of KSHV induced membrane blebs and macropinocytosis as well as virus entry. Immunoprecipitation of c-Cbl followed by mass spectrometry identified the interaction of c-Cbl with a novel molecular partner, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (myosin IIA, in bleb associated macropinocytosis. Phosphorylated c-Cbl colocalized with phospho-myosin light chain II in the interior of blebs of infected cells and this interaction was abolished by c-Cbl shRNA. Studies with the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin demonstrated that myosin IIA is a biologically significant component of the c-Cbl signaling pathway and c-Cbl plays a new role in the recruitment of myosin IIA to the blebs during KSHV infection. Myosin II associates with actin in KSHV induced blebs and the absence of actin and myosin ubiquitination in c-Cbl ShRNA cells suggested that c-Cbl is also responsible for the ubiquitination of these proteins in the infected cells. This is the first study demonstrating the role of c-Cbl in viral entry as well as macropinocytosis, and provides the evidence that a signaling complex

  10. Characteristics of myosin profile in human vastus lateralis muscle in relation to training background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadowska, B; Majerczak, J; Semik, D; Karasinski, J; Kolodziejski, L; Kilarski, W M; Duda, K; Zoladz, J A

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg) of different training background were investigated and classified into three groups according to their physical activity and sport discipline: untrained students (group A), national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B, 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training) and sprint-power athletes (group C, 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training). Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase and SDH activities, immunohistochemically for fast and slow myosin, and electrophoretically followed by Western immunoblotting for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. Significant differences (Pvolleyball, soccer and modern dance. Furthermore, the relative amount of the fastest MyHCIIX isoform in vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in the athletes from group C than in students (group A). We conclude that the myosin profile in the athletes belonging to group C was unfavourable for their sport disciplines. This could be the reason why those athletes did not reach international level despite of several years of training.

  11. Characteristics of myosin profile in human vastus lateralis muscle in relation to training background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Zoladz

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg of different training background were investigated and classified into three groups according to their physical activity and sport discipline: untrained students (group A, national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B, 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training and sprint-power athletes (group C, 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training. Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase and SDH activities, immunohistochemically for fast and slow myosin, and electrophoretically followed by Western immunoblotting for myosin heavy chain (MyHC composition. Significant differences (P<0.05 regarding composition of muscle fibre types and myosin heavy chains were found only between groups A (41.7+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 40.8+/-4.0% of MyHCIIA and 17.5+/-4.0% of MyHCIIX and B (64.3+/-0.8% of MyHCI, 34.0+/-1.4% of MyHCIIA and 1.7+/-1.4% of MyHCIIX and groups A and C (59.6+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 37.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIA and 3.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIX. Unexpectedly, endurance athletes (group B such as long-distance runners, cyclists and cross country skiers, did not differ from the athletes representing short term, high power output sports (group C such as ice hockey, karate, ski-jumping, volleyball, soccer and modern dance. Furthermore, the relative amount of the fastest MyHCIIX isoform in vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in the athletes from group C than in students (group A. We conclude that the myosin profile in the athletes belonging to group C was unfavourable for their sport disciplines. This could be the reason why those athletes did not reach international level despite of several years of training.

  12. [The effect of myosin from the human myocardium on quantitative T-lymphocyte values--active rosettes in patients with myocardial infarct and stenocardia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manev, V; Penkova, K; Ivanov, G; Ivanova, I; Grigorov, M; Nedialkova, V

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to study the influence of human myocardium myosin on the quantitative values of T-lymphocytes examined as active rosettes [correction of rosellae] in patients with ischemic heart disease. The study included 99 patients with ischemic heart disease, 49 of them with myocardial infarction and 50--with stenocardia. The controls were 61 clinically healthy donors. It was established that the active rosettes [correction of rosellae] in the patients with myocardial infarction were significantly less than in the controls (p less than 0.05). A significant inhibiting action of the human myocardium myosin on the active rosettes [correction of rosellae] was manifested (p less than 0.002). This action in the patients with stenocardia was less expressed (p less than 0.05). Myosin from a striated muscle did not exert an inhibiting action (p greater than 0.1). The results prove the participation of human myocardium myosin in the pathogenetic mechanism of T-lymphocytes suppression in patients with ischemic heart disease.

  13. Human Rab small GTPase- and class V myosin-mediated membrane tethering in a chemically defined reconstitution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshita, Motoki; Mima, Joji

    2017-11-10

    Membrane tethering is a fundamental process essential for the compartmental specificity of intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Rab-family small GTPases and specific sets of Rab-interacting effector proteins, including coiled-coil tethering proteins and multisubunit tethering complexes, are reported to be responsible for membrane tethering. However, whether and how these key components directly and specifically tether subcellular membranes remains enigmatic. Using chemically defined proteoliposomal systems reconstituted with purified human Rab proteins and synthetic liposomal membranes to study the molecular basis of membrane tethering, we established here that Rab-family GTPases have a highly conserved function to directly mediate membrane tethering, even in the absence of any types of Rab effectors such as the so-called tethering proteins. Moreover, we demonstrate that membrane tethering mediated by endosomal Rab11a is drastically and selectively stimulated by its cognate Rab effectors, class V myosins (Myo5A and Myo5B), in a GTP-dependent manner. Of note, Myo5A and Myo5B exclusively recognized and cooperated with the membrane-anchored form of their cognate Rab11a to support membrane tethering mediated by trans-Rab assemblies on opposing membranes. Our findings support the novel concept that Rab-family proteins provide a bona fide membrane tether to physically and specifically link two distinct lipid bilayers of subcellular membranes. They further indicate that Rab-interacting effector proteins, including class V myosins, can regulate these Rab-mediated membrane-tethering reactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  15. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley's mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm(2) (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm(2). Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer.

  16. Myosin Isoforms and Contractile Properties of Single Fibers of Human Latissimus Dorsi Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paoli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to investigate fiber type distribution and contractile characteristics of Latissimus Dorsi muscle (LDM. Samples were collected from 18 young healthy subjects (9 males and 9 females through percutaneous fine needle muscle biopsy. The results showed a predominance of fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC with 42% of MyHC 2A and 25% of MyHC 2X, while MyHC 1 represented only 33%. The unbalance toward fast isoforms was even greater in males (71% than in females (64%. Fiber type distribution partially reflected MyHC isoform distribution with 28% type 1/slow fibers and 5% hybrid 1/2A fibers, while fast fibers were divided into 30% type 2A, 31% type A/X, 4% type X, and 2% type 1/2X. Type 1/slow fibers were not only less abundant but also smaller in cross-sectional area than fast fibers. During maximal isometric contraction, type 1/slow fibers developed force and tension significantly lower than the two major groups of fast fibers. In conclusion, the predominance of fast fibers and their greater size and strength compared to slow fibers reveal that LDM is a muscle specialized mainly in phasic and powerful activity. Importantly, such specialization is more pronounced in males than in females.

  17. UNC-45a promotes myosin folding and stress fiber assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtimäki, Jaakko I; Fenix, Aidan M; Kotila, Tommi M; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Paavolainen, Lassi; Varjosalo, Markku; Burnette, Dylan T; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2017-12-04

    Contractile actomyosin bundles, stress fibers, are crucial for adhesion, morphogenesis, and mechanosensing in nonmuscle cells. However, the mechanisms by which nonmuscle myosin II (NM-II) is recruited to those structures and assembled into functional bipolar filaments have remained elusive. We report that UNC-45a is a dynamic component of actin stress fibers and functions as a myosin chaperone in vivo. UNC-45a knockout cells display severe defects in stress fiber assembly and consequent abnormalities in cell morphogenesis, polarity, and migration. Experiments combining structured-illumination microscopy, gradient centrifugation, and proteasome inhibition approaches revealed that a large fraction of NM-II and myosin-1c molecules fail to fold in the absence of UNC-45a. The remaining properly folded NM-II molecules display defects in forming functional bipolar filaments. The C-terminal UNC-45/Cro1/She4p domain of UNC-45a is critical for NM-II folding, whereas the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat domain contributes to the assembly of functional stress fibers. Thus, UNC-45a promotes generation of contractile actomyosin bundles through synchronized NM-II folding and filament-assembly activities. © 2017 Lehtimäki et al.

  18. A small part of myosin IIB takes on a big role in cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenix, Aidan M; Burnette, Dylan T

    2015-04-13

    A migrating cell must establish front-to-back polarity in order to move. In this issue, Juanes-Garcia et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201407059) report that a short serine-rich motif in nonmuscle myosin IIB is required to establish the cell's rear. This motif represents a new paradigm for what determines directional cell migration. © 2015 Fenix and Burnette.

  19. A small part of myosin IIB takes on a big role in cell polarity

    OpenAIRE

    Fenix, Aidan M.; Dylan T. Burnette

    2015-01-01

    A migrating cell must establish front-to-back polarity in order to move. In this issue, Juanes-Garcia et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201407059) report that a short serine-rich motif in nonmuscle myosin IIB is required to establish the cell’s rear. This motif represents a new paradigm for what determines directional cell migration.

  20. A triple stranded G-quadruplex formation in the promoter region of human myosin β(Myh7) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anju; Kukreti, Shrikant

    2017-09-19

    Regulatory regions in human genome, enriched in guanine-rich DNA sequences have the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex structures. On exploring the genome for search of G-tracts, it was interesting to find that promoter of Human Myosin Gene (MYH7) contains a conserved 23-mer G-rich sequence (HM-23). Mutations in this gene are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Enrichment of MYH7 gene in G-rich sequences could possibly play a critical role in its regulation. We used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), UV-Thermal denaturation (UV-Tm) and Circular Dichroism (CD), to demonstrate the formation of a G-quadruplex by 23-mer G-rich sequence HM23 in promoter location of MYH7 gene. We observed that the wild G-rich sequence HM23 containing consecutive G5 stretch in two stacks adopt G-quadruplexes of diverse molecularity by involvement of four-strand, three-strand and two-strands with same parallel topology. Interestingly, the mutated sequence in the absence of continuous G5 stretch obstructs the formation of three-stranded G-quadruplex. We demonstrated that continuous G5 stretch is mandatory for the formation of a unique three-stranded G-quadruplex. Presence of various transcription factors (TF) in vicinity of the sequence HM23 leave fair possibility of recognition by TF binding sites, and so modulate gene expression. These findings may add on our understanding about the effect of base change in the formation of varied structural species in similar solution condition. This study may give insight about structural polymorphism arising due to recognition of non-Watson-Crick G-quadruplex structures by cellular proteins and designing structure specific molecules.

  1. Functions of myosin motors tailored for parasitism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Christina; Graindorge, Arnault; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Myosin motors are one of the largest protein families in eukaryotes that exhibit divergent cellular functions. Their roles in protozoans, a diverse group of anciently diverged, single celled organisms with many prominent members known to be parasitic and to cause diseases in human and livestock......, are largely unknown. In the recent years many different approaches, among them whole genome sequencing, phylogenetic analyses and functional studies have increased our understanding on the distribution, protein architecture and function of unconventional myosin motors in protozoan parasites. In Apicomplexa......, myosins turn out to be highly specialized and to exhibit unique functions tailored to accommodate the lifestyle of these parasites....

  2. Blebbistatin, a myosin inhibitor, is phototoxic to human cancer cells under exposure to blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulich, Aliaksandr; Kavaliauskiene, Simona; Juzenas, Petras

    2012-07-01

    Blebbistatin is a new inhibitor of cell motility. It is used to study dynamics of cytokinesis machinery in cells. However, the potential of this inhibitor as an anticancer agent has not been studied so far. Cytotoxicity of blebbistatin was evaluated in five human cell lines, FEMX-I melanoma, U87 glioma, androgen independent Du145 and androgen sensitive LNCaP prostate adenocarcinoma, and F11-hTERT immortalized fibroblasts. Phototoxicity of blebbistatin was assessed in these cell lines after their exposure to a blue light (390-470 nm). Photostability of blebbistatin and its reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating properties were measured during irradiation with the blue light. Blebbistatin at a concentration range of 10-200 μmol/L was toxic to all studied cells. Toxic concentrations (TC) were about 10-25 μmol/L corresponding to TC10, 50-100 μmol/L to TC50 and 140-190 μmol/L to TC90. Only for the U87 glioma cells TC90 could not be measured as the highest studied concentration of 200 μmol/L gave around 70% toxicity. However, after exposure to the blue light blebbistatin exhibited phototoxicity on the cells, with a cytotoxicity enhancement ratio that was greatest for the FEMX-I cells (about 9) followed by LNCaP (5), Du145 (3), U87 (2) and F11-hTERT (1.7) cells. Blebbistatin inhibits cell motility and viability. Under exposure to the blue light blebbistatin exhibits photodynamic action on human cancer cells. During the irradiation blebbistatin oxidizes dihydrorhodamine 123 but not Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green. Our findings offer new possibilities for blebbistatin as a potential anticancer and photodynamic agent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cargo binding activates myosin VIIA motor function in cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2011-01-01

    Myosin VIIA, thought to be involved in human auditory function, is a gene responsible for human Usher syndrome type 1B, which causes hearing and visual loss. Recent studies have suggested that it can move processively if it forms a dimer. Nevertheless, it exists as a monomer in vitro, unlike the well-known two-headed processive myosin Va. Here we studied the molecular mechanism, which is currently unknown, of activating myosin VIIA as a cargo-transporting motor. Human myosin VIIA was present ...

  4. Cargo binding activates myosin VIIA motor function in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2011-04-26

    Myosin VIIA, thought to be involved in human auditory function, is a gene responsible for human Usher syndrome type 1B, which causes hearing and visual loss. Recent studies have suggested that it can move processively if it forms a dimer. Nevertheless, it exists as a monomer in vitro, unlike the well-known two-headed processive myosin Va. Here we studied the molecular mechanism, which is currently unknown, of activating myosin VIIA as a cargo-transporting motor. Human myosin VIIA was present throughout cytosol, but it moved to the tip of filopodia upon the formation of dimer induced by dimer-inducing reagent. The forced dimer of myosin VIIA translocated its cargo molecule, MyRip, to the tip of filopodia, whereas myosin VIIA without the forced dimer-forming module does not translocate to the filopodial tips. These results suggest that dimer formation of myosin VIIA is important for its cargo-transporting activity. On the other hand, myosin VIIA without the forced dimerization module became translocated to the filopodial tips in the presence of cargo complex, i.e., MyRip/Rab27a, and transported its cargo complex to the tip. Coexpression of MyRip promoted the association of myosin VIIA to vesicles and the dimer formation. These results suggest that association of myosin VIIA monomers with membrane via the MyRip/Rab27a complex facilitates the cargo-transporting activity of myosin VIIA, which is achieved by cluster formation on the membrane, where it possibly forms a dimer. Present findings support that MyRip, a cargo molecule, functions as an activator of myosin VIIA transporter function.

  5. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: ats-kawaguchi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-02-15

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.

  6. Myocardial infarction-induced N-terminal fragment of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) impairs myofilament function in human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witayavanitkul, Namthip; Ait Mou, Younss; Kuster, Diederik W D; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Sarkey, Jason; Govindan, Suresh; Chen, Xin; Ge, Ying; Rajan, Sudarsan; Wieczorek, David F; Irving, Thomas; Westfall, Margaret V; de Tombe, Pieter P; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2014-03-28

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with depressed cardiac contractile function and progression to heart failure. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C, a cardiac-specific myofilament protein, is proteolyzed post-MI in humans, which results in an N-terminal fragment, C0-C1f. The presence of C0-C1f in cultured cardiomyocytes results in decreased Ca(2+) transients and cell shortening, abnormalities sufficient for the induction of heart failure in a mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigate the association between C0-C1f and altered contractility in human cardiac myofilaments in vitro. To accomplish this, we generated recombinant human C0-C1f (hC0C1f) and incorporated it into permeabilized human left ventricular myocardium. Mechanical properties were studied at short (2 μm) and long (2.3 μm) sarcomere length (SL). Our data demonstrate that the presence of hC0C1f in the sarcomere had the greatest effect at short, but not long, SL, decreasing maximal force and myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity. Moreover, hC0C1f led to increased cooperative activation, cross-bridge cycling kinetics, and tension cost, with greater effects at short SL. We further established that the effects of hC0C1f occur through direct interaction with actin and α-tropomyosin. Our data demonstrate that the presence of hC0C1f in the sarcomere is sufficient to induce depressed myofilament function and Ca(2+) sensitivity in otherwise healthy human donor myocardium. Decreased cardiac function post-MI may result, in part, from the ability of hC0C1f to bind actin and α-tropomyosin, suggesting that cleaved C0-C1f could act as a poison polypeptide and disrupt the interaction of native cardiac myosin-binding protein C with the thin filament.

  7. Myosins, Actin and Autophagy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kruppa, Antonina J; Kendrick‐Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-01-01

    .... In this review, we will discuss the importance of actin filament dynamics for autophagy progression and highlight the distinct requirement for three classes of myosins during different stages of the autophagy pathway...

  8. Spatial distribution of "tissue-specific" antigens in the developing human heart and skeletal muscle. II. An immunohistochemical analysis of myosin heavy chain isoform expression patterns in the embryonic heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, A.; Vermeulen, J. L.; Virágh, S.; Kálmán, F.; Lamers, W. H.; Moorman, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    The spatial distribution of alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain isoforms (MHCs) was investigated immunohistochemically in the embryonic human heart between the 4th and the 8th week of development. The development of the overall MHC isoform expression pattern can be outlined as follows: (1) In all

  9. The familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated myosin mutation R403Q accelerates tension generation and relaxation of human cardiac myofibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belus, Alexandra; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Scellini, Beatrice; Tesi, Chiara; D'Amati, Giulia; Girolami, Francesca; Yacoub, Magdi; Cecchi, Franco; Olivotto, Iacopo; Poggesi, Corrado

    2008-08-01

    The R403Q mutation in beta-myosin heavy chain was the first mutation to be identified as responsible for familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). In spite of extensive work on the functional sequelae of this mutation, the mechanism by which the mutant protein causes the disease has not been definitely identified. Here we directly compare contraction and relaxation mechanics of single myofibrils from left ventricular samples of one patient carrying the R403Q mutation to those from a healthy control heart. Tension generation and relaxation following sudden increase and decrease in [Ca(2+)] were much faster in the R403Q myofibrils with relaxation rates being the most affected parameters. The results show that the R403Q mutation leads to an apparent gain of protein function but a greater energetic cost of tension generation. Increased energy cost of tension generation may be central to the FHC disease process, help explain some unresolved clinical observations, and carry significant therapeutic implications.

  10. Identification of CD245 as myosin 18A, a receptor for surfactant A: A novel pathway for activating human NK lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masson, A; Giustiniani, J; Marie-Cardine, A; Bouaziz, J D; Dulphy, N; Gossot, D; Validire, P; Tazi, A; Garbar, C; Bagot, M; Merrouche, Y; Bensussan, A

    2016-05-01

    CD245 is a human surface antigen expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes, initially delineated by two monoclonal antibodies DY12 and DY35. Until now, CD245 molecular and functional characteristics remained largely unknown. We combined immunological and proteomic approaches and identified CD245 as the unconventional myosin 18A, a highly conserved motor enzyme reported as a receptor for the surfactant protein A (SP-A), that plays a critical role in cytoskeleton organization and Golgi budding. We report that the recruitment of CD245 strongly enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity. Further, we show that the enhancement of the NK lymphocytes killing ability toward CD137-ligand expressing target cells could result from the induction of CD137 expression following CD245 engagement. The SP-A receptor could therefore represent a novel and promising target in cancer immunotherapy.

  11. TRPM7 regulates myosin IIA filament stability and protein localization by heavy chain phosphorylation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clark, K.; Middelbeek, J.; Lasonder, E.; Dulyaninova, N.G.; Morrice, N.A.; Ryazanov, A.G.; Bresnick, A.R.; Figdor, C.G.; Leeuwen, F.N. van

    2008-01-01

    Deregulation of myosin II-based contractility contributes to the pathogenesis of human diseases, such as cancer, which underscores the necessity for tight spatial and temporal control of myosin II activity. Recently, we demonstrated that activation of the mammalian alpha-kinase TRPM7 inhibits myosin

  12. Organization and polarity of actin filament networks in cells: implications for the mechanism of myosin-based cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, L P

    1999-01-01

    Force arising from myosin activity drives a number of different types of motility in eukaryotic cells. Outside of muscle tissue, the precise mechanism of myosin-based cell motility is for the most part theoretical. A large part of the problem is that, aside from cell surface features such as lamellipodia and microvilli, relatively little is known about the structural organization of potential actin substrates for myosin in non-muscle motile cells. Several groups [Cramer, Siebert and Mitchison (1997) J. Cell Biol. 136, 1287-1305; Guild, Connelly, Shaw and Tilney (1997) J. Cell Biol. 138, 783-797; Svitkina, Verkhovsky, McQuade and Borisy (1997) J. Cell Biol. 139, 397-415] have begun to address this issue by determining actin organization throughout entire non-muscle motile cells. These studies reveal that a single motile cell comprises up to four distinct structural groups of actin organization, distinguished by differences in actin filament polarity: alternating, uniform, mixed or graded. The relative abundance and spatial location in cells of a particular actin organization varies with cell type. The existence in non-muscle motile cells of alternating-polarity actin filament bundles, the organization of muscle sarcomeres, provides direct structural evidence that some forms of motility in non-muscle cells are based on sarcomeric contraction, a recurring theory in the literature since the early days of muscle research. In this scenario, as in muscle sarcomeres, myosin generates isometric force, which is ideally suited to driving symmetrical types of motility, e.g. healing of circular wounds in coherent groups of cells. In contrast, uniform-polarity actin filament bundles and oriented meshworks in cells allow oriented movement of myosin, potentially over relatively long distances. In this simple 'transport-based' scenario, the direction in which myosin generates force is inherently polarized, and is well placed for driving asymmetrical or polarized types of motility

  13. Pulsed contractions of an actin-myosin network drive apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam C; Kaschube, Matthias; Wieschaus, Eric F

    2009-01-22

    Apical constriction facilitates epithelial sheet bending and invagination during morphogenesis. Apical constriction is conventionally thought to be driven by the continuous purse-string-like contraction of a circumferential actin and non-muscle myosin-II (myosin) belt underlying adherens junctions. However, it is unclear whether other force-generating mechanisms can drive this process. Here we show, with the use of real-time imaging and quantitative image analysis of Drosophila gastrulation, that the apical constriction of ventral furrow cells is pulsed. Repeated constrictions, which are asynchronous between neighbouring cells, are interrupted by pauses in which the constricted state of the cell apex is maintained. In contrast to the purse-string model, constriction pulses are powered by actin-myosin network contractions that occur at the medial apical cortex and pull discrete adherens junction sites inwards. The transcription factors Twist and Snail differentially regulate pulsed constriction. Expression of snail initiates actin-myosin network contractions, whereas expression of twist stabilizes the constricted state of the cell apex. Our results suggest a new model for apical constriction in which a cortical actin-myosin cytoskeleton functions as a developmentally controlled subcellular ratchet to reduce apical area incrementally.

  14. Active surveillance for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makito Miyake

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is known to be a heterogeneous malignancy that requires varying treatment modalities and follow-up schedules. Low-grade Ta papillary tumors are categorized as low-risk NMIBC because of their favorable prognosis. There is an expanding movement that overdiagnosis and overtreatment should be avoided considering the economic impact and the patients’ quality of life. It has been over 10 years since the initial assessment of active surveillance for low-risk NMIBC suggested its feasibility and safety. However, urologists are still unfamiliar with this treatment option, which can be ideal in appropriately selected patients. In this review article, we focus on active surveillance for low-risk NMIBC and discuss the evidence and rationale for this treatment option. There are several issues to resolve in order to advocate active surveillance as a standard option in selected patients. A specific follow-up protocol including intervals of cystoscopy, urine cytology, urine markers, and other radiographic examinations need to be optimized and validated. Finally, we integrate the available data into the follow-up strategy and propose a new surveillance protocol for active surveillance of recurrent low-risk bladder cancer.

  15. At the Start of the Sarcomere: A Previously Unrecognized Role for Myosin Chaperones and Associated Proteins during Early Myofibrillogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Layne Myhre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of striated muscle in vertebrates requires the assembly of contractile myofibrils, consisting of highly ordered bundles of protein filaments. Myofibril formation occurs by the stepwise addition of complex proteins, a process that is mediated by a variety of molecular chaperones and quality control factors. Most notably, myosin of the thick filament requires specialized chaperone activity during late myofibrillogenesis, including that of Hsp90 and its cofactor, Unc45b. Unc45b has been proposed to act exclusively as an adaptor molecule, stabilizing interactions between Hsp90 and myosin; however, recent discoveries in zebrafish and C. elegans suggest the possibility of an earlier role for Unc45b during myofibrillogenesis. This role may involve functional control of nonmuscle myosins during the earliest stages of myogenesis, when premyofibril scaffolds are first formed from dynamic cytoskeletal actin. This paper will outline several lines of evidence that converge to build a model for Unc45b activity during early myofibrillogenesis.

  16. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  17. Regulation of class V myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Yao, Lin-Lin; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2018-01-01

    Class V myosin (myosin-5) is a molecular motor that functions as an organelle transporter. The activation of myosin-5's motor function has long been known to be associated with a transition from the folded conformation in the off-state to the extended conformation in the on-state, but only recently have we begun to understand the underlying mechanism. The globular tail domain (GTD) of myosin-5 has been identified as the inhibitory domain and has recently been shown to function as a dimer in regulating the motor function. The folded off-state of myosin-5 is stabilized by multiple intramolecular interactions, including head-GTD interactions, GTD-GTD interactions, and interactions between the GTD and the C-terminus of the first coiled-coil segment. Any cellular factor that affects these intramolecular interactions and thus the stability of the folded conformation of myosin-5 would be expected to regulate myosin-5 motor function. Both the adaptor proteins of myosin-5 and Ca2+ are potential regulators of myosin-5 motor function, because they can destabilize its folded conformation. A combination of these regulators provides a versatile scheme in regulating myosin-5 motor function in the cell.

  18. Myosin VI and Associated Proteins Are Expressed in Human Macrophages but Do Not Play a Role in Foam Cell Formation in THP-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley J. Dawson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin VI (Myo6 functions in endocytosis in conjunction with binding partners including adaptor protein (AP-2, disabled 2 (Dab2, and GAIP interacting protein C terminus 1 (GIPC1. This study aimed to investigate the expression and function of Myo6 in macrophages and its possible role in the endocytosis of lipoproteins during the induction of foam cell formation. Expression of Myo6, AP-2 (α2 subunit, and Dab2 in THP-1 macrophages and primary human monocyte-derived macrophages was demonstrated at the mRNA and protein level, but GIPC1 was only detected at the mRNA level. Immunofluorescence showed that Myo6 was distributed similarly to F-actin in both macrophage types. AP-2α2 was found to have a similar subcellular distribution to Myo6 and Dab2 in THP-1 cells. Myo6 was located within membrane ruffles and protrusions of the plasma membrane. These results suggest that in macrophages Myo6 is required for several functions including cell adhesion, cell progression, and macropinocytosis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL and oxidised LDL (oxLDL decreased Myo6 and GIPC1 mRNA expression in THP-1 cells, but uptake of the fluorescence-labelled lipoproteins was unaffected by knockdown of the expression of Myo6 or associated proteins with siRNA. Our findings, therefore, do not support the idea that Myo6 plays a major role in foam cell formation.

  19. Cortical mechanics and myosin-II abnormalities associated with post-ovulatory aging: implications for functional defects in aged eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Amelia C.L.; Kyle, Diane D.; McGinnis, Lauren A.; Lee, Hyo J.; Aldana, Nathalia; Robinson, Douglas N.; Evans, Janice P.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY HYPOTHESIS Cellular aging of the egg following ovulation, also known as post-ovulatory aging, is associated with aberrant cortical mechanics and actomyosin cytoskeleton functions. STUDY FINDING Post-ovulatory aging is associated with dysfunction of non-muscle myosin-II, and pharmacologically induced myosin-II dysfunction produces some of the same deficiencies observed in aged eggs. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Reproductive success is reduced with delayed fertilization and when copulation or insemination occurs at increased times after ovulation. Post-ovulatory aged eggs have several abnormalities in the plasma membrane and cortex, including reduced egg membrane receptivity to sperm, aberrant sperm-induced cortical remodeling and formation of fertilization cones at the site of sperm entry, and reduced ability to establish a membrane block to prevent polyspermic fertilization. STUDY DESIGN, SAMPLES/MATERIALS, METHODS Ovulated mouse eggs were collected at 21–22 h post-human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) (aged eggs) or at 13–14 h post-hCG (young eggs), or young eggs were treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, to test the hypothesis that disruption of myosin-II function could mimic some of the effects of post-ovulatory aging. Eggs were subjected to various analyses. Cytoskeletal proteins in eggs and parthenogenesis were assessed using fluorescence microscopy, with further analysis of cytoskeletal proteins in immunoblotting experiments. Cortical tension was measured through micropipette aspiration assays. Egg membrane receptivity to sperm was assessed in in vitro fertilization (IVF) assays. Membrane topography was examined by low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy (SEM). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Aged eggs have decreased levels and abnormal localizations of phosphorylated myosin-II regulatory light chain (pMRLC; P = 0.0062). Cortical tension, which is mediated in part by myosin-II, is reduced in aged mouse eggs when compared with

  20. APPL1 promotes glucose uptake in response to mechanical stretch via the PKCζ-non-muscle myosin IIa pathway in C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tsugumichi; Okada, Shuichi; Shimoda, Yoko; Tagaya, Yuko; Osaki, Aya; Yamada, Eijiro; Shibusawa, Ryo; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Ozawa, Atsushi; Satoh, Tetsurou; Mori, Masatomo; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-11-01

    Expression of adaptor protein, phosphotyrosine interaction, pleckstrin homology domain, and leucine zipper containing 1 (APPL1) promoted glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation and glucose uptake in adipose and muscle tissues in response to stimulation with insulin, adiponectin, or exercise. In response to mechanical stretch, knockdown of APPL1 in C2C12 myotubes suppressed glucose uptake. APPL1-induced increased glucose uptake was mediated by protein kinase C (PKC) ζ but not AKT, AMPK, or calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. In myotubes overexpressing APPL1, PKCζ was phosphorylated and translocated to the plasma membrane (PM) in response to mechanical stretch. Phosphorylated PKCζ co-immunoprecipitated with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) under basal conditions, but dissociated upon myotube stretching. Moreover, stretch-induced phosphorylated PKCζ co-immunoprecipitated with non-muscle myosin IIa. Blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, suppressed APPL1-mediated stretch-induced glucose uptake and PKCζ translocation. Taken together these data demonstrate that in response to mechanical stretch, APPL1 enhances glucose uptake by modulating the activation and localization of PKCζ, as well as its functional interaction with both PP2A and myosin IIa. These findings support a new function for non-muscle myosin IIa in differentiated myotubes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Stimulation of cortical myosin phosphorylation by p114RhoGEF drives cell migration and tumor cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Terry

    Full Text Available Actinomyosin activity is an important driver of cell locomotion and has been shown to promote collective cell migration of epithelial sheets as well as single cell migration and tumor cell invasion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying activation of cortical myosin to stimulate single cell movement, and the relationship between the mechanisms that drive single cell locomotion and those that mediate collective cell migration of epithelial sheets are incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that p114RhoGEF, an activator of RhoA that associates with non-muscle myosin IIA, regulates collective cell migration of epithelial sheets and tumor cell invasion. Depletion of p114RhoGEF resulted in specific spatial inhibition of myosin activation at cell-cell contacts in migrating epithelial sheets and the cortex of migrating single cells, but only affected double and not single phosphorylation of myosin light chain. In agreement, overall elasticity and contractility of the cells, processes that rely on persistent and more constant forces, were not affected, suggesting that p114RhoGEF mediates process-specific myosin activation. Locomotion was p114RhoGEF-dependent on Matrigel, which favors more roundish cells and amoeboid-like actinomyosin-driven movement, but not on fibronectin, which stimulates flatter cells and lamellipodia-driven, mesenchymal-like migration. Accordingly, depletion of p114RhoGEF led to reduced RhoA, but increased Rac activity. Invasion of 3D matrices was p114RhoGEF-dependent under conditions that do not require metalloproteinase activity, supporting a role of p114RhoGEF in myosin-dependent, amoeboid-like locomotion. Our data demonstrate that p114RhoGEF drives cortical myosin activation by stimulating myosin light chain double phosphorylation and, thereby, collective cell migration of epithelial sheets and amoeboid-like motility of tumor cells.

  2. [Expression of contractile proteins alpha-actin and myosin of smooth muscle cells and collagen of IV type in human placenta at placental insufficiency in III trimester of pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozhaĭ, L I; Otellin, V A; Pozharisskiĭ, K M; Pavlova, N G

    2010-01-01

    Changes of expression of contractile proteins (alpha-actin and myosin of smooth muscle cell) and of collagen of IV type in stroma of human placental villi were studied at the diagnosed placental insufficiency (PI) in III trimester of pregnancy. The study revealed pronounced disturbances of expression of contractile proteins and collagen of IV type at PI. It is shown that in perivascular envelopes of vessels of stem and intermediate villi there is present a much greater amount of cells expressing smooth muscle actin and myosin. These cells are arranged by the denser concentric layers and more compactly than in norm and fill the intervascular space inside the villi. The width of perivascular envelopes of vessels is higher, while vascular lumens are lower than in norm. In terminal villi the capillary walls are thickened and the number of pericytes immunopositive against the smooth muscle cell alpha-actin and myosin as well as collagen of IV type is increased. The change of synthesis of the cytoskeletal contractile proteins and collagen of IV type is shown to lead to structural disturbances of villi of different types and of perivascular areas and vessels, which doubtlessly indicates their participation in pathogenesis of placental dysfunction and of disturbance of placental hemodynamics.

  3. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Young Woo [Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Center, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin [Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Jin [Dr. Park' s Aesthetic Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong In, E-mail: oncochem@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo, E-mail: khsmd@unitel.co.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  4. Design considerations in coiled-coil fusion constructs for the structural determination of a problematic region of the human cardiac myosin rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Michael P.; Ajay, Gautam; Gellings, Jaclyn A.; Rayment, Ivan

    2017-12-01

    X-ray structural determination of segments of the myosin rod has proved difficult because of the strong salt-dependent aggregation properties and repeating pattern of charges on the surface of the coiled-coil that lead to the formation of paracrystals. This problem has been resolved in part through the use of globular assembly domains that improve protein folding and prevent aggregation. The primary consideration now in designing coiled-coil fusion constructs for myosin is deciding where to truncate the coiled-coil and which amino acid residues to include from the folding domain. This is especially important for myosin that contains numerous regions of low predicted coiled-coil propensity. Here we describe the strategy adopted to determine the structure of the region that extends from Arg1677 – Leu1797 that included two areas that do not show a strong sequence signature of a conventional left-handed coiled coil or canonical heptad repeat. This demonstrates again that, with careful choice of fusion constructs, overlapping structures exhibit very similar conformations for the myosin rod fragments in the canonical regions. However, conformational variability is seen around Leu1706 which is a hot spot for cardiomyopathy mutations suggesting that this might be important for function.

  5. Natural biology and management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Tyson, Mark D; Clark, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... in low-risk patients. SUMMARY: NMIBC represents a variety of disease states and continues to pose management challenges. As our understanding of tumor biology improves and technology advances, achieving better outcomes through individualized care may be possible....

  6. Rapid determination of myosin heavy chain expression in rat, mouse, and human skeletal muscle using multicolor immunofluorescence analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin Bloemberg

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue comprised of fibers with different morphological, functional, and metabolic properties. Different muscles contain varying proportions of fiber types; therefore, accurate identification is important. A number of histochemical methods are used to determine muscle fiber type; however, these techniques have several disadvantages. Immunofluorescence analysis is a sensitive method that allows for simultaneous evaluation of multiple MHC isoforms on a large number of fibers on a single cross-section, and offers a more precise means of identifying fiber types. In this investigation we characterized pure and hybrid fiber type distribution in 10 rat and 10 mouse skeletal muscles, as well as human vastus lateralis (VL using multicolor immunofluorescence analysis. In addition, we determined fiber type-specific cross-sectional area (CSA, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity, and α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (GPD activity. Using this procedure we were able to easily identify pure and hybrid fiber populations in rat, mouse, and human muscle. Hybrid fibers were identified in all species and made up a significant portion of the total population in some rat and mouse muscles. For example, rat mixed gastrocnemius (MG contained 12.2% hybrid fibers whereas mouse white tibialis anterior (WTA contained 12.1% hybrid fibers. Collectively, we outline a simple and time-efficient method for determining MHC expression in skeletal muscle of multiple species. In addition, we provide a useful resource of the pure and hybrid fiber type distribution, fiber CSA, and relative fiber type-specific SDH and GPD activity in a number of rat and mouse muscles.

  7. Analysis of the interactions between Rab GTPases and class V myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Andrew J; Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Goud, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Myosins are actin-based motor proteins that are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as membrane transport, muscle contraction, and cell division. Humans have over 40 myosins that can be placed into 18 classes, the malfunctioning of a number of which can lead to disease. There are three members of the human class V myosin family, myosins Va, Vb, and Vc. People lacking functional myosin Va suffer from a rare autosomal recessive disease called Griscelli's Syndrome type I (GS1) that is characterized by severe neurological defects and partial albinism. Mutations in the myosin Vb gene lead to an epithelial disorder called microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) that is often fatal in infants. The class V myosins have been implicated in the transport of diverse cargoes such as melanosomes in pigment cells, synaptic vesicles in neurons, RNA transcripts in a variety of cell types, and organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. The Rab GTPases play a critical role in recruiting class V myosins to their cargo. We recently published a study in which we used the yeast two-hybrid system to systematically test myosin Va for its ability to interact with each member of the human Rab GTPase family. We present here a detailed description of this yeast two-hybrid "living chip" assay. Furthermore, we present a protocol for validating positive interactions obtained from this screen by coimmunoprecipitation.

  8. An invertebrate smooth muscle with striated muscle myosin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulbarán, Guidenn; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Márquez, Gustavo; Méndez, Franklin; Padrón, Raúl; Craig, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Muscle tissues are classically divided into two major types, depending on the presence or absence of striations. In striated muscles, the actin filaments are anchored at Z-lines and the myosin and actin filaments are in register, whereas in smooth muscles, the actin filaments are attached to dense bodies and the myosin and actin filaments are out of register. The structure of the filaments in smooth muscles is also different from that in striated muscles. Here we have studied the structure of myosin filaments from the smooth muscles of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. We find, surprisingly, that they are indistinguishable from those in an arthropod striated muscle. This structural similarity is supported by sequence comparison between the schistosome myosin II heavy chain and known striated muscle myosins. In contrast, the actin filaments of schistosomes are similar to those of smooth muscles, lacking troponin-dependent regulation. We conclude that schistosome muscles are hybrids, containing striated muscle-like myosin filaments and smooth muscle-like actin filaments in a smooth muscle architecture. This surprising finding has broad significance for understanding how muscles are built and how they evolved, and challenges the paradigm that smooth and striated muscles always have distinctly different components. PMID:26443857

  9. Prothrombotic skeletal muscle myosin directly enhances prothrombin activation by binding factors Xa and Va

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Hiroshi; Sinha, Ranjeet K.; Marchese, Patrizia; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.; Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle myosins can directly influence blood coagulation and thrombosis, ex vivo studies of the effects of myosin on thrombogenesis in fresh human blood were conducted. Addition of myosin to blood augmented the thrombotic responses of human blood flowing over collagen-coated surfaces (300 s−1 shear rate). Perfusion of human blood over myosin-coated surfaces also caused fibrin and platelet deposition, evidencing myosin’s thrombogenicity. Myosin markedly enhanced thrombin generation in both platelet-rich plasma and platelet-poor plasma, indicating that myosin promoted thrombin generation in plasma primarily independent of platelets. In purified reaction mixtures composed only of factor Xa, factor Va, prothrombin, and calcium ions, myosin greatly enhanced prothrombinase activity. The Gla domain of factor Xa was not required for myosin’s prothrombinase enhancement. When binding of purified clotting factors to immobilized myosin was monitored using biolayer interferometry, factors Xa and Va each showed favorable binding interactions. Factor Va reduced by 100-fold the apparent Kd of myosin for factor Xa (Kd ∼0.48 nM), primarily by reducing koff, indicating formation of a stable ternary complex of myosin:Xa:Va. In studies to assess possible clinical relevance for this discovery, we found that antimyosin antibodies inhibited thrombin generation in acute trauma patient plasmas more than in control plasmas (P = .0004), implying myosin might contribute to acute trauma coagulopathy. We posit that myosin enhancement of thrombin generation could contribute either to promote hemostasis or to augment thrombosis risk with consequent implications for myosin’s possible contributions to pathophysiology in the setting of acute injuries. PMID:27421960

  10. Use of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Algorithms with Gene Expression Profiling to Predict Recurrent Nonmuscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Georg; Mitra, Anirban P; Mitra, Sheetal A; Almal, Arpit A; Steven, Kenneth E; Skinner, Donald G; Fry, David W; Lenehan, Peter F; Worzel, William P; Cote, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    Due to the high recurrence risk of nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma it is crucial to distinguish patients at high risk from those with indolent disease. In this study we used a machine learning algorithm to identify the genes in patients with nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma at initial presentation that were most predictive of recurrence. We used the genes in a molecular signature to predict recurrence risk within 5 years after transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Whole genome profiling was performed on 112 frozen nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma specimens obtained at first presentation on Human WG-6 BeadChips (Illumina®). A genetic programming algorithm was applied to evolve classifier mathematical models for outcome prediction. Cross-validation based resampling and gene use frequencies were used to identify the most prognostic genes, which were combined into rules used in a voting algorithm to predict the sample target class. Key genes were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The classifier set included 21 genes that predicted recurrence. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was done for these genes in a subset of 100 patients. A 5-gene combined rule incorporating a voting algorithm yielded 77% sensitivity and 85% specificity to predict recurrence in the training set, and 69% and 62%, respectively, in the test set. A singular 3-gene rule was constructed that predicted recurrence with 80% sensitivity and 90% specificity in the training set, and 71% and 67%, respectively, in the test set. Using primary nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma from initial occurrences genetic programming identified transcripts in reproducible fashion, which were predictive of recurrence. These findings could potentially impact nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma management. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Myosin II governs collective cell migration behaviour downstream of guidance receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combedazou, Anne; Choesmel-Cadamuro, Valérie; Gay, Guillaume; Liu, Jiaying; Dupré, Loïc; Ramel, Damien; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-01-01

    Border cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis is a potent model to study collective cell migration, a process involved in development and metastasis. Border cell clusters adopt two main types of behaviour during migration: linear and rotational. However, the molecular mechanism controlling the switch from one to the other is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that non-muscle Myosin II (NMII, also known as Spaghetti squash) activity controls the linear-to-rotational switch. Furthermore, we show that the regulation of NMII takes place downstream of guidance receptor signalling and is critical to ensure efficient collective migration. This study thus provides new insight into the molecular mechanism coordinating the different cell behaviours in a migrating cluster. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Emerging intravesical therapies for management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Tomaszewski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J Tomaszewski, Marc C SmaldoneDepartment of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the second most common urologic malignancy, and 70% of patients present with superficial or nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is the most effective agent for preventing disease recurrence, and the only therapy able to inhibit disease progression. However, recurrence rates as high as 30% and significant local and systemic toxicity have led to increased interest in alternative intravesical therapies. In patients refractory or intolerant to BCG, BCG-interferon α2b, gemcitabine, and anthracyclines (doxorubicin, epirubicin, valrubicin have demonstrated durable clinical responses. Phase I trials investigating alternative cytotoxic agents, such as apaziquone, taxanes (docetaxel, paclitaxel, and suramin are reporting promising data. Novel immunomodulating agents have demonstrated promise as efficacious alternatives in patients refractory to BCG. Optimization of existing chemotherapeutic regimens using hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy, magnetically-targeted carriers, and liposomes remains an area of active investigation. Despite enthusiasm for new intravesical agents, radical cystectomy remains the treatment of choice for patients with NMIBC who have failed intravesical therapy and selected patients with naïve T1 tumors and aggressive features. This report provides a comprehensive review of contemporary intravesical therapy for NMIBC and refractory NMIBC, with an emphasis on emerging agents and novel treatment modalities.Keywords: transitional cell carcinoma, nonmuscle, invasive, intravesical therapy, BCG

  13. Myosin storage myopathy: slow skeletal myosin (MYH7) mutation in two isolated cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, N G; Ceuterick-de Groote, C; Dye, D E; Liyanage, K; Duff, R M; Dubois, B; Robberecht, W; Sciot, R; Martin, J-J; Goebel, H H

    2005-02-08

    Myosin storage myopathy is a congenital myopathy characterized by subsarcolemmal hyaline bodies in type 1 muscle fibers, which are ATPase positive and thus contain myosin. Mutations recently were identified in the type 1 muscle fiber myosin gene (MYH7) in Swedish and Saudi families with myosin storage myopathy. The authors have identified the arginine 1845 tryptophan mutation found in the Swedish families in two isolated Belgian cases, indicating a critical role for myosin residue arginine 1845.

  14. Premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile smooth muscle cells in human umbilical artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffino, S; Lamy, E; Foucault-Bertaud, A; Risso, F; Reboul, R; Tellier, E; Chareyre, C; Dignat-George, F; Simeoni, U; Charpiot, P

    2012-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) participate to the regulation of peripheral arterial resistance and blood pressure. To assume their function, SMCs differentiate throughout the normal vascular development from a synthetic phenotype towards a fully differentiated contractile phenotype by acquiring a repertoire of proteins involved in contraction. In human fetal muscular arteries and umbilical arteries (UAs), no data are available regarding the differentiation of SMCs during the last trimester of gestation. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of SMCs during this gestation period in human UAs. We investigated the phenotype of SMCs in human UAs from very preterm (28-31 weeks of gestation), late preterm (32-35 weeks) and term (37-41 weeks) newborns using biochemical and immunohistochemical detection of α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, smoothelin, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain. We found that the number of SMCs positive for smoothelin in UAs increased with gestational age. Western blot analysis revealed a higher content of smoothelin in term compared to very preterm UAs. These results show that SMCs in human UAs gradually acquire a fully differentiated contractile phenotype during the last trimester of gestation and thus that premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile SMCs in human UAs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic myosin phosphorylation regulates contractile pulses and tissue integrity during epithelial morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Claudia G.; Tworoger, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Apical constriction is a cell shape change that promotes epithelial bending. Activation of nonmuscle myosin II (Myo-II) by kinases such as Rho-associated kinase (Rok) is important to generate contractile force during apical constriction. Cycles of Myo-II assembly and disassembly, or pulses, are associated with apical constriction during Drosophila melanogaster gastrulation. It is not understood whether Myo-II phosphoregulation organizes contractile pulses or whether pulses are important for tissue morphogenesis. Here, we show that Myo-II pulses are associated with pulses of apical Rok. Mutants that mimic Myo-II light chain phosphorylation or depletion of myosin phosphatase inhibit Myo-II contractile pulses, disrupting both actomyosin coalescence into apical foci and cycles of Myo-II assembly/disassembly. Thus, coupling dynamic Myo-II phosphorylation to upstream signals organizes contractile Myo-II pulses in both space and time. Mutants that mimic Myo-II phosphorylation undergo continuous, rather than incremental, apical constriction. These mutants fail to maintain intercellular actomyosin network connections during tissue invagination, suggesting that Myo-II pulses are required for tissue integrity during morphogenesis. PMID:25092658

  16. Myosin substitution rate is affected by the amount of cytosolic myosin in cultured muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Koichi; Ichimura, Emi; Yasukawa, Yuya; Oe, Mika; Muroya, Susumu; Suzuki, Takahiro; Wakamatsu, Jun-Ichi; Nishimura, Takanori

    2017-11-01

    In striated muscles, approximately 300 myosin molecules form a single thick filament in myofibrils. Each myosin is continuously displaced by another myosin to maintain the thick filament structure. Our previous study using a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique showed that the myosin replacement rate is decreased by inhibition of protein synthesis, but myosin is still exchangeable. This result prompted us to examine whether myosin in the cytoplasm is involved in myosin replacement in myofibrils. To address this, FRAP was measured in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged myosin heavy chain 3 (Myh3) expressing myotubes that were treated with streptolysin-O (SLO), which forms pores specifically in the plasma membrane to induce leakage of cytoplasmic proteins. Our biochemical data demonstrated that the cytoplasmic myosin content was reduced in SLO-permeabilized semi-intact myotubes. Furthermore, FRAP experiments showed a sluggish substitution rate of GFP-Myh3 in SLO-permeabilized myotubes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the myosin substitution rate is significantly reduced by a decreased amount of myosin in the cytoplasm and that cytoplasmic myosin contributes to myosin replacement in myofibrils. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  17. Myosin and myoglobin as tumor markers in the diagnosis of rhabdomyosarcoma. A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, A S; van Vark, M; Albus-Lutter, C E; van Raamsdonk, W; Voûte, P A

    1984-07-01

    Antibodies against the myosin heavy chain of adult chicken pectoral muscle and heart muscle which cross-react with myosin of human fast type II fibers ( antifast myosin) and slow type I fibers ( antislow myosin), respectively, and antibodies against human myoglobin have been assessed for their usefulness in diagnosing rhabdomyosarcoma. Formaldehyde-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue and the avidin-biotinyl-peroxidase complex technique were used. Of 23 rhabdomyosarcomas studied, 20 were positive with antifast myosin and 11 with antimyoglobin . All tumors were negative with antislow myosin. Positive staining was observed in all three types of rhabdomyosarcoma, i.e., embryonal, alveolar, and pleomorphic, regardless of the antiserum used. Staining with antimyoglobin was generally limited to the cytoplasm-rich tumor cells. Besides rhabdomyosarcomas, the only other positive neoplasms were those which contained rhabdomyoblastic differentiation such as malignant Triton tumors and malignant mixed müllerian tumors. Our results indicate that antibodies against the fast myosin heavy chain are a useful tool for diagnosing rhabdomyosarcoma and that they can be used to distinguish that tumor from other small round cell tumors in childhood. The results are discussed in the light of the embryogenesis of skeletal muscle.

  18. Oxidation of myosin by haem proteins generates myosin radicals and protein cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lametsch, Marianne Lund; Luxford, Catherine; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that myosin can be modified by oxidative stress and particularly by activated haem proteins. These reactions have been implicated in changes in the properties of this protein in food samples (changes in meat tenderness and palatability), in human physiology...... as a result of the reaction with activated haem proteins (horseradish peroxidase/H2O2) and met-myoglobin/H2O2) has been investigated by EPR spectroscopy and amino-acid consumption, product formation has been characterized by HPLC, and changes in protein integrity have been determined by SDS/PAGE. Multiple...

  19. New insights into myosin evolution and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foth, Bernardo J; Goedecke, Marc C; Soldati, Dominique

    2006-03-07

    Myosins are eukaryotic actin-dependent molecular motors important for a broad range of functions like muscle contraction, vision, hearing, cell motility, and host cell invasion of apicomplexan parasites. Myosin heavy chains consist of distinct head, neck, and tail domains and have previously been categorized into 18 different classes based on phylogenetic analysis of their conserved heads. Here we describe a comprehensive phylogenetic examination of many previously unclassified myosins, with particular emphasis on sequences from apicomplexan and other chromalveolate protists including the model organism Toxoplasma, the malaria parasite Plasmodium, and the ciliate Tetrahymena. Using different phylogenetic inference methods and taking protein domain architectures, specific amino acid polymorphisms, and organismal distribution into account, we demonstrate a hitherto unrecognized common origin for ciliate and apicomplexan class XIV myosins. Our data also suggest common origins for some apicomplexan myosins and class VI, for classes II and XVIII, for classes XII and XV, and for some microsporidian myosins and class V, thereby reconciling evolutionary history and myosin structure in several cases and corroborating the common coevolution of myosin head, neck, and tail domains. Six novel myosin classes are established to accommodate sequences from chordate metazoans (class XIX), insects (class XX), kinetoplastids (class XXI), and apicomplexans and diatom algae (classes XXII, XXIII, and XXIV). These myosin (sub)classes include sequences with protein domains (FYVE, WW, UBA, ATS1-like, and WD40) previously unknown to be associated with myosin motors. Regarding the apicomplexan "myosome," we significantly update class XIV classification, propose a systematic naming convention, and discuss possible functions in these parasites.

  20. Nuclear Actin and Myosins in Adenovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A.; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host’s transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  1. A PCR-based integrated protocol for the structural analysis of the 13th exon of the human beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7): development of a diagnostic tool for HCM disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Zapheiropoulos, Athanassios Z; Voutsinas, Gerassimos; Margaritis, Lukas H; Papassideri, Issidora S

    2008-06-01

    Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) constitutes a genetic disease of the sarcomere characterized by a Mendelian pattern of inheritance. A variety of different mutations affecting the at least eight sarcomeric gene products has been identified and the majority of them appear to function through a dominant negative mechanism. Family history analysis and genetic counseling have been widely adopted as integral tools for the evaluation and management of individuals with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM). Genetic testing of the disease has been progressively released into the clinical mainstream, thus rendering the development of novel and potent molecular diagnostic protocols an inevitable task. To this direction, we have evolved an integrated PCR-based molecular protocol, which through the utilization of novel "exonic" primers allows, among others, the structural analysis of the 13th exon of the human beta-myosin heavy chain gene locus (MYH7) mainly characterized by the critical for HCM Arginine residue 403 (R(403)). Interestingly, through a DNA sequencing approach, a single nucleotide substitution from "G" to "T" was detected in the adjacent 13th intron, thus divulging the versatile potential of the present molecular protocol to clinical practice.

  2. Obscurins: Goliaths and Davids take over non-muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Shriver, Marey; Perry, Nicole A; Hu, Li-Yen R; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Obscurins comprise a family of proteins originally identified in striated muscles, where they play essential roles in myofibrillogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and Ca(2+) homeostasis. They are encoded by the single OBSCN gene, and are composed of tandem adhesion domains and signaling motifs. To date, two giant obscurin isoforms have been described in detail that differ only at the extreme COOH-terminus; while obscurin-A (∼720 kDa) contains a non-modular COOH-terminus that harbors binding sites for the adaptor proteins ankyrins, obscurin-B (∼870 kDa) contains two COOH-terminal serine-threonine kinase domains preceded by adhesion motifs. Besides the two known giant obscurins, a thorough search of transcript databases suggests that complex alternative splicing of the obscurin transcript results in the generation of additional giant as well as small isoforms with molecular masses ranging between ∼50-970 kDa. These novel isoforms share common domains with the characterized isoforms, but also contain unique regions. Using a panel of highly specific antibodies directed against epitopes spanning the entire length of giant obscurins, we employed western blotting and immunohistochemistry to perform a systematic and comprehensive characterization of the expression profile of obscurins in muscle and non-muscle tissues. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that obscurins are not restricted to striated muscles, but are abundantly expressed in several tissues and organs including brain, skin, kidney, liver, spleen, and lung. While some obscurin isoforms are ubiquitously expressed, others are preferentially present in specific tissues and organs. Moreover, obscurins are present in select structures and cell types where they assume nuclear, cytosolic, and membrane distributions. Given the ubiquitous expression of some obscurins, along with the preferential expression of others, it becomes apparent that obscurins may play common and unique roles, respectively, in

  3. Novel slow-skeletal myosin (MYH7) mutation in the original myosin storage myopathy kindred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Danielle E; Azzarelli, Biagio; Goebel, Hans H; Laing, Nigel G

    2006-06-01

    Myosin storage myopathy (OMIM 608358), a congenital myopathy characterised by subsarcolemmal, hyaline-like accumulations of myosin in Type I muscle fibres, was first described by Cancilla and Colleagues in 1971 [Neurology 1971;21:579-585] in two siblings as 'familial myopathy with probable lysis of myofibrils in type I muscle fibres'. Two mutations in the slow skeletal myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) have recently been associated with the disease in other families. We have identified a novel heterozygous Leu1793Pro mutation in MYH7 in DNA from paraffin sections of one of the original siblings. This historical molecular analysis confirms the original cases had myosin storage myopathy.

  4. Defining and treating the spectrum of intermediate risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Brausi, M.; Soloway, M.; Lamm, D.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Bohle, A.; Colombel, M.; Palou, J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Low, intermediate and high risk categories have been defined to help guide the treatment of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (Ta, T1, CIS). However, while low and high risk disease has been well classified, the intermediate risk category has traditionally comprised a

  5. Defining progression in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: it is time for a new, standard definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamm, D.; Persad, R.; Brausi, M.; Buckley, R.; Witjes, J.A.; Palou, J.; Bohle, A.; Kamat, A.M.; Colombel, M.; Soloway, M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite being one of the most important clinical outcomes in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, there is currently no standard definition of disease progression. Major clinical trials and meta-analyses have used varying definitions or have failed to define this end point altogether. A

  6. Low prevalence of HPV detection and genotyping in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using single-step PCR followed by reverse line blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Renate; Borena, Wegene; Schäfer, Georg; Manzl, Claudia; Culig, Zoran; List, Sebastian; Neururer, Sabrina; Von Laer, Dorothee; Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Horninger, Wolfgang; Steiner, Hannes; Brunner, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    To clarify the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, HPV-DNA was scrutinized in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) bladder cancer tissue using single-step PCR (HPV L1) for HPV detection, followed by reverse line blot (RLB) for genotyping. A total of 186 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder due to primary, non-muscle invasive bladder cancer from 2006 to 2009 were reviewed. A positive control group of 22 cervical tissues with cervical carcinoma was included. Histology confirmed urothelial carcinoma in all patients: primary CIS, pTa, pT1 and pTa + pT1 in 14 (7.5 %), 134 (72 %), 36 (19.4 %) and two (1.1 %) patients, respectively. A total of 119 (63.9 %) of them were classified as low-risk, while 67 (36.1 %) were high-risk cancers. Tumor recurrence and progression (≥pT2) were seen in 79 and 11 patients (mean follow-up 45 months). The presence of HPV-DNA by single-step PCR was detected in four (2.2 %) patients. HPV 16 and HPV 6 were positive in two (1.1 %) and one (0.6 %) patient, respectively In one case, no HPV genotype listed on the RLB assay could be identified. In the control group, the HPV infection rate was 100 %: HPV 16 in 12 (54.6 %) patients, HPV 16/18 in four (18.3 %) patients, HPV 18 in two (9.1 %) patients, HPV 16/45 in one patient (4.5 %), HPV 18/33 in one (4.5 %) patient, HPV 16/33 in one (4.5 %) patient and HPV 33 in one (4.5 %) patient. Our study demonstrates low prevalence of HPV infection in FFPE bladder cancer tissue, arguing against the etiological role of HPV in non-muscle urothelial carcinogenesis.

  7. Local pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of the myosin 2A motor in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Michelle A; Billington, Neil; Wang, Aibing; Adelstein, Robert S; Sellers, James R; Fischer, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M

    2017-01-15

    The role of nonmuscle myosin 2 (NM2) pulsatile dynamics in generating contractile forces required for developmental morphogenesis has been characterized, but whether these pulsatile contractions are an intrinsic property of all actomyosin networks is not known. Here we used live-cell fluorescence imaging to show that transient, local assembly of NM2A "pulses" occurs in the cortical cytoskeleton of single adherent cells of mesenchymal, epithelial, and sarcoma origin, independent of developmental signaling cues and cell-cell or cell-ECM interactions. We show that pulses in the cortical cytoskeleton require Rho-associated kinase- or myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity, increases in cytosolic calcium, and NM2 ATPase activity. Surprisingly, we find that cortical cytoskeleton pulses specifically require the head domain of NM2A, as they do not occur with either NM2B or a 2B-head-2A-tail chimera. Our results thus suggest that pulsatile contractions in the cortical cytoskeleton are an intrinsic property of the NM2A motor that may mediate its role in homeostatic maintenance of tension in the cortical cytoskeleton of adherent cells. © 2017 Baird et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Myosin IIA modulates T cell receptor transport and CasL phosphorylation during early immunological synapse formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yu

    Full Text Available Activation of T cell receptor (TCR by antigens occurs in concert with an elaborate multi-scale spatial reorganization of proteins at the immunological synapse, the junction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell (APC. The directed movement of molecules, which intrinsically requires physical forces, is known to modulate biochemical signaling. It remains unclear, however, if mechanical forces exert any direct influence on the signaling cascades. We use T cells from AND transgenic mice expressing TCRs specific to the moth cytochrome c 88-103 peptide, and replace the APC with a synthetic supported lipid membrane. Through a series of high spatiotemporal molecular tracking studies in live T cells, we demonstrate that the molecular motor, non-muscle myosin IIA, transiently drives TCR transport during the first one to two minutes of immunological synapse formation. Myosin inhibition reduces calcium influx and colocalization of active ZAP-70 (zeta-chain associated protein kinase 70 with TCR, revealing an influence on signaling activity. More tellingly, its inhibition also significantly reduces phosphorylation of the mechanosensing protein CasL (Crk-associated substrate the lymphocyte type, raising the possibility of a direct mechanical mechanism of signal modulation involving CasL.

  9. Functions of class V myosins in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, John A; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-10-04

    This minireview focuses on recent studies implicating class V myosins in organelle and macromolecule transport within neurons. These studies reveal that class V myosins play important roles in a wide range of fundamental processes occurring within neurons, including the transport into dendritic spines of organelles that support synaptic plasticity, the establishment of neuronal shape, the specification of polarized cargo transport, and the subcellular localization of mRNA.

  10. The role of myosin 1c and myosin 1b in surfactant exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelberger, Nadine; Breunig, Markus; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Miklavc, Pika

    2016-04-15

    Actin and actin-associated proteins have a pivotal effect on regulated exocytosis in secretory cells and influence pre-fusion as well as post-fusion stages of exocytosis. Actin polymerization on secretory granules during the post-fusion phase (formation of an actin coat) is especially important in cells with large secretory vesicles or poorly soluble secretions. Alveolar type II (ATII) cells secrete hydrophobic lipo-protein surfactant, which does not easily diffuse from fused vesicles. Previous work showed that compression of actin coat is necessary for surfactant extrusion. Here, we investigate the role of class 1 myosins as possible linkers between actin and membranes during exocytosis. Live-cell microscopy showed translocation of fluorescently labeled myosin 1b and myosin 1c to the secretory vesicle membrane after fusion. Myosin 1c translocation was dependent on its pleckstrin homology domain. Expression of myosin 1b and myosin 1c constructs influenced vesicle compression rate, whereas only the inhibition of myosin 1c reduced exocytosis. These findings suggest that class 1 myosins participate in several stages of ATII cell exocytosis and link actin coats to the secretory vesicle membrane to influence vesicle compression. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. A role for myosin Va in cerebellar plasticity and motor learning: a possible mechanism underlying neurological disorder in myosin Va disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Mariko; Kishimoto, Yasushi; Tanaka, Masahiko; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Hirashima, Naohide; Murata, Yoshiharu; Kano, Masanobu; Takagishi, Yoshiko

    2011-04-20

    Mutations of the myosin Va gene cause the neurological diseases Griscelli syndrome type 1 and Elejalde syndrome in humans and dilute phenotypes in rodents. To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the neurological disorders in myosin Va diseases, we conducted an integrated analysis at the molecular, cellular, electrophysiological, and behavioral levels using the dilute-neurological (d-n) mouse mutant. These mice manifest an ataxic gait and clonic seizures during postnatal development, but the neurological disorders are ameliorated in adulthood. We found that smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) rarely extended into the dendritic spines of Purkinje cells (PCs) of young d-n mice, and there were few, if any, IP(3) receptors. Moreover, long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-PC synapses was abolished, consistent with our previous observations in juvenile lethal dilute mutants. Young d-n mice exhibited severe impairment of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. In contrast, adult d-n mice showed restoration of motor learning and LTD, and these neurological changes were associated with accumulation of SER and IP(3) receptors in some PC spines and the expression of myosin Va proteins in the PCs. RNA interference-mediated repression of myosin Va caused a reduction in the number of IP(3) receptor-positive spines in cultured PCs. These findings indicate that myosin Va function is critical for subsequent processes in localization of SER and IP(3) receptors in PC spines, LTD, and motor learning. Interestingly, d-n mice had defects of motor coordination from young to adult ages, suggesting that the role of myosin Va in PC spines is not sufficient for motor coordination.

  12. Blebbistain, a myosin II inhibitor, as a novel strategy to regulate detrusor contractility in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zhang

    Full Text Available Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO, a common urologic pathology mostly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, can coexist in 40-45% of patients with overactive bladder (OAB and is associated with detrusor overactivity (DO. PBOO that induces DO results in alteration in bladder myosin II type and isoform composition. Blebbistatin (BLEB is a myosin II inhibitor we recently demonstrated potently relaxed normal detrusor smooth muscle (SM and reports suggest varied BLEB efficacy for different SM myosin (SMM isoforms and/or SMM vs nonmuscle myosin (NMM. We hypothesize BLEB inhibition of myosin II as a novel contraction protein targeted strategy to regulate DO. Using a surgically-induced male rat PBOO model, organ bath contractility, competitive and Real-Time-RT-PCR were performed. It was found that obstructed-bladder weight significantly increased 2.74-fold while in vitro contractility of detrusor to various stimuli was impaired ∼50% along with decreased shortening velocity. Obstruction also altered detrusor spontaneous activities with significantly increased amplitude but depressed frequency. PBOO switched bladder from a phasic-type to a more tonic-type SM. Expression of 5' myosin heavy chain (MHC alternatively spliced isoform SM-A (associated with tonic-type SM increased 3-fold while 3' MHC SM1 and essential light chain isoform MLC(17b also exhibited increased relative expression. Total SMMHC expression was decreased by 25% while the expression of NMM IIB (SMemb was greatly increased by 4.5-fold. BLEB was found to completely relax detrusor strips from both sham-operated and PBOO rats pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or electrical field stimulation although sensitivity was slightly decreased (20% only at lower doses for PBOO. Thus we provide the first thorough characterization of the response of rat bladder myosin to PBOO and demonstrate complete BLEB-induced PBOO bladder SM relaxation. Furthermore, the present study provides valuable

  13. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.; (RPI); (IIT); (SDSU); (Vermont)

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  14. Novel Multisensor Probe for Monitoring Bladder Temperature During Locoregional Chemohyperthermia for Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Technical Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijsen, Debby E.; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Schooneveldt, Gerben; Sijbrands, Jan; Hulshof, Maarten C.; de la Rosette, Jean; de Reijke, Theo M.; Crezee, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose: The effectiveness of locoregional hyperthermia combined with intravesical instillation of mitomycin C to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is currently investigated in clinical trials. Clinically effective locoregional hyperthermia delivery necessitates adequate thermal dosimetry; thus, optimal thermometry methods are needed to monitor accurately the temperature distribution throughout the bladder wall. The aim of the study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of a novel intravesical device (multi-sensor probe) developed to monitor the local bladder wall temperatures during loco-regional C-HT. Materials and Methods: A multisensor thermocouple probe was designed for deployment in the human bladder, using special sensors to cover the bladder wall in different directions. The deployment of the thermocouples against the bladder wall was evaluated with visual, endoscopic, and CT imaging in bladder phantoms, porcine models, and human bladders obtained from obduction for bladder volumes and different deployment sizes of the probe. Finally, porcine bladders were embedded in a phantom and subjected to locoregional heating to compare probe temperatures with additional thermometry inside and outside the bladder wall. Results: The 7.5 cm thermocouple probe yielded optimal bladder wall contact, adapting to different bladder volumes. Temperature monitoring was shown to be accurate and representative for the actual bladder wall temperature. Conclusions: Use of this novel multisensor probe could yield a more accurate monitoring of the bladder wall temperature during locoregional chemohyperthermia. PMID:24112045

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of myosin II essential light chains of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites regulates their motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Moreno, Raúl; Pérez-Yépez, Eloy-Andrés; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Morales, Fernando O; Meza, Isaura

    2016-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites dwell in the human intestine as comensals although under still unclear circumstances become invasive and destroy the host tissues. For these activities, trophozoites relay on remarkable motility provided by the cytoskeleton organization. Amebic actin and some of its actin-associated proteins are well known, while components of the myosin II molecule, although predicted from the E. histolytica genome, need biochemical and functional characterization. Recently, an amebic essential light myosin II chain, named EhMLCI, was identified and reported to be phosphorylated in tyrosines. The phosphorylated form of the protein was associated with the soluble assembly incompetent conformation of the heavy myosin chains, while the non-phosphorylated protein was identified with filamentous heavy chains, organized in an assembly competent conformation. It was postulated that EhMLCI tyrosine phosphorylation could act as a negative regulator of myosin II activity by its phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles. To test this hypothesis, we constructed an expression vector containing an EhMLCI DNA sequence where two tyrosine residues, with strong probability of phosphorylation and fall within the single EF-hand domain that interacts with the N-terminus of myosin II heavy chains, were replaced by phenylalanines. Transfected trophozoites, expressing the mutant MutEhMLCI protein cannot process it, thereby not incorporated into the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles required for myosin II activity, results in motility defective trophozoites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Invertebrate and vertebrate class III myosins interact with MORN repeat-containing adaptor proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk L Mecklenburg

    Full Text Available In Drosophila photoreceptors, the NINAC-encoded myosin III is found in a complex with a small, MORN-repeat containing, protein Retinophilin (RTP. Expression of these two proteins in other cell types showed NINAC myosin III behavior is altered by RTP. NINAC deletion constructs were used to map the RTP binding site within the proximal tail domain of NINAC. In vertebrates, the RTP ortholog is MORN4. Co-precipitation experiments demonstrated that human MORN4 binds to human myosin IIIA (MYO3A. In COS7 cells, MORN4 and MYO3A, but not MORN4 and MYO3B, co-localize to actin rich filopodia extensions. Deletion analysis mapped the MORN4 binding to the proximal region of the MYO3A tail domain. MYO3A dependent MORN4 tip localization suggests that MYO3A functions as a motor that transports MORN4 to the filopodia tips and MORN4 may enhance MYO3A tip localization by tethering it to the plasma membrane at the protrusion tips. These results establish conserved features of the RTP/MORN4 family: they bind within the tail domain of myosin IIIs to control their behavior.

  17. Variant histology: role in management and prognosis of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porten, Sima P; Willis, Daniel; Kamat, Ashish M

    2014-09-01

    The true clinical significance of variant histology is controversial and diagnosis is challenging, especially in the setting of nonmuscle invasive (NMI) disease. If the presence of variant architecture in NMI identifies a high-risk population with a worse prognosis and better suited for early aggressive intervention (i.e., radical cystectomy), then treatment recommendations should reflect this notion. This review outlines the current evidence and determines whether histologic variants should change management of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk NMI tumors and variant histology should be offered early cystectomy, especially if harboring pure squamous, adenocarcinoma, sarcomatoid, plasmacytoid, or micropapillary disease. In patients with small cell disease, systemic primary chemotherapy is the ideal option followed by local therapy for primary tumor control. For squamous/glandular differentiation, nested variant, and other rare variants, intravesical therapy is an option based on standard risk stratification in patients with NMI disease. Diligence is needed in the presence of variant histology to minimize the risk of understaging as well as close surveillance to not compromise the opportunity of cure. The management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer with variant histology is challenging, largely in part to the high risk of understaging and the background of already existing controversy regarding the management of high-risk NMI disease for standard urothelial cell carcinoma (early cystectomy vs. intravesical therapy). Future studies should be focused identifying if variant architecture confers different tumor biology than that of pure urothelial carcinoma, and if this difference translates into innovations in bladder sparing therapies.

  18. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  19. Antiparallel coiled-coil–mediated dimerization of myosin X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Ye, Fei; Wei, Zhiyi; Wen, Zilong; Zhang, Mingjie

    2012-01-01

    Processive movements of unconventional myosins on actin filaments generally require motor dimerization. A commonly accepted myosin dimerization mechanism is via formation of a parallel coiled-coil dimer by a stretch of amino acid residues immediately carboxyl-terminal to the motor’s lever-arm domain. Here, we discover that the predicted coiled-coil region of myosin X forms a highly stable, antiparallel coiled-coil dimer (anti-CC). Disruption of the anti-CC either by single-point mutations or by replacement of the anti-CC with a parallel coiled coil with a similar length compromised the filopodial induction activity of myosin X. We further show that the anti-CC and the single α-helical domain of myosin X are connected by a semirigid helical linker. The anti-CC–mediated dimerization may enable myosin X to walk on both single and bundled actin filaments. PMID:23012428

  20. An orthotopic xenograft model for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in mice: influence of mouse strain, tumor cell count, dwell time and bladder pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Doreen; Rieger, Christiane; Bergmann, Ralf; Ullrich, Martin; Meister, Sebastian; Toma, Marieta; Wiedemuth, Ralf; Temme, Achim; Novotny, Vladimir; Wirth, Manfred P; Bachmann, Michael; Pietzsch, Jens; Fuessel, Susanne

    2017-11-23

    Novel theranostic options for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer are urgently needed. This requires a thorough evaluation of experimental approaches in animal models best possibly reflecting human disease before entering clinical studies. Although several bladder cancer xenograft models were used in the literature, the establishment of an orthotopic bladder cancer model in mice remains challenging. Luciferase-transduced UM-UC-3LUCK1 bladder cancer cells were instilled transurethrally via 24G permanent venous catheters into athymic NMRI and BALB/c nude mice as well as into SCID-beige mice. Besides the mouse strain, the pretreatment of the bladder wall (trypsin or poly-L-lysine), tumor cell count (0.5 × 106-5.0 × 106) and tumor cell dwell time in the murine bladder (30 min - 2 h) were varied. Tumors were morphologically and functionally visualized using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Immunodeficiency of the mouse strains was the most important factor influencing cancer cell engraftment, whereas modifying cell count and instillation time allowed fine-tuning of the BLI signal start and duration - both representing the possible treatment period for the evaluation of new therapeutics. Best orthotopic tumor growth was achieved by transurethral instillation of 1.0 × 106 UM-UC-3LUCK1 bladder cancer cells into SCID-beige mice for 2 h after bladder pretreatment with poly-L-lysine. A pilot PET experiment using 68Ga-cetuximab as transurethrally administered radiotracer revealed functional expression of epidermal growth factor receptor as representative molecular characteristic of engrafted cancer cells in the bladder. With the optimized protocol in SCID-beige mice an applicable and reliable model of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer for the development of novel theranostic approaches was established.

  1. The UNC-45 chaperone is critical for establishing myosin-based myofibrillar organization and cardiac contractility in the Drosophila heart model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish C Melkani

    Full Text Available UNC-45 is a UCS (UNC-45/CRO1/She4P class chaperone necessary for myosin folding and/or accumulation, but its requirement for maintaining cardiac contractility has not been explored. Given the prevalence of myosin mutations in eliciting cardiomyopathy, chaperones like UNC-45 are likely to be equally critical in provoking or modulating myosin-associated cardiomyopathy. Here, we used the Drosophila heart model to examine its role in cardiac physiology, in conjunction with RNAi-mediated gene silencing specifically in the heart in vivo. Analysis of cardiac physiology was carried out using high-speed video recording in conjunction with movement analysis algorithms. unc-45 knockdown resulted in severely compromised cardiac function in adults as evidenced by prolonged diastolic and systolic intervals, and increased incidence of arrhythmias and extreme dilation; the latter was accompanied by a significant reduction in muscle contractility. Structural analysis showed reduced myofibrils, myofibrillar disarray, and greatly decreased cardiac myosin accumulation. Cardiac unc-45 silencing also dramatically reduced life-span. In contrast, third instar larval and young pupal hearts showed mild cardiac abnormalities, as severe cardiac defects only developed during metamorphosis. Furthermore, cardiac unc-45 silencing in the adult heart (after metamorphosis led to less severe phenotypes. This suggests that UNC-45 is mostly required for myosin accumulation/folding during remodeling of the forming adult heart. The cardiac defects, myosin deficit and decreased life-span in flies upon heart-specific unc-45 knockdown were significantly rescued by UNC-45 over-expression. Our results are the first to demonstrate a cardiac-specific requirement of a chaperone in Drosophila, suggestive of a critical role of UNC-45 in cardiomyopathies, including those associated with unfolded proteins in the failing human heart. The dilated cardiomyopathy phenotype associated with UNC-45

  2. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Suggs

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3 display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in

  3. Urinary long noncoding RNAs in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: new architects in cancer prognostic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Daniela; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; D'Elia, Carolina; Musi, Gennaro; de Cobelli, Ottavio; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cimmino, Amelia

    2017-06-01

    Several reports over the last 10 years provided evidence that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often altered in bladder cancers. lncRNAs are longer than 200 nucleotides and function as important regulators of gene expression, interacting with the major pathways of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A large number of lncRNAs has oncogenic function and is more expressed in tumor compared with normal tissues. Their overexpression may be associated with tumor formation, progression, and metastasis in a variety of tumors including bladder cancer. Although lncRNAs have been shown to have critical regulatory roles in cancer biology, the biological functions and prognostic values in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer remain largely unknown. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence suggests that several lncRNAs expression profiles in bladder malignancies are associated with poor prognosis, and they can be detected in biological fluids, such as urines. Here, we review current progress in the biology and the implication of lncRNAs associated with bladder cancer, and we discuss their potential use as diagnosis and prognosis biomarkers in bladder malignancies with a focus on their role in high-risk nonmuscle-invasive tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of FSGS-associated mutations on the stability and function of myosin-1 in fission yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Bi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations in the human MYO1E gene, encoding class I myosin Myo1e, are associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, a primary kidney disorder that leads to end-stage kidney disease. In this study, we used a simple model organism, fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, to test the effects of FSGS-associated mutations on myosin activity. Fission yeast has only one class I myosin, Myo1, which is involved in actin patch assembly at the sites of endocytosis. The amino acid residues mutated in individuals with FSGS are conserved between human Myo1e and yeast Myo1, which allowed us to introduce equivalent mutations into yeast myosin and use the resulting mutant strains for functional analysis. Yeast strains expressing mutant Myo1 exhibited defects in growth and endocytosis similar to those observed in the myo1 deletion strain. These mutations also disrupted Myo1 localization to endocytic actin patches and resulted in mis-localization of Myo1 to eisosomes, linear membrane microdomains found in yeast cells. Although both mutants examined in this study exhibited loss of function, one of these mutants was also characterized by the decreased protein stability. Thus, using the yeast model system, we were able to determine that the kidney-disease-associated mutations impair myosin functional activity and have differential effects on protein stability.

  5. Knockdown of embryonic myosin heavy chain reveals an essential role in the morphology and function of the developing heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutland, Catrin Sian; Polo-Parada, Luis; Ehler, Elisabeth; Alibhai, Aziza; Thorpe, Aaran; Suren, Suganthi; Emes, Richard D.; Patel, Bhakti; Loughna, Siobhan

    2011-01-01

    The expression and function of embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMYH) has not been investigated within the early developing heart. This is despite the knowledge that other structural proteins, such as alpha and beta myosin heavy chains and cardiac alpha actin, play crucial roles in atrial septal development and cardiac function. Most cases of atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy are not associated with a known causative gene, suggesting that further analysis into candidate genes is required. Expression studies localised eMYH in the developing chick heart. eMYH knockdown was achieved using morpholinos in a temporal manner and functional studies were carried out using electrical and calcium signalling methodologies. Knockdown in the early embryo led to abnormal atrial septal development and heart enlargement. Intriguingly, action potentials of the eMYH knockdown hearts were abnormal in comparison with the alpha and beta myosin heavy chain knockdowns and controls. Although myofibrillogenesis appeared normal, in knockdown hearts the tissue integrity was affected owing to apparent focal points of myocyte loss and an increase in cell death. An expression profile of human skeletal myosin heavy chain genes suggests that human myosin heavy chain 3 is the functional homologue of the chick eMYH gene. These data provide compelling evidence that eMYH plays a crucial role in important processes in the early developing heart and, hence, is a candidate causative gene for atrial septal defects and cardiomyopathy. PMID:21862559

  6. Native bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, R; Peters, L K

    1982-11-15

    Native myosin filaments from rabbit psoas muscle are always 1.5 micrometer long. The regulated assembly of these filaments is generally considered to occur by an initial antiparallel and subsequent parallel aggregation of identical myosin subunits. In this schema myosin filament length is controlled by either a self-assembly or a Vernier process. We present evidence which refines these ideas. Namely, that the intact myosin bare zone assemblage nucleates myosin filament assembly. This suggestion is based on the following experimental evidence. (1) A native bare zone assemblage about 0.3 micrometer long can be formed by dialysis of native myosin filaments to either a pH 8 or a 0.2 M-KCl solution. (2) Upon dialysis back to 0.1 M-KCl, bare zone assemblages and distal myosin molecules recombine to form 1.5 micrometer long bipolar filaments. (3) The bare zone assemblage can be separated from the distal myosin molecules by column chromatography in 0.2 M-KCl. Upon dialysis of the fractionated subsets back to 0.1 M-KCl, the bare zone assemblage retains its length of about 0.3 micrometer. However, the distal molecules reassemble to form filaments about 5 micrometers long. (4) Filaments are formed from mixes of the isolated subsets. The lengths of these filaments vary with the amount of distal myosin present. (5) When native filaments, isolated bare zone assemblages or distal myosin molecules are moved sequentially to 0.6 M-KCl and then to 0.1 M-KCl, the final filament lengths are all about 5 micrometers. The capacity of the bare zone assemblage to nucleate filament assembly may be due to the bare zone myosin molecules, the associated M band components or both.

  7. Characterization of myosin light chain in shrimp hemocytic phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Wang, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiaoqing

    2010-11-01

    Myosin light chain, a well-known cytoskeleton gene, regulates multiple processes that are involved in material transport, muscle shrink and cell division. However, its function in phagocytosis against invading pathogens in crustacean remains unknown. In this investigation, a myosin light chain gene was obtained from Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp. The full-length cDNA of this gene was of 766 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 462 bp encoding a polypeptide of 153 amino acids. The myosin light chain protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Subsequently the specific antibody was raised using the purified GST fusion protein. As revealed by immuno-electron microscopy, the myosin light chain protein was only expressed in the dark bands of muscle. In the present study, the myosin light chain gene was up-regulated in the WSSV-resistant shrimp as revealed by real-time PCR and western blot. And the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index using FITC-labeled Vibrio parahemolyticus were remarkably increased in the WSSV-resistant shrimp, suggesting that the myosin light chain protein was essential in hemocytic phagocytosis. On the other hand, RNAi assays indicated that the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index were significantly decreased when the myosin light chain gene was silenced by sequence-specific siRNA. These findings suggested that myosin light chain protein was involved in the regulation of hemocytic phagocytosis of shrimp. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Robust mechanobiological behavior emerges in heterogeneous myosin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Paul F.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.; Weitz, David A.; Schunn, Christian; Cagan, Jonathan; LeDuc, Philip

    2017-09-01

    Biological complexity presents challenges for understanding natural phenomenon and engineering new technologies, particularly in systems with molecular heterogeneity. Such complexity is present in myosin motor protein systems, and computational modeling is essential for determining how collective myosin interactions produce emergent system behavior. We develop a computational approach for altering myosin isoform parameters and their collective organization, and support predictions with in vitro experiments of motility assays with α-actinins as molecular force sensors. The computational approach models variations in single myosin molecular structure, system organization, and force stimuli to predict system behavior for filament velocity, energy consumption, and robustness. Robustness is the range of forces where a filament is expected to have continuous velocity and depends on used myosin system energy. Myosin systems are shown to have highly nonlinear behavior across force conditions that may be exploited at a systems level by combining slow and fast myosin isoforms heterogeneously. Results suggest some heterogeneous systems have lower energy use near stall conditions and greater energy consumption when unloaded, therefore promoting robustness. These heterogeneous system capabilities are unique in comparison with homogenous systems and potentially advantageous for high performance bionanotechnologies. Findings open doors at the intersections of mechanics and biology, particularly for understanding and treating myosin-related diseases and developing approaches for motor molecule-based technologies.

  9. Differential susceptibility on myosin heavy chain isoform following eccentric-induced muscle damage

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-01-01

    Based on myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, human skeletal muscle fibers can be categorized into three fiber types, type I, IIa, IIx fibers, and each fiber type has different characteristics. Typical characteristics are difference in force production, shortening velocity, and fatigue resistance. When the muscle is contract and stretched by a force that is greater than the force generated by the muscle, contraction-induced muscle damage frequently occurs. Several experimental models involving b...

  10. Developmental expression and cardiac transcriptional regulation of Myh7b, a third myosin heavy chain in the vertebrate heart

    OpenAIRE

    Warkman, Andrew S.; Whitman, Samantha A; Miller, Melanie K.; Garriock, Robert J.; Schwach, Catherine M.; Gregorio, Carol C.; Krieg, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian heart expresses two myosin heavy chain genes (Myh6 and Myh7), which are major components of the thick filaments of the sarcomere. We have determined that a third myosin heavy chain, MYH7B, is also expressed in the myocardium. Developmental analysis shows Myh7b expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle of Xenopus, chick and mouse embryos, and in smooth muscle tissues during later stages of mouse embryogenesis. Myh7b is also expressed in the adult human heart. The promoter region ...

  11. Optimal Treatment for Intermediate- and High-Risk, Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.M. van der Meijden

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to clinical and pathological factors the prognosis of a patient with non-muscle invasive bladder tumors can be assessed. The prognosis is determined by the likelihood of recurrence(30-70% and/or progression to muscle invasive bladder cancer(1-15%.Trans urethral resection of bladder tumors remains the initial therapy but adjuvant intravesical instillations are necessary.All patients benefit from a single immediate post operative instillation with a chemotherapeutic agent and for low risk tumors this is the optimal therapy.Patients with intermediate and high risk tumors need more intravesical chemo-or immunotherapy. Chemotherapy reduces recurrences but not progression. Intravesical immunotherapy(BCG prevents or delays progression. Patients at high risk for progression may need upfront cystectomy.

  12. Dynamic Prognostication Using Conditional Recurrence and Progression Estimates for Patients with Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Carmen V; Ederer, Ines A; de Martino, Michela; Hofbauer, Sebastian L; Lucca, Ilaria; Mbeutcha, Aurélie; Mathieu, Romain; Haitel, Andrea; Susani, Martin; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Klatte, Tobias

    2016-07-01

    Conditional estimates provide a dynamic prediction of outcomes but to our knowledge there are no data on nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. We assessed changes in conditional recurrence and progression rates after transurethral resection of the bladder and explored the prognostic impact of established factors and risk groups with time. We retrospectively analyzed data on 1,292 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed Ta/T1 bladder cancer who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder. Study end points were time to first recurrence and time to progression. The 2-year recurrence rate at baseline was 36%, which improved as a function of the time that patients were free of disease recurrence. After 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months the 2-year conditional recurrence rate improved to 31% (14% improvement vs baseline), 22% (39% improvement), 16% (56% improvement), 13% (64% improvement) and 11% (69% improvement), respectively. Comparably, conditional progression rates improved with increasing followup, although relative differences were less distinct. The prognostic impact of established factors and nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer risk groups progressively decreased with time and finally disappeared. However, bacillus Calmette-Guérin had a protective effect on progression even after 3 years. We provide tables with dynamic prognostic information at all analyzed time points. In patients with primary Ta/T1 bladder cancer recurrence and progression rates improve with time. The prognostic impact of established factors and risk groups decreases and finally disappears. The effect of bacillus Calmette-Guérin on progression is long-lasting. Conditional outcome estimates may improve patient counseling and individualize surveillance planning. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A programmable DNA origami nanospring that reveals force-induced adjacent binding of myosin VI heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, M; Wickham, S F; Ikezaki, K; Yanagida, T; Shih, W M

    2016-12-12

    Mechanosensitive biological nanomachines such as motor proteins and ion channels regulate diverse cellular behaviour. Combined optical trapping with single-molecule fluorescence imaging provides a powerful methodology to clearly characterize the mechanoresponse, structural dynamics and stability of such nanomachines. However, this system requires complicated experimental geometry, preparation and optics, and is limited by low data-acquisition efficiency. Here we develop a programmable DNA origami nanospring that overcomes these issues. We apply our nanospring to human myosin VI, a mechanosensory motor protein, and demonstrate nanometre-precision single-molecule fluorescence imaging of the individual motor domains (heads) under force. We observe force-induced transitions of myosin VI heads from non-adjacent to adjacent binding, which correspond to adapted roles for low-load and high-load transport, respectively. Our technique extends single-molecule studies under force and clarifies the effect of force on biological processes.

  14. Structural insight into the UNC-45–myosin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratev, Filip; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Pajeva, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    is mainly stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Remarkably, the contact surface area is similar to that of the myosinactin complex. A significant interspecies difference in the myosin binding epitope is observed. Our results reveal the structural basis of MYH7 exons 15–16 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy......The UNC-45 chaperone protein interacts with and affects the folding, stability, and the ATPase activity of myosins. It plays a critical role in the cardiomyopathy development and in the breast cancer tumor growth. Here we propose the first structural model of the UNC-45–myosin complex using various...

  15. Reduction of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Malene Bøg

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis. Risager, Malene Bøg; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærsgaard; Ebbensgaard, Nanna Andersen; Zieger, Karsten. Department of Urology, Randers Regional Hospital, Randers, Denmark....... Background: Recurrences after non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) are common and a major burden for health care systems. Fluorescence-guided resection/ photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis can improve recurrence free survival, but the further outcome and cost......-invasive bladder cancer were excluded. 190 consecutive patients, treated between 03-01-2008 and 28-02-2010, were included into the intervention group, while 216 patients, treated between 03-01-2006 and 29-02-2008, served as controls. Procedures and pathology results were registered. The groups were comparable...

  16. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoda, Hiroki [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Katayama, Eisaku [Graduate School of Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki [Department of Biosciences, School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Utsunomiya, Tochigiken 320-8551 (Japan); Akimoto, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Sugi, Haruo, E-mail: sugi@kyf.biglobe.ne.jp [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. {yields} We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. {yields} We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. {yields} The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. {yields} The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  17. Combinations of urinary biomarkers for surveillance of patients with incident nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: the European FP7 UROMOL project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiverloon, Tahlita C M; Beukers, Willemien; van der Keur, Kirstin A; Nieuweboer, Annemieke J M; Reinert, Thomas; Dyrskjot, Lars; Orntoft, Torben F; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2013-05-01

    We determined a combination of markers with optimal sensitivity to detect recurrence in voided urine after resection of an incident low grade, nonmuscle invasive bladder tumor. A total of 136 patients with G1/G2 nonmuscle invasive bladder tumor were included in the study at transurethral resection of the incident tumor. At least 3 followup urine samples were required for patient selection. DNA was extracted from the incident tumor and cell pellets of subsequently collected urine samples. We performed FGFR3, PIK3CA and RAS mutation analysis, and microsatellite and methylation analysis on tissue and urine DNA samples. We obtained 716 urine samples. The 136 patients experienced a total of 552 recurrences during a median 3-year followup. Sensitivity for detecting a recurrent tumor varied between 66% and 68% for the molecular tests after patient stratification based on tumor DNA analysis. A combination of markers increased sensitivity but decreased the number of patients eligible for a certain test combination. Combining urine cytology with FGFR3 analysis without stratifying for FGFR3 status of the incident tumor increased sensitivity from 56% to 76%. A combination of markers increased the percentage of patients eligible for urine based followup and the sensitivity of recurrence detection. Adding FGFR3 analysis to urine cytology could be valuable for noninvasive followup of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  19. A role for myosin II in mammalian mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Farida; Gauvin, Timothy J; Higgs, Henry N

    2014-02-17

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, undergoing both fission and fusion regularly in interphase cells. Mitochondrial fission is thought to be part of a quality-control mechanism whereby damaged mitochondrial components are segregated from healthy components in an individual mitochondrion, followed by mitochondrial fission and degradation of the damaged daughter mitochondrion. Fission also plays a role in apoptosis. Defects in mitochondrial dynamics can lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Mitochondrial fission requires the dynamin GTPase Drp1, which assembles in a ring around the mitochondrion and appears to constrict both outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. However, mechanisms controlling Drp1 assembly on mammalian mitochondria are unclear. Recent results show that actin polymerization, driven by the endoplasmic reticulum-bound formin protein INF2, stimulates Drp1 assembly at fission sites. Here, we show that myosin II also plays a role in fission. Chemical inhibition by blebbistatin or small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated suppression of myosin IIA or myosin IIB causes an increase in mitochondrial length in both control cells and cells expressing constitutively active INF2. Active myosin II accumulates in puncta on mitochondria in an actin- and INF2-dependent manner. In addition, myosin II inhibition decreases Drp1 association with mitochondria. Based on these results, we propose a mechanistic model in which INF2-mediated actin polymerization leads to myosin II recruitment and constriction at the fission site, enhancing subsequent Drp1 accumulation and fission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Precipitation of kidney myosin IIA and IIB by freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Decivaldo dos Santos; da Cruz, Grabriel Costa Nunes; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; Coelho, Milton Vieira

    2011-03-01

    Actomyosin precipitation is a critical step in the purification of myosins. In this work, the objective was to precipitate rat kidney actomyosin and isolate myosin by freezing and thawing the soluble fraction. Kidney was homogenized in imidazole buffer, centrifuged at 45000 g for 30 min, and the supernatant was frozen at -20°C for 48 h. The supernatant was thawed at 4°C, centrifuged at 45000 g for 30 min and the precipitate washed twice with imidazole buffer pH 7.0 (with and without Triton X-100, respectively). The resulting precipitate presented a polypeptide profile in SDS/PAGE characteristic of actomyosin and expressed Mg- and K/EDTA-ATPase activity. The actomyosin complex was solubilized with ATP and Mg, and the main polypeptide, p200, was purified in a DEAE-Sepharose column. p200 was marked with anti-myosin II, co-sedimented with F-actin in the absence, but not in the presence, of ATP and was identified by MS/MS with a high Mascot score for myosin IIA. The analysis identified peptides exclusive of myosin IIB, but detected no peptides exclusive of myosin IIC.

  1. Gene duplication and conversion events shaped three homologous, differentially expressed myosin regulatory light chain (MLC2) genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerrits, L.; Overheul, G.J.; Derks, R.C.; Wieringa, B.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Wansink, D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin II is a hexameric protein complex consisting of two myosin heavy chains, two myosin essential light chains and two myosin regulatory light chains. Multiple subunit isoforms exist, allowing great diversity in myosin II composition which likely impacts on its contractile properties. Little is

  2. Dynamic instability of collective myosin II motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Fang; Wang, Zi-Qing; Li, Qi-Kun; Xing, Jian-Jun; Wang, Guo-Dong

    2016-11-01

    Some kinds of muscles can oscillate spontaneously, which is related to the dynamic instability of the collective motors. Based on the two-state ratchet model and with consideration of the motor stiffness, the dynamics of collective myosin II motors are studied. It is shown that when the motor stiffness is small, the velocity of the collective motors decreases monotonically with load increasing. When the motor stiffness becomes large, dynamic instability appears in the force-velocity relationship of the collective-motor transport. For a large enough motor stiffness, the zero-velocity point lies in the unstable range of the force-velocity curve, and the motor system becomes unstable before the motion is stopped, so spontaneous oscillations can be generated if the system is elastically coupled to its environment via a spring. The oscillation frequency is related to the motor stiffness, motor binding rate, spring stiffness, and the width of the ATP excitation interval. For a medium motor stiffness, the zero-velocity point lies outside the unstable range of the force-velocity curve, and the motion will be stopped before the instability occurs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11205123).

  3. Activation of endothelial pro-resolving anti-inflammatory pathways by circulating microvesicles from non-muscular myosin light chain kinase-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderahim Gaceb

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microvesicles, small membrane vesicles released from cells, have beneficial and/or deleterious effects in sepsis. We previously reported that non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK deletion protects mice against endotoxic shock by reducing inflammation. Here, we have evaluated the consequences of nmMLCK deletion on microvesicles phenotypes and their effects on mouse aortic endothelial cells in association with vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction during endotoxic shock induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced an increase in levels of circulating microvesicles in wild type but not in nmMLCK-deficient mice. Microvesicles from nmMLCK-deficient mice (MVsnmMLCK-/- prevented the inflammatory effects of lipopolysaccharide with concomitant increase of anti- inflammatory and reduction of pro-inflammatory secretome in mouse aortic endothelial cells. In addition, MVsnmMLCK-/- reduced the efficacy of lipopolysaccharide to increase aortic oxidative and nitrosative stresses as well as macrophage infiltration in the aorta. Moreover, MVsnmMLCK-/- prevented ex vivo endothelial dysfunction, vascular hyporeactivity and in vivo overproduction of nitric oxide in heart and liver in response to lipopolysaccharide. Altogether, these findings provide evidence that nmMLCK deletion generates circulating microvesicles displaying protective effects by activating endothelial pro-resolving anti-inflammatory pathways allowing the effective down-regulation of oxidative and nitrative stresses associated with endotoxic shock. Thus, nmMLCK plays a pivotal role in susceptibility to sepsis via the control of cellular activation and release of circulating microvesicles.

  4. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Justin R.; Dahm, Philipp; Chang, Sam S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients’ values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care. PMID:26604443

  5. Quality-of-life survey for patients diagnosed with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abáigar-Pedraza, I; Megías-Garrigós, J; Sánchez-Payá, J

    2016-05-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of a quality-of-life survey for patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer. A total of 180 patients were included in the study. We developed a survey with 21 questions grouped into 5 areas. The patients filled in this survey and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Bladder Cancer (FACT-BL) survey. To assess reliability, we calculated Cronbach's alpha coefficient and the kappa index. To determine criterion validity, we studied the association between the scores obtained from our survey and those from the FACT-BL survey using the Pearson correlation coefficient. To determine the construct validity (factorial and discriminatory), we performed a factor analysis, comparing it with Student's t-test for the scores obtained according to the tumour characteristics of reduced quality of life (e.g., malignancies located at the trigone of the bladder). Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient was .83, and the kappa index varied between .7 and 1. For the association study between the new survey and the FACT-BL survey, we measured an r=.82 for the overall score and between r=.68 (disease) and r=.97 (sex life) in the various measures. In the factor analysis, we measured a Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin index of .77 and performed the Barlett test (Pcancer is reliable and valid. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: what's changing and what has changed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Rodriguez, Oscar; Parada, Rubén; Palou Redorta, Joan

    2017-02-03

    Nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is a challenging disease to manage primarily due to its varied clinical course. The management of NMIBC has witnessed a widespread change with respect to its diagnosis and treatment. Although transurethral resection (TUR) and adjuvant bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) stills remain the cornerstone, newer protocols has come into vogue to achieve optimal care. On the basis of a literature review, we aimed to establish 'what changes has already occurred and what is expected in the future' in NMIBC. A Medline search was performed to identify the published literature with respect to diagnosis, treatment and future perspectives on NMIBC. Particular emphasis was directed to determinants such as the quality of TUR and the newer modifications, Re-TUR, current status of newer macroscopic and microscopic imaging, role of urinary biomarkers, clinical, histologic and molecular predictors of high-risk disease, administration of intravesical agents, salvage therapy in BCG recurrence and the current best practice guidelines were analyzed. Optimal TUR, restaging in select group, incorporation of newer endoscopic imaging and judicious administration of intravesical chemo-immunotherapeutic agents can contribute to better patient care. Although there is a plethora of urinary markers, there is insufficient evidence for their use in isolation. The future probably lies in identification of genetic markers to determine disease recurrence, nonresponders to standard treatment and early institution of alternative/targeted therapy.

  7. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients' values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care.

  8. The Role of Interferon in the Management of BCG Refractory Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres F. Correa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thirty to forty percent of patients with high grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC fail to respond to intravesical therapy with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG. Interferon-α2B plus BCG has been shown to be effective in a subset of patients with NMIBC BCG refractory disease. Here we present a contemporary series on the effectiveness and safety of intravesical BCG plus interferon-α2B therapy in patients with BCG refractory NMIBC. Methods. From January of 2005 to April of 2014 we retrospectively found 44 patients who underwent induction with combination IFN/BCG for the management of BCG refractory NMIBC. A chart review was performed to assess initial pathological stage/grade, pathological stage/grade at the time of induction, time to IFN/BCG failure, pathological stage/grade at failure, postfailure therapy, and current disease state. Results. Of the 44 patients who met criteria for the analysis. High risk disease was found in 88.6% of patients at induction. The 12-month and 24-month recurrence-free survival were 38.6% and 18.2%, respectively. 25 (56.8% ultimately had disease recurrence. Radical cystectomy was performed in 16 (36.4% patients. Conclusion. Combination BCG plus interferon-α2B remains a reasonably safe alternative treatment for select patients with BCG refractory disease prior to proceeding to radical cystectomy.

  9. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. THE DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER RECURRENCE, BY APPLYING CLINICAL METHODS AND FISH ANALYSIS (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Troyanov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the-state-of-the-art of diagnosis and prediction of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC. It gives data on the chromosomal abnormalities identified in urothelial cancer cells according to the results of trials. The development of a procedure for FISH diagnosis of BC is noted to be warranted. An algorithm for interpreting the result of the FISH analysis is given. The use of data on chromosomal abnormalities as additional predictors of the course of non-muscle invasive BC is described. The application of the FISH technique in assessing the results of adjuvant treatment in patients with non-muscle invasive BC is also depicted. In summary, the main problems in the existing algorithms for its diagnosis and prediction, by employing the FISH technique, are indicated.

  11. THE DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER RECURRENCE, BY APPLYING CLINICAL METHODS AND FISH ANALYSIS (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Troyanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the-state-of-the-art of diagnosis and prediction of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC. It gives data on the chromosomal abnormalities identified in urothelial cancer cells according to the results of trials. The development of a procedure for FISH diagnosis of BC is noted to be warranted. An algorithm for interpreting the result of the FISH analysis is given. The use of data on chromosomal abnormalities as additional predictors of the course of non-muscle invasive BC is described. The application of the FISH technique in assessing the results of adjuvant treatment in patients with non-muscle invasive BC is also depicted. In summary, the main problems in the existing algorithms for its diagnosis and prediction, by employing the FISH technique, are indicated.

  12. Myosin cross-bridges do not form precise rigor bonds in hypertrophic heart muscle carrying troponin T mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midde, K; Dumka, V; Pinto, J R; Muthu, P; Marandos, P; Gryczynski, I; Gryczynski, Z; Potter, J D; Borejdo, J

    2011-09-01

    Distribution of orientations of myosin was examined in ex-vivo myofibrils from hearts of transgenic (Tg) mice expressing Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) troponin T (TnT) mutations I79N, F110I and R278C. Humans are heterozygous for sarcomeric FHC mutations and so hypertrophic myocardium contains a mixture of the wild-type (WT) and mutated (MUT) TnT. If mutations are expressed at a low level there may not be a significant change in the global properties of heart muscle. In contrast, measurements from a few molecules avoid averaging inherent in the global measurements. It is thus important to examine the properties of only a few molecules of muscle. To this end, the lever arm of one out of every 60,000 myosin molecules was labeled with a fluorescent dye and a small volume within the A-band (~1 fL) was observed by confocal microscopy. This volume contained on average 5 fluorescent myosin molecules. The lever arm assumes different orientations reflecting different stages of acto-myosin enzymatic cycle. We measured the distribution of these orientations by recording polarization of fluorescent light emitted by myosin-bound fluorophore during rigor and contraction. The distribution of orientations of rigor WT and MUT myofibrils was significantly different. There was a large difference in the width and of skewness and kurtosis of rigor distributions. These findings suggest that the hypertrophic phenotype associated with the TnT mutations can be characterized by a significant increase in disorder of rigor cross-bridges. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Myosin II activity regulates vinculin recruitment to focal adhesions through FAK-mediated paxillin phosphorylation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana M. Pasapera; Ian C. Schneider; Erin Rericha; David D. Schlaepfer; Clare M. Waterman

    2010-01-01

    ...) are myosin II and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness dependent. Myosin II activity promotes FAK/ Src-mediated phosphorylation of paxillin on tyrosines 31 and 118 and vinculin association with paxillin...

  14. Protection against osmotic stress by cGMP-mediated myosin phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuwayama, H; Ecke, M; Gerisch, G; VanHaastert, PJM

    1996-01-01

    Conventional myosin functions universally as a generator of motive force in eukaryotic cells. Analysis of mutants of the microorganism Dictyostelium discoideum revealed that myosin also provides resistance against high external osmolarities. An osmo-induced increase of intracellular guanosine

  15. Risk prediction scores for recurrence and progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: an international validation in primary tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moniek M Vedder

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the validity of two risk scores for patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in different European settings, in patients with primary tumours. METHODS: We included 1,892 patients with primary stage Ta or T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer who underwent a transurethral resection in Spain (n = 973, the Netherlands (n = 639, or Denmark (n = 280. We evaluated recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival according to the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and the Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores for each patient and used the concordance index (c-index to indicate discriminative ability. RESULTS: The 3 cohorts were comparable according to age and sex, but patients from Denmark had a larger proportion of patients with the high stage and grade at diagnosis (p<0.01. At least one recurrence occurred in 839 (44% patients and 258 (14% patients had a progression during a median follow-up of 74 months. Patients from Denmark had the highest 10-year recurrence and progression rates (75% and 24%, respectively, whereas patients from Spain had the lowest rates (34% and 10%, respectively. The EORTC and CUETO risk scores both predicted progression better than recurrence with c-indices ranging from 0.72 to 0.82 while for recurrence, those ranged from 0.55 to 0.61. CONCLUSION: The EORTC and CUETO risk scores can reasonably predict progression, while prediction of recurrence is more difficult. New prognostic markers are needed to better predict recurrence of tumours in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients.

  16. THE DIAGNOSIS AND PREDICTION OF NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER RECURRENCE, BY APPLYING CLINICAL METHODS AND FISH ANALYSIS (A REVIEW OF LITERATURE)

    OpenAIRE

    A. V. Troyanov

    2014-01-01

    The review deals with the-state-of-the-art of diagnosis and prediction of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC). It gives data on the chromosomal abnormalities identified in urothelial cancer cells according to the results of trials. The development of a procedure for FISH diagnosis of BC is noted to be warranted. An algorithm for interpreting the result of the FISH analysis is given. The use of data on chromosomal abnormalities as additional predictors of the course of non-muscle invasive ...

  17. Are we following the guidelines on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Oliveira Reis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the clinical practice of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC treatment in Brazil in relation to international guidelines: Sociedade Brasileira de Urologia (SBU, European Association of Urology (EAU and American Urological Association (AUA. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study using questionnaires about urological practice on treatment of NMIBC during the 32nd Brazilian Congress of Urology. A total of 650 question forms were answered. Results There were 73% of complete answers (total of 476 question forms. In total, 246 urologists (51.68% lived in the southeast region and 310 (65.13% treat 1 to 3 cases of NMIBC per month. Low risk cancer: Only 35 urologists (7.5% apply the single intravesical dose of immediate chemotherapy with Mitomicin C recommended by the above guidelines. Adjuvant therapy with BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR is used by 167 participants (35.1% and 271 urologists (56.9% use only TUR. High risk tumors: 397 urologists (83.4% use adjuvant therapy, 375 (78.8% use BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR, of which 306 (64.3% referred the use for at least one year. Intravesical chemotherapy with Mitomicin C (a controversial recommendation was used by 22 urologists (4.6%. BCG dose raised a lot of discrepancies. Induction doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 105 (22%, 193 (40.4% and 54 (11.3% respectively. Maintenance doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 190 (48.7%, 144 (37.0% and 32 (8.2% urologists, respectively. Schemes of administration were also varied and the one cited by SWOG protocol was the most used: 142 (29.8%. Conclusion SBU, EAU and AUA guidelines are partially respected by Brazilian urologists, particularly in low risk tumors. In high risk tumors, concordance rates are comparable to international data. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the reasons of such disagreement.

  18. Managing Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Old Disease, New Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Uno Malmström

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof Per-Uno Malmström opened this symposium on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC by describing the medical and economic burden caused by the increasing incidence of bladder cancer and the lack of new therapeutic options available to address the challenges of the management of NMIBC. Prof Marko Babjuk followed with a presentation that demonstrated that risk stratification using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores remains a useful tool for determining the best individual treatment options for patients. The next presentation, given by Dr Carsten Ohlmann, described the use of mitomycin C (MMC for low and intermediate-risk patients as per the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines. However, despite a favourable safety profile, single case reports of severe adverse events following treatment with MMC should not be dismissed. MMC should therefore be given with care, with an emphasis on performing high quality transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB. Prof Bernard Malavaud then presented details of newer diagnostic methods, such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD and narrow band imaging (NBI, which offer better optical tumour recognition for the surgeon than the old standard of white light cystoscopy. The uptake of PDD and NBI in the future will facilitate an increase in the quality of TURB. Finally, Prof Ashish Kamat explained that recurrence of bladder cancer after bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG treatment (‘BCG failure’ needs to be more clearly defined and stratified. He stated that optimal recognition of timing with relation to BCG immunotherapy is critical to determine the next steps. For example, in the past, patients with late recurrence who may have benefitted from challenge with BCG may have been overlooked.

  19. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Are epicrises the ‘Bermuda Triangle’ of information transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Matthias; Wick, Anne-Kathrin; Roiner, Michael; Mathew, Marcella; Gilfrich, Christian; Schostak, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to collect information regarding the quality of communication of risk-determining factors or risk profile, and the guideline conformity of recommendations for adjuvant treatment in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) between clinical and ambulatory urologists. Material and methods At three German urological clinics during the period between 2012-2014, epicrises of 1,033 NMIBC-patients were retrospectively summarised to 505 tumour episodes (tumour resection including any re-resections) and analysed regarding the endpoints 1) risk profile is explicitly named or recorded risk factors are sufficient for the determination of risk profile, and 2) guideline conformity of treatment recommendation. Independent factors influencing the endpoints were determined by means of multivariate logistic regression models. Results The risk profile was explicitly named for 3.6% of tumour episodes; for 68.9% a risk profile could be derived from the information in the epicrises. Treatment recommendations were given for 93.7% of tumour episodes, but only 17.8% were guideline compliant. 42.6% of the recommendations were not reliably effective; 33.1% and 0.2% resulted in under- and overtreatment respectively. Neither endpoint showed gender specific or regional differences, but both were considerably less likely to be achieved in case of recurrence. Conclusions The discrepancy between treatment recommendation (93.7%) and guideline compliance (17.8%) could indicate a lack of familiarity with guidelines. The quality of the epicrises of NMIBC-patients was poor and bore the potential risk of undertreatment. The results of this study are not necessarily applicable to other clinics, but could, however, prompt physicians to re-examine epicrises for the fulfillment of the quality criteria examined here. PMID:29104786

  20. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Are epicrises the 'Bermuda Triangle' of information transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebentrau, Steffen; May, Matthias; Wick, Anne-Kathrin; Roiner, Michael; Mathew, Marcella; Gilfrich, Christian; Schostak, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to collect information regarding the quality of communication of risk-determining factors or risk profile, and the guideline conformity of recommendations for adjuvant treatment in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) between clinical and ambulatory urologists. At three German urological clinics during the period between 2012-2014, epicrises of 1,033 NMIBC-patients were retrospectively summarised to 505 tumour episodes (tumour resection including any re-resections) and analysed regarding the endpoints 1) risk profile is explicitly named or recorded risk factors are sufficient for the determination of risk profile, and 2) guideline conformity of treatment recommendation. Independent factors influencing the endpoints were determined by means of multivariate logistic regression models. The risk profile was explicitly named for 3.6% of tumour episodes; for 68.9% a risk profile could be derived from the information in the epicrises. Treatment recommendations were given for 93.7% of tumour episodes, but only 17.8% were guideline compliant. 42.6% of the recommendations were not reliably effective; 33.1% and 0.2% resulted in under- and overtreatment respectively. Neither endpoint showed gender specific or regional differences, but both were considerably less likely to be achieved in case of recurrence. The discrepancy between treatment recommendation (93.7%) and guideline compliance (17.8%) could indicate a lack of familiarity with guidelines. The quality of the epicrises of NMIBC-patients was poor and bore the potential risk of undertreatment. The results of this study are not necessarily applicable to other clinics, but could, however, prompt physicians to re-examine epicrises for the fulfillment of the quality criteria examined here.

  1. Optimization of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer recurrence detection using a urine based FGFR3 mutation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiverloon, Tahlita C M; Tjin, Stephen S; Busstra, Martijn; Bangma, Chris H; Boevé, Egbert R; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2011-08-01

    FGFR3 mutations occur in 70% of nonmuscle invasive bladder tumors. Although urine based FGFR3 mutation analysis can detect recurrence, its sensitivity may be limited if samples have few or no tumor cells. We determined whether test sensitivity depends on tumor size and the time point of urine collection, and how to increase sensitivity. A total of 440 urine samples from 18 patients with a suspicious bladder lesion at cystoscopy were collected during 6 days before surgery. Eight patients (300 samples) had an FGFR3 mutant tumor, including 4 each with a tumor greater than 3 and less than 1.5 cm. Polymerase chain reaction based FGFR3 analysis was done on all tumors and urine samples. FGFR3 mutations were detected in 257 of the 300 urine samples (86%) from patients with an FGFR3 mutant tumor. Assay sensitivity was 100% for tumors greater than 3 cm and 75% for tumors less than 1.5 cm. It increased to 100% in patients with a less than 1.5 cm tumor when samples were pooled during 24 hours. Sensitivity was not influenced by the time of urine collection. All urine samples from patients with an FGFR3 wild-type tumor were negative for FGFR3 mutation. The sensitivity of tumor detection increased with tumor size. FGFR3 assay sensitivity depends on the number of shed tumor cells and improves by increasing urine volume. These findings suggest that there is an upper limit to the sensitivity of the FGFR3 assay when 1 urine sample is analyzed. This may also apply to other DNA or RNA based assays. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Angiotensin II Facilitates Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-Mediated Myosin Light Chain Kinase Degradation in Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy

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    Shun Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Angiotensin II (Ang II has been shown to promote cardiac remodeling during the process of hypertrophy. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, a specific kinase for the phosphorylation of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2, plays an important role in regulating cardiac muscle contraction and hypertrophy. However, whether Ang II could facilitate cardiac hypertrophy by altering the expression of MLCK remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate this effect and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Cardiac hypertrophy was induced via pressure overload in rats, which were then evaluated via histological and biochemical measurements and echocardiography. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI was used to inhibit Ang II. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were stimulated with Ang II to induce hypertrophy and were treated with a matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 inhibitor. Myocyte hypertrophy was evaluated using immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Degradation of recombinant human MLCK by recombinant human MMP9 was tested using a cleavage assay. The expression levels of MLCK, MLC2, phospho-myosin light chain 2 (p-MLC2, myosin phosphatase 2 (MYPT2, and calmodulin (CaM were measured using western blotting. Results: ACEI improved cardiac function and remodeling and increased the levels of MLCK and p-MLC2 as well as reduced the expression of MMP9 in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Moreover, the MMP9 inhibitor alleviated myocyte hypertrophy and upregulated the levels of MLCK and p-MLC2 in Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Recombinant human MLCK was concentration- and time-dependently degraded by recombinant human MMP9 in vitro, and this process was prevented by the MMP9 inhibitor. Conclusion: Our results suggest that Ang II is involved in the degradation of MLCK in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and that this process was mediated by MMP9.

  3. Molecular adaptability of carp myosin: a study of some physico-chemical properties and their comparison with those of rabbit myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, A; Samejima, K; Takahashi, K; Yasui, T

    1979-10-01

    During thermal inactivation, the addition of as low as M urea resulted in the reduction of delta G identical to barrier of the inactivation of carp myosin Ca2+-ATPase, whereas that of rabbit myosin remained unaffected. In the absence of urea, a four-hour incubation of carp myosin was accompanied by the release of light chains at 30 degrees C, a value 10 degrees C lower than that for rabbit myosin. Electron micrographs revealed that carp myosin forms artificial thick filaments, which were uniform in size and may differ in a few details from those of rabbit. Not only that helical content of carp myosin was about 4% less than those of rabbit myosin, but it showed more sensitivity to thermal and urea denaturation; and its reversibility upon subsequent cooling or removal of urea was rather poor. The loss in helicity of myosins by urea was a concentration- and temperature-dependent biphasic reaction, with the most obvious effect observed on carp myosin. That carp myosin has increased tendency of unfolding in urea solutions was confirmed by viscosity data and the exposure of thiols also. Even in the absence of urea more SH groups of carp myosin were incorporated by DTNB, and more epsilon-amino groups reacted with NQS. Carp myosin remained in solution till the modification of about 52 surface myosin remained in solution till the modification of about 52 surface amino groups, whereas no precipitation effect was noted in case of rabbit myosin. Neither amino-acid composition nor some parameters derived from it, such as average hydrophobicity polarity index and number of polar side chains, revealed any difference pertinent to the relative stability of the two myosins. On the contrary, the contractile efficiency of carp myosin in the near physiological range was high and thus inversely related with the thermostability. This relationship along with the above evidence has been regarded to demonstrate the adaptability of carp myosin through a loose molecular conformation, which

  4. Characterization of a Myosin VII MyTH/FERM domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Rebecca J.; Johnsrud, Daniel O.; Thomas, David D.; Titus, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    A group of closely related myosins are characterized by the presence of at least one MyTH/FERM (myosin talin homology 4; band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin) domain in their C-terminal tails. This domain interacts with a variety of binding partners, and mutations in either the MyTH4 or FERM domains of myosin VII and XV result in deafness, highlighting the functional importance of each domain. The N-terminal MyTH/FERM region of Dictyostelium myosin VII (M7) has been isolated as a first step toward gaining insight into the function of this domain and its interaction with binding partners. The M7 MyTH4/FERM domain (MF1) binds to both actin and microtubules in vitro, with dissociation constants of 13.7 and 1.7 μM, respectively. Gel filtration and UV spectroscopy reveal that MF1 exists as a monomer in solution and forms a well-folded, compact conformation with a high degree of secondary structure. These results indicate that MF1 forms an integrated structural domain that serves to couple actin filaments and microtubules in specific regions of the cytoskeleton. PMID:21875595

  5. Transportation of Nanoscale Cargoes by Myosin Propelled Actin Filaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persson, Malin; Gullberg, Maria; Tolf, Conny; Lindberg, A. Michael; Mansson, Alf; Kocer, Armagan

    2013-01-01

    Myosin II propelled actin filaments move ten times faster than kinesin driven microtubules and are thus attractive candidates as cargo-transporting shuttles in motor driven lab-on-a-chip devices. In addition, actomyosin-based transportation of nanoparticles is useful in various fundamental studies.

  6. Analysis of molecular intra-patient variation and delineation of a prognostic 12-gene signature in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; technology transfer from microarrays to PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Reinert, Thomas; Novoradovsky, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple clinical risk factors and genetic profiles have been demonstrated to predict progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however, no easily clinical applicable gene signature has been developed to predict disease progression independent of disease stage and grade. Meth...

  7. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, S.P.; Bajorin, D.F.; Dinney, C.P.; Efstathiou, J.A.; Groshen, S.; Hahn, N.M.; Hansel, D.; Kwiatkowski, D.; O'Donnell, M.; Rosenberg, J.; Svatek, R.; Abrams, J.S.; Al-Ahmadie, H.; Apolo, A.B.; Bellmunt, J.; Callahan, M.; Cha, E.K.; Drake, C.; Jarow, J.; Kamat, A.; Kim, W.; Knowles, M.; Mann, B.; Marchionni, L.; McConkey, D.; McShane, L.; Ramirez, N.; Sharabi, A.; Sharpe, A.H.; Solit, D.; Tangen, C.M.; Amiri, A.T.; Allen, E. Van; West, P.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Quale, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from

  8. ADF/cofilin regulates actomyosin assembly through competitive inhibition of myosin II binding to F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggan, O'Neil; Shaw, Alisa E; DeLuca, Jennifer G; Bamburg, James R

    2012-03-13

    The contractile actin cortex is important for diverse fundamental cell processes, but little is known about how the assembly of F-actin and myosin II motors is regulated. We report that depletion of actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin proteins in human cells causes increased contractile cortical actomyosin assembly. Remarkably, our data reveal that the major cellular defects resulting from ADF/cofilin depletion, including cortical F-actin accumulation, were largely due to excessive myosin II activity. We identify that ADF/cofilins from unicellular organisms to humans share a conserved activity to inhibit myosin II binding to F-actin, indicating a mechanistic rationale for our cellular results. Our study establishes an essential requirement for ADF/cofilin proteins in the control of normal cortical contractility and in processes such as mitotic karyokinesis. We propose that ADF/cofilin proteins are necessary for controlling actomyosin assembly and intracellular contractile force generation, a function of equal physiological importance to their established roles in mediating F-actin turnover. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Presence of cardiac alpha-myosin correlates with histochemical myosin Ca2+ ATPase activity in rabbit masseter muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredman, J. J.; Weijs, W. A.; Moorman, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    A combined enzyme-histochemical (ATPase reactivity) and immunohistochemical study has been performed on sections of rabbit masseter muscle. The majority of the fibres previously designated as type IIC and/or type I according to their ATPase activity were found to contain 'cardiac' alpha-myosin heavy

  10. PIK3CA gene alterations in bladder cancer are frequent and associate with reduced recurrence in non-muscle invasive tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, Marta; Martínez-Fernández, Mónica; García-Escudero, Ramón; Villacampa, Felipe; Marqués, Miriam; Saiz-Ladera, Cristina; Duarte, José; Martínez, Victor; Gómez, M José; Martín, M Luisa; Fernández, Manoli; Castellano, Daniel; Real, Francisco X; Rodriguez-Peralto, Jose L; De La Rosa, Federico; Paramio, Jesús M

    2015-07-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world, being the non-muscle invasive tumors (NMIBC) the most frequent. NMIBC shows a very high frequency of recurrence and, in certain cases, tumor progression. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, which controls cell growth, tumorigenesis, cell invasion and drug response, is frequently activated in numerous human cancers, including BC, in part through alterations of PIK3CA gene. However, the significance of PIK3CA gene alterations with respect to clinicopathological characteristics, and in particular tumor recurrence and progression, remains elusive. Here, we analyzed the presence of mutations in FGFR3 and PIK3CA genes and copy number alterations of PIK3CA gene in bladder tumor and their correspondent paired normal samples from 87 patients. We observed an extremely high frequency of PIK3CA gene alterations (mutations, copy gains, or both) in tumor samples, affecting primarily T1 and T2 tumors. A significant number of normal tissues also showed mutations and copy gains, being coincident with those found in the corresponding tumor sample. In low-grade tumors PIK3CA mutations associated with FGFR3 mutations. Alterations in PIK3CA gene resulted in increased Akt activity in tumors. Interestingly, the presence of PIK3CA gene alterations, and in particular gene mutations, is significantly associated with reduced recurrence of NMIBC patients. Importantly, the presence of FGFR3 mutations may influence the clinical outcome of patients bearing alterations in PIK3CA gene, and increased recurrence was associated to FGFR3 mutated, PIK3CA wt tumors. These findings may have high relevance in terms of using PI3K-targeted therapies for BC treatment. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Slit and Netrin-1 guide cranial motor axon pathfinding via Rho-kinase, myosin light chain kinase and myosin II

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    Drescher Uwe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing hindbrain, cranial motor axon guidance depends on diffusible repellent factors produced by the floor plate. Our previous studies have suggested that candidate molecules for mediating this effect are Slits, Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A (Sema3A. It is unknown to what extent these factors contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of motor axons, and the downstream signalling pathways are largely unclear. Results In this study, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the components of floor plate chemorepulsion and their downstream signalling pathways. Using in vitro motor axon deflection assays, we demonstrate that Slits and Netrin-1, but not Sema3A, contribute to floor plate repulsion. We also find that the axon pathways of dorsally projecting branchiomotor neurons are disrupted in Netrin-1 mutant mice and in chick embryos expressing dominant-negative Unc5a receptors, indicating an in vivo role for Netrin-1. We further demonstrate that Slit and Netrin-1 signalling are mediated by Rho-kinase (ROCK and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, which regulate myosin II activity, controlling actin retrograde flow in the growth cone. We show that MLCK, ROCK and myosin II are required for Slit and Netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse of cranial motor axons. Inhibition of these molecules in explant cultures, or genetic manipulation of RhoA or myosin II function in vivo causes characteristic cranial motor axon pathfinding errors, including the inability to exit the midline, and loss of turning towards exit points. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both Slits and Netrin-1 contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of cranial motor axons. They further indicate that RhoA/ROCK, MLCK and myosin II are components of Slit and Netrin-1 signalling pathways, and suggest that these pathways are of key importance in cranial motor axon navigation.

  12. Lampreys Have a Single Gene Cluster for the Fast Skeletal Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Daisuke; Ono, Yosuke; Hirano, Shigeki; Kan-no, Nobuhiro; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs) and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod), a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs) are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost) contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans). We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5′-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny. PMID:24376886

  13. Lampreys have a single gene cluster for the fast skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ikeda

    Full Text Available Muscle tissues contain the most classic sarcomeric myosin, called myosin II, which consists of 2 heavy chains (MYHs and 4 light chains. In the case of humans (tetrapod, a total of 6 fast skeletal-type MYH genes (MYHs are clustered on a single chromosome. In contrast, torafugu (teleost contains at least 13 fast skeletal MYHs, which are distributed in 5 genomic regions; the MYHs are clustered in 3 of these regions. In the present study, the evolutionary relationship among fast skeletal MYHs is elucidated by comparing the MYHs of teleosts and tetrapods with those of cyclostome lampreys, one of two groups of extant jawless vertebrates (agnathans. We found that lampreys contain at least 3 fast skeletal MYHs, which are clustered in a head-to-tail manner in a single genomic region. Although there was apparent synteny in the corresponding MYH cluster regions between lampreys and tetrapods, phylogenetic analysis indicated that lamprey and tetrapod MYHs have independently duplicated and diversified. Subsequent transgenic approaches showed that the 5'-flanking sequences of Japanese lamprey fast skeletal MYHs function as a regulatory sequence to drive specific reporter gene expression in the fast skeletal muscle of zebrafish embryos. Although zebrafish MYH promoters showed apparent activity to direct reporter gene expression in myogenic cells derived from mice, promoters from Japanese lamprey MYHs had no activity. These results suggest that the muscle-specific regulatory mechanisms are partially conserved between teleosts and tetrapods but not between cyclostomes and tetrapods, despite the conserved synteny.

  14. Actin structure-dependent stepping of myosin 5a and 10 during processive movement.

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    Jianjun Bao

    Full Text Available How myosin 10, an unconventional myosin, walks processively along actin is still controversial. Here, we used single molecule fluorescence techniques, TIRF and FIONA, to study the motility and the stepping mechanism of dimerized myosin 10 heavy-meromyosin-like fragment on both single actin filaments and two-dimensional F-actin rafts cross-linked by fascin or α-actinin. As a control, we also tracked and analyzed the stepping behavior of the well characterized processive motor myosin 5a. We have shown that myosin 10 moves processively along both single actin filaments and F-actin rafts with a step size of 31 nm. Moreover, myosin 10 moves more processively on fascin-F-actin rafts than on α-actinin-F-actin rafts, whereas myosin 5a shows no such selectivity. Finally, on fascin-F-actin rafts, myosin 10 has more frequent side steps to adjacent actin filaments than myosin 5a in the F-actin rafts. Together, these results reveal further single molecule features of myosin 10 on various actin structures, which may help to understand its cellular functions.

  15. Actin sliding velocity on pure myosin isoforms from hindlimb unloaded mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, M; Longa, E; Qaisar, R; Agoni, V; Desaphy, J-F; Camerino, D Conte; Bottinelli, R; Canepari, M

    2014-12-01

    Notwithstanding the widely accepted idea that following disuse skeletal muscles become faster, an increase in shortening velocity was previously observed mostly in fibres containing type 1 myosin, whereas a decrease was generally found in fibres containing type 2B myosin. In this study, unloaded shortening velocity of pure type 1 and 2B fibres from hindlimb unloaded mice was determined and a decrease in type 2B fibres was found. To clarify whether the decrease in shortening velocity could depend on alterations of myosin motor function, an in vitro motility assay approach was applied to study pure type 1 and pure type 2B myosin from hindlimb unloaded mice. The latter approach, assessing actin sliding velocity on isolated myosin in the absence of other myofibrillar proteins, enabled to directly investigate myosin motor function. Actin sliding velocity was significantly lower on type 2B myosin following unloading (2.70 ± 0.32 μm s(-1)) than in control conditions (4.11 ± 0.35 μm s(-1)), whereas actin sliding velocity of type 1 myosin was not different following unloading (0.89 ± 0.04 μm s(-1)) compared with control conditions (0.84 ± 0.17 μm s(-1)). Myosin light chain (MLC) isoform composition of type 2B myosin from hindlimb unloaded and control mice was not different. No oxidation of either type 1 or 2B myosin was observed. Higher phosphorylation of regulatory MLC in type 2B myosin after unloading was found. Results suggest that the observed lower shortening velocity of type 2B fibres following unloading could be related to slowing of acto-myosin kinetics in the presence of MLC phosphorylation. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans unc-82 encodes a serine/threonine kinase important for myosin filament organization in muscle during growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Pamela E; Chau, Johnnie; Flanagan, Kelly A; Reedy, April R; Schriefer, Lawrence A

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the unc-82 locus of Caenorhabditis elegans were previously identified by screening for disrupted muscle cytoskeleton in otherwise apparently normal mutagenized animals. Here we demonstrate that the locus encodes a serine/threonine kinase orthologous to human ARK5/SNARK (NUAK1/NUAK2) and related to the PAR-1 and SNF1/AMP-Activated kinase (AMPK) families. The predicted 1600-amino-acid polypeptide contains an N-terminal catalytic domain and noncomplex repetitive sequence in the remainder of the molecule. Phenotypic analyses indicate that unc-82 is required for maintaining the organization of myosin filaments and internal components of the M-line during cell-shape changes. Mutants exhibit normal patterning of cytoskeletal elements during early embryogenesis. Defects in localization of thick filament and M-line components arise during embryonic elongation and become progressively more severe as development proceeds. The phenotype is independent of contractile activity, consistent with unc-82 mutations preventing proper cytoskeletal reorganization during growth, rather than undermining structural integrity of the M-line. This is the first report establishing a role for the UNC-82/ARK5/SNARK kinases in normal development. We propose that activation of UNC-82 kinase during cell elongation regulates thick filament attachment or growth, perhaps through phosphorylation of myosin and paramyosin. We speculate that regulation of myosin is an ancestral characteristic of kinases in this region of the kinome.

  17. Molecular effects of the myosin activator omecamtiv mecarbil on contractile properties of skinned myocardium lacking cardiac myosin binding protein-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gresham, Kenneth S; Li, Amy; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Stelzer, Julian E

    2015-08-01

    Decreased expression of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) in the myocardium is thought to be a contributing factor to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in humans, and the initial molecular defect is likely abnormal cross-bridge (XB) function which leads to impaired force generation, decreased contractile performance, and hypertrophy in vivo. The myosin activator omecamtiv mecarbil (OM) is a pharmacological drug that specifically targets the myosin XB and recent evidence suggests that OM induces a significant decrease in the in vivo motility velocity and an increase in the XB duty cycle. Thus, the molecular effects of OM maybe beneficial in improving contractile function in skinned myocardium lacking cMyBP-C because absence of cMyBP-C in the sarcomere accelerates XB kinetics and enhances XB turnover rate, which presumably reduces contractile efficiency. Therefore, parameters of XB function were measured in skinned myocardium lacking cMyBP-C prior to and following OM incubation. We measured ktr, the rate of force redevelopment as an index of XB transition from both the weakly- to strongly-bound state and from the strongly- to weakly-bound states and performed stretch activation experiments to measure the rates of XB detachment (krel) and XB recruitment (kdf) in detergent-skinned ventricular preparations isolated from hearts of wild-type (WT) and cMyBP-C knockout (KO) mice. Samples from donor human hearts were also used to assess the effects of OM in cardiac muscle expressing a slow β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC). Incubation of skinned myocardium with OM produced large enhancements in steady-state force generation which were most pronounced at low levels of [Ca(2+)] activations, suggesting that OM cooperatively recruits additional XB's into force generating states. Despite a large increase in steady-state force generation following OM incubation, parallel accelerations in XB kinetics as measured by ktr were not observed, and there was a significant OM

  18. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish

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    Joshua Abrams

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11. Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt, which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y and coil-coiled (L1287M domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt. Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress.

  19. The Shaker-1 Mouse Myosin VIIa Deafness Mutation Results in a Severely Reduced Rate of the ATP Hydrolysis Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ailian; Haithcock, Jessica; Liu, Yingying; Eusner, Lauren; McConnell, Matthew; White, Howard D; Belknap, Betty; Forgacs, Eva

    2017-11-22

    Mutations in the MYO7A gene, encoding the motor protein myosin VIIa, can cause Usher 1B, a deafness/blindness syndrome in humans, and the shaker-1 phenotype, characterized by deafness, head tossing and circling behavior, in mice. Myosin VIIa is responsible for tension bearing and the transduction mechanism in the stereocilia and for melanosome transport in the retina, in line with the phenotypic outcomes observed in mice. However, the effect of the shaker-1 mutation, a R502P amino acid substitution, on the motor function is unclear. To explore this question, we determined the kinetic properties and the effect on the filopodial tip localization of the recombinant mouse myosin VIIa-5IQ-SAH R502P (MyoVIIa-sh1) construct. Interestingly, though residue 502 is localized to a region thought to be involved in interacting with actin, the kinetic parameters for actin binding changed only slightly for the mutant construct. However, the rate constant for ATP hydrolysis (k+H + k-H) was reduced by ~ 200 fold from 12 s-1 to 0.05 s-1 making the hydrolysis step the rate limiting step of the ATPase cycle in the presence and absence of actin. Given that wild type mouse myosin VIIa is a slow, high duty ratio, monomeric motor, this altered hydrolysis rate would reduce activity to extremely low levels. Indeed, the translocation to the filopodial tips was hampered by the diminished motor function of a dimeric construct of the shaker-1 mutant. We conclude that the diminished motor activity of this mutant is most likely responsible for impaired hearing in the shaker-1 mice. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. Myosin binding protein C, a phosphorylation-dependent force regulator in muscle that controls the attachment of myosin heads by its interaction with myosin S2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, G; Kress, K R; Gruen, M; Uttenweiler, D; Gautel, M; Fink, R H

    Myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C) is one of the major sarcomeric proteins involved in the pathophysiology of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The cardiac isoform is tris-phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK) on beta-adrenergic stimulation at a conserved N-terminal domain (MyBP-C motif), suggesting a role in regulating positive inotropy mediated by cAPK. Recent data show that the MyBP-C motif binds to a conserved segment of sarcomeric myosin S2 in a phosphorylation-regulated way. Given that most MyBP-C mutations that cause FHC are predicted to result in N-terminal fragments of the protein, we investigated the specific effects of the MyBP-C motif on contractility and its modulation by cAPK phosphorylation. The diffusion of proteins into skinned fibers allows the investigation of effects of defined molecular regions of MyBP-C, because the endogenous MyBP-C is associated with few myosin heads. Furthermore, the effect of phosphorylation of cardiac MyBP-C can be studied in a defined unphosphorylated background in skeletal muscle fibers only. Triton skinned fibers were tested for maximal isometric force, Ca(2+)/force relation, rigor force, and stiffness in the absence and presence of the recombinant cardiac MyBP-C motif. The presence of unphosphorylated MyBP-C motif resulted in a significant (1) depression of Ca(2+)-activated maximal force with no effect on dynamic stiffness, (2) increase of the Ca(2+) sensitivity of active force (leftward shift of the Ca(2+)/force relation), (3) increase of maximal rigor force, and (4) an acceleration of rigor force and rigor stiffness development. Tris-phosphorylation of the MyBP-C motif by cAPK abolished these effects. This is the first demonstration that the S2 binding domain of MyBP-C is a modulator of contractility. The anchorage of the MyBP-C motif to the myosin filament is not needed for the observed effects, arguing that the mechanism of MyBP-C regulation is at least partly independent of a "tether

  1. Clinical significance of serum and urinary HER2/neu protein levels in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Arikan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to compare serum and urinary HER2/neu levels between healthy control group and patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Additionally, we evaluated relationship of HER2/neu levels with tumor stage, grade, recurrence and progression. Materials and Methods: Fourty-four patients with primary non-muscle invasive bladder tumors (Group 2 and 40 healthy control group (Group 1 were included the study. Blood and urinary samples were collected from all patients and HER2/neu levels were measured by ELISA method. Blood and urinary HER2/neu levels and additionally, ratio of urinary HER2/neu levels to urinary creatinine levels were recorded. Demographic data and tumor characteristics were recorded. Results: Mean serum HER2/neu levels were similar between two groups and statistically significant difference wasn't observed. Urinary HER2/neu levels were significantly higher in group 2 than group 1. Ratio of urinary HER2/neu to urinary creatinine was significantly higher in group 2 than group 1, (p=0,021. Serum and urinary HER2/ neu levels were not associated with tumor stage, grade, recurrence and progression while ratio of urinary HER2/neu to urinary creatinin levels were significantly higher in high-grade tumors. HER2/neu, the sensitivity of the test was found to be 20.5%, and the specificity was 97.5%, also for the urinary HER2/neu/urinary creatinine ratio, the sensitivity and specificity of the test were found to be 31.8% and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Urinary HER2/neu and ratio of urinary creatinine urine were significantly higher in patients with bladder cancer compared to healthy subjects. Large series and controlled studies are needed for use as a tumor marker.

  2. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K. (IIT); (EMBL); (Scripps); (Duke); (Prince); (FSU); (MRC); (U. Florence)

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  3. Active multistage coarsening of actin networks driven by myosin motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marina Soares e; Depken, Martin; Stuhrmann, Björn; Korsten, Marijn; MacKintosh, Fred C.; Koenderink, Gijsje H.

    2011-01-01

    In cells, many vital processes involve myosin-driven motility that actively remodels the actin cytoskeleton and changes cell shape. Here we study how the collective action of myosin motors organizes actin filaments into contractile structures in a simplified model system devoid of biochemical regulation. We show that this self-organization occurs through an active multistage coarsening process. First, motors form dense foci by moving along the actin network structure followed by coalescence. Then the foci accumulate actin filaments in a shell around them. These actomyosin condensates eventually cluster due to motor-driven coalescence. We propose that the physical origin of this multistage aggregation is the highly asymmetric load response of actin filaments: they can support large tensions but buckle easily under piconewton compressive loads. Because the motor-generated forces well exceed this threshold, buckling is induced on the connected actin network that resists motor-driven filament sliding. We show how this buckling can give rise to the accumulation of actin shells around myosin foci and subsequent coalescence of foci into superaggregates. This new physical mechanism provides an explanation for the formation and contractile dynamics of disordered condensed actomyosin states observed in vivo. PMID:21593409

  4. Structural basis of cargo recognitions for class V myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhiyi; Liu, Xiaotian; Yu, Cong; Zhang, Mingjie

    2013-07-09

    Class V myosins (MyoV), the most studied unconventional myosins, recognize numerous cargos mainly via the motor's globular tail domain (GTD). Little is known regarding how MyoV-GTD recognizes such a diverse array of cargos specifically. Here, we solved the crystal structures of MyoVa-GTD in its apo-form and in complex with two distinct cargos, melanophilin and Rab interacting lysosomal protein-like 2. The apo-MyoVa-GTD structure indicates that most mutations found in patients with Griscelli syndrome, microvillus inclusion disease, or cancers or in "dilute" rodents likely impair the folding of GTD. The MyoVa-GTD/cargo complex structure reveals two distinct cargo-binding surfaces, one primarily via charge-charge interaction and the other mainly via hydrophobic interactions. Structural and biochemical analysis reveal the specific cargo-binding specificities of various isoforms of mammalian MyoV as well as very different cargo recognition mechanisms of MyoV between yeast and higher eukaryotes. The MyoVa-GTD structures resolved here provide a framework for future functional studies of vertebrate class V myosins.

  5. Myosin: a noncovalent stabilizer of fibrin in the process of clot dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, Krasimir; Tenekedjiev, Kiril; Ajtai, Katalin; Kovalszky, Ilona; Gombas, Judit; Váradi, Balázs; Machovich, Raymund

    2003-06-01

    Myosin modulates the fibrinolytic process as a cofactor of the tissue plasminogen activator and as a substrate of plasmin. We report now that myosin is present in arterial thrombi and it forms reversible noncovalent complexes with fibrinogen and fibrin with equilibrium dissociation constants in the micromolar range (1.70 and 0.94 microM, respectively). Competition studies using a peptide inhibitor of fibrin polymerization (glycl-prolyl-arginyl-proline [GPRP]) indicate that myosin interacts with domains common in fibrinogen and fibrin and this interaction is independent of the GPRP-binding polymerization site in the fibrinogen molecule. An association rate constant of 1.81 x 10(2) M(-1) x s(-1) and a dissociation rate constant of 3.07 x 10(-4) s(-1) are determined for the fibrinogen-myosin interaction. Surface plasmon resonance studies indicate that fibrin serves as a matrix core for myosin aggregation. The fibrin clots equilibrated with myosin are stabilized against dissolution initiated by plasminogen and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) or urokinase (at fibrin monomer-myosin molar ratio as high as 30) and by plasmin under static and flow conditions (at fibrin monomer-myosin molar ratio lower than 15). Myosin exerts similar effects on the tPA-induced dissolution of blood plasma clots. Covalent modification involving factor XIIIa does not contribute to this stabilizing effect; myosin is not covalently attached to the clot by the time of complete cross-linking of fibrin. Thus, our in vitro data suggest that myosin detected in arterial thrombi binds to the polymerized fibrin, in the bound form its tPA-cofactor properties are masked, and the myosin fibrin clot is relatively resistant to plasmin.

  6. Myosin V attachment to cargo requires the tight association of two functional subdomains

    OpenAIRE

    Pashkova, Natasha; Catlett, Natalie L.; Novak, Jennifer L.; Wu, Guanming; Lu, Renne; Cohen, Robert E.; Weisman, Lois S.

    2005-01-01

    The myosin V carboxyl-terminal globular tail domain is essential for the attachment of myosin V to all known cargoes. Previously, the globular tail was viewed as a single, functional entity. Here, we show that the globular tail of the yeast myosin Va homologue, Myo2p, contains two structural subdomains that have distinct functions, namely, vacuole-specific and secretory vesicle–specific movement. Biochemical and genetic analyses demonstrate that subdomain I tightly associates with subdomain I...

  7. Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C releases myosin heads from the surface of cardiac thick filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensler, Robert W.; Craig, Roger; Moss, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) has a key regulatory role in cardiac contraction, but the mechanism by which changes in phosphorylation of cMyBP-C accelerate cross-bridge kinetics remains unknown. In this study, we isolated thick filaments from the hearts of mice in which the three serine residues (Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302) that are phosphorylated by protein kinase A in the m-domain of cMyBP-C were replaced by either alanine or aspartic acid, mimicking the fully nonphosphorylated and the fully phosphorylated state of cMyBP-C, respectively. We found that thick filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-deficient hearts had highly ordered cross-bridge arrays, whereas the filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-mimetic hearts showed a strong tendency toward disorder. Our results support the hypothesis that dephosphorylation of cMyBP-C promotes or stabilizes the relaxed/superrelaxed quasi-helical ordering of the myosin heads on the filament surface, whereas phosphorylation weakens this stabilization and binding of the heads to the backbone. Such structural changes would modulate the probability of myosin binding to actin and could help explain the acceleration of cross-bridge interactions with actin when cMyBP-C is phosphorylated because of, for example, activation of β1-adrenergic receptors in myocardium. PMID:28167762

  8. Walking to work: roles for class V myosins as cargo transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, John A; Sellers, James R

    2011-12-07

    Cells use molecular motors, such as myosins, to move, position and segregate their organelles. Class V myosins possess biochemical and structural properties that should make them ideal actin-based cargo transporters. Indeed, studies show that class V myosins function as cargo transporters in yeast, moving a range of organelles, such as the vacuole, peroxisomes and secretory vesicles. There is also increasing evidence in vertebrate cells that class V myosins not only tether organelles to actin but also can serve as short-range, point-to-point organelle transporters, usually following long-range, microtubule-dependent organelle transport.

  9. Evolutionary traces decode molecular mechanism behind fast pace of myosin XI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamaladevi Divya P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoplasmic class XI myosins are the fastest processive motors known. This class functions in high-velocity cytoplasmic streaming in various plant cells from algae to angiosperms. The velocities at which they process are ten times faster than its closest class V homologues. Results To provide sequence determinants and structural rationale for the molecular mechanism of this fast pace myosin, we have compared the sequences from myosin class V and XI through Evolutionary Trace (ET analysis. The current study identifies class-specific residues of myosin XI spread over the actin binding site, ATP binding site and light chain binding neck region. Sequences for ET analysis were accumulated from six plant genomes, using literature based text search and sequence searches, followed by triple validation viz. CDD search, string-based searches and phylogenetic clustering. We have identified nine myosin XI genes in sorghum and seven in grape by sequence searches. Both the plants possess one gene product each belonging to myosin type VIII as well. During this process, we have re-defined the gene boundaries for three sorghum myosin XI genes using fgenesh program. Conclusion Molecular modelling and subsequent analysis of putative interactions involving these class-specific residues suggest a structural basis for the molecular mechanism behind high velocity of plant myosin XI. We propose a model of a more flexible switch I region that contributes to faster ADP release leading to high velocity movement of the algal myosin XI.

  10. Differential patterns of myosin Va expression during the ontogenesis of the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Brinn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va is an actin-based, processive molecular motor protein highly enriched in the nervous tissue of vertebrates. It has been associated with processes of cellular motility, which include organelle transport and neurite outgrowth. The in vivo expression of myosin Va protein in the developing nervous system of mammals has not yet been reported. We describe here the immunolocalization of myosin Va in the developing rat hippocampus. Coronal sections of the embryonic and postnatal rat hippocampus were probed with an affinity-purified, polyclonal anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was localized in the cytoplasm of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and of pyramidal cells in Ammon's horn formation. Myosin Va expression changed during development, being higher in differentiating rather than already differentiated granule and pyramidal cells. Some of these cells presented a typical migratory profile, while others resembled neurons that were in the process of differentiation. Myosin Va was also transiently expressed in fibers present in the fimbria. Myosin Va was not detected in germinative matrices of the hippocampus proper or of the dentate gyrus. In conclusion, myosin Va expression in both granule and pyramidal cells showed both position and time dependency during hippocampal development, indicating that this motor protein is under developmental regulation.

  11. Effects of high intensity unltrasound on structural and physicochemical properties of myosin from silver carp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ru; Liu, Qing; Xiong, Shanbai; Fu, Yicheng; Chen, Liang

    2017-07-01

    Myosin from silver carp was sonicated with varying power output (100, 150, 200 and 250W) for 3, 6, 9, and 12min. The changes in the structure and physicochemical properties of myosin were evaluated by dynamic light scattering, SDS-PAGE and some physicochemical indexes. The ultrasound treatments induced a significant conversion of myosin aggregates to smaller ones with a more uniform distribution, and obvious enhancement in solubility. The structure of myosin was also notably changed by sonication, with a decrease in Ca2+-ATPase activity and SH content, and an increase in surface hydrophobicity. Furthermore, SH groups were oxidized, leading to a decrease in reactive SH and total SH contents. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that ultrasound could induce the degradation of myosin heavy chain and change the protein fraction of myosin. Collectively, the ultrasonic treatment of 100W for 3min showed slight influence on the SH content, S0-ANS, and electrophoretic patterns, and the extent of changes in myosin structure and physicochemical properties tended to increase with ultrasonic power and time. The integrated data indicate that ultrasonic treatment can facilitate the improvement of the solubility and dispersion of myosin, but the choice of a suitable ultrasonic condition to avoid oxidation and degradation of myosin is very important. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  13. Atractylodin Induces Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Promotes Gastric Emptying through Ghrelin Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Bai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Atractylodin is one of the main constituents in the rhizomes of Atractylodes lancea Thunb., being capable of treating cancer cachexia-anorexia and age-related diseases as an agonist of growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR. GHSR was herein expressed in human gastric smooth muscle cells (HGSMCs and activated by ghrelin receptor agonist L-692,585. Like L-692,585, atractylodin also increased Ca2+ and enhanced the phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC through GHSR in HGSMCs. In addition, atractylodin promoted gastric emptying and MLC phosphorylation in the gastric antrum of mice also through GHSR. Collectively, atractylodin can activate GHSR in gastric smooth muscle, as a potential target in clinical practice.

  14. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Omer; Zaritsky, Assaf; Yaffe, Yakey; Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  15. Study of Cholesterol Repletion Effect on Nanomechanical Properties of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Via Rapid Broadband Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Ren, Juan; Liu, Yue; Huang, Huarong; Zheng, Xi; Zou, Qingze

    2017-03-01

    Abnormalities of blood cholesterol concentration are associated with increased risks for vascular disease, especially heart attacks and strokes. As one of the main lipid components of plasma membrane in all mammalian cells, cholesterol has a major impact on the mechanical properties of the membrane of endothelial cells. Although the effect of cholesterol depletion on cell mechanical properties has been studied, no results yet have been reported on quantitative investigation of cholesterol repletion effect. In this study, the cholesterol repletion effect on the nanomechanical properties of human umbilical vein endothelial cell (EA.hy926) was studied using a control-based atomic force microscope (AFM) nanomechanical measurement protocol. The viscoelasticity of EA.hy926 cells were measured over a large frequency range (0.1-100 Hz) using both constant-rate excitation force with different loading rates and a broadband excitation force. The viscoelasticity oscillation of the cell membranes under the cholesterol effect was also monitored in real-time. The experiment results showed that under the effect of cholesterol repletion, both the Young's modulus and the complex modulus of EA.hy926 cell were increased over 30%, respectively, and moreover, the amplitudes of both the elasticity oscillation and the viscosity oscillation at a period of around 200 s were increased over 70%, respectively. Therefore, this work is among the first to investigate the mechanical properties, particularly, the broadband viscoelasticity variations of EA.hy926 cells under cholesterol repletion treatment. The results revealed that cholesterol repletion may reinforce the coupling of F-actin to plasma membrane by increasing actin stability, and the cholesterol might have modified the submembrane cytoskeletal organization of EA.hy926 cell by causing the involvement of the motor protein nonmuscle myosin II.

  16. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Ziv

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  17. Analysis of organelle targeting by DIL domains of the Arabidopsis myosin XI family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirali eSattarzadeh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 myosin XI motor proteins. Previous insertional mutant analysis has implicated substantial redundancy of function of plant myosin XIs in transport of intracellular organelles. Considerable information is available about the interaction of cargo with the myosin XI-homologous yeast myosin V protein myo2p. We identified a region in each of twelve myosin XI sequences that correspond to the yeast myo2p secretory-vesicle binding domain (the DIL domain. Structural modeling of the myosin DIL domain region of plant myosin XIs revealed significant similarity to the yeast myo2p and myo4p DIL domains. Transient expression of YFP fusions with the Arabidopsis myosin XI DIL domain resulted in fluorescent labeling of a variety of organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, Golgi and nuclear envelope. With the exception of the YFP: MYA1-DIL fusion, expression of the DIL-YFP fusions resulted in loss of motility of labeled organelles, consistent with a dominant-negative effect. Certain fusions resulted in localization to the cytoplasm or to unidentified vesicles. The same YFP-domain fusion sometimes labeled more than one organelle. Expression of a YFP fusion to a yeast myo2p DIL domain resulted in labeling of plant peroxisomes. Fusions with some of the myosin XI domains resulted in labeling of known cargoes of the particular myosin XI; however, certain myosin XI YFP fusions labeled organelles that had not previously been found to be detectably affected by mutations nor by expression of dominant negative constructs.

  18. Expression of myosin VIIA in the developing chick inner ear neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kristi; Hall, Amanda L; Jones, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    The auditory-vestibular ganglion (AVG) is formed by the division of otic placode-derived neuroblasts, which then differentiate into auditory and vestibular afferent neurons. The developmental mechanisms that regulate neuronal cell fate determination, axonal pathfinding and innervation of otic neurons are poorly understood. The present study characterized the expression of myosin VIIA, along with the neuronal markers, Islet1, NeuroD1 and TuJ1, in the developing avian ear, during Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stages 16-40. At early stages, when neuroblasts are delaminating from the otic epithelium, myosin VIIA expression was not observed. Myosin VIIA was initially detected in a subset of neurons during the early phase of neuronal differentiation (HH stage 20). As the AVG segregates into the auditory and vestibular portions, myosin VIIA was restricted to a subset of vestibular neurons, but was not present in auditory neurons. Myosin VIIA expression in the vestibular ganglion was maintained through HH stage 33 and was downregulated by stage 36. Myosin VIIA was also observed in the migrating processes of vestibular afferents as they begin to innervate the otic epithelium HH stage 22/23. Notably, afferents targeting hair cells of the cristae were positive for myosin VIIA while afferents targeting the utricular and saccular maculae were negative (HH stage 26-28). Although previous studies have reported that myosin VIIA is restricted to sensory hair cells, our data shows that myosin VIIA is also expressed in neurons of the developing chick ear. Our study suggests a possible role for myosin VIIA in axonal migration/pathfinding and/or innervation of vestibular afferents. In addition, myosin VIIA could be used as an early marker for vestibular neurons during the development of the avian AVG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Rho kinases I and II regulate different aspects of myosin II activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    The homologous mammalian rho kinases (ROCK I and II) are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on kinase construct overexpression. As downstream effectors of Rho GTPases, their major substrates are myosin light chain and myosin phosphatase. Both kinases are implicated in microfilament...

  20. Scoliosis surgery in a patient with "de novo" myosin storage myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, X.; Verrips, A.; Braakhekke, J.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Wijngaard, A. van den; Mostert, A.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin storage myopathy is a rare neuromuscular disorder, characterized by subsarcolemmal inclusions exclusively in type I skeletal muscle fibers, known as hyaline bodies. Its clinical spectrum is diverse, as are its modes of inheritance. Myosin storage myopathy, also called hyaline body myopathy,

  1. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Lana M; Chou, Shih-Wei; McDermott, Brian M

    2016-01-18

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle's morphology and hearing. © 2016 Pollock et al.

  2. The myosin-II-responsive focal adhesion proteome: a tour de force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Lisa; Ng, Mei Rosa; Brugge, Joan S

    2011-04-01

    The formation and maturation of focal adhesions involves significant changes in protein composition and requires acto-myosin contractility. A mass spectrometry approach reveals changes to the focal adhesion proteome on myosin inhibition, providing a valuable resource for the cell adhesion field. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  3. Covalent immobilization of myosin for in-vitro motility of actin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - tablished but ... In all the experiments, microbes- and pyrogen-free deionized water having 18.2 MΩ resistivity obtained from PureLab, Elga, UK, water purification system was used. 2.2 Immobilization of myosin. Myosin was immobilized on ...

  4. Mouse nuclear myosin I knock-out shows interchangeability and redundancy of myosin isoforms in the cell nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Venit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear myosin I (NM1 is a nuclear isoform of the well-known "cytoplasmic" Myosin 1c protein (Myo1c. Located on the 11(th chromosome in mice, NM1 results from an alternative start of transcription of the Myo1c gene adding an extra 16 amino acids at the N-terminus. Previous studies revealed its roles in RNA Polymerase I and RNA Polymerase II transcription, chromatin remodeling, and chromosomal movements. Its nuclear localization signal is localized in the middle of the molecule and therefore directs both Myosin 1c isoforms to the nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to trace specific functions of the NM1 isoform, we generated mice lacking the NM1 start codon without affecting the cytoplasmic Myo1c protein. Mutant mice were analyzed in a comprehensive phenotypic screen in cooperation with the German Mouse Clinic. Strikingly, no obvious phenotype related to previously described functions has been observed. However, we found minor changes in bone mineral density and the number and size of red blood cells in knock-out mice, which are most probably not related to previously described functions of NM1 in the nucleus. In Myo1c/NM1 depleted U2OS cells, the level of Pol I transcription was restored by overexpression of shRNA-resistant mouse Myo1c. Moreover, we found Myo1c interacting with Pol II. The ratio between Myo1c and NM1 proteins were similar in the nucleus and deletion of NM1 did not cause any compensatory overexpression of Myo1c protein. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We observed that Myo1c can replace NM1 in its nuclear functions. Amount of both proteins is nearly equal and NM1 knock-out does not cause any compensatory overexpression of Myo1c. We therefore suggest that both isoforms can substitute each other in nuclear processes.

  5. Myosin II in mechanotransduction: master and commander of cell migration, morphogenesis, and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Cuenca, Rocío; Juanes-García, Alba; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel

    2014-02-01

    Mechanotransduction encompasses the role of mechanical forces in controlling cell behavior by activating signal transduction pathways. Most forces at a cellular level are caused by myosin II, which contracts and cross-links actin. Myosin II-dependent forces are transmitted through the actin cytoskeleton to molecular endpoints that promote specific cellular outcomes, e.g., cell proliferation, adhesion, or migration. For example, most adhesive and migratory phenomena are mechanically linked by a molecular clutch comprised of mechanosensitive scaffolds. Myosin II activation and mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms are finely tuned and spatiotemporally integrated to coordinate morphogenetic events during development. Mechanical events dependent on myosin II also participate in tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and metastatic dissemination. Specifically, tumor cells alter the mechanical properties of the microenvironment to create favorable conditions for proliferation and/or dissemination. These observations position myosin II-dependent force generation and mechanotransduction at the crossroads between normal development and cancer.

  6. Different actions of salt and pyrophosphate on protein extraction from myofibrils reveal the mechanism controlling myosin dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qingwu W; Swartz, Darl R; Wang, Zhenyu; Liu, Yue; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Dequan

    2016-04-01

    Myosin is the major functional protein in muscle foods for water retention, protein binding/gelation and fat holding/emulsification. To maximize its functionality, myosin needs to be released from thick filaments. Understanding of the mechanism controlling myosin extraction will help improve quality traits of meat products. The data obtained show that actomyosin binding is the rate-limiting constraint for myosin release in rigor condition. Magnesium pyrophosphate (MgPPi) increased myosin extraction by weakening actomyosin interaction and maximized myosin extraction at 0.4 mol L(-1) NaCl, which was not attained at 1.0 mol L(-1) NaCl in the absence of PPi. Interaction between myosin rod domains is another critical constraint for myosin extraction, which is, rather than PPi, salt dependent. Further, our data suggest that MyBP-C (myosin binding protein C) and M-line might not be of significance in the process of NaCl-induced myosin extraction, though further study was needed. Our study provides new insight into the mechanism that controls myosin extraction from intact sarcomere, which could be applied to maximize myosin function and to improve meat quality in practice. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Early alterations of bile canaliculi dynamics and the rho kinase/myosin light chain kinase pathway are characteristics of drug-induced intrahepatic cholestasis

    OpenAIRE

    Burbank, M.G.; Burban, Audrey; Sharanek, Ahmad; Weaver, R J; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane; Guillouzo, André

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Intrahepatic cholestasis represents 20%-40%of drug-induced injuries from which a large proportion remains unpredictable. We aimed to investigate mechanisms underlying drug-induced cholestasis and improve its early detection using human HepaRG cells and a set of 12 cholestatic drugs and six noncholestatic drugs. In this study, we analyzed bile canaliculi dynamics, Rho kinase (ROCK)/myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) pathway implication, efflux inhibition of taurocholate [...

  8. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Hofmann, Wilma A., E-mail: whofmann@buffalo.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  9. Par-4: A New Activator of Myosin Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterkind, Susanne; Lee, Eunhee; Sundberg, Eric; Poythress, Ransom H.; Tao, Terence C.; Preuss, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Myosin phosphatase (MP) is a key regulator of myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation, a process essential for motility, apoptosis, and smooth muscle contractility. Although MP inhibition is well studied, little is known about MP activation. We have recently demonstrated that prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4 modulates vascular smooth muscle contractility. Here, we test the hypothesis that Par-4 regulates MP activity directly. We show, by proximity ligation assays, surface plasmon resonance and coimmunoprecipitation, that Par-4 interacts with the targeting subunit of MP, MYPT1. Binding is mediated by the leucine zippers of MYPT1 and Par-4 and reduced by Par-4 phosphorylation. Overexpression of Par-4 leads to increased phosphatase activity of immunoprecipitated MP, whereas small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous Par-4 significantly decreases MP activity and increases MYPT1 phosphorylation. LC20 phosphorylation assays demonstrate that overexpression of Par-4 reduces LC20 phosphorylation. In contrast, a phosphorylation site mutant, but not wild-type Par-4, interferes with zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK)-mediated MP inhibition. We conclude from our results Par-4 operates through a “padlock” model in which binding of Par-4 to MYPT1 activates MP by blocking access to the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, and inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 by ZIPK requires “unlocking” of Par-4 by phosphorylation and displacement of Par-4 from the MP complex. PMID:20130087

  10. Dwell time distributions of the molecular motor myosin V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The dwell times between two successive steps of the two-headed molecular motor myosin V are governed by non-exponential distributions. These distributions have been determined experimentally for various control parameters such as nucleotide concentrations and external load force. First, we use a simplified network representation to determine the dwell time distributions of myosin V, with the associated dynamics described by a Markov process on networks with absorbing boundaries. Our approach provides a direct relation between the motor's chemical kinetics and its stepping properties. In the absence of an external load, the theoretical distributions quantitatively agree with experimental findings for various nucleotide concentrations. Second, using a more complex branched network, which includes ADP release from the leading head, we are able to elucidate the motor's gating effect. This effect is caused by an asymmetry in the chemical properties of the leading and the trailing head of the motor molecule. In the case of an external load acting on the motor, the corresponding dwell time distributions reveal details about the motor's backsteps.

  11. Distinct sequences and post-translational modifications in cardiac atrial and ventricular myosin light chains revealed by top-down mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorich, Zachery R; Cai, Wenxuan; Lin, Ziqing; Chen, Albert J; Peng, Ying; Kohmoto, Takushi; Ge, Ying

    2017-06-01

    Myosin is the principal component of the thick filaments that, through interactions with the actin thin filaments, mediates force production during muscle contraction. Myosin is a hexamer, consisting of two heavy chains, each associated with an essential (ELC) and a regulatory (RLC) light chain, which bind the lever-arm of the heavy chain and play important modulatory roles in striated muscle contraction. Nevertheless, a comprehensive assessment of the sequences of the ELC and RLC isoforms, as well as their post-translational modifications, in the heart remains lacking. Herein, utilizing top-down high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS), we have comprehensively characterized the sequences and N-terminal modifications of the atrial and ventricular isoforms of the myosin light chains from human and swine hearts, as well as the sites of phosphorylation in the swine proteins. In addition to the correction of disparities in the database sequences of the swine proteins, we show for the first time that, whereas the ventricular isoforms of the ELC and RLC are methylated at their N-termini, which is consistent with previous studies, the atrial isoforms of the ELC and RLC from both human and swine are N(α)-methylated and N(α)-acetylated, respectively. Furthermore, top-down MS with electron capture dissociation enabled localization of the sites of phosphorylation in swine RLC isoforms from the ventricles and atria to Ser14 and Ser22, respectively. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the sequences and modifications of myosin light chain isoforms in the human and swine hearts, which will pave the way for a better understanding of their functional roles in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Three-dimensional stochastic model of actin–myosin binding in the sarcomere lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M.; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Stojanovic, Boban; Nedic, Djordje; Irving, Thomas C.; Geeves, MA (Harvard); (IIT); (U. Kent); (Kragujevac)

    2016-11-18

    The effect of molecule tethering in three-dimensional (3-D) space on bimolecular binding kinetics is rarely addressed and only occasionally incorporated into models of cell motility. The simplest system that can quantitatively determine this effect is the 3-D sarcomere lattice of the striated muscle, where tethered myosin in thick filaments can only bind to a relatively small number of available sites on the actin filament, positioned within a limited range of thermal movement of the myosin head. Here we implement spatially explicit actomyosin interactions into the multiscale Monte Carlo platform MUSICO, specifically defining how geometrical constraints on tethered myosins can modulate state transition rates in the actomyosin cycle. The simulations provide the distribution of myosin bound to sites on actin, ensure conservation of the number of interacting myosins and actin monomers, and most importantly, the departure in behavior of tethered myosin molecules from unconstrained myosin interactions with actin. In addition, MUSICO determines the number of cross-bridges in each actomyosin cycle state, the force and number of attached cross-bridges per myosin filament, the range of cross-bridge forces and accounts for energy consumption. At the macroscopic scale, MUSICO simulations show large differences in predicted force-velocity curves and in the response during early force recovery phase after a step change in length comparing to the two simplest mass action kinetic models. The origin of these differences is rooted in the different fluxes of myosin binding and corresponding instantaneous cross-bridge distributions and quantitatively reflects a major flaw of the mathematical description in all mass action kinetic models. Consequently, this new approach shows that accurate recapitulation of experimental data requires significantly different binding rates, number of actomyosin states, and cross-bridge elasticity than typically used in mass action kinetic models to

  13. Allosteric Transitions in Myosin V: Structural Basis for the Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehver, Riina; Thirumalai, D.

    2010-03-01

    The key to understanding the operation of molecular motors lies in deciphering the details of their mechano-chemical coupling, i.e. how nucleotide binding, hydrolysis and release translate into coordinated conformational changes and the resulting mechanical work. We use myosin V to study the details of this coupling. Applying the Structural Perturbation Method (SPM) in conjunction with normal model analysis helps us predict the key structural elements in the transitions. Brownian dynamics simulations, using a coarse-grained Self-Organized Polymer (SOP) model, reveal a hierarchy of local structural changes that occur in the structural elements during the transitions. The combination of methods used here should be of general applicability to describe the fundamental steps in the reaction cycle of other molecular motors.

  14. Imaging the bipolarity of myosin filaments with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Maxime; Couture, Charles-André; Miri, Amir K; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Mongeau, Luc; Légaré, François

    2013-01-01

    We report that combining interferometry with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy provides valuable information about the relative orientation of noncentrosymmetric structures composing tissues. This is confirmed through the imaging of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The inteferometric Second Harmonic Generation (ISHG) images reveal that each side of the myosin filaments composing the A band of the sarcomere generates π phase shifted SHG signal which implies that the myosin proteins at each end of the filaments are oriented in opposite directions. This highlights the bipolar structural organization of the myosin filaments and shows that muscles can be considered as a periodically poled biological structure.

  15. Shrinkage insensitivity of NKCC1 in myosin II-depleted cytoplasts from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2007-01-01

    -actin organization was disrupted, and myosin II, which in shrunken EATC translocates to the cortical region, was absent. Moreover, NKCC1 activity was essentially insensitive to the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, a potent blocker of shrinkage-induced NKCC1 activity in intact EATC. Cytoplast NKCC1...... to the substantial activation in shrunken intact cells, p38 MAPK could not be further activated by shrinkage of the cytoplasts. Together these findings indicate that shrinkage activation of NKCC1 in EATC is dependent on the cortical F-actin network, myosin II, and MLCK....

  16. Sarcomere lattice geometry influences cooperative myosin binding in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand C W Tanner

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In muscle, force emerges from myosin binding with actin (forming a cross-bridge. This actomyosin binding depends upon myofilament geometry, kinetics of thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and kinetics of cross-bridge cycling. Binding occurs within a compliant network of protein filaments where there is mechanical coupling between myosins along the thick-filament backbone and between actin monomers along the thin filament. Such mechanical coupling precludes using ordinary differential equation models when examining the effects of lattice geometry, kinetics, or compliance on force production. This study uses two stochastically driven, spatially explicit models to predict levels of cross-bridge binding, force, thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and ATP utilization. One model incorporates the 2-to-1 ratio of thin to thick filaments of vertebrate striated muscle (multi-filament model, while the other comprises only one thick and one thin filament (two-filament model. Simulations comparing these models show that the multi-filament predictions of force, fractional cross-bridge binding, and cross-bridge turnover are more consistent with published experimental values. Furthermore, the values predicted by the multi-filament model are greater than those values predicted by the two-filament model. These increases are larger than the relative increase of potential inter-filament interactions in the multi-filament model versus the two-filament model. This amplification of coordinated cross-bridge binding and cycling indicates a mechanism of cooperativity that depends on sarcomere lattice geometry, specifically the ratio and arrangement of myofilaments.

  17. The class V myosin motor, myosin 5c, localizes to mature secretory vesicles and facilitates exocytosis in lacrimal acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchelletta, Ronald R; Jacobs, Damon T; Schechter, Joel E; Cheney, Richard E; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F

    2008-07-01

    We investigated the role of the actin-based myosin motor, myosin 5c (Myo5c) in vesicle transport in exocrine secretion. Lacrimal gland acinar cells (LGAC) are the major source for the regulated secretion of proteins from the lacrimal gland into the tear film. Confocal fluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy revealed that Myo5c was associated with secretory vesicles in primary rabbit LGAC. Upon stimulation of secretion with the muscarinic agonist, carbachol, Myo5c was also detected in association with actin-coated fusion intermediates. Adenovirus-mediated expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the tail domain of Myo5c (Ad-GFP-Myo5c-tail) showed that this protein was localized to secretory vesicles. Furthermore, its expression induced a significant (P < or = 0.05) decrease in carbachol-stimulated release of two secretory vesicle content markers, secretory component and syncollin-GFP. Adenovirus-mediated expression of GFP appended to the full-length Myo5c (Ad-GFP-Myo5c-full) was used in parallel with adenovirus-mediated expression of GFP-Myo5c-tail in LGAC to compare various parameters of secretory vesicles labeled with either GFP-labeled protein in resting and stimulated LGAC. These studies revealed that the carbachol-stimulated increase in secretory vesicle diameter associated with compound fusion of secretory vesicles that was also exhibited by vesicles labeled with GFP-Myo5c-full was impaired in vesicles labeled with GFP-Myo5c-tail. A significant decrease in GFP labeling of actin-coated fusion intermediates was also seen in carbachol-stimulated LGAC transduced with GFP-Myo5c-tail relative to LGAC transduced with GFP-Myo5c-full. These results suggest that Myo5c participates in apical exocytosis of secretory vesicles.

  18. Apical constriction and invagination downstream of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway require Rho1 and Myosin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sandra G; Thorpe, Lauren M; Medrano, Vilma R; Mallozzi, Carolyn A; McCartney, Brooke M

    2010-04-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a negative regulator of Wnt signaling and functions in cytoskeletal organization. Disruption of human APC in colonic epithelia initiates benign polyps that progress to carcinoma following additional mutations. The early events of polyposis are poorly understood, as is the role of canonical Wnt signaling in normal epithelial architecture and morphogenesis. To determine the consequences of complete loss of APC in a model epithelium, we generated APC2 APC1 double null clones in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc. APC loss leads to segregation, apical constriction, and invagination that result from transcriptional activation of canonical Wnt signaling. Further, we show that Wnt-dependent changes in cell fate can be decoupled from Wnt-dependent changes in cell shape. Wnt activation is reported to upregulate DE-cadherin in wing discs, and elevated DE-cadherin is thought to promote apical constriction. We find that apical constriction and invagination of APC null tissue are independent of DE-cadherin elevation, but are dependent on Myosin II activity. Further, we show that disruption of Rho1 suppresses apical constriction and invagination in APC null cells. Our data suggest a novel link between canonical Wnt signaling and epithelial structure that requires activation of the Rho1 pathway and Myosin II. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Apical constriction and invagination downstream of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway requires Rho1 and Myosin II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Sandra G.; Thorpe, Lauren M.; Medrano, Vilma R.; Mallozzi, Carolyn A.; McCartney, Brooke M.

    2010-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is a negative regulator of Wnt signaling and functions in cytoskeletal organization. Disruption of human APC in colonic epithelia initiates benign polyps that progress to carcinoma following additional mutations. The early events of polyposis are poorly understood, as is the role of canonical Wnt signaling in normal epithelial architecture and morphogenesis. To determine the consequences of complete loss of APC in a model epithelium, we generated APC2 APC1 double null clones in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc. APC loss leads to segregation, apical constriction, and invagination that result from transcriptional activation of canonical Wnt signaling. Further, we show that Wnt-dependent changes in cell fate can be decoupled from Wnt-dependent changes in cell shape. Wnt activation is reported to upregulate DE-cadherin in wing discs, and elevated DE-cadherin is thought to promote apical constriction. We find that apical constriction and invagination of APC null tissue are independent of DE-cadherin elevation, but are dependent on Myosin II activity. Further, we show that disruption of Rho1 suppresses apical constriction and invagination in APC null cells. Our data suggest a novel link between canonical Wnt signaling and epithelial structure that requires activation of the Rho1 pathway and Myosin II. PMID:20102708

  20. Design of peptidase-resistant peptide inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khapchaev, Asker Y; Kazakova, Olga A; Samsonov, Mikhail V; Sidorova, Maria V; Bushuev, Valery N; Vilitkevich, Elena L; Az'muko, Andrey A; Molokoedov, Alexander S; Bespalova, Zhanna D; Shirinsky, Vladimir P

    2016-11-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is a key regulator of various forms of cell motility including smooth muscle contraction, cell migration, cytokinesis, receptor capping, secretion, etc. Inhibition of MLCK activity in endothelial and epithelial monolayers using cell-permeant peptide Arg-Lys-Lys-Tyr-Lys-Tyr-Arg-Arg-Lys (PIK, Peptide Inhibitor of Kinase) allows protecting the barrier capacity, suggesting a potential medical use of PIK. However, low stability of L-PIK in a biological milieu prompts for development of more stable L-PIK analogues for use as experimental tools in basic and drug-oriented biomedical research. Previously, we designed PIK1, H-(N(α) Me)Arg-Lys-Lys-Tyr-Lys-Tyr-Arg-Arg-Lys-NH2 , that was 2.5-fold more resistant to peptidases in human plasma in vitro than L-PIK and equal to it as MLCK inhibitor. In order to further enhance proteolytic stability of PIK inhibitor, we designed the set of six site-protected peptides based on L-PIK and PIK1 degradation patterns in human plasma as revealed by (1) H-NMR analysis. Implemented modifications increased half-live of the PIK-related peptides in plasma about 10-fold, and these compounds retained 25-100% of L-PIK inhibitory activity toward MLCK in vitro. Based on stability and functional activity ranking, PIK2, H-(N(α) Me)Arg-Lys-Lys-Tyr-Lys-Tyr-Arg-D-Arg-Lys-NH2 , was identified as the most stable and effective L-PIK analogue. PIK2 was able to decrease myosin light chain phosphorylation in endothelial cells stimulated with thrombin, and this effect correlated with the inhibition by PIK2 of thrombin-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro. Therefore, PIK2 could be used as novel alternative to other cell-permeant inhibitors of MLCK in cell culture-based and in vivo studies where MLCK catalytic activity inhibition is required. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The structural basis of myosin V processive movement as revealed by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Niels; Liu, HongJun; Hazelwood, Larnele; Krementsova, Elena B; Lowey, Susan; Trybus, Kathleen M; Hanein, Dorit

    2005-09-02

    The processive motor myosin V has a relatively high affinity for actin in the presence of ATP and, thus, offers the unique opportunity to visualize some of the weaker, hitherto inaccessible, actin bound states of the ATPase cycle. Here, electron cryomicroscopy together with computer-based docking of crystal structures into three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions provide the atomic models of myosin V in both weak and strong actin bound states. One structure shows that ATP binding opens the long cleft dividing the actin binding region of the motor domain, thus destroying the strong binding actomyosin interface while rearranging loop 2 as a tether. Nucleotide analogs showed a second new state in which the lever arm points upward, in a prepower-stroke configuration (lever arm up) bound to actin before phosphate release. Our findings reveal how the structural elements of myosin V work together to allow myosin V to step along actin for multiple ATPase cycles without dissociating.

  2. Cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic processes coupled by myosin II in dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabaud, Mélanie; Heuzé, Mélina L.; Bretou, Marine; Vargas, Pablo; Maiuri, Paolo; Solanes, Paola; Maurin, Mathieu; Terriac, Emmanuel; Le Berre, Maël; Lankar, Danielle; Piolot, Tristan; Adelstein, Robert S.; Zhang, Yingfan; Sixt, Michael; Jacobelli, Jordan; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    The immune response relies on the migration of leukocytes and on their ability to stop in precise anatomical locations to fulfil their task. How leukocyte migration and function are coordinated is unknown. Here we show that in immature dendritic cells, which patrol their environment by engulfing extracellular material, cell migration and antigen capture are antagonistic. This antagonism results from transient enrichment of myosin IIA at the cell front, which disrupts the back-to-front gradient of the motor protein, slowing down locomotion but promoting antigen capture. We further highlight that myosin IIA enrichment at the cell front requires the MHC class II-associated invariant chain (Ii). Thus, by controlling myosin IIA localization, Ii imposes on dendritic cells an intermittent antigen capture behaviour that might facilitate environment patrolling. We propose that the requirement for myosin II in both cell migration and specific cell functions may provide a general mechanism for their coordination in time and space. PMID:26109323

  3. Calcium inhibition as an intracellular signal for actin–myosin interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOHAMA, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    .... The activation of Ca2+ regulation of actin-myosin interactions was examined first, whereas it took 20 years for the author to clarify the inhibitory mode by using Physarum polycephalum, a lower eukaryote...

  4. Myosin III-mediated cross-linking and stimulation of actin bundling activity of Espin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Haiyang; Li, Jianchao; Raval, Manmeet H; Yao, Ningning; Deng, Xiaoying; Lu, Qing; Nie, Si; Feng, Wei; Wan, Jun; Yengo, Christopher M; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-01-01

    Class III myosins (Myo3) and actin-bundling protein Espin play critical roles in regulating the development and maintenance of stereocilia in vertebrate hair cells, and their defects cause hereditary hearing impairments...

  5. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  6. Apical constriction is driven by a pulsatile apical myosin network in delaminating Drosophila neuroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yanru; Xue, Guosheng; Shaobo, Yang; Mingxi, Deng; Zhou, Xiaowei; Yu, Weichuan; Ishibashi, Toyotaka; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Yan

    2017-06-15

    Cell delamination is a conserved morphogenetic process important for the generation of cell diversity and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here, we used Drosophila embryonic neuroblasts as a model to study the apical constriction process during cell delamination. We observe dynamic myosin signals both around the cell adherens junctions and underneath the cell apical surface in the neuroectoderm. On the cell apical cortex, the nonjunctional myosin forms flows and pulses, which are termed medial myosin pulses. Quantitative differences in medial myosin pulse intensity and frequency are crucial to distinguish delaminating neuroblasts from their neighbors. Inhibition of medial myosin pulses blocks delamination. The fate of a neuroblast is set apart from that of its neighbors by Notch signaling-mediated lateral inhibition. When we inhibit Notch signaling activity in the embryo, we observe that small clusters of cells undergo apical constriction and display an abnormal apical myosin pattern. Together, these results demonstrate that a contractile actomyosin network across the apical cell surface is organized to drive apical constriction in delaminating neuroblasts. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Myosins XI modulate host cellular responses and penetration resistance to fungal pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Qin, Li; Liu, Guosheng; Peremyslov, Valera V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Wei, Yangdou

    2014-01-01

    The rapid reorganization and polarization of actin filaments (AFs) toward the pathogen penetration site is one of the earliest cellular responses, yet the regulatory mechanism of AF dynamics is poorly understood. Using live-cell imaging in Arabidopsis, we show that polarization coupled with AF bundling involves precise spatiotemporal control at the site of attempted penetration by the nonadapted barley powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). We further show that the Bgh-triggered AF mobility and organelle aggregation are predominately driven by the myosin motor proteins. Inactivation of myosins by pharmacological inhibitors prevents bulk aggregation of organelles and blocks recruitment of lignin-like compounds to the penetration site and deposition of callose and defensive protein, PENETRATION 1 (PEN1) into the apoplastic papillae, resulting in attenuation of penetration resistance. Using gene knockout analysis, we demonstrate that highly expressed myosins XI, especially myosin XI-K, are the primary contributors to cell wall-mediated penetration resistance. Moreover, the quadruple myosin knockout mutant xi-1 xi-2 xi-i xi-k displays impaired trafficking pathway responsible for the accumulation of PEN1 at the cell periphery. Strikingly, this mutant shows not only increased penetration rate but also enhanced overall disease susceptibility to both adapted and nonadapted fungal pathogens. Our findings establish myosins XI as key regulators of plant antifungal immunity. PMID:25201952

  8. Regional Myosin heavy chain distribution in selected paraspinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Gilad J; Kim, Choll W; Thacker, Bryan E; Tomiya, Akihito; Garfin, Steven R; Ward, Samuel R; Lieber, Richard L

    2010-06-01

    Cross-sectional study with repeated measures design. To compare the myosin heavy-chain isoform distribution within and between paraspinal muscles and to test the theory that fiber-type gradients exist as a function of paraspinal muscle depth. There is still uncertainty regarding the fiber-type distributions within different paraspinal muscles. It has been previously proposed that deep fibers of the multifidus muscle may contain a higher ratio of type I to type II fibers, because, unlike superficial fibers, they primarily stabilize the spine, and may therefore have relatively higher endurance. Using a minimally invasive surgical approach, using tubular retractors that are placed within anatomic intermuscular planes, it was feasible to obtain biopsies from the multifidus, longissimus, iliocostalis, and psoas muscles at specific predefined depths. Under an institutional review board-approved protocol, muscle biopsies were obtained from 15 patients who underwent minimally invasive spinal surgery, using the posterior paramedian (Wiltse) approach or the minimally invasive lateral approach. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform distribution was analyzed using SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) electrophoresis. Because multiple biopsies were obtained from each patient, MyHC distribution was compared using both within- and between-muscle repeated measures analyses. The fiber-type distribution was similar among the posterior paraspinal muscles and was composed of relatively high percentage of type I (63%), compared to type IIA (19%) and type IIX (18%) fibers. In contrast, the psoas muscle was found to contain a lower percentage of type I fibers (42%) and a higher percentage of type IIA (33%) and IIX fibers (26%; Pmuscles. Fiber-type distribution between the posterior paraspinal muscles is consistent and is composed of relatively high percentage of type I fibers, consistent with a postural function. The psoas muscle, on the other hand, is

  9. Effects of low-level α-myosin heavy chain expression on contractile kinetics in porcine myocardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumova, Maria V.; Stelzer, Julian E.; Norman, Holly S.; Moss, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms are principal determinants of work capacity in mammalian ventricular myocardium. The ventricles of large mammals including humans normally express ∼10% α-MHC on a predominantly β-MHC background, while in failing human ventricles α-MHC is virtually eliminated, suggesting that low-level α-MHC expression in normal myocardium can accelerate the kinetics of contraction and augment systolic function. To test this hypothesis in a model similar to human myocardium we determined composite rate constants of cross-bridge attachment (fapp) and detachment (gapp) in porcine myocardium expressing either 100% α-MHC or 100% β-MHC in order to predict the MHC isoform-specific effect on twitch kinetics. Right atrial (∼100% α-MHC) and left ventricular (∼100% β-MHC) tissue was used to measure myosin ATPase activity, isometric force, and the rate constant of force redevelopment (ktr) in solutions of varying Ca2+ concentration. The rate of ATP utilization and ktr were approximately ninefold higher in atrial compared with ventricular myocardium, while tension cost was approximately eightfold greater in atrial myocardium. From these values, we calculated fapp to be ∼10-fold higher in α- compared with β-MHC, while gapp was 8-fold higher in α-MHC. Mathematical modeling of an isometric twitch using these rate constants predicts that the expression of 10% α-MHC increases the maximal rate of rise of force (dF/dtmax) by 92% compared with 0% α-MHC. These results suggest that low-level expression of α-MHC significantly accelerates myocardial twitch kinetics, thereby enhancing systolic function in large mammalian myocardium. PMID:21217059

  10. Exploration of flexible phenylpropylurea scaffold as novel cardiac myosin activators for the treatment of systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Manoj; Jalani, Hitesh B; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Sharma, Niti; Boggu, Pulla Reddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Lee, You-Jung; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2017-07-07

    A series of flexible urea derivatives have been synthesized and demonstrated as selective cardiac myosin ATPase activator. Among them 1-phenethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (1, cardiac myosin ATPase activation at 10 μM = 51.1%; FS = 18.90; EF = 12.15) and 1-benzyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (9, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 53.3%; FS = 30.04; EF = 18.27) showed significant activity in vitro and in vivo. The change of phenyl ring with tetrahydropyran-4-yl moiety viz., 1-(3-phenylpropyl)-3-((tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)methyl)urea (14, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 81.4%; FS = 20.50; EF = 13.10), and morpholine moiety viz., 1-(2-morpholinoethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (21, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 44.0%; FS = 24.79; EF = 15.65), proved to be efficient to activate the cardiac myosin. The potent compounds 1, 9, 14 and 21 were found to be selective for cardiac myosin over skeletal and smooth myosins. Thus, these urea derivatives are potent scaffold to develop as a newer cardiac myosin activator for the treatment of systolic heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Muscular tissues of the squid Doryteuthis pealeii express identical myosin heavy chain isoforms: an alternative mechanism for tuning contractile speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2012-01-15

    The speed of muscle contraction is largely controlled at the sarcomere level by the ATPase activity of the motor protein myosin. Differences in amino acid sequence in catalytically important regions of myosin yield different myosin isoforms with varying ATPase activities and resulting differences in cross-bridge cycling rates and interfilamentary sliding velocities. Modulation of whole-muscle performance by changes in myosin isoform ATPase activity is regarded as a universal mechanism to tune contractile properties, especially in vertebrate muscles. Invertebrates such as squid, however, may exhibit an alternative mechanism to tune contractile properties that is based on differences in muscle ultrastructure, including variable myofilament and sarcomere lengths. To determine definitively whether contractile properties of squid muscles are regulated via different myosin isoforms (i.e. different ATPase activities), the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the myosin heavy chain from the squid Doryteuthis pealeii were determined from the mantle, arm, tentacle, fin and funnel retractor musculature. We identified three myosin heavy chain isoforms in squid muscular tissues, with differences arising at surface loop 1 and the carboxy terminus. All three isoforms were detected in all five tissues studied. These results suggest that the muscular tissues of D. pealeii express identical myosin isoforms, and it is likely that differences in muscle ultrastructure, not myosin ATPase activity, represent the most important mechanism for tuning contractile speeds.

  12. MyosinVIIa interacts with Twinfilin-2 at the tips of mechanosensory stereocilia in the inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka K Rzadzinska

    Full Text Available In vertebrates hearing is dependent upon the microvilli-like mechanosensory stereocilia and their length gradation. The staircase-like organization of the stereocilia bundle is dynamically maintained by variable actin turnover rates. Two unconventional myosins were previously implicated in stereocilia length regulation but the mechanisms of their action remain unknown. MyosinXVa is expressed in stereocilia tips at levels proportional to stereocilia length and its absence produces staircase-like bundles of very short stereocilia. MyosinVIIa localizes to the tips of the shorter stereocilia within bundles, and when absent, the stereocilia are abnormally long. We show here that myosinVIIa interacts with twinfilin-2, an actin binding protein, which inhibits actin polymerization at the barbed end of the filament, and that twinfilin localization in stereocilia overlaps with myosinVIIa. Exogenous expression of myosinVIIa in fibroblasts results in a reduced number of filopodia and promotes accumulation of twinfilin-2 at the filopodia tips. We hypothesize that the newly described interaction between myosinVIIa and twinfilin-2 is responsible for the establishment and maintenance of slower rates of actin turnover in shorter stereocilia, and that interplay between complexes of myosinVIIa/twinfilin-2 and myosinXVa/whirlin is responsible for stereocilia length gradation within the bundle staircase.

  13. Myosin-II-Mediated Directional Migration of Dictyostelium Cells in Response to Cyclic Stretching of Substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Okimura, Chika; Sato, Katsuya; Nakashima, Yuta; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Minami, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to various mechanical stimulations, such as shear flow, osmotic pressure, and hardness of substratum. They must sense the mechanical aspects of their environment and respond appropriately for proper cell function. Cells adhering to substrata must receive and respond to mechanical stimuli from the substrata to decide their shape and/or migrating direction. In response to cyclic stretching of the elastic substratum, intracellular stress fibers in fibroblasts and endothelial, osteosarcoma, and smooth muscle cells are rearranged perpendicular to the stretching direction, and the shape of those cells becomes extended in this new direction. In the case of migrating Dictyostelium cells, cyclic stretching regulates the direction of migration, and not the shape, of the cell. The cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to that of the stretching. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce the directional migration remain unknown. Here, using a microstretching device, we recorded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-myosin-II dynamics in Dictyostelium cells on an elastic substratum under cyclic stretching. Repeated stretching induced myosin II localization equally on both stretching sides in the cells. Although myosin-II-null cells migrated randomly, myosin-II-null cells expressing a variant of myosin II that cannot hydrolyze ATP migrated perpendicular to the stretching. These results indicate that Dictyostelium cells accumulate myosin II at the portion of the cell where a large strain is received and migrate in a direction other than that of the portion where myosin II accumulated. This polarity generation for migration does not require the contraction of actomyosin. PMID:23442953

  14. Direct observation of the myosin Va recovery stroke that contributes to unidirectional stepping along actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Shiroguchi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Myosins are ATP-driven linear molecular motors that work as cellular force generators, transporters, and force sensors. These functions are driven by large-scale nucleotide-dependent conformational changes, termed "strokes"; the "power stroke" is the force-generating swinging of the myosin light chain-binding "neck" domain relative to the motor domain "head" while bound to actin; the "recovery stroke" is the necessary initial motion that primes, or "cocks," myosin while detached from actin. Myosin Va is a processive dimer that steps unidirectionally along actin following a "hand over hand" mechanism in which the trailing head detaches and steps forward ∼72 nm. Despite large rotational Brownian motion of the detached head about a free joint adjoining the two necks, unidirectional stepping is achieved, in part by the power stroke of the attached head that moves the joint forward. However, the power stroke alone cannot fully account for preferential forward site binding since the orientation and angle stability of the detached head, which is determined by the properties of the recovery stroke, dictate actin binding site accessibility. Here, we directly observe the recovery stroke dynamics and fluctuations of myosin Va using a novel, transient caged ATP-controlling system that maintains constant ATP levels through stepwise UV-pulse sequences of varying intensity. We immobilized the neck of monomeric myosin Va on a surface and observed real time motions of bead(s attached site-specifically to the head. ATP induces a transient swing of the neck to the post-recovery stroke conformation, where it remains for ∼40 s, until ATP hydrolysis products are released. Angle distributions indicate that the post-recovery stroke conformation is stabilized by ≥ 5 k(BT of energy. The high kinetic and energetic stability of the post-recovery stroke conformation favors preferential binding of the detached head to a forward site 72 nm away. Thus, the recovery

  15. Qdot Labeled Actin Super Resolution Motility Assay Measures Low Duty Cycle Muscle Myosin Step-Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Myosin powers contraction in heart and skeletal muscle and is a leading target for mutations implicated in inheritable muscle diseases. During contraction, myosin transduces ATP free energy into the work of muscle shortening against resisting force. Muscle shortening involves relative sliding of myosin and actin filaments. Skeletal actin filaments were fluorescence labeled with a streptavidin conjugate quantum dot (Qdot) binding biotin-phalloidin on actin. Single Qdot’s were imaged in time with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy then spatially localized to 1-3 nanometers using a super-resolution algorithm as they translated with actin over a surface coated with skeletal heavy meromyosin (sHMM) or full length β-cardiac myosin (MYH7). Average Qdot-actin velocity matches measurements with rhodamine-phalloidin labeled actin. The sHMM Qdot-actin velocity histogram contains low velocity events corresponding to actin translation in quantized steps of ~5 nm. The MYH7 velocity histogram has quantized steps at 3 and 8 nm in addition to 5 nm, and, larger compliance than sHMM depending on MYH7 surface concentration. Low duty cycle skeletal and cardiac myosin present challenges for a single molecule assay because actomyosin dissociates quickly and the freely moving element diffuses away. The in vitro motility assay has modestly more actomyosin interactions and methylcellulose inhibited diffusion to sustain the complex while preserving a subset of encounters that do not overlap in time on a single actin filament. A single myosin step is isolated in time and space then characterized using super-resolution. The approach provides quick, quantitative, and inexpensive step-size measurement for low duty cycle muscle myosin. PMID:23383646

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation for the reversed power stroke motion of a myosin subfragment-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tadashi

    2015-06-01

    Myosins are typical molecular motor proteins that convert the chemical energy from the ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. The fundamental mechanism of this energy conversion is still unknown. To explain the experimental results already obtained, Masuda has proposed a hypothesis called the "Driven by Detachment" theory for the working principle of the myosins. This theory insists that the energy used during the power stroke of the myosins does not directly originate from the chemical energy of ATP, but is converted from the elastic energy within the molecule at the joint between the head and neck domains. One method for demonstrating the validity of this theory is a computational simulation using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The MD software used was GROMACS. The target of the MD simulations was myosin subfragment-1 (S1), for which the initial structure was obtained from the Protein Data Bank entry 1M8Q. The AFM pull code of GROMACS was used to apply an external force of 17 pN at the end of the neck domain in the direction opposite to the power stroke to observe whether the myosin S1 takes the pre-power stroke conformation. The residues assumed to be engaged in the docking with an actin filament were fixed to the space. Starting from exactly the same initial position, 10 simulations were repeated by varying the random seeds for generating the initial velocities of the atoms. After 64ns of calculations, the myosin S1 took the conformation of the pre-power stroke state in which the neck domain was bent around the joint between the head and the neck domains. This result agrees with the prediction expected by the DbD theory, the validity of which may be established by conducting similar simulations for the other steps of the myosin working processes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Impact of the Motor and Tail Domains of Class III Myosins on Regulating the Formation and Elongation of Actin Protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Manmeet H; Quintero, Omar A; Weck, Meredith L; Unrath, William C; Gallagher, James W; Cui, Runjia; Kachar, Bechara; Tyska, Matthew J; Yengo, Christopher M

    2016-10-21

    Class III myosins (MYO3A and MYO3B) are proposed to function as transporters as well as length and ultrastructure regulators within stable actin-based protrusions such as stereocilia and calycal processes. MYO3A differs from MYO3B in that it contains an extended tail domain with an additional actin-binding motif. We examined how the properties of the motor and tail domains of human class III myosins impact their ability to enhance the formation and elongation of actin protrusions. Direct examination of the motor and enzymatic properties of human MYO3A and MYO3B revealed that MYO3A is a 2-fold faster motor with enhanced ATPase activity and actin affinity. A chimera in which the MYO3A tail was fused to the MYO3B motor demonstrated that motor activity correlates with formation and elongation of actin protrusions. We demonstrate that removal of individual exons (30-34) in the MYO3A tail does not prevent filopodia tip localization but abolishes the ability to enhance actin protrusion formation and elongation in COS7 cells. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that MYO3A slows filopodia dynamics and enhances filopodia lifetime in COS7 cells. We also demonstrate that MYO3A is more efficient than MYO3B at increasing formation and elongation of stable microvilli on the surface of cultured epithelial cells. We propose that the unique features of MYO3A, enhanced motor activity, and an extended tail with tail actin-binding motif, allow it to play an important role in stable actin protrusion length and ultrastructure maintenance. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Ozz-E3 ubiquitin ligase targets sarcomeric embryonic myosin heavy chain during muscle development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvan Campos

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contractile proteins are expressed as a series of developmental isoforms that are in constant dynamic remodeling during embryogenesis, but how obsolete molecules are recognized and removed is not known. Ozz is a developmentally regulated protein that functions as the adaptor component of a RING-type ubiquitin ligase complex specific to striated muscle. Ozz(-/- mutants exhibit defects in myofibrillogenesis and myofiber differentiation. Here we show that Ozz targets the rod portion of embryonic myosin heavy chain and preferentially recognizes the sarcomeric rather than the soluble pool of myosin. We present evidence that Ozz binding to the embryonic myosin isoform within sarcomeric thick filaments marks it for ubiquitination and proteolytic degradation, allowing its replacement with neonatal or adult isoforms. This unique function positions Ozz within a system that facilitates sarcomeric myosin remodeling during muscle maturation and regeneration. Our findings identify Ozz-E3 as the ubiquitin ligase complex that interacts with and regulates myosin within its fully assembled cytoskeletal structure.

  19. An embryonic myosin converter domain influences Drosophila indirect flight muscle stretch activation, power generation and flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Newhard, Christopher S; Ramanath, Seemanti; Sheppard, Debra; Swank, Douglas M

    2014-01-15

    Stretch activation (SA) is critical to the flight ability of insects powered by asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFMs). An essential muscle protein component for SA and power generation is myosin. Which structural domains of myosin are significant for setting SA properties and power generation levels is poorly understood. We made use of the transgenic techniques and unique single muscle myosin heavy chain gene of Drosophila to test the influence of the myosin converter domain on IFM SA and power generation. Replacing the endogenous converter with an embryonic version decreased SA tension and the rate of SA tension generation. The alterations in SA properties and myosin kinetics from the converter exchange caused power generation to drop to 10% of control fiber power when the optimal conditions for control fibers - 1% muscle length (ML) amplitude and 150 Hz oscillation frequency - were applied to fibers expressing the embryonic converter (IFI-EC). Optimizing conditions for IFI-EC fiber power production, by doubling ML amplitude and decreasing oscillation frequency by 60%, improved power output to 60% of optimized control fiber power. IFI-EC flies altered their aerodynamic flight characteristics to better match optimal fiber power generation conditions as wing beat frequency decreased and wing stroke amplitude increased. This enabled flight in spite of the drastic changes to fiber mechanical performance.

  20. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  1. A novel MYH7 mutation links congenital fiber type disproportion and myosin storage myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolano, Saida; Tarrío, Rosa; Blanco-Arias, Patricia; Teijeira, Susana; Rodríguez-Trelles, Francisco; García-Murias, María; Delague, Valerie; Lévy, Nicolas; Fernández, José M; Quintáns, Beatriz; Millán, Beatriz San; Carracedo, Angel; Navarro, Carmen; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2011-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the genetic defect in a multigenerational family presenting an autosomal dominant myopathy with histological features of congenital fiber type disproportion. Linkage analysis and genetic sequencing identified, in all affected members of the family, the c.5807A>G heterozygous mutation in MYH7, which encodes the slow/β-cardiac myosin heavy chain. This mutation causes skeletal but not cardiac involvement. Myosin heavy chain expression pattern was also characterized by immunohistochemistry, western blot and q-PCR in muscle biopsies from two patients aged 25 and 62, respectively. While only congenital fiber type disproportion was observed in the younger patient, older patient's biopsy presented aggregates of slow myosin heavy chains, in fiber sub-sarcolemmal region. These clinico-pathologic findings suggest a novel phenotype within the emerging group of hereditary myosin myopathies, which in this family presents typical characteristics of congenital fiber type disproportion in early stages and later evolves to myosin storage myopathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Live-cell single-molecule labeling and analysis of myosin motors with quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Hiroyasu; Nakahata, Yoshihito; Yarimizu, Hirokazu; Kanzaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are a powerful tool for quantitatively analyzing dynamic cellular processes by single-particle tracking. However, tracking of intracellular molecules with QDs is limited by their inability to penetrate the plasma membrane and bind to specific molecules of interest. Although several techniques for overcoming these problems have been proposed, they are either complicated or inconvenient. To address this issue, in this study, we developed a simple, convenient, and nontoxic method for labeling intracellular molecules in cells using HaloTag technology and electroporation. We labeled intracellular myosin motors with this approach and tracked their movement within cells. By simultaneously imaging myosin movement and F-actin architecture, we observed that F-actin serves not only as a rail but also as a barrier for myosin movement. We analyzed the effect of insulin on the movement of several myosin motors, which have been suggested to regulate intracellular trafficking of the insulin-responsive glucose transporter GLUT4, but found no significant enhancement in myosin motor motility as a result of insulin treatment. Our approach expands the repertoire of proteins for which intracellular dynamics can be analyzed at the single-molecule level. PMID:28035048

  3. Strain Mediated Adaptation Is Key for Myosin Mechanochemistry: Discovering General Rules for Motor Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biman Jana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A structure-based model of myosin motor is built in the same spirit of our early work for kinesin-1 and Ncd towards physical understanding of its mechanochemical cycle. We find a structural adaptation of the motor head domain in post-powerstroke state that signals faster ADP release from it compared to the same from the motor head in the pre-powerstroke state. For dimeric myosin, an additional forward strain on the trailing head, originating from the postponed powerstroke state of the leading head in the waiting state of myosin, further increases the rate of ADP release. This coordination between the two heads is the essence of the processivity of the cycle. Our model provides a structural description of the powerstroke step of the cycle as an allosteric transition of the converter domain in response to the Pi release. Additionally, the variation in structural elements peripheral to catalytic motor domain is the deciding factor behind diverse directionalities of myosin motors (myosin V & VI. Finally, we observe that there are general rules for functional molecular motors across the different families. Allosteric structural adaptation of the catalytic motor head in different nucleotide states is crucial for mechanochemistry. Strain-mediated coordination between motor heads is essential for processivity and the variation of peripheral structural elements is essential for their diverse functionalities.

  4. Internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin subfragment-1 studied by quasielastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Tatsuhito [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Arata, Toshiaki [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Oda, Toshiro [Graduate School of Science, University of Hyogo, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Nakajima, Kenji; Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko; Kikuchi, Tatsuya [Neutron Science Section, J-PARC Center, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Fujiwara, Satoru, E-mail: fujiwara.satoru@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-04-10

    Various biological functions related to cell motility are driven by the interaction between the partner proteins, actin and myosin. To obtain insights into how this interaction occurs, the internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin subfragment-1 (S1) were characterized by the quasielastic neutron scattering measurements on the solution samples of F-actin and S1. Contributions of the internal motions of the proteins to the scattering spectra were separated from those of the global macromolecular diffusion. Analysis of the spectra arising from the internal dynamics showed that the correlation times of the atomic motions were about two times shorter for F-actin than for S1, suggesting that F-actin fluctuates more rapidly than S1. It was also shown that the fraction of the immobile atoms is larger for S1 than for F-actin. These results suggest that F-actin actively facilitates the binding of myosin by utilizing the more frequent conformational fluctuations than those of S1. - Highlights: • We studied the internal dynamics of F-actin and myosin S1 by neutron scattering. • The correlation times of the atomic motions were smaller for F-actin than for S1. • The fraction of the immobile atoms was also smaller for F-actin than for S1. • Our results suggest that mobility of atoms in F-actin is higher than that in S1. • We propose that high flexibility of F-actin facilitates the binding of myosin.

  5. A bioinformatic and computational study of myosin phosphatase subunit diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Rachael P; Fisher, Steven A

    2014-08-01

    Variability in myosin phosphatase (MP) subunits may provide specificity in signaling pathways that regulate muscle tone. We utilized public databases and computational algorithms to investigate the phylogenetic diversity of MP regulatory (PPP1R12A-C) and inhibitory (PPP1R14A-D) subunits. The comparison of exonic coding sequences and expression data confirmed or refuted the existence of isoforms and their tissue-specific expression in different model organisms. The comparison of intronic and exonic sequences identified potential expressional regulatory elements. As examples, smooth muscle MP regulatory subunit (PPP1R12A) is highly conserved through evolution. Its alternative exon E24 is present in fish through mammals with two invariant features: 1) a reading frame shift generating a premature termination codon and 2) a hexanucleotide sequence adjacent to the 3' splice site hypothesized to be a novel suppressor of exon splicing. A characteristic of the striated muscle MP regulatory subunit (PPP1R12B) locus is numerous and phylogenetically variable transcriptional start sites. In fish this locus only codes for the small (M21) subunit, suggesting the primordial function of this gene. Inhibitory subunits show little intragenic variability; their diversity is thought to have arisen by expansion and tissue-specific expression of different gene family members. We demonstrate differences in the regulatory landscape between smooth muscle enriched (PPP1R14A) and more ubiquitously expressed (PPP1R14B) family members and identify deeply conserved intronic sequence and predicted transcriptional cis-regulatory elements. This bioinformatic and computational study has uncovered a number of attributes of MP subunits that supports selection of ideal model organisms and testing of hypotheses regarding their physiological significance and regulated expression. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Mutations in the Slow Skeletal Muscle Fiber Myosin Heavy Chain Gene ( MYH7) Cause Laing Early-Onset Distal Myopathy (MPD1)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meredith, Christopher; Herrmann, Ralf; Parry, Cheryl; Liyanage, Khema; Dye, Danielle E; Durling, Hayley J; Duff, Rachael M; Beckman, Kaye; de Visser, Marianne; van der Graaff, Maaike M; Hedera, Peter; Fink, John K; Petty, Elizabeth M; Lamont, Phillipa; Fabian, Vicki; Bridges, Leslie; Voit, Thomas; Mastaglia, Frank L; Laing, Nigel G

    2004-01-01

    .... One candidate gene in the region, MYH7, which is mutated in cardiomyopathy and myosin storage myopathy, codes for the myosin heavy chain of type I skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac ventricles...

  7. Possible Interrelationship between Changes in F-actin and Myosin II, Protein Phosphorylation and Cell Volume Regulation in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine F.; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2002-01-01

    F-actin; myosin II; osmotic; Rho kinase; p38; PKC; MLCK; serine/threonine phosphatase; blebbing; NHE1......F-actin; myosin II; osmotic; Rho kinase; p38; PKC; MLCK; serine/threonine phosphatase; blebbing; NHE1...

  8. A panel of prognostic protein markers for progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer - a multicenter tissue microarray validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Niels; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    cohort of 283 patients with long-term follow-up. For validation of the results we used three independent patient cohorts with long-term follow-up from Sweden, Spain, and Taiwan. In total 649 primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from patients with long-term follow-up were used. Protein expression...... in the independent NMIBC cohort with long-term follow-up. These results will be presented at AACR annual meeting 2012. We conclude that ADAM10, TRIM29, Aurora Kinase B, and Cyclin D1 may have prognostic value for guiding optimal treatment of NMIBC patients if successfully validated in the independent patient cohorts...... Ta and T1 urothelial carcinomas. Transcripts from the five genes encoding these proteins were previously included in gene expression signatures for outcome prediction for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). As a training-set, we used primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from a Danish...

  9. Spontaneous detachment of the leading head contributes to myosin VI backward steps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keigo Ikezaki

    Full Text Available Myosin VI is an ATP driven molecular motor that normally takes forward and processive steps on actin filaments, but also on occasion stochastic backward steps. While a number of models have attempted to explain the backwards steps, none offer an acceptable mechanism for their existence. We therefore performed single molecule imaging of myosin VI and calculated the stepping rates of forward and backward steps at the single molecule level. The forward stepping rate was proportional to the ATP concentration, whereas the backward stepping rate was independent. Using these data, we proposed that spontaneous detachment of the leading head is uncoupled from ATP binding and is responsible for the backward steps of myosin VI.

  10. Effect of nucleotides on the orientation and mobility of myosin subfragment-1 in ghost muscle fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronina, O E; Wrzosek, A; Dabrowska, R; Borovikov, Yu S

    2005-10-01

    Using polarization fluorimetry, the orientation and mobility of 1,5-IAEDANS specifically bound to Cys707 of myosin subfragment-1 (S1) were studied in ghost muscle tropomyosin-containing fibers in the absence and in the presence of MgADP, MgAMP-PNP, MgATPgammaS, or MgATP. Modeling of various intermediate states was accompanied by discrete changes in actomyosin orientation and mobility of fluorescent dye dipoles. This suggests multistep changes in the structural state of the myosin head during the ATPase cycle. Maximal differences in the probe orientation by 4 degrees and its mobility by 30% were found between actomyosin states in the presence of MgADP and MgATP. It is suggested that interaction of S1 with F-actin induces nucleotide-dependent rotation of the whole motor domain of the myosin head or only the dye-binding site and also change in the head mobility.

  11. Polymer Nanocomposites as a Facile Method for Engineering Acto-Myosin Networks at the Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporizzo, Matthew; Sun, Yujie; Goldman, Yale; Composto, Russell; Nano-Bio Interface Center Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    Filamentous actin acts as the rails for the molecular motor myosin in muscle contraction and intercellular mass transport. Consequently, understanding the process by which actin organizes, polymerizes, and binds is fundamental for the design of myosin based actuators capable of responding to external stimuli. Starting with atomically smooth, freshly cleaved mica optically coupled to glass slides, a random copolymer nanoparticle composite is engineered for in situ single molecule TIRF/AFM studies with controlled roughness, electrostatic binding strength, and binding site density. Four distinct regimes of actin binding are observed; no attachment, end-on attachment, weak side-on attachment, and side-on immobilization. Transitions between regimes are likely to mark competition between the affinity to charged nanoparticles and the inherent resistance of the semi-rigid filaments to bending. Surface conditions optimal for actin immobilization are identified, and Myosin V stepping kinetics are studied on the artificially immobilized filaments, confirming filament support of motility. Supported by NSF grant DMR-0425780.

  12. Purified protein derivative skin test reactions are associated with clinical outcomes of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer treated with induction bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Naoya; Kikuchi, Eiji; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Mizuno, Ryuichi; Oya, Mototsugu

    2017-10-30

    To investigate the relationship between purified protein derivative (PPD) skin test reactions before bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy and the clinical outcomes of BCG-naïve nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer patients treated with adjuvant BCG therapy. A total of 288 nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer patients subjected to the PPD skin test before BCG therapy were included. PPD skin test reactions were categorized into 3 groups: positive, slightly positive, and negative. The presence of an induration was positive. If an induration was absent, erythema of 10mm or more and less than 10mm corresponded to slightly positive and negative, respectively. A total of 66 (22.9%), 149 (51.7%), and 73 (25.3%) patients exhibited a positive, slightly positive, and negative to PPD skin test, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate of patients with positive PPD skin test reactions was 89.4 ± 4.1%, which was significantly higher than those of patients with slightly positive (65.5 ± 4.2%, P = 0.001) and negative reactions (56.4 ± 6.6%, P<0.001). A multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that a positive PPD skin test reaction was independently associated with tumor recurrence (hazard ratio of 0.233, P<0.001), but not with stage progression. The incidence of fever persisting for more than 2 days or fever of ≥38°C was significantly higher in patients with a positive PPD skin test reaction (18.2%) than in patients with slightly positive (8.7%) and negative PPD skin test reactions (4.1%). The PPD skin test reactions before BCG therapy may predict clinical outcomes following BCG therapy and help clinicians counsel patients exhibiting strong therapeutic effects with BCG therapy and potentially major BCG-related side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. UCS protein Rng3p is essential for myosin-II motor activity during cytokinesis in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C Stark

    Full Text Available UCS proteins have been proposed to operate as co-chaperones that work with Hsp90 in the de novo folding of myosin motors. The fission yeast UCS protein Rng3p is essential for actomyosin ring assembly and cytokinesis. Here we investigated the role of Rng3p in fission yeast myosin-II (Myo2p motor activity. Myo2p isolated from an arrested rng3-65 mutant was capable of binding actin, yet lacked stability and activity based on its expression levels and inactivity in ATPase and actin filament gliding assays. Myo2p isolated from a myo2-E1 mutant (a mutant hyper-sensitive to perturbation of Rng3p function showed similar behavior in the same assays and exhibited an altered motor conformation based on limited proteolysis experiments. We propose that Rng3p is not required for the folding of motors per se, but instead works to ensure the activity of intrinsically unstable myosin-II motors. Rng3p is specific to conventional myosin-II and the actomyosin ring, and is not required for unconventional myosin motor function at other actin structures. However, artificial destabilization of myosin-I motors at endocytic actin patches (using a myo1-E1 mutant led to recruitment of Rng3p to patches. Thus, while Rng3p is specific to myosin-II, UCS proteins are adaptable and can respond to changes in the stability of other myosin motors.

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Membrane Protein CT228 Recruits Elements of the Myosin Phosphatase Pathway to Regulate Release Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika I. Lutter

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis replicates within a membrane-bound compartment termed an inclusion. The inclusion membrane is modified by the insertion of multiple proteins known as Incs. In a yeast two-hybrid screen, an interaction was found between the inclusion membrane protein CT228 and MYPT1, a subunit of myosin phosphatase. MYPT1 was recruited peripherally around the inclusion, whereas the phosphorylated, inactive form was localized to active Src-family kinase-rich microdomains. Phosphorylated myosin light chain 2 (MLC2, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, myosin IIA, and myosin IIB also colocalized with inactive MYPT1. The role of these proteins was examined in the context of host-cell exit mechanisms (i.e., cell lysis and extrusion of intact inclusions. Inhibition of myosin II or small interfering RNA depletion of myosin IIA, myosin IIB, MLC2, or MLCK reduced chlamydial extrusion, thus favoring lytic events as the primary means of release. These studies provide insights into the regulation of egress mechanisms by C. trachomatis.

  15. BMP-2 Overexpression Augments Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Motility by Upregulating Myosin Va via Erk Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The disruption of physiologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration initiates atherosclerosis development. The biochemical mechanisms leading to dysfunctional VSMC motility remain unknown. Recently, cytokine BMP-2 has been implicated in various vascular physiologic and pathologic processes. However, whether BMP-2 has any effect upon VSMC motility, or by what manner, has never been investigated. Methods. VSMCs were adenovirally transfected to genetically overexpress BMP-2. VSMC motility was detected by modified Boyden chamber assay, confocal time-lapse video assay, and a colony wounding assay. Gene chip array and RT-PCR were employed to identify genes potentially regulated by BMP-2. Western blot and real-time PCR detected the expression of myosin Va and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed myosin Va expression locale. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were recorded. Results. VSMC migration was augmented in VSMCs overexpressing BMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myosin Va inhibited VSMC motility. Both myosin Va mRNA and protein expression significantly increased after BMP-2 administration and were inhibited by Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126. BMP-2 induced Ca2+ oscillations, generated largely by a “cytosolic oscillator”. Conclusion. BMP-2 significantly increased VSMCs migration and myosin Va expression, via the Erk signaling pathway and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and inhibition of BMP-2-induced myosin Va expression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy.

  16. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Cole, Rex A; Fowler, John E; Dolja, Valerian V

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  17. Myosin light chain kinase facilitates endocytosis of synaptic vesicles at hippocampal boutons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Wu, Xiaomei; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Xu, Jianhua

    2016-07-01

    At nerve terminals, endocytosis efficiently recycles vesicle membrane to maintain synaptic transmission under different levels of neuronal activity. Ca(2+) and its downstream signal pathways are critical for the activity-dependent regulation of endocytosis. An activity- and Ca(2+) -dependent kinase, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been reported to regulate vesicle mobilization, vesicle cycling, and motility in different synapses, but whether it has a general contribution to regulation of endocytosis at nerve terminals remains unknown. We investigated this issue at rat hippocampal boutons by imaging vesicle endocytosis as the real-time retrieval of vesicular synaptophysin tagged with a pH-sensitive green fluorescence protein. We found that endocytosis induced by 200 action potentials (5-40 Hz) was slowed by acute inhibition of MLCK and down-regulation of MLCK with RNA interference, while the total amount of vesicle exocytosis and somatic Ca(2+) channel current did not change with MLCK down-regulation. Acute inhibition of myosin II similarly impaired endocytosis. Furthermore, down-regulation of MLCK prevented depolarization-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain, an effect shared by blockers of Ca(2+) channels and calmodulin. These results suggest that MLCK facilitates vesicle endocytosis through activity-dependent phosphorylation of myosin downstream of Ca(2+) /calmodulin, probably as a widely existing mechanism among synapses. Our study suggests that MLCK is an important activity-dependent regulator of vesicle recycling in hippocampal neurons, which are critical for learning and memory. The kinetics of vesicle membrane endocytosis at nerve terminals has long been known to depend on activity and Ca(2+) . This study provides evidence suggesting that myosin light chain kinase increases endocytosis efficiency at hippocampal neurons by mediating Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of myosin. The authors propose that this signal cascade may serve as

  18. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenping Wu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ.We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening.We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  19. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A. (UPENN); (Duke); (MRCLMB); (FSU); (Jikei-Med)

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are

  20. Opening the Arg-Glu salt bridge in myosin: computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliman, Ilya; Grigorenko, Bella; Shadrina, Maria; Nemukhin, Alexander

    2009-06-28

    Opening the Arg-Glu salt bridge in myosin, which presumably succeeds the myosin-catalyzed hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate, was modeled computationally on the basis of the structures corresponding to the enzyme-substrate and enzyme-product complexes found in the quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics simulations. According to the calculations of the potential of mean force, opening the bridge is considerably facilitated upon termination of the chemical reaction, but does not promote egress of inorganic phosphate by the back-door mechanism.

  1. Transport of single cells using an actin bundle-myosin bionanomotor transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takatsuki, Hideyo; Rice, Kevin M; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Blough, Eric R [Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV (United States); Tanaka, Hideyuki [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Kolli, Madhukar B; Nalabotu, Siva K [Center for Diagnostic Nanosystems, Marshall University, Huntington, WV (United States); Famouri, Parviz, E-mail: blough@marshall.edu [Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2011-06-17

    The potential of using actin bundles for the transport of liposomes and single cells across myosin-coated surfaces is investigated. Compared to that observed with filamentous actin, the liposome transport using actin bundles was more linear in nature and able to occur over longer distances. Bundles, but not filamentous actin, were capable of moving single cells. Cargo unloading from bundles was achieved by incubation with Triton X-100. These data suggest that actin bundling may improve the ability of the myosin motor system for nanotransport applications.

  2. Growth and Muscle Defects in Mice Lacking Adult Myosin Heavy Chain Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Acakpo-Satchivi, Leslie J.R.; Edelmann, Winfried; Sartorius, Carol; Lu, Brian D.; Wahr, Philip A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Metzger, Joseph M.; Leinwand, Leslie; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1997-01-01

    The three adult fast myosin heavy chains (MyHCs) constitute the vast majority of the myosin in adult skeletal musculature, and are >92% identical. We describe mice carrying null mutations in each of two predominant adult fast MyHC genes, IIb and IId/x. Both null strains exhibit growth and muscle defects, but the defects are different between the two strains and do not correlate with the abundance or distribution of each gene product. For example, despite the fact that MyHC-IIb accounts for >7...

  3. Electron Microscopic Observation and Biochemical Properties of Carp Myosin B during Frozen Storage at -8°C with Cryoprotectants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Norio; Oguni, Moritoshi; Yamamoto, Mika; Shinano, Haruo

    The cryoprotective effect of sorbitol (0.5M) and monosodium glutamate (0.3M) was examined on the freeze denaturation of carp myosin B filaments by observing the morphological changes in electron microscopy. Myosin B in the presence of 0.1 or 0.6M KCl was stored at -8°C that was higer temperature than the eutectic point of KCl and provided the concentrated KCl solution for causing the filamentous structure to deform. In the case of frozen storage in 0.1M KCl, the deformation of myosin B filaments was protected with both cryoprotectants. In the case of 0.6M KCl with monosodium glutamate, the deformation of the filaments was prevented. However, the granular matters deformed from myosin B were observed to some extent in 0.6M KCl with sorbitol. Morphological changes of the filaments in the electron microscopy agreed with the changes in biochemical properties of myosin B.

  4. Deletion of myosin VI causes slow retinal optic neuropathy and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-relevant retinal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Timm; Gleiser, Corinna; Heiduschka, Peter; Franz, Christoph; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Weisschuh, Nicole; Eske, Gordon; Rohbock, Karin; Rieger, Norman; Paquet-Durand, François; Wissinger, Bernd; Wolfrum, Uwe; Hirt, Bernhard; Singer, Wibke; Rüttiger, Lukas; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Knipper, Marlies

    2015-10-01

    The unconventional myosin VI, a member of the actin-based motor protein family of myosins, is expressed in the retina. Its deletion was previously shown to reduce amplitudes of the a- and b-waves of the electroretinogram. Analyzing wild-type and myosin VI-deficient Snell's Waltzer mice in more detail, the expression pattern of myosin VI in retinal pigment epithelium, outer limiting membrane, and outer plexiform layer could be linked with differential progressing ocular deficits. These encompassed reduced a-waves and b-waves and disturbed oscillatory potentials in the electroretinogram, photoreceptor cell death, retinal microglia infiltration, and formation of basal laminar deposits. A phenotype comprising features of glaucoma (neurodegeneration) and age-related macular degeneration could thus be uncovered that suggests dysfunction of myosin VI and its variable cargo adaptor proteins for membrane sorting and autophagy, as possible candidate mediators for both disease forms.

  5. The effect of novel mutations on the structure and enzymatic activity of unconventional myosins associated with autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwon, T.J.; Oh, S.K.; Park, H.J.; Sato, O.; Venselaar, H.; Choi, S.Y.; Kim, S.; Lee, K.Y.; Bok, J.; Lee, S.H.; Vriend, G.; Ikebe, M.; Kim, U.K.; Choi, J.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in five unconventional myosin genes have been associated with genetic hearing loss (HL). These genes encode the motor proteins myosin IA, IIIA, VI, VIIA and XVA. To date, most mutations in myosin genes have been found in the Caucasian population. In addition, only a few functional studies

  6. Circadian rhythmicity and photic plasticity of myosin gene transcription in fast skeletal muscle of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazado, Carlo C; Nagasawa, Kazue; Babiak, Igor; Kumaratunga, Hiruni P S; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2014-12-01

    The circadian rhythm is a fundamental adaptive mechanism to the daily environmental changes experienced by many organisms, including fish. Myosins constitute a large family of contractile proteins that are essential functional components of skeletal muscle. They are known to display thermal plasticity but the influence of light on myosin expression remains to be investigated in fish. In the present study, we have examined the circadian rhythmicity and photoperiodic plasticity of myosin gene transcription in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) fast skeletal muscle. In silico mining of the Atlantic cod genome resulted in the identification of 76 myosins representing different classes, many of which were hitherto uncharacterized. Among the 23 fast skeletal muscle myosin genes, myh_tc, myh_n1, myh_n4, myo18a_2, and myo18b_2 displayed circadian rhythmic expression and contained several circadian-related transcription factor binding sites (Creb, Mef2 and E-box motifs) within their putative promoter regions. Also, the circadian expression of these 5 myosins strongly correlated with the transcription pattern of clock genes in fast skeletal muscle. Under ex vivo conditions, myosin transcript levels lost their circadian rhythmicity. Nonetheless, different photoperiod regimes influenced the mRNA levels of myh_n4, myo18a_2 and myo18b_2 in fast skeletal muscle explants. Photoperiod manipulation in Atlantic cod juveniles revealed that continuous light significantly elevated mRNA levels of several myosins in fast skeletal muscle when compared to natural photoperiod. The daily rhythmicity observed in some fast skeletal muscle myosin genes suggests that they may be under circadian clock regulation. In addition, the influence of photoperiod on their expression implies that myosins may be involved in the photic plasticity of muscle growth observed in Atlantic cod. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel mutations in beta-myosin heavy chain, actin and troponin-I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 3. Novel mutations in beta-myosin heavy chain, actin and troponin-I genes associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in Indian population. Ushasree Boda Shivani Vadapalli Narsimhan Calambur Pratibha Nallari. Research Note Volume 88 Issue 3 December 2009 pp ...

  8. Calix[4]arene C-90 and its analogs activate ATPase of the myometrium myosin subfragment-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Labyntseva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous female reproductive abnormalities are consequences of disorders in uterus smooth muscle (myometrium contractile function. In this work, we described activators of ATPase, which could be used for development of effective treatments for correcting this dysfunction. Myosin ATPase localized in the catalytic domain of myosin subfragment-1 transforms a chemical energy deposited in macroergic bonds of ATP into mechanical movement. It was shown that сalix[4]arene C-90 and its structural analogs functionalized at the upper rim of macrocycle with four or at least two N-phenylsulfonуltrifluoroacetamidine groups, are able to activate ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by myometrium myosin subfragment-1. It was shown with the method of computer modeling that N-phenylsulfonуltrifluoroacetamidine groups of calix[4]arene C-90 interact with responsible for binding, coordination and the hydrolysis of ATP amino acid residues of myosin subfragment-1. The results can be used for further research aimed at using calix[4]arene C-90 and its analogs as pharmacological compounds that can effectively normalize myometrium contractile hypofunction.

  9. Myosin II has distinct functions in PNS and CNS myelin sheath formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Tewari, Ambika; Einheber, Steven; Salzer, James L; Melendez-Vasquez, Carmen V

    2008-09-22

    The myelin sheath forms by the spiral wrapping of a glial membrane around the axon. The mechanisms responsible for this process are unknown but are likely to involve coordinated changes in the glial cell cytoskeleton. We have found that inhibition of myosin II, a key regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics, has remarkably opposite effects on myelin formation by Schwann cells (SC) and oligodendrocytes (OL). Myosin II is necessary for initial interactions between SC and axons, and its inhibition or down-regulation impairs their ability to segregate axons and elongate along them, preventing the formation of a 1:1 relationship, which is critical for peripheral nervous system myelination. In contrast, OL branching, differentiation, and myelin formation are potentiated by inhibition of myosin II. Thus, by controlling the spatial and localized activation of actin polymerization, myosin II regulates SC polarization and OL branching, and by extension their ability to form myelin. Our data indicate that the mechanisms regulating myelination in the peripheral and central nervous systems are distinct.

  10. An embryonic myosin isoform enables stretch activation and cyclical power in Drosophila jump muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cuiping; Swank, Douglas M

    2013-06-18

    The mechanism behind stretch activation (SA), a mechanical property that increases muscle force and oscillatory power generation, is not known. We used Drosophila transgenic techniques and our new muscle preparation, the jump muscle, to determine if myosin heavy chain isoforms influence the magnitude and rate of SA force generation. We found that Drosophila jump muscles show very low SA force and cannot produce positive power under oscillatory conditions at pCa 5.0. However, we transformed the jump muscle to be moderately stretch-activatable by replacing its myosin isoform with an embryonic isoform (EMB). Expressing EMB, jump muscle SA force increased by 163% and it generated net positive power. The rate of SA force development decreased by 58% with EMB expression. Power generation is Pi dependent as >4 mM Pi was required for positive power from EMB. Pi increased EMB SA force, but not wild-type SA force. Our data suggest that when muscle expressing EMB is stretched, EMB is more easily driven backward to a weakly bound state than wild-type jump muscle. This increases the number of myosin heads available to rapidly bind to actin and contribute to SA force generation. We conclude that myosin heavy chain isoforms influence both SA kinetics and SA force, which can determine if a muscle is capable of generating oscillatory power at a fixed calcium concentration. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diaphragm single-fiber weakness and loss of myosin in congestive heart failure rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, H.W.H. van; Heijden, H.F.M. van der; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.; Heunks, L.M.A.; Pigmans, C.J.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.

    2007-01-01

    Diaphragm weakness commonly occurs in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) and is an independent predictor of mortality. However, the pathophysiology of diaphragm weakness is poorly understood. We hypothesized that CHF induces diaphragm weakness at the single-fiber level by decreasing myosin

  12. Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of porcine myosin heavy chain 1 gene in Berkshire loins with a high pH24 value. Jin Hun Kang, Woo Young Bang, Eun Jung Kwon, Yong Hwa Lee, Da Hye Park, Eun Seok Cho, Min Ji Kim, Jong-Soon Choi, Hwa Chun Park, Beom Young Park, Chul Wook Kim ...

  13. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Functional effects of myosin mutation R723G in cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraft, T.; Witjas-Paalberends, E.R.; Boontje, N.; Tripathi, S.; Brandis, A.; Montag, J.; Hodgkinson, J.L.; Francino, A.; Navarro-Lopez, F.; Brenner, B.; Stienen, G.J.M.; van der Velden, J.

    2013-01-01

    Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) is frequently caused by mutations in the β-cardiac myosin heavy chain (β-MyHC). To identify changes in sarcomeric function triggered by such mutations, distinguishing mutation effects from other functional alterations of the myocardium is essential. We

  14. Heterogeneous activation of a slow myosin gene in proliferating myoblasts and differentiated single myofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Hua; Wang, Qiao-Jing; Wang, Chao; Reinholt, Brad; Grant, Alan L; Gerrard, David E; Kuang, Shihuan

    2015-06-01

    Each skeletal muscle contains a fixed ratio of fast and slow myofibers that are distributed in a stereotyped pattern to achieve a specific motor function. How myofibers are specified during development and regeneration is poorly understood. Here we address this question using transgenic reporter mice that indelibly mark the myofiber lineages based on activation of fast or slow myosin. Lineage tracing indicates that during development all muscles have activated the fast myosin gene Myl1, but not the slow myosin gene Myh7, which is activated in all slow but a subset of fast myofibers. Similarly, most nascent myofibers do not activate Myh7 during fast muscle regeneration, but the ratio and pattern of fast and slow myofibers are restored at the completion of regeneration. At the single myofiber level, most mature fast myofibers are heterogeneous in nuclear composition, manifested by mosaic activation of Myh7. Strikingly, Myh7 is activated in a subpopulation of proliferating myoblasts that co-express the myogenic progenitor marker Pax7. When induced to differentiate, the Myh7-activated myoblasts differentiate more readily than the non-activated myoblasts, and have a higher tendency, but not restricted, to become slow myotubes. Together, our data reveal significant nuclear heterogeneity within a single myofiber, and challenge the conventional view that myosin genes are only expressed after myogenic differentiation. These results provide novel insights into the regulation of muscle fiber type specification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Tail domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus class V myosin orchestrates septal localization and hyphal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Hilary; Vargas-Muñiz, José M; Juvvadi, Praveen R; Richards, Amber D; Waitt, Greg; Soderblom, Erik J; Moseley, M Arthur; Steinbach, William J

    2017-12-08

    Myosins are critical motor proteins that contribute to the secretory pathway, polarized growth, and cytokinesis. The globular tail domains of class V myosins have been shown to be important for cargo binding and actin cable organization. Additionally, phosphorylation plays a role in class V myosin cargo choice. Our previous studies on the class V myosin, MyoE, in the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus confirmed its requirement for normal morphology and virulence. However, the domains and molecular mechanisms governing MyoE's function remain unknown. Here, by analyzing tail mutants we demonstrate that the tail is required for radial growth, conidiation, septation frequency, and MyoE localization at the septum. Furthermore, MyoE is phosphorylated at multiple residues in vivo; however, alanine substitution mutants revealed that no single phosphorylated residue was critical. Importantly, in the absence of the phosphatase calcineurin, an additional residue was phosphorylated in its tail domain. Mutation of this tail residue led to mislocalization of MyoE from the septa. This work reveals the importance of the MyoE tail domain and its phosphorylation/dephosphorylation in the growth and morphology of A. fumigatus. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Tropomyosin is essential for processive movement of a class V myosin from budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Alex R; Krementsova, Elena B; Bookwalter, Carol S; Fagnant, Patricia M; Sladewski, Thomas E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2012-08-07

    Myosin V is an actin-based motor protein involved in intracellular cargo transport [1]. Given this physiological role, it was widely assumed that all class V myosins are processive, able to take multiple steps along actin filaments without dissociating. This notion was challenged when several class V myosins were characterized as nonprocessive in vitro, including Myo2p, the essential class V myosin from S. cerevisiae [2-6]. Myo2p moves cargo including secretory vesicles and other organelles for several microns along actin cables in vivo. This demonstrated cargo transporter must therefore either operate in small ensembles or behave processively in the cellular context. Here we show that Myo2p moves processively in vitro as a single motor when it walks on an actin track that more closely resembles the actin cables found in vivo. The key to processivity is tropomyosin: Myo2p is not processive on bare actin but highly processive on actin-tropomyosin. The major yeast tropomyosin isoform, Tpm1p, supports the most robust processivity. Tropomyosin slows the rate of MgADP release, thus increasing the time the motor spends strongly attached to actin. This is the first example of tropomyosin switching a motor from nonprocessive to processive motion on actin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    KAUST Repository

    Conti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS\\'s pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  18. The Role of a Novel Myosin Isoform in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    J.A. Goodrich, P. de Lanerolle, Nuclear myosin I is necessary for the formation of the first phosphodiester bond during transcrip- tion initiation by... noncovalent association of lamin A with SUMO1. DISCUSSION We discovered that the lamin A tail domain is modified, both in vitro and in Cos-7 cells

  19. Myosin heavy chain composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of male body builders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, H; Zhou, M.-Y.; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of young sedentary men (28 +/- 0.4 years, mean +/- SE, n = 4) and male body builders (25 +/- 2.0 years, n = 4) was analysed with a sensitive one-dimensional electrophoretic technique. Compared with sedentary men...

  20. A novel cGMP signalling pathway mediating myosin phosphorylation and chemotaxis in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgraaf, Leonard; Russcher, Henk; Smith, Janet L.; Wessels, Deborah; Soll, David R.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2002-01-01

    Chemotactic stimulation of Dictyostelium cells results in a transient increase in cGMP levels, and transient phosphorylation of myosin II heavy and regulatory light chains. In Dictyostelium, two guanylyl cyclases and four candidate cGMP-binding proteins (GbpA- GbpD) are implicated in cGMP

  1. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Antonio; Riva, Nilo; Pesca, Mariasabina; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Corbo, Massimo; Previtali, Stefano C; Quattrini, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS's pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Twirling of actin by myosins II and V observed via polarized TIRF in a modified gliding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Schroeder, Harry W; Nelson, Philip C; Goldman, Yale E

    2008-12-15

    The force generated between actin and myosin acts predominantly along the direction of the actin filament, resulting in relative sliding of the thick and thin filaments in muscle or transport of myosin cargos along actin tracks. Previous studies have also detected lateral forces or torques that are generated between actin and myosin, but the origin and biological role of these sideways forces is not known. Here we adapt an actin gliding filament assay to measure the rotation of an actin filament about its axis ("twirling") as it is translocated by myosin. We quantify the rotation by determining the orientation of sparsely incorporated rhodamine-labeled actin monomers, using polarized total internal reflection microscopy. To determine the handedness of the filament rotation, linear incident polarizations in between the standard s- and p-polarizations were generated, decreasing the ambiguity of our probe orientation measurement fourfold. We found that whole myosin II and myosin V both twirl actin with a relatively long (approximately 1 microm), left-handed pitch that is insensitive to myosin concentration, filament length, and filament velocity.

  3. Orbit/CLASP is required for myosin accumulation at the cleavage furrow in Drosophila male meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishi Kitazawa

    Full Text Available Peripheral microtubules (MTs near the cell cortex are essential for the positioning and continuous constriction of the contractile ring (CR in cytokinesis. Time-lapse observations of Drosophila male meiosis showed that myosin II was first recruited along the cell cortex independent of MTs. Then, shortly after peripheral MTs made contact with the equatorial cortex, myosin II was concentrated there in a narrow band. After MT contact, anillin and F-actin abruptly appeared on the equatorial cortex, simultaneously with myosin accumulation. We found that the accumulation of myosin did not require centralspindlin, but was instead dependent on Orbit, a Drosophila ortholog of the MT plus-end tracking protein CLASP. This protein is required for stabilization of central spindle MTs, which are essential for cytokinesis. Orbit was also localized in a mid-zone of peripheral MTs, and was concentrated in a ring at the equatorial cortex during late anaphase. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments indicated that Orbit is closely associated with F-actin in the CR. We also showed that the myosin heavy chain was in close proximity with Orbit in the cleavage furrow region. Centralspindlin was dispensable in Orbit ring formation. Instead, the Polo-KLP3A/Feo complex was required for the Orbit accumulation independently of the Orbit MT-binding domain. However, orbit mutations of consensus sites for the phosphorylation of Cdk1 or Polo did not influence the Orbit accumulation, suggesting an indirect regulatory role of these protein kinases in Orbit localization. Orbit was also necessary for the maintenance of the CR. Our data suggest that Orbit plays an essential role as a connector between MTs and the CR in Drosophila male meiosis.

  4. Myosin II Motors and F-Actin Dynamics Drive the Coordinated Movement of the Centrosome and Soma during CNS Glial-Guided Neuronal Migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solecki, Dr. David [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Trivedi, Dr. Niraj [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Govek, Eve-Ellen [Rockefeller University, The; Kerekes, Ryan A [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Hatten, Mary E [Rockefeller University, The

    2009-01-01

    Lamination of cortical regions of the vertebrate brain depends on glial-guided neuronal migration. The conserved polarity protein Par6{alpha} localizes to the centrosome and coordinates forward movement of the centrosome and soma in migrating neurons. The cytoskeletal components that produce this unique form of cell polarity and their relationship to polarity signaling cascades are unknown. We show that F-actin and Myosin II motors are enriched in the neuronal leading process and that Myosin II activity is necessary for leading process actin dynamics. Inhibition of Myosin II decreased the speed of centrosome and somal movement, whereas Myosin II activation increased coordinated movement. Ectopic expression or silencing of Par6{alpha} inhibited Myosin II motors by decreasing Myosin light-chain phosphorylation. These findings suggest leading-process Myosin II may function to 'pull' the centrosome and soma forward during glial-guided migration by a mechanism involving the conserved polarity protein Par6{alpha}.

  5. Identification of a 48 kDa form of unconventional myosin 1c in blood serum of patients with autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severyn Myronovkij

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We searched for protein markers present in blood serum of multiple sclerosis (MS, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients in comparison to healthy human individuals. We used precipitation/extraction methods and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, and identified a protein with Mr ~46 kDa as a fragment of human unconventional myosin IC isoform b (Myo1C. Western blotting with specific anti-human Myo1C antibodies confirmed the identity. Screening of blood serum samples from different autoimmune patients for the presence of Myo1c revealed its high level in MS and RA patients, relatively low level in SLE patients, and undetected in healthy donors. These data are suggesting that the level of p46 Myo1C in blood serum is a potential marker for testing of autoimmune diseases.

  6. Identification of a 48 kDa form of unconventional myosin 1c in blood serum of patients with autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myronovkij, Severyn; Negrych, Nazar; Nehrych, Tetyana; Redowicz, Maria J; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy; Stoika, Rostyslav; Kit, Yuriy

    2016-03-01

    We searched for protein markers present in blood serum of multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in comparison to healthy human individuals. We used precipitation/extraction methods and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry, and identified a protein with Mr ~46 kDa as a fragment of human unconventional myosin IC isoform b (Myo1C). Western blotting with specific anti-human Myo1C antibodies confirmed the identity. Screening of blood serum samples from different autoimmune patients for the presence of Myo1c revealed its high level in MS and RA patients, relatively low level in SLE patients, and undetected in healthy donors. These data are suggesting that the level of p46 Myo1C in blood serum is a potential marker for testing of autoimmune diseases.

  7. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  8. Confinement-Optimized 3-Dimensional T cell Amoeboid Motility is Modulated via Myosin IIA-Regulated Adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobelli, Jordan; Friedman, Rachel S.; Conti, Mary Anne; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu; Sorensen, Caitlin M.; Adelstein, Robert S.; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2010-01-01

    During trafficking through tissues, T cells fine-tune their motility to balance the extent and duration of cell-surface contacts with the need to traverse an entire organ. In vivo, Myosin-IIA-deficient T cells exhibited a triad of defects including over-adherence to high-endothelial venules, reduced interstitial migration, and inefficient completion of recirculation through lymph nodes. Spatiotemporal analysis of 3-dimensional motility in microchannels revealed that the degree of confinement and Myosin-IIA function, rather than integrin adhesion as proposed by the haptokinetic model, optimize motility rate. This occurs via a Myosin-IIA-dependent rapid ‘walking’ motility mode using multiple small and simultaneous adhesions to the substrate, which prevent spurious and prolonged adhesions. Adhesion discrimination provided by Myosin-IIA is thus necessary for optimizing motility through complex tissues. PMID:20835229

  9. Blebs produced by actin-myosin contraction during apoptosis release damage-associated molecular pattern proteins before secondary necrosis occurs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wickman, G R; Julian, L; Mardilovich, K; Schumacher, S; Munro, J; Rath, N; Zander, S Al; Mleczak, A; Sumpton, D; Morrice, N; Bienvenut, W V; Olson, M F

    2013-01-01

    ... the catastrophic loss of membrane integrity during secondary necrosis. Blebbing, apoptotic body formation and protein release during early apoptosis are dependent on ROCK and myosin ATPase activity to drive actomyosin contraction...

  10. An evaluation of morphological and functional multi-parametric MRI sequences in classifying non-muscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Giovanni; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Del Monte, Maurizio; Carano, Davide; Catalano, Carlo [Sapienza Univ. Rome (Italy). Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology; De Berardinis, Ettore; Leonardo, Constantino [Sapienza Univ. Rome (Italy). Dept. of Gynaecological-Obstetric and Urological Sciences; Simone, Giuseppe; Gallucci, Michele [' ' Regina Elena' ' National Cancer Insitute, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Urology; Catto, James [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Aademic Urology Unit

    2017-09-15

    Our goal is to determine the ability of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to differentiate muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) from non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Patients underwent mpMRI before tumour resection. Four MRI sets, i.e. T2-weighted (T2W) + perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), T2W plus diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T2W + DWI + PWI, and T2W + DWI + PWI + dif-fusion tensor imaging (DTI) were interpreted qualitatively by two radiologists, blinded to histology results. PWI, DWI and DTI were also analysed quantitatively. Accuracy was determined using histopathology as the reference standard. A total of 82 tumours were analysed. Ninety-six percent of T1-labeled tumours by the T2W + DWI + PWI image set were confirmed to be NMIBC at histopathology. Overall accuracy of the complete mpMRI protocol was 94% in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. PWI, DWI and DTI quantitative parameters were shown to be significantly different in cancerous versus non-cancerous areas within the bladder wall in T2-labelled lesions. MpMRI with DWI and DTI appears a reliable staging tool for bladder cancer. If our data are validated, then mpMRI could precede cystoscopic resection to allow a faster recognition of MIBC and accelerated treatment pathways. (orig.)

  11. The Moreau Strain of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) for High-Risk Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: An Alternative during Worldwide BCG Shortage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Sebastian L; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Chade, Daher C; Sarkis, Alvaro S; Ribeiro-Filho, Leopoldo A; Nahas, Willian C; Klatte, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the standard of care for adjuvant intravesical instillation therapy for intermediate- and high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) after complete transurethral resection. Increasing evidence suggests that there are marked differences in outcomes according to BCG substrains. BCG-Moreau was recently introduced to the European market to cover the issue of BCG shortage, but there are little data regarding the oncologic efficacy. We retrospectively analyzed 295 consecutive patients, who received adjuvant intravesical instillation therapy with BCG-Moreau for intermediate- and high-risk NMIBC between October 2007 and April 2013 at a single institution. The end points of this study were time to first recurrence and progression to muscle-invasive disease. Median age was 66 years (interquartile range 59-74, mean 65.9 years). According to the EAU risk group, 76 patients presented with intermediate-risk and 219 patients with high-risk NMIBC. The 5-year recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival rate was 64.8% (95% CI 52.8-74.4) and 81.4% (95% CI 65.2-90.2), respectively. BCG-Moreau is an effective substrain for adjuvant instillation therapies of NMIBC, and outcomes appear to be comparable to series using other substrains. During worldwide shortage of BCG-TICE, Connaught and RIVM, BCG-Moreau may serve as an equally effective alternative. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Novel Simulation Model of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Platform for a Virtual Randomized Trial of Conservative Therapy vs. Cystectomy in BCG Refractory Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay; Dinh, Tuan; Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Rengarajan, Badri; Mayo, Kevin; Clark, Peter E; Kamat, Ashish M; Lee, Cheryl T; Sexton, Wade J; Steinberg, Gary D

    2015-10-26

    Introduction: There have been no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the clinical or economic benefit of mitomycin C intravesical therapy vs. radical cystectomy in patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We used the Archimedes computational model to simulate RCT comparing radical cystectomy versus intravesical mitomycin C (MMC) therapy to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes for BCG-refractory NMIBC as well demonstrate the utility of computer based models to simulate a clinical trial. Methods: The Archimedes model was developed to generate a virtual population using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, other clinical trials, and expert opinions. Patients selected were diagnosed with NMIBC (virtual patients were evaluation. Progression to MIBC in the MMC treatment arm was 30% over the lifetime. Disease specific death at 5 years was 1.6% and 8.7% for the immediate cystectomy and MMC treatment arms respectively; while, overall death was 17.8% and 23.8% at 5 years. Over a 5-year period the average cost of immediate cystectomy was $64,675 vs $68,517 in the MMC arm. Conclusion: Immediate radical cystectomy after BCG failure for NMIBC has improved survival and is more cost-effective when compared to those undergoing MMC. Simulation of clinical trials using computational models similar to the Archimedes model can overcome shortcomings of real-world clinical trials and may prove useful in the face of current medical cost-conscious era.

  13. A clinical trial of neoadjuvant hyperthermic intravesical chemotherapy (HIVEC) for treating intermediate and high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Alejandro; Inman, Brant A; Piñeiro, Idelfonso; Monserrat, Victor; Pérez, Alberto; Aparici, Vincente; Gómez, Isabel; Neira, Pilar; Uribarri, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Ths paper reports a pilot/feasibility trial of neoadjuvant hyperthermic intravesical chemotherapy (HIVEC) prior to transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). A pilot/feasibility clinical trial was performed and 15 patients with intermediate to high-risk NMIBC received HIVEC prior to TURBT. HIVEC consisting of eight weekly instillations of intravesical MMC (80 mg in 50 mL) delivered with the novel Combat BRS® system at a temperature of 43 °C for 60 min. Treatment-related adverse effects were measured and patients were followed for 2 years for disease recurrence. A total of 119 HIVEC treatments occurred. Grade 1 adverse events consisted of irritative bladder symptoms (33%), bladder spasms (27%), pain (27%), haematuria (20%) and urinary tract infection (UTI; 14%). Grade 2 adverse events were bladder calcification (7%) and reduced bladder capacity (7%). No grade 3 or higher toxicity was observed. At TURBT, eight patients (53%) were complete responders (pT0) while seven (47%) were partial responders. With a median follow-up of 29 months, the 3-year cumulative incidence of recurrence was 15%. The Combat BRS® system achieved target bladder temperatures and delivered HIVEC with a favourable side-effect profile. Our pilot trial also provides preliminary evidence of treatment efficacy.

  14. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY OF PROSPIDINE AND CISPLATIN IN NEOADJUVANT INTRAVESICAL CHEMOTHERAPY FOR NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Shabunina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the antitumor efficiency of the intravesical administration of prospiridine versus cisplatin in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC.Subjects and methods. The therapeutic effect of neoadjuvant intravesical chemotherapy (CT was comparatively analyzed in 74 patients with transitional cell NMIBC. Thirty-four patients were given prospidine in a single dose of 200 mg to the total dose of 4000 mg; 40 patients received cisplatin in a single dose of 20 mg to the total dose of 500 mg.Results. There was a preponderance of moderate dysuretic manifestations (55 % during CH with prospidine and mild cystitis (62.5 % during that with cisplatin. In the prospidine group, mild leukopenia was observed in 5 (14.7 % patients receiving intravesical CT with prospidine and in none patients treated with cisplatin. In the same group, 11.7 and 23.5 % achieved complete or partial regression, respectively. The total effect of intravesical CT with prospidine was 32.4 % and that with cisplatin was 50 % (complete or partial regression was seen in 22.5 and 27.5 %, respectively.Conclusion. The study has demonstrated that intravesical CT with prospidine is effective and well tolerated and may be recommended for the treatment of NMIBC.

  15. [Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer : Current aspects of diagnostics, local therapy options and the update of the 2016 WHO classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, A; Grimm, T; Jokisch, F; Gaisa, N T; Stief, C G

    2016-09-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder is known as one of most common malignant tumors in the urogenital tract. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) in particular has a high recurrence rate and results in correspondingly high costs for the public health system. To improve the recurrence rate and the prognosis of NMIBC the diagnosis, resection technique, adjuvant instillation therapy and exact histopathological classification of tumor lesions are indispensable. This article gives an overview on the current developments in this field. The current European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines and the preliminary version of the German S3 guidelines on bladder cancer list photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and narrow band imaging (NBI) as diagnostic procedures for tumors of the bladder. The trend for resection of bladder tumors is towards the use of en bloc resection using various techniques. Furthermore, an update of the WHO classification aims at a better identification and prognosis of the different risk groups of NMIBC. The treatment of NMIBC can only be improved by the combination of optimized diagnosis, precise tumor resection, improved adjuvant intravesical therapy and correct histopathological evaluation of tumors.

  16. Myosin Va Plays a Role in Nitrergic Smooth Muscle Relaxation in Gastric Fundus and Corpora Cavernosa of Penis

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Chaudhury; Vivian Cristofaro; Carew, Josephine A.; Goyal, Raj K; Sullivan, Maryrose P.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular motor protein myosin Va is involved in nitrergic neurotransmission possibly by trafficking of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) within the nerve terminals. In this study, we examined the role of myosin Va in the stomach and penis, proto-typical smooth muscle organs in which nitric oxide (NO) mediated relaxation is critical for function. We used confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation of tissue from the gastric fundus (GF) and penile corpus cavernosum (CCP) to loca...

  17. Refined model of the 10S conformation of smooth muscle myosin by cryo-electron microscopy 3D image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wendt, Thomas; Taylor, Dianne; Taylor, Kenneth

    2003-06-20

    The actin-activated ATPase activity of smooth muscle myosin and heavy meromyosin (smHMM) is regulated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC). Complete regulation requires two intact myosin heads because single-headed myosin subfragments are always active. 2D crystalline arrays of the 10S form of intact myosin, which has a dephosphorylated RLC, were produced on a positively charged lipid monolayer and imaged in 3D at 2.0 nm resolution by cryo-electron microscopy of frozen, hydrated specimens. An atomic model of smooth muscle myosin was constructed from the X-ray structures of the smooth muscle myosin motor domain and essential light chain and a homology model of the RLC was produced based on the skeletal muscle S1 structure. The initial model of the 10S myosin, based on the previous reconstruction of smHMM, was subjected to real space refinement to obtain a quantitative fit to the density. The smHMM was likewise refined and both refined models reveal the same asymmetric interaction between the upper 50 kDa domain of the "blocked" head and parts of the catalytic, converter domains and the essential light chain of the "free" head observed previously. This observation suggests that this interaction is not simply due to crystallographic packing but is enforced by elements of the myosin heads. The 10S reconstruction shows additional alpha-helical coiled-coil not seen in the earlier smHMM reconstruction, but the location of one segment of S2 is the same in both.

  18. The Role of the UNC-82 Protein Kinase in Organizing Myosin Filaments in Striated Muscle of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, NaTasha R; Duchesneau, Christopher D; Lane, Latrisha S; Reedy, April R; Manzon, Emily R; Hoppe, Pamela E

    2017-03-01

    We study the mechanisms that guide the formation and maintenance of the highly ordered actin-myosin cytoskeleton in striated muscle. The UNC-82 kinase of Caenorhabditis elegans is orthologous to mammalian kinases ARK5/NUAK1 and SNARK/NUAK2. UNC-82 localizes to the M-line, and is required for proper organization of thick filaments, but its substrate and mechanism of action are unknown. Antibody staining of three mutants with missense mutations in the UNC-82 catalytic domain revealed muscle structure that is less disorganized than in the null unc-82(0), but contained distinctive ectopic accumulations not found in unc-82(0) These accumulations contain paramyosin and myosin B, but lack myosin A and myosin A-associated proteins, as well as proteins of the integrin-associated complex. Fluorescently tagged missense mutant protein UNC-82 E424K localized normally in wild type; however, in unc-82(0), the tagged protein was found in the ectopic accumulations, which we also show to label with recently synthesized paramyosin. Recruitment of wild-type UNC-82::GFP to aggregates of differing protein composition in five muscle-affecting mutants revealed that colocalization of UNC-82 and paramyosin does not require UNC-96, UNC-98/ZnF, UNC-89/obscurin, CSN-5, myosin A, or myosin B individually. Dosage effects in paramyosin mutants suggest that UNC-82 acts as part of a complex, in which its stoichiometric relationship with paramyosin is critical. UNC-82 dosage affects muscle organization in the absence of paramyosin, perhaps through myosin B. We present evidence that the interaction of UNC-98/ZnF with myosin A is independent of UNC-82, and that UNC-82 acts upstream of UNC-98/ZnF in a pathway that organizes paramyosin during thick filament assembly. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. THERMAL STABILITY OF SYNTHETIC PEPTIDES MIMICKING THE SEQUENCE OF THE REGION CONTAINING THE SKIP RESIDUES IN SQUID MYOSIN ROD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Ochiai

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Myosin is the major protein in skeletal muscles including those of fish and shellfish. The characteristics of this protein are closely related to the biological function and the quality and physical properties of musclefood. In the myosin rod (the coiled-coil region of myosin, several amino acid residues, known as skip residues, seem to destabilize the ordered structure (heptad repeat. These residues might be responsible for reducing thermal stability. Attempts were thus made to examine the role of these residues in the rod of squid myosin, based on the thermodynamic properties of synthetic peptides which have been designed to mimic the partial sequence of myosin heavy chain from the squid Todarodes pacificus mantle muscle. Five peptides, namely, with the sequence of Trp1343 -Ala1372  having the skip residue Glu1357 at the center (Peptide WT, without the skip residue (Peptide Δ, with the replacements of the skip residue (Glu by Ile, Gln and Pro (Peptides E/I, E/Q, and E/P, respectively to modify the helix forming propensity, were synthesized. The results obtained showed that the stability of the peptides as measured by circular dichroism spectrometry was in the order of Peptide Δ > Peptide WT > Peptide E/Q > Peptide E/P > Peptide E/I. It is suggested that the presence of the skip residues dexterously tunes the stability or flexibility of the coiled-coil structure, thus possibly regulating thick filament formation and further gel formation ability of myosin.

  20. Calix[4]arene C-99 inhibits myosin ATPase activity and changes the organization of contractile filaments of myometrium

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    R. D. Labyntseva,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calix[4]arenes are cup-like macrocyclic (polyphenolic compounds, they are regarded as promising molecular “platforms” for the design of new physiologically active compounds. We have earlier found that сalix[4]arenе C-99 inhibits the ATPase activity of actomyosin and myosin subfragment-1 of pig uterus іn vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of calix[4]arene C-99 with myosin from rat uterine myocytes. It was found that the ATPase activity of myosin prepared from pre-incubated with 100 mM of calix[4]arene C-99 myocytes was almost 50% lower than in control. Additionally, we have revealed the effect of calix[4]arene C-99 on the subcellular distribution of actin and myosin in uterus myocytes by the method of confocal microscopy. This effect can be caused by reorganization of the structure of the contractile smooth muscle cell proteins due to their interaction with calix[4]arene. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of calix[4]arene C-99 to penetrate into the uterus muscle cells and affect not only the myosin ATPase activity, but also the structure of the actin and myosin filaments in the myometrial cells. Demonstrated ability of calix[4]arene C-99 can be used for development of new pharmacological agents for efficient normalization of myometrial contractile hyperfunction.

  1. Cell-scale dynamic recycling and cortical flow of the actin–myosin cytoskeleton for rapid cell migration

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    Shigehiko Yumura

    2012-11-01

    Actin and myosin II play major roles in cell migration. Whereas pseudopod extension by actin polymerization has been intensively researched, less attention has been paid to how the rest of the actin cytoskeleton such as the actin cortex contributes to cell migration. In this study, cortical actin and myosin II filaments were simultaneously observed in migrating Dictyostelium cells under total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The cortical actin and myosin II filaments remained stationary with respect to the substratum as the cells advanced. However, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and direct observation of filaments showed that they rapidly turned over. When the cells were detached from the substratum, the actin and myosin filaments displayed a vigorous retrograde flow. Thus, when the cells migrate on the substratum, the cortical cytoskeleton firmly holds the substratum to generate the motive force instead. The present studies also demonstrate how myosin II localizes to the rear region of the migrating cells. The observed dynamic turnover of actin and myosin II filaments contributes to the recycling of their subunits across the whole cell and enables rapid reorganization of the cytoskeleton.

  2. Enhanced paracellular transport of insulin can be achieved via transient induction of myosin light chain phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, Alistair; Dondi, Ruggero; Almansour, Khaled; Laurent, Floriane; Owens, Siân-Eleri; Eggleston, Ian M; Fotaki, Nikoletta; Mrsny, Randall J

    2015-07-28

    The intestinal epithelium functions to effectively restrict the causal uptake of luminal contents but has been demonstrated to transiently increase paracellular permeability properties to provide an additional entry route for dietary macromolecules. We have examined a method to emulate this endogenous mechanism as a means of enhancing the oral uptake of insulin. Two sets of stable Permeant Inhibitor of Phosphatase (PIP) peptides were rationally designed to stimulate phosphorylation of intracellular epithelial myosin light chain (MLC) and screened using Caco-2 monolayers in vitro. Apical application of PIP peptide 640, designed to disrupt protein-protein interactions between protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and its regulator CPI-17, resulted in a reversible and non-toxic transient reduction in Caco-2 monolayer trans-epithelial electric resistance (TEER) and opening of the paracellular route to 4kDa fluorescent dextran but not 70kDa dextran in vitro. Apical application of PIP peptide 250, designed to impede MYPT1-mediated regulation of PP1, also decreased TEER in a reversible and non-toxic manner but transiently opened the paracellular route to both 4 and 70kDa fluorescent dextrans. Direct injection of PIP peptides 640 or 250 with human insulin into the lumen of rat jejunum caused a decrease in blood glucose levels that was PIP peptide and insulin dose-dependent and correlated with increased pMLC levels. Systemic levels of insulin suggested approximately 3-4% of the dose injected into the intestinal lumen was absorbed, relative to a subcutaneous injection. Measurement of insulin levels in the portal vein showed a time window of absorption that was consistent with systemic concentration-time profiles and approximately 50% first-pass clearance by the liver. Monitoring the uptake of a fluorescent form of insulin suggested its uptake occurred via the paracellular route. Together, these studies add validation to the presence of an endogenous mechanism used by the intestinal

  3. Myosin-II dependent cell contractility contributes to spontaneous nodule formation of mesothelioma cells

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    Tárnoki-Zách, Julia; Méhes, Elod; Paku, Sándor; Neufeld, Zoltán; Hegedus, Balázs; Döme, Balázs; Czirok, Andras

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that characteristic nodules emerge in cultures of several malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cell lines. Instead of excessive local cell proliferation, the nodules arise by Myosin II-driven cell contractility. The aggregation process can be prevented or reversed by suitable pharmacological inhibitors of acto-myosin contractility. A cell-resolved elasto-plastic model of the multicellular patterning process indicates that the morphology and size of the nodules as well as the speed of their formation is determined by the mechanical tension cells exert on their neighbors, and the stability of cell-substrate adhesion complexes. A linear stability analysis of a homogenous, self-tensioned Maxwell fluid indicates the unconditional presence of a patterning instability.

  4. Cloning and characterization of myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) gene from Culex pipiens pallens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mifang; Qian, Jin; Sun, Jing; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Donghui; Ma, Lei; Sun, Yan; Zhu, Changliang

    2008-10-01

    Myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) (GenBank accession no. DQ140391) was cloned from Culex pipiens pallens. An open reading frame (ORF) of 630 bps was found to encode a putative 210 amino acids protein which shows 73% similarity with myosin regulatory light chain of Gryllotalpa orientalis. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated that the transcription level of MRLC in deltamethrin-resistant strain (DR-strain) was 4.08-fold higher than in deltamethrin-susceptible strain (DS-strain) of C. pipiens pallens. Over-expression of MRLC in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells conferred protection against deltamethrin based on tritiated methyl tritiated thymidine ((3)H-TdR) incorporation assay. These results indicate that MRLC may be a potential cause of deltamethrin resistance in C. pipiens pallens.

  5. Myosin Light Chain Kinase: A Potential Target for Treatment of Inflammatory Diseases

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    Yongjian Xiong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK induces contraction of the perijunctional apical actomyosin ring in response to phosphorylation of the myosin light chain. Abnormal expression of MLCK has been observed in respiratory diseases, pancreatitis, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. The signaling pathways involved in MLCK activation and triggering of endothelial barrier dysfunction are discussed in this review. The pharmacological effects of regulating MLCK expression by inhibitors such as ML-9, ML-7, microbial products, naturally occurring products, and microRNAs are also discussed. The influence of MLCK in inflammatory diseases starts with endothelial barrier dysfunction. The effectiveness of anti-MLCK treatment may depend on alleviation of that primary pathological mechanism. This review summarizes evidence for the potential benefits of anti-MLCK agents in the treatment of inflammatory disease and the importance of avoiding treatment-related side effects, as MLCK is widely expressed in many different tissues.

  6. Magnetic manipulation of actin orientation, polymerization, and gliding on myosin using superparamagnetic iron oxide particles

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    Chen Yun; Guzik, Stephanie; Sumner, James P; Koretsky, Alan P [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Moreland, John, E-mail: koretskya@ninds.nih.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2011-02-11

    The actin cytoskeleton controls cell shape, motility, as well as intracellular molecular trafficking. The ability to remotely manipulate actin is therefore highly desirable as a tool to probe and manipulate biological processes at the molecular level. We demonstrate actin manipulation by labeling actin filaments with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (IOPs) and applying a uniform magnetic field to affect actin orientation, polymerization and gliding on myosin. We show for the first time magnetic manipulation of magnetizable actin filaments at the molecular level while gliding on a bed of myosin molecules and during polymerization. A model for the magnetic alignment and guiding mechanism is proposed based on the torque from the induced molecular anisotropy due to interactions between neighboring IOPs distributed along magnetically labeled actin molecules.

  7. The E3 ligase Ubr3 regulates Usher syndrome and MYH9 disorder proteins in the auditory organs of Drosophila and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongchao; Giagtzoglou, Nikolaos; Eberl, Daniel F; Jaiswal, Sonal Nagarkar; Cai, Tiantian; Godt, Dorothea; Groves, Andrew K; Bellen, Hugo J

    2016-06-22

    Myosins play essential roles in the development and function of auditory organs and multiple myosin genes are associated with hereditary forms of deafness. Using a forward genetic screen in Drosophila, we identified an E3 ligase, Ubr3, as an essential gene for auditory organ development. Ubr3 negatively regulates the mono-ubiquitination of non-muscle Myosin II, a protein associated with hearing loss in humans. The mono-ubiquitination of Myosin II promotes its physical interaction with Myosin VIIa, a protein responsible for Usher syndrome type IB. We show that ubr3 mutants phenocopy pathogenic variants of Myosin II and that Ubr3 interacts genetically and physically with three Usher syndrome proteins. The interactions between Myosin VIIa and Myosin IIa are conserved in the mammalian cochlea and in human retinal pigment epithelium cells. Our work reveals a novel mechanism that regulates protein complexes affected in two forms of syndromic deafness and suggests a molecular function for Myosin IIa in auditory organs.

  8. Lead reduces tension development and the myosin ATPase activity of the rat right ventricular myocardium

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    D.V. Vassallo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb2+ poisoning causes hypertension, but little is known regarding its acute effects on cardiac contractility. To evaluate these effects, force was measured in right ventricular strips that were contracting isometrically in 45 male Wistar rats (250-300 g before and after the addition of increasing concentrations of lead acetate (3, 7, 10, 30, 70, 100, and 300 µM to the bath. Changes in rate of stimulation (0.1-1.5 Hz, relative potentiation after pauses of 15, 30, and 60 s, effect of Ca2+ concentration (0.62, 1.25, and 2.5 mM, and the effect of isoproterenol (20 ng/mL were determined before and after the addition of 100 µM Pb2+. Effects on contractile proteins were evaluated after caffeine treatment using tetanic stimulation (10 Hz and measuring the activity of the myosin ATPase. Pb2+ produced concentration-dependent force reduction, significant at concentrations greater than 30 µM. The force developed in response to increasing rates of stimulation became smaller at 0.5 and 0.8 Hz. Relative potentiation increased after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment. Extracellular Ca2+ increment and isoproterenol administration increased force development but after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment the force was significantly reduced suggesting an effect of the metal on the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx. Concentration of 100 µM Pb2+ also reduced the peak and plateau force of tetanic contractions and reduced the activity of the myosin ATPase. Results showed that acute Pb2+ administration, although not affecting the sarcoplasmic reticulum activity, produces a concentration-dependent negative inotropic effect and reduces myosin ATPase activity. Results suggest that acute lead administration reduced myocardial contractility by reducing sarcolemmal calcium influx and the myosin ATPase activity. These results also suggest that lead exposure is hazardous and has toxicological consequences affecting cardiac muscle.

  9. Actin polymerization or myosin contraction: two ways to build up cortical tension for symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Kevin; Lemière, Joël; Faqir, Fahima; Manzi, John; Blanchoin, Laurent; Plastino, Julie; Betz, Timo; Sykes, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    Cells use complex biochemical pathways to drive shape changes for polarization and movement. One of these pathways is the self-assembly of actin filaments and myosin motors that together produce the forces and tensions that drive cell shape changes. Whereas the role of actin and myosin motors in cell polarization is clear, the exact mechanism of how the cortex, a thin shell of actin that is underneath the plasma membrane, can drive cell shape changes is still an open question. Here, we address this issue using biomimetic systems: the actin cortex is reconstituted on liposome membranes, in an ‘outside geometry’. The actin shell is either grown from an activator of actin polymerization immobilized at the membrane by a biotin–streptavidin link, or built by simple adsorption of biotinylated actin filaments to the membrane, in the presence or absence of myosin motors. We show that tension in the actin network can be induced either by active actin polymerization on the membrane via the Arp2/3 complex or by myosin II filament pulling activity. Symmetry breaking and spontaneous polarization occur above a critical tension that opens up a crack in the actin shell. We show that this critical tension is reached by growing branched networks, nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex, in a concentration window of capping protein that limits actin filament growth and by a sufficient number of motors that pull on actin filaments. Our study provides the groundwork to understanding the physical mechanisms at work during polarization prior to cell shape modifications. PMID:24062578

  10. Unexpectedly Low Mutation Rates in Beta-Myosin Heavy Chain and Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein Genes in Italian Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncarati, Roberta; Latronico, Michael VG; Musumeci, Beatrice; Aurino, Stefania; Torella, Annalaura; Bang, Marie-Louise; Jotti, Gloria Saccani; Puca, Annibale A; Volpe, Massimo; Nigro, Vincenzo; Autore, Camillo; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiac disease. Fourteen sarcomeric and sarcomere-related genes have been implicated in HCM etiology, those encoding β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) reported as the most frequently mutated: in fact, these account for around 50% of all cases related to sarcomeric gene mutations, which are collectively responsible for approximately 70% of all HCM cases. Here, we used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography followed by bidirectional sequencing to screen the coding regions of MYH7 and MYBPC3 in a cohort (n = 125) of Italian patients presenting with HCM. We found 6 MHY7 mutations in 9/125 patients and 18 MYBPC3 mutations in 19/125 patients. Of the three novel MYH7 mutations found, two were missense, and one was a silent mutation; of the eight novel MYBPC3 mutations, one was a substitution, three were stop codons, and four were missense mutations. Thus, our cohort of Italian HCM patients did not harbor the high frequency of mutations usually found in MYH7 and MYBPC3. This finding, coupled to the clinical diversity of our cohort, emphasizes the complexity of HCM and the need for more inclusive investigative approaches in order to fully understand the pathogenesis of this disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 226: 2894–2900, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:21302287

  11. Worse prognosis with gene mutations of beta-myosin heavy chain than myosin-binding protein C in Chinese patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuxia; Zou, Yubao; Fu, Chunyan; Xu, Xiqi; Wang, Jizheng; Song, Lei; Wang, Hu; Chen, Jingzhou; Wang, Jianwei; Huan, Tujun; Hui, Rutai

    2008-03-01

    No data are available on survival analysis and longitudinal evolution of patients with gene mutations of beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) and myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) in Chinese. To prospectively investigate whether different gene mutations confer distinct prognosis. We performed a prospective study in 70 HCM patients and 46 genetically affected family members without HCM-phenotype with direct DNA sequencing of MYH7 and MYBPC3, clinical assessments, and 5.8 +/- 1.8 years follow-up. After follow-up, more surgical intervention (8/52 versus 0/18, p MYH7 mutations than in patients with MYBPC3 mutations (45.1 +/- 14.0 versus 73.5 +/- 7.5 years, p = 0.03). Seven of the 27 mutation carriers of MYH7 had clinical presentations of HCM, but no carriers of MYBPC3 mutations developed to HCM during follow-up. Maximal wall thickness was thicker in the patients carrying mutations in the global region of MYH7 than in those carrying mutations in the rod region of MYH7 (21.5 +/- 6.6 versus 15 +/- 6.1 mm, p MYH7 than in patients with other mutations. MYH7 mutations, especially in the global region, cause malignant clinical phenotypes.

  12. A Kinase Anchoring Protein 9 Is a Novel Myosin VI Binding Partner That Links Myosin VI with the PKA Pathway in Myogenic Cells

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    Justyna Karolczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin VI (MVI is a unique motor protein moving towards the minus end of actin filaments unlike other known myosins. Its important role has recently been postulated for striated muscle and myogenic cells. Since MVI functions through interactions of C-terminal globular tail (GT domain with tissue specific partners, we performed a search for MVI partners in myoblasts and myotubes using affinity chromatography with GST-tagged MVI-GT domain as a bait. A kinase anchoring protein 9 (AKAP9, a regulator of PKA activity, was identified by means of mass spectrometry as a possible MVI interacting partner both in undifferentiated and differentiating myoblasts and in myotubes. Coimmunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assay confirmed that both proteins could interact. MVI and AKAP9 colocalized at Rab5 containing early endosomes. Similarly to MVI, the amount of AKAP9 decreased during myoblast differentiation. However, in MVI-depleted cells, both cAMP and PKA levels were increased and a change in the MVI motor-dependent AKAP9 distribution was observed. Moreover, we found that PKA phosphorylated MVI-GT domain, thus implying functional relevance of MVI-AKAP9 interaction. We postulate that this novel interaction linking MVI with the PKA pathway could be important for targeting AKAP9-PKA complex within cells and/or providing PKA to phosphorylate MVI tail domain.

  13. Actin turnover is required for myosin-dependent mitochondrial movements in Arabidopsis root hairs.

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    Maozhong Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that plant mitochondrial movements are myosin-based along actin filaments, which undergo continuous turnover by the exchange of actin subunits from existing filaments. Although earlier studies revealed that actin filament dynamics are essential for many functions of the actin cytoskeleton, there are little data connecting actin dynamics and mitochondrial movements. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We addressed the role of actin filament dynamics in the control of mitochondrial movements by treating cells with various pharmaceuticals that affect actin filament assembly and disassembly. Confocal microscopy of Arabidopsis thaliana root hairs expressing GFP-FABD2 as an actin filament reporter showed that mitochondrial distribution was in agreement with the arrangement of actin filaments in root hairs at different developmental stages. Analyses of mitochondrial trajectories and instantaneous velocities immediately following pharmacological perturbation of the cytoskeleton using variable-angle evanescent wave microscopy and/or spinning disk confocal microscopy revealed that mitochondrial velocities were regulated by myosin activity and actin filament dynamics. Furthermore, simultaneous visualization of mitochondria and actin filaments suggested that mitochondrial positioning might involve depolymerization of actin filaments on the surface of mitochondria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Base on these results we propose a mechanism for the regulation of mitochondrial speed of movements, positioning, and direction of movements that combines the coordinated activity of myosin and the rate of actin turnover, together with microtubule dynamics, which directs the positioning of actin polymerization events.

  14. Simulating the dynamics of the mechanochemical cycle of myosin-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Shayantani; Alhadeff, Raphael; Warshel, Arieh

    2017-01-01

    The detailed dynamics of the cycle of myosin-V are explored by simulation approaches, examining the nature of the energy-driven motion. Our study started with Langevin dynamics (LD) simulations on a very coarse landscape with a single rate-limiting barrier and reproduced the stall force and the hand-over-hand dynamics. We then considered a more realistic landscape and used time-dependent Monte Carlo (MC) simulations that allowed trajectories long enough to reproduce the force/velocity characteristic sigmoidal correlation, while also reproducing the hand-over-hand motion. Overall, our study indicated that the notion of a downhill lever-up to lever-down process (popularly known as the powerstroke mechanism) is the result of the energetics of the complete myosin-V cycle and is not the source of directional motion or force generation on its own. The present work further emphasizes the need to use well-defined energy landscapes in studying molecular motors in general and myosin in particular. PMID:28193897

  15. Myosin II promotes the anisotropic loss of the apical domain during Drosophila neuroblast ingression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Sérgio; Oh, Youjin; Wang, Michael F Z; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Tepass, Ulrich

    2017-05-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transitions play key roles in development and cancer and entail the loss of epithelial polarity and cell adhesion. In this study, we use quantitative live imaging of ingressing neuroblasts (NBs) in Drosophila melanogaster embryos to assess apical domain loss and junctional disassembly. Ingression is independent of the Snail family of transcriptional repressors and down-regulation of Drosophila E-cadherin (DEcad) transcription. Instead, the posttranscriptionally regulated decrease in DEcad coincides with the reduction of cell contact length and depends on tension anisotropy between NBs and their neighbors. A major driver of apical constriction and junctional disassembly are periodic pulses of junctional and medial myosin II that result in progressively stronger cortical contractions during ingression. Effective contractions require the molecular coupling between myosin and junctions and apical relaxation of neighboring cells. Moreover, planar polarization of myosin leads to the loss of anterior-posterior junctions before the loss of dorsal-ventral junctions. We conclude that planar-polarized dynamic actomyosin networks drive apical constriction and the anisotropic loss of cell contacts during NB ingression. © 2017 Simões et al.

  16. Active turnover regulates pattern formation and stress transmission in disordered acto-myosin networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Patrick; Stam, Samantha; Kovar, David; Gardel, Margaret

    The shape and mechanics of animal cells are controlled by a dynamic, thin network of semiflexible actin filaments and myosin-II motor proteins called the actomyosin cortex. Motor-generated stresses in the cortex drive changes in cell shape during cell division and morphogenesis, while dynamic turnover of actin filaments dissipates stress. The relative effects that force generation, force dissipation, and disassembly and reassembly of material have on motion in these networks are unknown. We find that cross-linked actin networks in vitro contract under myosin-generated stresses, resulting in partial filament disassembly, the formation of asters, and clustering of myosin motors. We observe a rapid restoration of uniform polymer density in the presence of the assembly factors which catalyze network turnover through elongation of severed actin filaments. When severing is accelerated further by the addition of a severing protein, network contraction and motor clustering are dramatically suppressed. We test the relative effects of material regeneration and force transmission using image analysis, and conclude that the dominant mechanism for this effect is relatively short-lived stresses that do not propagate over considerable distance or push network deformation into the nonlinear contractile regime we have previously characterized. Our results present a framework to understand cytoskeletal active matter that are influenced by a complex interplay between stress generation, network reorganization, and polymer turnover.

  17. Thermal Denaturation and Aggregation of Myosin Subfragment 1 Isoforms with Different Essential Light Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Denis I.; Zubov, Eugene O.; Nikolaeva, Olga P.; Kurganov, Boris I.; Levitsky, Dmitrii I.

    2010-01-01

    We compared thermally induced denaturation and aggregation of two isoforms of the isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1) containing different “essential” (or “alkali”) light chains, A1 or A2. We applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate the domain structure of these two S1 isoforms. For this purpose, a special calorimetric approach was developed to analyze the DSC profiles of irreversibly denaturing multidomain proteins. Using this approach, we revealed two calorimetric domains in the S1 molecule, the more thermostable domain denaturing in two steps. Comparing the DSC data with temperature dependences of intrinsic fluorescence parameters and S1 ATPase inactivation, we have identified these two calorimetric domains as motor domain and regulatory domain of the myosin head, the motor domain being more thermostable. Some difference between the two S1 isoforms was only revealed by DSC in thermal denaturation of the regulatory domain. We also applied dynamic light scattering (DLS) to analyze the aggregation of S1 isoforms induced by their thermal denaturation. We have found no appreciable difference between these S1 isoforms in their aggregation properties under ionic strength conditions close to those in the muscle fiber (in the presence of 100 mM KCl). Under these conditions kinetics of this process was independent of protein concentration, and the aggregation rate was limited by irreversible denaturation of the S1 motor domain. PMID:21151434

  18. Thermal Denaturation and Aggregation of Myosin Subfragment 1 Isoforms with Different Essential Light Chains

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    Eugene O. Zubov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared thermally induced denaturation and aggregation of two isoforms of the isolated myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1 containing different “essential” (or “alkali” light chains, A1 or A2. We applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC to investigate the domain structure of these two S1 isoforms. For this purpose, a special calorimetric approach was developed to analyze the DSC profiles of irreversibly denaturing multidomain proteins. Using this approach, we revealed two calorimetric domains in  the S1 molecule, the more thermostable domain denaturing in two steps. Comparing the DSC data with temperature dependences of intrinsic fluorescence parameters and S1 ATPase inactivation, we have identified these two calorimetric domains as motor domain and regulatory domain of the myosin head, the motor domain being more thermostable. Some difference between the two S1 isoforms was only revealed by DSC in thermal denaturation of the regulatory domain. We also applied dynamic light scattering (DLS to analyze the aggregation of S1 isoforms induced by their thermal denaturation. We have found no appreciable difference between these S1 isoforms in their aggregation properties under ionic strength conditions close to those in the muscle fiber (in the presence of 100 mM KCl. Under these conditions kinetics of this process was independent of protein concentration, and the aggregation rate was limited by irreversible denaturation of the S1 motor domain.

  19. Myosin storage myopathy associated with a heterozygous missense mutation in MYH7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajsharghi, Homa; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Lindberg, Christopher; Lindvall, Björn; Henriksson, Karl-Gösta; Oldfors, Anders

    2003-10-01

    Myosin constitutes the major part of the thick filaments in the contractile apparatus of striated muscle. MYH7 encodes the slow/beta-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MyHC), which is the main MyHC isoform in slow, oxidative, type 1 muscle fibers of skeletal muscle. It is also the major MyHC isoform of cardiac ventricles. Numerous missense mutations in the globular head of slow/beta-cardiac MyHC are associated with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We identified a missense mutation, Arg1845Trp, in the rod region of slow/beta-cardiac MyHC in patients with a skeletal myopathy from two different families. The myopathy was characterized by muscle weakness and wasting with onset in childhood and slow progression, but no overt cardiomyopathy. Slow, oxidative, type 1 muscle fibers showed large inclusions consisting of slow/beta-cardiac MyHC. The features were similar to a previously described entity: hyaline body myopathy. Our findings indicate that the mutated residue of slow/beta-cardiac MyHC is essential for the assembly of thick filaments in skeletal muscle. We propose the term myosin storage myopathy for this disease.

  20. Antidepressants and protein kinases: inhibition of Ca2+-regulated myosin phosphorylation by fluoxetine and iprindole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, P J; Sigg, E B; Moyer, J A

    1986-02-11

    The effects of several antidepressant and antipsychotic agents on Ca2+-calmodulin-regulated myosin light chain phosphorylation were evaluated. At a concentration of 100 microM, the antidepressant agents buproprion, mianserin and maprotiline were ineffective; zimelidine, desipramine and imipramine produced 40-50% inhibition; and iprindole and fluoxetine produced 75-90% inhibition. The efficacies of iprindole and fluoxetine were similar to the phenothiazine antipsychotics chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine. Clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic and the butyrophenone haloperidol were relatively ineffective as myosin light chain phosphorylation inhibitors. IC50 values of the most effective agents were: trifluoperazine 16 microM, fluoxetine 28 microM, chlorpromazine and iprindole 56 microM. As with trifluoperazine, inhibition of myosin phosphorylation by iprindole was completely attenuated in the presence of exogenous calmodulin. However, a significant component (30%) of the inhibitory effect of fluoxetine was not reversible with calmodulin. These results show that some antidepressant agents, most notably iprindole and fluoxetine, are capable of antagonizing a calmodulin-regulated protein kinase through calmodulin inhibition; and in the case of fluoxetine, through an additional calmodulin-independent mechanism.

  1. Lack of replication for the myosin-18B association with mathematical ability in independent cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, K A; Fajutrao Valles, S F; Moll, K; Northstone, K; Ring, S; Pennell, C; Wang, C; Leavett, R; Hayiou-Thomas, M E; Thompson, P; Simpson, N H; Fisher, S E; Whitehouse, A J O; Snowling, M J; Newbury, D F; Paracchini, S

    2015-04-01

    Twin studies indicate that dyscalculia (or mathematical disability) is caused partly by a genetic component, which is yet to be understood at the molecular level. Recently, a coding variant (rs133885) in the myosin-18B gene was shown to be associated with mathematical abilities with a specific effect among children with dyslexia. This association represents one of the most significant genetic associations reported to date for mathematical abilities and the only one reaching genome-wide statistical significance. We conducted a replication study in different cohorts to assess the effect of rs133885 maths-related measures. The study was conducted primarily using the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), (N = 3819). We tested additional cohorts including the York Cohort, the Specific Language Impairment Consortium (SLIC) cohort and the Raine Cohort, and stratified them for a definition of dyslexia whenever possible. We did not observe any associations between rs133885 in myosin-18B and mathematical abilities among individuals with dyslexia or in the general population. Our results suggest that the myosin-18B variant is unlikely to be a main factor contributing to mathematical abilities. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior published by International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Smooth muscle myosin inhibition: a novel therapeutic approach for pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ho

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension remains a major clinical problem despite current therapies. In this study, we examine for the first time a novel pharmacological target, smooth muscle myosin, and determine if the smooth muscle myosin inhibitor, CK-2019165 (CK-165 ameliorates pulmonary hypertension.Six domestic female pigs were surgically instrumented to measure pulmonary blood flow and systemic and pulmonary vascular dynamics. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by hypoxia, or infusion of the thromboxane analog (U-46619, 0.1 µg/kg/min, i.v.. In rats, chronic pulmonary hypertension was induced by monocrotaline.CK-165 (4 mg/kg, i.v. reduced pulmonary vascular resistance by 22±3 and 28±6% from baseline in hypoxia and thromboxane pig models, respectively (p<0.01 and 0.01, while mean arterial pressure also fell and heart rate rose slightly. When CK-165 was delivered via inhalation in the hypoxia model, pulmonary vascular resistance fell by 17±6% (p<0.05 while mean arterial pressure and heart rate were unchanged. In the monocrotaline model of chronic pulmonary hypertension, inhaled CK-165 resulted in a similar (18.0±3.8% reduction in right ventricular systolic pressure as compared with sildenafil (20.3±4.5%.Inhibition of smooth muscle myosin may be a novel therapeutic target for treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  3. Auxotonic to isometric contraction transitioning in a beating heart causes myosin step-size to down shift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    Full Text Available Myosin motors in cardiac ventriculum convert ATP free energy to the work of moving blood volume under pressure. The actin bound motor cyclically rotates its lever-arm/light-chain complex linking motor generated torque to the myosin filament backbone and translating actin against resisting force. Previous research showed that the unloaded in vitro motor is described with high precision by single molecule mechanical characteristics including unitary step-sizes of approximately 3, 5, and 8 nm and their relative step-frequencies of approximately 13, 50, and 37%. The 3 and 8 nm unitary step-sizes are dependent on myosin essential light chain (ELC N-terminus actin binding. Step-size and step-frequency quantitation specifies in vitro motor function including duty-ratio, power, and strain sensitivity metrics. In vivo, motors integrated into the muscle sarcomere form the more complex and hierarchically functioning muscle machine. The goal of the research reported here is to measure single myosin step-size and step-frequency in vivo to assess how tissue integration impacts motor function. A photoactivatable GFP tags the ventriculum myosin lever-arm/light-chain complex in the beating heart of a live zebrafish embryo. Detected single GFP emission reports time-resolved myosin lever-arm orientation interpreted as step-size and step-frequency providing single myosin mechanical characteristics over the active cycle. Following step-frequency of cardiac ventriculum myosin transitioning from low to high force in relaxed to auxotonic to isometric contraction phases indicates that the imposition of resisting force during contraction causes the motor to down-shift to the 3 nm step-size accounting for >80% of all the steps in the near-isometric phase. At peak force, the ATP initiated actomyosin dissociation is the predominant strain inhibited transition in the native myosin contraction cycle. The proposed model for motor down-shifting and strain sensing involves ELC N

  4. Expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms mRNA transcripts in the temporalis muscle of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurana, Neus; Artells, Rosa; Muñoz, Carmen; Arias-Martorell, Júlia; Bello-Hellegouarch, Gaëlle; Casado, Aroa; Cuesta, Elisabeth; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Pastor, Juan Francisco; Potau, Josep Maria

    2017-11-01

    The common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is the primate that is phylogenetically most closely related to humans (Homo sapiens). In order to shed light on the anatomy and function of the temporalis muscle in the chimpanzee, we have analyzed the expression patterns of the mRNA transcripts of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms in different parts of the muscle. We dissected the superficial, deep and sphenomandibularis portions of the temporalis muscle in five adult P. troglodytes and quantified the expression of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC isoforms in each portion using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed significant differences in the patterns of expression of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC-IIM isoform between the sphenomandibularis portion and the anterior superficial temporalis (33.6% vs 47.0%; P=0.032) and between the sphenomandibularis portion and the anterior deep temporalis (33.6% vs 43.0; P=0.016). We also observed non-significant differences between the patterns of expression in the anterior and posterior superficial temporalis. The differential expression patterns of the mRNA transcripts of the MyHC isoforms in the temporalis muscle in P. troglodytes may be related to the functional differences that have been observed in electromyographic studies in other species of primates. Our findings can be applicable to the fields of comparative anatomy, evolutionary anatomy, and anthropology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Intermediate filament-co-localized molecules with myosin heavy chain epitopes define distinct cellular domains in hair follicles and epidermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Simon M

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins linking intermediate filaments to other cytoskeletal components have important functions in maintaining tissue integrity and cell shape. Results We found a set of monoclonal antibodies raised against specific human sarcomeric myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms labels cells in distinct regions of the mammalian epidermis. The antigens co-localize with intermediate filament-containing structures. A slow MyHC-related antigen is punctate on the cell surface and co-localizes with desmoplakin at desmosomal junctions of all suprabasal epidermal layers from rat fœtal day 16 onwards, in the root sheath of the hair follicle and in intercalated disks of cardiomyocytes. A fast MyHC-related antigen occurs in cytoplasmic filaments in a subset of basal cells of skin epidermis and bulb, but not neck, of hair follicles. A fast IIA MyHC-related antigen labels filaments of a single layer of cells in hair bulb. This 230 000 Mr antigen co-purifies with keratin. No obvious candidate for any of the antigens appears in the literature. Conclusions We describe a set of molecules that co-localize with intermediate filament in specific cell subsets in epithelial tissues. These antigens presumably influence intermediate filament structure or function.

  6. Ginsenoside Rg1 Protects against Oxidative Stress-induced Neuronal Apoptosis through Myosin IIA-actin Related Cytoskeletal Reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Qian; Xu, Yingqiong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Yanni; Tan, Yisha; Jiang, Nan; Cao, Guosheng; Ma, Xiaonan; Wang, Jingrong; Cao, Zhengyu; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced cytoskeletal dysfunction of neurons has been implicated as a crucial cause of cell apoptosis or death in the central nervous system (CNS) diseases, such as neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. The application of neuroprotectants rescuing the neurons from cytoskeletal damage and apoptosis can be a potential treatment for these CNS diseases. Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), one of the major active components of ginseng, has been reported possessing notable neuroprotective activities. However, there is rare report about its effect on cytoskeleton and its undergoing mechanism. The current study is to reveal the regulatory effects of Rg1 on cytoskeletal and morphological lesion in oxidative stress-induced neuronal apoptosis. The results demonstrated that pre-treatment with Rg1 (0.1-10 μM) attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress through reducing the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) level. The Rg1 treatment also abolished H2O2-induced morphological changes, including cell rounding, membrane blebbing, neurite retraction and nuclei condensation, which were generated by myosin IIA-actin interaction. These effects were mediated via the down-regulation of caspase-3, ROCK1 (Rho-associated kinase1) activation and myosin light chain (MLC, Ser-19) phosphorylation. Furthermore, inhibiting myosin II activity with blebbistatin partly blocked the neuroprotective effects of Rg1. The computer-aided homology modelling revealed that Rg1 preferentially positioned in the actin binding cleft of myosin IIA and might block the binding of myosin IIA to actin filaments. Accordingly, the neuroprotective mechanism of Rg1 is related to the activity that inhibits myosin IIA-actin interaction and the caspase-3/ROCK1/MLC signaling pathway. These findings put some insights into the unique neuroprotective properties of Rg1 associated with the regulation of myosin IIA

  7. Clinical usefulness of random biopsies in diagnosis and treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, J D; Palou, J; Esquinas, C; Fernández Gómez, J M; Rodríguez Faba, O

    2017-11-20

    This systematic review of the literature has been focused on determining the clinical usefulness of random bladder biopsies (RB) in the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis was performed to establish the clinic and pathological factors associated to positive biopsies. A systematic review was performed using Pubmed/Medline database according to the PRISMA guidelines. Thirty-seven articles were included, recruiting a total of 12,657 patients, 10,975 were submitted to RB. The overall incidence of positive RB was 21.91%. Significant differences were found in the incidence of positive RB when patients were stratified according to urine cytology result, tumor multiplicity, tumor appearance, stage and grade. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that the presence of positive cytology, tumor multiplicity, non-papillary appearance tumors, stage T1 and histological grades G2 and G3 represent the risk factors to predict abnormalities in RB. The incidence of positive RB in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer was 21.91%. The maximum usefulness of RB was observed when these are performed in a standardized way. The results of the meta-analysis showed that besides positive cytology and non-papillary appearance tumors, tumor multiplicity and histological grades G2 and G3 represent risk factors associated to positive RB, suggesting that the use of RB might be extensive to the intermediate risk group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypoxia regulates FGFR3 expression via HIF-1α and miR-100 and contributes to cell survival in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, C; Ramachandran, A; Wigfield, S; McCormick, R; Jubb, A; Buffa, F M; Turley, H; Knowles, M A; Cranston, D; Catto, J; Harris, A L

    2013-07-09

    Non-muscle invasive (NMI) bladder cancer is characterised by increased expression and activating mutations of FGFR3. We have previously investigated the role of microRNAs in bladder cancer and have shown that FGFR3 is a target of miR-100. In this study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia on miR-100 and FGFR3 expression, and the link between miR-100 and FGFR3 in hypoxia. Bladder cancer cell lines were exposed to normoxic or hypoxic conditions and examined for the expression of FGFR3 by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blotting, and miR-100 by qPCR. The effect of FGFR3 and miR-100 on cell viability in two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) was examined by transfecting siRNA or mimic-100, respectively. In NMI bladder cancer cell lines, FGFR3 expression was induced by hypoxia in a transcriptional and HIF-1α-dependent manner. Increased FGFR3 was also in part dependent on miR-100 levels, which decreased in hypoxia. Knockdown of FGFR3 led to a decrease in phosphorylation of the downstream kinases mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (PKB), which was more pronounced under hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, transfection of mimic-100 also decreased phosphorylation of MAPK and PKB. Finally, knocking down FGFR3 profoundly decreased 2-D and 3-D cell growth, whereas introduction of mimic-100 decreased 3-D growth of cells. Hypoxia, in part via suppression of miR-100, induces FGFR3 expression in bladder cancer, both of which have an important role in maintaining cell viability under conditions of stress.

  9. FGFR3 mutation analysis in voided urine samples to decrease cystoscopies and cost in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer surveillance: a comparison of 3 strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Kim E M; Kompier, Lucie C; de Bekker-Grob, Esther W; Zuiverloon, Tahlita C M; Vergouwe, Yvonne; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2013-05-01

    We determined whether FGFR3 mutation analysis of voided urine samples would be cost-effective to partly replace cystoscopy in the surveillance of patients treated for nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma. In this decision analytical study we analyzed data on 70 Dutch patients with FGFR3 positive primary tumors and a median followup of 8.8 years. Surveillance strategies were compared in a Markov model. Modified surveillance consisted of FGFR3 mutation analysis of voided urine samples every 3 months, and cystoscopy at 3, 12 and 24 months. Standard surveillance was defined as cystoscopy every 3 months and minimal surveillance was defined as cystoscopy at 3, 12 and 24 months. Analysis was stratified for 3 risk profiles, including surveillance after 1) the primary tumor, 2) the first to third recurrence and 3) the fourth recurrence or more. Sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the impact of variations in cost, sensitivity and specificity. The probability of no recurrence after 2 years of surveillance after a primary tumor was higher for modified surveillance than for standard and minimal surveillance, eg after primary tumors (95.7% vs 95.0% and 93.9%, respectively). The total cost of surveillance after the primary tumor was lower for minimal and modified surveillance (€2,254 and €2,558, respectively) than for standard surveillance (€5,861). Results were robust to changing inputs over plausible ranges and consistent for each of the 3 risk profiles. Surveillance in which cystoscopy is partly replaced by FGFR3 mutation analysis of urine seems a safe, effective and cost-effective surveillance strategy. Further validation in larger cohorts is required. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Seth P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Dinney, Colin P.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Groshen, Susan; Hahn, Noah M.; Hansel, Donna; Kwiatkowski, David; O’Donnell, Michael; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Svatek, Robert; Abrams, Jeffrey S.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Apolo, Andrea B.; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Callahan, Margaret; Cha, Eugene K.; Drake, Charles; Jarow, Jonathan; Kamat, Ashish; Kim, William; Knowles, Margaret; Mann, Bhupinder; Marchionni, Luigi; McConkey, David; McShane, Lisa; Ramirez, Nilsa; Sharabi, Andrew; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Solit, David; Tangen, Catherine M.; Amiri, Abdul Tawab; Van Allen, Eliezer; West, Pamela J.; Witjes, J. A.; Quale, Diane Zipursky

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from NCI, FDA, National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), advocacy and the pharmaceutical and biotech industry. The meeting goals and objectives were to: 1) create a collaborative environment in which the greater bladder research community can pursue future optimally designed novel clinical trials focused on the theme of molecular targeted and immune-based therapies in NMIBC; 2) frame the clinical and translational questions that are of highest priority; and 3) develop two clinical trial designs focusing on immunotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Despite successful development and implementation of large Phase II and Phase III trials in bladder and upper urinary tract cancers, there are no active and accruing trials in the NMIBC space within the NCTN. Disappointingly, there has been only one new FDA approved drug (Valrubicin) in any bladder cancer disease state since 1998. Although genomic-based data for bladder cancer are increasingly available, translating these discoveries into practice changing treatment is still to come. Recently, major efforts in defining the genomic characteristics of NMIBC have been achieved. Aligned with these data is the growing number of targeted therapy agents approved and/or in development in other organ site cancers and the multiple similarities of bladder cancer with molecular subtypes in these other cancers. Additionally, although bladder cancer is one of the more immunogenic tumors, some tumors have the ability to attenuate or eliminate host immune responses. Two trial concepts emerged from the meeting including a window of opportunity trial (Phase 0) testing an FGFR3 inhibitor and a second multi-arm multi-stage trial testing combinations

  11. Effectivity of intravescical thermo-chemotherapy prophylaxis for patients with high recurrence and progression risk for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Serdar Gözen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background&Aim: High grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is common in urological practice. Most of these cancers are or become refractory to intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Here we evaluated the efficacy of combined local bladder hyperthermia and intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC instillation in patients with high-risk recurrent NMIBC. Materials and methods: Between February 2014 and December 2015, 18 patients with high risk NMIBC were enrolled. Patients were treated in an outpatient basis with 6 weekly induction sessions followed by monthly maintenance sessions with intravesical MMC in local hyperthermia with bladder wall thermo-chemotherapy (BWT system (PelvixTT system, Elmedical Ltd., Hod Hasharon, Israel. The follow-up regimen included cystoscopy after the induction cycle and thereafter with regular intervals. Time to disease recurrence was defined as time from the first intravesical treatment to endoscopic or histological documentation of a new bladder tumour. Adverse events were recorded according to CTC 4.0 (Common Toxicity Criteria score system. Results: Mean age was 72 (32-87 years. 10 patients had multifocal disease, 9 had CIS, 6 had recurrent disease and 2 had highly recurrent disease (> 3 recurrences in a 24 months period. 6 patients underwent previous intravesical chemotherapy with MMC. The average number of maintenance sessions per patient was 7.6. After a mean follow-up of 433 days, 15 patients (83.3% were recurrence-free. 3 patients had tumour recurrence after a mean period of 248 days without progression. Side effects were limited to grade 1 in 2 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. Conclusions: BWT seems to be feasible and safe in high grade NMIBC. More studies are needed to identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit more from this treatment.

  12. Generation of potent cytotoxic T lymphocytes against in male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer by dendritic cells loaded with dying T24 bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eu Chang; Jung, Seung Il; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Je-Jung; Kwon, Dong Deuk

    2017-01-01

    In order to induce a potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy for bladder cancer, various tumor antigens can be loaded onto DCs. The aim of this study was to establish a method of immunotherapy for male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), using bladder cancer-specific CTLs generated in vitro by DCs. Monocyte-derived DCs from bladder cancer patients were induced to mature in a standard cytokine cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and PGE2: standard DCs, sDCs) or anα-type 1-polarized DC (αDC1) cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-α, IFN-γ, and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid) and loaded with the UVB-irradiated bladder cancer cell line, T24. Antigen-loaded αDC1s were evaluated by morphological and functional assays, and the bladder cancer-specific CTL response was analyzed by cytotoxic assay. The αDC1s significantly increased the expression of several molecules pertaining to DC maturation, regardless of whether or not the αDC1s were loaded with tumor antigens, relative to sDCs. The αDC1s demonstrated increased production of interleukin-12 both during maturation and after subsequent stimulation with CD40L that was not significantly affected by loading with tumor antigens as compared to that of sDCs. Bladder cancer-specific CTLs targeting autologous bladder cancer cells were successfully induced by αDC1s loaded with dying T24 cells. Autologous αDC1s loaded with an allogeneic bladder cancer cell line resulted in increased bladder cancer-specific CTL responses as compared to that with sDCs, and therefore, may provide a novel source of DC-based vaccines that canbe used in immunotherapy for male patients with NMIBC. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  13. An evaluation of morphological and functional multi-parametric MRI sequences in classifying non-muscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; De Berardinis, Ettore; Barchetti, Giovanni; Simone, Giuseppe; Leonardo, Constantino; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Del Monte, Maurizio; Carano, Davide; Gallucci, Michele; Catto, James; Catalano, Carlo

    2017-09-01

    Our goal is to determine the ability of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to differentiate muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) from non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Patients underwent mpMRI before tumour resection. Four MRI sets, i.e. T2-weighted (T2W) + perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), T2W plus diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T2W + DWI + PWI, and T2W + DWI + PWI + dif-fusion tensor imaging (DTI) were interpreted qualitatively by two radiologists, blinded to histology results. PWI, DWI and DTI were also analysed quantitatively. Accuracy was determined using histopathology as the reference standard. A total of 82 tumours were analysed. Ninety-six percent of T1-labeled tumours by the T2W + DWI + PWI image set were confirmed to be NMIBC at histopathology. Overall accuracy of the complete mpMRI protocol was 94% in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. PWI, DWI and DTI quantitative parameters were shown to be significantly different in cancerous versus non-cancerous areas within the bladder wall in T2-labelled lesions. MpMRI with DWI and DTI appears a reliable staging tool for bladder cancer. If our data are validated, then mpMRI could precede cystoscopic resection to allow a faster recognition of MIBC and accelerated treatment pathways. • A critical step in BCa staging is to differentiate NMIBC from MIBC. • Morphological and functional sequences are reliable techniques in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. • Diffusion tensor imaging could be an additional tool in BCa staging.

  14. Interleukin-6 markedly decreases skeletal muscle protein turnover and increases nonmuscle amino acid utilization in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit; Steensberg, Adam; Fischer, Christian

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: IL-6 is a key modulator of immune function and suggested to be involved in skeletal muscle wasting as seen in sepsis. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine the role of IL-6 in human in vivo systemic and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism and protein turnover. SUBJECTS AND METHODS:...

  15. The R403Q myosin mutation implicated in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy causes disorder at the actomyosin interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Volkmann

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in virtually all of the proteins comprising the cardiac muscle sarcomere have been implicated in causing Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC. Mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain (MHC remain among the most common causes of FHC, with the widely studied R403Q mutation resulting in an especially severe clinical prognosis. In vitro functional studies of cardiac myosin containing the R403Q mutation have revealed significant changes in enzymatic and mechanical properties compared to wild-type myosin. It has been proposed that these molecular changes must trigger events that ultimately lead to the clinical phenotype.Here we examine the structural consequences of the R403Q mutation in a recombinant smooth muscle myosin subfragment (S1, whose kinetic features have much in common with slow beta-MHC. We obtained three-dimensional reconstructions of wild-type and R403Q smooth muscle S1 bound to actin filaments in the presence (ADP and absence (apo of nucleotide by electron cryomicroscopy and image analysis. We observed that the mutant S1 was attached to actin at highly variable angles compared to wild-type reconstructions, suggesting a severe disruption of the actin-myosin interaction at the interface.These results provide structural evidence that disarray at the molecular level may be linked to the histopathological myocyte disarray characteristic of the diseased state.

  16. Myosin IXB gene region and gluten intolerance: linkage to coeliac disease and a putative dermatitis herpetiformis association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, L L E; Korponay-Szabo, I R; Viiri, K; Juuti-Uusitalo, K; Kaukinen, K; Lindfors, K; Mustalahti, K; Kurppa, K; Adány, R; Pocsai, Z; Széles, G; Einarsdottir, E; Wijmenga, C; Mäki, M; Partanen, J; Kere, J; Saavalainen, P

    2008-04-01

    Coeliac disease is caused by dietary gluten, which triggers chronic inflammation of the small intestine in genetically predisposed individuals. In one quarter of the patients the disease manifests in the skin as dermatitis herpetiformis. Recently, a novel candidate gene, myosin IXB on chromosome 19p13, was shown to be associated with coeliac disease in the Dutch and Spanish populations. The same gene has previously been associated with inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis risk, making myosin IXB a potential shared risk factor in these inflammatory disorders. In this study, previously reported myosin IXB variants were tested for genetic linkage and association with coeliac disease in 495 Hungarian and Finnish families and in an additional 270 patients and controls. The results show significant linkage (logarithm of odds (LOD) 3.76, p = 0.00002) to 19p13 which supports the presence of a genuine risk factor for coeliac disease in this locus. Myosin IXB variants were not associated with coeliac disease in this study; however, weak evidence of association with dermatitis herpetiformis was found. The association could not explain the strong linkage seen in both phenotypes, indicating that the role of other neighbouring genes in the region cannot be excluded. Therefore, more detailed genetic and functional studies are required to characterise the role of the myosin IXB gene in both coeliac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis.

  17. Differential phosphorylation of myosin light chain (Thr)18 and (Ser)19 and functional implications in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, T M; Dangelmaier, C A; Jin, J; Daniel, J L; Kunapuli, S P

    2010-10-01

    Myosin IIA is an essential platelet contractile protein that is regulated by phosphorylation of its regulatory light chain (MLC) on residues (Thr)18 and (Ser)19 via the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). The present study was carried out to elucidate the mechanisms regulating MLC (Ser)19 and (Thr)18 phosphorylation and the functional consequence of each phosphorylation event in platelets. Induction of 2MeSADP-induced shape change occurs within 5s along with robust phosphorylation of MLC (Ser)19 with minimal phosphorylation of MLC (Thr)18. Selective activation of G(12/13) produces both slow shape change and comparably slow MLC (Thr)18 and (Ser)19 phosphorylation. Stimulation with agonists that trigger ATP secretion caused rapid MLC (Ser)19 phosphorylation while MLC (Thr)18 phosphorylation was coincident with secretion. Platelets treated with p160(ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 exhibited a partial inhibition in secretion and had a substantial inhibition in MLC (Thr)18 phosphorylation without effecting MLC (Ser)19 phosphorylation. These data suggest that phosphorylation of MLC (Ser)19 is downstream of Gq/Ca(2+) -dependent mechanisms and sufficient for shape change, whereas MLC (Thr)18 phosphorylation is substantially downstream of G(12/13) -regulated Rho kinase pathways and necessary, probably in concert with MLC (Ser)19 phosphorylation, for full contractile activity leading to dense granule secretion. Overall, we suggest that the amplitude of the platelet contractile response is differentially regulated by a least two different signaling pathways, which lead to different phosphorylation patterns of the myosin light chain, and this mechanism results in a graded response rather than a simple on/off switch. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  18. Allosteric communication in myosin V: from small conformational changes to large directed movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cecchini

    Full Text Available The rigor to post-rigor transition in myosin, a consequence of ATP binding, plays an essential role in the Lymn-Taylor functional cycle because it results in the dissociation of the actomyosin complex after the powerstroke. On the basis of the X-ray structures of myosin V, we have developed a new normal mode superposition model for the transition path between the two states. Rigid-body motions of the various subdomains and specific residues at the subdomain interfaces are key elements in the transition. The allosteric communication between the nucleotide binding site and the U50/L50 cleft is shown to result from local changes due to ATP binding, which induce large amplitude motions that are encoded in the structure of the protein. The triggering event is the change in the interaction of switch I and the P-loop, which is stabilized by ATP binding. The motion of switch I, which is a relatively rigid element of the U50 subdomain, leads directly to a partial opening of the U50/L50 cleft; the latter is expected to weaken the binding of myosin to actin. The calculated transition path demonstrates the nature of the subdomain coupling and offers an explanation for the mutual exclusion of ATP and actin binding. The mechanism of the uncoupling of the converter from the motor head, an essential part of the transition, is elucidated. The origin of the partial untwisting of the central beta-sheet in the rigor to post-rigor transition is described.

  19. Fiber size and myosin phenotypes of selected rhesus lower limb muscles after a 14-day spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, R. R.; Zhong, H.; Bodine, S. C.; Pierotti, D. J.; Talmadge, R. J.; Barkhoudarian, G.; Kim, J.; Fanton, J. W.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsies were taken from the rhesus (Macaca mulatta) soleus (Sol, a slow ankle extensor), medial gastrocnemius (MG, a fast ankle extensor), tibialis anterior (TA, a fast ankle flexor), and vastus lateralis (VL, a fast knee extensor) muscles in vivarium controls (n=5) before and after either a 14-day spaceflight (Bion 11, n=2) or a 14-day ground-based flight simulation (n=3). Myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition (gel electrophoresis), fiber type distribution (immunohistochemistry), and fiber size were determined. Although there were no significant changes, each muscle showed trends towards adaptation.

  20. Myosin Binding Protein C Interaction with Actin: CHARACTERIZATION AND MAPPING OF THE BINDING SITE*

    OpenAIRE

    Rybakova, Inna N.; Greaser, Marion L.; Moss, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Myosin binding protein C (MyBPC) is a multidomain protein associated with the thick filaments of striated muscle. Although both structural and regulatory roles have been proposed for MyBPC, its interactions with other sarcomeric proteins remain obscure. The current study was designed to examine the actin-binding properties of MyBPC and to define MyBPC domain regions involved in actin interaction. Here, we have expressed full-length mouse cardiac MyBPC (cMyBPC) in a baculovirus system and show...

  1. Determining the impact of oxidation on the motility of single muscle-fibres expressing different myosin isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Li, M.; Baron, Caroline P.

    2013-01-01

    Under oxidative stress, myosin has been shown to be one of the muscle proteins that are extensively modified, leading to carbonylation and cross-linking. However, how oxidation affects the actomyosin interaction in muscle fibres with different metabolic profiles and expressing different myosin...... heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms has not been previously investigated. Oxidation of myosin isolated from muscle fibres originating from various porcine muscles with a different metabolic profile was studied using a single muscle fibre in-vitro motility assay, allowing measurements of catalytic properties...... (motility speed) and force-generation capacity of specific MyHC isoforms. In the experimental procedure, single muscle fibres were split in different segments and each segment was exposed to a different concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Speed and force measurements were recorded and compared, to assess...

  2. Myosin content of single muscle fibers following short-term disuse and active recovery in young and old healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars Grøndahl; Brocca, Lorenza; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2017-01-01

    in young, it is unknown whether similar relationships exist in old. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of 14days lower limb disuse followed by 28days of active recovery on single muscle fiber myosin content in old (68yrs) and young (24yrs) recreationally physically active......Short-term disuse and subsequent recovery affect whole muscle and single myofiber contractile function in young and old. While the loss and recovery of single myofiber specific force (SF) following disuse and rehabilitation has been shown to correlate with alterations in myosin concentrations...... contractile capacity of MHC 2a fibers. In conclusion, adaptive changes in myofiber myosin content appear to occur rapidly following brief periods of disuse (2wks) and after subsequent active recovery (4wks) in young and old, which contribute to alterations in contractile function at the single muscle fiber...

  3. Long single [alpha]-helical tail domains bridge the gap between structure and function of myosin VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spink, Benjamin J.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Lipfert, Jan; Doniach, Sebastian; Spudich, James A. (Stanford)

    2008-09-29

    Myosin VI has challenged the lever arm hypothesis of myosin movement because of its ability to take {approx}36-nm steps along actin with a canonical lever arm that seems to be too short to allow such large steps. Here we demonstrate that the large step of dimeric myosin VI is primarily made possible by a medial tail in each monomer that forms a rare single {alpha}-helix of {approx}10 nm, which is anchored to the calmodulin-bound IQ domain by a globular proximal tail. With the medial tail contributing to the {approx}36-nm step, rather than dimerizing as previously proposed, we show that the cargo binding domain is the dimerization interface. Furthermore, the cargo binding domain seems to be folded back in the presence of the catalytic head, constituting a potential regulatory mechanism that inhibits dimerization.

  4. Myosin Va plays a role in nitrergic smooth muscle relaxation in gastric fundus and corpora cavernosa of penis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chaudhury

    Full Text Available The intracellular motor protein myosin Va is involved in nitrergic neurotransmission possibly by trafficking of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS within the nerve terminals. In this study, we examined the role of myosin Va in the stomach and penis, proto-typical smooth muscle organs in which nitric oxide (NO mediated relaxation is critical for function. We used confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation of tissue from the gastric fundus (GF and penile corpus cavernosum (CCP to localize myosin Va with nNOS and demonstrate their molecular interaction. We utilized in vitro mechanical studies to test whether smooth muscle relaxations during nitrergic neuromuscular neurotransmission is altered in DBA (dilute, brown, non-agouti mice which lack functional myosin Va. Myosin Va was localized in nNOS-positive nerve terminals and was co-immunoprecipitated with nNOS in both GF and CCP. In comparison to C57BL/6J wild type (WT mice, electrical field stimulation (EFS of precontracted smooth muscles of GF and CCP from DBA animals showed significant impairment of nitrergic relaxation. An NO donor, Sodium nitroprusside (SNP, caused comparable levels of relaxation in smooth muscles of WT and DBA mice. These normal postjunctional responses to SNP in DBA tissues suggest that impairment of smooth muscle relaxation resulted from inhibition of NO synthesis in prejunctional nerve terminals. Our results suggest that normal physiological processes of relaxation of gastric and cavernosal smooth muscles that facilitate food accommodation and penile erection, respectively, may be disrupted under conditions of myosin Va deficiency, resulting in complications like gastroparesis and erectile dysfunction.

  5. Myosin Va Plays a Role in Nitrergic Smooth Muscle Relaxation in Gastric Fundus and Corpora Cavernosa of Penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, Josephine A.; Goyal, Raj K.; Sullivan, Maryrose P.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular motor protein myosin Va is involved in nitrergic neurotransmission possibly by trafficking of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) within the nerve terminals. In this study, we examined the role of myosin Va in the stomach and penis, proto-typical smooth muscle organs in which nitric oxide (NO) mediated relaxation is critical for function. We used confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation of tissue from the gastric fundus (GF) and penile corpus cavernosum (CCP) to localize myosin Va with nNOS and demonstrate their molecular interaction. We utilized in vitro mechanical studies to test whether smooth muscle relaxations during nitrergic neuromuscular neurotransmission is altered in DBA (dilute, brown, non-agouti) mice which lack functional myosin Va. Myosin Va was localized in nNOS-positive nerve terminals and was co-immunoprecipitated with nNOS in both GF and CCP. In comparison to C57BL/6J wild type (WT) mice, electrical field stimulation (EFS) of precontracted smooth muscles of GF and CCP from DBA animals showed significant impairment of nitrergic relaxation. An NO donor, Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caused comparable levels of relaxation in smooth muscles of WT and DBA mice. These normal postjunctional responses to SNP in DBA tissues suggest that impairment of smooth muscle relaxation resulted from inhibition of NO synthesis in prejunctional nerve terminals. Our results suggest that normal physiological processes of relaxation of gastric and cavernosal smooth muscles that facilitate food accommodation and penile erection, respectively, may be disrupted under conditions of myosin Va deficiency, resulting in complications like gastroparesis and erectile dysfunction. PMID:24516539

  6. Botulinum Toxin Type A Inhibits α-Smooth Muscle Actin and Myosin II Expression in Fibroblasts Derived From Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minliang; Yan, Tongtong; Ma, Kui; Lai, Linying; Liu, Chang; Liang, Liming; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Scar contracture (SC) is one of the most common complications resulting from major burn injuries. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Recent reports suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) is effective at reducing SC clinically, but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and myosin II are the main components of stress fibers, which are the contractile structures of fibroblasts. The effects of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II in SC are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II expression in fibroblasts derived from SC and to elucidate its actual mechanism further. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of SC. Fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with different concentrations of BTXA and their proliferation was analyzed through the tetrazolium-based colorimetric method at 1, 4, and 7 days. Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II were checked using Western blot in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations of BTXA at 1, 4, and 7 days. Fibroblasts without BTXA treatment had a higher proliferation than that in other groups, which indicated that the proliferation of fibroblasts was significantly inhibited by BTXA (P < 0.05). Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (P < 0.05). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from SC and reduced the expression of α-SMA and myosin II, which provided theoretical support for the application of BTXA to control SC.

  7. Head-neck domain of Arabidopsis myosin XI, MYA2, fused with GFP produces F-actin patterns that coincide with fast organelle streaming in different plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holweg Carola L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytoskeletal mechanisms that underlie organelle transport in plants are intimately linked to acto-myosin function. This function is mediated by the attachment of myosin heads to F-actin and the binding of cargo to the tails. Acto-myosin also powers vigorous cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. Class XI myosins exhibit strikingly fast velocities and may have extraordinary roles in cellular motility. Studies of the structural basis of organelle transport have focused on the cargo-binding tails of myosin XI, revealing a close relationship with the transport of peroxisomes, mitochondria, and Golgi-vesicles. Links between myosin heads and F-actin-based motility have been less investigated. To address this function, we performed localization studies using the head-neck domain of AtMYA2, a myosin XI from Arabidopsis. Results We expressed the GFP-fused head-neck domain of MYA2 in epidermal cells of various plant species and found that it associated with F-actin. By comparison to other markers such as fimbrin and talin, we revealed that the myosin-labeled F-actin was of a lower quality and absent from the fine microfilament arrays at the cell cortex. However, it colocalized with cytoplasmic (transvacuolar F-actin in areas coinciding with the tracks of fast organelles. This observation correlates well with the proposed function of myosin XI in organelle trafficking. The fact that organelle streaming was reduced in cells expressing the GFP-MYA2-head6IQ indicated that the functionless motor protein inhibits endogenous myosins. Furthermore, co-expression of the GFP-MYA2-head6IQ with other F-actin markers disrupted its attachment to F-actin. In nuclei, the GFP-myosin associated with short bundles of F-actin. Conclusion The localization of the head of MYA2 in living plant cells, as investigated here for the first time, suggests a close linkage between this myosin XI and cytoplasmic microfilaments that support the rapid streaming of

  8. Myosin light chains are not a physiological substrate of AMPK in the control of cell structure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultot, Laurent; Horman, Sandrine; Neumann, Dietbert; Walsh, Michael P; Hue, Louis; Rider, Mark H

    2009-01-05

    The kinetics of myosin regulatory light chain (MLC) phosphorylation by recombinant AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were compared with commercial AMPK from rat liver and smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK). With identical amounts of activity units, initial rates of phosphorylation of MLC were at least 100-fold less with recombinant AMPK compared to smMLCK, whereas with rat liver AMPK significant phosphorylation was seen. In Madin-Darby Canine Kidney cells, AMPK activation led to an increase in MLC phosphorylation, which was decreased by a Rho kinase inhibitor without affecting AMPK activation. Therefore, MLC phosphorylation during energy deprivation does not result from direct phosphorylation by AMPK.

  9. Possible interrelationship between changes in F-actin and myosin II, protein phosphorylation, and cell volume regulation in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S F; Hoffmann, E K

    2002-01-01

    Osmotic shrinkage of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC) elicited translocation of myosin II from the cytosol to the cortical region, and swelling elicits concentration of myosin II in the Golgi region. Rho kinase and p38 both appeared to be involved in shrinkage-induced myosin II reorganization....... In contrast, the previously reported shrinkage-induced actin polymerization [Pedersen et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 252, 63-74] was independent of Rho kinase, p38, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), and protein kinase C (PKC), which thus do not exert their effects on the shrinkage-activated transporters via...... by osmotic shrinkage and by the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor Calyculin A (CL-A). Both stimuli caused Rho kinase-dependent myosin II relocation to the cortical cytoplasm, but in contrast to the shrinkage-induced F-actin polymerization, CL-A treatment elicited a slight F-actin depolymerization...

  10. Generation of potent cytotoxic T lymphocytes against in male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer by dendritic cells loaded with dying T24 bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Chang Hwang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background In order to induce a potent cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in dendritic cell (DC-based immunotherapy for bladder cancer, various tumor antigens can be loaded onto DCs. Objective The aim of this study was to establish a method of immunotherapy for male patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC, using bladder cancer-specific CTLs generated in vitro by DCs. Materials and Methods Monocyte-derived DCs from bladder cancer patients were induced to mature in a standard cytokine cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and PGE2: standard DCs, sDCs or anα-type 1-polarized DC (αDC1 cocktail (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-α, IFN-γ, and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid and loaded with the UVB-irradiated bladder cancer cell line, T24. Antigen-loaded αDC1s were evaluated by morphological and functional assays, and the bladder cancer-specific CTL response was analyzed by cytotoxic assay. Results The αDC1s significantly increased the expression of several molecules pertaining to DC maturation, regardless of whether or not the αDC1s were loaded with tumor antigens, relative to sDCs. The αDC1s demonstrated increased production of interleukin-12 both during maturation and after subsequent stimulation with CD40L that was not significantly affected by loading with tumor antigens as compared to that of sDCs. Bladder cancer-specific CTLs targeting autologous bladder cancer cells were successfully induced by αDC1s loaded with dying T24 cells. Conclusion Autologous αDC1s loaded with an allogeneic bladder cancer cell line resulted in increased bladder cancer-specific CTL responses as compared to that with sDCs, and therefore, may provide a novel source of DC-based vaccines that canbe used in immunotherapy for male patients with NMIBC.

  11. Dose, duration and strain of bacillus Calmette-Guerin in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yongjun; Jeong, Chang Wook; Kwak, Cheol; Kim, Hyeon Hoe; Kim, Hyung Suk; Ku, Ja Hyeon

    2017-10-01

    Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) instillation is widely used as an adjuvant therapy after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) in patients with intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, the effective dose, duration, and strain of BCG have not yet been clearly determined. We aimed to elucidate the relationship between dose, duration, and strain of BCG and clinical outcomes in NMIBC patients treated with TURBT. We conducted a literature search in Embase, Scopus, and PubMed databases for all relevant articles published up to October 2016 in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis guidelines. The relative risks of clinical outcomes, including recurrence, progression, cancer-specific mortality, and all-cause mortality according to dose (standard vs low), duration (induction vs maintenance), and strain of BCG were presented as the pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Nineteen studies meeting the inclusion criteria were finally selected in this meta-analysis. The risk of recurrence was significantly highly observed in case of low-dose BCG (RR, 1.17; 95% CI 1.06-1.30) and induction BCG (RR, 1.33; 95% CI 1.17-1.50) only group without heterogeneity among the included studies. Although there were no significant differences between dose or duration and other clinical outcomes. On direct comparison in each study comparing BCG strains, the Tice stain showed a relatively high probability of recurrence compared with the Connaught (RR, 1.29; 95% CI 1.01-1.64) and RIVM (RR, 2.04, 95% CI 1.28-3.25) strains. Funnel plot testing revealed no significant publication bias. The use of standard dose and maintenance BCG instillation may be effective to reduce recurrence rate after TURBT for NMIBC. Further large scale, well-designed, and prospective studies, with stratification of the patients into risk group at randomization, will be required to determine the optimal

  12. Antibodies covalently immobilized on actin filaments for fast myosin driven analyte transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Kumar

    Full Text Available Biosensors would benefit from further miniaturization, increased detection rate and independence from external pumps and other bulky equipment. Whereas transportation systems built around molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments hold significant promise in the latter regard, recent proof-of-principle devices based on the microtubule-kinesin motor system have not matched the speed of existing methods. An attractive solution to overcome this limitation would be the use of myosin driven propulsion of actin filaments which offers motility one order of magnitude faster than the kinesin-microtubule system. Here, we realized a necessary requirement for the use of the actomyosin system in biosensing devices, namely covalent attachment of antibodies to actin filaments using heterobifunctional cross-linkers. We also demonstrated consistent and rapid myosin II driven transport where velocity and the fraction of motile actin filaments was negligibly affected by the presence of antibody-antigen complexes at rather high density (>20 µm(-1. The results, however, also demonstrated that it was challenging to consistently achieve high density of functional antibodies along the actin filament, and optimization of the covalent coupling procedure to increase labeling density should be a major focus for future work. Despite the remaining challenges, the reported advances are important steps towards considerably faster nanoseparation than shown for previous molecular motor based devices, and enhanced miniaturization because of high bending flexibility of actin filaments.

  13. Myosin light chain kinase mediates intestinal barrier dysfunction via occludin endocytosis during anoxia/reoxygenation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Younggeon; Blikslager, Anthony T

    2016-12-01

    Intestinal anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) injury induces loss of barrier function followed by epithelial repair. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been shown to alter barrier function via regulation of interepithelial tight junctions, but has not been studied in intestinal A/R injury. We hypothesized that A/R injury would disrupt tight junction barrier function via MLCK activation and myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. Caco-2BBe1 monolayers were subjected to anoxia for 2 h followed by reoxygenation in 21% O 2 , after which barrier function was determined by measuring transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and FITC-dextran flux. Tight junction proteins and MLCK signaling were assessed by Western blotting, real-time PCR, or immunofluorescence microscopy. The role of MLCK was further investigated with select inhibitors (ML-7 and peptide 18) by using in vitro and ex vivo models. Following A/R injury, there was a significant increase in paracellular permeability compared with control cells, as determined by TER and dextran fluxes (P endocytosis caused by A/R injury. Application of MLCK inhibitors to ischemia-injured porcine ileal mucosa induced significant increases in TER and reduced mucosal-to-serosal fluxes of 3 H-labeled mannitol. These data suggest that MLCK-induced occludin endocytosis mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction during A/R injury. Our results also indicate that MLCK-dependent occludin regulation may be a target for the therapeutic treatment of ischemia/reperfusion injury. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. PTP1B triggers integrin-mediated repression of myosin activity and modulates cell contractility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana E. González Wusener

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell contractility and migration by integrins depends on precise regulation of protein tyrosine kinase and Rho-family GTPase activities in specific spatiotemporal patterns. Here we show that protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B cooperates with β3 integrin to activate the Src/FAK signalling pathway which represses RhoA-myosin-dependent contractility. Using PTP1B null (KO cells and PTP1B reconstituted (WT cells, we determined that some early steps following cell adhesion to fibronectin and vitronectin occurred robustly in WT cells, including aggregation of β3 integrins and adaptor proteins, and activation of Src/FAK-dependent signalling at small puncta in a lamellipodium. However, these events were significantly impaired in KO cells. We established that cytoskeletal strain and cell contractility was highly enhanced at the periphery of KO cells compared to WT cells. Inhibition of the Src/FAK signalling pathway or expression of constitutive active RhoA in WT cells induced a KO cell phenotype. Conversely, expression of constitutive active Src or myosin inhibition in KO cells restored the WT phenotype. We propose that this novel function of PTP1B stimulates permissive conditions for adhesion and lamellipodium assembly at the protruding edge during cell spreading and migration.

  15. The role of myosin II in glioma invasion: A mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanho Lee

    Full Text Available Gliomas are malignant tumors that are commonly observed in primary brain cancer. Glioma cells migrate through a dense network of normal cells in microenvironment and spread long distances within brain. In this paper we present a two-dimensional multiscale model in which a glioma cell is surrounded by normal cells and its migration is controlled by cell-mechanical components in the microenvironment via the regulation of myosin II in response to chemoattractants. Our simulation results show that the myosin II plays a key role in the deformation of the cell nucleus as the glioma cell passes through the narrow intercellular space smaller than its nuclear diameter. We also demonstrate that the coordination of biochemical and mechanical components within the cell enables a glioma cell to take the mode of amoeboid migration. This study sheds lights on the understanding of glioma infiltration through the narrow intercellular spaces and may provide a potential approach for the development of anti-invasion strategies via the injection of chemoattractants for localization.

  16. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP3R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP3R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP3R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment. PMID:25637353

  17. MYH7 gene mutation in myosin storage myopathy and scapulo-peroneal myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Elena; Gavassini, Bruno F; Borsato, Carlo; Melacini, Paola; Vianello, Andrea; Stramare, Roberto; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Angelini, Corrado

    2007-04-01

    In order to characterize, at the clinical, molecular and imaging level, myopathies due to MYH7 gene mutations, MYH7 gene analysis was conducted by RT-PCR/SSCP/sequencing in two patients diagnosed with myosin storage myopathy and 17 patients diagnosed with scapulo-peroneal myopathy of unknown etiology. MYH7 gene studies revealed the 5533C>T mutation (Arg1845Trp) in both myosin storage myopathy and in 2 of the 17 scapulo-peroneal patients studied. 5533C>T segregation analysis in the mutation carrier families identified 11 additional patients. The clinical spectrum in our cohort of patients included asymptomatic hyperCKemia, scapulo-peroneal myopathy and proximal and distal myopathy with muscle hypertrophy. Muscle MRI identified a unique pattern in the posterior compartment of the thigh, characterized by early involvement of the biceps femoris and semimembranosus, with relative sparing of the semitendinosus. Muscle biopsy revealed hyaline bodies in only half of biopsied patients (2/4). In conclusion, phenotypic and histopathological variability may underlie MYH7 gene mutation and the absence of hyaline bodies in muscle biopsies does not rule out MYH7 gene mutations.

  18. A single molecule approach to mRNA transport by a class V myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladewski, Thomas E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2014-01-01

    mRNA localization ensures correct spatial and temporal control of protein synthesis in the cell. We show that an in vitro single molecule approach, using purified recombinant full-length proteins and synthesized mRNA, provides insight into the mechanism by which localizing mRNAs are carried to their destination. A messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex was reconstituted from a budding yeast class V myosin motor complex (Myo4p-She3p), an mRNA-binding adaptor protein (She2p), and a localizing mRNA (ASH1). The motion of the mRNP was tracked with high spatial (∼10 nm) and temporal (70 ms) resolution. Using this "bottom-up" methodology, we show that mRNA triggers the assembly of a high affinity double-headed motor-mRNA complex that moves continuously for long distances on actin filaments at physiologic ionic strength. Without mRNA, the myosin is monomeric and unable to move continuously on actin. This finding reveals an elegant strategy to ensure that only cargo-bound motors are activated for transport. Increasing the number of localization elements ("zip codes") in the mRNA enhanced both the frequency of motile events and their run length, features which likely enhance cellular localization. Future in vitro reconstitution of mRNPs with kinesin and dynein motors should similarly yield mechanistic insight into mRNA transport by microtubule-based motors.

  19. Altered myosin isoform expression in rat skeletal muscles induced by a changed thyroid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahrmann, J P; Fulla, Y; Rieu, M; Kahn, A; Dinh-Xuan, A T

    2002-11-01

    The aim of our study was to find out, which are the thyroid linked mechanisms responsible for the changes in myosin isoform composition which accompany endurance training (ET) in rodents. We studied the interaction between ET and altered sedentary group with no thyroid treatment or Se group. Six groups of rats were compared: (1) a trained group with no thyroid treatment or T group; (2) a thyroid state in rats; (3) a sedentary group rendered hypothyroid with 6-n-propyl thio uracil (H); (4) a sedentary group rendered hyperthyroid with T3 (150 microg kg(-1) every other day for 4 weeks) (St); (5) trained rats rendered hyperthyroid with T3 (150 microg kg(-1) every other day for 4 weeks) (Tt) and (6) a trained group kept euthyroid with T3 (150 ng kg(-1) every other day for 4 weeks) (Te). In each group myosin isoform composition was determined in five muscles, three locomotor muscles: (1) extensor digitorum longus, (2) superficial lateral gastrocnemius, (3) deep medial gastrocnemius, (4) an antigravity muscle, the soleus and (5) a rhytmic respiratory muscle, the crural diaphragm. Different muscles responded in a specific way to variations of the thyroid state and training.

  20. Myosin phosphorylation potentiated steady state work output without altering contractile economy of mouse fast skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittings, William; Bunda, Jordan; Vandenboom, Rene

    2017-11-09

    Skeletal myosin light chain kinase (skMLCK) catalyzed phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) increases (i.e. potentiates) mechanical work output of fast skeletal muscle. The influence of this event on contractile economy (i.e. energy cost/work performed) remains controversial, however. Our purpose was to quantify contractile economy of potentiated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from mouse skeletal muscles with (wildtype, WT) and without (skMLCK ablated, skMLCK-/-) the ability to phosphorylate the RLC. Contractile economy was calculated as the ratio of total work performed to high-energy phosphate consumption (HEPC) during a period of repeated isovelocity contractions that followed a potentiating stimulus (PS). Consistent with genotype, the PS increased RLC phosphorylation measured during before and after isovelocity contractions in WT but not skMLCK-/- muscles (i.e. 0.65 and 0.05 mol phos mol RLC, respectively). In addition, although the PS enhanced work during repeated isovelocity contractions in both genotypes the increase was significantly greater in WT than in skMLCK-/- muscles (1.51±0.03 vs. 1.10±0.05, respectively) (all data Peconomy calculated for WT muscles was similar to that calculated for skMLCK-/- muscles (i.e. 5.74±0.67 and 4.61±0.71 J•kg-1μmol∼P-1; respectively (Peconomy. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Planarian myosin essential light chain is involved in the formation of brain lateral branches during regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuying; Chen, Xuhui; Yuan, Zuoqing; Zhou, Luming; Pang, Qiuxiang; Mao, Bingyu; Zhao, Bosheng

    2015-08-01

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structure component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, however, the functions in the central nervous system (CNS) development and regeneration remain poorly understood. Planarian Dugesia japonica has revealed fundamental mechanisms and unique aspects of neuroscience and neuroregeneration. In this study, the cDNA DjElc, encoding a planarian essential light chain of myosin, was identified from the planarian Dugesia japonica cDNA library. It encodes a deduced protein with highly conserved functionally domains EF-Hand and Ca(2+) binding sites that shares significant similarity with other members of ELC. Whole mount in situ hybridization studies show that DjElc expressed in CNS during embryonic development and regeneration of adult planarians. Loss of function of DjElc by RNA interference during planarian regeneration inhibits brain lateral branches regeneration completely. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that DjElc is required for maintenance of neurons and neurite outgrowth, particularly for involving the brain later branch regeneration.

  2. Model of myosin node aggregation into a contractile ring: the effect of local alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojkic, Nikola; Vavylonis, Dimitrios [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Wu Jianqiu, E-mail: vavylonis@lehigh.edu [Department of Molecular Genetics and Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    Actomyosin bundles frequently form through aggregation of membrane-bound myosin clusters. One such example is the formation of the contractile ring in fission yeast from a broad band of cortical nodes. Nodes are macromolecular complexes containing several dozens of myosin-II molecules and a few formin dimers. The condensation of a broad band of nodes into the contractile ring has been previously described by a search, capture, pull and release (SCPR) model. In SCPR, a random search process mediated by actin filaments nucleated by formins leads to transient actomyosin connections among nodes that pull one another into a ring. The SCPR model reproduces the transport of nodes over long distances and predicts observed clump-formation instabilities in mutants. However, the model does not generate transient linear elements and meshwork structures as observed in some wild-type and mutant cells during ring assembly. As a minimal model of node alignment, we added short-range aligning forces to the SCPR model representing currently unresolved mechanisms that may involve structural components, cross-linking and bundling proteins. We studied the effect of the local node alignment mechanism on ring formation numerically. We varied the new parameters and found viable rings for a realistic range of values. Morphologically, transient structures that form during ring assembly resemble those observed in experiments with wild-type and cdc25-22 cells. Our work supports a hierarchical process of ring self-organization involving components drawn together from distant parts of the cell followed by progressive stabilization.

  3. Myosin head orientation: a structural determinant for the Frank-Starling relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farman, Gerrie P.; Gore, David; Allen, Edward; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Irving, Thomas C.; de Tombe, Pieter P. (IIT); (UIC)

    2011-09-06

    The cellular mechanism underlying the Frank-Starling law of the heart is myofilament length-dependent activation. The mechanism(s) whereby sarcomeres detect changes in length and translate this into increased sensitivity to activating calcium has been elusive. Small-angle X-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the intact myofilament lattice undergoes numerous structural changes upon an increase in sarcomere length (SL): lattice spacing and the I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} intensity ratio decreases, whereas the M3 meridional reflection intensity (I{sub M3}) increases, concomitant with increases in diastolic and systolic force. Using a short ({approx}10 ms) X-ray exposure just before electrical stimulation, we were able to obtain detailed structural information regarding the effects of external osmotic compression (with mannitol) and obtain SL on thin intact electrically stimulated isolated rat right ventricular trabeculae. We show that over the same incremental increases in SL, the relative changes in systolic force track more closely to the relative changes in myosin head orientation (as reported by IM3) than to the relative changes in lattice spacing. We conclude that myosin head orientation before activation determines myocardial sarcomere activation levels and that this may be the dominant mechanism for length-dependent activation.

  4. Coupling of two non-processive myosin 5c dimers enables processive stepping along actin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Laura K; Furuta, Ken'ya; Bao, Jianjun; Urbanowski, Monica K; Kojima, Hiroaki; White, Howard D; Sakamoto, Takeshi

    2014-05-09

    Myosin 5c (Myo5c) is a low duty ratio, non-processive motor unable to move continuously along actin filaments though it is believed to participate in secretory vesicle trafficking in vertebrate cells. Here, we measured the ATPase kinetics of Myo5c dimers and tested the possibility that the coupling of two Myo5c molecules enables processive movement. Steady-state ATPase activity and ADP dissociation kinetics demonstrated that a dimer of Myo5c-HMM (double-headed heavy meromyosin 5c) has a 6-fold lower Km for actin filaments than Myo5c-S1 (single-headed myosin 5c subfragment-1), indicating that the two heads of Myo5c-HMM increase F-actin-binding affinity. Nanometer-precision tracking analyses showed that two Myo5c-HMM dimers linked with each other via a DNA scaffold and moved processively along actin filaments. Moreover, the distance between the Myo5c molecules on the DNA scaffold is an important factor for the processive movement. Individual Myo5c molecules in two-dimer complexes move stochastically in 30-36 nm steps. These results demonstrate that two dimers of Myo5c molecules on a DNA scaffold increased the probability of rebinding to F-actin and enabled processive steps along actin filaments, which could be used for collective cargo transport in cells.

  5. The On-off Switch in Regulated Myosins: Different Triggers but Related Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, Daniel M.; Mui, Suet; O'Neall-Hennessey, Elizabeth; Szent-Györgyi, Andrew G.; Cohen, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    In regulated myosins, motor and enzymatic activity are toggled between on- and off-states by a switch located on its lever arm, or regulatory domain (RD). This region consists of a long alpha-helical "heavy chain" stabilized by a "regulatory" and an "essential" light chain. The on-state is activated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain of smooth muscle RD, or by direct binding of Ca2+ to the essential light chain of molluscan RD. Crystal structures are available only for the molluscan RD. To understand the pathway between the on and off states in more detail, we have now also determined the crystal structure of a molluscan (scallop) RD in the absence of Ca2+. Our results indicate that loss of Ca2+ abolishes most of the interactions between the light chains and may increase flexibility of the RD heavy chain. We propose that disruption of critical links with the C-lobe of the regulatory light chain is the key event initiating the off-state in both smooth muscle and molluscan myosins. PMID:19769984

  6. An inducible mouse model for microvillus inclusion disease reveals a role for myosin Vb in apical and basolateral trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Kerstin; Vogel, Georg F.; Teunissen, Hans; van Ommen, Domenique D.; Begthel, Harry; El Bouazzaoui, Layla; van Vugt, Anke H. M.; Beekman, Jeffrey M.; Klumperman, Judith; Müller, Thomas; Janecke, Andreas; Gerner, Patrick; Huber, Lukas A.; Hess, Michael W.; Clevers, Hans; van Es, Johan H.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Middendorp, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a rare intestinal enteropathy with an onset within a few days to months after birth, resulting in persistent watery diarrhea. Mutations in the myosin Vb gene (MYO5B) have been identified in the majority of MVID patients. However, the exact pathophysiology of MVID still remains unclear. To address the specific role of MYO5B in the intestine, we generated an intestine-specific conditional Myo5b-deficient (Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2) mouse model. We analyzed intestinal tissues and cultured organoids of Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 mice by electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry. Our data showed that Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 mice developed severe diarrhea within 4 d after tamoxifen induction. Periodic Acid Schiff and alkaline phosphatase staining revealed subapical accumulation of intracellular vesicles in villus enterocytes. Analysis by electron microscopy confirmed an almost complete absence of apical microvilli, the appearance of microvillus inclusions, and enlarged intercellular spaces in induced Myo5bfl/fl;Vil-CreERT2 intestines. In addition, we determined that MYO5B is involved not only in apical but also basolateral trafficking of proteins. The analysis of the intestine during the early onset of the disease revealed that subapical accumulation of secretory granules precedes occurrence of microvillus inclusions, indicating involvement of MYO5B in early differentiation of epithelial cells. By comparing our data with a novel MVID patient, we conclude that our mouse model completely recapitulates the intestinal phenotype of human MVID. This includes severe diarrhea, loss of microvilli, occurrence of microvillus inclusions, and subapical secretory granules. Thus, loss of MYO5B disturbs both apical and basolateral trafficking of proteins and causes MVID in mice. PMID:26392529

  7. Whole-Genome SNP Association in the Horse: Identification of a Deletion in Myosin Va Responsible for Lavender Foal Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Samantha A.; Gabreski, Nicole; Miller, Donald; Brisbin, Abra; Brown, Helen E.; Streeter, Cassandra; Mezey, Jason; Cook, Deborah; Antczak, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    Lavender Foal Syndrome (LFS) is a lethal inherited disease of horses with a suspected autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. LFS has been primarily diagnosed in a subgroup of the Arabian breed, the Egyptian Arabian horse. The condition is characterized by multiple neurological abnormalities and a dilute coat color. Candidate genes based on comparative phenotypes in mice and humans include the ras-associated protein RAB27a (RAB27A) and myosin Va (MYO5A). Here we report mapping of the locus responsible for LFS using a small set of 36 horses segregating for LFS. These horses were genotyped using a newly available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip containing 56,402 discriminatory elements. The whole genome scan identified an associated region containing these two functional candidate genes. Exon sequencing of the MYO5A gene from an affected foal revealed a single base deletion in exon 30 that changes the reading frame and introduces a premature stop codon. A PCR–based Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR–RFLP) assay was designed and used to investigate the frequency of the mutant gene. All affected horses tested were homozygous for this mutation. Heterozygous carriers were detected in high frequency in families segregating for this trait, and the frequency of carriers in unrelated Egyptian Arabians was 10.3%. The mapping and discovery of the LFS mutation represents the first successful use of whole-genome SNP scanning in the horse for any trait. The RFLP assay can be used to assist breeders in avoiding carrier-to-carrier matings and thus in preventing the birth of affected foals. PMID:20419149

  8. Whole-genome SNP association in the horse: identification of a deletion in myosin Va responsible for Lavender Foal Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha A Brooks

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Lavender Foal Syndrome (LFS is a lethal inherited disease of horses with a suspected autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. LFS has been primarily diagnosed in a subgroup of the Arabian breed, the Egyptian Arabian horse. The condition is characterized by multiple neurological abnormalities and a dilute coat color. Candidate genes based on comparative phenotypes in mice and humans include the ras-associated protein RAB27a (RAB27A and myosin Va (MYO5A. Here we report mapping of the locus responsible for LFS using a small set of 36 horses segregating for LFS. These horses were genotyped using a newly available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP chip containing 56,402 discriminatory elements. The whole genome scan identified an associated region containing these two functional candidate genes. Exon sequencing of the MYO5A gene from an affected foal revealed a single base deletion in exon 30 that changes the reading frame and introduces a premature stop codon. A PCR-based Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP assay was designed and used to investigate the frequency of the mutant gene. All affected horses tested were homozygous for this mutation. Heterozygous carriers were detected in high frequency in families segregating for this trait, and the frequency of carriers in unrelated Egyptian Arabians was 10.3%. The mapping and discovery of the LFS mutation represents the first successful use of whole-genome SNP scanning in the horse for any trait. The RFLP assay can be used to assist breeders in avoiding carrier-to-carrier matings and thus in preventing the birth of affected foals.

  9. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using ‘harmonic force spectroscopy...

  10. Head-head interactions of resting myosin crossbridges in intact frog skeletal muscles, revealed by synchrotron x-ray fiber diffraction.

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    Kanji Oshima

    Full Text Available The intensities of the myosin-based layer lines in the x-ray diffraction patterns from live resting frog skeletal muscles with full thick-thin filament overlap from which partial lattice sampling effects had been removed were analyzed to elucidate the configurations of myosin crossbridges around the thick filament backbone to nanometer resolution. The repeat of myosin binding protein C (C-protein molecules on the thick filaments was determined to be 45.33 nm, slightly longer than that of myosin crossbridges. With the inclusion of structural information for C-proteins and a pre-powerstroke head shape, modeling in terms of a mixed population of regular and perturbed regions of myosin crown repeats along the filament revealed that the myosin filament had azimuthal perturbations of crossbridges in addition to axial perturbations in the perturbed region, producing pseudo-six-fold rotational symmetry in the structure projected down the filament axis. Myosin crossbridges had a different organization about the filament axis in each of the regular and perturbed regions. In the regular region that lacks C-proteins, there were inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in axially adjacent crown levels. In the perturbed region that contains C-proteins, in addition to inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in the closest adjacent crown levels, there were also intra-molecular interactions between the paired heads on the same crown level. Common features of the interactions in both regions were interactions between a portion of the 50-kDa-domain and part of the converter domain of the myosin heads, similar to those found in the phosphorylation-regulated invertebrate myosin. These interactions are primarily electrostatic and the converter domain is responsible for the head-head interactions. Thus multiple head-head interactions of myosin crossbridges also characterize the switched-off state and have an important role in the regulation

  11. An inducible mouse model for microvillus inclusion disease reveals a role for myosin Vb in apical and basolateral trafficking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Kerstin; Vogel, Georg F; Teunissen, Hans; van Ommen, Domenique D; Begthel, Harry; El Bouazzaoui, Layla; van Vugt, Anke H M; Beekman, Jeffrey M; Klumperman, Judith; Müller, Thomas; Janecke, Andreas; Gerner, Patrick; Huber, Lukas A; Hess, Michael W; Clevers, Hans; van Es, Johan H; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Middendorp, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) is a rare intestinal enteropathy with an onset within a few days to months after birth, resulting in persistent watery diarrhea. Mutations in the myosin Vb gene (MYO5B) have been identified in the majority of MVID patients. However, the exact pathophysiology of

  12. Maintenance of muscle myosin levels in adult C. elegans requires both the double bromodomain protein BET-1 and sumoylation

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    Kate Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Attenuation of RAS-mediated signalling is a conserved process essential to control cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Cooperative interactions between histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation and sumoylation are crucial for proper attenuation in C. elegans, implying that the proteins recognising these histone modifications could also play an important role in attenuation of RAS-mediated signalling. We sought to systematically identify these proteins and found BET-1. BET-1 is a conserved double bromodomain protein that recognises acetyl-lysines on histone tails and maintains the stable fate of various lineages. Unexpectedly, adults lacking both BET-1 and SUMO-1 are depleted of muscle myosin, an essential component of myofibrils. We also show that this muscle myosin depletion does not occur in all animals at a specific time, but rather that the penetrance of the phenotype increases with age. To gain mechanistic insights into this process, we sought to delay the occurrence of the muscle myosin depletion phenotype and found that it requires caspase activity and MEK-dependent signalling. We also performed transcription profiling on these mutants and found an up-regulation of the FGF receptor, egl-15, a tyrosine kinase receptor acting upstream of MEK. Consistent with a MEK requirement, we could delay the muscle phenotype by systemic or hypodermal knock down of egl-15. Thus, this work uncovered a caspase- and MEK-dependent mechanism that acts specifically on ageing adults to maintain the appropriate net level of muscle myosin.

  13. Myosin IXB gene region and gluten intolerance : linkage to coeliac disease and a putative dermatitis herpetiformis association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koskinen, L. L. E.; Korponay-Szabo, I. R.; Viiri, K.; Juuti-Uusitalo, K.; Kaukinen, K.; Lindfors, K.; Mustalahti, K.; Kurppa, K.; Adany, R.; Pocsai, Z.; Szeles, G.; Einarsdottir, E.; Wijmenga, C.; Maeki, M.; Partanen, J.; Kere, J.; Saavalainen, P.

    Background: Coeliac disease is caused by dietary gluten, which triggers chronic inflammation of the small intestine in genetically predisposed individuals. In one quarter of the patients the disease manifests in the skin as dermatitis herpetiformis. Recently, a novel candidate gene, myosin IXB on

  14. Balance between cell−substrate adhesion and myosin contraction determines the frequency of motility initiation in fish keratocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Erin; Lee, Kun-Chun; Allen, Greg M.; Theriot, Julie A.; Mogilner, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Cells are dynamic systems capable of spontaneously switching among stable states. One striking example of this is spontaneous symmetry breaking and motility initiation in fish epithelial keratocytes. Although the biochemical and mechanical mechanisms that control steady-state migration in these cells have been well characterized, the mechanisms underlying symmetry breaking are less well understood. In this work, we have combined experimental manipulations of cell−substrate adhesion strength and myosin activity, traction force measurements, and mathematical modeling to develop a comprehensive mechanical model for symmetry breaking and motility initiation in fish epithelial keratocytes. Our results suggest that stochastic fluctuations in adhesion strength and myosin localization drive actin network flow rates in the prospective cell rear above a critical threshold. Above this threshold, high actin flow rates induce a nonlinear switch in adhesion strength, locally switching adhesions from gripping to slipping and further accelerating actin flow in the prospective cell rear, resulting in rear retraction and motility initiation. We further show, both experimentally and with model simulations, that the global levels of adhesion strength and myosin activity control the stability of the stationary state: The frequency of symmetry breaking decreases with increasing adhesion strength and increases with increasing myosin contraction. Thus, the relative strengths of two opposing mechanical forces—contractility and cell−substrate adhesion—determine the likelihood of spontaneous symmetry breaking and motility initiation. PMID:25848042

  15. Myosin Vb mediated plasma membrane homeostasis regulates peridermal cell size and maintains tissue homeostasis in the zebrafish epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonal; Sidhaye, Jaydeep; Phatak, Mandar; Banerjee, Shamik; Mulay, Aditya; Deshpande, Ojas; Bhide, Sourabh; Jacob, Tressa; Gehring, Ines; Nuesslein-Volhard, Christiane; Sonawane, Mahendra

    2014-09-01

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium, which forms a barrier to maintain the internal milieu in metazoans. Being the outermost tissue, growth of the epidermis has to be strictly coordinated with the growth of the embryo. The key parameters that determine tissue growth are cell number and cell size. So far, it has remained unclear how the size of epidermal cells is maintained and whether it contributes towards epidermal homeostasis. We have used genetic analysis in combination with cellular imaging to show that zebrafish goosepimples/myosin Vb regulates plasma membrane homeostasis and is involved in maintenance of cell size in the periderm, the outermost epidermal layer. The decrease in peridermal cell size in Myosin Vb deficient embryos is compensated by an increase in cell number whereas decrease in cell number results in the expansion of peridermal cells, which requires myosin Vb (myoVb) function. Inhibition of cell proliferation as well as cell size expansion results in increased lethality in larval stages suggesting that this two-way compensatory mechanism is essential for growing larvae. Our analyses unravel the importance of Myosin Vb dependent cell size regulation in epidermal homeostasis and demonstrate that the epidermis has the ability to maintain a dynamic balance between cell size and cell number.

  16. An isoform of Arabidopsis myosin XI interacts with small GTPases in its C-terminal tail region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kohsuke; Igarashi, Hisako; Mano, Shoji; Takenaka, Chikako; Shiina, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Demura, Taku; Nishimura, Mikio; Shimmen, Teruo; Yokota, Etsuo

    2008-01-01

    Myosin XI, a class of myosins expressed in plants is believed to be responsible for cytoplasmic streaming and the translocation of organelles and vesicles. To gain further insight into the translocation of organelles and vesicles by myosin XI, an isoform of Arabidopsis myosin XI, MYA2, was chosen and its role in peroxisome targeting was examined. Using the yeast two-hybrid screening method, two small GTPases, AtRabD1 and AtRabC2a, were identified as factors that interact with the C-terminal tail region of MYA2. Both recombinant AtRabs tagged with His bound to the recombinant C-terminal tail region of MYA2 tagged with GST in a GTP-dependent manner. Furthermore, AtRabC2a was localized on peroxisomes, when its CFP-tagged form was expressed transiently in protoplasts prepared from Arabidopsis leaf tissue. It is suggested that MYA2 targets the peroxisome through an interaction with AtRabC2a. PMID:18703495

  17. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  18. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ting

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+ to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our

  19. Myosin IIA participates in docking of Glut4 storage vesicles with the plasma membrane in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Le Thi Kim, E-mail: ngocanh@nutr.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Hosaka, Toshio [Department of Public Health and Applied Nutrition, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima (Japan); Harada, Nagakatsu; Jambaldorj, Bayasgalan; Fukunaga, Keiko; Nishiwaki, Yuka [Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Teshigawara, Kiyoshi [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Sakai, Tohru [Department of Public Health and Applied Nutrition, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima (Japan); Nakaya, Yutaka [Department of Nutrition and Metabolism, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, 3-18-15 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Funaki, Makoto, E-mail: m-funaki@clin.med.tokushima-u.ac.jp [Clinical Research Center for Diabetes, Tokushima University Hospital, 2-50-1 Kuramoto-cho, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    In adipocytes and myocytes, insulin stimulation translocates glucose transporter 4 (Glut4) storage vesicles (GSVs) from their intracellular storage sites to the plasma membrane (PM) where they dock with the PM. Then, Glut4 is inserted into the PM and initiates glucose uptake into these cells. Previous studies using chemical inhibitors demonstrated that myosin II participates in fusion of GSVs and the PM and increase in the intrinsic activity of Glut4. In this study, the effect of myosin IIA on GSV trafficking was examined by knocking down myosin IIA expression. Myosin IIA knockdown decreased both glucose uptake and exposures of myc-tagged Glut4 to the cell surface in insulin-stimulated cells, but did not affect insulin signal transduction. Interestingly, myosin IIA knockdown failed to decrease insulin-dependent trafficking of Glut4 to the PM. Moreover, in myosin IIA knockdown cells, insulin-stimulated binding of GSV SNARE protein, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) to PM SNARE protein, syntaxin 4 was inhibited. These data suggest that myosin IIA plays a role in insulin-stimulated docking of GSVs to the PM in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through SNARE complex formation.

  20. EF-hand proteins and the regulation of actin-myosin interaction in the eutardigrade Hypsibius klebelsbergi (tardigrada).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasath, Thiruketheeswaran; Greven, Hartmut; D'Haese, Jochen

    2012-06-01

    Many tardigrade species resist harsh environmental conditions by entering anhydrobiosis or cryobiosis. Desiccation as well as freeze resistance probably leads to changes of the ionic balance that includes the intracellular calcium concentration. In order to search for protein modifications affecting the calcium homoeostasis, we studied the regulatory system controlling actin-myosin interaction of the eutardigrade Hypsibius klebelsbergi and identified full-length cDNA clones for troponin C (TnC, 824 bp), calmodulin (CaM, 1,407 bp), essential myosin light chain (eMLC, 1,015 bp), and regulatory myosin light chain (rMLC, 984 bp) from a cDNA library. All four proteins belong to the EF-hand superfamily typified by a calcium coordinating helix-loop-helix motif. Further, we cloned and obtained recombinant TnC and both MLCs. CaM and TnC revealed four and two potential calcium-binding domains, respectively. Gel mobility shift assays demonstrated calcium-induced conformational transition of TnC. From both MLCs, only the rMLC showed one potential N-terminal EF-hand domain. Additionally, sequence properties suggest phosphorylation of this myosin light chain. Based on our results, we suggest a dual-regulated system at least in somatic muscles for tardigrades with a calcium-dependent tropomyosin-troponin complex bound to the actin filaments and a phosphorylation of the rMLC turning on and off both actin and myosin. Our results indicate no special modifications of the molecular structure and function of the EF-hand proteins in tardigrades. Phylogenetic trees of 131 TnCs, 96 rMLCs, and 62 eMLCs indicate affinities to Ecdysozoa, but also to some other taxa suggesting that our results reflect the complex evolution of these proteins rather than phylogenetic relationships. © 2012 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. The Intensity Of The 2.7nm Reflection As A Constraint For Models Of Myosin Docking To Actin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reconditi, Massimo; Irving, Tom C.; (IIT); (U.Florence)

    2009-03-16

    Previous workers have proposed high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin on the basis of combined crystallographic and electron microscopy data (Mendelson and Morris, 1997 PNAS 94:8533; Holmes et al. 2003 Nature 425:423). We have used data from small angle X-ray fiber diffraction from living muscle to check the predictions of these models. Whole sartorius muscles from Rana pipiens were mounted in a chamber containing Ringer's solution at 10 C and at rest length at the BioCAT beamline (18 ID, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL-U.S.A.). The muscles were activated by electrical stimulation and the force was recorded with a muscle lever system type 300B (Aurora Scientific). X-ray patterns were collected with 1s total exposures at rest and during isometric contraction out to 0.5 nm{sup -1} in reciprocal space, as the higher angle reflections are expected to be more sensitive to the arrangement of myosin heads on actin. We observed that during isometric contraction the meridional reflection originating from the 2.73nm repeat of the actin monomers along the actin filament increases its intensity by a factor 2.1 {+-} 0.2 relative to rest. Among the models tested, Holmes et al. fits the data when the actin filament is decorated with 30-40% the total available myosin heads, a fraction similar to that estimated with fast single fiber mechanics by Piazzesi et al. (2007, Cell 131:784). However, when the mismatch between the periodicities of actin and myosin filaments is taken into account, none of the models can reproduce the fiber diffraction data. We suggest that the fiber diffraction data should be used as a further constraint on new high resolution models for the docking of the myosin heads on actin.

  2. Myosins XI-K, XI-1, and XI-2 are required for development of pavement cells, trichomes, and stigmatic papillae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The positioning and dynamics of vesicles and organelles, and thus the growth of plant cells, is mediated by the acto-myosin system. In Arabidopsis there are 13 class XI myosins which mediate vesicle and organelle transport in different cell types. So far the involvement of five class XI myosins in cell expansion during the shoot and root development has been shown, three of which, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, are essential for organelle transport. Results Simultaneous depletion of Arabidopsis class XI myosins XI-K, XI-1, and XI-2 in double and triple mutant plants affected the growth of several types of epidermal cells. The size and shape of trichomes, leaf pavement cells and the elongation of the stigmatic papillae of double and triple mutant plants were affected to different extent. Reduced cell size led to significant size reduction of shoot organs in the case of triple mutant, affecting bolt formation, flowering time and fertility. Phenotype analysis revealed that the reduced fertility of triple mutant plants was caused by delayed or insufficient development of pistils. Conclusions We conclude that the class XI myosins XI-K, XI-1 and XI-2 have partially redundant roles in the growth of shoot epidermis. Myosin XI-K plays more important role whereas myosins XI-1 and XI-2 have minor roles in the determination of size and shape of epidermal cells, because the absence of these two myosins is compensated by XI-K. Co-operation between myosins XI-K and XI-2 appears to play an important role in these processes. PMID:22672737

  3. Arabidopsis myosin XI sub-domains homologous to the yeast myo2p organelle inheritance sub-domain target subcellular structures in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirali eSattarzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Myosin XI motor proteins transport plant organelles on the actin cytoskeleton. The Arabidopsis gene family that encodes myosin XI has 13 members, 12 of which have sub-domains within the tail region that are homologous to well-characterized cargo-binding domains in the yeast myosin V myo2p. Little is presently known about the cargo-binding domains of plant myosin XIs. Prior experiments in which most or all of the tail regions of myosin XIs have been fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and transiently expressed have often not resulted in fluorescent labeling of plant organelles. We identified 42 amino-acid regions within 12 Arabidopsis myosin XIs that are homologous to the yeast myo2p tail region known to be essential for vacuole and mitochondrial inheritance. A YFP fusion of the yeast region expressed in plants did not label tonoplasts or mitochondria. We investigated whether the homologous Arabidopsis regions, termed by us the PAL sub-domain, could associate with subcellular structures following transient expression of fusions with YFP in Nicotiana benthamiana. Seven YFP::PAL sub-domain fusions decorated Golgi and six were localized to mitochondria. In general, the myosin XI PAL sub-domains labeled organelles whose motility had previously been observed to be affected by mutagenesis or dominant negative assays with the respective myosins. Simultaneous transient expression of the PAL sub-domains of myosin XI-H, XI-I, and XI-K resulted in inhibition of movement of mitochondria and Golgi.

  4. Apical domain polarization localizes actin-myosin activity to drive ratchet-like apical constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Frank M; Tworoger, Michael; Martin, Adam C

    2013-08-01

    Apical constriction promotes epithelia folding, which changes tissue architecture. During Drosophila gastrulation, mesoderm cells exhibit repeated contractile pulses that are stabilized such that cells apically constrict like a ratchet. The transcription factor Twist is required to stabilize cell shape. However, it is unknown how Twist spatially coordinates downstream signals to prevent cell relaxation. We find that during constriction, Rho-associated kinase (Rok) is polarized to the middle of the apical domain (medioapical cortex), separate from adherens junctions. Rok recruits or stabilizes medioapical myosin II (Myo-II), which contracts dynamic medioapical actin cables. The formin Diaphanous mediates apical actin assembly to suppress medioapical E-cadherin localization and form stable connections between the medioapical contractile network and adherens junctions. Twist is not required for apical Rok recruitment, but instead polarizes Rok medioapically. Therefore, Twist establishes radial cell polarity of Rok/Myo-II and E-cadherin and promotes medioapical actin assembly in mesoderm cells to stabilize cell shape fluctuations.

  5. Myosin IXa binds AMPAR and regulates synaptic structure, LTP and cognitive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eFolci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin IXa (Myo9a is a motor protein that is highly expressed in the brain. However, the role of Myo9a in neurons remains unknown. Here, we investigated Myo9a function in hippocampal synapses. In rat hippocampal neurons, Myo9a localizes to the postsynaptic density (PSD and binds the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor (AMPAR GluA2 subunit. Myo9a+/- mice displayed a thicker PSD and increased levels of PSD95 and surface AMPAR expression. Furthermore, synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation (LTP and cognitive functions were impaired in Myo9a+/- mice. Together, these results support a key role for Myo9a in controlling the molecular structure and function of hippocampal synapses.

  6. Active diffusion and microtubule-based transport oppose myosin forces to position organelles in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Congping; Schuster, Martin; Guimaraes, Sofia Cunha; Ashwin, Peter; Schrader, Michael; Metz, Jeremy; Hacker, Christian; Gurr, Sarah Jane; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-06-01

    Even distribution of peroxisomes (POs) and lipid droplets (LDs) is critical to their role in lipid and reactive oxygen species homeostasis. How even distribution is achieved remains elusive, but diffusive motion and directed motility may play a role. Here we show that in the fungus Ustilago maydis ~95% of POs and LDs undergo diffusive motions. These movements require ATP and involve bidirectional early endosome motility, indicating that microtubule-associated membrane trafficking enhances diffusion of organelles. When early endosome transport is abolished, POs and LDs drift slowly towards the growing cell end. This pole-ward drift is facilitated by anterograde delivery of secretory cargo to the cell tip by myosin-5. Modelling reveals that microtubule-based directed transport and active diffusion support distribution, mobility and mixing of POs. In mammalian COS-7 cells, microtubules and F-actin also counteract each other to distribute POs. This highlights the importance of opposing cytoskeletal forces in organelle positioning in eukaryotes.

  7. Single-molecule reconstitution of mRNA transport by a class V myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladewski, Thomas E; Bookwalter, Carol S; Hong, Myoung-Soon; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2013-08-01

    Molecular motors are instrumental in mRNA localization, which provides spatial and temporal control of protein expression and function. To obtain mechanistic insight into how a class V myosin transports mRNA, we performed single-molecule in vitro assays on messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes reconstituted from purified proteins and a localizing mRNA found in budding yeast. mRNA is required to form a stable, processive transport complex on actin--an elegant mechanism to ensure that only cargo-bound motors are motile. Increasing the number of localizing elements ('zip codes') on the mRNA, or configuring the track to resemble actin cables, enhanced run length and event frequency. In multi-zip-code mRNPs, motor separation distance varied during a run, thus showing the dynamic nature of the transport complex. Building the complexity of single-molecule in vitro assays is necessary to understand how these complexes function within cells.

  8. Myosin heavy chain expression in rodent skeletal muscle: effects of exposure to zero gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F.; Herrick, R. E.; Adams, G. R.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1993-01-01

    This study ascertained the effects of 9 days of zero gravity on the relative (percentage of total) and calculated absolute (mg/muscle) content of isomyosin expressed in both antigravity and locomotor skeletal muscle of ground control (CON) and flight-exposed (FL) rats. Results showed that although there were no differences in body weight between FL and CON animals, a significant reduction in muscle mass occurred in the vastus intermedius (VI) (P muscle protein and myofibril protein content were not different between the muscle regions examined in the FL and CON groups. In the VI, there were trends for reductions in the relative content of type I and IIa myosin heavy chains (MHCs) that were offset by increases in the relative content of both type IIb and possibly type IIx MHC protein (P > 0.05). mRNA levels were consistent with this pattern (P antigravity skeletal muscle during exposure to zero gravity that could affect muscle function.

  9. Myosin-Va-dependent cell-to-cell transfer of RNA from Schwann cells to axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José R; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José R; Xu, Lei; Wallrabe, Horst; Calliari, Aldo; Rosso, Gonzalo; Cal, Karina; Mercer, John A

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the role of protein synthesis in axons, we have identified the source of a portion of axonal RNA. We show that proximal segments of transected sciatic nerves accumulate newly-synthesized RNA in axons. This RNA is synthesized in Schwann cells because the RNA was labeled in the complete absence of neuronal cell bodies both in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the transfer is prevented by disruption of actin and that it fails to occur in the absence of myosin-Va. Our results demonstrate cell-to-cell transfer of RNA and identify part of the mechanism required for transfer. The induction of cell-to-cell RNA transfer by injury suggests that interventions following injury or degeneration, particularly gene therapy, may be accomplished by applying them to nearby glial cells (or implanted stem cells) at the site of injury to promote regeneration.

  10. Myosin heavy chain isoforms in single fibres from m. vastus lateralis of sprinters: influence of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J L; Klitgaard, H; Saltin, B

    1994-06-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of single fibres from m. vastus lateralis of a group of male sprint athletes (n = 6) was analysed, before and after a three months period of intensive strength- and interval-training, using a sensitive gel electrophoretic technique. Significant improvements were observed after training in almost all of a series of performance tests. After training the sprinters revealed a decrease in fibres containing only MHC isoform I (52.0 +/- 3.0% vs. 41.2 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- SE) (P training (12.9 +/- 5.0% vs. 5.1 +/- 3.1% (P sprinters seems therefore to contain both MHC isoforms IIA and IIB. Sprint-training appears to induce an increased expression of MHC isoform IIA in skeletal muscles. This seems related to a bi-directional transformation from both MHC isoforms I and IIB towards MHC isoform IIA.

  11. The Intriguing Dual Lattices of the Myosin Filaments in Vertebrate Striated Muscles: Evolution and Advantage

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    Pradeep K. Luther

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180° according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have.

  12. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Coso, Juan; Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts.

  13. Myosin VIIA mutation screening in 189 Usher syndrome type 1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, M.D.; Kelley, P.M.; Overbeck, L.D. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Usher syndrome type 1b (USH1B) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital profound hearing loss, vestibular abnormalities, and retinitis pigmentosa. The disorder has recently been shown to be caused by mutations in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) located on 11q14. In the current study, a panel of 189 genetically independent Usher I cases were screened for the presence of mutations in the N-terminal coding portion of the motor domain of MYO7A by heteroduplex analysis of 14 exons. Twenty-three mutations were found segregating with the disease in 20 families. Of the 23 mutations, 13 were unique, and 2 of the 13 unique mutations (Arg212His and Arg212Cys) accounted for the greatest percentage of observed mutant alleles (8/23, 31%). Six of the 13 mutations caused premature stop codons, 6 caused changes in the amino acid sequence of the myosin VIIa protein, and 1 resulted in a splicing defect. Three patients were homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for mutant alleles; these three cases were Tyr333Stop/Tyr333Stop, Arg212His-Arg302His/Arg212His-Arg302His, and IVS13nt-8c{r_arrow}g/ G1u450Gln. All the other USH1B mutations observed were simple heterozygotes, and it is presumed that the mutation on the other allele is present in the unscreened regions of the gene. None of the mutations reported here were observed in 96 unrelated control samples, although several polymorphisms were detected. These results add three patients to a single case reported previously where mutations have been found in both alleles and raises the total number of unique mutations in MYO7A to 16. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Mechanochemical coupling in the myosin motor domain. I. Insights from equilibrium active-site simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Yu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the major structural transitions in molecular motors are often argued to couple to the binding of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP, the recovery stroke in the conventional myosin has been shown to be dependent on the hydrolysis of ATP. To obtain a clearer mechanistic picture for such "mechanochemical coupling" in myosin, equilibrium active-site simulations with explicit solvent have been carried out to probe the behavior of the motor domain as functions of the nucleotide chemical state and conformation of the converter/relay helix. In conjunction with previous studies of ATP hydrolysis with different active-site conformations and normal mode analysis of structural flexibility, the results help establish an energetics-based framework for understanding the mechanochemical coupling. It is proposed that the activation of hydrolysis does not require the rotation of the lever arm per se, but the two processes are tightly coordinated because both strongly couple to the open/close transition of the active site. The underlying picture involves shifts in the dominant population of different structural motifs as a consequence of changes elsewhere in the motor domain. The contribution of this work and the accompanying paper [] is to propose the actual mechanism behind these "population shifts" and residues that play important roles in the process. It is suggested that structural flexibilities at both the small and large scales inherent to the motor domain make it possible to implement tight couplings between different structural motifs while maintaining small free-energy drops for processes that occur in the detached states, which is likely a feature shared among many molecular motors. The significantly different flexibility of the active site in different X-ray structures with variable level arm orientations supports the notation that external force sensed by the lever arm may transmit into the active site and influence the chemical steps (nucleotide

  15. Effect of spaceflight on skeletal muscle: Mechanical properties and myosin isoform content of a slow muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Baker, Michael J.; Herrick, Robert E.; Tao, Ming; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1994-01-01

    This study examined changes in contractile, biochemical, and histochemical properties of slow antigravity skeletal muscle after a 6-day spaceflight mission. Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: flight and ground-based control. Approximately 3 h after the landing, in situ contractile measurements were made on the soleus muscles of the flight animals. The control animals were studied 24 h later. The contractile measurements included force-velocity relationship, force-frequency relationship, and fatigability. Biochemical measurements focused on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myosin light chain profiles. Adenosinetriphosphatase histochemistry was performed to identify cross-sectional area of slow and fast muscle fibers and to determine the percent fiber type distribution. The force-velocity relationships of the flight muscles were altered such that maximal isometric tension P(sub o) was decreased by 24% and maximal shortening velocity was increased by 14% (P less than 0.05). The force-frequency relationship of the flight muscles was shifted to the right of the control muscles. At the end of the 2-min fatigue test, the flight muscles generated only 34% of P(sub o), whereas the control muscles generated 64% of P(sub o). The flight muscles exhibited de novo expression of the type IIx MHC isoform as well as a slight decrease in the slow type I and fast type IIa MHC isoforms. Histochemical analyses of flight muscles demonstrated a small increase in the percentage of fast type II fibers and a greater atrophy of the slow type I fibers. The results demonstrate that contractile properties of slow antigravity skeletal muscle are sensitive to the microgravity environment and that changes begin to occur within the 1st wk. These changes were at least, in part, associated with changes in the amount and type of contractile protein expressed.

  16. Noninvasive Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Trained and Untrained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Andrew C; Housh, Terry J; Cramer, Joel B; Weir, Joseph P; Beck, Travis W; Schilling, Brian K; Miller, Jonathan D; Nicoll, Justin X

    2017-09-01

    Fry, AC, Housh, TJ, Cramer, JB, Weir, JP, Beck, TW, Schilling, BK, Miller, JD, and Nicoll, JX. Noninvasive assessment of skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain expression in trained and untrained men. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2355-2362, 2017-Numerous conditions and types of physical activity (e.g., exercise, aging, and muscle-related diseases) can influence muscle fiber types and the proteins expressed. To date, muscle fibers can only be characterized by actually obtaining a tissue sample using the invasive muscle biopsy procedure. Mechanomyography (MMG) is the assessment of the vibration properties of contracting skeletal muscle and has been proposed as a possible noninvasive method for muscle fiber analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of using MMG and muscle performance measures to noninvasively assess muscle fiber characteristics. Fifteen men (5 endurance-trained, 5 weight-trained, and 5 sedentary) provided muscle samples from their vastus lateralis muscle. These samples were analyzed for relative myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein expression, which is highly correlated with % muscle fiber type areas. Additionally, each subject performed several muscle performance tests, and MMG of the quadriceps was assessed during a knee extension exercise. Multiple regression was used to develop prediction equations for determining relative muscle content of MHC types I, IIa, and IIx. A combination of MMG and knee extension performance variables estimated types I, IIa, and IIx MHCs with approximately 80% accuracy. Although preliminary, these data suggest that muscle performance tests in addition to MMG assessments during a simple muscle performance task (knee extension) can be used to estimate muscle fiber type composition in a healthy male population. Such methods could ultimately be used to noninvasively monitor muscle health and fitness.

  17. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Umeki

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition.We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1 expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and calcineurin pathway and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO pathway and myostatin expression in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB.Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth, and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  18. Genetic impairment of parasite myosin motors uncovers the contribution of host cell membrane dynamics to Toxoplasma invasion forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichet, Marion; Touquet, Bastien; Gonzalez, Virginie; Florent, Isabelle; Meissner, Markus; Tardieux, Isabelle

    2016-11-09

    The several-micrometer-sized Toxoplasma gondii protozoan parasite invades virtually any type of nucleated cell from a warm-blooded animal within seconds. Toxoplasma initiates the formation of a tight ring-like junction bridging its apical pole with the host cell membrane. The parasite then actively moves through the junction into a host cell plasma membrane invagination that delineates a nascent vacuole. Recent high resolution imaging and kinematics analysis showed that the host cell cortical actin dynamics occurs at the site of entry while gene silencing approaches allowed motor-deficient parasites to be generated, and suggested that the host cell could contribute energetically to invasion. In this study we further investigate this possibility by analyzing the behavior of parasites genetically impaired in different motor components, and discuss how the uncovered mechanisms illuminate our current understanding of the invasion process by motor-competent parasites. By simultaneously tracking host cell membrane and cortex dynamics at the site of interaction with myosin A-deficient Toxoplasma, the junction assembly step could be decoupled from the engagement of the Toxoplasma invasive force. Kinematics combined with functional analysis revealed that myosin A-deficient Toxoplasma had a distinct host cell-dependent mode of entry when compared to wild-type or myosin B/C-deficient Toxoplasma. Following the junction assembly step, the host cell formed actin-driven membrane protrusions that surrounded the myosin A-deficient mutant and drove it through the junction into a typical vacuole. However, this parasite-entry mode appeared suboptimal, with about 40 % abortive events for which the host cell membrane expansions failed to cover the parasite body and instead could apply deleterious compressive forces on the apical pole of the zoite. This study not only clarifies the key contribution of T. gondii tachyzoite myosin A to the invasive force, but it also highlights a new mode

  19. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Ward, Christopher W; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-08-19

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 7-35% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 30-70% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes.

  20. Human faces are slower than chimpanzee faces.

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    Anne M Burrows

    Full Text Available While humans (like other primates communicate with facial expressions, the evolution of speech added a new function to the facial muscles (facial expression muscles. The evolution of speech required the development of a coordinated action between visual (movement of the lips and auditory signals in a rhythmic fashion to produce "visemes" (visual movements of the lips that correspond to specific sounds. Visemes depend upon facial muscles to regulate shape of the lips, which themselves act as speech articulators. This movement necessitates a more controlled, sustained muscle contraction than that produced during spontaneous facial expressions which occur rapidly and last only a short period of time. Recently, it was found that human tongue musculature contains a higher proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers than in rhesus macaques, which is related to the slower, more controlled movements of the human tongue in the production of speech. Are there similar unique, evolutionary physiologic biases found in human facial musculature related to the evolution of speech?Using myosin immunohistochemistry, we tested the hypothesis that human facial musculature has a higher percentage of slow-twitch myosin fibers relative to chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. We sampled the orbicularis oris and zygomaticus major muscles from three cadavers of each species and compared proportions of fiber-types. Results confirmed our hypothesis: humans had the highest proportion of slow-twitch myosin fibers while chimpanzees had the highest proportion of fast-twitch fibers.These findings demonstrate that the human face is slower than that of rhesus macaques and our closest living relative, the chimpanzee. They also support the assertion that human facial musculature and speech co-evolved. Further, these results suggest a unique set of evolutionary selective pressures on human facial musculature to slow down while the function of this muscle

  1. ADAPTIVE CHANGES OF MYOSIN ISOFORMS IN RESPONSE TO LONG-TERM STRENGTH AND POWER TRAINING IN MIDDLE-AGED MEN

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    Raivo Puhke

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the adaptive changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC and light chain (MLC isoforms in human vastus lateralis muscle caused by long-term strength and power training (54 weeks, approximately 3 times a week in untrained middle- aged men (16 in the training and 6 in the control group. Muscular MHC and MLC isoforms were determined by means of SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis. During the training period, maximal anaerobic cycling power increased by 64 W (p < 0.001 and the maximal jumping height by 1.5 cm (p < 0. 05 in the training group, but no significant changes were found in the control group. However, the group by time effect was not significant. In the training group, the increase of the maximal jumping height correlated with the number of strength and power training sessions (r = 0.56; p < 0.05. The change of the proportion of MHC IIa isoform from 52.6 ± 12.2% to 59.4 ± 11.6% did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.070 for group by time; within training group p = 0.061 and neither did the change of the proportion of MHC IIx isoform from 18.1 ± 11.4% to 11.1 ± 9.1% (p = 0.104 for group by time; within training group p=0.032. The degree of change of MHC IIx isoform correlated with the amount of earlier recreational sports activity (r = 0.61; p < 0.05. In the training group, the changes of MLC1s isoform correlated negatively with the changes of MLC1f isoform (r = -0. 79; p < 0.05 as well as with the changes in maximal anaerobic cycling power (r = -0.81; p < 0.05, and positively with those of MHC I isoform (r = 0.81; p < 0.05. In conclusion, the long- term strength and power training ~3 times a week seemed to have only slight effects on fast MHC isoforms in the vastus lateralis muscle of untrained middle-aged men; the proportion of MHC IIa tended to increase and that of MHC IIx tended to decrease. No changes in MLC isoform profile could be shown

  2. Influence of long-term arotinolol treatment on myocardial mechanics and ventricular myosin isoenzymes in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, N; Ohkubo, T; Iwai, T; Tanamura, A; Nagano, M

    1990-01-01

    Alterations in myocardial mechanics and left ventricular myosin isoenzymes by long-term treatment of hypertension with arotinolol were examined in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Approximately 20 mg/kg/day arotinolol was administered to 22-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats for 8-10 weeks. There was no significant difference in systolic blood pressure between arotinolol-treated and untreated rats. However, ventricular weight tended to decrease in the arotinolol-treated group, although not significantly. There were no significant differences in isometric developed tension and dT/dtmax of isolated left ventricular papillary muscles between the arotinolol-treated and untreated groups. The left ventricular myosin isoenzyme pattern, on the other hand, obtained by pyrophosphate gel electrophoresis, showed a significant shift toward VM-1 as a result of long-term arotinolol treatment.

  3. Homozygous MYH7 R1820W mutation results in recessive myosin storage myopathy: scapuloperoneal and respiratory weakness with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüceyar, Nur; Ayhan, Özgecan; Karasoy, Hatice; Tolun, Aslıhan

    2015-04-01

    Myosin storage myopathy (MSM) is a protein aggregate myopathy caused by the accumulation of myosin in muscle fibres and results from MYH7 mutation. Although MYH7 mutation is also an established cause of variable cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal myopathy, cardiomyopathy with MSM is a rare combination. Here, we update the clinical findings in the two brothers that we previously reported as having recessively inherited MSM characterized by scapuloperoneal distribution of weakness and typical hyaline-like bodies in type 1 muscle fibres. One of the patients, weak from childhood but not severely symptomatic until 28 years of age, had an unusual combination of MSM, severe dilated cardiomyopathy, and respiratory impairment at the age of 44 years. We identified homozygous missense mutation c.5458C>T (p.R1820W) in exon 37 in these patients as the second recessive MYH7 mutation reported to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Temporal embryonic transcription of chicken fast skeletal myosin heavy chain isoforms in the single comb white leghorn

    OpenAIRE

    Griffin, J.; St-Pierre, N.; Lilburn, M. S.; Wick, M.

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous factors that can significantly influence embryonic development in poultry and thus make simple days of incubation (chronological age) a less than perfect metric for studying embryonic physiology. The developmental fast skeletal muscle myosin (MyHC), the predominant protein in the Pectoralis major (PM), is temporally expressed as a cadre of highly specific developmental isoforms. In the study described herein, a novel molecular technology (NanoString) was used to characteriz...

  5. Myosin II activity dependent and independent vinculin recruitment to the sites of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion

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    Shih Wenting

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintaining proper adhesion between neighboring cells depends on the ability of cells to mechanically respond to tension at cell-cell junctions through the actin cytoskeleton. Thus, identifying the molecules involved in responding to cell tension would provide insight into the maintenance, regulation, and breakdown of cell-cell junctions during various biological processes. Vinculin, an actin-binding protein that associates with the cadherin complex, is recruited to cell-cell contacts under increased tension in a myosin II-dependent manner. However, the precise role of vinculin at force-bearing cell-cell junctions and how myosin II activity alters the recruitment of vinculin at quiescent cell-cell contacts have not been demonstrated. Results We generated vinculin knockdown cells using shRNA specific to vinculin and MDCK epithelial cells. These vinculin-deficient MDCK cells form smaller cell clusters in a suspension than wild-type cells. In wound healing assays, GFP-vinculin accumulated at cell-cell junctions along the wound edge while vinculin-deficient cells displayed a slower wound closure rate compared to vinculin-expressing cells. In the presence of blebbistatin (myosin II inhibitor, vinculin localization at quiescent cell-cell contacts was unaffected while in the presence of jasplakinolide (F-actin stabilizer, vinculin recruitment increased in mature MDCK cell monolayers. Conclusion These results demonstrate that vinculin plays an active role at adherens junctions under increased tension at cell-cell contacts where vinculin recruitment occurs in a myosin II activity-dependent manner, whereas vinculin recruitment to the quiescent cell-cell junctions depends on F-actin stabilization.

  6. Shared gene structures and clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons within the metazoan muscle myosin heavy chain genes.

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    Martin Kollmar

    Full Text Available Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs. The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both have independently been developed

  7. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

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    Juan Del Coso

    Full Text Available Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1% were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9% were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30 and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21 and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29. However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03 and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05 than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts.

  8. A novel skeletal-myosin blocking drug for the study of neuromuscular physiology

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    Dante J Heredia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The failure to transmit neural action potentials (APs into muscle APs is referred to as neuromuscular transmission failure (NTF. Although synaptic dysfunction occurs in a variety of neuromuscular diseases and impaired neurotransmission contributes to muscle fatigue, direct evaluation of neurotransmission by measurement of successfully transduced muscle APs is difficult due to the subsequent movements produced by muscle. Moreover, the voltage-gated sodium channel inhibitor used to study neurotransmitter release at the adult neuromuscular junction is ineffective in embryonic tissue, making it nearly impossible to precisely measure any aspect of neurotransmission in embryonic lethal mouse mutants. In this study we utilized 3-(N-butylethanimidoyl-4-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BHC, previously identified in a small-molecule screen of skeletal muscle myosin inhibitors, to suppress movements without affecting membrane currents. In contrast to previously characterized drugs from this screen such as BTS, which inhibit skeletal muscle myosin ATPase activity but also block neurotransmission, BHC selectively blocked nerve-evoked muscle contraction without affecting neurotransmitter release. This feature allowed a detailed characterization of neurotransmission in both embryonic and adult mice. In the presence of BHC, neural APs produced by tonic stimulation of the phrenic nerve at rates up to 20 Hz were successfully transmitted into muscle APs. At higher rates of phrenic nerve stimulation, NTF was observed. NTF was intermittent and characterized by successful muscle APs following failed ones, with the percentage of successfully transmitted muscle APs diminishing over time. Nerve stimulation rates that failed to produce NTF in the presence of BHC similarly failed to produce a loss of peak muscle fiber shortening, which was examined using a novel optical method of muscle fatigue, or a loss of peak cytosolic calcium transient intensity, examined in whole

  9. Long-range coupling between ATP-binding and lever-arm regions in myosin via dielectric allostery

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    Sato, Takato; Ohnuki, Jun; Takano, Mitsunori

    2017-12-01

    A protein molecule is a dielectric substance, so the binding of a ligand is expected to induce dielectric response in the protein molecule, considering that ligands are charged or polar in general. We previously reported that binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to molecular motor myosin actually induces such a dielectric response in myosin due to the net negative charge of ATP. By this dielectric response, referred to as "dielectric allostery," spatially separated two regions in myosin, the ATP-binding region and the actin-binding region, are allosterically coupled. In this study, from the statistically stringent analyses of the extensive molecular dynamics simulation data obtained in the ATP-free and the ATP-bound states, we show that there exists the dielectric allostery that transmits the signal of ATP binding toward the distant lever-arm region. The ATP-binding-induced electrostatic potential change observed on the surface of the main domain induced a movement of the converter subdomain from which the lever arm extends. The dielectric response was found to be caused by an underlying large-scale concerted rearrangement of the electrostatic bond network, in which highly conserved charged/polar residues are involved. Our study suggests the importance of the dielectric property for molecular machines in exerting their function.

  10. The myosin passenger protein Smy1 controls actin cable structure and dynamics by acting as a formin damper.

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    Chesarone-Cataldo, Melissa; Guérin, Christophe; Yu, Jerry H; Wedlich-Soldner, Roland; Blanchoin, Laurent; Goode, Bruce L

    2011-08-16

    Formins are a conserved family of proteins with robust effects in promoting actin nucleation and elongation. However, the mechanisms restraining formin activities in cells to generate actin networks with particular dynamics and architectures are not well understood. In S. cerevisiae, formins assemble actin cables, which serve as tracks for myosin-dependent intracellular transport. Here, we show that the kinesin-like myosin passenger-protein Smy1 interacts with the FH2 domain of the formin Bnr1 to decrease rates of actin filament elongation, which is distinct from the formin displacement activity of Bud14. In vivo analysis of smy1Δ mutants demonstrates that this "damper" mechanism is critical for maintaining proper actin cable architecture, dynamics, and function. We directly observe Smy1-3GFP being transported by myosin V and transiently pausing at the neck in a manner dependent on Bnr1. These observations suggest that Smy1 is part of a negative feedback mechanism that detects cable length and prevents overgrowth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of different drying methods on the myosin structure, amino acid composition, protein digestibility and volatile profile of squid fillets.

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    Deng, Yun; Luo, Yali; Wang, Yuegang; Zhao, Yanyun

    2015-03-15

    The impacts of freeze drying (FD), hot-air drying (AD), and heat pump drying (HPD) on myosin structure, amino acid composition, protein digestibility and volatile compounds of squid (Todarodes pacificus) fillets were evaluated. Freeze-dried squids showed similar amino acid composition to that of raw squids, but differed from that of AD and HPD samples. The percentage of in vitro digestibility followed the order of FD (76.81%)>HPD (70.51%)>raw (67.99%)>AD (61.47%) samples. AD caused more damage to squid myosin structure than HPD, while FD effectively retained the myosin integrity. Drying decreased total number of volatile compounds, but increased the content of total volatile compounds based on GC × GC-TOFMS results. HPD and AD samples had the highest and lowest total numbers and contents of volatiles, respectively. In general, FD provided squids with the best quality, followed by HPD. Considering the production cost and product quality, HPD demonstrated the potential for industrial application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-range coupling between ATP-binding and lever-arm regions in myosin via dielectric allostery.

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    Sato, Takato; Ohnuki, Jun; Takano, Mitsunori

    2017-12-07

    A protein molecule is a dielectric substance, so the binding of a ligand is expected to induce dielectric response in the protein molecule, considering that ligands are charged or polar in general. We previously reported that binding of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to molecular motor myosin actually induces such a dielectric response in myosin due to the net negative charge of ATP. By this dielectric response, referred to as "dielectric allostery," spatially separated two regions in myosin, the ATP-binding region and the actin-binding region, are allosterically coupled. In this study, from the statistically stringent analyses of the extensive molecular dynamics simulation data obtained in the ATP-free and the ATP-bound states, we show that there exists the dielectric allostery that transmits the signal of ATP binding toward the distant lever-arm region. The ATP-binding-induced electrostatic potential change observed on the surface of the main domain induced a movement of the converter subdomain from which the lever arm extends. The dielectric response was found to be caused by an underlying large-scale concerted rearrangement of the electrostatic bond network, in which highly conserved charged/polar residues are involved. Our study suggests the importance of the dielectric property for molecular machines in exerting their function.

  13. Myosin XIK of Arabidopsis thaliana accumulates at the root hair tip and is required for fast root hair growth.

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    Eunsook Park

    Full Text Available Myosin motor proteins are thought to carry out important functions in the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity by moving cellular components such as organelles, vesicles, or protein complexes along the actin cytoskeleton. In Arabidopsis thaliana, disruption of the myosin XIK gene leads to reduced elongation of the highly polar root hairs, suggesting that the encoded motor protein is involved in this cell growth. Detailed live-cell observations in this study revealed that xik root hairs elongated more slowly and stopped growth sooner than those in wild type. Overall cellular organization including the actin cytoskeleton appeared normal, but actin filament dynamics were reduced in the mutant. Accumulation of RabA4b-containing vesicles, on the other hand, was not significantly different from wild type. A functional YFP-XIK fusion protein that could complement the mutant phenotype accumulated at the tip of growing root hairs in an actin-dependent manner. The distribution of YFP-XIK at the tip, however, did not match that of the ER or several tip-enriched markers including CFP-RabA4b. We conclude that the myosin XIK is required for normal actin dynamics and plays a role in the subapical region of growing root hairs to facilitate optimal growth.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of IFM-specific actin and myosin nulls in Drosophila melanogaster unravels lesion-specific expression blueprints across muscle mutations.

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    Madan, Aditi; Thimmaiya, Divesh; Franco-Cea, Ari; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Kumar, Prabodh; Sparrow, John C; Nongthomba, Upendra

    2017-10-05

    Muscle contraction is a highly fine-tuned process that requires the precise and timely construction of large protein sub-assemblies to form sarcomeres. Mutations in many genes encoding constituent proteins of this macromolecular machine result in defective functioning of the muscle tissue. However, the pathways underlying muscle degeneration, and manifestation of myopathy phenotypes are not well understood. In this study, we explored transcriptional alterations that ensue from the absence of the two major muscle proteins - myosin and actin - using the Drosophila indirect flight muscles. Our aim was to understand how the muscle tissue responds as a whole to the absence of either of the major scaffold proteins, whether the responses are generic to the tissue; or unique to the thick versus thin filament systems. Our results indicated that muscles respond by altering gene transcriptional levels in multiple systems active in muscle remodelling, protein degradation and heat shock responses. However, there were some responses that were filament-specific signatures of muscle degeneration, like immune responses, metabolic alterations and alterations in expression of muscle structural genes and mitochondrial ribosomal genes. These general and filament-specific changes in gene expression may be of relevance to human myopathies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain

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    Lima, V.V. [Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, MT (Brazil); Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P. [Curso de Medicina, Setor de Fisiologia Humana, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Jataí, GO (Brazil); Webb, R.C. [Department of Physiology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (United States); Tostes, R.C. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Giachini, F.R. [Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, MT (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2±2 vs 7.9±1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4±2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3±2 vs 7.5±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1±2 vs 7.4±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction.

  16. Cofilin Regulates Nuclear Architecture through a Myosin-II Dependent Mechanotransduction Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggan, O’Neil; Schroder, Bryce; Krapf, Diego; Bamburg, James R.; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2017-01-01

    Structural features of the nucleus including shape, size and deformability impact its function affecting normal cellular processes such as cell differentiation and pathological conditions such as tumor cell migration. Despite the fact that abnormal nuclear morphology has long been a defining characteristic for diseases such as cancer relatively little is known about the mechanisms that control normal nuclear architecture. Mounting evidence suggests close coupling between F-actin cytoskeletal organization and nuclear morphology however, mechanisms regulating this coupling are lacking. Here we identify that Cofilin/ADF-family F-actin remodeling proteins are essential for normal nuclear structure in different cell types. siRNA mediated silencing of Cofilin/ADF provokes striking nuclear defects including aberrant shapes, nuclear lamina disruption and reductions to peripheral heterochromatin. We provide evidence that these anomalies are primarily due to Rho kinase (ROCK) controlled excessive contractile myosin-II activity and not to elevated F-actin polymerization. Furthermore, we demonstrate a requirement for nuclear envelope LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex proteins together with lamin A/C for nuclear aberrations induced by Cofilin/ADF loss. Our study elucidates a pivotal regulatory mechanism responsible for normal nuclear structure and which is expected to fundamentally influence nuclear function. PMID:28102353

  17. Electrophoretic Mobility of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Revisited: Application of MALDI TOF/TOF Analysis

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    Petra Arnostova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of two cardiac myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms in response to the thyroid status was studied in left ventricles (LVs of Lewis rats. Major MyHC isoform in euthyroid and hyperthyroid LVs had a higher mobility on SDS-PAGE, whereas hypothyroid LVs predominantly contained a MyHC isoform with a lower mobility corresponding to that of the control soleus muscle. By comparing the MyHC profiles obtained under altered thyroid states together with the control soleus, we concluded that MyHCα was represented by the lower band with higher mobility and MyHCβ by the upper band. The identity of these two bands in SDS-PAGE gels was confirmed by western blot and mass spectrometry. Thus, in contrast to the literature data, we found that the MyHCα possessed a higher mobility rate than the MyHCβ isoform. Our data highlighted the importance of the careful identification of the MyHCα and MyHCβ isoforms analyzed by the SDS-PAGE.

  18. Myosin Va and Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Channel Complex Regulates Membrane Export during Axon Guidance

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    Fumitaka Wada

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During axon guidance, growth cones navigate toward attractive cues by inserting new membrane on the cue side. This process depends on Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+ channels, but the Ca2+ sensor and effector governing this asymmetric vesicle export remain unknown. We identified a protein complex that controls asymmetric ER Ca2+-dependent membrane vesicle export. The Ca2+-dependent motor protein myosin Va (MyoVa tethers membrane vesicles to the ER via a common binding site on the two major ER Ca2+ channels, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ryanodine receptors. In response to attractive cues, micromolar Ca2+ from ER channels triggers MyoVa-channel dissociation and the movement of freed vesicles to the cue side, enabling growth cone turning. MyoVa-Ca2+ channel interactions are required for proper long-range axon growth in developing spinal cord in vivo. These findings reveal a peri-ER membrane export pathway for Ca2+-dependent attraction in axon guidance.

  19. Myosin VIIA regulates microvillus morphogenesis and interacts with cadherin Cad99C in Drosophila oogenesis.

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    Glowinski, Cory; Liu, Ri-Hua Sandy; Chen, Xi; Darabie, Audrey; Godt, Dorothea

    2014-11-15

    Microvilli and related actin-based protrusions permit multiple interactions between cells and their environment. How the shape, length and arrangement of microvilli are determined remains largely unclear. To address this issue and explore the cooperation of the two main components of a microvillus, the central F-actin bundle and the enveloping plasma membrane, we investigated the expression and function of Myosin VIIA (Myo7A), which is encoded by crinkled (ck), and its interaction with cadherin Cad99C in the microvilli of the Drosophila follicular epithelium. Myo7A is present in the microvilli and terminal web of follicle cells, and associates with several other F-actin-rich structures in the ovary. Loss of Myo7A caused brush border defects and a reduction in the amount of the microvillus regulator Cad99C. We show that Myo7A and Cad99C form a molecular complex and that the cytoplasmic tail of Cad99C recruits Myo7A to microvilli. Our data indicate that Myo7A regulates the structure and spacing of microvilli, and interacts with Cad99C in vivo. A comparison of the mutant phenotypes suggests that Myo7A and Cad99C have co-dependent and independent functions in microvilli. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Myosin heavy chain composition of tiger (Panthera tigris) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K; Roy, Roland R; Rugg, Stuart; Talmadge, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Felids have a wide range of locomotor activity patterns and maximal running speeds, including the very fast cheetah (Acinonyx jubatas), the roaming tiger (Panthera tigris), and the relatively sedentary domestic cat (Felis catus). As previous studies have suggested a relationship between the amount and type of activity and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition of a muscle, we assessed the MHC isoform composition of selected hindlimb muscles from these three felid species with differing activity regimens. Using gel electrophoresis, western blotting, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry with MHC isoform-specific antibodies, we compared the MHC composition in the tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (Plt), and soleus muscles of the tiger, cheetah, and domestic cat. The soleus muscle was absent in the cheetah. At least one slow (type I) and three fast (types IIa, IIx, and IIb) MHC isoforms were present in the muscles of each felid. The tiger had a high combined percentage of the characteristically slower isoforms (MHCs I and IIa) in the MG (62%) and the Plt (86%), whereas these percentages were relatively low in the MG (44%) and Plt (55%) of the cheetah. In general, the MHC isoform characteristics of the hindlimb muscles matched the daily activity patterns of these felids: the tiger has daily demands for covering long distances, whereas the cheetah has requirements for speed and power. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Myosin heavy chain composition of skeletal muscles in young rats growing under hypobaric hypoxia conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigard, A X; Sanchez, H; Birot, O; Serrurier, B

    2000-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of voluntary wheel running on the myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of the soleus (Sol) and plantaris muscles (Pla) in rats developing under hypobaric choronic hypoxia (CH) conditions during 4 wk in comparison with those of control rats maintained under local barometric pressure conditions (C) or rats pair-fed an equivalent quantity of food to that consumed by CH animals (PF). Compared with C animals, sedentary rats subjected to CH conditions showed a significant decrease in type I MHC in Sol (-12%, P difference in the MHC profile of Sol was shown between CH active and C active rats. The MHC distribution in Sol of PF rats was not significantly different from that found in C animals. CH resulted in a significant decrease in type I (P fast shift in the MHC profile was unaffected by spontaneous running activity. These results suggest that running exercise suppresses the hypoxia-induced slow-to-fast transition in the MHC expression in Sol muscles only. The hypoxia-induced decrease in food intake has no major influence on MHC expression in developing rats.

  2. Vangl2 cooperates with Rab11 and Myosin V to regulate apical constriction during vertebrate gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossipova, Olga; Chuykin, Ilya; Chu, Chih-Wen; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2015-01-01

    Core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins are well known to regulate polarity in Drosophila and vertebrate epithelia; however, their functions in vertebrate morphogenesis remain poorly understood. In this study, we describe a role for PCP signaling in the process of apical constriction during Xenopus gastrulation. The core PCP protein Vangl2 is detected at the apical surfaces of cells at the blastopore lip, and it functions during blastopore formation and closure. Further experiments show that Vangl2, as well as Daam1 and Rho-associated kinase (Rock), regulate apical constriction of bottle cells at the blastopore and ectopic constriction of ectoderm cells triggered by the actin-binding protein Shroom3. At the blastopore lip, Vangl2 is required for the apical accumulation of the recycling endosome marker Rab11. We also show that Rab11 and the associated motor protein Myosin V play essential roles in both endogenous and ectopic apical constriction, and might be involved in Vangl2 trafficking to the cell surface. Overexpression of Rab11 RNA was sufficient to partly restore normal blastopore formation in Vangl2-deficient embryos. These observations suggest that Vangl2 affects Rab11 to regulate apical constriction during blastopore formation. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats.

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    Yousefzadeh, Nasibeh; Jeddi, Sajad; Alipour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH) in rats has not been elucidated thus far. The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and β-MHC isoforms. Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201%) and α- MHC expression was lower (47%) than control. Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart.

  4. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow: An Intricate Subfamily of Proteins

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    Maegen A. Ackermann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin binding protein C (MyBP-C consists of a family of thick filament associated proteins. Three isoforms of MyBP-C exist in striated muscles: cardiac, slow skeletal, and fast skeletal. To date, most studies have focused on the cardiac form, due to its direct involvement in the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Here we focus on the slow skeletal form, discuss past and current literature, and present evidence to support that: (i MyBP-C slow comprises a subfamily of four proteins, resulting from complex alternative shuffling of the single MyBP-C slow gene, (ii the four MyBP-C slow isoforms are expressed in variable amounts in different skeletal muscles, (iii at least one MyBP-C slow isoform is preferentially found at the periphery of M-bands and (iv the MyBP-C slow subfamily may play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of sarcomeric M- and A-bands and regulate the contractile properties of the actomyosin filaments.

  5. Hypoxia favors myosin heavy chain beta gene expression in an Hif-1alpha-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binó, Lucia; Procházková, Jiřina; Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Kučera, Jan; Kudová, Jana; Pacherník, Jiří; Kubala, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    The potentiation of the naturally limited regenerative capacity of the heart is dependent on an understanding of the mechanisms that are activated in response to pathological conditions such as hypoxia. Under these conditions, the expression of genes suggested to support cardiomyocyte survival and heart adaptation is triggered. Particularly important are changes in the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. We propose here that alterations in the expression profiles of MHC genes are induced in response to hypoxia and are primarily mediated by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). In in vitro models of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, we showed that hypoxia (1% O2) or the pharmacological stabilization of HIFs significantly increased MHCbeta (Myh7) gene expression. The key role of HIF-1alpha is supported by the absence of these effects in HIF-1alpha-deficient cells, even in the presence of HIF-2alpha. Interestingly, ChIP analysis did not confirm the direct interaction of HIF-1alpha with putative HIF response elements predicted in the MHCalpha and beta encoding DNA region. Further analyses showed the significant effect of the mTOR signaling inhibitor rapamycin in inducing Myh7 expression and a hypoxia-triggered reduction in the levels of antisense RNA transcripts associated with the Myh7 gene locus. Overall, the recognized and important role of HIF in the regulation of heart regenerative processes could be highly significant for the development of novel therapeutic interventions in heart failure. PMID:29137374

  6. Myosin-1C uses a novel phosphoinositide-dependent pathway for nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, Ilja; Sidorenko, Ekaterina; Wang, Weihuan; Zhao, Hongxia; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2018-02-01

    Accurate control of macromolecule transport between nucleus and cytoplasm underlines several essential biological processes, including gene expression. According to the canonical model, nuclear import of soluble proteins is based on nuclear localization signals and transport factors. We challenge this view by showing that nuclear localization of the actin-dependent motor protein Myosin-1C (Myo1C) resembles the diffusion-retention mechanism utilized by inner nuclear membrane proteins. We show that Myo1C constantly shuttles in and out of the nucleus and that its nuclear localization does not require soluble factors, but is dependent on phosphoinositide binding. Nuclear import of Myo1C is preceded by its interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum, and phosphoinositide binding is specifically required for nuclear import, but not nuclear retention, of Myo1C. Our results therefore demonstrate, for the first time, that membrane association and binding to nuclear partners is sufficient to drive nuclear localization of also soluble proteins, opening new perspectives to evolution of cellular protein sorting mechanisms. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  7. The effect of the substitution of D{sub 2}O for H{sub 2}O on the degradation of myosin {beta} in solution by heat and by {sup 60}Co {gamma} radiation (1962); Effet de la substitution de D{sub 2}O a H{sub 2}O sur l'alteration de la Myosine B en solution par la chaleur et par les rayons {gamma} du {sup 60}CO (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinset-Harstrom, I.; Fritsch, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-07-01

    (1) Alterations of myosin B produced by heat or irradiation are shown to be qualitatively identical as demonstrated by analytical centrifugation. (2) A considerable isotope effect was demonstrated using 75 per cent D{sub 2}O in the solvent. The sensitivity of myosin B to heat and irradiation is discussed in the light of this isotope effect. (3) Polymers appearing upon heat treatment of myosin B seem to be of a very different nature than the polymers occurring alter a similar treatment upon myosin A. Polymers obtained from myosin B can be depolymerized by ATP and they appear in a much narrower temperature range than myosin A polymers. This fact indicates a considerable difference in the activation enthalpies in the two reactions. (authors) [French] (1) Cette etude montre que les alterations de la myosine B provoquees par la chaleur et par l'irradiation aux rayons {gamma} sont - telles qu'elles apparaissent a l'ultracentrifugation analytique - qualitativement semblables. (2) Nous avons observe un effet isotopique considerable de la presence de 75 pour cent de D{sub 2}O dans le solvant sur la sensibilite de la myosine B envers ces deux agents, et nous avons presente une tentative d'explication de ce fait. (3) Les polymeres qui apparaissent apres un traitement par la chaleur de la myosine semblent etre d'une nature tres differente des polymeres que l'on voit apparaitre apres un traitement identique de la myosine A. Ceux obtenus a partir de le myosine B sont depolymerisables par l'intermediaire de l'ATP et apparaissent dans une zone de temperature beaucoup plus etroite que celles de la myosine A. Ce dernier fait indique une difference considerable de l'enthalpie d'activation des deux reactions. (auteurs)

  8. The Autophagy Receptor TAX1BP1 and the Molecular Motor Myosin VI Are Required for Clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium by Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumbarello, David A; Manna, Paul T; Allen, Mark; Bycroft, Mark; Arden, Susan D; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy plays a key role during Salmonella infection, by eliminating these pathogens following escape into the cytosol. In this process, selective autophagy receptors, including the myosin VI adaptor proteins optineurin and NDP52, have been shown to recognize cytosolic pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that myosin VI and TAX1BP1 are recruited to ubiquitylated Salmonella and play a key role in xenophagy. The absence of TAX1BP1 causes an accumulation of ubiquitin-positive Salmonella, whereas loss of myosin VI leads to an increase in ubiquitylated and LC3-positive bacteria. Our structural studies demonstrate that the ubiquitin-binding site of TAX1BP1 overlaps with the myosin VI binding site and point mutations in the TAX1BP1 zinc finger domains that affect ubiquitin binding also ablate binding to myosin VI. This mutually exclusive binding and the association of TAX1BP1 with LC3 on the outer limiting membrane of autophagosomes may suggest a molecular mechanism for recruitment of this motor to autophagosomes. The predominant role of TAX1BP1, a paralogue of NDP52, in xenophagy is supported by our evolutionary analysis, which demonstrates that functionally intact NDP52 is missing in Xenopus and mice, whereas TAX1BP1 is expressed in all vertebrates analysed. In summary, this work highlights the importance of TAX1BP1 as a novel autophagy receptor in myosin VI-mediated xenophagy. Our study identifies essential new machinery for the autophagy-dependent clearance of Salmonella typhimurium and suggests modulation of myosin VI motor activity as a potential therapeutic target in cellular immunity.

  9. The Autophagy Receptor TAX1BP1 and the Molecular Motor Myosin VI Are Required for Clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium by Autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Tumbarello

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays a key role during Salmonella infection, by eliminating these pathogens following escape into the cytosol. In this process, selective autophagy receptors, including the myosin VI adaptor proteins optineurin and NDP52, have been shown to recognize cytosolic pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that myosin VI and TAX1BP1 are recruited to ubiquitylated Salmonella and play a key role in xenophagy. The absence of TAX1BP1 causes an accumulation of ubiquitin-positive Salmonella, whereas loss of myosin VI leads to an increase in ubiquitylated and LC3-positive bacteria. Our structural studies demonstrate that the ubiquitin-binding site of TAX1BP1 overlaps with the myosin VI binding site and point mutations in the TAX1BP1 zinc finger domains that affect ubiquitin binding also ablate binding to myosin VI. This mutually exclusive binding and the association of TAX1BP1 with LC3 on the outer limiting membrane of autophagosomes may suggest a molecular mechanism for recruitment of this motor to autophagosomes. The predominant role of TAX1BP1, a paralogue of NDP52, in xenophagy is supported by our evolutionary analysis, which demonstrates that functionally intact NDP52 is missing in Xenopus and mice, whereas TAX1BP1 is expressed in all vertebrates analysed. In summary, this work highlights the importance of TAX1BP1 as a novel autophagy receptor in myosin VI-mediated xenophagy. Our study identifies essential new machinery for the autophagy-dependent clearance of Salmonella typhimurium and suggests modulation of myosin VI motor activity as a potential therapeutic target in cellular immunity.

  10. A Toxoplasma gondii Class XIV Myosin, Expressed in Sf9 Cells with a Parasite Co-chaperone, Requires Two Light Chains for Fast Motility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S.; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Ward, Gary E.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:25231988

  11. Myosin II ATPase activity mediates the long-term potentiation-induced exodus of stable F-actin bound by drebrin A from dendritic spines.

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    Toshiyuki Mizui

    Full Text Available The neuronal actin-binding protein drebrin A forms a stable structure with F-actin in dendritic spines. NMDA receptor activation causes an exodus of F-actin bound by drebrin A (DA-actin from dendritic spines, suggesting a pivotal role for DA-actin exodus in synaptic plasticity. We quantitatively assessed the extent of DA-actin localization to spines using the spine-dendrite ratio of drebrin A in cultured hippocampal neurons, and found that (1 chemical long-term potentiation (LTP stimulation induces rapid DA-actin exodus and subsequent DA-actin re-entry in dendritic spines, (2 Ca(2+ influx through NMDA receptors regulates the exodus and the basal accumulation of DA-actin, and (3 the DA-actin exodus is blocked by myosin II ATPase inhibitor, but is not blocked by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK or Rho-associated kinase (ROCK inhibitors. These results indicate that myosin II mediates the interaction between NMDA receptor activation and DA-actin exodus in LTP induction. Furthermore, myosin II seems to be activated by a rapid actin-linked mechanism rather than slow MLC phosphorylation. Thus the myosin-II mediated DA-actin exodus might be an initial event in LTP induction, triggering actin polymerization and spine enlargement.

  12. Bud detachment in hydra requires activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a Rho–ROCK–myosin II signaling pathway to ensure formation of a basal constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Oliver; Apel, David; Steinmetz, Patrick; Lange, Ellen; Hopfenmüller, Simon; Ohler, Kerstin; Sudhop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hydra propagates asexually by exporting tissue into a bud, which detaches 4 days later as a fully differentiated young polyp. Prerequisite for detachment is activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling. The mechanism which enables constriction and tissue separation within the monolayered ecto‐ and endodermal epithelia is unknown. Results: Histological sections and staining of F‐actin by phalloidin revealed conspicuous cell shape changes at the bud detachment site indicating a localized generation of mechanical forces and the potential enhancement of secretory functions in ectodermal cells. By gene expression analysis and pharmacological inhibition, we identified a candidate signaling pathway through Rho, ROCK, and myosin II, which controls bud base constriction and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Specific regional myosin phosphorylation suggests a crucial role of ectodermal cells at the detachment site. Inhibition of FGFR, Rho, ROCK, or myosin II kinase activity is permissive for budding, but represses myosin phosphorylation, rearrangement of F‐actin and constriction. The young polyp remains permanently connected to the parent by a broad tissue bridge. Conclusions: Our data suggest an essential role of FGFR and a Rho‐ROCK‐myosin II pathway in the control of cell shape changes required for bud detachment. Developmental Dynamics 246:502–516, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:28411398

  13. Myosin light chain kinase mediates intestinal barrier disruption following burn injury.

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    Chuanli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe burn injury results in the loss of intestinal barrier function, however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Myosin light chain (MLC phosphorylation mediated by MLC kinase (MLCK is critical to the pathophysiological regulation of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesized that the MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates the regulation of intestinal barrier function following burn injury, and that MLCK inhibition attenuates the burn-induced intestinal barrier disfunction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male balb/c mice were assigned randomly to either sham burn (control or 30% total body surface area (TBSA full thickness burn without or with intraperitoneal injection of ML-9 (2 mg/kg, an MLCK inhibitor. In vivo intestinal permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-dextran was measured. Intestinal mucosa injury was assessed histologically. Tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-1 was analyzed by immunofluorescent assay. Expression of MLCK and phosphorylated MLC in ileal mucosa was assessed by Western blot. Intestinal permeability was increased significantly after burn injury, which was accompanied by mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and increase of both MLCK and MLC phosphorylation. Treatment with ML-9 attenuated the burn-caused increase of intestinal permeability, mucosa injury, tight junction protein alterations, and decreased MLC phosphorylation, but not MLCK expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation mediates intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction after severe burn injury. It is suggested that MLCK-dependent MLC phosphorylation may be a critical target for the therapeutic treatment of intestinal epithelial barrier disruption after severe burn injury.

  14. Association analysis of genetic variants in the myosin IXB gene in acute pancreatitis.

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    Rian M Nijmeijer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Impairment of the mucosal barrier plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. The myosin IXB (MYO9B gene and the two tight-junction adaptor genes, PARD3 and MAGI2, have been linked to gastrointestinal permeability. Common variants of these genes are associated with celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, two other conditions in which intestinal permeability plays a role. We investigated genetic variation in MYO9B, PARD3 and MAGI2 for association with acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MYO9B, two SNPs in PARD3, and three SNPs in MAGI2 were studied in a Dutch cohort of 387 patients with acute pancreatitis and over 800 controls, and in a German cohort of 235 patients and 250 controls. RESULTS: Association to MYO9B and PARD3 was observed in the Dutch cohort, but only one SNP in MYO9B and one in MAGI2 showed association in the German cohort (p < 0.05. Joint analysis of the combined cohorts showed that, after correcting for multiple testing, only two SNPs in MYO9B remained associated (rs7259292, p = 0.0031, odds ratio (OR 1.94, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 1.35-2.78; rs1545620, p = 0.0006, OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.16-1.53. SNP rs1545620 is a non-synonymous SNP previously suspected to impact on ulcerative colitis. None of the SNPs showed association to disease severity or etiology. CONCLUSION: Variants in MYO9B may be involved in acute pancreatitis, but we found no evidence for involvement of PARD3 or MAGI2.

  15. Effects of voluntary wheel running on cardiac function and myosin heavy chain in chemically gonadectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydock, David S; Lien, Chia-Ying; Schneider, Carole M; Hayward, Reid

    2007-12-01

    Reducing testosterone and estrogen levels with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist such as Zoladex (i.e., chemical gonadectomy) is a common treatment for many prostate and breast cancer patients, respectively. There are reports of surgical gonadectomy inducing cardiac dysfunction, and exercise has been shown to be cardioprotective under these circumstances. Minimal research has been done investigating the effects of chemical gonadectomy and increased physical activity on cardiac function. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of chemical gonadectomy and physical activity on cardiac function. Male (M) and female (F) Sprague-Dawley rats received either Zoladex treatment (Zol) that suppressed gonadal function for 8 wk or control implants (Con) and either were allowed unlimited access to voluntary running wheels (WR) or remained sedentary (Sed) throughout the treatment period. In vivo and ex vivo left ventricle (LV) function were then assessed, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was analyzed to help explain LV functional differences. Hearts from M Sed+Zol exhibited significantly lower aortic blood flow velocity, developed pressure, and maximal rate of pressure development and higher beta-MHC expression than M Sed+Con. Hearts from F Sed+Zol exhibited significantly lower LV wall thicknesses, fractional shortening, and developed pressure and higher beta-MHC expression than F Sed+Con. This cardiac dysfunction was not evident in hearts from M or F WR+Zol, and this was associated with a preservation of the MHC isoform distribution. Thus an 8-wk chemical gonadectomy with Zoladex promoted cardiac dysfunction in male and female rats, and voluntary wheel running protected against this cardiac dysfunction.

  16. Expression of calmodulin and myosin light chain kinase during larval settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite.

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    Zhang-Fan Chen

    Full Text Available Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM, encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca(2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite.

  17. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats

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    Nasibeh Yousefzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH in rats has not been elucidated thus far. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC and β-MHC isoforms. Methods: Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Results: Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p < 0.05 and heart rate (217 ± 11 vs. 273 ± 6 beat/min, p < 0.05 were lower in the FH rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201% and α- MHC expression was lower (47% than control. Conclusion: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart.

  18. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta (IIT); (Iowa); (Miami-MED)

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  19. Unequal allelic expression of wild-type and mutated β-myosin in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Snigdha; Schultz, Imke; Becker, Edgar; Montag, Judith; Borchert, Bianca; Francino, Antonio; Navarro-Lopez, Francisco; Perrot, Andreas; Özcelik, Cemil; Osterziel, Karl-Josef; McKenna, William J; Brenner, Bernhard; Kraft, Theresia

    2011-11-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is an autosomal dominant disease, which in about 30% of the patients is caused by missense mutations in one allele of the β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) gene (MYH7). To address potential molecular mechanisms underlying the family-specific prognosis, we determined the relative expression of mutant versus wild-type MYH7-mRNA. We found a hitherto unknown mutation-dependent unequal expression of mutant to wild-type MYH7-mRNA, which is paralleled by similar unequal expression of β-MHC at the protein level. Relative abundance of mutated versus wild-type MYH7-mRNA was determined by a specific restriction digest approach and by real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Fourteen samples from M. soleus and myocardium of 12 genotyped and clinically well-characterized FHC patients were analyzed. The fraction of mutated MYH7-mRNA in five patients with mutation R723G averaged to 66 and 68% of total MYH7-mRNA in soleus and myocardium, respectively. For mutations I736T, R719W and V606M, fractions of mutated MYH7-mRNA in M. soleus were 39, 57 and 29%, respectively. For all mutations, unequal abundance was similar at the protein level. Importantly, fractions of mutated transcripts were comparable among siblings, in younger relatives and unrelated carriers of the same mutation. Hence, the extent of unequal expression of mutated versus wild-type transcript and protein is characteristic for each mutation, implying cis-acting regulatory mechanisms. Bioinformatics suggest mRNA stability or splicing effectors to be affected by certain mutations. Intriguingly, we observed a correlation between disease expression and fraction of mutated mRNA and protein. This strongly suggests that mutation-specific allelic imbalance represents a new pathogenic factor for FHC.

  20. Hem-1 complexes are essential for Rac activation, actin polymerization, and myosin regulation during neutrophil chemotaxis.

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    Orion D Weiner

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Migrating cells need to make different actin assemblies at the cell's leading and trailing edges and to maintain physical separation of signals for these assemblies. This asymmetric control of activities represents one important form of cell polarity. There are significant gaps in our understanding of the components involved in generating and maintaining polarity during chemotaxis. Here we characterize a family of complexes (which we term leading edge complexes, scaffolded by hematopoietic protein 1 (Hem-1, that organize the neutrophil's leading edge. The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family Verprolin-homologous protein (WAVE2 complex, which mediates activation of actin polymerization by Rac, is only one member of this family. A subset of these leading edge complexes are biochemically separable from the WAVE2 complex and contain a diverse set of potential polarity-regulating proteins. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Hem-1-containing complexes in neutrophil-like cells: (a dramatically impairs attractant-induced actin polymerization, polarity, and chemotaxis; (b substantially weakens Rac activation and phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate production, disrupting the (phosphatidylinositol-(3,4,5-tris-phosphate/Rac/F-actin-mediated feedback circuit that organizes the leading edge; and (c prevents exclusion of activated myosin from the leading edge, perhaps by misregulating leading edge complexes that contain inhibitors of the Rho-actomyosin pathway. Taken together, these observations show that versatile Hem-1-containing complexes coordinate diverse regulatory signals at the leading edge of polarized neutrophils, including but not confined to those involving WAVE2-dependent actin polymerization.

  1. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

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    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  2. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2012-02-13

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus (= Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca 2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. © 2012 Chen et al.

  3. Park7 expression influences myotube size and myosin expression in muscle.

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    Hui Yu

    Full Text Available Callipyge sheep exhibit postnatal muscle hypertrophy due to the up-regulation of DLK1 and/or RTL1. The up-regulation of PARK7 was identified in hypertrophied muscles by microarray analysis and further validated by quantitative PCR. The expression of PARK7 in hypertrophied muscle of callipyge lambs was confirmed to be up-regulated at the protein level. PARK7 was previously identified to positively regulate PI3K/AKT pathway by suppressing the phosphatase activity of PTEN in mouse fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of PARK7 in muscle growth and protein accretion in response to IGF1. Primary myoblasts isolated from Park7 (+/+ and Park7 (-/- mice were used to examine the effect of differential expression of Park7. The Park7 (+/+ myotubes had significantly larger diameters and more total sarcomeric myosin expression than Park7 (-/- myotubes. IGF1 treatment increased the mRNA abundance of Myh4, Myh7 and Myh8 between 20-40% in Park7 (+/+ myotubes relative to Park7 (-/-. The level of AKT phosphorylation was increased in Park7 (+/+ myotubes at all levels of IGF1 supplementation. After removal of IGF1, the Park7 (+/+ myotubes maintained higher AKT phosphorylation through 3 hours. PARK7 positively regulates the PI3K/AKT pathway by inhibition of PTEN phosphatase activity in skeletal muscle. The increased PARK7 expression can increase protein synthesis and result in myotube hypertrophy. These results support the hypothesis that elevated expression of PARK7 in callipyge muscle would increase levels of AKT activity to cause hypertrophy in response to the normal IGF1 signaling in rapidly growing lambs. Increasing expression of PARK7 could be a novel mechanism to increase protein accretion and muscle growth in livestock or help improve muscle mass with disease or aging.

  4. Noncompaction of the Ventricular Myocardium Is Associated with a De Novo Mutation in the β-Myosin Heavy Chain Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budde, Birgit S.; Binner, Priska; Waldmüller, Stephan; Höhne, Wolfgang; Blankenfeldt, Wulf; Hassfeld, Sabine; Brömsen, Jürgen; Dermintzoglou, Anastassia; Wieczorek, Marcus; May, Erik; Kirst, Elisabeth; Selignow, Carmen; Rackebrandt, Kirsten; Müller, Melanie; Goody, Roger S.; Vosberg, Hans-Peter; Nürnberg, Peter; Scheffold, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium (NVM) is the morphological hallmark of a rare familial or sporadic unclassified heart disease of heterogeneous origin. NVM results presumably from a congenital developmental error and has been traced back to single point mutations in various genes. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying genetic defect in a large German family suffering from NVM. Twenty four family members were clinically assessed using advanced imaging techniques. For molecular characterization, a genome-wide linkage analysis was undertaken and the disease locus was mapped to chromosome 14ptel-14q12. Subsequently, two genes of the disease interval, MYH6 and MYH7 (encoding the α- and β-myosin heavy chain, respectively) were sequenced, leading to the identification of a previously unknown de novo missense mutation, c.842G>C, in the gene MYH7. The mutation affects a highly conserved amino acid in the myosin subfragment-1 (R281T). In silico simulations suggest that the mutation R281T prevents the formation of a salt bridge between residues R281 and D325, thereby destabilizing the myosin head. The mutation was exclusively present in morphologically affected family members. A few members of the family displayed NVM in combination with other heart defects, such as dislocation of the tricuspid valve (Ebstein's anomaly, EA) and atrial septal defect (ASD). A high degree of clinical variability was observed, ranging from the absence of symptoms in childhood to cardiac death in the third decade of life. The data presented in this report provide first evidence that a mutation in a sarcomeric protein can cause noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium. PMID:18159245

  5. Cardiac alpha-myosin (MYH6 is the predominant sarcomeric disease gene for familial atrial septal defects.

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    Maximilian G Posch

    Full Text Available Secundum-type atrial septal defects (ASDII account for approximately 10% of all congenital heart defects (CHD and are associated with a familial risk. Mutations in transcription factors represent a genetic source for ASDII. Yet, little is known about the role of mutations in sarcomeric genes in ASDII etiology. To assess the role of sarcomeric genes in patients with inherited ASDII, we analyzed 13 sarcomeric genes (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TCAP, TNNI3, MYH6, TPM1, MYL2, CSRP3, ACTC1, MYL3, TNNC1, and TTN kinase region in 31 patients with familial ASDII using array-based resequencing. Genotyping of family relatives and control subjects as well as structural and homology analyses were used to evaluate the pathogenic impact of novel non-synonymous gene variants. Three novel missense mutations were found in the MYH6 gene encoding alpha-myosin heavy chain (R17H, C539R, and K543R. These mutations co-segregated with CHD in the families and were absent in 370 control alleles. Interestingly, all three MYH6 mutations are located in a highly conserved region of the alpha-myosin motor domain, which is involved in myosin-actin interaction. In addition, the cardiomyopathy related MYH6-A1004S and the MYBPC3-A833T mutations were also found in one and two unrelated subjects with ASDII, respectively. No mutations were found in the 11 other sarcomeric genes analyzed. The study indicates that sarcomeric gene mutations may represent a so far underestimated genetic source for familial recurrence of ASDII. In particular, perturbations in the MYH6 head domain seem to play a major role in the genetic origin of familial ASDII.

  6. Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium is associated with a de novo mutation in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit S Budde

    Full Text Available Noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium (NVM is the morphological hallmark of a rare familial or sporadic unclassified heart disease of heterogeneous origin. NVM results presumably from a congenital developmental error and has been traced back to single point mutations in various genes. The objective of this study was to determine the underlying genetic defect in a large German family suffering from NVM. Twenty four family members were clinically assessed using advanced imaging techniques. For molecular characterization, a genome-wide linkage analysis was undertaken and the disease locus was mapped to chromosome 14ptel-14q12. Subsequently, two genes of the disease interval, MYH6 and MYH7 (encoding the alpha- and beta-myosin heavy chain, respectively were sequenced, leading to the identification of a previously unknown de novo missense mutation, c.842G>C, in the gene MYH7. The mutation affects a highly conserved amino acid in the myosin subfragment-1 (R281T. In silico simulations suggest that the mutation R281T prevents the formation of a salt bridge between residues R281 and D325, thereby destabilizing the myosin head. The mutation was exclusively present in morphologically affected family members. A few members of the family displayed NVM in combination with other heart defects, such as dislocation of the tricuspid valve (Ebstein's anomaly, EA and atrial septal defect (ASD. A high degree of clinical variability was observed, ranging from the absence of symptoms in childhood to cardiac death in the third decade of life. The data presented in this report provide first evidence that a mutation in a sarcomeric protein can cause noncompaction of the ventricular myocardium.

  7. The Drosophila GIPC homologue can modulate myosin based processes and planar cell polarity but is not essential for development.

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    Alexandre Djiane

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Epithelia often show, in addition to the ubiquitous apico-basal (A/B axis, a polarization within the plane of the epithelium, perpendicular to the A/B axis. Such planar cell polarity (PCP is for example evident in the regular arrangement of the stereocilia in the cochlea of the mammalian inner ear or in (almost all Drosophila adult external structures. GIPCs (GAIP interacting protein, C terminus were first identified in mammals and bind to the Galphai GTPase activating protein RGS-GAIP. They have been proposed to act in a G-protein coupled complex controlling vesicular trafficking. Although GIPCs have been found to bind to numerous proteins including Frizzled receptors, which participate in PCP establishment, there is little in vivo evidence for the functional role(s of GIPCs. We show here that overexpressed Drosophila dGIPC alters PCP generation in the wing. We were however unable to find any binding between dGIPC and the Drosophila receptors Fz1 and Fz2. The effect of overexpressed dGIPC is likely due to an effect on the actin cytoskeleton via myosins, since it is almost entirely suppressed by removing a genomic copy of the Myosin VI/jaguar gene. Surprisingly, although dGIPC can interfere with PCP generation and myosin based processes, the complete loss-of-function of dGIPC gives viable adults with no PCP or other detectable defects arguing for a non-essential role of dGIPC in viability and normal Drosophila development.

  8. β-Arrestin regulation of myosin light chain phosphorylation promotes AT1aR-mediated cell contraction and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Simard

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, it has been established that G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs signal not only through canonical G-protein-mediated mechanisms, but also through the ubiquitous cellular scaffolds β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2. Previous studies have implicated β-arrestins as regulators of actin reorganization in response to GPCR stimulation while also being required for membrane protrusion events that accompany cellular motility. One of the most critical events in the active movement of cells is the cyclic phosphorylation and activation of myosin light chain (MLC, which is required for cellular contraction and movement. We have identified the myosin light chain phosphatase Targeting Subunit (MYPT-1 as a binding partner of the β-arrestins and found that β-arrestins play a role in regulating the turnover of phosphorylated myosin light chain. In response to stimulation of the angiotensin Type 1a Receptor (AT1aR, MLC phosphorylation is induced quickly and potently. We have found that β-arrestin-2 facilitates dephosphorylation of MLC, while, in a reciprocal fashion, β-arrestin 1 limits dephosphorylation of MLC. Intriguingly, loss of either β-arrestin-1 or 2 blocks phospho-MLC turnover and causes a decrease in the contraction of cells as monitored by atomic force microscopy (AFM. Furthermore, by employing the β-arrestin biased ligand [Sar(1,Ile(4,Ile(8]-Ang, we demonstrate that AT1aR-mediated cellular motility involves a β-arrestin dependent component. This suggests that the reciprocal regulation of MLC phosphorylation status by β-arrestins-1 and 2 causes turnover in the phosphorylation status of MLC that is required for cell contractility and subsequent chemotaxic motility.

  9. Effects of Vanadium Ions in Different Oxidation States on Myosin ATPase Extracted from the Solitary Ascidian, Halocynthia roretzi (Drasche) : Biochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Hitoshi, Michibata; YUTAKA, ZENKO; Kenji, YAMADA; Masato, HASEGAWA; TATSURO, TERADA; TAKAHARU, NUMAKUANI; Biological Institute, Faculty of Science, University of Kanazawa; Department of Chemistry, Toyama College of Technology; Marine Biological Station,Tohoku University

    1989-01-01

    Some ascidians are known to accumulate vanadium ion within their tissues by 10^6-fold as that in sea water and store the metal ion in its reduced tetravalent and/or trivalent states. It is also well known that phosphoenzymes are inhibited by pentavalent vanadium ion over a range of 10nM to 1mM. In the present experiment we have therefore examined the effects of vanadium ions in different oxidation states on the activity of myosin ATPase extracted from the mantle of the ascidian, Halocynthia r...

  10. Post-mortem degradation of myosin heavy chain in intact fish muscle: Effects of pH and enzyme inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, P. A.; Vang, B.; Pedersen, A M; Martínez, Iciar; Olsen, R L

    2011-01-01

    Fish muscle is rapidly degraded during post-mortem storage, due to proteolytic enzymes acting probably both on muscle cells and connective tissue. In this work we have developed a model system which may be used to study the enzymatic degradation occurring in intact post-mortem fish muscle. Degradation of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was monitored in muscle with pH adjusted to 6.05, 6.3 and 6.9 and in the presence of the enzyme inhibitors PMSF, EDTA, phenanthroline, pepstatin A, antipain, E-64 and...

  11. The effect of phallotoxins on the structure of F-actin in myosin-free ghost muscle fibres of rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikov YuS; Bukatina, A E; Son'kin BJa

    1984-10-29

    Using polarized UV fluorescent microscopy it has been shown that phallotoxins (phalloidin-sulfone, phalloidin-sulfoxide-B, phalloidin-sulfoxide-A and dithio-phalloidin) cause an increase in tryptophan fluorescence anisotropy of F-actin myofilaments in myosin-free ghost muscle fibres of rabbit. The results obtained are considered to be evidence of conformational changes in F-actin, induced by phallotoxins. These changes are irreversible to a significant extent, which points to a high degree of actin binding to both toxic and nontoxic phallotoxins.

  12. Uncoupling of Expression of an Intronic MicroRNA and Its Myosin Host Gene by Exon Skipping▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Matthew L; Buvoli, Massimo; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2010-01-01

    The ancient MYH7b gene, expressed in striated muscle and brain, encodes a sarcomeric myosin and the intronic microRNA miR-499. We find that skipping of an exon introduces a premature termination codon in the transcript that downregulates MYH7b protein production without affecting microRNA expression. Among other genes, endogenous miR-499 targets the 3′ untranslated region of the transcription factor Sox6, which in turn acts as a repressor of MYH7b transcriptional activity. Thus, concerted tra...

  13. Striking phenotypic variability in two familial cases of myosin storage myopathy with a MYH7 Leu1793pro mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Arné-Bes, Marie-Christine; Pellissier, Jean-François; Richard, Pascale; Levade, Thierry; Heitz, François; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Delisle, Marie-Bernadette

    2009-02-01

    Myosin Storage Myopathies (MSM) have emerged as a new group of inherited myopathies with heterogenous clinical severity and age of onset. We have identified in a woman and her daughter, a pLeu1793Pro mutation in MYH7. This mutation has already been reported to be associated with MSM presenting as neonatal hypotony. Our index case complained of proximal muscle weakness at age 30. Her daughter presented at birth with a cardiomyopathy without any skeletal muscle involvement. This report underlines the clinical variability of MSM even with a given mutation or in a same family.

  14. Specific nuclear localizing sequence directs two myosin isoforms to the cell nucleus in calmodulin-sensitive manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dzijak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear myosin I (NM1 was the first molecular motor identified in the cell nucleus. Together with nuclear actin, they participate in crucial nuclear events such as transcription, chromatin movements, and chromatin remodeling. NM1 is an isoform of myosin 1c (Myo1c that was identified earlier and is known to act in the cytoplasm. NM1 differs from the "cytoplasmic" myosin 1c only by additional 16 amino acids at the N-terminus of the molecule. This amino acid stretch was therefore suggested to direct NM1 into the nucleus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the mechanism of nuclear import of NM1 in detail. Using over-expressed GFP chimeras encoding for truncated NM1 mutants, we identified a specific sequence that is necessary for its import to the nucleus. This novel nuclear localization sequence is placed within calmodulin-binding motif of NM1, thus it is present also in the Myo1c. We confirmed the presence of both isoforms in the nucleus by transfection of tagged NM1 and Myo1c constructs into cultured cells, and also by showing the presence of the endogenous Myo1c in purified nuclei of cells derived from knock-out mice lacking NM1. Using pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays we identified importin beta, importin 5 and importin 7 as nuclear transport receptors that bind NM1. Since the NLS sequence of NM1 lies within the region that also binds calmodulin we tested the influence of calmodulin on the localization of NM1. The presence of elevated levels of calmodulin interfered with nuclear localization of tagged NM1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have shown that the novel specific NLS brings to the cell nucleus not only the "nuclear" isoform of myosin I (NM1 protein but also its "cytoplasmic" isoform (Myo1c protein. This opens a new field for exploring functions of this molecular motor in nuclear processes, and for exploring the signals between cytoplasm and the nucleus.

  15. Differential roles of regulatory light chain and myosin binding protein-C phosphorylations in the modulation of cardiac force development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Brett A.; Locher, Matthew R.; Bekyarova, Tanya; Patel, Jitandrakumar R.; Fitzsimons, Daniel P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Moss, Richard L. (IIT); (UW-MED)

    2010-05-25

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) by protein kinase A (PKA) independently accelerate the kinetics of force development in ventricular myocardium. However, while MLCK treatment has been shown to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force (pCa{sub 50}), PKA treatment has been shown to decrease pCa{sub 50}, presumably due to cardiac troponin I phosphorylation. Further, MLCK treatment increases Ca{sup 2+}-independent force and maximum Ca{sup 2+}-activated force, whereas PKA treatment has no effect on either force. To investigate the structural basis underlying the kinase-specific differential effects on steady-state force, we used synchrotron low-angle X-ray diffraction to compare equatorial intensity ratios (I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}) to assess the proximity of myosin cross-bridge mass relative to actin and to compare lattice spacings (d{sub 1,0}) to assess the inter-thick filament spacing in skinned myocardium following treatment with either MLCK or PKA. As we showed previously, PKA phosphorylation of cMyBP-C increases I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} and, as hypothesized, treatment with MLCK also increased I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, which can explain the accelerated rates of force development during activation. Importantly, interfilament spacing was reduced by {approx}2 nm ({Delta} 3.5%) with MLCK treatment, but did not change with PKA treatment. Thus, RLC or cMyBP-C phosphorylation increases the proximity of cross-bridges to actin, but only RLC phosphorylation affects lattice spacing, which suggests that RLC and cMyBP-C modulate the kinetics of force development by similar structural mechanisms; however, the effect of RLC phosphorylation to increase the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of force is mediated by a distinct mechanism, most probably involving changes in interfilament spacing.

  16. Mechanosensing in myosin filament solves a 60 years old conflict in skeletal muscle modeling between high power output and slow rise in tension

    CERN Document Server

    Marcucci, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Almost 60 years ago Andrew Huxley with his seminal paper \\cite{Huxley1957} laid the foundation of modern muscle modeling, linking chemical events to mechanical performance. He described mechanics and energetics of muscle contraction through the cyclical attachment and detachment of myosin motors to the actin filament with ad hoc assumptions on the dependence of the rate constants on the strain of the myosin motors. That relatively simple hypothesis is still present in recent models, even though with several modifications to adapt the model to the different experimental constraints which became subsequently available. However, already in that paper, one controversial aspect of the model became clear. Relatively high attachment and detachment rates of myosin to the actin filament were needed to simulate the high power output at intermediate velocity of contraction. However, these rates were incompatible with the relatively slow rise in tension after activation, despite the rise should be generated by the same r...

  17. Mutations in the slow skeletal muscle fiber myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) cause laing early-onset distal myopathy (MPD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Christopher; Herrmann, Ralf; Parry, Cheryl; Liyanage, Khema; Dye, Danielle E; Durling, Hayley J; Duff, Rachael M; Beckman, Kaye; de Visser, Marianne; van der Graaff, Maaike M; Hedera, Peter; Fink, John K; Petty, Elizabeth M; Lamont, Phillipa; Fabian, Vicki; Bridges, Leslie; Voit, Thomas; Mastaglia, Frank L; Laing, Nigel G

    2004-10-01

    We previously linked Laing-type early-onset autosomal dominant distal myopathy (MPD1) to a 22-cM region of chromosome 14. One candidate gene in the region, MYH7, which is mutated in cardiomyopathy and myosin storage myopathy, codes for the myosin heavy chain of type I skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac ventricles. We have identified five novel heterozygous mutations--Arg1500Pro, Lys1617del, Ala1663Pro, Leu1706Pro, and Lys1729del in exons 32, 34, 35, and 36 of MYH7--in six families with early-onset distal myopathy. All five mutations are predicted, by in silico analysis, to locally disrupt the ability of the myosin tail to form the coiled coil, which is its normal structure. These findings demonstrate that heterozygous mutations toward the 3' end of MYH7 cause Laing-type early-onset distal myopathy. MYH7 is the fourth distal-myopathy gene to have been identified.

  18. A collapsin response mediator protein 2 isoform controls myosin II-mediated cell migration and matrix assembly by trapping ROCK II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wait, Robin

    2012-01-01

    nonneuronal cells, regulates myosin II-mediated cellular functions, including cell migration. While the CRMP-2 short form (CRMP-2S) is recognized as a substrate of the Rho-GTP downstream kinase ROCK in neuronal cells, a CRMP-2 complex containing 2L not only bound the catalytic domain of ROCK II through two...... binding domains but also trapped and inhibited the kinase. CRMP-2L protein levels profoundly affected haptotactic migration and the actin-myosin cytoskeleton of carcinoma cells as well as nontransformed epithelial cell migration in a ROCK activity-dependent manner. Moreover, the ectopic expression of CRMP......-2L but not -2S inhibited fibronectin matrix assembly in fibroblasts. Underlying these responses, CRMP-2L regulated the kinase activity of ROCK II but not ROCK I, independent of GTP-RhoA levels. This study provides a new insight into CRMP-2 as a controller of myosin II-mediated cellular functions...

  19. Acceleration of the sliding movement of actin filaments with the use of a non-motile mutant myosin in in vitro motility assays driven by skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Iwase

    Full Text Available We examined the movement of an actin filament sliding on a mixture of normal and genetically modified myosin molecules that were attached to a glass surface. For this purpose, we used a Dictyostelium G680V mutant myosin II whose release rates of Pi and ADP were highly suppressed relative to normal myosin, leading to a significantly extended life-time of the strongly bound state with actin and virtually no motility. When the mixing ratio of G680V mutant myosin II to skeletal muscle HMM (heavy myosin was 0.01%, the actin filaments moved intermittently. When they moved, their sliding velocities were about two-fold faster than the velocity of skeletal HMM alone. Furthermore, sliding movements were also faster when the actin filaments were allowed to slide on skeletal muscle HMM-coated glass surfaces in the motility buffer solution containing G680V HMM. In this case no intermittent movement was observed. When the actin filaments used were copolymerized with a fusion protein consisting of Dictyostelium actin and Dictyostelium G680V myosin II motor domain, similar faster sliding movements were observed on skeletal muscle HMM-coated surfaces. The filament sliding velocities were about two-fold greater than the velocities of normal actin filaments. We found that the velocity of actin filaments sliding on skeletal muscle myosin molecules increased in the presence of a non-motile G680V mutant myosin motor.