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Sample records for human neuroblastoma xenograft

  1. Metformin impairs Rho GTPase signaling to induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells and inhibits growth of tumors in the xenograft mouse model of neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ambrish; Al-Sammarraie, Nadia; DiPette, Donald J.; Singh, Ugra S.

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in xenograft rodent models of adult cancers, and various human clinical trials are in progress. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of metformin action are largely unknown. In the present study we examined the anti-tumor activity of metformin against neuroblastoma, and determined the underlying signaling mechanisms. Using human neuroblastoma xenograft mice, we demonstrated that oral administration of metformin (100 and 250 mg/kg body weight) significantly inhibited the growth of tumors. The interference of metformin in spheroid formation further confirmed the anti-tumor activity of metformin. In tumors, the activation of Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) and Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42) was increased while RhoA activation (GTP-RhoA) was decreased by metformin. It also induced phosphorylation of JNK and inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting p38 MAP Kinase. Infection of cells by adenoviruses expressing dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1-N17), Cdc42 (Cdc42-N17) or constitutively active RhoA (RhoA-V14), or incubation of cells with pharmacological inhibitors of Rac1 (NSC23766) or Cdc42 (ML141) significantly protected neuroblastoma cells from metformin-induced apoptosis. Additionally, inhibition of JNK activity along with Rac1 or Cdc42 attenuated cytotoxic effects of metformin. These studies demonstrated that metformin impairs Rho GTPases signaling to induce apoptosis via JNK pathway. PMID:25365944

  2. A comparison of targetting of neuroblastoma with MIBG and anti L1-CAM antibody mAb chCE7: therapeutic efficacy in a neuroblastoma xenograft model and imaging of neuroblastoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rutgers, M.; Buitenhuis, C.K.M.; Smets, L.A. [Dept. of Experimental Therapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kraker, J. de [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meli, M.; Carrel, F.; Schubiger, P.A.; Novak-Hofer, I. [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Science, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Amstutz, H. [ZLB Bioplasma AG, Berne (Switzerland)

    2001-03-01

    Modine-131 labelled anti L1-CAM antibody mAb chCE7 was compared with the effective neuroblastoma-seeking agent {sup 131}I-labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) with regard to (a) its therapeutic efficacy in treating nude mice with neuroblastoma xenografts and (b) its tumour targetting ability in neuroblastoma patients. The SK-N-SH tumour cells used in the mouse experiments show good MIBG uptake and provide a relatively low number of 6,300 binding sites/cell for mAb chCE7. Tumours were treated with single injections of {sup 131}I-MIBG (110 MBq) and with {sup 131}I-labelled mAb chCE7 (17 MBq) and both agents showed antitumour activity. After therapy with {sup 131}I-chCE7, the subcutaneous tumours nearly disappeared; treatment with {sup 131}I-MIBG was somewhat less effective, resulting in a 70% reduction in tumour volume. A calculated tumour regrowth delay of 9 days occurred with a radioactivity dose of 17 MBq of an irrelevant control antibody mAb 35, which does not bind to SK-N-SH cells, compared with a regrowth delay of 34 days with {sup 131}I-mAb chCE7 and of 24 days with {sup 131}I-MIBG. General toxicity appeared to be mild, as assessed by a transient, approximate 10% maximum decrease in body weight during the treatments. The superior growth inhibition achieved by {sup 131}I-chCE7 compared with {sup 131}I-MIBG can be explained by its prolonged retention in the tumours, due to slower normal tissue and plasma clearance. Cross-reaction of mAb chCE7 with L1-CAM present in normal human tissues was investigated by direct binding of radioiodinated mAb to frozen tissue sections. Results showed a strong reaction with normal human brain tissue and weak but detectable binding to normal adult kidney sections. Seven patients with recurrent neuroblastoma were sequentially imaged with {sup 131}I-MIBG and {sup 131}I-chCE7. The results underlined the heterogeneity of neuroblastoma and showed the two imaging modalities to be complementary. {sup 131}I-chCE7 scintigraphy may have

  3. trans-4,4’-Dihydroxystilbene (DHS) inhibits human neuroblastoma tumor growth and induces mitochondrial and lysosomal damages in neuroblastoma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Patro, Birija Sankar; Koli, Mrunesh; Pai, Ganesh; Ray, Jharna; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K.; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2017-01-01

    In view of the inadequacy of neuroblastoma treatment, five hydroxystilbenes and resveratrol (Resv) were screened for their cytotoxic property against human neuroblastoma cell lines. The mechanism of cytotoxic action of the most potent compound, trans-4,4’-dihydroxystilbene (DHS) was investigated in vitro using human neuroblastoma cell lines. DHS was also tested in a mouse xenograft model of human neuroblastoma tumor. The MTT, sub-G1, annexin V and clonogenic assays as well as microscopy established higher cytotoxicity of DHS than Resv to the IMR32 cell line. DHS (20 μM) induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) in the cells, as revealed from JC-1 staining, cytochrome c and ApaF1 release and caspases-9/3 activation. DHS also induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) to release cathepsins B, L and D, and the cathepsins inhibitors partially reduced MMP/caspase-3 activation. The ROS, produced by DHS activated the p38 and JNK MAPKs to augment the BAX activity and BID-cleavage, and induce LMP and MMP in the cells. DHS (100 mg/kg) also inhibited human neuroblastoma tumor growth in SCID mice by 51%. Hence, DHS may be a potential chemotherapeutic option against neuroblastoma. The involvement of an independent LMP as well as a partially LMP-dependent MMP by DHS is attractive as it provides options to target both mitochondria and lysosome. PMID:29088756

  4. trans-4,4'-Dihydroxystilbene (DHS) inhibits human neuroblastoma tumor growth and induces mitochondrial and lysosomal damages in neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Patro, Birija Sankar; Koli, Mrunesh; Pai, Ganesh; Ray, Jharna; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2017-09-26

    In view of the inadequacy of neuroblastoma treatment, five hydroxystilbenes and resveratrol (Resv) were screened for their cytotoxic property against human neuroblastoma cell lines. The mechanism of cytotoxic action of the most potent compound, trans-4,4'-dihydroxystilbene (DHS) was investigated in vitro using human neuroblastoma cell lines. DHS was also tested in a mouse xenograft model of human neuroblastoma tumor. The MTT, sub-G1, annexin V and clonogenic assays as well as microscopy established higher cytotoxicity of DHS than Resv to the IMR32 cell line. DHS (20 μM) induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (MMP) in the cells, as revealed from JC-1 staining, cytochrome c and ApaF1 release and caspases-9/3 activation. DHS also induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) to release cathepsins B, L and D, and the cathepsins inhibitors partially reduced MMP/caspase-3 activation. The ROS, produced by DHS activated the p38 and JNK MAPKs to augment the BAX activity and BID-cleavage, and induce LMP and MMP in the cells. DHS (100 mg/kg) also inhibited human neuroblastoma tumor growth in SCID mice by 51%. Hence, DHS may be a potential chemotherapeutic option against neuroblastoma. The involvement of an independent LMP as well as a partially LMP-dependent MMP by DHS is attractive as it provides options to target both mitochondria and lysosome.

  5. Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Davidoff, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a heterogeneous disease; tumors can spontaneously regress or mature, or display an aggressive, therapy-resistant phenotype. Increasing evidence indicates that the biologic and molecular features of neuroblastoma significantly influence and are highly predictive of clinical behavior. Because of this, neuroblastoma has served as a paradigm for biological risk assessment and treatment assignment. Most current clinical studies of neuroblastoma base therapy and its intensity on a ...

  6. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Libo; Vines, Douglass C.; Scollard, Deborah A.; McKee, Trevor; Komal, Teesha; Ganguly, Milan; Do, Trevor; Wu, Bing; Alexander, Natasha; Vali, Reza; Shammas, Amer; Besanger, Travis; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2) expression with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB) xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imagin...

  7. Correlation of Somatostatin Receptor-2 Expression with Gallium-68-DOTA-TATE Uptake in Neuroblastoma Xenograft Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptide-receptor imaging and therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs such as 68Ga-DOTA-TATE and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE have become an effective treatment option for SSTR-positive neuroendocrine tumors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation of somatostatin receptor-2 (SSTR2 expression with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy in neuroblastoma (NB xenograft models. We demonstrated variable SSTR2 expression profiles in eight NB cell lines. From micro-PET imaging and autoradiography, a higher uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-TATE was observed in SSTR2 high-expressing NB xenografts (CHLA-15 compared to SSTR2 low-expressing NB xenografts (SK-N-BE(2. Combined autoradiography-immunohistochemistry revealed histological colocalization of SSTR2 and 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake in CHLA-15 tumors. With a low dose of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE (20 MBq/animal, tumor growth inhibition was achieved in the CHLA-15 high SSTR2 expressing xenograft model. Although, in vitro, NB cells showed variable expression levels of norepinephrine transporter (NET, a molecular target for 131I-MIBG therapy, low 123I-MIBG uptake was observed in all selected NB xenografts. In conclusion, SSTR2 expression levels are associated with 68Ga-DOTA-TATE uptake and antitumor efficacy of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. 68Ga-DOTA-TATE PET is superior to 123I-MIBG SPECT imaging in detecting NB tumors in our model. Radiolabeled DOTA-TATE can be used as an agent for NB tumor imaging to potentially discriminate tumors eligible for 177Lu-DOTA-TATE therapy.

  8. Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also may be at higher risk for other cancers. Caring for Your Child Being told your child has neuroblastoma can be ... Cancer Center Use Finn's Story to Talk About Cancer Preparing Your Child for Surgery Late Effects of Cancer and Cancer ...

  9. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Irradiation Rapidly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Perfusion in a Xenograft Model of Neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jani, Ashish; Shaikh, Fauzia; Barton, Sunjay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Willis, Callen [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, Debarshi [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Mitchell, Jason [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hernandez, Sonia L. [Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hei, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamashiro, Darrell J. [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Connolly, Eileen P., E-mail: epc2116@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) on neuroblastoma tumor vasculature, including the endothelial cell (EC)–pericyte interaction as a potential target for combined treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Methods and Materials: The vascular effects of radiation therapy were examined in a xenograft model of high-risk neuroblastoma. In vivo 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (3D-CEUS) imaging and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Results: HDRT significantly reduced tumor blood volume 6 hours after irradiation compared with the lower doses used in conventionally fractionated radiation. There was a 63% decrease in tumor blood volume after 12-Gy radiation compared with a 24% decrease after 2 Gy. Analysis of tumor vasculature by lectin angiography showed a significant loss of small vessel ends at 6 hours. IHC revealed a significant loss of ECs at 6 and 72 hours after HDRT, with an accompanying loss of immature and mature pericytes at 72 hours. Conclusions: HDRT affects tumor vasculature in a manner not observed at lower doses. The main observation was an early reduction in tumor perfusion resulting from a reduction of small vessel ends with a corresponding loss of endothelial cells and pericytes.

  10. Transcriptional Profiling Reveals a Common Metabolic Program in High-Risk Human Neuroblastoma and Mouse Neuroblastoma Sphere-Forming Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengling Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available High-risk neuroblastoma remains one of the deadliest childhood cancers. Identification of metabolic pathways that drive or maintain high-risk neuroblastoma may open new avenues of therapeutic interventions. Here, we report the isolation and propagation of neuroblastoma sphere-forming cells with self-renewal and differentiation potential from tumors of the TH-MYCN mouse, an animal model of high-risk neuroblastoma with MYCN amplification. Transcriptional profiling reveals that mouse neuroblastoma sphere-forming cells acquire a metabolic program characterized by transcriptional activation of the cholesterol and serine-glycine synthesis pathways, primarily as a result of increased expression of sterol regulatory element binding factors and Atf4, respectively. This metabolic reprogramming is recapitulated in high-risk human neuroblastomas and is prognostic for poor clinical outcome. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the metabolic program markedly decreases the growth and tumorigenicity of both mouse neuroblastoma sphere-forming cells and human neuroblastoma cell lines. These findings suggest a therapeutic strategy for targeting the metabolic program of high-risk neuroblastoma.

  11. Humanized mouse xenograft models: narrowing the tumor-microenvironment gap

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, J. Jason; Bird, Gregory; Refaeli, Yosef; Jimeno, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer research has long been hampered by the limitations of the current model systems. Both cultured cells and mouse xenografts grow in an environment highly dissimilar to that of their originating tumor, frequently resulting in promising treatments that are ultimately clinically ineffective. The development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains into which human immune systems can be engrafted can help bridge this gap. Humanized mice (HM) allow researchers to examine xenograft growth in th...

  12. Of mice and men: olfactory neuroblastoma among animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubojemska, A; Borejko, M; Czapiewski, P; Dziadziuszko, R; Biernat, W

    2016-09-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare tumour of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses that arises from the olfactory neuroepithelium and has unpredictable clinical course. As the sense of smell is phylogenetically one of the first senses and olfactory neuroepithelium is evolutionary conserved with striking similarities among different species, we performed an extensive analysis of the literature in order to evaluate the similarities and differences between animals and humans on the clinical, morphological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and molecular level. Our analysis revealed that ONB was reported mainly in mammals and showed striking similarities to human ONB. These observations provide rationale for introduction of therapy modalities used in humans into the veterinary medicine. Animal models of neuroblastoma should be considered for the preclinical studies evaluating novel therapies for ONB. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Nature of tumor control by permanently and transiently modified GD2 chimeric antigen receptor T cells in xenograft models of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nathan; Liu, Xiaojun; Hulitt, Jessica; Jiang, Shuguang; June, Carl H; Grupp, Stephan A; Barrett, David M; Zhao, Yangbing

    2014-11-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy has begun to demonstrate success as a novel treatment modality for hematologic malignancies. The success observed thus far has been with T cells permanently engineered to express chimeric receptors. T cells engineered using RNA electroporation represent an alternative with the potential for similar efficacy and greater safety when initially targeting novel antigens. Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric solid tumor with the potential to be targeted using immunotherapy. We performed xenograft studies in NSG mice in which we assessed the efficacy of both permanently modified and transiently modified CAR T cells directed against the neuroblastoma antigen GD2 in both local and disseminated disease models. Disease response was monitored by tumor volume measurement and histologic examination, as well as in vivo bioluminescence. RNA-modified GD2 CAR T cells mediated rapid tumor destruction when delivered locally. A single infusion of lentivirally modified GD2 CAR T cells resulted in long-term control of disseminated disease. Multiple infusions of RNA GD2 CAR T cells slowed the progression of disseminated disease and improved survival, but did not result in long-term disease control. Histologic examination revealed that the transiently modified cells were unable to significantly penetrate the tumor environment when delivered systemically, despite multiple infusions of CAR T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that RNA-modified GD2 CAR T cells can mediate effective antitumor responses in vivo, and permanently modified cells are able to control disseminated neuroblastoma in xenograft mice. Lack of long-term disease control by RNA-engineered cells resulted from an inability to penetrate the tumor microenvironment. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Developing a xenograft human tumor model in immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Matthew T; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Ganta, Chanran; Shreshta, Tej B; Marquez, Alejandro; Pyle, Marla; Hill, Jennifer; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2018-01-01

    Animal models are essential to cancer research, but current xenograft models are limited in their utility especially due to the lack of an immune system. Here we demonstrate that a xenograft tumor model can be developed in immunocompetent mice by tolerizing murine fetuses to human tumor cells. A375 human melanoma cells were injected into day E14 fetuses and after birth mice were challenged with A375 cells to determine their ability to develop tumors. Intravenous injections of cells resulted in metastatic-like lung tumors, which were verified to be human in origin by immunohistochemistry and PCR. These results were replicated with several other human tumor types: BxPC3 (human pancreatic adenocarcinoma), MDA-MB-231 (human breast adenocarcinoma), M21 (human melanoma), and HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma). Development of an immunocompetent xenograft tumor model would allow the further elucidation of the interaction of the immune system with therapy in both preclinical research and patient derived xenografts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  16. The Checkpoint Kinase 1 Inhibitor Prexasertib Induces Regression of Preclinical Models of Human Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Caitlin D; VanWye, Alle B; Dowless, Michele; Blosser, Wayne; Falcon, Beverly L; Stewart, Julie; Stephens, Jennifer; Beckmann, Richard P; Bence Lin, Aimee; Stancato, Louis F

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) is a key regulator of the DNA damage response and a mediator of replication stress through modulation of replication fork licensing and activation of S and G2-M cell-cycle checkpoints. We evaluated prexasertib (LY2606368), a small-molecule CHK1 inhibitor currently in clinical testing, in multiple preclinical models of pediatric cancer. Following an initial assessment of prexasertib activity, this study focused on the preclinical models of neuroblastoma.Experimental Design: We evaluated the antiproliferative activity of prexasertib in a panel of cancer cell lines; neuroblastoma cell lines were among the most sensitive. Subsequent Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses measured DNA damage and DNA repair protein activation. Prexasertib was investigated in several cell line-derived xenograft mouse models of neuroblastoma.Results: Within 24 hours, single-agent prexasertib promoted γH2AX-positive double-strand DNA breaks and phosphorylation of DNA damage sensors ATM and DNA-PKcs, leading to neuroblastoma cell death. Knockdown of CHK1 and/or CHK2 by siRNA verified that the double-strand DNA breaks and cell death elicited by prexasertib were due to specific CHK1 inhibition. Neuroblastoma xenografts rapidly regressed following prexasertib administration, independent of starting tumor volume. Decreased Ki67 and increased immunostaining of endothelial and pericyte markers were observed in xenografts after only 6 days of exposure to prexasertib, potentially indicating a swift reduction in tumor volume and/or a direct effect on tumor vasculature.Conclusions: Overall, these data demonstrate that prexasertib is a specific inhibitor of CHK1 in neuroblastoma and leads to DNA damage and cell death in preclinical models of this devastating pediatric malignancy. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4354-63. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Human reconstructed skin xenografts on mice to model skin physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Giorgiana; Ng, Yi Zhen; Koh, Li Fang; Goh, Christabelle S M; Common, John E

    Xenograft models to study skin physiology have been popular for scientific use since the 1970s, with various developments and improvements to the techniques over the decades. Xenograft models are particularly useful and sought after due to the lack of clinically relevant animal models in predicting drug effectiveness in humans. Such predictions could in turn boost the process of drug discovery, since novel drug compounds have an estimated 8% chance of FDA approval despite years of rigorous preclinical testing and evaluation, albeit mostly in non-human models. In the case of skin research, the mouse persists as the most popular animal model of choice, despite its well-known anatomical differences with human skin. Differences in skin biology are especially evident when trying to dissect more complex skin conditions, such as psoriasis and eczema, where interactions between the immune system, epidermis and the environment likely occur. While the use of animal models are still considered the gold standard for systemic toxicity studies under controlled environments, there are now alternative models that have been approved for certain applications. To overcome the biological limitations of the mouse model, research efforts have also focused on "humanizing" the mice model to better recapitulate human skin physiology. In this review, we outline the different approaches undertaken thus far to study skin biology using human tissue xenografts in mice and the technical challenges involved. We also describe more recent developments to generate humanized multi-tissue compartment mice that carry both a functioning human immune system and skin xenografts. Such composite animal models provide promising opportunities to study drugs, disease and differentiation with greater clinical relevance. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cholinergic regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bo; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing......Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, muscarinic receptor, neuroblastoma cell, mRNA, gene expression, peptide processing...

  19. Pathology of Human Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma Xenografts in NSG Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, James F; Pacak, Karel; Tischler, Arthur S

    2017-03-01

    A major impediment to the development of effective treatments for metastatic or unresectable pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas has been the absence of valid models for pre-clinical testing. Attempts to establish cell lines or xenografts from human pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas have previously been unsuccessful. NOD-scid gamma (NSG) mice are a recently developed strain lacking functional B-cells, T-cells, and NK cells. We report here that xenografts of primary human paragangliomas will take in NSG mice while maintaining their architectural and immunophenotypic characteristics as expressed in the patients. In contrast to grafts of cell lines and of most common types of primary tumors, the growth rate of grafted paragangliomas is very slow, accurately representing the growth rate of most pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas even in metastases in humans. Although the model is therefore technically challenging, primary patient-derived xenografts of paragangliomas in NSG mice provide a potentially valuable new tool that could prove especially valuable for testing treatments aimed at eradicating the small tumor deposits that are often numerous in patients with metastatic paraganglioma.

  20. Humanized Mouse Xenograft Models: Narrowing the Tumor-Microenvironment Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, J Jason; Bird, Gregory; Refaeli, Yosef; Jimeno, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Cancer research has long been hampered by the limitations of the current model systems. Both cultured cells and mouse xenografts grow in an environment highly dissimilar to that of their originating tumor, frequently resulting in promising treatments that are ultimately clinically ineffective. The development of highly immunodeficient mouse strains into which human immune systems can be engrafted can help bridge this gap. Humanized mice (HM) allow researchers to examine xenograft growth in the context of a human immune system and resultant tumor microenvironment, and recent studies have highlighted the increased similarities in attendant tumor structure, metastasis, and signaling to those features in cancer patients. This setting also facilitates the examination of investigational cancer therapies, including new immunotherapies. This review discusses recent advancements in the generation and application of HM models, their promise in cancer research, and their potential in generating clinically relevant treatments. This review also focuses on current efforts to improve HM models by engineering mouse strains expressing human cytokines or HLA proteins and implanting human bone, liver, and thymus tissue to facilitate immune cell maturation and trafficking. Finally, we discuss how these improvements may help direct future HM model cancer studies. Cancer Res; 76(21); 6153-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. CDDO and ATRA Instigate Differentiation of IMR32 Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Namrata Chaudhari; Priti Talwar; Christian Lefebvre D'hellencourt; Palaniyandi Ravanan

    2017-01-01

    ...(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO) on human neuroblastoma IMR32 cells. Our results demonstrate that treatment with low concentration of CDDO and particularly in combination with all trans retinoic acid (ATRA...

  2. Xenografted tissue models for the study of human endometrial biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuokkanen, Satu; Zhu, Liyin; Pollard, Jeffrey W

    The human endometrium undergoes extensive morphological, biochemical and molecular changes under the influence of female sex steroid hormones. Besides the fact that estrogen stimulates endometrial cell proliferation and progesterone inhibits this proliferation and induces differentiation, there is limited knowledge about precise molecular mechanisms underlying human endometrial biology. The importance of paracrine signaling in endometrial physiology explains why in vitro culture of endometrial cells has been challenging. Researchers, therefore, have developed alternative experimental in vivo models for the study of endometrial biology. The objective of this review is to summarize the recent developments and work on these in vivo endometrial research models. The in vivo recombinant tissue models in which wild-type endometrial cells are combined with endometrial cells from a gene-targeted mouse strain followed by xenografting to host mice have been critical in confirming the significance of paracrine signaling between the epithelium and stroma in the growth regulation of the endometrium. Additionally, these studies have uncovered differences between the mouse and human, emphasizing the need for the development of experimental models specifically of the human endometrium. Recently, xenotransplants of human endometrial fragments into the subcutaneous space of host mice and endometrial xenografts of dissociated and recombined epithelial and stromal cells beneath the kidney capsule of immunodeficient host mice have proven to be highly promising tools for in vivo research of endometrial functions. For the first time, the latter approach provides an immense opportunity for the application of genome engineering, such as targeted ablation of endometrial genes for example by using CRISPR/CAS9 system. This research will begin to elucidate the functional role of specific genes in this complex tissue. Another advantage of xenotransplantation and xenograft models of the human

  3. Molecular mechanism of action of opioids in human neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V.C.K.

    1987-01-01

    A series of human neuroblastoma cell lines was screened for the presence of opioid receptor sites. Of these cell lines, SK-N-SH was found to express approximately 50,000 ..mu.. and 10,000 delta opioid receptor sites/cell. In vitro characterization revealed that the binding properties of these receptor sites closely resembled those of human and rodent brain. Phosphatidylinositol turnover as a potential second messenger system for the ..mu.. receptor was examined in SK-N-SH cells. Neurotransmitter receptor systems were determined in the three sub-clones of SK-N-SH cells. Cells of the SH-SY5Y line, a phenotypically stable subclone of SK-N-SH cells, were induced to differentiate by treatment with various inducing agents, and changes of several neurotransmitter receptor systems were determined. Nerve growth factor (NGF) and retinoic acid (RA) up-regulated, while dBcAMP down-regulated opioid receptor sites. (/sup 3/H)Dopamine uptake was slightly enhanced only in RA-treated cells. Strikingly, the efficacy of PGE/sub 1/-stimulated accumulation of cAMP was enhanced by 15- to 30-fold upon RA treatment.

  4. Choline Autoradiography of Human Prostate Cancer Xenograft: Effect of Castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jadvar

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of castration and tracer uptake time interval on the level of radiolabeled choline accumulation in murine-implanted human prostate tumor xenografts using quantitative autoradiography. We implanted androgen-dependent (CWR22 and androgen-independent (PC3 human prostate cancer cells in castrated (n = 9 and noncastrated (n = 9 athymic male mice and allowed tumors to grow to 1 cm3. The mice were euthanized at 5, 10, and 20 minutes after injection of 5 µCi [14C]-choline. Mice were prepared for quantitative autoradiography with density light units of viable tumor sections converted to units of radioactivity (nCi/mm2 using calibration. Two-group comparisons were performed using a two-tailed Student t-test with unequal variance and with a significance probability level of less than .05. Two-group comparisons between the means of the tracer uptake level for each tumor type at each of three time points for each of two host types showed that (1 the level of tracer localization in the two tumor types was affected little in relation to the host type and (2 PC3 tumor uptake level tended to increase slowly with time only in the noncastrated host, whereas this was not observed in the castrated host or with CWR22 tumor in either host type. The uptake time interval and castration do not appear to significantly affect the level of radiolabeled choline uptake by the human prostate cancer xenograft.

  5. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 2 ... Human tumour xenografts; radiation; rats; tumour bed ... Dosimetry and the corresponding methodology for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat ...

  6. Akt2 regulates metastatic potential in neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Qiao

    Full Text Available Activation of PI3K/AKT pathway correlates with poor prognosis in patients with neuroblastoma. Our previous studies have demonstrated that PI3K/AKT signaling is critical for the oncogenic transformations induced by gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP and its receptor, GRP-R, in neuroblastoma. Moreover, PI3K/AKT-dependent oncogenic transformations require N-myc, an extensively studied oncogene in neuroblastoma. Whether AKT directly regulates the expression of N-myc oncogene is yet to be determined. Here, we report a novel finding that of the three AKT isoforms, AKT2 specifically regulated N-myc expression in neuroblastoma cells. We also confirmed that GRP-R is upstream of AKT2 and in turn, regulated N-myc expression via AKT2 in neuroblastoma cells. Functional assays demonstrated that attenuation of AKT2 impaired cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth, and decreased the secretion of angiogenic factor VEGF in vitro. Furthermore, silencing AKT2 inhibited migration and invasion of neuroblastoma cells in vitro. Xenografts established by injecting AKT2 silenced human neuroblastoma cells into murine spleen expressed decreased levels of AKT2 and resulted in fewer liver metastases compared to controls in vivo. Hence, our study highlights the potential molecular mechanism(s mediating the oncogenic role of GRP/GRP-R and demonstrates a novel role for AKT2 in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, indicating that targeting the GRP/GRP-R/AKT2 axis may be important for developing novel therapeutics in the treatment of clinically aggressive neuroblastoma.

  7. Relation between Irofulven (MGI-114) systemic exposure and tumor response in human solid tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggas, Markos; Stewart, Clinton F; Woo, Michael H; Fouladi, Maryam; Cheshire, Pamela J; Peterson, Jennifer K; Friedman, Henry S; Billups, Catherine; Houghton, Peter J

    2002-09-01

    Irofulven is a novel, small molecular weight semisynthetic compound, derived from a family of mushroom toxins known as illudins. This DNA alkylating agent has a chemical structure unlike any other chemotherapeutic agent in clinical use. The molecule is currently being studied in several Phase I, II, and III trials. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antitumor activity of Irofulven in a panel of 20 pediatric solid tumor xenografts and to relate the Irofulven systemic exposure, defined as area under the concentration time curve, to the antitumor dose associated with tumor regression in the tumor models. Irofulven was administered i.v. daily for 5 days with courses repeated every 21 days for a total of three cycles. The minimum effective dose of Irofulven causing objective regression (> or =50% volume regression) of advanced tumors was determined for each of 19 of 20 independently derived tumor models (12 brain tumors, 4 neuroblastomas, and 4 rhabdomyosarcomas). At the maximum tolerated dose for three cycles of treatment (4.6 mg/kg/day) objective regressions were determined in 14 of 18 tumor lines (78%). However, the dose-response relationship was acute. At 2 mg/kg only 3 of 15 tumors tested demonstrated objective regressions, and in 3 additional tumors volume regressions were not achieved at a higher dose level (3 mg/kg), hence were not additionally tested. After administering the maximum tolerated dose (tolerated for one or two cycles of treatment) of Irofulven, 7 mg/kg, to mice bearing sensitive and resistant human tumors plasma concentration-time profiles were determined. Tumors were highly sensitive to Irofulven, but the systemic exposure required for a significant rate of objective response in this panel of tumors is in excess of that achievable in patients at tolerable doses, using this schedule of drug administration.

  8. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  9. LMNA knock-down affects differentiation and progression of human neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Maresca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma (NB is one of the most aggressive tumors that occur in childhood. Although genes, such as MYCN, have been shown to be involved in the aggressiveness of the disease, the identification of new biological markers is still desirable. The induction of differentiation is one of the strategies used in the treatment of neuroblastoma. A-type lamins are components of the nuclear lamina and are involved in differentiation. We studied the role of Lamin A/C in the differentiation and progression of neuroblastoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Knock-down of Lamin A/C (LMNA-KD in neuroblastoma cells blocked retinoic acid-induced differentiation, preventing neurites outgrowth and the expression of neural markers. The genome-wide gene-expression profile and the proteomic analysis of LMNA-KD cells confirmed the inhibition of differentiation and demonstrated an increase of aggressiveness-related genes and molecules resulting in augmented migration/invasion, and increasing the drug resistance of the cells. The more aggressive phenotype acquired by LMNA-KD cells was also maintained in vivo after injection into nude mice. A preliminary immunohistochemistry analysis of Lamin A/C expression in nine primary stages human NB indicated that this protein is poorly expressed in most of these cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated for the first time in neuroblastoma cells that Lamin A/C plays a central role in the differentiation, and that the loss of this protein gave rise to a more aggressive tumor phenotype.

  10. Preclinical models for neuroblastoma: establishing a baseline for treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Teitz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical models of pediatric cancers are essential for testing new chemotherapeutic combinations for clinical trials. The most widely used genetic model for preclinical testing of neuroblastoma is the TH-MYCN mouse. This neuroblastoma-prone mouse recapitulates many of the features of human neuroblastoma. Limitations of this model include the low frequency of bone marrow metastasis, the lack of information on whether the gene expression patterns in this system parallels human neuroblastomas, the relatively slow rate of tumor formation and variability in tumor penetrance on different genetic backgrounds. As an alternative, preclinical studies are frequently performed using human cell lines xenografted into immunocompromised mice, either as flank implant or orthtotopically. Drawbacks of this system include the use of cell lines that have been in culture for years, the inappropriate microenvironment of the flank or difficult, time consuming surgery for orthotopic transplants and the absence of an intact immune system.Here we characterize and optimize both systems to increase their utility for preclinical studies. We show that TH-MYCN mice develop tumors in the paraspinal ganglia, but not in the adrenal, with cellular and gene expression patterns similar to human NB. In addition, we present a new ultrasound guided, minimally invasive orthotopic xenograft method. This injection technique is rapid, provides accurate targeting of the injected cells and leads to efficient engraftment. We also demonstrate that tumors can be detected, monitored and quantified prior to visualization using ultrasound, MRI and bioluminescence. Finally we develop and test a "standard of care" chemotherapy regimen. This protocol, which is based on current treatments for neuroblastoma, provides a baseline for comparison of new therapeutic agents.The studies suggest that use of both the TH-NMYC model of neuroblastoma and the orthotopic xenograft model provide the optimal

  11. Cryopreservation of human colorectal carcinomas prior to xenografting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krohn Mathias

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular heterogeneity of colorectal carcinoma (CRC is well recognized, forming the rationale for molecular tests required before administration of some of the novel targeted therapies that now are rapidly entering the clinics. For clinical research at least, but possibly even for future individualized tumor treatment on a routine basis, propagation of patients' CRC tissue may be highly desirable for detailed molecular, biochemical or functional analyses. However, complex logistics requiring close liaison between surgery, pathology, laboratory researchers and animal care facilities are a major drawback in this. We here describe and evaluate a very simple cryopreservation procedure for colorectal carcinoma tissue prior to xenografting that will considerably reduce this logistic complexity. Methods Fourty-eight CRC collected ad hoc were xenografted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice either fresh from surgery (N = 23 or after cryopreservation (N = 31; up to 643 days. Results Take rates after cryopreservation were satisfactory (71% though somewhat lower than with tumor tissues fresh from surgery (74%, but this difference was not statistically significant. Re-transplantation of cryopreserved established xenografts (N = 11 was always successful. Of note, in this series, all of the major molecular types of CRC were xenografted successfully, even after cryopreservation. Conclusions Our procedure facilitates collection, long-time storage and propagation of clinical CRC specimens (even from different centres for (preclinical studies of novel therapies or for basic research.

  12. Patient-derived xenografts recapitulate molecular features of human uveal melanomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Cécile; Gentien, David; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Némati, Fariba; Nicolas, André; Tesson, Bruno; Desjardins, Laurence; Mariani, Pascale; Rapinat, Audrey; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Couturier, Jérôme; Hupé, Philippe; de Koning, Leanne; Dubois, Thierry; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Stern, Marc-Henri; Barillot, Emmanuel; Harbour, J William; Saule, Simon; Decaudin, Didier

    2013-06-01

    We have previously developed a new method for the development and maintenance of uveal melanoma (UM) xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Here, we compare the genetic profiles of the primary tumors to their corresponding xenografts that have been passaged over time. The study included sixteen primary UMs and corresponding xenografts at very early (P1), early (P4), and late (P9) in vivo passages. The tumors were analyzed for mutation status of GNAQ, GNA11, GNAS, GNA15, BAP1, and BRAF, chromosomal copy number alterations using Affymetrix GeneChip(®) Genome-Wide Human SNP6.0 arrays, gene expression profiles using GeneChip(®) Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays, BAP1 mRNA and protein expression, and MAPK pathway status using Reverse Phase Protein Arrays (RPPA). The UM xenografts accurately recapitulated the genetic features of primary human UMs and they exhibited genetic stability over the course of their in vivo maintenance. Our technique for establishing and maintaining primary UMs as xenograft tumors in immunodeficient mice exhibit a high degree of genetic conservation between the primary tumors and the xenograft tumors over multiple passages in vivo. These models therefore constitute valuable preclinical tool for drug screening in UM. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel dysfunctional p53 mutation in the human neuroblastoma cell line TGW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Hisahiko; Arita, Michitsune; Min, Zhenghua; Zhong, Xioling; Iwasaki, Iwao; Hirano, Keihachiro; Shimatake, Hiroyuki; Hemmi, Hiromichi

    2003-12-01

    Mutations of p53 are rare in primary and advanced neuroblastomas. The p53 gene was studied in a TGW cell line established from a TNB1 xenograft, derived from metastasized neuroblastoma. The p53 protein level in TGW was elevated at baseline. Treatment with doxorubicin to induce genotoxic stress neither altered the p53 protein level nor induced p21 protein within 24 hours. DNA sequencing analysis revealed a novel triplet deletion mutation at codon 282 (R282del) of the p53 gene, a mutation also found in TNB1, indicating that the mutation occurred in the relapsed tumor. The mutant was incapable of transactivation and had no effect on the transactivational activity of the wild-type p53 gene product in reporter assays using a plasmid possessing a p53 responsive element of p21, bax or mdm2. These results suggest that the mutant p53R282del found in TGW is a non-functional mutant and has no dominant negative nature.

  14. Withania somnifera water extract as a potential candidate for differentiation based therapy of human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardeep Kataria

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is an aggressive childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system. Treatments are often ineffective and have serious side effects. Conventional therapy of neuroblastoma includes the differentiation agents. Unlike chemo-radiotherapy, differentiation therapy shows minimal side effects on normal cells, because normal non-malignant cells are already differentiated. Keeping in view the limited toxicity of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha, the current study was aimed to investigate the efficacy of Ashwagandha water extract (ASH-WEX for anti-proliferative potential in neuroblastoma and its underlying signalling mechanisms. ASH-WEX significantly reduced cell proliferation and induced cell differentiation as indicated by morphological changes and NF200 expression in human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. The induction of differentiation was accompanied by HSP70 and mortalin induction as well as pancytoplasmic translocation of the mortalin in ASH-WEX treated cells. Furthermore, the ASH-WEX treatment lead to induction of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM expression and reduction in its polysialylation, thus elucidating its anti-migratory potential, which was also supported by downregulation of MMP 2 and 9 activity. ASH-WEX treatment led to cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and increase in early apoptotic population. Modulation of cell cycle marker Cyclin D1, anti-apoptotic marker bcl-xl and Akt-P provide evidence that ASH-WEX may prove to be a promising phytotherapeutic intervention in neuroblatoma related malignancies.

  15. Withania somnifera water extract as a potential candidate for differentiation based therapy of human neuroblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Wadhwa, Renu; Kaul, Sunil C; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an aggressive childhood disease of the sympathetic nervous system. Treatments are often ineffective and have serious side effects. Conventional therapy of neuroblastoma includes the differentiation agents. Unlike chemo-radiotherapy, differentiation therapy shows minimal side effects on normal cells, because normal non-malignant cells are already differentiated. Keeping in view the limited toxicity of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), the current study was aimed to investigate the efficacy of Ashwagandha water extract (ASH-WEX) for anti-proliferative potential in neuroblastoma and its underlying signalling mechanisms. ASH-WEX significantly reduced cell proliferation and induced cell differentiation as indicated by morphological changes and NF200 expression in human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. The induction of differentiation was accompanied by HSP70 and mortalin induction as well as pancytoplasmic translocation of the mortalin in ASH-WEX treated cells. Furthermore, the ASH-WEX treatment lead to induction of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) expression and reduction in its polysialylation, thus elucidating its anti-migratory potential, which was also supported by downregulation of MMP 2 and 9 activity. ASH-WEX treatment led to cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase and increase in early apoptotic population. Modulation of cell cycle marker Cyclin D1, anti-apoptotic marker bcl-xl and Akt-P provide evidence that ASH-WEX may prove to be a promising phytotherapeutic intervention in neuroblatoma related malignancies.

  16. Comparison of the Gene Expression Profiles of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells between Humans and a Humanized Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Hideyuki; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yahata, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Ando, Kiyoshi

    2017-04-20

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of NOD/Shi-scid-IL2Rγnull(NOG) mice transplanted with human CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low hematopoietic cells from cord blood (CB) as an experimental model of the gene expression in human hematopoiesis. We compared the gene expressions of human CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low cells from human bone marrow (BM) and in xenograft models. The microarray data revealed that 25 KEGG pathways were extracted from the comparison of human CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low HSCs between CB and BM, and that 17 of them--which were mostly related to cellular survival, RNA metabolism and lymphoid development--were shared with the xenograft model. When the probes that were commonly altered in CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low cells from both human and xenograft BM were analyzed, most of them, including the genes related hypoxia, hematopoietic differentiation, epigenetic modification, translation initiation, and RNA degradation, were downregulated. These alterations of gene expression suggest a reduced differentiation capacity and likely include key alterations of gene expression for settlement of CB CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low cells in BM. Our findings demonstrate that the xenograft model of human CB CD34+/CD38-/Lin-/low cells using NOG mice was useful, at least in part, for the evaluation of the gene expression profile of human hematopoietic stem cells.

  17. Neuroblastoma Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neuroblastoma Treatment for more information about neuroblastoma. Most cases of neuroblastoma are diagnosed before 1 year of ... to Use This Summary PDQ is a registered trademark. The content of PDQ documents can be used ...

  18. Signaling pathways in PACAP regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, Birgitte; Georg, Birgitte; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Ganglia expressing the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) innervate vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) containing neurons suggesting a role of PACAP in regulating VIP expression. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells were applied to study PACAP regulated VIP gene...... in PACAP regulation of the FOS and VIP gene expressions suggest for the first time a role of FOS in PACAP-induced VIP gene expression in human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells....... expression aiming to identify the receptor and the signaling proteins involved. The PACAP receptor subtype PAC1 induced VIP gene expression as (i) PACAP and the PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan were equally efficient and approximately 200-fold more potent than VIP, and (ii) PACAP6-38 and PG99-465, antagonists...

  19. Signaling pathways in PACAP regulation of VIP gene expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, B.; Georg, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ganglia expressing the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) innervate vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) containing neurons suggesting a role of PACAP in regulating VIP expression. Human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells were applied to study PACAP regulated VIP gene...... in PACAP regulation of the FOS and VIP gene expressions suggest for the first time a role of FOS in PACAP-induced VIP gene expression in human NB-1 neuroblastoma cells. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2009/10...... expression aiming to identify the receptor and the signaling proteins involved. The PACAP receptor subtype PAC1 induced VIP gene expression as (i) PACAP and the PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan were equally efficient and similar to 200-fold more potent than VIP, and (ii) PACAP6-38 and PG99-465, antagonists...

  20. A ketogenic diet supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides enhances the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic efficacy of chemotherapy on neuroblastoma xenografts in a CD1-nu mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh-Gohari, Sepideh; Feichtinger, René Günther; Vidali, Silvia; Locker, Felix; Rutherford, Tricia; O'Donnel, Maura; Stöger-Kleiber, Andrea; Mayr, Johannes Adalbert; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2017-09-12

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric malignancy characterized by a marked reduction in aerobic energy metabolism. Recent preclinical data indicate that targeting this metabolic phenotype by a ketogenic diet (KD), especially in combination with calorie restriction, slows tumor growth and enhances metronomic cyclophosphamide (CP) therapy of NB xenografts. Because calorie restriction would be contraindicated in most cancer patients, the aim of the present study was to optimize the KD such that the tumors are sensitized to CP without the need of calorie restriction. In a NB xenograft model, metronomic CP was combined with KDs of different triglyceride compositions and fed to CD1-nu mice ad libitum. Metronomic CP in combination with a KD containing 8-carbon medium-chain triglycerides exerted a robust anti-tumor effect, suppressing growth and causing a significant reduction of tumor blood-vessel density and intratumoral hemorrhage, accompanied by activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in NB cells. Furthermore, the KDs caused a significant reduction in the serum levels of essential amino acids, but increased those of serine, glutamine and glycine. Our data suggest that targeting energy metabolism by a modified KD may be considered as part of a multimodal treatment regimen to improve the efficacy of classic anti-NB therapy.

  1. A SCID mouse-human lung xenograft model of varicella-zoster virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Pan, Dequan; Fu, Wenkun; Cai, Linli; Ye, Jianghui; Liu, Jian; Liu, Che; Huang, Xiumin; Lin, Yanzhen; Xia, Ningshao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua

    2017-10-01

    Varicella pneumonia is one of the most serious, potentially life-threatening complications of primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection in adults and immunocompromised individuals. However, studies on the lung pathogenesis of VZV infection as well as development and testing of antivirals have long been hindered by limited access to clinical samples and a lack of suitable animal models. In this study, we report for the first time the use of human lung xenografts in SCID mice for investigating VZV infection. Human fetal lung tissues grafted under the kidney capsule of SCID mice rapidly grew and developed mature structures closely resembling normal human lung. Following infection, VZV replicated and spread efficiently in human lung xenografts, where the virus targeted both alveolar epithelial and mesenchymal cells, and resulted in formation of large viral lesions. VZV particles were readily detected in the nuclei and cytoplasm of infected lung cells by electron microscopy. Additionally, VZV infection resulted in a robust pro-inflammatory cytokine response in human lung xenografts. In conclusion, infecting human lung xenografts in SCID mice provides a useful, biological relevant tool for future mechanistic studies on VZV lung pathogenesis, and may potentially facilitate the evaluation of new antiviral therapies for VZV lung infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. α-Pinene Inhibits Human Prostate Cancer Growth in a Mouse Xenograft Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunqi; Chen, Ran; Wang, Yun; Yang, Yixin

    2017-10-26

    α-Pinene is one of the most widely found terpenoids in nature. Substantial evidence shows that α-pinene has cancer prevention properties. In this study, the PC-3 cell line was used to establish subcutaneous xenograft tumors in nude mice. Cytotoxicity was measured with the MTT assay, and apoptosis and cell cycle analyses were conducted using flow cytometry in vitro. The PC-3 cell line was used to establish subcutaneous xenograft tumors in nude mice. We found that treatment with α-pinene significantly inhibited human prostate cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the cell line-based model. Furthermore, tumor progression was inhibited more in mice treated with α-pinene than in control mice. We detected less Ki67 and proliferation cell nuclear antigen in paraffin sections from xenograft tumor specimens taken from α-pinene-treated mice than in those from the control group. Meanwhile, α-pinene treatment induced apoptosis in xenograft tumors as determined by the TUNEL assay. These data strongly suggest that α-pinene inhibits prostate cancer growth in a xenograft model and may be an effective therapeutic agent for prostate cancer treatment. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat model were investigated. Procedures and results described herein prove the feasibility of use of the device, which is applicable for any investigation involving irradiation ...

  4. Validation of a mouse xenograft model system for gene expression analysis of human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-clinical models that effectively recapitulate human disease are critical for expanding our knowledge of cancer biology and drug resistance mechanisms. For haematological malignancies, the non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mouse is one of the most successful models to study paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL. However, for this model to be effective for studying engraftment and therapy responses at the whole genome level, careful molecular characterisation is essential. Results Here, we sought to validate species-specific gene expression profiling in the high engraftment continuous ALL NOD/SCID xenograft. Using the human Affymetrix whole transcript platform we analysed transcriptional profiles from engrafted tissues without prior cell separation of mouse cells and found it to return highly reproducible profiles in xenografts from individual mice. The model was further tested with experimental mixtures of human and mouse cells, demonstrating that the presence of mouse cells does not significantly skew expression profiles when xenografts contain 90% or more human cells. In addition, we present a novel in silico and experimental masking approach to identify probes and transcript clusters susceptible to cross-species hybridisation. Conclusions We demonstrate species-specific transcriptional profiles can be obtained from xenografts when high levels of engraftment are achieved or with the application of transcript cluster masks. Importantly, this masking approach can be applied and adapted to other xenograft models where human tissue infiltration is lower. This model provides a powerful platform for identifying genes and pathways associated with ALL disease progression and response to therapy in vivo.

  5. Epigenetic alterations differ in phenotypically distinct human neuroblastoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwen Helen R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic aberrations and a CpG island methylator phenotype have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in children with neuroblastoma (NB. Seven cancer related genes (THBS-1, CASP8, HIN-1, TIG-1, BLU, SPARC, and HIC-1 that have been shown to have epigenetic changes in adult cancers and play important roles in the regulation of angiogenesis, tumor growth, and apoptosis were analyzed to investigate the role epigenetic alterations play in determining NB phenotype. Methods Two NB cell lines (tumorigenic LA1-55n and non-tumorigenic LA1-5s that differ in their ability to form colonies in soft agar and tumors in nude mice were used. Quantitative RNA expression analyses were performed on seven genes in LA1-5s, LA1-55n and 5-Aza-dC treated LA1-55n NB cell lines. The methylation status around THBS-1, HIN-1, TIG-1 and CASP8 promoters was examined using methylation specific PCR. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was used to examine histone modifications along the THBS-1 promoter. Luciferase assay was used to determine THBS-1 promoter activity. Cell proliferation assay was used to examine the effect of 5-Aza-dC on NB cell growth. The soft agar assay was used to determine the tumorigenicity. Results Promoter methylation values for THBS-1, HIN-1, TIG-1, and CASP8 were higher in LA1-55n cells compared to LA1-5s cells. Consistent with the promoter methylation status, lower levels of gene expression were detected in the LA1-55n cells. Histone marks associated with repressive chromatin states (H3K9Me3, H3K27Me3, and H3K4Me3 were identified in the THBS-1 promoter region in the LA1-55n cells, but not the LA1-5s cells. In contrast, the three histone codes associated with an active chromatin state (acetyl H3, acetyl H4, and H3K4Me3 were present in the THBS-1 promoter region in LA1-5s cells, but not the LA1-55n cells, suggesting that an accessible chromatin structure is important for THBS-1 expression. We also show that 5-Aza

  6. Human skeletal muscle xenograft as a new preclinical model for muscle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanfan; King, Oliver D; Rahimov, Fedik; Jones, Takako I; Ward, Christopher W; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Liu, Naili; Emerson, Charles P; Kunkel, Louis M; Partridge, Terence A; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2014-06-15

    Development of novel therapeutics requires good animal models of disease. Disorders for which good animal models do not exist have very few drugs in development or clinical trial. Even where there are accepted, albeit imperfect models, the leap from promising preclinical drug results to positive clinical trials commonly fails, including in disorders of skeletal muscle. The main alternative model for early drug development, tissue culture, lacks both the architecture and, usually, the metabolic fidelity of the normal tissue in vivo. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility and validity of human to mouse xenografts as a preclinical model of myopathy. Human skeletal muscle biopsies transplanted into the anterior tibial compartment of the hindlimbs of NOD-Rag1(null) IL2rγ(null) immunodeficient host mice regenerate new vascularized and innervated myofibers from human myogenic precursor cells. The grafts exhibit contractile and calcium release behavior, characteristic of functional muscle tissue. The validity of the human graft as a model of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is demonstrated in disease biomarker studies, showing that gene expression profiles of xenografts mirror those of the fresh donor biopsies. These findings illustrate the value of a new experimental model of muscle disease, the human muscle xenograft in mice, as a feasible and valid preclinical tool to better investigate the pathogenesis of human genetic myopathies and to more accurately predict their response to novel therapeutics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Human microdosing and mice xenograft data of AGM-130 applied to estimate efficacious doses in patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Wan-Su; Park, Gab-Jin; Han, Seunghoon; Ban, Sooho; Park, Moon-Young; Kim, San-Ho; Kim, Seon-Myung; Kim, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung Sik; Shin, Young G; Yim, Dong-Seok

    2017-08-01

    AGM-130 is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that exhibits dose-dependent efficacy in xenograft mouse models. During preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) studies, mice and rats showed comparable PK parameters while dogs showed unusually high clearance (CL), which has made human PK prediction challenging. To address this discrepancy, we performed a human microdosing PK and developed a mouse PK/PD model in order to guide the first-in-human studies. A microdose of AGM-130 was given via intravenous injection to healthy subjects. Efficacy data obtained using MCF-7 breast cancer cells implanted in mice was analyzed using pre-existing tumor growth inhibition models. We simulated a human PK/PD profile with the PK parameters obtained from the microdose study and the PD parameters estimated from the xenograft PK/PD model. The human CL of AGM-130 was 3.08 L/h/kg, which was comparable to CL in mice and rats. The time-courses of tumor growth in xenograft model was well described by a preexisting model. Our simulation indicated that the human doses needed for 50 and 90% inhibition of tumor growth were about 100 and 400 mg, respectively. This is the first report of using microdose PK and xenograft PK/PD model to predict efficacious doses before the first-in-human trial in cancer patients. In addition, this work highlights the importance of integration of all of information in PK/PD analysis and illustrates how modeling and simulation can be used to add value in the early stages of drug development.

  8. Galectin-3 impairment of MYCN-dependent apoptosis-sensitive phenotype is antagonized by nutlin-3 in neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Veschi

    Full Text Available MYCN amplification occurs in about 20-25% of human neuroblastomas and characterizes the majority of the high-risk cases, which display less than 50% prolonged survival rate despite intense multimodal treatment. Somehow paradoxically, MYCN also sensitizes neuroblastoma cells to apoptosis, understanding the molecular mechanisms of which might be relevant for the therapy of MYCN amplified neuroblastoma. We recently reported that the apoptosis-sensitive phenotype induced by MYCN is linked to stabilization of p53 and its proapoptotic kinase HIPK2. In MYCN primed neuroblastoma cells, further activation of both HIPK2 and p53 by Nutlin-3 leads to massive apoptosis in vitro and to tumor shrinkage and impairment of metastasis in xenograft models. Here we report that Galectin-3 impairs MYCN-primed and HIPK2-p53-dependent apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells. Galectin-3 is broadly expressed in human neuroblastoma cell lines and tumors and is repressed by MYCN to induce the apoptosis-sensitive phenotype. Despite its reduced levels, Galectin-3 can still exert residual antiapoptotic effects in MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cells, possibly due to its specific subcellular localization. Importantly, Nutlin-3 represses Galectin-3 expression, and this is required for its potent cell killing effect on MYCN amplified cell lines. Our data further characterize the apoptosis-sensitive phenotype induced by MYCN, expand our understanding of the activity of MDM2-p53 antagonists and highlight Galectin-3 as a potential biomarker for the tailored p53 reactivation therapy in patients with high-risk neuroblastomas.

  9. The Arctic Alzheimer mutation enhances sensitivity to toxic stress in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Nilsberth, Camilla; Stenh, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    The E693G (Arctic) mutation of the amyloid precursor protein was recently found to lead to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in a Swedish family. In the present study, we report that the Arctic mutation decreases cell viability in human neuroblastoma cells. The cell viability, as measured by the MTT...... their secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein. The enhanced sensitivity to toxic stress in cells with the Arctic mutation most likely contributes to the pathogenic pathway leading to Alzheimer's disease....

  10. Antitumor effect of Kanglaite® injection in human pancreatic cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Kanglaite® injection (KLT), with a main ingredient of Coix seed oil (a traditional Chinese medicine), has been widely used for cancer treatment in China. KLT has an inhibitory effect on many kinds of tumors and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling promotes cell survival, proliferation, and progression in cancer cells. Therefore, targeting this pathway may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches for human cancers. Methods Here, we examined the effects of KLT on the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in pancreatic cancer xenografts in mice, and assessed its therapeutic potential. Growth and apoptosis of tumor xenografts were examined, and the expression levels of genes and proteins involved in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway were measured by RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Results Our results revealed that KLT dramatically inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer xenografts and induced apoptosis simultaneously. Furthermore, it downregulated the expression of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR. Conclusions These results suggest that KLT can suppress growth and induce apoptosis of pancreatic cancer xenografts. Moreover, KLT can downregulate the expression of phospho-Akt and phospho-mTOR to modulate the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:25005526

  11. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth by Ketogenic Diet and/or Calorie Restriction in a CD1-Nu Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morscher, Raphael Johannes; Aminzadeh-Gohari, Sepideh; Feichtinger, René Gunther; Mayr, Johannes Adalbert; Lang, Roland; Neureiter, Daniel; Sperl, Wolfgang; Kofler, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant pediatric cancer derived from neural crest cells. It is characterized by a generalized reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet on neuroblastoma tumor growth and monitor potential adaptive mechanisms of the cancer's oxidative phosphorylation system. Xenografts were established in CD-1 nude mice by subcutaneous injection of two neuroblastoma cell lines having distinct genetic characteristics and therapeutic sensitivity [SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2)]. Mice were randomized to four treatment groups receiving standard diet, calorie-restricted standard diet, long chain fatty acid based ketogenic diet or calorie-restricted ketogenic diet. Tumor growth, survival, metabolic parameters and weight of the mice were monitored. Cancer tissue was evaluated for diet-induced changes of proliferation indices and multiple oxidative phosphorylation system parameters (respiratory chain enzyme activities, western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and mitochondrial DNA content). Ketogenic diet and/or calorie restriction significantly reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival in the xenograft model. Neuroblastoma growth reduction correlated with decreased blood glucose concentrations and was characterized by a significant decrease in Ki-67 and phospho-histone H3 levels in the diet groups with low tumor growth. As in human tumor tissue, neuroblastoma xenografts showed distinctly low mitochondrial complex II activity in combination with a generalized low level of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, validating the tumor model. Neuroblastoma showed no ability to adapt its mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity to the change in nutrient supply induced by dietary intervention. Our data suggest that targeting the metabolic characteristics of neuroblastoma could open a new front in supporting standard therapy regimens. Therefore, we propose

  12. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth by Ketogenic Diet and/or Calorie Restriction in a CD1-Nu Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Johannes Morscher

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is a malignant pediatric cancer derived from neural crest cells. It is characterized by a generalized reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet on neuroblastoma tumor growth and monitor potential adaptive mechanisms of the cancer's oxidative phosphorylation system.Xenografts were established in CD-1 nude mice by subcutaneous injection of two neuroblastoma cell lines having distinct genetic characteristics and therapeutic sensitivity [SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2]. Mice were randomized to four treatment groups receiving standard diet, calorie-restricted standard diet, long chain fatty acid based ketogenic diet or calorie-restricted ketogenic diet. Tumor growth, survival, metabolic parameters and weight of the mice were monitored. Cancer tissue was evaluated for diet-induced changes of proliferation indices and multiple oxidative phosphorylation system parameters (respiratory chain enzyme activities, western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry and mitochondrial DNA content.Ketogenic diet and/or calorie restriction significantly reduced tumor growth and prolonged survival in the xenograft model. Neuroblastoma growth reduction correlated with decreased blood glucose concentrations and was characterized by a significant decrease in Ki-67 and phospho-histone H3 levels in the diet groups with low tumor growth. As in human tumor tissue, neuroblastoma xenografts showed distinctly low mitochondrial complex II activity in combination with a generalized low level of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, validating the tumor model. Neuroblastoma showed no ability to adapt its mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation activity to the change in nutrient supply induced by dietary intervention.Our data suggest that targeting the metabolic characteristics of neuroblastoma could open a new front in supporting standard therapy regimens

  13. Recombinant human endostatin normalizes tumor vasculature and enhances radiation response in xenografted human nasopharyngeal carcinoma models.

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    Fang Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxic tumor cells can reduce the efficacy of radiation. Antiangiogenic therapy may transiently "normalize" the tumor vasculature to make it more efficient for oxygen delivery. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the recombinant human endostatin (endostar can create a "vascular normalization window" to alleviate hypoxia and enhance the inhibitory effects of radiation therapy in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Transient changes in morphology of tumor vasculature and hypoxic tumor cell fraction in response to endostar were detected in mice bearing CNE-2 and 5-8F human NPC xenografts. Various treatment schedules were tested to assess the influence of endostar on the effect of radiation therapy. Several important factors relevant to the angiogenesis were identified through immunohistochemical staining. During endostar treatment, tumor vascularity decreased, while the basement membrane and pericyte coverage associated with endothelial cells increased, which supported the idea of vessel normalization. Hypoxic tumor cell fraction also decreased after the treatment. The transient modulation of tumor physiology caused by endostar improved the effect of radiation treatment compared with other treatment schedules. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-14 decreased, while the level of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF increased. CONCLUSIONS: Endostar normalized tumor vasculature, which alleviated hypoxia and significantly sensitized the function of radiation in anti-tumor in human NPC. The results provide an important experimental basis for combining endostar with radiation therapy in human NPC.

  14. Synergistic interactions between PBDEs and PCBs in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellacani, C; Tagliaferri, S; Caglieri, A; Goldoni, M; Giordano, G; Mutti, A; Costa, L G

    2014-04-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Exposure to these chemicals has been associated with developmental neurotoxicity, endocrine dysfunction, and reproductive disorders. Humans and wildlife are generally exposed to a mixture of these environmental pollutants, highlighting the need to evaluate the potential effects of combined exposures. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of the combined exposure to two PBDEs and two PCBs in a human neuronal cell line. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether, 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether, PCB-126 (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl; a dioxin-like PCB), and PCB-153 (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl; a non-dioxin-like PCB) were chosen, because their concentrations are among the highest in human tissues and the environment. The results suggest that the nature of interactions is related to the PCB structure. Mixtures of PCB-153 and both PBDEs had a prevalently synergistic effect. In contrast, mixtures of each PBDE congener with PCB-126 showed additive effects at threshold concentrations, and synergistic effects at higher concentrations. These results emphasize the concept that the toxicity of xenobiotics may be affected by possible interactions, which may be of significance given the common coexposures to multiple contaminants. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Efficacy of Sulforaphane in Eradicating Helicobacter pylori in Human Gastric Xenografts Implanted in Nude Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Haristoy, Xavier; Angioi-Duprez, Karine; Duprez, Adrien; Lozniewski, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate abundant in the form of its glucosinolate precursor in broccoli sprouts, has shown in vitro activity against Helicobacter pylori. We evaluated the effect of sulforaphane in vivo against this bacterium by using human gastric xenografts in nude mice. H. pylori was completely eradicated in 8 of the 11 sulforaphane-treated grafts. This result suggests that sulforaphane might be beneficial in the treatment of H. pylori-infected individuals.

  16. Polyamine Metabolism Is Sensitive to Glycolysis Inhibition in Human Neuroblastoma Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, M. Victoria; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Urdiales, José Luis; Keinänen, Tuomo A.; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation, and their levels are elevated in many human tumors. The oncogene n-myc is known to potentiate polyamine metabolism. Neuroblastoma, the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children, harbors the amplification of n-myc oncogene in 25% of the cases, and it is associated with treatment failure and poor prognosis. We evaluated several metabolic features of the human neuroblastoma cell lines Kelly, IMR-32, and SK-N-SH. We further investigated the effects of glycolysis impairment in polyamine metabolism in these cell lines. A previously unknown linkage between glycolysis impairment and polyamine reduction is unveiled. We show that glycolysis inhibition is able to trigger signaling events leading to the reduction of N-Myc protein levels and a subsequent decrease of both ornithine decarboxylase expression and polyamine levels, accompanied by cell cycle blockade preceding cell death. New anti-tumor strategies could take advantage of the direct relationship between glucose deprivation and polyamine metabolism impairment, leading to cell death, and its apparent dependence on n-myc. Combined therapies targeting glucose metabolism and polyamine synthesis could be effective in the treatment of n-myc-expressing tumors. PMID:25593318

  17. Polyamine metabolism is sensitive to glycolysis inhibition in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, M Victoria; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Urdiales, José Luis; Keinänen, Tuomo A; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2015-03-06

    Polyamines are essential for cell proliferation, and their levels are elevated in many human tumors. The oncogene n-myc is known to potentiate polyamine metabolism. Neuroblastoma, the most frequent extracranial solid tumor in children, harbors the amplification of n-myc oncogene in 25% of the cases, and it is associated with treatment failure and poor prognosis. We evaluated several metabolic features of the human neuroblastoma cell lines Kelly, IMR-32, and SK-N-SH. We further investigated the effects of glycolysis impairment in polyamine metabolism in these cell lines. A previously unknown linkage between glycolysis impairment and polyamine reduction is unveiled. We show that glycolysis inhibition is able to trigger signaling events leading to the reduction of N-Myc protein levels and a subsequent decrease of both ornithine decarboxylase expression and polyamine levels, accompanied by cell cycle blockade preceding cell death. New anti-tumor strategies could take advantage of the direct relationship between glucose deprivation and polyamine metabolism impairment, leading to cell death, and its apparent dependence on n-myc. Combined therapies targeting glucose metabolism and polyamine synthesis could be effective in the treatment of n-myc-expressing tumors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Cytotoxicity induced by cypermethrin in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Line SH-SY5Y

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    Grzegorz Raszewski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of Cypermethrin (CM on cultured human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. SH-SY5Y cells were treated with CM at 0–200µM for 24, 48, and 72 h, [i]in vitro[/i]. It was found that CM induced the cell death of Neuroblastoma cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, as shown by LDH assays. Next, some aspects of the process of cell death triggered by CM in the human SH-SY5Y cell line were investigated. It was revealed that the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPh, sensitizes SH-SY5Y cells to necroptosis caused by CM. Furthermore, signal transduction inhibitors PD98059, SL-327, SB202190, SP600125 failed to attenuate the effect of the pesticide. Finally, it was shown that inhibition of TNF-a by Pomalidomide (PLD caused statistically significant reduction in CM-induced cytotoxicity. Overall, the data obtained suggest that CM induces neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells by necroptosis.

  19. Antibody directed against human YKL-40 increases tumor volume in a human melanoma xenograft model in scid mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salamon, Johannes; Hoffmann, Tatjana; Elies, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Induced overexpression of the secretory protein YKL-40 promotes tumor growth in xenograft experiments. We investigated if targeting YKL-40 with a monoclonal antibody could inhibit tumor growth. YKL-40 expressing human melanoma cells (LOX) were injected subcutenously in Balb/c scid mice. Animals...

  20. Alvocidib (Flavopiridol) suppresses tumor growth in SCID mice with human esophageal cancer xenografts without inducing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinsuke; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Masahiko; Iwanuma, Yoshimi; Sonoue, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Toshiharu; Tsurumaru, Masahiko

    2006-08-01

    Alvocidib (Flavopiridol, HMR1275) is a potent inhibitor of multiple cyclin-dependent kinases and has been identified recently as an antitumor agent in several cancers. Previous studies have shown that alvocidib could potentially treat esophageal cancer in vitro. This study evaluates alvocidib for its ability to suppress tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice bearing TE8 human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) xenografts. Alvocidib treatment of 10mg/kg body weight reduced tumor volume significantly. Immunohistochemistry analysis of alvocidib-treated tumor sections showed significant reductions in cyclin D1, VEGF, and Rb levels. Alvocidib treatment did not cause a marked increase in apoptotic tumor cells by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis, yet hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed tumor necrosis. In vivo investigation of alvocidib treatment confirmed antitumor activity in TE8 esophageal xenografts. These findings suggest that alvocidib could be a useful anti-cancer agent for esophageal cancer.

  1. DNA Topoisomerase I-Targeted Chemotherapy of Human Colon Cancer in Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanella, Beppino C.; Stehlin, John S.; Wall, Monroe E.; Wani, Mansukh C.; Nicholas, Allan W.; Liu, Leroy F.; Silber, Robert; Potmesil, Milan

    1989-11-01

    Drug development is needed to improve chemotherapy of patients with locally advanced or metastatic colon carcinoma, who otherwise have an unfavorable prognosis. DNA topoisomerase I, a nuclear enzyme important for solving topological problems arising during DNA replication and for other cellular functions, has been identified as a principal target of a plant alkaloid 20 (S)-camptothecin. Significantly increased concentrations of this enzyme, compared to that in normal colonic mucosa, were found in advanced stages of human colon adenocarcinoma and in xenografts of colon cancer carried by immunodeficient mice. Several synthetic analogs of camptothecin, selected by tests with the purified enzyme and tissue-culture screens, were evaluated in the xenograft model. Unlike other anticancer drugs tested, 20(RS)-9-amino-camptothecin (9-AC) induced disease-free remissions. The overall drug toxicity was low and allowed for repeated courses of treatment.

  2. Therapeutic activity of two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthou Christian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that allanxanthone C and macluraxanthone, two xanthones purified from Guttiferae trees, display in vitro antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and leukemia B cell lines. Results Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of the two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human CLL, developed by engrafting CD5-transfected chronic leukemia B cells into SCID mice. Treatment of the animals with five daily injections of either allanxanthone C or macluraxanthone resulted in a significant prolongation of their survival as compared to control animals injected with the solvent alone (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0141, respectively. The same treatment of mice which were not xenografted induced no mortality. Conclusion These data show for the first time the in vivo antileukemic activities of two plant-derived xanthones, and confirm their potential interest for CLL therapy.

  3. Effects of curcumin on growth of human cervical cancer xenograft in nude mice and underlying mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aixue LIU

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study investigated the effects of curcumin (Cur on growth of human cervical cancer xenograft in nude mice and underlying mechanism. The nude mice modeled with human cervical cancer HeLa cell xenograft were treated with normal saline (control, 3 mg/kg Cisplatin, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg Cur, respectively. The animal body weight and growth of tumor were measured. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, p21, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein in tumor tissue were determined. Results showed that, after treatment for 20 days, the tumor mass and tumor volume in 100 and 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05. The expressions of Bax, p53 and p21 protein in tumor tissue in 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly higher than control group (P < 0.05, and the expressions of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein in tumor tissue in 200 mg/kg Cur group were significantly lower than control group (P < 0.05. Cur can inhibit the growth of HeLa cell xenograft in nude mice. The possible mechanism may be related to its up-regulation of Bax, p53 and p21 protein expression in tumor tissue, and down-regulation of Bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF and MIF protein expression.

  4. Human xenografts are not rejected in a naturally occurring immunodeficient porcine line: a human tumor model in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Matthew T; Balivada, Sivasai; Beck, Amanda P; Kerrigan, Maureen A; Pyle, Marla M; Dekkers, Jack C M; Wyatt, Carol R; Rowland, Robert R R; Anderson, David E; Bossmann, Stefan H; Troyer, Deryl L

    2012-04-01

    Animal models for cancer therapy are invaluable for preclinical testing of potential cancer treatments; however, therapies tested in such models often fail to translate into clinical settings. Therefore, a better preclinical model for cancer treatment testing is needed. Here we demonstrate that an immunodeficient line of pigs can host and support the growth of xenografted human tumors and has the potential to be an effective animal model for cancer therapy. Wild-type and immunodeficient pigs were injected subcutaneously in the left ear with human melanoma cells (A375SM cells) and in the right ear with human pancreatic carcinoma cells (PANC-1). All immunodeficient pigs developed tumors that were verified by histology and immunohistochemistry. Nonaffected littermates did not develop tumors. Immunodeficient pigs, which do not reject xenografted human tumors, have the potential to become an extremely useful animal model for cancer therapy because of their similarity in size, anatomy, and physiology to humans.

  5. Modification of the hypoxic fraction of a xenografted human colon tumor by differentiation-inducing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, J.T.

    1988-05-18

    Xenografted tumors were produced in nude mice by injection of HCT-15 human colon tumor cells. The hypoxic fractions of control tumors as determined from x-ray survival curves were approximately 18%. Other tumors were treated (every day X 9) with daily injections of N-methylformamide (150 mg/kg) or sodium butyrate (2,000 mg/kg). For both agents, it was found that the hypoxic fractions were less than 0.05% and less than 1.7%, respectively. These data indicate that selected differentiation-inducing agents could be of value for treatment of human solid tumors that contain hypoxic cells.

  6. Targeting of human interleukin-12B by small hairpin RNAs in xenografted psoriatic skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Maria

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that shows as erythematous and scaly lesions. The pathogenesis of psoriasis is driven by a dysregulation of the immune system which leads to an altered cytokine production. Proinflammatory cytokines that are up-regulated in psoriasis include tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, interleukin-12 (IL-12, and IL-23 for which monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for clinical use. We have previously documented the therapeutic applicability of targeting TNFα mRNA for RNA interference-mediated down-regulation by anti-TNFα small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs delivered by lentiviral vectors to xenografted psoriatic skin. The present report aims at targeting mRNA encoding the shared p40 subunit (IL-12B of IL-12 and IL-23 by cellular transduction with lentiviral vectors encoding anti-IL12B shRNAs. Methods Effective anti-IL12B shRNAs are identified among a panel of shRNAs by potency measurements in cultured cells. The efficiency and persistency of lentiviral gene delivery to xenografted human skin are investigated by bioluminescence analysis of skin treated with lentiviral vectors encoding the luciferase gene. shRNA-expressing lentiviral vectors are intradermally injected in xenografted psoriatic skin and the effects of the treatment evaluated by clinical psoriasis scoring, by measurements of epidermal thickness, and IL-12B mRNA levels. Results Potent and persistent transgene expression following a single intradermal injection of lentiviral vectors in xenografted human skin is reported. Stable IL-12B mRNA knockdown and reduced epidermal thickness are achieved three weeks after treatment of xenografted psoriatic skin with lentivirus-encoded anti-IL12B shRNAs. These findings mimick the results obtained with anti-TNFα shRNAs but, in contrast to anti-TNFα treatment, anti-IL12B shRNAs do not ameliorate the psoriatic phenotype as evaluated by semi-quantitative clinical scoring and by

  7. [Establishment of subcutaneously transplanted and metastatic neuroblastoma models in nude mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong-ting; Dong, Qian; Gao, Qiang; Hao, Xi-wei; Song, Hua; Zhao, Nan

    2010-04-01

    To establish a tumor-bearing nude mouse model of human neuroblastoma in order to study the mechanisms of neuroblastoma invasion and metastasis, and to investigate potential therapeutic modalities in the experimental animal models. A human neuroblastoma cell line was cultured in vitro. 1 x 10(7) cells undergoing exponential growth were collected in 0.1 ml of suspension and subcutaneously inoculated into the right flank next to the forelimb in nude mice. The biological characteristics of the developed tumors were observed, and histopathological and DNA microarray analyses were performed. The expressions of NSE in the subcutaneous tumor, metastatic tumor and the primary neuroblastoma tumor tissues from a pediatric patient were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Tumors successfully grew in 36 out of 48 injected mice, with a total tumor-formation rate of 75.0%. Metastasis occurred in 10 cases, and the metastatic rate was 20.8%. Tumors in five injected mice grew locally without metastasis. These tumors had large volume and the tumor weight reached up to half of the body weight of the host animal. Four mice exhibited systemic metastasis without tumor growth at the primary inoculation site. There were six mice with locally growing tumor accompanied by metastasis. We have successfully established a human neuroblastoma xenograft model in nude mice with high tumor growth and metastatic rates. This model depicting the natural cell growth, local infiltration and distant metastasis characteristics of human neuroblastoma, providing an ideal animal model for in vivo studies of neuroblastoma. In addition, the results of this study indicate the heterogeneous nature of neuroblastoma, it may play an important role in metastasis of this tumor.

  8. Scorpion (Odontobuthus doriae) venom induces apoptosis and inhibits DNA synthesis in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargan, Jamil; Sajad, Mir; Umar, Sadiq; Naime, M; Ali, Shakir; Khan, Haider A

    2011-02-01

    Scorpion and its organs have been used to cure epilepsy, rheumatism, and male impotency since medieval times. Scorpion venom which contains different compounds like enzyme and non-enzyme proteins, ions, free amino acids, and other organic inorganic substances have been reported to posses antiproliferative, cytotoxic, apoptogenic, and immunosuppressive properties. We for the first time report the apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of scorpion venom (Odontobuthus doriae) in human neuroblastoma cells. After exposure of cells to medium containing varying concentrations of venom (10, 25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/ml), cell viability decreased to 90.75, 75.53, 55.52, 37.85, and 14.30%, respectively, after 24 h. Cells expressed morphological changes like swelling, inhibition of neurite outgrowth, irregular shape, aggregation, rupture of membrane, and release of cytosolic contents after treatment with venom. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level increased in 50 and 100 μg/ml as compared to control, but there was no significant increase in LDH level at a dose of 10 and 20 μg/ml. Two concentrations viz. 50 and 100 μ/ml were selected because of the profound effect of these concentrations on the cellular health and population. Treatment with these two concentrations induced reactive nitrogen intermediates and depolarization in mitochondria. While caspase-3 activity increased in a concentration-dependent manner, only 50 μg/ml was able to fragment DNA. It was interesting to note that at higher dose, i.e., 100 μg/ml, the cells were killed, supposedly by acute necrosis. DNA synthesis evidenced by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner. The cells without treatment incorporated BrdU with high affinity confirming their cancerous nature whereas very less incorporation was noticed in treated cells. Our results show apoptotic and antiproliferative potential of scorpion venom (O. doriae) in human neuroblastoma cells. These properties

  9. Antigen expression of metastasizing and non-metastasizing human melanoma cells xenografted into nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Muijen, G N; Cornelissen, L M; Jansen, C F; Figdor, C G; Johnson, J P; Bröcker, E B; Ruiter, D J

    1991-01-01

    In order to study differences in antigen expression related to the different stages of the process of metastasis of human melanoma cell lines, we determined the expression pattern of a series of well-characterized genes in a set of human melanoma cell lines with different metastatic behavior in nude mice. This set included non-metastatic (IF6, 530), sporadically metastatic (M14, Mel 57), and frequently metastatic (BLM, MV3) cell lines after subcutaneous inoculation. To study the phenotype of these cell lines both the cultured cells and representative samples of local tumors at the inoculation site and their metastases in the lungs were immunostained with a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against melanocytic differentiation or progression antigens. Although most cell lines (IF6, 530, M14 and Mel 57) showed HLA-DR expression in vitro, these antigens were lacking in all xenografted lesions studied with exception of the 530 cell line. 530 Xenografts, however, showed a dramatic down-regulation of HLA-DR compared with the cell line in vitro. The same phenomenon was seen with respect to ICAM-1 expression. The expression of all other antigens studied in xenografts, both in subcutaneous tumors and in lung lesions, was in general comparable to that in the melanoma cell lines in vitro, with exception of the 530 cell line. In all melanoma cell lines except 530 the degree of intra- and interlesional heterogeneity regarding the expression of all antigens studied was limited. Remarkably, comparison of the immunophenotype of the frequently metastasizing (BLM, MV3) and the sporadically (M14, Mel 57) or non-metastasizing (IF6, 530) cell lines showed that the two frequently metastasizing cell lines had marked expression of the progression antigens VLA-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor, and lack of expression of the differentiation antigen NKI-beteb. These findings warrant further studies on the role of these antigens in the process of metastasis of human melanoma cells

  10. Developmental exposure to estrogen alters differentiation and epigenetic programming in a human fetal prostate xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia M Saffarini

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequent non-cutaneous malignancy in men. There is strong evidence in rodents that neonatal estrogen exposure plays a role in the development of this disease. However, there is little information regarding the effects of estrogen in human fetal prostate tissue. This study explored early life estrogen exposure, with and without a secondary estrogen and testosterone treatment in a human fetal prostate xenograft model. Histopathological lesions, proliferation, and serum hormone levels were evaluated at 7, 30, 90, and 200-day time-points after xenografting. The expression of 40 key genes involved in prostatic glandular and stromal growth, cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, hormone receptors and tumor suppressors was evaluated using a custom PCR array. Epigenome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was performed on whole tissue, and laser capture-microdissection (LCM isolated epithelial and stromal compartments of 200-day prostate xenografts. Combined initial plus secondary estrogenic exposures had the most severe tissue changes as revealed by the presence of hyperplastic glands at day 200. Gene expression changes corresponded with the cellular events in the KEGG prostate cancer pathway, indicating that initial plus secondary exposure to estrogen altered the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, ultimately resulting in apoptosis inhibition and an increase in cell cycle progression. DNA methylation revealed that differentially methylated CpG sites significantly predominate in the stromal compartment as a result of estrogen-treatment, thereby providing new targets for future investigation. By using human fetal prostate tissue and eliminating the need for species extrapolation, this study provides novel insights into the gene expression and epigenetic effects related to prostate carcinogenesis following early life estrogen exposure.

  11. TLR3 triggering regulates PD-L1 (CD274) expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boes, Marianne; Meyer-Wentrup, Friederike

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, causing 12% of all pediatric cancer mortality. Neuroblastoma specific T-cells have been detected in patients, but usually fail to attack and eradicate the tumors. Tumor immune evasion may thus play an important role in

  12. Creation and characterization of a xenograft model for human cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Corinna; Bachran, Christopher; Stanke, Jonas; Elezkurtaj, Sefer; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Fuchs, Hendrik; Fuchs, Hendrick; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Schneider, Achim; Cichon, Günter

    2010-07-01

    Most of primary human cancer tissues show effective engraftment and proliferation after transplantation onto Scid mice. However xenotransplantation of vital specimens of cervical carcinoma has not been successful in the past, also the generation of cell lines from primary cervical cancer has hardly ever been possible. The lack of appropriate xenograft models impedes the search for improved specific therapeutic agents. We explored the efficiency of different techniques for tumor transplantation and describe the first protocol to enable reliable and efficient engraftment of human cervical cancer in Scid beige mice. To demonstrate the value of this tumor model, we explored the therapeutic potency of a novel immunotoxin (SA2E). SA2E is a chimeric protein constructed by fusing the human epidermal growth factor and the plant protein toxin saporin. About 70% of transplanted tumors exhibited potent proliferation, and multiple retransplantation was possible in 40%. Local treatment with the immunotoxin SA2E had a dose dependent therapeutic effect and achieved a tumor volume reduction of up to 60%. Reliable engraftment and high reproducibility make this novel xenograft model an attractive test system to identify new therapeutic agents for cervical cancer. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Metastatic pathway and the microvascular and physicochemical microenvironments of human melanoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixia; Andersen, Lise Mari K; Rofstad, Einar K

    2017-10-10

    Malignant melanoma of the skin can metastasize through blood vessels and lymphatics. The primary tumor develops a vascular microenvironment characterized by abnormal blood vessels and lymphatics and a physicochemical microenvironment characterized by low oxygen tension, regions with hypoxic tissue, and high interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). This study aimed at identifying relationships between the metastatic route of melanomas and characteristic features of the microvascular and physicochemical microenvironments of the primary tumor. Two patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models (E-13, N-15) and four cell line-derived xenografts (CDX) models (C-10, D-12, R-18, T-22) of human melanoma were included in the study. Tumors were transplanted to an orthotopic site in BALB/c-nu/nu mice, and when the tumors had grown to a volume of 500-600 mm3, the IFP of the primary tumor was measured and the hypoxia marker pimonidazole was administered before the host mouse was euthanized. The primary tumor, lungs, and six pairs of lymph nodes were evaluated by examining hematoxylin/eosin-stained and immunostained histological preparations. The expression of angiogenesis-related genes was assessed by quantitative PCR. C-10, D-12, and E-13 tumors disseminated primarily by the hematogenous route and developed pulmonary metastases. These tumors showed high angiogenic activity and high expression of the F3 gene as well as ANGPT2 and TIE1, genes encoding proteins of the angiopoietin-tie system. N-15, R-18, and T-22 tumors disseminated mainly by the lymphogenous route and developed metastases in draining lymph nodes. These tumors had highly elevated IFP and showed high expression of NRP2, a gene encoding neuropilin-2. The primary metastatic route of orthotopic human melanoma xenografts and the development of lung and lymph node metastases are influenced significantly by the microvascular and physicochemical microenvironments of the primary tumor.

  14. Wild-type rabies virus induces autophagy in human and mouse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiaojiao; Zhu, Shenghe; Hu, Lili; Ye, Pingping; Wang, Yifei; Tian, Qin; Mei, Mingzhu; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-10-02

    Different rabies virus (RABV) strains have their own biological characteristics, but little is known about their respective impact on autophagy. Therefore, we evaluated whether attenuated RABV HEP-Flury and wild-type RABV GD-SH-01 strains triggered autophagy. We found that GD-SH-01 infection significantly increased the number of autophagy-like vesicles, the accumulation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-LC3 fluorescence puncta and the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, while HEP-Flury was not able to induce this phenomenon. When evaluating autophagic flux, we found that GD-SH-01 infection triggers a complete autophagic response in the human neuroblastoma cell line (SK), while autophagosome fusion with lysosomes was inhibited in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (NA). In these cells, GD-SH-01 led to apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction while triggering autophagy, and apoptosis could be decreased by enhancing autophagy. To further identify the virus constituent causing autophagy, 5 chimeric recombinant viruses carrying single genes of HEP-Flury instead of those of GD-SH-01 were rescued. While the HEP-Flury virus carrying the wild-type matrix protein (M) gene of RABV triggered LC3-I to LC3-II conversion in SK and NA cells, replacement of genes of nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P) and glycoprotein (G) produced only minor autophagy. But no one single structural protein of GD-SH-01 induced autophagy. Moreover, the AMPK signaling pathway was activated by GD-SH-01 in SK. Therefore, our data provide strong evidence that autophagy is induced by GD-SH-01 and can decrease apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, the M gene of GD-SH-01 may cooperatively induce autophagy.

  15. Generation and Characterization of Novel Local and Metastatic Human Neuroblastoma Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ido Nevo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is the most commonly occurring solid tumor in children. The disease usually arises in the adrenal medulla, and it is characterized by a remarkable heterogeneity in its progression. Most NB patients with an advanced disease have massive bone marrow infiltration at diagnosis. Lung metastasis represents a widely disseminated stage and is typically considered to be a terminal event. Much like other malignancies, NB progression is a complex, multistep process. The expression, function, and significance of the various factors involved in NB progression must be studied in relevant in vivo and in vitro models. Currently, models consisting of metastatic and nonmetastatic cell variants of the same genetic background exist for several types of cancer; however, none exists for NB. In the present study, we describe the generation of a NB metastasis model. SH-SY5Y and MHH-NB-11 NB cells were inoculated orthotopically into the adrenal glands of athymic nude mice. Neuroblastoma cells metastasizing to the lungs were isolated from mice bearing adrenal tumors. Lung metastatic variants were generated by repeated cycles of in vivo passage. Characterization of these variants included cellular morphology and immunophenotyping in vitro, aggressiveness in vivo, and various biologic parameters in vitro. The NB metastatic variant in each model displayed unique properties, and both metastatic variants demonstrated a metastatic phenotype in vivo. These reproducible models of human NB metastasis will serve as an unlimited source of transcriptomic and proteomic material. Such models can facilitate future studies on NB metastasis and the identification of novel NB biomarkers and targets for therapy.

  16. Noninvasive multiparametric imaging of metastasis-permissive microenvironments in a human prostate cancer xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Pathak, Arvind P; Raman, Venu; Ballesteros, Paloma; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2009-11-15

    Metastasis continues to be one of the major causes of mortality from prostate cancer. Because human malignant cell lines metastasize more readily from orthotopic sites than from heterotopic sites, to identify metastasis-permissive tumor microenvironments, we used noninvasive imaging to compare the in vivo vascular, metabolic, and physiologic characteristics of a human prostate cancer xenograft implanted orthotopically in the prostate or s.c. in the flank. Hypoxia was detected in these xenografts by placing an enhanced green fluorescence protein optical reporter under the control of a hypoxia response element. A multiparametric analysis of hypoxia, extracellular pH, vascularization, and metabolism provided a characterization of environments that are permissive for metastasis to occur. We found that orthotopic tumors, which metastasized more easily, were characterized by higher vascular volume, permeability, and total choline and a more acidic extracellular pH. Interestingly, metastatic deposits in the lymph nodes as well as cancer cells in ascites fluid were found to be hypoxic, explaining, in part, the refractory nature of metastatic disease. These results also provide the basis for clinically translatable noninvasive imaging markers for predicting metastatic risk in prostate cancer.

  17. Noninvasive Multi-parametric Imaging of Metastasis-Permissive Microenvironments in a Human Prostate Cancer Xenograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penet, Marie-France; Pathak, Arvind P.; Raman, Venu; Ballesteros, Paloma; Artemov, Dmitri; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis continues to be one of the major causes of mortality from prostate cancer. Since human malignant cell lines metastasize more readily from orthotopic sites than from heterotopic sites, to identify metastasis-permissive tumor microenvironments, we used noninvasive imaging to compare the in vivo vascular, metabolic and physiological characteristics of a human prostate cancer xenograft implanted orthotopically in the prostate or subcutaneously in the flank. Hypoxia was detected in these xenografts by placing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) optical reporter under the control of a hypoxia response element (HRE). A multi-parametric analysis of hypoxia, extracellular pH (pHe), vascularization and metabolism provided a characterization of environments that are permissive for metastasis to occur. We found that orthotopic tumors, which metastasized more easily, were characterized by higher vascular volume, permeability, and total choline, and a more acidic pHe. Interestingly, metastatic deposits in the lymph nodes as well as cancer cells in ascites fluid were found to be hypoxic, explaining in part, the refractory nature of metastatic disease. These results also provide the basis for clinically translatable noninvasive imaging markers for predicting metastatic risk in prostate cancer. PMID:19861534

  18. DADS Suppresses Human Esophageal Xenograft Tumors through RAF/MEK/ERK and Mitochondria-Dependent Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoran Yin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl disulfide (DADS is a natural organosulfur compound isolated from garlic. DADS has various biological properties, including anticancer, antiangiogenic, and antioxidant effects. However, the anticancer mechanisms of DADS in human esophageal carcinoma have not been elucidated, especially in vivo. In this study, MTT assay showed that DADS significantly reduced cell viability in human esophageal carcinoma ECA109 cells, but was relatively less toxic in normal liver cells. The pro–apoptotic effect of DADS on ECA109 cells was detected by Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (PI staining. Flow cytometry analysis showed that DADS promoted apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and the apoptosis rate could be decreased by caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO. Xenograft study in nude mice showed that DADS treatment inhibited the growth of ECA109 tumor in both 20 and 40 mg/kg DADS groups without obvious side effects. DADS inhibited ECA109 tumor proliferation by down-regulating proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA. DADS induced apoptosis by activating a mitochondria-dependent pathway with the executor of caspase-3, increasing p53 level and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and downregulating the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in ECA109 xenograft tumosr. Based on studies in cell culture and animal models, the findings here indicate that DADS is an effective and safe anti-cancer agent for esophageal carcinoma.

  19. A zebrafish xenograft model for studying human cancer stem cells in distant metastasis and therapy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Groenewoud, A; Tulotta, C; Zoni, E; Kruithof-de Julio, M; van der Horst, G; van der Pluijm, G; Ewa Snaar-Jagalska, B

    2017-01-01

    Lethal and incurable bone metastasis is one of the main causes of death in multiple types of cancer. A small subpopulation of cancer stem/progenitor-like cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells from heterogenetic cancer is considered to mediate bone metastasis. Although over the past decades numerous studies have been performed in different types of cancer, it is still difficult to track small numbers of CSCs during the onset of metastasis. With use of noninvasive high-resolution imaging, transparent zebrafish embryos can be employed to dynamically visualize cancer progression and reciprocal interaction with stroma in a living organism. Recently we established a zebrafish CSC-xenograft model to visually and functionally analyze the role of CSCs and their interactions with the microenvironment at the onset of metastasis. Given the highly conserved human and zebrafish genome, transplanted human cancer cells are able to respond to zebrafish cytokines, modulate the zebrafish microenvironment, and take advantage of the zebrafish stroma during cancer progression. This chapter delineates the zebrafish CSC-xenograft model as a useful tool for both CSC biological study and anticancer drug screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of human glioblastoma cell lines in vitro and their xenografts in nude mice by DNA fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Türeci, O; Fischer, H; Lagoda, P

    1990-01-01

    Human gliomas were grown as permanent tissue cultures and xenografts in nude mice. DNA fingerprint patterns from two human gliomas were established using two different hypervariable multilocus probes [( GTG]5 and 33.15). In general the cell lines investigated showed an overall stability in the DN...

  1. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2015-12-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2-mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue-based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest, mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) probe and imaged according to package instructions. Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model is effective for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P = 0·03) with return to baseline levels by day 10, paralleling the reepithelialisation of the wound. This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Prolonged exposure to acetaminophen reduces testosterone production by the human fetal testis in a xenograft model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Driesche, Sander; Macdonald, Joni; Anderson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Most common male reproductive disorders are linked to lower testosterone exposure in fetal life, although the factors responsible for suppressing fetal testosterone remain largely unknown. Protracted use of acetaminophen during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of cryptorchidism in sons......, but effects on fetal testosterone production have not been demonstrated. We used a validated xenograft model to expose human fetal testes to clinically relevant doses and regimens of acetaminophen. Exposure to a therapeutic dose of acetaminophen for 7 days significantly reduced plasma testosterone (45...... the final dose) in exposed host mice were substantially below those reported in humans after a therapeutic oral dose. Subsequent in utero exposure studies in rats indicated that the acetaminophen-induced reduction in testosterone likely results from reduced expression of key steroidogenic enzymes (Cyp11a1...

  3. The impact of Zika virus infection on human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luplertlop, Natthanej; Suwanmanee, San; Muangkaew, Watcharamat; Ampawong, Sumate; Kitisin, Thitinan; Poovorawan, Yong

    2017-01-01

    An increase in Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic during the last decade has become a major global concern as the virus affects both newborns and adult humans. Earlier studies have shown the impact of ZIKV infection in developing human foetus. However, effective in vitro model of target cells for studying the ZIKV infection in adult human neurons is not available. This study aimed to establish the use of human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) for studying an infection of ZIKV in vitro. ZIKV growth kinetics, viral toxicity, and SH-SY5Y cell vialibity were determined after ZIKV infection in SH-SY5Y cells in vitro. ZIKV-infected SH-SY5Y cells were morphologically analysed and compared with nonhuman primate Vero cells. Furthermore, the susceptibility of SH-SY5Y cells to ZIKV infection was also determined. The results showed that ZIKV efficiently infects SH-SY5Y cell lines in vitro. Gradual changes of several cellular homeostasis parameters including cell viability, cytotoxicity, and cell morphology were observed in ZIKVinfected SH-SY5Y cells when compared to mock-treated or non-human primate cells. Interestingly, ZIKV particles were detected in the nucleoplasmic compartment of the infected SH-SY5Y cells. The results suggest that ZIKV particle can be detected in the nucleoplasmic compartment of the infected SH-SY5Y cells beside the known viral replicating cytoplasmic area. Hence, SH-SY5Y cells can be used as an in vitro adult human neuronal cell-based model, for further elucidating the ZIKV biology, and highlight other possible significance of Zika virus distribution through nuclear localization, which may correlate to the neuropathological defects in ZIKV-infected adult humans.

  4. Androgen regulated genes in human prostate xenografts in mice: relation to BPH and prostate cancer.

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    Harold D Love

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate carcinoma (CaP are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1 highly expressed in prostate, 2 had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3 encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues.

  5. Effects of Agelas oroides and Petrosia ficiformis crude extracts on human neuroblastoma cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Cristina; Marengo, Barbara; De Ciucis, Chiara; Nitti, Mariapaola; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Pronzato, Roberto; Manconi, Renata; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2007-01-01

    Among marine sessile organisms, sponges (Porifera) are the major producers of bioactive secondary metabolites that defend them against predators and competitors and are used to interfere with the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Some of these biological active metabolites are able to influence cell survival and death, modifying the activity of several enzymes involved in these cellular processes. These natural compounds show a potential anticancer activity but the mechanism of this action is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of two Mediterranean sponges, Agelas oroides and Petrosia ficiformis on the viability of human neuroblastoma cells. Upon treatment with the methanolic extract of Petrosia ficiformis, a marked cytotoxic effect was observed at any concentration or time of exposure. In contrast, a time- and dose-dependent effect was monitored for Agelas oroides that induced the development of apoptotic features and ROS production in LAN5 cells. These events were suppressed by calpeptin or zVAD and by vitamin C suggesting that the cell death caused by Agelas oroides was calpain- and caspase-dependent and of oxidative nature. Comet assay showed that this methanolic extract was not able to produce a genotoxic effect. Future studies will be applied to investigate the effect of isolated bioactive compounds from crude extract of this sponge which are potentially useful for cancer therapeutics.

  6. Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat (CM) extract protects human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells against MPP+-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In Su; Koppula, Sushruta; Park, Pyo-Jam; Kim, Ee Hwa; Kim, Chan Gil; Choi, Wahn Soo; Lee, Kwang Ho; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2009-12-10

    Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat (Asteraceae) has (CM) long been used in Korean and Chinese traditional herbal medicines with numerous therapeutic applications. To evaluate the neuroprotective activities of Chrysanthemum morifolium (CM) extract against 1-methyl-4-phenylpridinium ions (MPP(+)), Parkinsonian toxin through oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and the underlying mechanisms. The effects of CM against MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity and neuronal cell viability, oxidative damage, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax, caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteolysis were evaluated by using SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. CM effectively inhibited the cytotoxicity and improved cell viability. CM also attenuated the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP proteolysis. These results demonstrate that CM possesses potent neuroprotective activity and therefore, might be a potential candidate in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  7. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in human neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-gao Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The active ingredient of ginseng, ginsenosides Rg1, has been shown to scavenge free radicals and improve antioxidant capacity. This study hypothesized that ginsenosides Rg1 has a protective role in human neuroblastoma cells injured by H2O2. Ginsenosides Rg1 at different concentrations (50 and 100 μM was used to treat H2O2 (150 μM-injured SH-SY5Y cells. Results demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg1 elevated the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2, diminished the amount of leaked lactate dehydrogenase, and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 effectively suppressed caspase-3 immunoreactivity, and contributed to heat shock protein 70 gene expression, in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effects on SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2 and that its mechanism of action is associated with anti-oxidation and the inhibition of apoptosis.

  8. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 against hydrogen peroxide-induced injury in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Gao; Chen, Li-Ping; Wang, Fa-Wei; Xu, Cheng-Yong; Geng, Miao

    2016-07-01

    The active ingredient of ginseng, ginsenosides Rg1, has been shown to scavenge free radicals and improve antioxidant capacity. This study hypothesized that ginsenosides Rg1 has a protective role in human neuroblastoma cells injured by H2O2. Ginsenosides Rg1 at different concentrations (50 and 100 μM) was used to treat H2O2 (150 μM)-injured SH-SY5Y cells. Results demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg1 elevated the survival rate of SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2, diminished the amount of leaked lactate dehydrogenase, and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Ginsenoside Rg1 effectively suppressed caspase-3 immunoreactivity, and contributed to heat shock protein 70 gene expression, in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ginsenoside Rg1 has protective effects on SH-SY5Y cells injured by H2O2 and that its mechanism of action is associated with anti-oxidation and the inhibition of apoptosis.

  9. Cytopathogenesis of Naegleria fowleri Thai strains for cultured human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiewcharoen, Supathra; Malainual, Nat; Junnu, Virach; Chetanachan, Pruksawan; Rabablert, Jundee

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate cellular interaction between free-living amoebae Naegleria fowleri strains and mammalian target cells in vitro. Two Thai strains of N. fowleri; Khon Kaen strain from the environment and Siriraj strain from the patient's cerebrospinal fluid and the Center of Disease Control VO 3081 strain from Atlanta (US) were studied. Human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) and African Green monkey Kidney (Vero) cells were used as target cells. Each cell line was inoculated with each strain of N. fowleri at a ratio of 1:1 and observed for 7 days. The uninoculated target cells and each strain of N. fowleri were used as control. The numbers of the challenged and unchallenged cells as well as the free-living amoebae were counted three times by trypan blue exclusion method. The inoculation began when the amoebae attached to the cell membrane and ingested the target cells. In this study, extensive cytopathogenesis with many floating inoculated cells and abundant number of amoebae were observed. The destruction pattern of both inoculated SK-N-MC and Vero target cells were similar. Interestingly, SK-N-MC was more susceptible to N. fowleri strains than the Vero cell. In addition, N. fowleri Siriraj strain showed the highest destruction pattern for each target cell. Our findings suggest that the SK-N-MC should be used as a base model for studying the neuropathogenesis in primary amoebic meningoencephalitis patients.

  10. Cytoarchitecture of Zika virus infection in human neuroblastoma and Aedes albopictus cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Danielle K; Dorward, David W; Hansen, Bryan T; Bloom, Marshall E

    2017-01-15

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) pandemic is a global concern due to its role in the development of congenital anomalies of the central nervous system. This mosquito-borne flavivirus alternates between mammalian and mosquito hosts, but information about the biogenesis of ZIKV is limited. Using a human neuroblastoma cell line (SK-N-SH) and an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line (C6/36), we characterized ZIKV infection by immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron tomography (ET) to better understand infection in these disparate host cells. ZIKV replicated well in both cell lines, but infected SK-N-SH cells suffered a lytic crisis. Flaviviruses scavenge host cell membranes to serve as replication platforms and ZIKV showed the hallmarks of this process. Via TEM, we identified virus particles and 60-100nm spherular vesicles. ET revealed these vesicular replication compartments contain smaller 20-30nm spherular structures. Our studies indicate that SK-N-SH and C6/36 cells are relevant models for viral cytoarchitecture study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Neuritogenic effect of standardized extract of Centella asiatica ECa233 on human neuroblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In order to gain insight into neuroprotective effects of ECa 233, a standardized extract of Centella asiatica, previously demonstrated in animal models of memory impairment induced by transient global ischemia or intracerebroventricular injection of β-amyloid, the effect of ECa 233 on neurite outgrowth of human IMR-32 neuroblastoma cell line was investigated. Methods Cells were seeded and incubated with various concentrations of ECa 233. Morphometric analysis was carried out by a measurement of the longest neurite growth of cells at 24 and 48 h. Contributing signaling pathways possibly involved were subsequently elucidated by western blot analysis. Results While ECa 233 had only limited effects on cell viability, it significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth of IMR-32 cells at the concentrations of 1–100 μg/ml. Western blot analysis revealed that ECa 233 significantly upregulated the level of activated ERK1/2 and Akt of the treated cells suggesting their involvement in the neuritogenic effect observed, which was subsequently verified by the finding that an addition of their respective inhibitors could reverse the effect of ECa 233 on these cells. Conclusions The present study clearly demonstrated neurite outgrowth promoting activity of ECa 233. ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways seemed to account for the neurotrophic effect observed. In conjunction with in vivo neuroprotective effect of ECa 233 previously reported, the results obtained support further development of ECa 233 for clinical use in neuronal injury or neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23915016

  12. Neuroprotective Effects of Castanea sativa Mill. Bark Extract in Human Neuroblastoma Cells Subjected to Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizi, Claudia; Santulli, Chiara; Micucci, Matteo; Budriesi, Roberta; Chiarini, Alberto; Aldinucci, Carlo; Frosini, Maria

    2016-02-01

    One of the major features of neurodegenerative disease is the selective vulnerability of different neuronal populations that are affected in a progressive and often stereotyped manner. Despite the susceptible neuronal population varies between diseases, oxidative stress is implicated as the major pathogenic process in all of them. Natural Extract of Castanea sativa Mill. bark (ENC), recently characterized in its phenolic composition, acts as antioxidant and cardioprotective agent. Its neuroprotettive properties, however, have never been investigated. The aim of this study was to assess neuroprotection of ENC in in vitro models of oxidative-stress-mediate injury. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with glutamate (50 mM for 24 h) or hydrogen peroxide (25 μM for 1 h followed by 24 with medium) were used. The results showed that the addition of ENC (1-50 μg/ml) to cell medium before the neuronal damage provided neuroprotection in both experimental models used, while its addition after the injury was ineffective. In conclusion, the present results suggest that ENC could be a valuable support as dietary supplement, combining beneficial preventive neuroprotettive effects with a high antioxidant activity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Acute mitochondrial and chronic toxicological effects of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephans, Stacy E; Miller, Gary W; Levey, Allan I; Greenamyre, J Timothy

    2002-10-01

    At low micromolar concentrations, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the toxic metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) selectively kills nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons by mechanisms believed to involve impairment of mitochondrial complex I. A human neuroblastoma cell line expressing the dopamine transporter (DAT) was utilized to examine the effects of MPP+ on acute physiologic responses and subsequent cell death. Acute responses were measured by microphysiometry and by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential with [3H]tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) uptake. MPP+ (10 microM) increased extracellular proton excretion in DAT-expressing cells within 2-3 min, but had no effect in untransfected cells. The lipophilic complex I inhibitor, rotenone, increased proton excretion in both cell lines. In DAT-expressing cells, mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced within I h of 10 microM MPP+ exposure. Rotenone reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in both cell lines. MPP+ caused apoptotic death of DAT-transfected cells 2-3 days after drug application, but did not kill untransfected cells. Thus, MPP+ produces immediate mitochondrial impairment only in cells that express DAT, and these changes occur days before overt cellular toxicity. The magnitude, time course and nature of these changes were similar to those produced by rotenone, confirming the site of action of MPP+ as mitochondrial complex I. These immediate mitochondrial effects appear to be an accurate predictor of subsequent cell death.

  14. Effect of ELF-EMF Exposure on Human Neuroblastoma Cell Line: a Proteomics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Rezaie-Tavirani, Mostafa; Seyyedi, Samaneh Sadat; Zali, Hakimeh; Heydari Keshel, Saeid; Jadidi, Majid; Abedelahi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have been common in daily life all over the world. They have produced by power lines and electrical appliances, but higher levels of them have raised a lot of concerns about their carcinogenesis. Both epidemiological and laboratory studies have suggested that EMFs might increase cancer incidence, including acute childhood leukemia, brain and breast cancer. In the present study, SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line has exposed to 2mT, 50 Hz magnetic field for 3 h. Next, effect of this exposure on protein expression including over-expression or under-expression has assessed by proteomics. Bioinformatics and statistical analysis using progenesis same spot software on the obtained 2D electrophoresis has shown that expression of 189 proteins in exposed group has changed relative to control. Besides, PCA analysis has verified results of clustering, and has shown that protein data has clustered according to experimental conditions. The results of this study have shown that ELF-EMF changes cell morphology via altering protein expression, but more profound studies have needed to determine the kind of proteins altered.

  15. Antitumor effects of flavopiridol on human uterine leiomyoma in vitro and in a xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Gyo; Baek, Jong-Woo; Shin, So-Jin; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Cha, Soon-Do; Park, Won-Jin; Chung, Rosa; Choi, Eun-Som; Lee, Gun-Ho; Cho, Chi-Heum

    2014-09-01

    Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are considered a potential target for cancer therapy. Flavopiridol is a potent CDK inhibitor. In this study, the antiproliferative effect of the flavonoid compound flavopiridol and its mechanism in human uterine leiomyoma cells were investigated. The present study focused on the effect of flavopiridol in cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in primary cultured human uterine leiomyoma cells. Cell viability and cell proliferation assays were conducted. Flow cytometry was performed to determine the effect of flavopiridol on cell cycle. The expression of cell cycle regulatory-related proteins was evaluated by Western blotting. Cell viability and proliferation of uterine leiomyoma cells were significantly reduced by flavopiridol treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry results showed that flavopiridol induced G1 phase arrest. Flavopiridol-induced growth inhibition in uterine leiomyoma cells was associated with increased expression of p21(cip/wafl) and p27(kip1) in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of CDK2/4 and Cyclin A with a concomitant increase in dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma was observed. This study demonstrates that flavopiridol inhibits cell proliferation by initiating G1 cell cycle arrest in human uterine leiomyoma. We also found that flavopiridol is effective in inhibiting xenografted human uterine leiomyoma growth. These results indicate that flavopiridol could prove to be a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic agent for human uterine leiomyoma. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Human histologic evaluation of a bovine-derived bone xenograft in the treatment of periodontal osseous defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellonig, J T

    2000-02-01

    This study evaluated a bovine-derived bone xenograft (Bio-Oss) in the treatment of human periodontal osseous defects. Four patients with at least one tooth that had been recommended for extraction because of interproximal advanced periodontal disease volunteered to participate. The surgical procedure consisted of flap reflection, soft tissue debridement, placing a notch in calculus as a histologic reference point, root planing, placement of the bovine-derived xenograft and a bioresorbable physical barrier, and flap closure. Patients were seen every 2 weeks for plaque control and any necessary adjunctive treatment. At 4 to 6 months postsurgery, 6 teeth, along with the adjacent graft site, were removed en bloc. Histologic observations demonstrated new bone, new cementum, and new periodontal ligament coronal to the reference notch in 3 of the 4 specimens. This study indicates that periodontal regeneration is possible following grafting with a bovine-derived xenograft.

  17. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevey, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dobos, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Vago, A. [Central Lab., National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Head and Neck Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Doeme, B. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tovari, J. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); 1. Inst. of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPO{alpha} on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPO{alpha} at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPO{alpha} on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1{alpha} expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPO{alpha} and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPO{alpha} treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPO{alpha} administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPO{alpha} treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 {+-} 4.7 mg and 34.9 {+-} 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPO{alpha} treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  18. Transient treatment with epigenetic modifiers yields stable neuroblastoma stem cells resembling aggressive large-cell neuroblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegaki, Naohiko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Fox, Autumn M; Regan, Paul L; Jacobs, Joshua R; Hicks, Sakeenah L; Rappaport, Eric F; Tang, Xao X

    2013-04-09

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are plastic in nature, a characteristic that hampers cancer therapeutics. Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric tumor of neural crest origin, and half of the cases are highly aggressive. By treating NB cell lines [SKNAS, SKNBE(2)C, CHP134, and SY5Y] with epigenetic modifiers for a short time, followed by sphere-forming culture conditions, we have established stem cell-like NB cells that are phenotypically stable for more than a year. These cells are characterized by their high expression of stemness factors, stem cell markers, and open chromatin structure. We referred to these cells as induced CSCs (iCSCs). SKNAS iCSC and SKNBE(2)C iCSC clones (as few as 100 cells) injected s.c. into SCID/Beige mice formed tumors, and in one case, SKNBE(2)C iCSCs metastasized to the adrenal gland, suggesting their increased metastatic potential. SKNAS iCSC xenografts showed the histologic appearance of totally undifferentiated large-cell NBs (LCNs), the most aggressive and deadly form of NB in humans. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that SKNAS iCSC xenografts expressed high levels of the stem cell marker CXCR4, whereas the SKNAS monolayer cell xenografts did not. The patterns of CXCR4 and MYC expression in SKNAS iCSC xenografts resembled those in the LCNs. The xenografts established from the NB iCSCs shared two common features: the LCN phenotype and high-level MYC/MYCN expression. These observations suggest both that NB cells with large and vesicular nuclei, representing their open chromatin structure, are indicative of stem cell-like tumor cells and that epigenetic changes may have contributed to the development of these most malignant NB cells.

  19. TNF-α and IFN-γ Together Up-Regulates Par-4 Expression and Induce Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh V. Shelke

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine the combined effect of Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and Tumor Necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α on cytotoxicity and expression of prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4 and Par-4 interacting proteins B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells/p65 subunit (NF-κB/p65, Ak mouse strain thymoma (Akt in human neuroblastoma (NB cells. Materials and methods included human neuroblastoma cell lines-SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH, and SH-SY5Y, which were treated with IFN-γ and TNF-α individually, or in combination, and were assessed for viability by tetrazolium (MTT assay. Apoptosis was monitored by hypodiploid population (by flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, and caspase-8 activity. Transcript level of Par-4 was measured by RT-PCR. Protein levels of Par-4 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS-3 were assessed by immunoblotting. Cellular localization of Par-4 and p65 was examined by immunofluorescence. Unbiased transcript analysis for IFN-γ, TNF-α, and Par-4 were analyzed from three independent clinical datasets from neuroblastoma patients. In terms of results, SK-N-MC cells treated with a combination of, but not individually with, IFN-γ and TNF-α induced apoptosis characterized by hypodiploidy, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, and increased caspase-8 activity. Apoptosis was associated with up-regulation of Par-4 mRNA and protein expression. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that Par-4 was localized exclusively in cytoplasm in SK-N-MC cells cultured for 24 h. but showed nuclear localization at 48 h. Treatment with IFN-γ and TNF-α together enhanced the intensity of nuclear Par-4. In gene expression, data from human neuroblastoma patients, levels of IFN-γ, and TNF-α have strong synergy with Par-4 expression and provide good survival advantage. The findings also demonstrated that apoptosis was associated with reduced level of pro

  20. TNF-α and IFN-γ Together Up-Regulates Par-4 Expression and Induce Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelke, Ganesh V; Jagtap, Jayashree C; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Shah, Reecha D; Das, Gowry; Shivayogi, Mruthyunjaya; Pujari, Radha; Shastry, Padma

    2017-12-26

    The objective of this study was to examine the combined effect of Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and Tumor Necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) on cytotoxicity and expression of prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) and Par-4 interacting proteins B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells/p65 subunit (NF-κB/p65), Ak mouse strain thymoma (Akt) in human neuroblastoma (NB) cells. Materials and methods included human neuroblastoma cell lines-SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH, and SH-SY5Y, which were treated with IFN-γ and TNF-α individually, or in combination, and were assessed for viability by tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was monitored by hypodiploid population (by flow cytometry), DNA fragmentation, Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and caspase-8 activity. Transcript level of Par-4 was measured by RT-PCR. Protein levels of Par-4 and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS-3) were assessed by immunoblotting. Cellular localization of Par-4 and p65 was examined by immunofluorescence. Unbiased transcript analysis for IFN-γ, TNF-α, and Par-4 were analyzed from three independent clinical datasets from neuroblastoma patients. In terms of results, SK-N-MC cells treated with a combination of, but not individually with, IFN-γ and TNF-α induced apoptosis characterized by hypodiploidy, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, and increased caspase-8 activity. Apoptosis was associated with up-regulation of Par-4 mRNA and protein expression. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that Par-4 was localized exclusively in cytoplasm in SK-N-MC cells cultured for 24 h. but showed nuclear localization at 48 h. Treatment with IFN-γ and TNF-α together enhanced the intensity of nuclear Par-4. In gene expression, data from human neuroblastoma patients, levels of IFN-γ, and TNF-α have strong synergy with Par-4 expression and provide good survival advantage. The findings also demonstrated that apoptosis was associated with reduced level of pro

  1. Lysosomal proteases as potential targets for the induction of apoptotic cell death in human neuroblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castino, Roberta; Pace, Deborah; Démoz, Marina; Gargiulo, Marco; Ariatta, Chiara; Raiteri, Elisabetta; Isidoro, Ciro

    2002-02-20

    Neuroblastoma is the most common type of cancer in infants. In children this tumor is particularly aggressive; despite various new therapeutic approaches, it is associated with poor prognosis. Given the importance of endosomal-lysosomal proteolysis in cellular metabolism, we hypothesized that inhibition of lysosomal protease would impact negatively on neuroblastoma cell survival. Treatment with E-64 or CA074Me (2 specific inhibitors of cathepsin B) or with pepstatin A (a specific inhibitor of cathepsin D) was cytotoxic for 2 neuroblastoma cell lines having different degrees of malignancy. Cell death was associated with condensation and fragmentation of chromatin and externalization of plasma membrane phosphatidylserine, 2 hallmarks of apoptosis. Concomitant inhibition of the caspase cascade protected neuroblastoma cells from cathepsin inhibitor-induced cytotoxicity. These data indicate that prolonged inhibition of the lysosomal proteolytic pathway is incompatible with cell survival, leading to apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells, and that the cathepsin-mediated and caspase-mediated proteolytic systems are connected and cooperate in the regulation of such an event. Since modern antitumor chemotherapy is aimed at restoring the normal rate of apoptosis in neoplastic tissues, the demonstration that endosomal-lysosomal cathepsins are involved in this process may constitute a basis for novel strategies that include cathepsin inhibitors in the therapeutic regimen. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  3. Genetically engineered mesenchymal stromal cells producing TNFα have tumour suppressing effect on human melanoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava; Bohovic, Roman; Polakova, Katarina; Toro, Lenka; Skolekova, Svetlana; Kucerova, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a promising tool for targeted cancer therapy due to their tumour-homing ability. Intrinsic resistance enables the MSC to longer tolerate therapeutic factors, such as prodrug converting enzymes, cytokines and pro-apoptotic proteins. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is known to be cytotoxic to a variety of cancer cells and exert a tumour-destructive capacity. MSC were retrovirally transduced to stable express an exogenous gene encoding the desired therapeutic agent hTNFα. The effect of a TNFα-producing adipose tissue-derived MSC (AT-MSC/hTNFα) was tested on the tumour cell lines of different origins: melanoma (A375), breast carcinoma (SKBR3, MDA-MB-231), colon carcinoma (HT29), ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3) and glioblastoma (U87-MG) cells. The tumour suppressing effect of AT-MSC/hTNFα on A375 melanoma xenografts was monitored in an immunodeficient mouse model in vivo. Engineered AT-MSC are able to constitutively secrete human TNFα protein, induce apoptosis of tumour cell lines via caspase 3/7 activation and inhibit the tumour cell proliferation in vitro. Melanoma A375 and breast carcinoma SKBR3 cells were the most sensitive, and their proliferation in vitro was reduced by conditioned media produced by AT-MSC/hTNFα to 60% and 40%, respectively. The previously reported tumour supportive effect of AT-MSC on subcutaneous A375 melanoma xenograft growth was neutralised and suppressed by engineered AT-MSC stably producing hTNFα. When AT-MSC/hTNFα were coinjected with A375 melanoma cells, the tumour mass inhibition was up to 97.5%. The results of the present study demonstrate that tumour cells respond to hTNFα-based treatment mediated by genetically engineered AT-MSC/hTNFα both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Luteolin inhibits progestin-dependent angiogenesis, stem cell-like characteristics, and growth of human breast cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew T; Liang, Yayun; Besch-Williford, Cynthia; Goyette, Sandy; Mafuvadze, Benford; Hyder, Salman M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials and epidemiological evidence have shown that combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy, but not estrogen therapy alone, increases breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. Previously we have shown that natural and synthetic progestins, including the widely used synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), increase production of a potent angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in human breast cancer cells, potentially providing an explanation for progestin's mechanism of action. Here, we tested the effects of luteolin (LU), a flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables, on inhibiting progestin-dependent VEGF induction and angiogenesis in human breast cancer cells, inhibiting stem cell-like characteristics, as well as breast cancer cell xenograft tumor growth in vivo and expression of angiogenesis markers. Viability of both T47-D and BT-474 cells was measured using sulforhodamine B assays. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to monitor VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells. Progestin-dependent xenograft tumor growth was used to determine LU effects in vivo. CD31 immunohistochemistry was used to determine blood-vessel density in xenograft tumors. CD44 expression, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and mammosphere-formation assays were used to monitor stem cell-like characteristics of breast cancer cells. Luteolin treatment reduced breast cancer cell viability, progestin-dependent VEGF secretion from breast cancer cells, and growth of MPA-dependent human breast cancer cell xenograft tumors in nude mice. LU treatment also decreased xenograft tumor VEGF expression and blood-vessel density. Furthermore, LU blocked MPA-induced acquisition of stem cell-like properties by breast cancer cells. Luteolin effectively blocks progestin-dependent human breast cancer tumor growth and the stem cell-like phenotype in human breast cancer cells.

  5. Expression of CD38 in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orciani, M; Trubiani, O; Cavaletti, G; Guarnieri, S; Salvolini, E; Tredici, G; Di Primio, R

    2008-01-01

    Human CD38 antigen is a 42-45 kDa type II transmembrane glycoprotein with a short N-terminal cytoplasmic domain and a long C-terminal extracellular region. It is widely expressed in different cell types including thymocytes, activated T cells, and terminally differentiated B cells (plasma cells) and it is involved in cellular proliferation and adhesion. CD38 acts as an ectocyclase that converts NAD+ to the Ca2+ -releasing second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). It has been also demonstrated that increased extracellular levels of NAD+ and cADPR are involved in inflammatory diseases and in cellular damage, such as ischemia. In the present study, we have characterized the expression of CD38 in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment was used to induce cell differentiation. Our results indicate that: a) even if SH-SY5Y cells have a negative phenotype express CD38 at nuclear level, ATRA treatment does not influence this pattern; b) CD38 localizing to the nucleus may co-localize with p80-coilin positive nuclear-coiled bodies; c) purified nuclei, by Western blot determinations using anti-CD38 antibodies, display a band with a molecular mass of approximately 42 kDa; d) SH-SY5Y cells show nuclear ADP-ribosyl cyclase due to CD38 activity; e) the basal level of CD38 mRNA shows a time-dependent increase after treatment with ATRA. These results suggest that the presence of constitutive fully functional CD38 in the SH-SY5Y nucleus has some important implications for intracellular generation of cADP-ribose and subsequent nucleoplasmic calcium release.

  6. Intracerebral and subcutaneous xenografts of human sclc in the nude rat - comparison of monoclonal-antibody localization and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulte, J. W. M.; Go, K. Gwan; Zuiderveen, F.; The, T. Hauw; de Leij, Lou

    In the WAG/Rij nude rat, subcutaneous (s.c.) and intracerebral (i.c.) xenografts of the human SCLC cell line GLC-28 were evaluated for their growth behavior, in vivo monoclonal antibody binding and presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. For the i.c. xenografts, two models of cerebral tumor

  7. The protective effect of geniposide on human neuroblastoma cells in the presence of formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde can induce misfolding and aggregation of Tau protein and β amyloid protein, which are characteristic pathological features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). An increase in endogenous formaldehyde concentration in the brain is closely related to dementia in aging people. Therefore, the discovery of effective drugs to counteract the adverse impact of formaldehyde on neuronal cells is beneficial for the development of appropriate treatments for age-associated cognitive decline. Methods In this study, we assessed the neuroprotective properties of TongLuoJiuNao (TLJN), a traditional Chinese medicine preparation, against formaldehyde stress in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). The effect of TLJN and its main ingredients (geniposide and ginsenoside Rg1) on cell viability, apoptosis, intracellular antioxidant activity and the expression of apoptotic-related genes in the presence of formaldehyde were monitored. Results Cell counting studies showed that in the presence of TLJN, the viability of formaldehyde-treated SH-SY5Y cells significantly recovered. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that the morphology of formaldehyde-injured cells was rescued by TLJN and geniposide, an effective ingredient of TLJN. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of geniposide on formaldehyde-induced apoptosis was dose-dependent. The activity of intracellular antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) increased, as did mRNA and protein levels of the antiapoptotic gene Bcl-2 after the addition of geniposide. In contrast, the expression of the apoptotic-related gene - P53, apoptotic executer - caspase 3 and apoptotic initiator - caspase 9 were downregulated after geniposide treatment. Conclusions Our results indicate that geniposide can protect SH-SY5Y cells against formaldehyde stress through modulating the expression of Bcl-2, P53, caspase 3 and caspase 9, and by increasing the activity of intracellular superoxide dismutase and glutathione

  8. Comprehensive DNA methylation analysis of human neuroblastoma cells treated with blonanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yui; Nishioka, Masaki; Bundo, Miki; Sunaga, Fumiko; Kasai, Kiyoto; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2014-03-20

    Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic drug for schizophrenia. The pharmacological actions of blonanserin are shown to be the antagonism of dopamine receptor 2 and serotonin receptors. However, its molecular mechanisms in brain cells have not been fully characterized. Accumulating evidence suggests that antipsychotic drugs and mood stabilizers show epigenetic effects on a wide range of genes in animal and cellular models. We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis targeting 479,814 CpG sites of cultured human neuroblastoma cells administered with blonanserin. We found that 3,057 CpG sites showed statistically significant changes in DNA methylation at two different doses of blonanserin (1.36 nM and 13.6 nM). These included hypermethylated CpG sites that were enriched in genes related to axonogenesis and cell morphogenesis involved in neuron differentiation. We also showed that the global effect on DNA methylome depends on the concentration of the drug. With a high dose of blonanserin, the overall methylation levels across all CpG sites significantly increased. These increases in DNA methylation were prominent in the CpG sites distant from promoter regions. We further examined DNA methylation changes in specific genes implicated for the actions of antipsychotic drugs, such as the dopamine receptor 2 (DRD2) gene and the serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A) gene. We observed that CpG sites that were located within DRD2 and HTR2A genes were significantly hypermethylated by blonanserin. The DNA methylation changes induced by the treatment with blonanserin will be useful for understanding its pharmacological actions at the cellular level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of human neuroblastoma cells via oxidative stress dependent of TXNIP upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Cunjin; Shi, Aiming; Cao, Guowen [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Urology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, Nanjing, 210009 (China); Chen, Ruidong [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Hu, Zhanhong; Shen, Zhu; Tao, Hong; Cao, Bin [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Hu, Duanmin, E-mail: hudmsdfey@sina.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China); Bao, Junjie, E-mail: baojjsdfey@sina.com [Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, 215004 (China)

    2015-05-15

    There are no appropriate drugs for metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), which is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor for childhood. Thioredoxin binding protein (TXNIP), the endogenous inhibitor of ROS elimination, has been identified as a tumor suppressor in various solid tumors. It reported that fenofibrate exerts anti-tumor effects in several human cancer cell lines. However, its detail mechanisms remain unclear. The present study assessed the effects of fenofibrate on NB cells and investigated TXNIP role in its anti-tumor mechanisms. We used MTT assay to detect cells proliferation, starch wound test to investigate cells migration, H{sub 2}DCF-DA to detect intracellular ROS, siRNA to interfere TXNIP and peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) expression, western blot to determine protein levels, flow cytometry to analyze apoptosis. Fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells, remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, promoted cell apoptosis. Furthermore, inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells by exacerbating oxidative stress and inducing apoptosis was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP. - Highlights: • We found that fenofibrate suppressed proliferation and migration of NB cells. • We found that fenofibrate remarkably increased intracellular ROS, upregulated TXNIP expression, and promoted cell apoptosis. • Inhibition of TXNIP expression attenuated anti-tumor effects of fenofibrate, while inhibition of PPAR-α had no influences. • Our results indicated the anti-tumor role of fenofibrate on NB cells was dependent on the upregulation of TXNIP.

  10. Jak Inhibitors Modulate Production of Replication Competent Zika Virus in Human Hofbauer, Trophoblasts, and Neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gavegnano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika Virus (ZIKV is a Flavivirus that has been implicated in brain deformations, birth defects, and microcephaly of unborn fetuses and associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome.  Mechanisms responsible for transmission of ZIKV across the placenta to the fetus are incompletely understood.  Herein, we define key events modulating infection in clinically relevant cells, including primary placental macrophages (human hofbauer cells; HC, trophoblasts, and neuroblastoma cells. Consistent with previous findings, HC and trophoblasts are permissive to ZIKV infection. Decrease of interferon signaling by Jak 1/2 inhibition (via ruxolitinib significantly increased ZIKV replicationin HC, trophoblasts, and neuroblasts. Enhanced ZIKV production in ruxolitinib treated HC was associated with increased expression of HLA-DR and DC-SIGN. Nucleoside analogs blocked ruxolitinib-mediated production of extracellular virus. Although low-level ZIKV infection occurred in untreated HC and trophoblasts, the produced virus was incapable of infecting naïve Vero cells.  These deficient virions from untreated HC present “thin-coats” suggesting immature virion structure. Blocking Jak 1/2 signaling (with ruxolitinib restored replication competence as virions produced under these conditions confer CPE in naïve Vero cells.  These data demonstrate that Jak-STAT signaling directly impacts the ability of primary placental cells to produce replication competent virus and is a key gatekeeper in production of mature virions in clinically relevant cells including HC and trophoblasts. Design of targeted agents to prevent ZIKV replication in the placenta should consider Jak 1/2 signaling and the impact of its block on ZIKV infection and subsequent transmission to the fetus.

  11. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  12. Survivin knockdown increased anti-cancer effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2 and SH-SY5Y cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, Md. Motarab [Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States); Banik, Naren L. [Department of Neurosciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States); Ray, Swapan K., E-mail: swapan.ray@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2012-08-01

    network formation ability of cells was significantly inhibited by survivin silencing and completely by combination of survivin silencing and EGCG treatment. Collectively, survivin silencing potentiated anti-cancer effects of EGCG in human malignant neuroblastoma cells having survivin overexpression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG controlled growth of human malignant neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin knockdown induced neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Survivin shRNA + EGCG induced morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination therapy inhibited invasion, proliferation, and angiogenesis as well. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer So, combination therapy showed multiple anti-cancer mechanisms in neuroblastoma.

  13. Effect of sulfasalazine on human neuroblastoma: Analysis of sepiapterin reductase (SPR) as a new therapeutic target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.P. Yco (Lisette P.); D. Geerts (Dirk); G. Mocz (Gabor); J. Koster (Jan); A.S. Bachmann (André)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Neuroblastoma (NB) is an aggressive childhood malignancy in children up to 5 years of age. High-stage tumors frequently relapse even after aggressive multimodal treatment, and then show therapy resistance, typically resulting in patient death. New molecular-targeted compounds

  14. Human Neuroblastoma: From Basic Science to Clinical Debut of Cellular Oncogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Manfred

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood embryonic tumor of migrating neuroectodermal cells derived from the neural crest and destined for the adrenal medulla and the sympathetic nervous system. It very often has a rapidly progressive clinical course, and although many advances have been made in understanding the development of this tumor, improving the survival rates particularly in patients with metastatic tumor has been a frustrating experience. The mechanisms leading to neuroblastoma are largely unclear, but nonrandom chromosomal changes discovered early suggested the involvement of genetic alterations. Most prominent among these is the amplification of the oncogene MYCN, which identifies a group of patients who have a particularly dire prognosis. Amplified MYCN is used today as a prognostic marker on which therapy design is based to a large extent. An unusual aspect of neuroblastoma is the high rate at which tumors regress spontaneously, even in infants with extensive liver involvement and numerous subcutaneous nodules. Identifying the molecular and cellular basis of spontaneous regression could result in improved therapeutic approaches. Neuroblastoma is a model tumor with many fascinating aspects but has remained a challenge to the pediatric oncologist

  15. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Trigger Cell Cycle Arrest and Induce Apoptosis in Human Neuroblastoma LA-N-1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Wing So

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 (n-3 fatty acids are dietary long-chain fatty acids with an array of health benefits. Previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effect of n-3 fatty acids on different cancer cell lines in vitro, yet their anti-tumor effects and underlying action mechanisms on human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells have not yet been reported. In this study, we showed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA exhibited time- and concentration-dependent anti-proliferative effect on the human neuroblastoma LA-N-1 cells, but had minimal cytotoxicity on the normal or non-tumorigenic cells, as measured by MTT reduction assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that DHA and EPA triggered G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in LA-N-1 cells, as detected by flow cytometry, which was accompanied by a decrease in the expression of CDK2 and cyclin E proteins. Moreover, DHA and EPA could also induce apoptosis in LA-N-1 cells as revealed by an increase in DNA fragmentation, phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Up-regulation of Bax, activated caspase-3 and caspase-9 proteins, and down-regulation of Bcl-XL protein, might account for the occurrence of apoptotic events. Collectively, our results suggest that the growth-inhibitory effect of DHA and EPA on LA-N-1 cells might be mediated, at least in part, via triggering of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Therefore, DHA and EPA are potential anti-cancer agents which might be used for the adjuvant therapy or combination therapy with the conventional anti-cancer drugs for the treatment of some forms of human neuroblastoma with minimal toxicity.

  16. Presenilin-1 mutations alter K+ currents in the human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plant, Leigh D; Boyle, John P; Thomas, Natasha M

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 1 (PS1) are the major cause of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease. We have measured the voltage-gated K+ current in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y using whole-cell patch-clamp. When cells were stably transfected to over-express PS1, no change in K+ current...... membrane distribution when the deltaE9 over-expressing cells were compared to control cells. Intracellular retention of Kv3.1 is consistent with the notion that PS1 can modulate the activity and trafficking of ion channels in central neurones and implicates a compromise in electrical signalling...

  17. A human cancer xenograft model utilizing normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells conditionally transformed with defined oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagawa, Yuki; Yamada, Kenji; Yugawa, Takashi; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Esaki, Minoru; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Aoki, Kazunori; Saya, Hideyuki; Kiyono, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are considered to arise through neoplastic transformation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDECs). In order to evaluate the biological significance of genetic and epigenetic alterations in PDACs, we isolated primary HPDECs and established an in vitro carcinogenesis model. Firstly, lentivirus-mediated transduction of KRAS(G12V), MYC and human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 under the control of a tetracyclin-inducible promoter efficiently immortalized and transformed primary HPDECs, which gave rise to adenocarcinomas subcutaneously in an immune-deficient mouse xenograft model, depending on expression of the four genes. The tumors regressed promptly upon shutting-off the oncogenes, and the remaining tissues showed histological features corresponding to normal ductal structures with simple columnar epithelium. Reexpression of the oncogenes resulted in development of multiple PDACs through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like structures. We also succeeded in efficient immortalization of primary HPDECs with transduction of mutant CDK4, cyclin D1 and TERT. The cells maintained a normal diploid status and formed duct-like structures in a three-dimensional culture. In combination with p53 silencing, KRAS(G12V) alone was sufficient to fully transform the immortalized HPDECs, and MYC markedly accelerated the development of tumors. Our PDAC model supports critical roles of KRAS mutations, inactivation of the p53 and p16-pRB pathways, active telomerase and MYC expression in pancreatic carcinogenesis and thus recapitulates many features of human PDAC development. The present system with reversible control of oncogene expression enabled de novo development of PDAC from quasinormal human tissues preformed subcutaneously in mice and might be applicable to carcinogenesis models in many organ sites. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Mouse xenograft modeling of human adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia provides mechanistic insights into adult LIC biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Aditi; Castleton, Anna Z.; Schwab, Claire; Samuel, Edward; Sivakumaran, Janani; Beaton, Brendan; Zareian, Nahid; Zhang, Christie Yu; Rai, Lena; Enver, Tariq; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fielding, Adele K.

    2014-01-01

    The distinct nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults, evidenced by inferior treatment outcome and different genetic landscape, mandates specific studies of disease-initiating mechanisms. In this study, we used NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγ nullc (NSG) mouse xenotransplantation approaches to elucidate leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) biology in primary adult precursor B (pre-B) ALL to optimize disease modeling. In contrast with xenografting studies of pediatric ALL, we found that modification of the NSG host environment using preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) was indispensable for efficient engraftment of adult non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL, whereas t(4;11) pre-B ALL was successfully reconstituted without this adaptation. Furthermore, TBI-based xenotransplantation of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL enabled detection of a high frequency of LICs (<1:6900) and permitted frank leukemic engraftment from a remission sample containing drug-resistant minimal residual disease. Investigation of TBI-sensitive stromal-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor type 4 signaling revealed greater functional dependence of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL on this niche-based interaction, providing a possible basis for the differential engraftment behavior. Thus, our studies establish the optimal conditions for experimental modeling of human adult pre-B ALL and demonstrate the critical protumorogenic role of microenvironment-derived SDF-1 in regulating adult pre-B LIC activity that may present a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24825861

  20. Biological studies of samarium-153 bleomycin complex in human breast cancer murine xenografts for therapeutic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami-Samani, A. [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir Univ. of Tech., Tehran (Iran); Ghannadi-Maragheh, M. [Faculty of Nuclear Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir Univ. of Tech., Tehran (Iran); Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab. (RRDL), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst. (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran); Jalilian, A.R.; Mazidi, M. [Radiopharmaceutical Research and Development Lab. (RRDL), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Inst. (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a potential therapeutic DNA targeting agent, {sup 153}Sm-bleomycin complex ({sup 153}Sm-BLM), was developed and the tumor accumulation studies were performed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and scarification studies. {sup 153}Sm-BLM was prepared at optimized conditions (room temperature, 4-8 h, 0.1 mg bleomycin for 740-3700 MBq {sup 153}SmCl{sub 3}, radiochemical purity over 98%, HPLC, specific activity = 55 TBq/mmol). {sup 153}Sm-BLM was administered into human breast cancer murine xenografts and the biodistribution and imaging studies were performed up to 48 h. {sup 153}Sm-BLM demonstrated superior tumor accumulation properties in contrast with the other radiolabeled bleomycins with tumor:blood ratios of 41, 72 and 182 at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, and tumor:muscle ratios of 23, 33 and > 1490 at 4, 24 and 48 h, respectively, while administered intravenously. The SPECT images also demonstrated the obvious tumor uptake at the chest region of the breast-tumor bearing mice. These initial experiments demonstrate significant accumulation of {sup 153}Sm-BLM in tumor tissues. (orig.)

  1. Interleukin-20 plays a critical role in maintenance and development of psoriasis in the human xenograft transplantation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, K; Rosada, C; Worsaae, A

    2009-01-01

    . Objectives In this study, we investigate the effects both of blocking IL-20 signalling in psoriatic plaques and of adding IL-20 to nonlesional psoriasis skin. Methods We employed the human skin xenograft transplantation model in which psoriatic plaques and nonlesional keratome skin biopsies obtained from...... in the induction and maintenance of psoriasis, and IL-20 is suggested as a new possible specific target in psoriasis treatment....

  2. A novel, diffusely infiltrative xenograft model of human anaplastic oligodendroglioma with mutations in FUBP1, CIC, and IDH1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Klink

    Full Text Available Oligodendroglioma poses a biological conundrum for malignant adult human gliomas: it is a tumor type that is universally incurable for patients, and yet, only a few of the human tumors have been established as cell populations in vitro or as intracranial xenografts in vivo. Their survival, thus, may emerge only within a specific environmental context. To determine the fate of human oligodendroglioma in an experimental model, we studied the development of an anaplastic tumor after intracranial implantation into enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP positive NOD/SCID mice. Remarkably after nearly nine months, the tumor not only engrafted, but it also retained classic histological and genetic features of human oligodendroglioma, in particular cells with a clear cytoplasm, showing an infiltrative growth pattern, and harboring mutations of IDH1 (R132H and of the tumor suppressor genes, FUBP1 and CIC. The xenografts were highly invasive, exhibiting a distinct migration and growth pattern around neurons, especially in the hippocampus, and following white matter tracts of the corpus callosum with tumor cells accumulating around established vasculature. Although tumors exhibited a high growth fraction in vivo, neither cells from the original patient tumor nor the xenograft exhibited significant growth in vitro over a six-month period. This glioma xenograft is the first to display a pure oligodendroglioma histology and expression of R132H. The unexpected property, that the cells fail to grow in vitro even after passage through the mouse, allows us to uniquely investigate the relationship of this oligodendroglioma with the in vivo microenvironment.

  3. Hydrochloric acid alters the effect of L-glutamic acid on cell viability in human neuroblastoma cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Nicoletta; Bernardini, Sergio; Di Cecca, Stefano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Angelucci, Francesco

    2013-07-15

    l-Glutamic acid (l-glutamate) is used to induce excitotoxicity and test neuroprotective compounds in cell cultures. However, because l-glutamate powder is nearly insoluble in water, many manufacturers recommend reconstituting l-glutamate in hydrochloric acid (HCl) prior to successive dilutions. Nevertheless, HCl, even at low concentrations, may alter the pH of the cell culture medium and interfere with cell activity. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the reconstitution of l-glutamate powder in HCl alters its capacity to induce neurotoxicity in different human neuroblastoma cell lines. SH-SY5Y, IMR-32 and SK-N-BE(2) cells were exposed to various concentrations of l-glutamate, which was either reconstituted in HCl (1M) or post re-equilibrated to the pH of the culture medium (7.5). After 24 and 48h of incubation, changes in the cell viability of treated versus untreated cells were evaluated. The effect of an identical amount of HCl present in the l-glutamate dilutions on neuroblastoma cell survival was also investigated. Our data showed that the neurotoxicity of glutamate reconstituted in HCl was comparable to that of HCl alone. Moreover, the pH variations induced by glutamate or HCl in the culture medium were similar. When the pH of the glutamate stock solution was re-equilibrated, l-glutamate induced variation in cell viability to a lower extent and after a longer incubation time. This study demonstrated that HCl used to reconstitute l-glutamate powder might alter the effect of glutamate itself in neuroblastoma cell cultures. Thus, this information might be useful to scientists who use l-glutamate to induce excitotoxicity or to test neuroprotective agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Reactive oxygen species regulate the levels of dual oxidase (Duox1-2 in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Damiano

    Full Text Available Dual Oxidases (DUOX 1 and 2 are efficiently expressed in thyroid, gut, lung and immune system. The function and the regulation of these enzymes in mammals are still largely unknown. We report here that DUOX 1 and 2 are expressed in human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells as well as in a human oligodendrocyte cell line (MO3-13 and in rat brain and they are induced by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF. The levels of DUOX 1 and 2 proteins and mRNAs are induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by the membrane NADPH oxidase. As to the mechanism, we find that PDGF stimulates membrane NADPH oxidase to produce ROS, which stabilize DUOX1 and 2 mRNAs and increases the levels of the proteins. Silencing of gp91(phox (NOX2, or of the other membrane subunit of NADPH oxidase, p22(phox, blocks PDGF induction of DUOX1 and 2. These data unravel a novel mechanism of regulation of DUOX enzymes by ROS and identify a circuitry linking NADPH oxidase activity to DUOX1 and 2 levels in neuroblastoma cells.

  5. Delayed IFN response differentiates replication of West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yuki; Uchida, Leo; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are important causes of human encephalitis cases, which result in a high mortality ratio and neurological sequelae after recovery. Understanding the mechanism of neuropathogenicity in these viral infections is important for the development of specific antiviral therapy. Here, we focused on human-derived neuronal and glial cells to understand the cellular responses against WNV and JEV infection. It was demonstrated that early IFN-β induction regulated virus replication in glioblastoma tbl98G cells, whereas delayed IFN-β induction resulted in efficient virus replication in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Moreover, the concealing of viral dsRNA in the intracellular membrane resulted in the delayed IFN response in SK-N-SH cells. These results, which showed different IFN responses between human neuronal and glial cells after WNV or JEV infection, are expected to contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for neuropathology in these viral infections.

  6. Targeted inhibition of NMYC by peptide nucleic acid in N-myc amplified human neuroblastoma cells: cell-cycle inhibition with induction of neuronal cell differentiation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pession, Andrea; Tonelli, Roberto; Fronza, Raffaele; Sciamanna, Elena; Corradini, Roberto; Sforza, Stefano; Tedeschi, Tullia; Marchelli, Rosangela; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Camerin, Consuelo; Franzoni, Monica; Paolucci, Guido

    2004-02-01

    We developed an antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeted against a unique sequence in the terminus of the 5'-UTR of N-myc, designed for selective inhibition of NMYC in neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescent microscopy showed carrier-free delivery of the PNA to two human neuro-blastoma cell lines: GI-LI-N (N-myc-amplified) and GI-CA-N (N-myc-unamplified). Only in the former, PNA treatment determined 70% cell-viability reduction (at 48 h). In N-myc-amplified GI-LI-N cells, the PNA determined NMYC-translation inhibition (Western blotting), accumulation of cells in G1, induction of differentiation and apoptosis. Selectivity of the PNA was demonstrated by altering three point mutations. These findings should encourage development of a PNA-based tumor-specific agent for neuroblastoma (or other neoplasms) with N-myc overexpression.

  7. A human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft--radiation response, cellular composition, and tumor disaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, C M; Keng, P C; Siemann, D W; Sutherland, R M

    1987-02-01

    The human colon adenocarcinoma cell line WiDr was xenografted and the tumor characterized. When athymic mice (NCR-nu) were inoculated with 10(6) cells, tumors appeared after 7-14 days with a 93-100% take rate and grew with an initial volume-doubling time of around 6 days. For optimizing the tumor disaggregation method, a comparison was made of two dissociation procedures and of different dissociation times. An enzyme cocktail (collagenase, DNase, pronase) resulted in total viable cell yields of 1-3 X 10(7) cells/g tumor tissue. Cell yield decreased with increasing tumor weight. Disaggregation with trypsin gave lower cell yields; and so, although the plating efficiencies (PEs) were higher, the enzyme cocktail was chosen for tumor disaggregation. On the basis of morphologic identification, cell suspensions prepared from WiDr tumors, by use of the enzyme cocktail for 2 hours, contained 49% malignant cells as well as a significant fraction of nonneoplastic cells. The major nonneoplastic host cell component was macrophage (33%); lymphocytes (13%) and granulocytes (5%) also were present. Host cells could be separated from neoplastic cells by centrifugal elutriation. By mixing various proportions of host and tumor cells, it was subsequently shown that the presence of host cells did not influence the malignant cell PE unless the cell suspensions contained greater than 90% host cells. Single-cell suspensions prepared from WiDr tumors, with use of the enzyme cocktail for 2 hours, were irradiated and then plated for survival (D0 = 1.5 Gy; n = 5) (D0, the 37% dose slope). A comparison was made of the sensitivity to radiation, after the different dissociation methods. The radiation sensitivities after 1.5-hour trypsinization and 2- and 6-hour enzyme cocktail administrations were similar, but after 0.5 hour of trypsin, the cells were more sensitive to radiation.

  8. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  9. Therapeutic Electromagnetic Field (TEMF) and gamma irradiation on human breast cancer xenograft growth, angiogenesis and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ivan L; Sun, Lu-Zhe; Short, Nicholas; Hardman, W Elaine; Williams, C Douglas

    2005-01-01

    Background The effects of a rectified semi-sinewave signal (15 mT amplitude, 120 pulses per second, EMF Therapeutics, Inc.) (TEMF) alone and in combination with gamma irradiation (IR) therapy in nude mice bearing a human MDA MB231 breast cancer xenograft were tested. Green fluorescence protein transfected cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of young female mice. Six weeks later, mice were randomly divided into four treatment groups: untreated controls; 10 minute daily TEMF; 200 cGy of IR every other day (total 800 cGy); IR plus daily TEMF. Some mice in each group were euthanized 24 hours after the end of IR. TEMF treatment continued for 3 additional weeks. Tumor sections were stained for: endothelial cells with CD31 and PAS or hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF). Results Most tumors 35 mm3 were pink and had a vascularized capsule. The cortex within 100 microns of the capsule had little vascularization. Blood vessels, capillaries, and endothelial pseudopods were found at >100 microns from the capsule (subcortex). Tumors >35 mm3 treated with IR 24 hours previously or with TEMF had decreased blood vessels in the subcortex and more endothelial pseudopods projecting into hypoxic, HIF positive areas than tumors from the control group. Mice that received either IR or TEMF had significantly fewer lung metastatic sites and slower tumor growth than did untreated mice. No harmful side effects were attributed to TEMF. Conclusion TEMF therapy provided a safe means for retarding tumor vascularization, growth and metastasis. PMID:16045802

  10. Therapeutic Electromagnetic Field (TEMF and gamma irradiation on human breast cancer xenograft growth, angiogenesis and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardman W Elaine

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of a rectified semi-sinewave signal (15 mT amplitude, 120 pulses per second, EMF Therapeutics, Inc. (TEMF alone and in combination with gamma irradiation (IR therapy in nude mice bearing a human MDA MB231 breast cancer xenograft were tested. Green fluorescence protein transfected cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of young female mice. Six weeks later, mice were randomly divided into four treatment groups: untreated controls; 10 minute daily TEMF; 200 cGy of IR every other day (total 800 cGy; IR plus daily TEMF. Some mice in each group were euthanized 24 hours after the end of IR. TEMF treatment continued for 3 additional weeks. Tumor sections were stained for: endothelial cells with CD31 and PAS or hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF. Results Most tumors 3 were white but tumors >35 mm3 were pink and had a vascularized capsule. The cortex within 100 microns of the capsule had little vascularization. Blood vessels, capillaries, and endothelial pseudopods were found at >100 microns from the capsule (subcortex. Tumors >35 mm3 treated with IR 24 hours previously or with TEMF had decreased blood vessels in the subcortex and more endothelial pseudopods projecting into hypoxic, HIF positive areas than tumors from the control group. Mice that received either IR or TEMF had significantly fewer lung metastatic sites and slower tumor growth than did untreated mice. No harmful side effects were attributed to TEMF. Conclusion TEMF therapy provided a safe means for retarding tumor vascularization, growth and metastasis.

  11. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids and ionizing irradiation on human breast cancer xenograft growth and angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Ivan L

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of an omega-3 (n-3 fatty acid enriched diet alone and in combination with gamma irradiation (IR therapy in nude mice bearing a human MDA-MB231 breast cancer xenograft were tested. The cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of young female mice. Six weeks later, mice were randomly divided into two diet groups: 1 mice with 10% corn oil (rich in omega 6 fatty acids in their food, 2 mice consuming a 10% fat diet that was enriched in n-3 fatty acids. After two weeks on the diet, treatment with 200 cGy of IR every second day for four treatments (total 800 cGy was initiated on half of the mice from each diet group. Some mice in each of the 4 groups were euthanized 24 hours after the end of IR while the remaining mice were followed for 3 additional weeks. Tumor sections were stained for endothelial cells with CD31 and PAS and for hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-α. Results The tumor cortex within 100 microns of the well-vascularized capsule had little vascularization. Blood vessels, capillaries, and endothelial pseudopods were found at areas greater than 100 microns from the capsule (subcortex. Mice on the corn oil diet and treated with IR 24 hours previously or non-irradiated mice fed the n-3 diet had tumors with fewer blood vessels in the subcortex and more endothelial pseudopods projecting into hypoxic (HIF- α positive areas than did mice from the non-irradiated corn oil fed group. The tumor growth rate of mice that received IR or that were fed the n-3 fatty acid enriched diet was significantly slower than in the mice fed the 10% corn oil diet. Harmful side effects were found only in the IR treated mice. Conclusion The omega-3 fatty acid enriched diet proved to be a safe means for retarding tumor growth and vascularization.

  12. Intraperitoneal delivery of human natural killer cells for treatment of ovarian cancer in a mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Melissa A; Knorr, David A; Hermanson, David A; Pribyl, Lee; Bendzick, Laura; McCullar, Valarie; Miller, Jeffrey S; Kaufman, Dan S

    2013-10-01

    There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic strategies for relapsed ovarian cancer. Dramatic clinical anti-tumor effects have been observed with interleukin (IL)-2 activated natural killer (NK) cells; however, intravenous delivery of NK cells in patients with ovarian cancer has not been successful in ameliorating disease. We investigated in vivo engraftment of intraperitoneally (IP) delivered NK cells in an ovarian cancer xenograft model to determine if delivery mode can affect tumor cell killing and circumvent lack of NK cell expansion. An ovarian cancer xenograft mouse model was established to evaluate efficacy of IP-delivered NK cells. Tumor burden was monitored by bioluminescent imaging of luciferase-expressing ovarian cancer cells. NK cell persistence, tumor burden and NK cell trafficking were evaluated. Transplanted NK cells were evaluated by flow cytometry and cytotoxicity assays. IP delivery of human NK cells plus cytokines led to high levels of circulating NK and was effective in clearing intraperitoneal ovarian cancer burden in xenografted mice. NK cells remained within the peritoneal cavity 54 days after injection and had markers of maturation. Additionally, surviving NK cells were able to kill ovarian cancer cells at a rate similar to pre-infusion levels, supporting that in vivo functionality of human NK cells can be maintained after IP infusion. IP delivery of NK cells leads to stable engraftment and antitumor response in an ovarian cancer xenograft model. These data support further pre-clinical and clinical evaluation of IP delivery of allogeneic NK cells in ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. NCYM, a Cis-antisense gene of MYCN, encodes a de novo evolved protein that inhibits GSK3β resulting in the stabilization of MYCN in human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suenaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3β, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3β, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3β inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3β activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease.

  14. Differentiation in neuroblastoma: diffusion-limited hypoxia induces neuro-endocrine secretory protein 55 and other markers of a chromaffin phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Hedborg

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is a childhood malignancy of sympathetic embryonal origin. A high potential for differentiation is a hallmark of neuroblastoma cells. We have previously presented data to suggest that in situ differentiation in tumors frequently proceeds along the chromaffin lineage and that decreased oxygen (hypoxia plays a role in this. Here we explore the utility of Neuro-Endocrine Secretory Protein 55 (NESP55, a novel member of the chromogranin family, as a marker for this process.Immunohistochemical analyses and in situ hybridizations were performed on human fetal tissues, mouse xenografts of human neuroblastoma cell lines, and on specimens of human neuroblastoma/ganglioneuroma. Effects of anaerobic exposure on gene expression by cultured neuroblastoma cells was analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR. Fetal sympathetic nervous system expression of NESP55 was shown to be specific for chromaffin cell types. In experimental and clinical neuroblastoma NESP55 immunoreactivity was specific for regions of chronic hypoxia. NESP55 expression also correlated strikingly with morphological evidence of differentiation and with other chromaffin-specific patterns of gene expression, including IGF2 and HIF2α. Anaerobic culture of five neuroblastoma cell lines resulted in an 18.9-fold mean up-regulation of NESP55.The data confirms that chronic tumor hypoxia is a key microenvironmental factor for neuroblastoma cell differentiation, causing induction of chromaffin features and NESP55 provides a reliable marker for this neuronal to neuroendocrine transition. The hypoxia-induced phenotype is the predominant form of differentiation in stroma-poor tumors, while in stroma-rich tumors the chromaffin phenotype coexists with ganglion cell-like differentiation. The findings provide new insights into the biological diversity which is a striking feature of this group of tumors.

  15. Neural differentiation of the human neuroblastoma cell line IMR32 induces production of a thyrotropin-releasing hormone-like peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.M. Rondeel (Jan); W. Klootwijk (Willem); E. Linkels; W.J. de Greef (W.); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe human neuroblastoma cell line IMR32 produces and secretes substantial amounts of TRH-immunoreactivity (TRH-IR) as measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA) using the nonspecific antiserum 4319. It was found that synthesis of TRH-IR is dependent on neural differentiation: under serum-free

  16. Cystatins - Extra- and intracellular cysteine protease inhibitors: High-level secretion and uptake of cystatin C in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Hanna; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Vogel, Lotte

    2010-01-01

    Cystatins are present in mammals, birds, fish, insects, plants, fungi and protozoa and constitute a large protein family, with most members sharing a cysteine protease inhibitory function. In humans 12 functional cystatins exist, forming three groups based on molecular organisation and distribution...... signal peptides) for cellular export following translation. Results indicating existence of systems for significant internalisation of type 2 cystatins from the extracellular to intracellular compartments are reviewed. Data showing that human neuroblastoma cell lines generally secrete high levels......, but also contain high amounts of cystatin C are presented. Culturing of these cells in medium containing cystatin C at concentrations found in body fluids resulted in increased intracellular cystatin C, as a result of an uptake process. At immunofluorescence cytochemistry a pronounced vesicular cystatin C...

  17. Isolation of human lymphatic malformation endothelial cells, their in vitro characterization and in vivo survival in a mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokmic, Zerina; Mitchell, Geraldine M; Koh Wee Chong, Nicholas; Bastiaanse, Jacqueline; Gerrand, Yi-Wen; Zeng, Yiping; Williams, Elizabeth D; Penington, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Human lymphatic vascular malformations (LMs), also known as cystic hygromas or lymphangioma, consist of multiple lymphatic endothelial cell-lined lymph-containing cysts. No animal model of this disease exists. To develop a mouse xenograft model of human LM, CD34(Neg)CD31(Pos) LM lymphatic endothelial cells (LM-LEC) were isolated from surgical specimens and compared to foreskin CD34(Neg)CD31(Pos) lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). Cells were implanted into a mouse tissue engineering model for 1, 2 and 4 weeks. In vitro LM-LECs showed increased proliferation and survival under starvation conditions (P lymphatic malformations.

  18. Human cytomegalovirus infection leads to elevated levels of transplant arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse aortic xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abele-Ohl, S; Leis, M; Wollin, M; Mahmoudian, S; Hoffmann, J; Müller, R; Heim, C; Spriewald, B M; Weyand, M; Stamminger, T; Ensminger, S M

    2012-07-01

    Recent findings emphasized an important role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in the development of transplant arteriosclerosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a human peripheral blood lymphocyte (hu-PBL)/Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mouse-xenograft-model to investigate both immunological as well as viral effector mechanisms in the progression of transplant arteriosclerosis. For this, sidebranches from the internal mammary artery were recovered during coronary artery bypass graft surgery, tissue-typed and infected with HCMV. Then, size-matched sidebranches were implanted into the infrarenal aorta of Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice. The animals were reconstituted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) 7 days after transplantation. HCMV-infection was confirmed by Taqman-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. Arterial grafts were analyzed by histology on day 40 after transplantation. PBMC-reconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) animals showed splenic chimerism levels ranging from 1-16% human cells. After reconstitution, Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice developed human leukocyte infiltrates in their grafts and vascular lesions that were significantly elevated after infection. Cellular infiltration revealed significantly increased ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression after HCMV-infection of the graft. Arterial grafts from unreconstituted Rag-2(-/-) γc(-/-) recipients showed no vascular lesions. These data demonstrate a causative relationship between HCMV-infection as an isolated risk factor and the development of transplant-arteriosclerosis in a humanized mouse arterial-transplant-model possibly by elevated ICAM-1 and PDGF-R-β expression. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. Antitumor activity of irofulven against human ovarian cancer cell lines, human tumor colony-forming units, and xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laar, E S; Izbicka, E; Weitman, S; Medina-Gundrum, L; Macdonald, J R; Waters, S J

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic activity of irofulven (HMAF, MGI 114), a unique chemotherapeutic agent currently under clinical investigation, in various preclinical models of ovarian cancer. Antiproliferative effects of irofulven in ovarian cancer cell lines and ovarian tumor specimens were characterized in vitro using sulforhodamine B and human tumor colony-forming assays, respectively. Irofulven demonstrated marked activity against a panel of ovarian tumor cell lines, including IGROV1, OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4, OVCAR-5, OVCAR-8, and SK-OV-3, all of which exhibit various drug resistance mechanisms. In human tumor cloning assays, irofulven inhibited colony formation in surgically derived ovarian tumors at concentrations as low as 0.001 micro g /ml and indicated superior activity in comparison with paclitaxel when tested against the same tumor specimens. The antitumor activity of irofulven compared to that of paclitaxel was also examined using the SK-OV-3 xenograft model. In mice bearing subcutaneously implanted SK-OV-3 tumors, treatment with paclitaxel failed to inhibit tumor growth; whereas mice treated with maximum tolerated doses of irofulven had a 25% partial shrinkage rate, and the remaining animals had a mean tumor growth inhibition of 82%. The potent activity of irofulven against ovarian tumors in vitro and in vivo supports the evaluation of its clinical activity in ovarian cancer.

  20. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether promotes human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells migration via the GPER/PI3K/Akt signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, P-C; Wang, H-L; Chen, G-H; Luo, Q; Chen, Z; Wang, Y; Liu, Y-F

    2016-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is the predominant tumor of early childhood. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) has the highest concentration among all polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners in human body, particularly for children. Considering that accumulating evidences showed developmental neurotoxicity of PBDE, there is an urgent need to investigate the effects of BDE-47 on the development of neuroblastoma. This study revealed that BDE-47 had limited effects on the cytotoxicity while significantly increased the in vitro migration and invasion of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. This was further confirmed by the results that BDE-47 treatment significantly downregulated the expression of E-cadherin and zona occludin-1 and upregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Silencing of MMP-9 by specific small interfering RNA significantly abolished the BDE-47-induced migration and invasion of SH-SY5Y cells. Further, the signals G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER)/phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) mediated the BDE-47-induced upregulation of MMP-9 and in vitro migration of SH-SY5Y cells since G15 (GPER inhibitor) and LY 294002 (PI3K/Akt inhibitor) significantly abolished the effects of BDE-47. Our results revealed that BDE-47 significantly triggered the metastasis of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells via upregulation of MMP-9 by the GPER/PI3K/Akt signal pathway. This study revealed for the first time that BDE-47 can promote the migration of SH-SY5Y cells. It also provided a better understanding about the metastasis of human neuroblastoma induced by environmental endocrine disruptors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 deficiency attenuates growth while promoting chemosensitivity of human endometrial xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Anne M; Zhang, Ling; Pru, Cindy A; Clark, Nicole C; McCallum, Melissa L; Blok, Leen J; Shioda, Toshi; Peluso, John J; Rueda, Bo R; Pru, James K

    2015-01-28

    Endometrial cancer is the leading gynecologic cancer in women in the United States with 52,630 women predicted to be diagnosed with the disease in 2014. The objective of this study was to determine if progesterone (P4) receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) influenced endometrial cancer cell viability in response to chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. A lentiviral-based shRNA knockdown approach was used to generate stable PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines that also lacked expression of the classical progesterone receptor (PGR). Progesterone treatment inhibited mitosis of PGRMC1-intact, but not PGRMC1-deplete cells, suggesting that PGRMC1 mediates the anti-mitotic actions of P4. To test the hypothesis that PGRMC1 attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete cells were treated in vitro with vehicle, P4 (1 µM), doxorubicin (Dox, 2 µg/ml), or P4 + Dox for 48 h. Doxorubicin treatment of PGRMC1-intact cells resulted in a significant increase in cell death; however, co-treatment with P4 significantly attenuated Dox-induced cell death. This response to P4 was lost in PGRMC1-deplete cells. To extend these observations in vivo, a xenograft model was employed where PGRMC1-intact and PGRMC1-deplete endometrial tumors were generated following subcutaneous and intraperitoneal inoculation of immunocompromised NOD/SCID and nude mice, respectively. Tumors derived from PGRMC1-deplete cells grew slower than tumors from PGRMC1-intact cells. Mice harboring endometrial tumors were then given three treatments of vehicle (1:1 cremophor EL: ethanol + 0.9% saline) or chemotherapy [Paclitaxel (15 mg/kg, i.p.) followed after an interval of 30 minutes by CARBOplatin (50 mg/kg)] at five day intervals. In response to chemotherapy, tumor volume decreased approximately four-fold more in PGRMC1-deplete tumors when compared with PGRMC1-intact control tumors, suggesting that PGRMC1 promotes tumor cell viability

  2. Exendin-4 induces cell adhesion and differentiation and counteracts the invasive potential of human neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Luciani

    Full Text Available Exendin-4 is a molecule currently used, in its synthetic form exenatide, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exendin-4 binds and activates the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R, thus inducing insulin release. More recently, additional biological properties have been associated to molecules that belong to the GLP-1 family. For instance, Peptide YY and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide have been found to affect cell adhesion and migration and our previous data have shown a considerable actin cytoskeleton rearrangement after exendin-4 treatment. However, no data are currently available on the effects of exendin-4 on tumor cell motility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of this molecule on cell adhesion, differentiation and migration in two neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS. We first demonstrated, by Extra Cellular Matrix cell adhesion arrays, that exendin-4 increased cell adhesion, in particular on a vitronectin substrate. Subsequently, we found that this molecule induced a more differentiated phenotype, as assessed by i the evaluation of neurite-like protrusions in 3D cell cultures, ii the analysis of the expression of neuronal markers and iii electrophysiological studies. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exendin-4 reduced cell migration and counteracted anchorage-independent growth in neuroblastoma cells. Overall, these data indicate for the first time that exendin-4 may have anti-tumoral properties.

  3. Effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids and their metabolites on bleomycin-induced cytotoxic action on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailaja Polavarapu

    Full Text Available In the present study, we noted that bleomycin induced growth inhibitory action was augmented by all the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs tested on human neuroblastoma IMR-32 (0.5 × 10(4 cells/100 µl of IMR cells (EPA > DHA > ALA = GLA = AA > DGLA = LA: ∼ 60, 40, 30, 10-20% respectively at the maximum doses used. Of all the prostaglandins (PGE1, PGE2, PGF2α, and PGI2 and leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE4 tested; PGE1, PGE2 and LTD4 inhibited the growth of IMR-32 cells to a significant degree at the highest doses used. Lipoxin A4 (LXA4, 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoate (19, 20 DiHDPA and 10(S,17(S-dihydroxy-4Z,7Z,11E,13Z,15E,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid (protectin: 10(S,17(SDiHDoHE, metabolites of DHA, significantly inhibited the growth of IMR-32 cells. Pre-treatment with AA, GLA, DGLA and EPA and simultaneous treatment with all PUFAs used in the study augmented growth inhibitory action of bleomycin. Surprisingly, both indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA at 60 and 20 µg/ml respectively enhanced the growth of IMR-32 cells even in the presence of bleomycin. AA enhanced oxidant stress in IMR-32 cells as evidenced by an increase in lipid peroxides, superoxide dismutase levels and glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that PUFAs suppress growth of human neuroblastoma cells, augment growth inhibitory action of bleomycin by enhancing formation of lipid peroxides and altering the status of anti-oxidants and, in all probability, increase the formation of lipoxins, resolvins and protectins from their respective precursors that possess growth inhibitory actions.

  4. Effects of combination therapy with vesnarinone, 5-FU and radiation on growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamura, Michio; Nio, Yoshinori; Minari, Yoshimitsu; Iguchi, Chikage; Sasaki, Susumu; Hirahara, Noriyuki; Tamura, Katsuhiro [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    We examined the combination effect of Vesnarinone (AZ, 5 mg/day), 5-FU (40 mg/kg) and radiation (RT, 8 Gy/body) for human pancreatic cancer lines which were subcutaneously xenografted in nude mice. AZ alone did not inhibit their growth, but a combination of AZ, 5-FU and RT showed a significant inhibition. Pathological study demonstrated that the ductal structure became more prominent in the poorly differentiated tumors after Vesnarinone treatment. In conclusion, vesnarinone may be a beneficial agent for the differentiation therapy of pancreatic cancer, especially in combination with 5-FU and/or RT. (author)

  5. Real-time PCR-based assay to quantify the relative amount of human and mouse tissue present in tumor xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcoser Sergio Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenograft samples used to test anti-cancer drug efficacies and toxicities in vivo contain an unknown mix of mouse and human cells. Evaluation of drug activity can be confounded by samples containing large amounts of contaminating mouse tissue. We have developed a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR assay using TaqMan technology to quantify the amount of mouse tissue that is incorporated into human xenograft samples. Results The forward and reverse primers bind to the same DNA sequence in the human and the mouse genome. Using a set of specially designed fluorescent probes provides species specificity. The linearity and sensitivity of the assay is evaluated using serial dilutions of single species and heterogeneous DNA mixtures. We examined many xenograft samples at various in vivo passages, finding a wide variety of human:mouse DNA ratios. This variation may be influenced by tumor type, number of serial passages in vivo, and even which part of the tumor was collected and used in the assay. Conclusions This novel assay provides an accurate quantitative assessment of human and mouse content in xenograft tumors. This assay can be performed on aberrantly behaving human xenografts, samples used in bioinformatics studies, and periodically for tumor tissue frequently grown by serial passage in vivo.

  6. Soma-to-germline transmission of RNA in mice xenografted with human tumour cells: possible transport by exosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cossetti

    Full Text Available Mendelian laws provide the universal founding paradigm for the mechanism of genetic inheritance through which characters are segregated and assorted. In recent years, however, parallel with the rapid growth of epigenetic studies, cases of inheritance deviating from Mendelian patterns have emerged. Growing studies underscore phenotypic variations and increased risk of pathologies that are transgenerationally inherited in a non-Mendelian fashion in the absence of any classically identifiable mutation or predisposing genetic lesion in the genome of individuals who develop the disease. Non-Mendelian inheritance is most often transmitted through the germline in consequence of primary events occurring in somatic cells, implying soma-to-germline transmission of information. While studies of sperm cells suggest that epigenetic variations can potentially underlie phenotypic alterations across generations, no instance of transmission of DNA- or RNA-mediated information from somatic to germ cells has been reported as yet. To address these issues, we have now generated a mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells stably expressing EGFP-encoding plasmid. We find that EGFP RNA is released from the xenografted human cells into the bloodstream and eventually in spermatozoa of the mice. Tumor-released EGFP RNA is associated with an extracellular fraction processed for exosome purification and expressing exosomal markers, in all steps of the process, from the xenografted cancer cells to the spermatozoa of the recipient animals, strongly suggesting that exosomes are the carriers of a flow of information from somatic cells to gametes. Together, these results indicate that somatic RNA is transferred to sperm cells, which can therefore act as the final recipients of somatic cell-derived information.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity Induces Ras Signaling in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cultured Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirapa Chetsawang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that overproduction of reactive oxygen species occurs after brain injury and mediates neuronal cells degeneration. In the present study, we examined the role of Ras signaling on hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cells degeneration in dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. An inhibitor of the enzyme that catalyzes the farnesylation of Ras proteins, FTI-277, and a competitive inhibitor of GTP-binding proteins, GDP-beta-S significantly decreased hydrogen peroxide-induced reduction in cell viability in SH-SY5Y cultured cells. The results of this study might indicate that a Ras-dependent signaling pathway plays a role in hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in neuronal cells.

  8. Modeling BCR-ABL and MLL-AF9 leukemia in a human bone marrow-like scaffold-based xenograft model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, P.; Carretta, M.; Jaques, J.; Brouwers-Vos, A. Z.; Lubbers-Aalders, L.; Yuan, H.; de Bruijn, J. D.; Martens, A. C. M.; Vellenga, E.; Groen, R. W. J.; Schuringa, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Although NOD-SCID IL2R gamma(-/-) (NSG) xenograft mice are currently the most frequently used model to study human leukemia in vivo, the absence of a human niche severely hampers faithful recapitulation of the disease. We used NSG mice in which ceramic scaffolds seeded with human mesenchymal stromal

  9. Modeling BCR-ABL and MLL-AF9 leukemia in a human bone marrow-like scaffold-based xenograft mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, P.; Carretta, M.; Jaques, J.; Brouwers-Vos, A.Z.; Lubbers-Aalders, L.; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost Dick; Martens, ACM; Vellenga, E.; Groen, R.W.J.; Schuringa, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Although NOD-SCID IL2Rγ−/− (NSG) xenograft mice are currently the most frequently used model to study human leukemia in vivo, the absence of a human niche severely hampers faithful recapitulation of the disease. We used NSG mice in which ceramic scaffolds seeded with human mesenchymal stromal cells

  10. Pseudotyped AAV vector-mediated gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model: implications for in utero gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep G Keswani

    Full Text Available Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF, making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2 gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls.Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts.Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  11. Characterization of a large panel of patient-derived tumor xenografts representing the clinical heterogeneity of human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Sylvia; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Lacroix, Ludovic; Pocard, Marc; Goéré, Diane; Mariani, Pascale; Landron, Sophie; Bigot, Ludovic; Nemati, Fariba; Dartigues, Peggy; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Lantuas, Denis; Morgand, Loïc; Pham, Emmanuel; Gonin, Patrick; Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Job, Bastien; Dessen, Philippe; Bruno, Alain; Pierré, Alain; De Thé, Hugues; Soliman, Hany; Nunes, Manoel; Lardier, Guillaume; Calvet, Loreley; Demers, Brigitte; Prévost, Grégoire; Vrignaud, Patricia; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Duchamp, Olivier; Berthet, Cyril

    2012-10-01

    Patient-derived xenograft models are considered to represent the heterogeneity of human cancers and advanced preclinical models. Our consortium joins efforts to extensively develop and characterize a new collection of patient-derived colorectal cancer (CRC) models. From the 85 unsupervised surgical colorectal samples collection, 54 tumors were successfully xenografted in immunodeficient mice and rats, representing 35 primary tumors, 5 peritoneal carcinoses and 14 metastases. Histologic and molecular characterization of patient tumors, first and late passages on mice includes the sequence of key genes involved in CRC (i.e., APC, KRAS, TP53), aCGH, and transcriptomic analysis. This comprehensive characterization shows that our collection recapitulates the clinical situation about the histopathology and molecular diversity of CRC. Moreover, patient tumors and corresponding models are clustering together allowing comparison studies between clinical and preclinical data. Hence, we conducted pharmacologic monotherapy studies with standard of care for CRC (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and cetuximab). Through this extensive in vivo analysis, we have shown the loss of human stroma cells after engraftment, observed a metastatic phenotype in some models, and finally compared the molecular profile with the drug sensitivity of each tumor model. Through an experimental cetuximab phase II trial, we confirmed the key role of KRAS mutation in cetuximab resistance. This new collection could bring benefit to evaluate novel targeted therapeutic strategies and to better understand the basis for sensitivity or resistance of tumors from individual patients.

  12. Effects of SC-560 in Combination with Cisplatin or Taxol on Angiogenesis in Human Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1 inhibitor, SC-560, combined with cisplatin or taxol, on angiogenesis in human ovarian cancer xenografts. Mice were treated with intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of SC-560 6 mg/kg/day, i.p. injections of cisplatin 3 mg/kg every other day and i.p. injections of taxol 20 mg/kg once a week for 21 days. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF mRNA levels were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR; microvessel density (MVD was determined by immunohistochemistry; and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 levels were determined using ELISA. Expression levels of VEGF mRNA and MVD in treatment groups were inhibited significantly when compared with the control group (p < 0.05 for all, and SC-560 combined with cisplatin displayed a greater reduction in the expression of VEGF and MVD than SC-560 or cisplatin alone (p < 0.05. SC-560 combined with taxol showed a greater inhibition on VEGF mRNA expression than SC-560 or taxol alone (p < 0.05. The level of PGE2 in treatment groups was significantly reduced when compared with the control group (p < 0.01 for all. These findings may indicate that cisplatin or taxol supplemented by SC-560 in human ovarian cancer xenografts enhances the inhibition effect of cisplatin or taxol alone on angiogenesis.

  13. Identification of replication-competent HSV-1 Cgal+ strain targets in a mouse model of human hepatocarcinoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Enrique; Mora, María I; Carro-Roldán, Elvira; Molina, Manuela; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Marconi, Peggy; Manservigi, Roberto; Greco, Anna; Epstein, Alberto L; Prieto, Jesús; Hernández-Alcoceba, Rubén; Corrales, Fernando J

    2009-11-02

    Recent studies based on animal models have shown the advantages and potential of oncolytic viral therapy using HSV-1 -based replication-competent vectors in the treatment of liver tumors, but little is known about the cellular targets that are modulated during viral infection. In the present work, we have studied the effects of intratumoral injections of HSV-1 Cgal(+) strain in a murine model of human hepatoma xenografts. Viral replication was assessed for more than 1month, leading to a significant reduction of tumor growth rate mediated, in part, by a cyclin B dependent cell proliferation arrest. Early events resulting in this effect were analyzed using a proteomic approach. Protein extracts from xenografted human hepatomas treated with saline or HSV-1 Cgal(+) strain during 24h were compared by 2-D DIGE and differential spots were identified by nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS. Alterations on glutathione S transferase 1 Omega, and ERp29 suggest novel HSV-1 Cgal(+) targets in solid liver tumors. Additionally, ERp29 showed a complex differential isoform pattern upon HSV-1 Cgal(+) infection, suggesting regulatory mechanisms based on post-translational modification events.

  14. Blood vessel hyperpermeability and pathophysiology in human tumour xenograft models of breast cancer: a comparison of ectopic and orthotopic tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Karyn S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human tumour xenografts in immune compromised mice are widely used as cancer models because they are easy to reproduce and simple to use in a variety of pre-clinical assessments. Developments in nanomedicine have led to the use of tumour xenografts in testing nanoscale delivery devices, such as nanoparticles and polymer-drug conjugates, for targeting and efficacy via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. For these results to be meaningful, the hyperpermeable vasculature and reduced lymphatic drainage associated with tumour pathophysiology must be replicated in the model. In pre-clinical breast cancer xenograft models, cells are commonly introduced via injection either orthotopically (mammary fat pad, MFP or ectopically (subcutaneous, SC, and the organ environment experienced by the tumour cells has been shown to influence their behaviour. Methods To evaluate xenograft models of breast cancer in the context of EPR, both orthotopic MFP and ectopic SC injections of MDA-MB-231-H2N cells were given to NOD scid gamma (NSG mice. Animals with matched tumours in two size categories were tested by injection of a high molecular weight dextran as a model nanocarrier. Tumours were collected and sectioned to assess dextran accumulation compared to liver tissue as a positive control. To understand the cellular basis of these observations, tumour sections were also immunostained for endothelial cells, basement membranes, pericytes, and lymphatic vessels. Results SC tumours required longer development times to become size matched to MFP tumours, and also presented wide size variability and ulcerated skin lesions 6 weeks after cell injection. The 3 week MFP tumour model demonstrated greater dextran accumulation than the size matched 5 week SC tumour model (for P  Conclusions Dextran accumulation and immunostaining results suggest that small MFP tumours best replicate the vascular permeability required to observe the EPR effect

  15. Rho-associated kinase is a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyberg, Cecilia; Fransson, Susanne; Andonova, Teodora; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur; Lännerholm-Palm, Jessika; Olsen, Thale K; Forsberg, David; Herlenius, Eric; Martinsson, Tommy; Brodin, Bertha; Kogner, Per; Johnsen, John Inge; Wickström, Malin

    2017-08-08

    Neuroblastoma is a peripheral neural system tumor that originates from the neural crest and is the most common and deadly tumor of infancy. Here we show that neuroblastoma harbors frequent mutations of genes controlling the Rac/Rho signaling cascade important for proper migration and differentiation of neural crest cells during neuritogenesis. RhoA is activated in tumors from neuroblastoma patients, and elevated expression of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK)2 is associated with poor patient survival. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of ROCK1 and 2, key molecules in Rho signaling, resulted in neuroblastoma cell differentiation and inhibition of neuroblastoma cell growth, migration, and invasion. Molecularly, ROCK inhibition induced glycogen synthase kinase 3β-dependent phosphorylation and degradation of MYCN protein. Small-molecule inhibition of ROCK suppressed MYCN-driven neuroblastoma growth in TH-MYCN homozygous transgenic mice and MYCN gene-amplified neuroblastoma xenograft growth in nude mice. Interference with Rho/Rac signaling might offer therapeutic perspectives for high-risk neuroblastoma.

  16. Characterizing the metabolic heterogeneity in human breast cancer xenografts by 3D high resolution fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N; Zheng, Gang; Tchou, Julia; Nioka, Shoko; Li, Lin Z

    2013-12-01

    We previously reported that tumor mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity distinguished between the aggressive and the indolent breast cancer xenografts, suggesting novel metabolic indices as biomarkers for predicting tumor metastatic potential. Additionally, we reported that the identified redox biomarkers successfully differentiated between the normal breast tissue and the cancerous breast tissue from breast cancer patients. The aim of the present study was to further characterize intratumor heterogeneity by its distribution of mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake pattern in tumor xenografts and to further investigate the metabolic heterogeneity of the clinical biopsy samples. We employed the Chance redox scanner, a multi-section cryogenic fluorescence imager to simultaneously image the intratumor heterogeneity in the mitochondrial redox state and glucose uptake at a high spatial resolution (down to 50 × 50 × 20 μm(3)). The mitochondrial redox state was determined by the ratio of the intrinsic fluorescence signals from reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp including FAD, i.e., flavin adenine dinucleotide), and the glucose uptake was measured using a near-infrared fluorescent glucose-analogue, pyropheophorbide 2-deoxyglucosamide (Pyro-2DG). Significant inter- and intratumor metabolic heterogeneity were observed from our imaging data on various types of breast cancer xenografts. The patterns and degrees of heterogeneity of mitochondrial redox state appeared to relate to tumor size and metastatic potential. The glucose uptake was also heterogeneous and generally higher in tumor peripheries. The oxidized and reduced regions mostly corresponded with the lower and the higher pyro-2DG uptake, respectively. However, there were some regions where the glucose uptake did not correlate with the redox indices. Pronounced glucose uptake and high NADH were observed in certain localized areas within the tumor

  17. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells

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    Juan C Corredor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB. Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVδM51 and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVδM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses.

  18. Calcium antagonist radioprotectors do not reduce radiotherapeutic efficacy in three human tumor xenografts

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    Floersheim, G.L. [Dept. of Research, Univ. Hospitals, Basel (Switzerland); Racine, C. [Dept. of Research, Univ. Hospitals, Basel (Switzerland)

    1995-07-01

    One Ewing`s sarcoma and 2 colon carcinomas were grown as xenografts in immunosuppressed mice. The mice were treated with diltiazem, nifedipine, nimodipine and nitrendipine. The effect of whole body {gamma}-radiation on the growth of the subcutaneously implanted tumors was assessed. Growth delay or regression of the tumors in mice treated with the calcium antagonists prior to irradiation was not reduced as compared to only irradiated controls. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Ewings-Sarkom und zwei Kolonkarzinome wurden als Xenotransplantate in immunsupprimierten Maeusen zum Wachstum gebracht. Zu den Pruefsubstanzen gehoerten Diltiazem, Nifedipin, Nimodipin und Nitrendipin. Beurteilt wurde der Effekt von {gamma}-Ganzkoerperbestrahlung auf das Wachstum der subkutan transplantierten Tumoren. Die Wachstumsverzoegerung oder Rueckbildung der transplantierten Tumoren durch die Bestrahlung wurde durch Vorbehandlung der Maeuse mit Calciumantagonisten im Vergleich zu nur bestrahlten Tieren nicht vermindert. (orig.)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activating mutations of the ALK kinase receptor in neuroblastoma. Nature. 2008 Oct 16;455(7215):967-70. doi: ... JM. Identification of ALK as a major familial neuroblastoma predisposition gene. Nature. 2008 Oct 16;455(7215):930-5. doi: ...

  20. Identification of neuroblastoma stem cells by characterization of side population cells in the human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Shiqin; Zheng, Jicui; Zhu, Haitao; Yang, Lin; Xiao, Xianmin

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to sort side population (SP) cells from the neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell line and to systematically investigate whether this population has stem cell characteristics. Side population and non-SP cells were separated from the SK-N-SH cell line by flow cytometry, and their morphologic characteristics were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. We also used Western blotting to analyze marker proteins, Cell Counting Kit-8 assay for proliferative ability, series differentiation studies for differentiation properties, and Matrigel invasion study and tumorigenicity assay for malignant potential. The SK-N-SH SP cells expressed high levels of stem cell markers, had high proliferative and malignant abilities, and had the capacity for rapid differentiation. The non-SP cells expressed differentiated cell marker proteins at high levels, had low proliferative and malignant abilities, and exhibited slow differentiation. The SK-N-SH SP cells have cancer stem cell-like properties. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. BET inhibition silences expression of MYCN and BCL2 and induces cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma tumor models.

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    Anastasia Wyce

    Full Text Available BET family proteins are epigenetic regulators known to control expression of genes involved in cell growth and oncogenesis. Selective inhibitors of BET proteins exhibit potent anti-proliferative activity in a number of hematologic cancer models, in part through suppression of the MYC oncogene and downstream Myc-driven pathways. However, little is currently known about the activity of BET inhibitors in solid tumor models, and whether down-regulation of MYC family genes contributes to sensitivity. Here we provide evidence for potent BET inhibitor activity in neuroblastoma, a pediatric solid tumor associated with a high frequency of MYCN amplifications. We treated a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines with a novel small molecule inhibitor of BET proteins, GSK1324726A (I-BET726, and observed potent growth inhibition and cytotoxicity in most cell lines irrespective of MYCN copy number or expression level. Gene expression analyses in neuroblastoma cell lines suggest a role of BET inhibition in apoptosis, signaling, and N-Myc-driven pathways, including the direct suppression of BCL2 and MYCN. Reversal of MYCN or BCL2 suppression reduces the potency of I-BET726-induced cytotoxicity in a cell line-specific manner; however, neither factor fully accounts for I-BET726 sensitivity. Oral administration of I-BET726 to mouse xenograft models of human neuroblastoma results in tumor growth inhibition and down-regulation MYCN and BCL2 expression, suggesting a potential role for these genes in tumor growth. Taken together, our data highlight the potential of BET inhibitors as novel therapeutics for neuroblastoma, and suggest that sensitivity is driven by pleiotropic effects on cell growth and apoptotic pathways in a context-specific manner.

  2. HIF2A and IGF2 Expression Correlates in Human Neuroblastoma Cells and Normal Immature Sympathetic Neuroblasts

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    Sofie Mohlin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During normal sympathetic nervous system (SNS development, cells of the ganglionic lineage can malignantly transform and develop into the childhood tumor neuroblastoma. Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs mediate cellular responses during normal development and are central in the adaptation to oxygen shortage. HIFs are also implicated in the progression of several cancer forms, and high HIF-2α expression correlates with disseminated disease and poor outcome in neuroblastoma. During normal SNS development, HIF2A is transiently expressed in neuroblasts and chromaffin cells. SNS cells can, during development, be distinguished by distinct gene expression patterns, and insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2 is a marker of sympathetic chromaffin cells, whereas sympathetic neuroblasts lack IGF2 expression. Despite the neuronal derivation of neuroblastomas, we show that neuroblastoma cell lines and specimens express IGF2 and that expression of HIF2A and IGF2 correlates, with the strongest correlation in high-stage tumors. In neuroblastoma, both IGF2 and HIF2A are hypoxia-driven and knocking down IGF2 at hypoxia resulted in downregulated HIF2A levels. HIF-2α and IGF2 were strongly expressed in subsets of immature neuroblastoma cells, suggesting that these two genes could be co-expressed also at early stages of SNS development. We show that IGF2 is indeed expressed in sympathetic chain ganglia at embryonic week 6.5, a developmental stage when HIF-2α is present. These findings provide a rationale for the unexpected IGF2 expression in neuroblastomas and might suggest that IGF2 and HIF2A positive neuroblastoma cells are arrested at an embryonic differentiation stage corresponding to the stage when sympathetic chain ganglia begins to coalesce.

  3. Downregulation and/or Release of NKG2D Ligands as Immune Evasion Strategy of Human Neuroblastoma

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    Lizzia Raffaghello

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is a pediatric extracranial tumor characterized by downregulation of human leukocyte antigen class I and defects of the antigen processing machinery, two features that make it an appropriate target for natural killer (NK-mediated lysis. NKG2D is an activating immunoreceptor expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells. The ligands for NKG2D are the major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain (MICA and MICB glycoproteins, and the UL-16-binding proteins (ULBPs. Here, the expression of NKG2D ligands was investigated in human primary NB tumors and cell lines because scanty information is available on this issue. MICA, MICB, and ULBP transcripts were found in most tumors and cell lines. MICA protein was detected in some NB cell lines but not in primary tumors. A soluble form of MICA (sMICA was identified in most patient sera and in some cell line supernatants. sMICA downregulated surface NKG2D in normal peripheral blood CD8+ cells and decreased NK-mediated killing of MICA+ NB cells. MICB was detected exclusively in the cytosol of primary tumors and cell lines. Approximately 50% of primary tumors expressed ULBP-2, but not ULBP-1 or -3. ULBP-3 was expressed in 5 of 9 cell lines, ULBP-2 in 2 of 9, whereas ULBP-1 was never detected. These studies delineate novel potential pathways of tumor escape and immunodeficiency in NB.

  4. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  5. Anti-oligomeric Abeta single-chain variable domain antibody blocks Abeta-induced toxicity against human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zameer, Andleeb; Kasturirangan, Srinath; Emadi, Sharareh; Nimmagadda, Sridevi V; Sierks, Michael R

    2008-12-26

    The Amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide is a major component of the amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies suggest that the most toxic forms of Abeta are small, soluble oligomeric aggregates. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a single-chain variable domain (scFv) antibody isolated against oligomeric Abeta using a protocol developed in our laboratory that combines phage display technology and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Starting with a randomized, single framework phage display library, after three rounds of selection against oligomeric Abeta, we identified an scFv that bound oligomeric Abeta specifically, but not monomeric or fibrillar forms. The anti-oligomeric scFv inhibits Abeta aggregation and toxicity, and reduces the toxicity of preformed oligomeric Abeta towards human neuroblastoma cells. When used to probe samples of human brain tissue, the scFv reacted with AD tissue but not a healthy control or Parkinson's disease brain samples. The anti-oligomeric Abeta scFv therefore has potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications in specifically targeting or identifying the toxic morphologies of Abeta in AD brains.

  6. Resveratrol preconditioning increases methionine sulfoxide reductases A expression and enhances resistance of human neuroblastoma cells to neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng-Fei; Xie, Na; Zhang, Juan-Juan; Guan, Xin-Lei; Zhou, Jun; Long, Li-Hong; Li, Yuan-Long; Xiong, Qiu-Ju; Zeng, Jian-Hua; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2013-06-01

    Methionine sulfoxide reductases A (MsrA) has been postulated to act as a catalytic antioxidant system involved in the protection of oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Recently, attention has turned to MsrA in coupling with the pathology of Parkinson's disease, which is closely related to neurotoxins that cause dopaminergic neuron degeneration. Here, we firstly provided evidence that pretreatment with a natural polyphenol resveratrol (RSV) up-regulated the expression of MsrA in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. It was also observed that the expression and nuclear translocation of forkhead box group O 3a (FOXO3a), a transcription factor that activates the human MsrA promoter, increased after RSV pretreatment. Nicotinamide , an inhibitor of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), prevented RSV-induced elevation of FOXO3a and MsrA expression, indicating that the effect of RSV was mediated by a SIRT1-dependent pathway. RSV preconditioning increased methionine sulfoxide(MetO)-reducing activity in SH-SY5Y cells and enhanced their resistance to neurotoxins, including chloramine-T and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium. In addition, the enhancement of cell resistance to neurotoxins caused by RSV preconditioning can be largely prevented by MsrA inhibitor dimethyl sulfoxide. Our findings suggest that treatment with polyphenols such as RSV can be used as a potential regulatory strategy for MsrA expression and function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of exposure to DAMPS and GSM signals on ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity: II. SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaudel, Bernard; Taxile, Murielle; Poulletier de Gannes, Florence; Ruffie, Gilles; Lagroye, Isabelle; Veyret, Bernard

    2009-06-01

    An increase in Ornithine Decarboxylase (ODC) activity was reported in L929 murine fibroblast cells after exposure to a digital cellular telephone signal. This result was not confirmed by several other studies, including the one reported in a companion paper. As a partner in the Perform-B programme, we extended this study to human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y), using well-defined waveguide systems to imitate exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR): Digital Advanced Mobile Phone System (DAMPS) or Global System for Mobile communications (GSM) signals emitted by mobile phones. Human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) were exposed at various Specific Absorption Rates (SAR) to DAMPS or GSM signals using different set-ups. Cell ODC activities were assayed using 14CO2 generation from 14C-labeled L-ornithine. SH-SY5Y cells were incubated for 20 hours, and were blindly exposed to 50 Hz-modulated DAMPS-835 or 217 Hz-modulated GSM-1800 for 8 or 24 h using Information Technologies in Society (IT'IS) waveguides equipped with fans. After cell lysis, ODC activity was determined using 14C-labeled L-ornithine. ODC activity was estimated by the 14CO2 generated from 14C-labeled L-ornithine, as generated d.p.m. 14CO2/h/mg protein. The results showed that, irrespective of the signal used (835 MHz/DAMPS, or 1800 MHz/GSM) and exposure conditions (duration and SAR), human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells did not exhibit any alteration in ODC enzyme activity. This work did not show a significant effect of mobile phone RFR exposure on ODC activity in neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y).

  8. Curcumin-Free Turmeric Exhibits Activity against Human HCT-116 Colon Tumor Xenograft: Comparison with Curcumin and Whole Turmeric

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    Sahdeo Prasad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research within last two decades has indicated that curcumin extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa, exhibits anticancer potential, in part through the modulation of inflammatory pathways. However, the residual antitumor activity of curcumin-free turmeric (CFT relative to curcumin or turmeric is not well-understood. In the present study, therefore, we determined activities of these agents in both in vitro and in vivo models of human HCT-116 colorectal cancer (CRC. When examined in an in vitro antiproliferative, clonogenic or anti-inflammatory assay system, we found that curcumin was highly active whereas turmeric and CFT had relatively poor activity against CRC cells. However, when examined in vivo at an oral dose of either 100 or 500 mg/kg given to nude mice bearing CRC xenografts, all three preparations of curcumin, turmeric, and CFT similarly suppressed the growth of the xenograft. The effect of CFT on suppression of tumor growth was dose-dependent, with 500 mg/kg tending to be more effective than 100 mg/kg. Interestingly, 100 mg/kg curcumin or turmeric was found to be more effective than 500 mg/kg. When examined in vivo for the expression of biomarkers associated with cell survival (cIAP-1, Bcl-2, and survivin, proliferation (Ki-67 and cyclin D1 and metastasis (ICAM-1 and VEGF, all were down-modulated. These agents also suppressed inflammatory transcription factors (NF-κB and STAT3 in tumor cells. Overall, our results with CFT provide evidence that turmeric must contain additional bioactive compounds other than curcumin that, in contrast to curcumin, exhibit greater anticancer potential in vivo than in vitro against human CRC. Moreover, our study highlights the fact that the beneficial effects of turmeric and curcumin in humans may be more effectively realized at lower doses, whereas CFT could be given at higher doses without loss in favorable activity.

  9. Tubulin-destabilizing agent BPR0L075 induces vascular-disruption in human breast cancer mammary fat pad xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Beck, Haley; Wang, Xiaolei; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Mason, Ralph P; Liu, Xinli

    2012-01-01

    BPR0L075, 6-methoxy-3-(3',4',5'-trimethoxy-benzoyl)-1H-indole, is a tubulin-binding agent that inhibits tubulin polymerization by binding to the colchicine-binding site. BPR0L075 has shown antimitotic and antiangiogenic activity in vitro. The current study evaluated the vascular-disrupting activity of BPR0L075 in human breast cancer mammary fat pad xenografts using dynamic bioluminescence imaging. A single dose of BPR0L075 (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) induced rapid, temporary tumor vascular shutdown (at 2, 4, and 6 hours); evidenced by rapid and reproducible decrease of light emission from luciferase-expressing orthotopic MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast tumors after administration of luciferin substrate. A time-dependent reduction of tumor perfusion after BPR0L075 treatment was confirmed by immunohistological staining of the perfusion marker Hoechst 33342 and tumor vasculature marker CD31. The vasculature showed distinct recovery within 24 hours post therapy. A single i.p. injection of 50 mg/kg of BPR0L075 initially produced plasma concentrations in the micromolar range within 6 hours, but subsequent drug distribution and elimination caused BPR0L075 plasma levels to drop rapidly into the nanomolar range within 24 h. Tests with human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVEC) cells and tumor cells in culture showed that BPR0L075 was cytotoxic to both tumor cells and proliferating endothelial cells, and disrupted pre-established vessels in vitro and ex vivo. In conclusion, BPR0L075 caused rapid, albeit, temporary tumor vascular shutdown and led to reduction of tumor perfusion in orthotopic human breast cancer xenografts, suggesting that this antimitotic agent may be useful as a vascular-disrupting cancer therapy.

  10. U1 Adaptor Oligonucleotides Targeting BCL2 and GRM1 Suppress Growth of Human Melanoma Xenografts In Vivo

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    Rafal Goraczniak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available U1 Adaptor is a recently discovered oligonucleotide-based gene-silencing technology with a unique mechanism of action that targets nuclear pre-mRNA processing. U1 Adaptors have two distinct functional domains, both of which must be present on the same oligonucleotide to exert their gene-silencing function. Here, we present the first in vivo use of U1 Adaptors by targeting two different human genes implicated in melanomagenesis, B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2 and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1, in a human melanoma cell xenograft mouse model system. Using a newly developed dendrimer delivery system, anti-BCL2 U1 Adaptors were very potent and suppressed tumor growth at doses as low as 34 µg/kg with twice weekly intravenous (iv administration. Anti-GRM1 U1 Adaptors suppressed tumor xenograft growth with similar potency. Mechanism of action was demonstrated by showing target gene suppression in tumors and by observing that negative control U1 Adaptors with just one functional domain show no tumor suppression activity. The anti-BCL2 and anti-GRM1 treatments were equally effective against cell lines harboring either wild-type or a mutant V600E B-RAF allele, the most common mutation in melanoma. Treatment of normal immune-competent mice (C57BL6 indicated no organ toxicity or immune stimulation. These proof-of-concept studies represent an in-depth (over 800 mice in ~108 treatment groups validation that U1 Adaptors are a highly potent gene-silencing therapeutic and open the way for their further development to treat other human diseases.

  11. Idebenone induces apoptotic cell death in the human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SHSY-5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Kwok-Keung; Pham, L; Truong, D D

    2011-11-01

    Idebenone is a coenzyme Q10 analog and an antioxidant that has been used clinically to treat Friedreich Ataxia. Being an antioxidant, idebenone could have potential therapeutic potential to treat other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease in which oxidative stress plays a role in their pathogenesis. But whether idebenone can be used to treat Parkinson's disease has not been evaluated. In this study, we found that exposure of the dopaminergic neuroblastoma SHSY-5Y cells to 1-10 μM idebenone for 72 h had no effect on the cell viability revealed by trypan blue exclusion assay and MTT assay. However, cells exposed to 25 μM or higher concentrations of idebenone showed extensive trypan blue-positive staining and significant reduction in cell viability revealed by MTT assay indicating that most of the cells were no longer viable. Idebenone-induced cell death was characterized by genomic DNA fragmentation and accumulation of cytochrome c in the cytosol indicating that the death was apoptotic in nature. In addition, idebenone induced an increase in the total RNA of the pro-apoptosis protein BAX, it also increased the caspase-3 activity in the cell lysates when compared with the untreated control cells or cells exposed to 10 μM or lower concentrations of idebenone. The detrimental effect of idebenone was attenuated by glutathione, an antioxidant, suggesting that oxidative stress contributed to the idebenone-induced cell death. In conclusion, our results suggest that antioxidant idebenone induced apoptosis when used in high concentrations.

  12. Induction of post-menstrual regeneration by ovarian steroid withdrawal in the functionalis of xenografted human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudyzer, Pauline; Lemoine, Pascale; Po, Chrystelle; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Courtoy, Pierre J; Henriet, Patrick; Marbaix, Etienne

    2015-05-01

    Does the endometrial functionalis have the potential to undergo self-renewal after menstruation and how is this process controlled by ovarian steroids? Endometrial xenografts subjected to withdrawal of estradiol and progesterone shrink but also show signs of proliferation and tissue repair; new estradiol supply prevents atrophy but is not sufficient to increase graft volume. Menstruation, i.e. cyclic proteolysis of the extracellular matrix of endometrial functionalis, is induced by a fall in estrogen and progesterone concentration and is followed by tissue regeneration. However, there is debate about whether regenerating cells must originate from the basalis or from stem cells and whether new estrogen supply is required for the early repair concomitant with menstruation. Fragments from human endometrial functionalis (from 24 hysterectomy specimens) were xenografted in ovariectomized SCID mice and submitted to a 4-day estradiol and progesterone withdrawal (to mimic menstruation) followed by re-exposure to estradiol (to mimic the proliferative phase). We measured signs of proliferation and changes in graft volume. Endometrium was collected from spontaneously cycling women. Cell proliferation was examined by immunolabeling Ki-67, cyclin D1 and phosphorylated-histone H3. Xenograft volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. Xenograft histomorphometry was performed to determine how the different tissue compartments contributed to volume change. Hormone withdrawal induced a rapid decrease in graft volume mainly attributable to stroma condensation and breakdown, concomitant with an increase of proliferation markers. Reinsertion of estradiol pellets after induced menstruation blocked volume decrease and stimulated epithelial and stromal growth, but, surprisingly, did not induce graft enlargement. Reinsertion of both estradiol and progesterone pellets blocked apoptosis. Mechanisms of endometrial remodeling are different in women and mice and the contribution of

  13. Impact of anemia prevention by recombinant human erythropoietin on the sensitivity of xenografted glioblastomas to fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stueben, G.; Poettgen, C.; Knuehmann, K.; Sack, H.; Stuschke, M. [West German Tumor Center, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Essen (Germany); Thews, O.; Vaupel, P. [Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Background: Pronounced oxygen deficiency in tumors which might be caused by a diminished oxygen transport capacity of the blood (e.g., in anemia) reduces the efficacy of ionizing radiation. The aim of this study was to analyze whether anemia prevention by recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) affects the radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma xenografts during fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Anemia was induced by total body irradiation (TBI, 2 x 4 Gy) of mice prior to tumor implantation into the subcutis of the hind leg. In one experimental group, the development of anemia was prevented by rHuEPO (750 U/kg s.c.) given three times weekly starting 10 days prior to TBI. 13 days after tumor implantation (tumor volume approx. 40 mm{sup 3}), fractionated irradiation (4 x 7 Gy, one daily fraction) of the glioblastomas was performed resulting in a growth delay with subsequent regrowth of the tumors. Results: Compared to nonanemic control animals (hemoglobin concentration cHb = 14.7 g/dl), the growth delay in anemic mice (cHb = 9.9 g/dl) was significantly shorter (49 {+-} 5 days vs. 79 {+-} 4 days to reach four times the initial tumor volume) upon fractionated radiation. The prevention of anemia by rHuEPO treatment (cHb = 13.3 g/dl) resulted in a significantly prolonged growth delay (61 {+-} 5 days) compared to the anemia group, even though the growth inhibition found in control animals was not completely achieved. Conclusions: These data indicate that moderate anemia significantly reduces the efficacy of radiotherapy. Prevention of anemia with rHuEPO partially restores the radiosensitivity of xenografted glioblastomas to fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  14. Schedule-dependent therapeutic effects of gemcitabine combined with uracil-tegafur in a human pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujie, Masanori; Nakamori, Shoji; Nakahira, Shin; Takeda, Setsuo; Takahashi, Yuji; Hayashi, Nobuyasu; Okami, Jiro; Nagano, Hiroaki; Dono, Keizo; Umeshita, Koji; Sakon, Masato; Monden, Morito

    2006-08-01

    Gemcitabine is taken up by cells mainly via human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1). Pretreatment of cancer cell lines with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) leads to an increase in the expression of hENT1 and augments the effect of single-agent gemcitabine treatment in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between the schedules of gemcitabine/uracil-tegafur (UFT) combination therapy and their effects in pancreatic cancer in vivo. The expression level of hENT1 mRNA was examined using 6 types of human pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with 5-FU and MiaPaCa-2 xenograft tumors in BALB/c nu/nu mice treated with UFT. A [H] gemcitabine cellular uptake assay was performed using MiaPaCa-2 cells treated with 5-FU. We compared the effects of 6 different schedules of treatment using UFT and/or gemcitabine on MiaPaCa-2 xenograft tumors. MiaPaCa-2 cell line was one of the lines that showed the highest rate of 5-FU-induced increase in the hENT1 mRNA level. Gemcitabine uptake was significantly increased when cells were treated with 5-FU. Treatment with UFT significantly increased the hENT1 mRNA expression in MiaPaCa-2 tumors. A significant growth inhibition of MiaPaCa-2 tumors was observed in the mice treated with UFT followed by gemcitabine as compared with either untreated mice or UFT alone-treated mice. Our results suggest that the schedule in which the gemcitabine is administered after UFT may be the optimal combination for gemcitabine/UFT treatment in pancreatic cancer.

  15. Targeting of histone deacetylases to reactivate tumour suppressor genes and its therapeutic potential in a human cervical cancer xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingqing Feng

    Full Text Available Aberrant histone acetylation plays an essential role in the neoplastic process via the epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes (TSGs; therefore, the inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDAC has become a promising target in cancer therapeutics. To investigate the correlation of histone acetylation with clinicopathological features and TSG expression, we examined the expression of acetylated H3 (AcH3, RARβ2, E-cadherin, and β-catenin by immunohistochemistry in 65 cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients. The results revealed that the absence of AcH3 was directly associated with poor histological differentiation and nodal metastasis as well as reduced/negative expression of RARβ2, E-cadherin, and β-catenin in clinical tumour samples. We further demonstrated that the clinically available HDAC inhibitors valproic acid (VPA and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, in combination with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, can overcome the epigenetic barriers to transcription of RARβ2 in human cervical cancer cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the combination treatment increased the enrichment of acetylated histone in the RARβ2-RARE promoter region. In view of these findings, we evaluated the antitumor effects induced by combined VPA and ATRA treatment in a xenograft model implanted with poorly differentiated human squamous cell carcinoma. Notably, VPA restored RARβ2 expression via epigenetic modulation. Additive antitumour effects were produced in tumour xenografts by combining VPA with ATRA treatment. Mechanistically, the combination treatment reactivated the expression of TSGs RARβ2, E-cadherin, P21 (CIP1 , and P53 and reduced the level of p-Stat3. Sequentially, upregulation of involucrin and loricrin, which indicate terminal differentiation, strongly contributed to tumour growth inhibition along with partial apoptosis. In conclusion, targeted therapy with HDAC inhibitors and RARβ2 agonists may represent a novel

  16. Genetically engineered mesenchymal stromal cells produce IL-3 and TPO to further improve human scaffold-based xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, Marco; de Boer, Bauke; Jaques, Jenny; Antonelli, Antonella; Horton, Sarah J; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost D; Groen, Richard W J; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2017-07-01

    Recently, NOD-SCID IL2Rγ -/- (NSG) mice were implanted with human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the presence of ceramic scaffolds or Matrigel to mimic the human bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. This approach allowed the engraftment of leukemic samples that failed to engraft in NSG mice without humanized niches and resulted in a better preservation of leukemic stem cell self-renewal properties. To further improve our humanized niche scaffold model, we genetically engineered human MSCs to secrete human interleukin-3 (IL-3) and thrombopoietin (TPO). In vitro, these IL-3- and TPO-producing MSCs were superior in expanding human cord blood (CB) CD34 + hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. MLL-AF9-transduced CB CD34 + cells could be transformed efficiently along myeloid or lymphoid lineages on IL-3- and TPO-producing MSCs. In vivo, these genetically engineered MSCs maintained their ability to differentiate into bone, adipocytes, and other stromal components. Upon transplantation of MLL-AF9-transduced CB CD34 + cells, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) developed in engineered scaffolds, in which a significantly higher percentage of myeloid clones was observed in the mouse compartments compared with previous models. Engraftment of primary AML, B-cell ALL, and biphenotypic acute leukemia (BAL) patient samples was also evaluated, and all patient samples could engraft efficiently; the myeloid compartment of the BAL samples was better preserved in the human cytokine scaffold model. In conclusion, we show that we can genetically engineer the ectopic human BM microenvironment in a humanized scaffold xenograft model. This approach will be useful for functional study of the importance of niche factors in normal and malignant human hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2017 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. All rights reserved.

  17. [COMPARISON OF CYTOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF HEMANTANE AND AMANTADINE UNDER CONDITIONS OF 6-HYDROXYDOPAMINE NEUROTOXIN ACTION ON CULTURED HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvinov, I O; Antipova, T A; Nepoklonov, A V; Valdman, E A

    2016-01-01

    Potential neuroprotective activity of the novel antiparkinsonian drug hemantane (hydrochloride N-2-(adamantyl)-hexamethylenimine) in comparison to amantadine has been studied in various regimes of administration on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line injury induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which is used as in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons for Parkinson's disease. Two regimes of hemantane and amantadine administration in a range of final concentrations 10⁻⁶-10⁻⁸ M were used either prior to or immediately after 6-OHDA introduction. MTT colorimetric assay was used to assess the viability of test cells. Significant decrease in viability of SH-SY5Y cells treated with 6-OHDA was observed. The addition of hemantane to cell medium produced cytoprotective effects in both regimes of administration--before and after 6-OHDA--at concentrations 10⁻⁷ M and 10⁻⁶-10⁻⁸ M, respectively. Amantadine in con- centrations 10⁻⁷-10⁻⁸ M was effective to increase cell survival only when administered after 6-OHDA. These results show that hemantane has a greater neu-roprotective potential in comparison to amantadine.

  18. Lysosome vacuolation disrupts the completion of autophagy during norephedrine exposure in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funakoshi, Takeshi; Aki, Toshihiko; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2013-01-15

    In our current study, we examined the mechanism underlying neuronal cell injuries caused by norephedrine in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Norephedrine was found to induce cytoplasmic vacuolation and a resultant loss of cell viability. In the cells treated with norephedrine also, an autophagic marker LC3 was converted to its LC3-II activated form, suggesting the induction of autophagy. In cells transfected with RFP-LC3 and GFP-LAMP1, a punctate patterning of LC3 expression and colocalization of LAMP1 with the formed vacuoles were observed, highlighting the lysosomal nature of the vacuoles and their association with autophagosomes. An autophagic flux assay using tfLC3 (mRFP-GFP-LC3) indicated the formation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes by norephedrine stimulation at an early timepoint (∼3 h). However, at a later timepoint (∼6 h), both the dilation of autolysosomes/lysosomes and the neutralization of the vacuolar pH were also observed. These results thus indicate that norephedrine induces autophagy at an early timepoint and cell death with lysosomal dysfunction and autophagy disruption at a later timepoint. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide modifies both activity and isoforms of acetylcholinesterase in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Garcimartín

    2017-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were treated with H2O2 (1–1000 µM for 24 h and AChE activity and AChE and cytochrome c levels were evaluated. AChE activity was strongly increased from 1 µM to 1000 µM of H2O2. The results of the kinetic study showed that H2O2 affected Vmax but not Km; and also that H2O2 changed the sigmoid kinetic observed in control samples to hyperbolic kinetic. Thus, results suggest that H2O2 acts as an allosteric activators. In addition, H2O2, (100–1000 µM reduced the total AChE content and modified its isoform profile (mainly 50-, 70-, and 132-kDa·H2O2 from 100 µM to 1000 µM induced cytochrome c release confirming cell death by apoptosis. All these results together suggest: a the involvement of oxidative stress in the imbalance of AChE; and b treatment with antioxidant agents may be a suitable strategy to protect cholinergic system alterations promoted by oxidative stress.

  20. Sinus grafting using recombinant human tissue factor, platelet-rich plasma gel, autologous bone, and anorganic bovine bone mineral xenograft: histologic analysis and case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, Pierre; Daubie, Valéry; Pochet, Roland

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze healthy bone formation by means of histology and immunohistochemistry after grafting with a mixture of autologous ground calvarial bone, inorganic xenograft, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and recombinant human tissue factor (rhTF). Maxillary sinus floor augmentation was performed on 3 patients by grafting with 5 to 10 mL of a paste consisting of autologous powder from calvarial bone (diameter plasma), and about 1 microg rhTF. Six and 10 months after grafting, bone cores were extracted for implant fixation and analyzed. Histology demonstrated a high degree of inorganic xenograft integration and natural bone regeneration. Both the xenograft and newly synthesized bone were colonized with osteocytes and surrounded by osteoblasts. Six-month-old bone cores demonstrated a ratio of synthesized bone to xenograft particles ratio of 0.5, whereas 10-month-old cores demonstrated a ratio of 2. A low degree of inflammation could also be observed using S100A8 immunohistochemistry. Autologous grafting in edentulous patients is a complex procedure; the successful substitution of synthetic analogs for ground bone is a major challenge. In this investigation, it was shown that inorganic xenograft in the harvested bone paste could be safe for patients and had high bone regeneration capacity over time. The sinus graft showed intense bone formation 6 months after grafting and a further increase in bone growth 10 months after grafting.

  1. MDM2 Molecular Imaging for the Prediction of Chemotherapeutic Sensitivity in Human Breast Cancer Xenograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Fu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible use of mouse double-minute 2 (MDM2 molecular imaging to predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity in breast cancer xenografts (BCXs. MCF-7 cells were transfected with MDM2 antisense oligonucleotides (ASONs, and MDM2 expression levels were determined by Western blotting. Cell viability was assessed by 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in MCF-7 cells transfected with ASONs and treated with paclitaxel. BCXs were established in nude mice by injection of ASONs, and tumor volumes were measured after paclitaxel treatment. MDM2 ASONs were labeled with 99mTc to generate an MDM2 molecular probe, and MDM2 expression levels were evaluated by imaging and Western blotting. MDM2 ASONs downregulated MDM2 expression in a dose-dependent manner and increased the rate of paclitaxel-induced cell growth inhibition. Imaging of tumors revealed significant differences in the tumor to skeletal muscle (T/M ratio between groups. Tumor MDM2 protein expression was correlated with T/M ratios at 4 hours (R = .880 and 10 hours (R = .886. The effect of paclitaxel varied among nude mice bearing BCXs with different concentrations of ASONs, as shown by differences in tumor growth. MDM2 molecular imaging could be a promising method for predicting the sensitivity of BCXs to chemotherapy.

  2. Quantitative proteomic analysis of human lung tumor xenografts treated with the ectopic ATP synthase inhibitor citreoviridin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsuan Wu

    Full Text Available ATP synthase is present on the plasma membrane of several types of cancer cells. Citreoviridin, an ATP synthase inhibitor, selectively suppresses the proliferation and growth of lung cancer without affecting normal cells. However, the global effects of targeting ectopic ATP synthase in vivo have not been well defined. In this study, we performed quantitative proteomic analysis using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ and provided a comprehensive insight into the complicated regulation by citreoviridin in a lung cancer xenograft model. With high reproducibility of the quantitation, we obtained quantitative proteomic profiling with 2,659 proteins identified. Bioinformatics analysis of the 141 differentially expressed proteins selected by their relative abundance revealed that citreoviridin induces alterations in the expression of glucose metabolism-related enzymes in lung cancer. The up-regulation of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis and storage of glucose indicated that citreoviridin may reduce the glycolytic intermediates for macromolecule synthesis and inhibit cell proliferation. Using comprehensive proteomics, the results identify metabolic aspects that help explain the antitumorigenic effect of citreoviridin in lung cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the links between metabolism and tumorigenesis in cancer therapy.

  3. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In preclinical research MatrixgelTM Basement Membrane Matrix (MG) is used frequently for the establishment of syngeneic and xenograft cancer models. Limited information on its influence on parameters including; tumor growth, vascularization, hypoxia and imaging characteristics...... is currently available. This study evaluates the potential effect of matrigel use in a human head and neck cancer xenograft model (FaDu; hypopharyngeal carcinoma) in NMRI nude mice. The FaDu cell line was chosen based on its frequent use in studies of cancer imaging and tumor microenvironment. Methods: NMRI...

  4. Quantitative PET imaging of Met-expressing human cancer xenografts with {sup 89}Zr-labelled monoclonal antibody DN30

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perk, Lars R.; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Vosjan, Maria J.W.D.; Leemans, C.R. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, De Boelelaan 1117, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Visser, Gerard W.M.; Kloet, Reina W. [VU University Medical Centre, Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Giaccone, Giuseppe [National Cancer Institute, Medical Oncology Branch CCR, Bethesda, MD (United States); Albano, Raffaella; Comoglio, Paolo M. [University of Turin Medical School, Division of Molecular Oncology, Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Turin (Italy); Dongen, Guus A.M.S. van [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, De Boelelaan 1117, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Nuclear Medicine and PET Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15

    Targeting the c-Met receptor with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is an appealing approach for cancer diagnosis and treatment because this receptor plays a prominent role in tumour invasion and metastasis. Positron emission tomography (PET) might be a powerful tool for guidance of therapy with anti-Met MAbs like the recently described MAb DN30 because it allows accurate quantitative imaging of tumour targeting (immuno-PET). We considered the potential of PET with either {sup 89}Zr-labelled (residualising radionuclide) or {sup 124}I-labelled (non-residualising radionuclide) DN30 for imaging of Met-expressing tumours. The biodistribution of co-injected {sup 89}Zr-DN30 and iodine-labelled DN30 was compared in nude mice bearing either the human gastric cancer line GLT-16 (high Met expression) or the head-and-neck cancer line FaDu (low Met expression). PET images were acquired in both xenograft models up to 4 days post-injection (p.i.) and used for quantification of tumour uptake. Biodistribution studies in GTL-16-tumour-bearing mice revealed that {sup 89}Zr-DN30 achieved much higher tumour uptake levels than iodine-labelled DN30 (e.g. 19.6%ID/g vs 5.3%ID/g, 5 days p.i.), while blood levels were similar, indicating internalisation of DN30. Therefore, {sup 89}Zr-DN30 was selected for PET imaging of GLT-16-bearing mice. Tumours as small as 11 mg were readily visualised with immuno-PET. A distinctive lower {sup 89}Zr uptake was observed in FaDu compared to GTL-16 xenografts (e.g. 7.8%ID/g vs 18.1%ID/g, 3 days p.i.). Nevertheless, FaDu xenografts were also clearly visualised with {sup 89}Zr-DN30 immuno-PET. An excellent correlation was found between PET-image-derived {sup 89}Zr tumour uptake and ex-vivo-assessed {sup 89}Zr tumour uptake (R {sup 2} = 0.98). The long-lived positron emitter {sup 89}Zr seems attractive for PET-guided development of therapeutic anti-c-Met MAbs. (orig.)

  5. The use of matrigel has no influence on tumor development or PET imaging in FaDu human head and neck cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fliedner, Frederikke P.; Hansen, Anders Elias; Jorgensen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    is currently available. This study evaluates the potential effect of matrigel use in a human head and neck cancer xenograft model (FaDu; hypopharyngeal carcinoma) in NMRI nude mice. The FaDu cell line was chosen based on its frequent use in studies of cancer imaging and tumor microenvironment. Methods: NMRI...

  6. Hydrogen sulfide generation from l-cysteine in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG and neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronowicka-Adamska, Patrycja; Bentke, Anna; Wróbel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is endogenously synthesized from l-cysteine in reactions catalyzed by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22) and gamma-cystathionase (CSE, EC 4.4.1.1). The role of 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST, EC 2.8.1.2) in H2S generation is also considered; it could be important for tissues with low CTH activity, e.g. cells of the nervous system. The expression and activity of CBS, CTH, and MPST were detected in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma (U-87 MG) and neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cell lines. In both cell lines, the expression and activity of MPST were the highest among the investigated enzymes, suggesting its possible role in the generation of H2S. The RP-HPLC method was used to determine the concentration of cystathionine and alpha-ketobutyrate, products of the CBS- and CTH-catalyzed reactions. The difference in cystathionine levels between cell homogenates treated with totally CTH-inhibiting concentrations of dl-propargylglycine and without the inhibitor was used to evaluate the activity of CBS. The higher expression and activity of CBS, CTH and MPST in the neuroblastoma cells were associated with more intensive generation of H2S in the presence of 2 mM cysteine. A threefold higher level of sulfane sulfur, a potential source of hydrogen sulfide, was detected in the astrocytoma cells in comparison to the neuroblastoma cells.

  7. miR-143 overexpression impairs growth of human colon carcinoma xenografts in mice with induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M Borralho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are aberrantly expressed in human cancer and involved in the (dysregulation of cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and death. Specifically, miRNA-143 (miR-143 is down-regulated in human colon cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the role of miR-143 overexpression on the growth of human colon carcinoma cells xenografted in nude mice (immunodeficient mouse strain: N: NIH(s II-nu/nu. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HCT116 cells with stable miR-143 overexpression (Over-143 and control (Empty cells were subcutaneously injected into the flanks of nude mice, and tumor growth was evaluated over time. Tumors arose ∼ 14 days after tumor cell implantation, and the experiment was ended at 40 days after implantation. miR-143 was confirmed to be significantly overexpressed in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts, by TaqMan® Real-time PCR (p<0.05. Importantly, Over-143 xenografts displayed slower tumor growth compared to Empty xenografts from 23 until 40 days in vivo (p<0.05, with final volumes of 928±338 and 2512±387 mm(3, respectively. Evaluation of apoptotic proteins showed that Over-143 versus Empty xenografts displayed reduced Bcl-2 levels, and increased caspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage (p<0.05. In addition, the incidence of apoptotic tumor cells, assessed by TUNEL, was increased in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts (p<0.01. Finally, Over-143 versus Empty xenografts displayed significantly reduced NF-κB activation and ERK5 levels and activation (p<0.05, as well as reduced proliferative index, evaluated by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that reduced tumor volume in Over-143 versus Empty xenografts may result from increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation induced by miR-143. This reinforces the relevance of miR-143 in colon cancer, indicating an important role in the control of in vivo tumor progression, and suggesting that miR-143 may constitute a putative

  8. Development of a Fully Human Anti-PDGFRβ Antibody That Suppresses Growth of Human Tumor Xenografts and Enhances Antitumor Activity of an Anti-VEGFR2 Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juqun Shen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ is upregulated in most of solid tumors. It is expressed by pericytes/smooth muscle cells, fibroblast, macrophage, and certain tumor cells. Several PDGF receptor-related antagonists are being developed as potential antitumor agents and have demonstrated promising antitumor activity in both preclinical and clinical settings. Here, we produced a fully human neutralizing antibody, IMC-2C5, directed against PDGFRβ from an antibody phage display library. IMC-2C5 binds to both human and mouse PDGFRβ and blocks PDGF-B from binding to the receptor. IMC-2C5 also blocks ligand-stimulated activation of PDGFRβ and downstream signaling molecules in tumor cells. In animal studies, IMC-2C5 significantly delayed the growth of OVCAR-8 and NCI-H460 human tumor xenografts in nude mice but failed to show antitumor activities in OVCAR-5 and Caki-1 xenografts. Our results indicate that the antitumor efficacy of IMC-2C5 is primarily due to its effects on tumor stroma, rather than on tumor cells directly. Combination of IMC-2C5 and DC101, an anti-mouse vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 antibody, resulted in significantly enhanced antitumor activity in BxPC-3, NCI-H460, and HCT-116 xenografts, compared with DC101 alone, and the trend of additive effects to DC101 treatment in several other tumor models. ELISA analysis of NCI-H460 tumor homogenates showed that IMC-2C5 attenuated protein level of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor elevated by DC101 treatment. Finally, IMC-2C5 showed a trend of additive effects when combined with DC101/chemotherapy in MIA-PaCa-2 and NCI-H460 models. Taken together, these results lend great support to the use of PDGFRβ antagonists in combination with other antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of a broad range of human cancers.

  9. The Effects of Vandetanib on Paclitaxel Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Activity in a Xenograft Model of Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Cesca

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the effects of vandetanib, a small-molecule receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor receptor, on paclitaxel (PTX tumor distribution and antitumor activity in xenograft models of human ovarian carcinoma. Nude mice bearing A2780-1A9 xenografts received daily (5, 10, or 15 days doses of vandetanib (50 mg/kg per os, combined with PTX (20 mg/kg intravenously. Morphologic and functional modifications associated with the tumor vasculature (CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin staining and Hoechst 33342 perfusion and PTX concentrations in plasma and tumor tissues were analyzed. Activity was evaluated as inhibition of tumor growth subcutaneously and spreading into the peritoneal cavity. Vandetanib treatment produced no significant change in tumor vessel density, although a reduced number of large vessels, an increased percentage of mature vessels, and diminished tumor perfusion were evident. Pretreatment with vandetanib led to decreased tumor PTX levels within 1 hour of PTX injection, although 24 hours later, tumor PTX levels were comparable with controls. In efficacy studies, the combination of vandetanib plus PTX improved antitumor activity compared with vandetanib or PTX alone, with greater effects being obtained when PTX was administered before vandetanib. The combination of PTX plus vandetanib reduced tumor burden in the peritoneal cavity of mice and significantly increased their survival. Analysis of vascular changes and PTX tumor uptake in vandetanib-treated tumors may help to guide the scheduling of vandetanib plus PTX combinations and may have implications for the design of clinical trials with these drugs.

  10. Combined therapeutic effect and molecular mechanisms of metformin and cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Qin Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This work was aimed at studying the inhibitory activity of metformin combined with the commonly used chemotherapy drug cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice. We also examined the combined effects of these drugs on the molecular expression of survivin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2, vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C, and vascular endothelial growth factorreceptor-3 (VEGFR-3 to determine the mechanism of action and to explore the potential applications of the new effective drug therapy in lung cancer. Materials and Methods: The nude mice model of lung cancer xenografts was established, and mice were randomly divided into the metformin group, the cisplatin group, the metformin + cisplatin group, and the control group. The animals were killed 42 days after drug administration, and the tumor tissues were then sampled to detect the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA and protein expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the cisplatin group and the combined treatment group were lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. In the metformin group, the expression of MMP-2 protein and mRNA was lower than that in the control group (P < 0.05. The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the combined treatment group were lower than that in the cisplatin group and the metformin group (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Metformin inhibited the expression of MMP-2, cisplatin and the combined treatment inhibited the expression of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3, and the combined treatment of metformin with cisplatin resulted in enhanced anti-tumor efficacy.

  11. Combined therapeutic effect and molecular mechanisms of metformin and cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Qin; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at studying the inhibitory activity of metformin combined with the commonly used chemotherapy drug cisplatin in human lung cancer xenografts in nude mice. We also examined the combined effects of these drugs on the molecular expression of survivin, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C), and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) to determine the mechanism of action and to explore the potential applications of the new effective drug therapy in lung cancer. The nude mice model of lung cancer xenografts was established, and mice were randomly divided into the metformin group, the cisplatin group, the metformin + cisplatin group, and the control group. The animals were killed 42 days after drug administration, and the tumor tissues were then sampled to detect the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protein and mRNA expression levels of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3 in the cisplatin group and the combined treatment group were lower than that in the control group (P metformin group, the expression of MMP-2 protein and mRNA was lower than that in the control group (P metformin group (P Metformin inhibited the expression of MMP-2, cisplatin and the combined treatment inhibited the expression of survivin, MMP-2, VEGF-C, and VEGFR-3, and the combined treatment of metformin with cisplatin resulted in enhanced anti-tumor efficacy.

  12. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  13. Therapy of human carcinoma xenografts with antibodies to EGFr and HER-2 conjugated to radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, M.J.; Goldenberg, David M. [Garden State Cancer Center at the Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Belleville, NJ (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Low-energy electrons (10-50 keV) can be effective and specific cytotoxic agents when delivered to the cell surface by antibodies, because their path length in tissue is comparable to a cell diameter. In this study, we have begun to evaluate the therapeutic potential of antibodies (Abs) conjugated to {sup 111}In against carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. Abs to EGFr or HER-2 were labeled with {sup 111}In to a high specific activity of approximately 1.48 GBq/mg (40 mCi/mg). They were injected into nude mice 5-6 days after inoculation of human carcinoma cells, either A431 or SK-OV-3, and tumor growth was monitored. In preliminary in vitro experiments, we calculated the cumulative decays per cell, estimated the centigray dose delivered to the nucleus, and related this to the fraction surviving. Abs to both antigens provided significant protection in nude mouse xenograft models (p values ranging from <0.05 to <0.001). Some mice appeared to be cured, but most had delayed tumor growth. The specificity of the effect was demonstrated by testing non-reactive Abs labeled in the same way. The radioactivity was required, because unconjugated Abs had no therapeutic effect. The maximum tolerated dose was required in order for therapy to be effective, but most of the treated mice had no significant weight loss or other overt signs of toxicity. Abs labeled with nuclides emitting low-energy electrons, such as {sup 111}In, can be effective therapeutic agents against microscopic s.c. tumors. This strategy should be considered for clinical applications. (orig.)

  14. Targeting mesothelin receptors with drug-loaded bacterial nanocells suppresses human mesothelioma tumour growth in mouse xenograft models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A Alfaleh

    Full Text Available Human malignant mesothelioma is a chemoresistant tumour that develops from mesothelial cells, commonly associated with asbestos exposure. Malignant mesothelioma incidence rates in European countries are still rising and Australia has one of the highest burdens of malignant mesothelioma on a population basis in the world. Therapy using systemic delivery of free cytotoxic agents is associated with many undesirable side effects due to non-selectivity, and is thus dose-limited which limits its therapeutic potential. Therefore, increasing the selectivity of anti-cancer agents has the potential to dramatically enhance drug efficacy and reduce toxicity. EnGeneIC Dream Vectors (EDV are antibody-targeted nanocells which can be loaded with cytotoxic drugs and delivered to specific cancer cells via bispecific antibodies (BsAbs which target the EDV and a cancer cell-specific receptor, simultaneously. BsAbs were designed to target doxorubicin-loaded EDVs to cancer cells via cell surface mesothelin (MSLN. Flow cytometry was used to investigate cell binding and induction of apoptosis, and confocal microscopy to visualize internalization. Mouse xenograft models were used to assess anti-tumour effects in vivo, followed by immunohistochemistry for ex vivo evaluation of proliferation and necrosis. BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs were able to bind to and internalize within mesothelioma cells in vitro via MSLN receptors and induce apoptosis. In mice xenografts, the BsAb-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded EDVs suppressed the tumour growth and also decreased cell proliferation. Thus, the use of MSLN-specific antibodies to deliver encapsulated doxorubicin can provide a novel and alternative modality for treatment of mesothelioma.

  15. Dynamic PET evaluation of elevated FLT level after sorafenib treatment in mice bearing human renal cell carcinoma xenograft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ukon, Naoyuki; Zhao, Songji; Yu, Wenwen; Shimizu, Yoichi; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Kubo, Naoki; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Tamaki, Nagara; Higashikawa, Kei; Yasui, Hironobu; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    ... (PET) and kinetic studies were performed in mice bearing a RCC xenograft (A498).The A498 xenograft was established in nude mice, and the mice were assigned to the control (n = 5) and treatment (n = 5) groups...

  16. MicroRNA-184-mediated inhibition of tumour growth in an orthotopic murine model of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivnan, Amanda; Foley, Niamh H; Tracey, Lorraine; Davidoff, Andrew M; Stallings, Raymond L

    2010-11-01

    Neuroblastoma is a paediatric cancer which originates from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system. Previous studies have shown that miR-184 expression has anti-proliferative effects in neuroblastoma cells grown in culture. Therefore, it was of interest to evaluate this effect in vivo. Neuroblastoma cells overexpressing miR-184 were injected retroperitoneally into CB17-SCID mice and tumour burden was assessed by measuring bioluminescence. Overall survival was also evaluated. Ectopic overexpression of miR-184 in neuroblastoma cell lines is anti-proliferative. In addition, overexpression of miR-184 led to a significant reduction in tumour growth relative to negative control-treated cohorts in a xenograft model of neuroblastoma. This study demonstrated for the first time that miR-184 significantly reduces tumour growth and increases overall survival in an orthotopic murine model of neuroblastoma through assessment of tumour growth and moribundity relative to control miRNA-treated cohorts.

  17. Lipoxygenase mediates invasion of intrametastatic lymphatic vessels and propagates lymph node metastasis of human mammary carcinoma xenografts in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Rudas, Margaretha; Sexl, Veronika; Schneckenleithner, Christine; Wolbank, Susanne; Bartel, Gregor; Krieger, Sigurd; Kalt, Romana; Hantusch, Brigitte; Keller, Thomas; Nagy-Bojarszky, Katalin; Huttary, Nicole; Raab, Ingrid; Lackner, Karin; Krautgasser, Katharina; Schachner, Helga; Kaserer, Klaus; Rezar, Sandra; Madlener, Sybille; Vonach, Caroline; Davidovits, Agnes; Nosaka, Hitonari; Hämmerle, Monika; Viola, Katharina; Dolznig, Helmut; Schreiber, Martin; Nader, Alexander; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Gnant, Michael; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Detmar, Michael; Alitalo, Kari; Nijman, Sebastian; Offner, Felix; Maier, Thorsten J; Steinhilber, Dieter; Krupitza, Georg

    2011-05-01

    In individuals with mammary carcinoma, the most relevant prognostic predictor of distant organ metastasis and clinical outcome is the status of axillary lymph node metastasis. Metastases form initially in axillary sentinel lymph nodes and progress via connecting lymphatic vessels into postsentinel lymph nodes. However, the mechanisms of consecutive lymph node colonization are unknown. Through the analysis of human mammary carcinomas and their matching axillary lymph nodes, we show here that intrametastatic lymphatic vessels and bulk tumor cell invasion into these vessels highly correlate with formation of postsentinel metastasis. In an in vitro model of tumor bulk invasion, human mammary carcinoma cells caused circular defects in lymphatic endothelial monolayers. These circular defects were highly reminiscent of defects of the lymphovascular walls at sites of tumor invasion in vivo and were primarily generated by the tumor-derived arachidonic acid metabolite 12S-HETE following 15-lipoxygenase-1 (ALOX15) catalysis. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition and shRNA knockdown of ALOX15 each repressed formation of circular defects in vitro. Importantly, ALOX15 knockdown antagonized formation of lymph node metastasis in xenografted tumors. Furthermore, expression of lipoxygenase in human sentinel lymph node metastases correlated inversely with metastasis-free survival. These results provide evidence that lipoxygenase serves as a mediator of tumor cell invasion into lymphatic vessels and formation of lymph node metastasis in ductal mammary carcinomas.

  18. Effects of 1950 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on Aβ processing in human neuroblastoma and mouse hippocampal neuronal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongyeon; Kwon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Nam

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease leading to progressive loss of memory and other cognitive functions. One of the well-known pathological markers of AD is the accumulation of amyloid-beta protein (Aβ), and its plaques, in the brain. Recent studies using Tg-5XFAD mice as a model of AD have reported that exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from cellular phones reduced Aβ plaques in the brain and showed beneficial effects on AD. In this study, we examined whether exposure to 1950 MHz RF-EMF affects Aβ processing in neural cells. We exposed HT22 mouse hippocampal neuronal cells and SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells to RF-EMF (SAR 6 W/kg) for 2 h per day for 3 days, and analyzed the mRNA and protein expression of the key genes related to Aβ processing. When exposed to RF-EMF, mRNA levels of APP, BACE1, ADAM10 and PSEN1 were decreased in HT22, but the mRNA level of APP was not changed in SH-SY5Y cells. The protein expression of APP and BACE1, as well as the secreted Aβ peptide, was not significantly different between RF-EMF–exposed 7w-PSML, HT22 and SH-SY5Y cells and the unexposed controls. These observations suggest that RF-EMF exposure may not have a significant physiological effect on Aβ processing of neural cells in the short term. However, considering that we only exposed HT22 and SH-SY5Y cells to RF-EMF for 2 h per day for 3 days, we cannot exclude the possibility that 1950 MHz RF-EMF induces physiological change in Aβ processing with long-term and continuous exposure. PMID:29040655

  19. Multimodal Treatment Eliminates Cancer Stem Cells and Leads to Long-Term Survival in Primary Human Pancreatic Cancer Tissue Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C Hermann

    Full Text Available In spite of intense research efforts, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains one of the most deadly malignancies in the world. We and others have previously identified a subpopulation of pancreatic cancer stem cells within the tumor as a critical therapeutic target and additionally shown that the tumor stroma represents not only a restrictive barrier for successful drug delivery, but also serves as a paracrine niche for cancer stem cells. Therefore, we embarked on a large-scale investigation on the effects of combining chemotherapy, hedgehog pathway inhibition, and mTOR inhibition in a preclinical mouse model of pancreatic cancer.Prospective and randomized testing in a set of almost 200 subcutaneous and orthotopic implanted whole-tissue primary human tumor xenografts.The combined targeting of highly chemoresistant cancer stem cells as well as their more differentiated progenies, together with abrogation of the tumor microenvironment by targeting the stroma and enhancing tissue penetration of the chemotherapeutic agent translated into significantly prolonged survival in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Most pronounced therapeutic effects were observed in gemcitabine-resistant patient-derived tumors. Intriguingly, the proposed triple therapy approach could be further enhanced by using a PEGylated formulation of gemcitabine, which significantly increased its bioavailability and tissue penetration, resulting in a further improved overall outcome.This multimodal therapeutic strategy should be further explored in the clinical setting as its success may eventually improve the poor prognosis of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  20. Efficacy and pharmacodynamic effects of bosutinib (SKI-606), a Src/Abl inhibitor, in freshly generated human pancreas cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, Wells A; Rajeshkumar, N V; Tan, Aik Choon; Wang, Xiao Fei; Diesl, Veronica; Choe, Sung E; Follettie, Max; Coughlin, Christina; Boschelli, Frank; Garcia-Garcia, Elena; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Jimeno, Antonio; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2009-06-01

    Recently, Src tyrosine kinase has emerged as an attractive target for anticancer therapy, and Src is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. The purpose of the study was to investigate the in vivo efficacy and pharmacodynamic effects of bosutinib (SKI-606), a Src/Abl inhibitor, using a panel of human pancreatic tumor xenografts. Surgically resected human pancreatic tumors were implanted into female nude mice and randomized to bosutinib versus control. Src and other pathways were analyzed by Western Blot, IHC, and Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 gene arrays. Of 15 patient tumors, 3 patient tumors were found to be sensitive to bosutinib, defined as tumor growth of bosutinib resulted in increased apoptosis. Phosphorylation of key signaling molecules downstream of Src, signal transducers and activators of transcription 3, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3, were significantly inhibited by bosutinib. K-Top Scoring Pairs analysis of gene arrays gave a six-gene classifier that predicted resistance versus sensitivity in six validation cases. These results may aid the clinical development of bosutinib and other Src inhibitors in pancreas cancer.

  1. Effect of antidepressants on body weight, ethology and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lin; Shang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yu-Yuan

    2008-07-21

    To investigate the effects of mirtazapine and fluoxetine, representatives of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant respectively, on body weight, ingestive behavior, locomotor activity and tumor growth of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. A subcutaneous xenograft model of human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990 was established in nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into mirtazapine group (10 mg/kg per day), fluoxetine group (10 mg/kg per day) and control group (an equivalent normal saline solution) (7 mice in each group). Doses of all drugs were administered orally, once a day for 42 d. Tumor volume and body weight were measured biweekly. Food intake was recorded once a week. Locomotor activity was detected weekly using an open field test (OFT). Compared to the fluoxetine, mirtazapine significantly increased food intake from d 14 to 42 and attenuated the rate of weight loss from d 28 to 42 (t = 4.38, P < 0.05). Compared to the control group, food intake was significantly suppressed from d 21 to 42 and weight loss was promoted from d 35 to 42 in the fluoxetine group (t = 2.52, P < 0.05). There was a significant difference in body weight of the mice after removal of tumors among the three groups. The body weight of mice was the heaviest (13.66 +/- 1.55 g) in the mirtazapine group and the lightest (11.39 +/- 1.45 g) in the fluoxetine group (F( (2,12) ) = 11.43, P < 0.01). The behavioral test on d 7 showed that the horizontal and vertical activities were significantly increased in the mirtazapine group compared with the fluoxetine and control groups (F( (2,18) ) = 10.89, P < 0.01). These effects disappeared in the mirtazapine and fluoxetine groups during 2-6 wk. The grooming activity was higher in the mirtazapine group than in the fluoxetine group (10.1 +/- 2.1 vs 7.1 +/- 1.9 ) (t = 2.40, P < 0.05) in the second week. There was no

  2. Drug retention and distribution after intratumoral chemotherapy with fluorouracil/epinephrine injectable gel in human pancreatic cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P; Kanekal, S; Patawaran, M B; Chen, J Y; Jones, R E; Orenberg, E K; Yu, N Y

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is widespread, associated with high mortality, and rapidly fatal. Most cases are diagnosed too late for surgical treatment, and the disease responds poorly to systemic chemotherapy. Nevertheless, pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to fluorouracil (5-FU) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, suggesting that improved retention of drug in the tumor may improve patient prognosis. In this study, we evaluated a novel drug delivery system, 5-FU/epinephrine injectable gel (5-FU/epi gel), designed to improve drug retention in tumors. We used a BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer xenograft model in athymic mice to examine drug levels in tumor, liver, and kidney tissue following administration of: (a) 5-FU/epi gel (30 mg 5-FU/ml) intratumorally (i.t.); (b) 5-FU solution i.t.; and (c) 5-FU solution intraperitoneally (i.p.). [(3)H]5-FU was added as a radiolabeled marker to all test formulations. Animals were sacrificed at designated times, and the tumor, liver, and one kidney from each animal were excised and processed for radioactivity analysis. Drug concentration was quantified by both storage-phosphor autoradiography (SPA) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC). Higher and sustained i.t. drug levels were achieved following i.t. administration of 5-FU/epi gel (SPA AUC 18.4 mM. h, LSC AUC 13.0 mM. h) compared with 5-FU solution i.t. (SPA AUC 2.02 mM. h, LSC AUC 1.92 mM. h) or 5-FU solution i.p. (SPA AUC 0.07 mM. h, LSC AUC 0.04 mM. h). Use of the 5-FU/gel system was associated with lower drug levels in liver and kidney, indicating that it produces far less systemic exposure. In the human pancreatic cancer xenografts, i.t. administration of 5-FU/epi injectable gel provided significantly higher drug and/or metabolite concentrations for extended periods than was possible with either i.t. or i.p administration of drug solution. This i.t. drug delivery system could potentially be used to treat patients with pancreatic cancer to increase tumor exposure to drug and

  3. Olfactory Neuroblastoma: Diagnostic Difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya MN,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory neuroblastoma is an uncommon malignant tumor of sinonasal tract arising from the olfactory neuro epithelium. The olfactory neuroblastomas presenting with divergent histomorphologies like, epithelial appearance of cells, lacking a neuro fibrillary background and absence of rosettes are difficult to diagnose. Such cases require immunohistochemistry to establish the diagnosis. We describe the clinical features, pathological and immunohistochemical findings of grade IV Olfactory neuroblastoma in a 57 year old man

  4. CCAAT-binding factor regulates expression of the beta1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase gene in the BE2 human neuroblastoma cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Martin, Emil; Thomas, Anthony; Uray, Karen L.; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a cytosolic enzyme producing the intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) on activation with nitric oxide (NO). sGC is an obligatory heterodimer composed of alpha and beta subunits. We investigated human beta1 sGC transcriptional regulation in BE2 human neuroblastoma cells. The 5' upstream region of the beta1 sGC gene was isolated and analyzed for promoter activity by using luciferase reporter constructs. The transcriptional start site of the beta1 sGC gene in BE2 cells was identified. The functional significance of consensus transcriptional factor binding sites proximal to the transcriptional start site was investigated by site deletions in the 800-bp promoter fragment. The elimination of CCAAT-binding factor (CBF) and growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) binding cores significantly diminished whereas deletion of the NF1 core elevated the transcription. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) and Western analysis of proteins bound to biotinated EMSA probes confirmed the interaction of GFI1, CBF, and NF1 factors with the beta1 sGC promoter. Treatment of BE2 cells with genistein, known to inhibit the CBF binding to DNA, significantly reduced protein levels of beta1 sGC by inhibiting transcription. In summary, our study represents an analysis of the human beta1 sGC promoter regulation in human neuroblastoma BE2 cells and identifies CBF as a critically important factor in beta1 sGC expression.

  5. Chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone mediated photosensitization is effective against human non-small cell lung carcinoma compared to small cell lung carcinoma xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, William WL; Heng, Paul WS; Olivo, Malini

    2007-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective local cancer treatment that involves light activation of a photosensitizer, resulting in oxygen-dependent, free radical-mediated cell death. Little is known about the comparative efficacy of PDT in treating non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), despite ongoing clinical trials treating lung cancers. The present study evaluated the potential use of chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone (Ce6-PVP) as a multimodality photosensitizer for fluorescence detection and photodynamic therapy (PDT) on NSCLC and SCLC xenografts. Results Human NSCLC (NCI-H460) and SCLC (NCI-H526) tumor cell lines were used to establish tumor xenografts in the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model as well as in the Balb/c nude mice. In the CAM model, Ce6-PVP was applied topically (1.0 mg/kg) and fluorescence intensity was charted at various time points. Tumor-bearing mice were given intravenous administration of Ce6-PVP (2.0 mg/kg) and laser irradiation at 665 nm (fluence of 150 J/cm2 and fluence rate of 125 mW/cm2). Tumor response was evaluated at 48 h post PDT. Studies of temporal fluorescence pharmacokinetics in CAM tumor xenografts showed that Ce6-PVP has a selective localization and a good accuracy in demarcating NSCLC compared to SCLC from normal surrounding CAM after 3 h post drug administration. Irradiation at 3 h drug-light interval showed greater tumor necrosis against human NSCLC xenografts in nude mice. SCLC xenografts were observed to express resistance to photosensitization with Ce6-PVP. Conclusion The formulation of Ce6-PVP is distinctly advantageous as a diagnostic and therapeutic agent for fluorescence diagnosis and PDT of NSCLC. PMID:18053148

  6. Enhancement by N-methylformamide of the effect of ionizing radiation on a human colon tumor xenografted in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dexter, D.L.; Lee, E.S.; Bliven, S.F.; Glicksman, A.S.; Leith, J.T.

    1984-11-01

    Polar solvents, which induce differentiation in murine and human tumor cells, enhance the effect of ionizing radiation on cultured mouse mammary and human colon cancer cells. To determine whether this enhancement occurs in vivo, DLD-2 human colon carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were treated with combinations of 6 MV photon irradiation, the polar solvent N-methylformamide (NMF), or combinations of the two agents. Nude mice bearing 300-mg s.c. implants of DLD-2 tumors were treated i.p. with 150 mg NMF/kg daily for 19 days. Local tumor irradiations were administered as graded single doses or as fractionated doses, daily for 4 days, following the third NMF injection. The growth-inhibiting effect of the radiation treatment for both single dose and fractionation protocols was enhanced by the polar solvent. NMF alone increased the time required for a doubling of initial tumor volume by 1.7 days, compared to control tumors. Initial tumor volume doubling times compared to untreated controls were increased by 3.6 and 7.6 days by photon doses of 10.0 and 13.75 Gy, respectively, whereas NMF plus 10.0 or 13.75 Gy increased the DLD-2 regrowth delay time by 7.5 or 12.9 days. NMF caused essentially equivalent enhancements, whether split-dose schedules of 2.5 Gy daily for 4 days, and 3.44 Gy daily for 4 days, or single doses of 10.0 and 13.75 Gy were used; therefore, radiation enhancement was not due to effects on sublethal damage repair. The results support the use of NMF, currently in Phase 1-Phase 2 clinical trials, with radiation in the therapy of selected human neoplasms.

  7. Human Fetal Testis Xenografts Are Resistant to Phthalate-Induced Endocrine Disruption

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicholas E. Heger; Susan J. Hall; Moses A. Sandrof; Elizabeth V. McDonnell; Janan B. Hensley; Erin N. McDowell; Kayla A. Martin; Kevin W. Gaido; Kamin J. Johnson; Kim Boekelheide

    2012-01-01

    .... Impomntly, ex vivo phthalate exposure of the letal testis does not recapitulate the species-specific endocrine disruption, demonstrating me need for a new bioassay to assess the human response to phthalates. Objectives...

  8. Antitumor Effects of Flavopiridol on Human Uterine Leiomyoma In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun-Gyo; Baek, Jong-Woo; Shin, So-Jin; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Cha, Soon-Do; Park,Won-Jin; Chung, Rosa; Choi, Eun-Som; Lee, Gun-Ho; Cho, Chi-Heum

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are considered a potential target for cancer therapy. Flavopiridol is a potent CDK inhibitor. In this study, the antiproliferative effect of the flavonoid compound flavopiridol and its mechanism in human uterine leiomyoma cells were investigated. The present study focused on the effect of flavopiridol in cell proliferation and cell cycle progression in primary cultured human uterine leiomyoma cells. Cell viability and cell proliferation assays were...

  9. Reproducibility study of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} uptake in murine models of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Edwin; Liu, Shuangdong; Chin, Frederick; Cheng, Zhen [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Gowrishankar, Gayatri; Yaghoubi, Shahriar [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Wedgeworth, James Patrick [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Berndorff, Dietmar; Gekeler, Volker [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany); Gambhir, Sanjiv S. [Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Department of Bioengineering, School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Nuclear Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    An {sup 18}F-labeled PEGylated arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) dimer [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} has been used to image tumor {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin levels in preclinical and clinical studies. Serial positron emission tomography (PET) studies may be useful for monitoring antiangiogenic therapy response or for drug screening; however, the reproducibility of serial scans has not been determined for this PET probe. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility of the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}-targeted PET probe, [{sup 18}F ]FPP(RGD){sub 2} using small animal PET. Human HCT116 colon cancer xenografts were implanted into nude mice (n = 12) in the breast and scapular region and grown to mean diameters of 5-15 mm for approximately 2.5 weeks. A 3-min acquisition was performed on a small animal PET scanner approximately 1 h after administration of [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} (1.9-3.8 MBq, 50-100 {mu}Ci) via the tail vein. A second small animal PET scan was performed approximately 6 h later after reinjection of the probe to assess for reproducibility. Images were analyzed by drawing an ellipsoidal region of interest (ROI) around the tumor xenograft activity. Percentage injected dose per gram (%ID/g) values were calculated from the mean or maximum activity in the ROIs. Coefficients of variation and differences in %ID/g values between studies from the same day were calculated to determine the reproducibility. The coefficient of variation (mean {+-}SD) for %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between [{sup 18}F]FPP(RGD){sub 2} small animal PET scans performed 6 h apart on the same day were 11.1 {+-} 7.6% and 10.4 {+-} 9.3%, respectively. The corresponding differences in %ID{sub mean}/g and %ID{sub max}/g values between scans were -0.025 {+-} 0.067 and -0.039 {+-} 0.426. Immunofluorescence studies revealed a direct relationship between extent of {alpha}{sub {nu}}{beta}{sub 3} integrin expression in tumors and tumor vasculature

  10. Importance of Bevacizumab Maintenance Following Combination Chemotherapy in Human Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Xenograft Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikura, Nobuyuki; Yanagisawa, Mieko; Noguchi-Sasaki, Mariko; Iwai, Toshiki; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Sugimoto, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Kaname

    2017-02-01

    Bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapeutics has shown significant survival benefit in clinical studies in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Since bevacizumab was administered as standard treatment until disease progression, the importance of bevacizumab during the maintenance phase was not prospectively investigated in these studies. Three human NSCLC cell line xenograft models were used to investigate antitumor effect of bevacizumab and tumor microvessel density (MVD) was analyzed. In A549 and NCI-H292 models, bevacizumab maintenance following combination with paclitaxel exhibited stronger tumor suppression than its absence. In an NCI-H292 model, bevacizumab maintenance continuously inhibited increase of MVD. In an NCI-H2228 model following induction treatment with pemetrexed and bevacizumab, maintenance with pemetrexed plus bevacizumab, had stronger efficacy than pemetrexed alone and led to lower MVD and level of thymidylate synthase. Continuous suppression of angiogenesis by bevacizumab may contribute to the superior efficacy of maintenance treatment containing bevacizumab. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of perfusion conditions on melphalan distribution in the isolated perfused rat hindlimb bearing a human melanoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z. Y.; Smithers, B. M.; Parsons, P. G.; Roberts, M. S.

    1997-01-01

    An isolated rat hindlimb perfusion model carrying xenografts of the human melanoma cell line MM96 was used to study the effects of perfusion conditions on melphalan distribution. Krebs-Henseleit buffer and Hartmann's solution containing 4.7% bovine serum albumin (BSA) or 2.8% dextran 40 were used as perfusates. Melphalan concentrations in perfusate, tumour nodules and normal tissues were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Increasing the perfusion flow rates (from 4 to 8 ml min(-1)) resulted in higher tissue blood flow (determined with 51Cr-labelled microspheres) and melphalan uptake by tumour and normal tissues. The distribution of melphalan within tumour nodules and normal tissues was similar for both Krebs-Henseleit buffer and Hartmann's solution; however, tissue concentrations of melphalan were significantly higher for a perfusate containing 2.8% dextran 40 than for one containing 4.7% BSA. The melphalan concentration in the tumour was one-third of that found in the skin if the perfusate contained 4.7% BSA. In conclusion, this study has shown that a high perfusion flow enhances the delivery of melphalan into implanted tumour nodules and normal tissues, and a perfusate with low melphalan binding (no albumin) is preferred for maximum uptake of drug by the tumour. PMID:9099965

  12. Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Glypican-2 in Neuroblastoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology (NCI LMB) have developed and isolated several single domain monoclonal human antibodies against GPC2. NCI seeks parties interested in licensing or co-developing GPC2 antibodies and/or conjugates.

  13. Human embryonic stem cells differentiated to lung lineage-specific cells ameliorate pulmonary fibrosis in a xenograft transplant mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ena Ray Banerjee

    Full Text Available Our aim was to differentiate human (h embryonic stem (ES cells into lung epithelial lineage-specific cells [i.e., alveolar epithelial type I (AEI and type II (AEII cells and Clara cells] as the first step in the development of cell-based strategies to repair lung injury in the bleomycin mouse model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. A heterogeneous population of non-ciliated lung lineage-specific cells was derived by a novel method of embryoid body (EB differentiation. This differentiated human cell population was used to modulate the profibrotic phenotype in transplanted animals.Omission or inclusion of one or more components in the differentiation medium skewed differentiation of H7 hES cells into varying proportions of AEI, AEII, and Clara cells. ICG-001, a small molecule inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin/Creb-binding protein (CBP transcription, changed marker expression of the differentiated ES cells from an AEII-like phenotype to a predominantly AEI-like phenotype. The differentiated cells were used in xenograft transplantation studies in bleomycin-treated Rag2γC(-/- mice. Human cells were detected in lungs of the transplanted groups receiving differentiated ES cells treated with or without ICG-001. The increased lung collagen content found in bleomycin-treated mice receiving saline was significantly reduced by transplantation with the lung-lineage specific epithelial cells differentiated from ES cells. A significant increase in progenitor number was observed in the airways of bleomycin-treated mice after transplantation of differentiated hES cells.This study indicates that ES cell-based therapy may be a powerful novel approach to ameliorate lung fibrosis.

  14. The efficacy of the anthracycline prodrug daunorubicin-GA3 in human ovarian cancer xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houba, PHJ; Boven, E; Erkelens, CAM; Leenders, RGG; Scheeren, JW; Pinedo, HM; Haisma, HJ

    1998-01-01

    The prodrug N-[4-(daunorubicin-N-carbonyl-oxymethyl)phenyl] O-beta-glucuronyl carbamate (DNR-GA3) was synthesized for specific activation by human beta-glucuronidase, released in necrotic areas of tumour lesions. In vitro, DNR-GA3 was 18 times less toxic than daunorubicin (DNR) and the prodrug was

  15. In vivo VEGF imaging with radiolabeled bevacizumab in a human ovarian tumor xenograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B.; Hospers, Geke A.; Mulder, Nanno H.; de Jong, Johan R.; Hollema, Harry; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; van Dongen, Guns A.; Perk, Lars R.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), released by tumor cells, is an important growth factor in tumor angiogenesis. The humanized monoclonal antibody bevacizumab blocks VEGF-induced tumor angiogenesis by binding, thereby neutralizing VEGF. Our aim was to develop radiolabeled bevacizumab for

  16. Human milk protein production in xenografts of genetically engineered bovine mammary epithelial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignani, Eugenio; Eirew, Peter; Accornero, Paolo; Eaves, Connie J; Baratta, Mario

    2010-10-19

    In the bovine species milk production is well known to correlate with mammary tissue mass. However, most advances in optimizing milk production relied on improvements of breeding and husbandry practices. A better understanding of the cells that generate bovine mammary tissue could facilitate important advances in milk production and have global economic impact. With this possibility in mind, we show that a mammary stem cell population can be functionally identified and isolated from the bovine mammary gland. We also demonstrate that this stem cell population may be a promising target for manipulating the composition of cow's milk using gene transfer. We show that the in vitro colony-forming cell assay for detecting normal primitive bipotent and lineage-restricted human mammary clonogenic progenitors are applicable to bovine mammary cells. Similarly, the ability of normal human mammary stem cells to regenerate functional bilayered structures in collagen gels placed under the kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice is shared by a subset of bovine mammary cells that lack aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. We also find that this activity is a distinguishing feature of luminal-restricted bovine progenitors. The regenerated structures recapitulate the organization of bovine mammary tissue, and milk could be readily detected in these structures when they were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis. Transplantation of the bovine cells transduced with a lentivirus encoding human β-CASEIN led to expression of the transgene and secretion of the product by their progeny regenerated in vivo. These findings point to a common developmental hierarchy shared by human and bovine mammary glands, providing strong evidence of common mechanisms regulating the maintenance and differentiation of mammary stem cells from both species. These results highlight the potential of novel engineering and transplant strategies for a variety of commercial applications including the production of

  17. Identification of proteins sensitive to thermal stress in human neuroblastoma and glioma cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilian Xu

    Full Text Available Heat-shock is an acute insult to the mammalian proteome. The sudden elevation in temperature has far-reaching effects on protein metabolism, leads to a rapid inhibition of most protein synthesis, and the induction of protein chaperones. Using heat-shock in cells of neuronal (SH-SY5Y and glial (CCF-STTG1 lineage, in conjunction with detergent extraction and sedimentation followed by LC-MS/MS proteomic approaches, we sought to identify human proteins that lose solubility upon heat-shock. The two cell lines showed largely overlapping profiles of proteins detected by LC-MS/MS. We identified 58 proteins in detergent insoluble fractions as losing solubility in after heat shock; 10 were common between the 2 cell lines. A subset of the proteins identified by LC-MS/MS was validated by immunoblotting of similarly prepared fractions. Ultimately, we were able to definitively identify 3 proteins as putatively metastable neural proteins; FEN1, CDK1, and TDP-43. We also determined that after heat-shock these cells accumulate insoluble polyubiquitin chains largely linked via lysine 48 (K-48 residues. Collectively, this study identifies human neural proteins that lose solubility upon heat-shock. These proteins may represent components of the human proteome that are vulnerable to misfolding in settings of proteostasis stress.

  18. Beneficial effects of the transgenic expression of human sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 on pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ji-Jing; Yeom, Hye-Jeong; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Jae-Ghi; Lee, Eun Won; Cho, Bumrae; Lee, Han Sin; Kim, Su Jin; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Sung Joo; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-02-01

    Both human soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor-Fc (sTNF-αR-Fc) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic pigs have been generated previously for xenotransplantation. Here, we investigated whether overexpression of sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 in pig islets prolongs islet xenograft survival. Adult porcine islets were isolated from human sTNF-αR-Fc or HO-1 transgenic and wild type pigs, and were transplanted into diabetic nude mice. Effects of the expression of both genes on islet apoptosis, chemokine expression, cellular infiltration, antibody production, and islet xenograft survival were analyzed. Human sTNF-αR-Fc transgenic pigs successfully expressed sTNF-αR-Fc in the islets; human HO-1 transgenic pigs expressed significant levels of HO-1 in the islets. Pig-to-mouse islet xenograft survival was significantly prolonged in both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups compared with that in the wild type group. Both the sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 groups exhibited suppressed intragraft expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and decreased perigraft infiltration of immune cells. However, there was no difference in the anti-pig antibody levels between the groups. Apoptosis of islet cells during the early engraftment was suppressed only in the HO-1 group. Porcine islets from both sTNF-αR-Fc and HO-1 transgenic pigs prolonged xenograft survival by suppressing islet cell apoptosis or secondary inflammatory responses following islet death, indicating that these transgenic pigs might have applications in successful islet xenotransplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-gene peptide nucleic acid specifically inhibits MYCN expression in human neuroblastoma cells leading to cell growth inhibition and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Roberto; Purgato, Stefania; Camerin, Consuelo; Fronza, Raffaele; Bologna, Fabrizio; Alboresi, Simone; Franzoni, Monica; Corradini, Roberto; Sforza, Stefano; Faccini, Andrea; Shohet, Jason M; Marchelli, Rosangela; Pession, Andrea

    2005-05-01

    We developed an anti-gene peptide nucleic acid (PNA) for selective inhibition of MYCN transcription in neuroblastoma cells, targeted against a unique sequence in the antisense DNA strand of exon 2 of MYCN and linked at its NH(2) terminus to a nuclear localization signal peptide. Fluorescence microscopy showed specific nuclear delivery of the PNA in six human neuroblastoma cell lines: GI-LI-N and IMR-32 (MYCN-amplified/overexpressed); SJ-N-KP and NB-100 (MYCN-unamplified/low-expressed); and GI-CA-N and GI-ME-N (MYCN-unamplified/unexpressed). Antiproliferative effects were observable at 24 hours (GI-LI-N, 60%; IMR-32, 70%) and peaked at 72 hours (GI-LI-N, 80%; IMR-32, 90%; SK-N-KP, 60%; NB-100, 50%); no reduction was recorded for GI-CA-N and GI-ME-N (controls). In MYCN-amplified/overexpressed IMR-32 cells and MYCN-unamplified/low-expressed SJ-N-KP cells, inhibition was recorded of MYCN mRNA (by real-time PCR) and N-Myc (Western blotting); these inhibitory effects increased over 3 days after single treatment in IMR-32. Anti-gene PNA induced G(1)-phase accumulation (39-53%) in IMR-32 and apoptosis (56% annexin V-positive cells at 24 hours in IMR-32 and 22% annexin V-positive cells at 48 hours in SJ-N-KP). Selective activity of the PNA was shown by altering three point mutations, and by the observation that an anti-gene PNA targeted against the noncoding DNA strand did not exert any effect. These findings could encourage research into development of an anti-gene PNA-based tumor-specific agent for neuroblastoma (and other neoplasms) with MYCN expression.

  20. Unlabelled iododeoxyuridine increases the rate of uptake of [{sup 125}I]iododeoxyuridine in human xenografted glioblastomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupertuis, Yves M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Xiao, Wei-Hong; Slosman, Daniel O. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Tribolet, N. de [Division of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Pichard, Claude [Clinical Nutrition, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Bischof Delaloye, Angelika [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Lausanne (Switzerland); Buchegger, Franz [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2002-04-01

    5-Iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (IdUrd), a thymidine (TdR) analogue, can be radiolabelled with iodine-125, an Auger radiation emitter, to provoke double-strand breaks once incorporated into DNA of cancer cells. We have previously shown that co-incubation of [{sup 125}I]IdUrd with unlabelled IdUrd provided an additive cytotoxicity in two human glioblastoma cell lines. This observation was unexpectedly correlated with an increase in the rate of DNA incorporation of [{sup 125}I]IdUrd. Here, we further evaluated the effects of unlabelled IdUrd on the uptake of [{sup 125}I]IdUrd in vitro and in vivo in mice xenografted with three human glioblastoma lines. The results showed that, in these three glioblastoma lines, unlabelled IdUrd increased the rate of uptake of [{sup 125}I]IdUrd in vitro by 2- to 4.4-fold and in vivo by 1.5- to 2.8-fold. The rate of uptake of [{sup 125}I]IdUrd in normal rapidly dividing tissues was also increased by 1.3- to 2.8-fold. TdR completely blocked [{sup 125}I]IdUrd uptake in tumours and tissues. Analogues of IdUrd, such as deoxyuridine and 5-iodo-1,3-dimethyuracil, did not reproduce the effect of IdUrd on the uptake of [{sup 125}I]IdUrd, suggesting that it is not related to protection against [{sup 125}I]IdUrd degradation. It is concluded that combined administration of unlabelled IdUrd may improve the use of radiolabelled IdUrd for cancer diagnosis or therapy. (orig.)

  1. Noscapine induced apoptosis via downregulation of survivin in human neuroblastoma cells having wild type or null p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwang Li

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. It accounts for 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment in children with advanced neuroblastoma. Noscapine, a nontoxic natural compound, can trigger apoptosis in many cancer types. We now show that p53 is dispensable for Noscapine-induced cell death in neuroblastoma cell lines, proapoptotic response to this promising chemopreventive agent is mediated by suppression of survivin protein expression. The Noscapine treatment increased levels of total and Ser(15-phosphorylated p53 protein in SK-SY5Y cells, but the proapoptotic response to this agent was maintained even after knockdown of the p53 protein level. Exposure of SK-SY5Y and LA1-5S cells to Noscapine resulted in a marked decrease in protein and mRNA level of survivin as early as 12 hours after treatment. Ectopic expression of survivin conferred statistically significant protection against Noscapine-mediated cytoplasmic histone-associated apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Also, the Noscapine-induced apoptosis was modestly but statistically significantly augmented by RNA interference of survivin in both cell lines. Furthermore, Noscapine-induced apoptotic cell death was associated with activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP. In conclusion, the present study provides novel insight into the molecular circuitry of Noscapine-induced apoptosis to indicate suppression of survivin expression as a critical mediator of this process.

  2. FHL2 interacts with and acts as a functional repressor of Id2 in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weidong; Wu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yali; Meng, Yuanguang; Si, Yiling; Yang, Jie; Fu, Xiaobing; Yu, Li

    2009-07-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation 2 (Id2) is a natural inhibitor of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Although Id2 is well known to prevent differentiation and promote cell-cycle progression and tumorigenesis, the molecular events that regulate Id2 activity remain to be investigated. Here, we identified that Four-and-a-half LIM-only protein 2 (FHL2) is a novel functional repressor of Id2. Moreover, we demonstrated that FHL2 can directly interact with all members of the Id family (Id1-4) via an N-terminal loop-helix structure conserved in Id proteins. FHL2 antagonizes the inhibitory effect of Id proteins on basic helix-loop-helix protein E47-mediated transcription, which was abrogated by the deletion mutation of Ids that disrupted their interaction with FHL2. We also showed a competitive nature between FHL2 and E47 for binding Id2, whereby FHL2 prevents the formation of the Id2-E47 heterodimer, thus releasing E47 to DNA and restoring its transcriptional activity. FHL2 expression was remarkably up-regulated during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of neuroblastoma cells, during which the expression of Id2 was opposite to that. Ectopic FHL2 expression in neuroblastoma cells markedly reduces the transcriptional and cell-cycle promoting functions of Id2. Altogether, these results indicate that FHL2 is an important repressor of the oncogenic activity of Id2 in neuroblastoma cells.

  3. Decellularization of porcine corneas and repopulation with human corneal cells for tissue-engineered xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoeruek, Efdal; Bayyoud, Tarek; Maurus, Christine; Hofmann, Johanna; Spitzer, Martin S; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Szurman, Peter

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the potential use of decellularized porcine corneas (DPCs) as a carrier matrix for cultivating human corneal cells in tissue engineering. Corneal cells were isolated from human corneoscleral rims. Porcine corneas were decellularized using hypotonic tris buffer, ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA, 0.1%), aprotinin (10 KIU/ml) and 0.3% sodium dodecyl sulphate. Haematoxylin-eosin (HE) and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining were performed to confirm removal of the corneal cells. Quantitative analysis was performed to determine levels of desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) using DNA Purification Kit (Fermentas, St. Leon-Rot, Germany). Alcian blue staining was carried out to analyse the structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Corneal stromal cells were injected into the DPCs; limbal corneal epithelial cells and corneal endothelial cells were seeded onto the anterior and posterior surfaces of the DPCs, respectively. Evaluation was undertaken at days 14 and 30. The phenotypical properties of the cultivated corneal cells were investigated using Immunolocalization of type I collagen, keratocan, lumican, cytokeratin 3 (AE5) and type VIII collagen. Haematoxylin-eosin and DAPI staining showed efficient elimination of porcine corneal cells, whereas alcian blue confirmed gross preservation of the ECM. The quantitative analysis of the DNA content showed a significant reduction (mean before decellularization: 75.45 ± 13.71 ng/mg; mean after decellularization: 9.87 ± 2.04 ng/mg, p types of corneal cells were efficiently cultured and expanded on the DPCs. Decellularized porcine corneas might serve as a potential scaffold for tissue engineering of the cornea, possibly providing xenogenic substrate for corneal transplantation. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  4. Experimental radioimmunotherapy of a xenografted human colonic tumor (GW-39) producing carcinoembryonic antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Gaffar, S.A.; Bennett, S.J.; Beach, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Experiments were undertaken to evaluate the antitumor effects of 131I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G prepared against carcinoembryonic antigen in hamsters bearing the carcinoembryonic antigen-producing GW-39 human colonic carcinoma. At a single injection of 1 mCi 131I and higher, a marked growth inhibition of GW-39 tumors, as well as a considerable increase in the survival time of the tumor-bearing hamsters, could be achieved. At a dose of 1 mCi, the radioactive affinity-purified antibody appeared to be superior to radioactive normal goat immunoglobulin G in influencing tumor growth and survival time, but no significant difference could be seen at the higher dose of 2 mCi given. Radiobiological calculations indicated that the tumors received, at up to 20 days after therapy, 1325 rads for the specific antibody and only 411 rads for the normal immunoglobulin G preparation. These findings encourage the further evaluation of antibodies to tumor markers for isotopic cancer therapy.

  5. Survival of free and encapsulated human and rat islet xenografts transplanted into the mouse bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael P H Meier

    Full Text Available Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow and 10 days (kidney capsule. Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation.

  6. Principal component analysis for the comparison of metabolic profiles from human rectal cancer biopsies and colorectal xenografts using high-resolution magic angle spinning 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flatmark Kjersti

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was conducted in order to elucidate metabolic differences between human rectal cancer biopsies and colorectal HT29, HCT116 and SW620 xenografts by using high-resolution magnetic angle spinning (MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and for determination of the most appropriate human rectal xenograft model for preclinical MR spectroscopy studies. A further aim was to investigate metabolic changes following irradiation of HT29 xenografts. Methods HR MAS MRS of tissue samples from xenografts and rectal biopsies were obtained with a Bruker Avance DRX600 spectrometer and analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA and partial least square (PLS regression analysis. Results and conclusion HR MAS MRS enabled assignment of 27 metabolites. Score plots from PCA of spin-echo and single-pulse spectra revealed separate clusters of the different xenografts and rectal biopsies, reflecting underlying differences in metabolite composition. The loading profile indicated that clustering was mainly based on differences in relative amounts of lipids, lactate and choline-containing compounds, with HT29 exhibiting the metabolic profile most similar to human rectal cancers tissue. Due to high necrotic fractions in the HT29 xenografts, radiation-induced changes were not detected when comparing spectra from untreated and irradiated HT29 xenografts. However, PLS calibration relating spectral data to the necrotic fraction revealed a significant correlation, indicating that necrotic fraction can be assessed from the MR spectra.

  7. Principal component analysis for the comparison of metabolic profiles from human rectal cancer biopsies and colorectal xenografts using high-resolution magic angle spinning 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seierstad, Therese; Røe, Kathrine; Sitter, Beathe; Halgunset, Jostein; Flatmark, Kjersti; Ree, Anne H; Olsen, Dag Rune; Gribbestad, Ingrid S; Bathen, Tone F

    2008-04-25

    This study was conducted in order to elucidate metabolic differences between human rectal cancer biopsies and colorectal HT29, HCT116 and SW620 xenografts by using high-resolution magnetic angle spinning (MAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and for determination of the most appropriate human rectal xenograft model for preclinical MR spectroscopy studies. A further aim was to investigate metabolic changes following irradiation of HT29 xenografts. HR MAS MRS of tissue samples from xenografts and rectal biopsies were obtained with a Bruker Avance DRX600 spectrometer and analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square (PLS) regression analysis. HR MAS MRS enabled assignment of 27 metabolites. Score plots from PCA of spin-echo and single-pulse spectra revealed separate clusters of the different xenografts and rectal biopsies, reflecting underlying differences in metabolite composition. The loading profile indicated that clustering was mainly based on differences in relative amounts of lipids, lactate and choline-containing compounds, with HT29 exhibiting the metabolic profile most similar to human rectal cancers tissue. Due to high necrotic fractions in the HT29 xenografts, radiation-induced changes were not detected when comparing spectra from untreated and irradiated HT29 xenografts. However, PLS calibration relating spectral data to the necrotic fraction revealed a significant correlation, indicating that necrotic fraction can be assessed from the MR spectra.

  8. Imaging beta-galactosidase activity in human tumor xenografts and transgenic mice using a chemiluminescent substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Detection of enzyme activity or transgene expression offers potential insight into developmental biology, disease progression, and potentially personalized medicine. Historically, the lacZ gene encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase has been the most common reporter gene and many chromogenic and fluorogenic substrates are well established, but limited to histology or in vitro assays. We now present a novel approach for in vivo detection of beta-galactosidase using optical imaging to detect light emission following administration of the chemiluminescent 1,2-dioxetane substrate Galacto-Light PlusTM. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: B-gal activity was visualized in stably transfected human MCF7-lacZ tumors growing in mice. LacZ tumors were identified versus contralateral wild type tumors as controls, based on two- to tenfold greater light emission following direct intra tumoral or intravenous administration of reporter substrate. The 1,2-dioxetane substrate is commercially available as a kit for microplate-based assays for beta-gal detection, and we have adapted it for in vivo application. Typically, 100 microl substrate mixture was administered intravenously and light emission was detected from the lacZ tumor immediately with gradual decrease over the next 20 mins. Imaging was also undertaken in transgenic ROSA26 mice following subcutaneous or intravenous injection of substrate mixture. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Light emission was detectable using standard instrumentation designed for more traditional bioluminescent imaging. Use of 1,2-dioxetane substrates to detect enzyme activity offers a new paradigm for non-invasive biochemistry in vivo.

  9. Critical role of c-Jun overexpression in liver metastasis of human breast cancer xenograft model

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    Qian Lu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background c-Jun/AP-1 has been linked to invasive properties of aggressive breast cancer. Recently, it has been reported that overexpression of c-Jun in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 resulted in increased AP-1 activity, motility and invasiveness of the cells in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice. However, the role of c-Jun in metastasis of human breast cancer in vivo is currently unknown. Methods To further investigate the direct involvement of c-Jun in tumorigenesis and metastasis, in the present study, the effects of c-Jun overexpression were studied in both in vitro and in nude mice. Results Ectopic overexpression of c-Jun promoted the growth of MCF-7 cells and resulted in a significant increase in the percentage of cells in S phase and increased motility and invasiveness. Introduction of c-Jun gene alone into weakly invasive MCF-7 cells resulted in the transfected cells capable of metastasizing to the nude mouse liver following tail vein injection. Conclusion The present study confirms that overexpression of c-Jun contributes to a more invasive phenotype in MCF-7 cells. It indicates an interesting relationship between c-Jun expression and increased property of adhesion, migration and in vivo liver metastasis of MCF-7/c-Jun cells. The results provide further evidence that c-Jun is involved in the metastasis of breast cancer. The finding also opens an opportunity for development of anti-c-Jun strategies in breast cancer therapy.

  10. Islet xenograft destruction in the hu-PBL-severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse necessitates anti-CD3 preactivation of human immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysemans, C; Waer, M; Laureys, J; Depovere, J; Pipeleers, D; Bouillon, R; Mathieu, C

    2000-01-01

    Introduction of the hu-PBL-SCID mouse model has yielded a potentially useful tool for research in transplantation. The aim of this study was to define the conditions necessary for a reconstituted human immune system to destroy in a consistent manner rat islet xenografts in the alloxan-diabetic hu-PBL-SCID mouse. We examined different time points of hu-PBL reconstitution, different transplantation sites of the islets and several hu-PBL reconstitution protocols. Major differences in graft destruction were observed between the different hu-PBL reconstitution protocols, irrespective of timing of hu-PBL reconstitution or site of transplantation. Although preactivation of hu-PBL did not improve the level of hu-PBL chimerism, histological and immunohistochemical analysis of the grafts revealed a severe human lymphocytic infiltration and β cell destruction only in the grafts of mice receiving preactivated hu-PBL. This β cell injury resulted in impaired glucose tolerance, with in some animals recurrence of hyperglycaemia, and decreased insulin and C-peptide levels after glucose stimulation. Therefore, we conclude that activation of hu-PBL prior to transfer is essential in achieving xenograft infiltration and destruction in hu-PBL-SCID mice. The need for immune manipulation suggests that interactions between hu-PBL and xenografts in this model may be hampered by incompatibilities in cross-species adhesion and/or activation signals. PMID:10971525

  11. Electroporation increases antitumoral efficacy of the bcl-2 antisense G3139 and chemotherapy in a human melanoma xenograft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldi Alfonso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleic acids designed to modulate the expression of target proteins remain a promising therapeutic strategy in several diseases, including cancer. However, clinical success is limited by the lack of efficient intracellular delivery. In this study we evaluated whether electroporation could increase the delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against bcl-2 (G3139 as well as the efficacy of combination chemotherapy in human melanoma xenografts. Methods Melanoma-bearing nude mice were treated i.v. with G3139 and/or cisplatin (DDP followed by the application of trains of electric pulses to tumors. Western blot, immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR were performed to analyze protein and mRNA expression. The effect of electroporation on muscles was determined by histology, while tumor apoptosis and the proliferation index were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides tumor accumulation was measured by FACS and confocal microscopy. Results The G3139/Electroporation combined therapy produced a significant inhibition of tumor growth (TWI, more than 50% accompanied by a marked tumor re-growth delay (TRD, about 20 days. The efficacy of this treatment was due to the higher G3139 uptake in tumor cells which led to a marked down-regulation of bcl-2 protein expression. Moreover, the G3139/EP combination treatment resulted in an enhanced apoptotic index and a decreased proliferation rate of tumors. Finally, an increased tumor response was observed after treatment with the triple combination G3139/DDP/EP, showing a TWI of about 75% and TRD of 30 days. Conclusions These results demonstrate that electroporation is an effective strategy to improve the delivery of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides within tumor cells in vivo and it may be instrumental in optimizing the response of melanoma to chemotherapy. The high response rate observed in this study suggest to apply this strategy for the treatment of melanoma patients.

  12. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate inhibits growth of human oral carcinoma xenograft in mice and potentiates cisplatin effect via proinflammatory microenvironment alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Lionel L A; Arshad, Norhafiza M; Ibrahim, Halijah; Azmi, Mohamad Nurul; Awang, Khalijah; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2012-10-09

    Oral cancers although preventable, possess a low five-year survival rate which has remained unchanged over the past three decades. In an attempt to find a more safe, affordable and effective treatment option, we describe here the use of 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), a component of Malaysian ginger traditionally used for various medicinal purposes. Whether ACA can inhibit the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells alone or in combination with cisplatin (CDDP), was explored both in vitro using MTT assays and in vivo using Nu/Nu mice. Occurrence of apoptosis was assessed using PARP and DNA fragmentation assays, while the mode of action were elucidated through global expression profiling followed by Western blotting and IHC assays. We found that ACA alone inhibited the growth of oral SCC cells, induced apoptosis and suppressed its migration rate, while minimally affecting HMEC normal cells. ACA further enhanced the cytotoxic effects of CDDP in a synergistic manner as suggested by combination index studies. We also found that ACA inhibited the constitutive activation of NF-κB through suppression of IKKα/β activation. Human oral tumor xenografts studies in mice revealed that ACA alone was as effective as CDDP in reducing tumor volume, and further potentiated CDDP effects when used in combination with minimal body weight loss. The effects of ACA also correlated with a down-regulation of NF-κB regulated gene (FasL and Bim), including proinflammatory (NF-κB and COX-2) and proliferative (cyclin D1) biomarkers in tumor tissue. Overall, our results suggest that ACA inhibits the growth of oral SCC and further potentiates the effect of standard CDDP treatment by modulation of proinflammatory microenvironment. The current preclinical data could form the basis for further clinical trials to improve the current standards for oral cancer care using this active component from the Malaysian ginger.

  13. Treatment of human colon cancer xenografts with TRA-8 anti-death receptor 5 antibody alone or in combination with CPT-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Patsy G; LoBuglio, Albert F; Zinn, Kurt R; Kim, Hyunki; Nan, Li; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Wenquan; Buchsbaum, Donald J

    2008-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo efficacy of TRA-8, a mouse monoclonal antibody that binds to the DR5 death receptor for tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (also called Apo2L), alone and in combination with CPT-11, against human colon cancer cells and xenografts. DR5 expression was assessed on human colon cancer cell lines using flow cytometry, and cellular cytotoxicity after TRA-8 treatment, alone and in combination with SN-38, was determined by measuring cellular ATP levels. Tumor growth inhibition and regression rates of well-established subcutaneous COLO 205, SW948, HCT116, and HT-29 colon cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice treated with TRA-8 or CPT-11 alone and in combination were determined. (99m)Tc-TRA-8 was used to examine tumor localization of TRA-8 in animals bearing each of the four xenografts. In addition, whole-body biodistribution and imaging was carried out in COLO 205-bearing animals using in vivo single-photon emission computed tomography imaging and tissue counting. DR5 expression was highest on HCT116, intermediate on SW948 and COLO 205 cells, and lowest on HT-29 cells. COLO 205 cells were the most sensitive to TRA-8-induced cytotoxicity in vitro, SW948 and HCT116 cell lines were moderately sensitive, and HT-29 cells were resistant. Combination treatment with TRA-8 and SN-38 produced additive to synergistic cytotoxicity against all cell lines compared with either single agent. The levels of apoptosis in all cell lines, including HT-29, were increased by combination treatment with SN-38. In vivo, combination therapy with TRA-8 and CPT-11 was superior to either single-agent regimen for three of the xenografts: COLO 205, SW948, and HCT116. COLO 205 tumors were most responsive to therapy with 73% complete regressions after combination therapy. HT-29 cells derived no antitumor efficacy from TRA-8 therapy. Tumor xenografts established from the four colon cancer cell lines had comparable

  14. Intratumoral chemotherapy with a sustained-release drug delivery system inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P; Stock, E; Orenberg, E K; Yu, N Y; Kanekal, S; Brown, D M

    1995-12-01

    This study provides the first evidence that treatment of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma is markedly improved by the intratumoral administration of chemotherapeutic agents in a novel drug delivery system. The effect of chemotherapeutic agents delivered in a sustained-release, protein-based, injectable gel was evaluated on the growth of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line, BxPC-3. In vitro chemosensitivity of BxPC-3 cells exposed for 24 or 72 h to fluorouracil (0.01-5 mM), cisplatin or doxorubicin (0.1-50 microM) and floxuridine, vinblastine, mitomycin or paclitaxel (1.0-100 microM) was compared with that of untreated cells. In vitro chemosensitivity was also studied with fluorouracil and mitomycin in the poorly differentiated PANC-1, human pancreatic cancer cell line. Survival was determined after 7-10 days. All drugs decreased cell growth in a dose-dependent fashion. The efficacy of fluorouracil, cisplatin and doxorubicin increased with prolonged exposure, rendering these drugs most appropriate for a sustained-release preparation. For in vivo studies, athymic nude mice bearing BxPC-3 xenografts were treated either with fluorouracil, cisplatin or doxorubicin in the therapeutic injectable gel containing epinephrine or with vehicle alone administered intratumorally on days 1 and 4. After 28 days, the mice were sacrificed and tumors dissected and weighed. Tumors in mice treated with the injectable gel decreased in size by 72-79% compared with tumors in untreated controls and tumors treated with vehicle alone. Intratumoral injection of drug solution and intraperitoneal injection of drug in the injectable gel did not change tumor size compared with controls. In a drug-retention study, mice were injected intratumorally with [3H]fluorouracil either in the injectable gel or in solution. Sustained radioactivity was observed in tumors injected with the gel, and, conversely, greater radioactivity was detected in the liver and kidneys in mice receiving the radiolabeled

  15. The Beta Subunit of Hemoglobin (HBB2/HBB) Suppresses Neuroblastoma Growth and Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maman, Shelly; Sagi-Assif, Orit; Yuan, Weirong; Ginat, Ravit; Meshel, Tsipi; Zubrilov, Inna; Keisari, Yona; Lu, Weiyue; Lu, Wuyuan; Witz, Isaac P

    2017-01-01

    Soluble pulmonary factors have been reported to be capable of inhibiting the viability of cancer cells that metastasize to the lung, but the molecular identity was obscure. Here we report the isolation and characterization of the beta subunit of hemoglobin as a lung-derived antimetastatic factor. Peptide mapping in the beta subunit of human hemoglobin (HBB) defined a short C-terminal region (termed Metox) as responsible for activity. In tissue culture, both HBB and murine HBB2 mediated growth arrest and apoptosis of lung-metastasizing neuroblastoma cells, along with a variety of other human cancer cell lines. Metox acted similarly and its administration in human tumor xenograft models limited the development of adrenal neuroblastoma tumors as well as spontaneous lung and bone marrow metastases. Expression studies in mice indicated that HBB2 is produced by alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells and is upregulated in mice bearing undetectable metastasis. Our work suggested a novel function for HBB as a theranostic molecule: an innate antimetastasis factor with potential utility as an anticancer drug and a biomarker signaling the presence of clinically undetectable metastasis. Cancer Res; 77(1); 14-26. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. MicroRNA-627 mediates the epigenetic mechanisms of vitamin D to suppress proliferation of human colorectal cancer cells and growth of xenograft tumors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padi, Sathish K R; Zhang, Qunshu; Rustum, Youcef M; Morrison, Carl; Guo, Bin

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D protects against colorectal cancer through unclear mechanisms. We investigated the effects of calcitriol (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3; the active form of vitamin D) on levels of different microRNAs (miRNAs) in colorectal cancer cells from humans and xenograft tumors in mice. Expression of miRNAs in colorectal cancer cell lines was examined using the Ambion mirVana miRNA Bioarray. The effects of calcitriol on expression of miR-627 and cell proliferation were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction and WST-1 assay, respectively; growth of colorectal xenograft tumors was examined in nude mice. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to analyze levels of miR-627 in human colon adenocarcinoma samples and nontumor colon mucosa tissues (controls). In HT-29 cells, miR-627 was the only miRNA significantly up-regulated by calcitriol. Jumonji domain containing 1A (JMJD1A), which encodes a histone demethylase, was found to be a target of miR-627. By down-regulating JMJD1A, miR-627 increased methylation of histone H3K9 and suppressed expression of proliferative factors, such as growth and differentiation factor 15. Calcitriol induced expression of miR-627, which down-regulated JMJD1A and suppressed growth of xenograft tumors from HCT-116 cells in nude mice. Overexpression of miR-627 prevented proliferation of colorectal cancer cell lines in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Conversely, blocking the activity of miR-627 inhibited the tumor suppressive effects of calcitriol in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in mice. Levels of miR-627 were decreased in human colon adenocarcinoma samples compared with controls. miR-627 mediates tumor-suppressive epigenetic activities of vitamin D on colorectal cancer cells and xenograft tumors in mice. The messenger RNA that encodes the histone demethylase JMJD1A is a direct target of miR-627. Reagents designed to target JMJD1A or its messenger RNA, or increase the function of miR-627, might have the same

  17. Imaging of dihydrofolate reductase fusion gene expression in xenografts of human liver metastases of colorectal cancer in living rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata [Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School/UMDNJ, 195 Little Albany Street, NJ 08903, New Brunswick (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald; Tjuvajev, Juri Gelovani [Department of Neurooncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gusani, Niraj J.; Fong, Yuman [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Gade, Terence; Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Balatoni, Julius; Finn, Ronald [Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Akhurst, Tim; Larson, Steven [Nuclear Medicine Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Radionuclide imaging has been demonstrated to be feasible to monitor transgene expression in vivo. We hypothesized that a potential application of this technique is to non-invasively detect in deep tissue, such as cancer cells metastatic to the liver, a specific molecular response following systemic drug treatment. Utilizing human colon adenocarcinoma cells derived from a patient's liver lesion we first developed a nude rat xenograft model for colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver. Expression of a dihydrofolate reductase-herpes simplex virus 1 thymidine kinase fusion (DHFR-HSV1 TK) transgene in the hepatic tumors was monitored in individual animals using the tracer [{sup 124}I]2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodouracil-{beta}-d-arabinofuranoside (FIAU) and a small animal micro positron emission tomograph (microPET), while groups of rats were imaged using the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a clinical gamma camera. Growth of the human metastatic colorectal cancer cells in the rat liver was detected using magnetic resonance imaging and confirmed by surgical inspection. Single as well as multiple lesions of different sizes and sites were observed in the liver of the animals. Next, using a subset of rats bearing hepatic tumors, which were retrovirally bulk transduced to express the DHFR-HSV1 TK transgene, we imaged the fusion protein expression in the hepatic tumor of living rats using the tracer [{sup 124}I]FIAU and a microPET. The observed deep tissue signals were highly specific for the tumors expressing the DHFR-HSV1 TK fusion protein compared with parental untransduced tumors and other tissues as determined by gamma counting of tissue samples. A subsequent study used the tracer [{sup 131}I]FIAU and a gamma camera to monitor two groups of transduced hepatic tumor-bearing rats. Prior to imaging, one group was treated with trimetrexate to exploit DHFR-mediated upregulation of the fusion gene product. Imaging in the living animal as well as subsequent gamma

  18. Molecular events during tumor progression in neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Lenardo, M.

    1990-01-01

    The N-myc oncogene was first identified as an amplified DNA element with homology to c-myc in human neuroblastoma. Since this initial observation, amplification of N-myc has also been observed in other types of human cancer, predominantly in retinoblastoma and small cell lung cancer. The

  19. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neuroblastoma. We present preclinical research and clinical trials on several promising candidates such as IL-12, dendritic cell vaccines, anti-GD2 antibodies, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. An optimal treatment plan for neuroblastoma will most likely involve multimodal approaches and combinations of immune therapies. PMID:19342881

  1. Evaluation of the neurotoxic/neuroprotective role of organoselenides using differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line challenged with 6-hydroxydopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Fernanda Martins; Londero, Giovana Ferreira; de Medeiros, Liana Marengo; da Motta, Leonardo Lisbôa; Behr, Guilherme Antônio; de Oliveira, Valeska Aguiar; Ibrahim, Mohammad; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Porciúncula, Lisiane de Oliveira; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Klamt, Fábio

    2012-08-01

    It is well established that oxidative stress plays a major role in several neurodegenerative conditions, like Parkinson disease (PD). Hence, there is an enormous effort for the development of new antioxidants compounds with therapeutic potential for the management of PD, such as synthetic organoselenides molecules. In this study, we selected between nine different synthetic organoselenides the most eligible ones for further neuroprotection assays, using the differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as in vitro model. Neuronal differentiation of exponentially growing human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells was triggered by cultivating cells with DMEM/F12 medium with 1% of fetal bovine serum (FBS) with the combination of 10 μM retinoic acid for 7 days. Differentiated cells were further incubated with different concentrations of nine organoselenides (0.1, 0.3, 3, 10, and 30 μM) for 24 h and cell viability, neurites densities and the immunocontent of neuronal markers were evaluated. Peroxyl radical scavenging potential of each compound was determined with TRAP assay. Three organoselenides tested presented low cytotoxicity and high antioxidant properties. Pre-treatment of cells with those compounds for 24 h lead to a significantly neuroprotection against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) toxicity, which were directly related to their antioxidant properties. Neuroprotective activity of all three organoselenides was compared to diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)₂, the simplest of the diaryl diselenides tested. Our results demonstrate that differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells are suitable cellular model to evaluate neuroprotective/neurotoxic role of compounds, and support further evaluation of selected organoselenium molecules as potential pharmacological and therapeutic drugs in the treatment of PD.

  2. AMG 900, a potent inhibitor of aurora kinases causes pharmacodynamic changes in p-Histone H3 immunoreactivity in human tumor xenografts and proliferating mouse tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Gloria; Bush, Tammy L; Ma, Connie; Manoukian, Raffi; Chung, Grace; Hawkins, Jennifer M; Zoog, Stephen; Kendall, Richard; Radinsky, Robert; Loberg, Robert; Friberg, Greg; Payton, Marc

    2014-11-04

    The Aurora family of serine-threonine kinases are essential regulators of cell division in mammalian cells. Aurora-A and -B expression and kinase activity is elevated in a variety of human cancers and is associated with high proliferation rates and poor prognosis. AMG 900 is a highly potent and selective pan-aurora kinase inhibitor that has entered clinical evaluation in adult patients with advanced cancers. In mice, oral administration of AMG 900 blocks the phosphorylation of histone H3 on serine-10 (p-Histone H3), a proximal substrate of aurora-B and inhibits the growth of multiple human tumor xenografts, including multidrug-resistant models. In order to establish a preclinical pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) relationship for AMG 900 that could be translated to the clinic, we used flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry detection platforms to assess the effects on p-Histone H3 inhibition in terms of sensitivity, precision, and specificity, in human tumor xenografts in conjunction with mouse skin and bone marrow tissues. Mice with established COLO 205 tumors were administered AMG 900 at 3.75, 7.5, and 15 mg/kg and assessed after 3 hours. Significant suppression of p-Histone H3 in mouse skin was only observed at 15 mg/kg (p Histone H3 in tumors and surrogate tissues (although tissues such as skin may be less sensitive for assessing PD effects). To further extend our work, we evaluated the feasibility of measuring p-Histone H3 using fine-needle aspirate (FNA) tumor xenograft biopsies. Treatment with AMG 900 significantly inhibited p-Histone H3 (>99% inhibition, p Histone H3 positive cells using mock FNAs from primary human breast tumor tissues. Phosphorylation of histone H3 is a useful biomarker to determine the pharmacodynamics (PD) activity of AMG 900. FNA biopsies may be a viable approach for assessing AMG 900 PD effects in the clinic.

  3. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neu...

  4. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  5. [Expression of Jagged1 mRNA in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and effect of RNA interference of Jagged1 on growth of xenograft in nude mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G Y; Gao, Z H; Li, L; Song, T T; Sheng, X G

    2016-06-25

    To investigate the expression of Jagged1 in human epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and the effect of Jagged1 on growth of xenograft in nude mice. (1) Forty-eight cases of ovarian cancer and 30 cases of patients with benign epithelial ovarian tumor in the Henan Province Xinxiang Central Hospital during Feb. 2011 to Mar. 2014 were enrolled in this study. The mRNA expression of Jagged1, Notch1 and the downstream target genes Hes1, Hey1 were analyzed by using realtime PCR method. (2) The ovarian cancer xenograft models in nude mice were constructed by injecting SKOV3 cells in axillary subcutaneouswere. The nude mice were randomly divided into Jagged1 interference group, blank plasmid group and control group. Each group had 10 mice. They were transfected with pcDNA3.1(+)-siRNA-Jagged1, blank plasmid pDC3.1 and phosphate buffer, respectively. The tumor volumes and tumor masses were measured 14 days after transfection and the inhibition rate was calculated. The relative mRNA expression of Jagged1, Notch1, Hes1 and Hey1 in xenograft tissues after transfection in each group was detected by using realtime PCR technique and the relative protein expression of Jagged1, Notch1, Hes1 and Hey1 in xenograft tissues was detected by utilizing western blot method. (1) The relative mRNA expression of Jagged1, Notch1, Hes1 and Hey1 in ovarian cancer tissues were higher than benign ovarian tumor tissues, the differences were statistically significant (Pinterference group, which were significantly lower than that in the blank plasmid group [(842±88) mm(3) and (4.4±0.8) g, respectively] and that in the control group [(851±90) mm(3) and (4.5±0.9) g, respectively; Pinterference group, which was significantly higher than that in the blank plasmid group and that in the control group (2.2% and 0, respectively), the differences were statistically significant (Pinterference group were lower than that in the other two groups, the differences were statistically significant (P0.05). Jagged1

  6. Gamma Knife Surgery as Monotherapy with Clinically Relevant Doses Prolongs Survival in a Human GBM Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Sandvei Skeie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Object. Gamma knife surgery (GKS may be used for recurring glioblastomas (GBMs. However, patients have then usually undergone multimodal treatment, which makes it difficult to specifically validate GKS independent of established treatments. Thus, we developed an experimental brain tumor model to assess the efficacy and radiotoxicity associated with GKS. Methods. GBM xenografts were implanted intracerebrally in nude rats, and engraftment was confirmed with MRI. The rats were allocated to GKS, with margin doses of 12 Gy or 18 Gy, or to no treatment. Survival time was recorded, tumor sections were examined, and radiotoxicity was evaluated in a behavioral open field test. Results. In the first series, survival from the time of implantation was 96 days in treated rats and 72 days in controls (P<0.001. In a second experiment, survival was 72 days in the treatment group versus 54 days in controls (P<0.006. Polynuclear macrophages and fibrosis was seen in groups subjected to GKS. Untreated rats with GBM xenografts displayed less mobility than GKS-treated animals in the open field test 4 weeks after treatment (P=0.04. Conclusion. GKS administered with clinically relevant doses prolongs survival in rats harboring GBM xenografts, and the associated toxicity is mild.

  7. Glycolysis-related gene induction and ATP reduction during fractionated irradiation. Markers for radiation responsiveness of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, K.; Meyer, S.S.; Mueller-Klieser, W. [University Medical Center Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Yaromina, A. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Zips, D. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Baumann, M. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; University Hospital Dresden Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: Lactate was previously shown to be a prognostic but not a predictive pre-therapeutic marker for radiation response of tumor xenografts. We hypothesize that metabolic changes during fractionated irradiation may restrict the predictiveness of lactate regarding tumor radiosensitivity. Materials and methods: Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice by implanting 4 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines with different sensitivities to fractionated irradiation. Tumors were irradiated with up to 15 fractions of 2 Gy over a period of 3 weeks, and ATP and lactate levels were measured in vital tumor areas with induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging. Corresponding changes in mRNA expression of glycolysis-related genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Lactate content decreased significantly in 3 out of 4 cell lines in the course of irradiation showing no correlation with cell line-specific radiosensitivity. Radiation-induced changes in ATP levels and glycolysis-related mRNA expression, however, only occurred in radiosensitive or intermediately radioresistant xenografts, whereas these parameters remained unchanged in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: Sensitivity-related differences in the transcriptional response of tumors to radiotherapy may be exploited in the clinic for better individualization of tumor treatment. (orig.)

  8. Human fused NKG2D-IL-15 protein controls xenografted human gastric cancer through the recruitment and activation of NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Chen, Bei; Yang, Ti; Xiao, Weiming; Qian, Li; Ding, Yanbing; Ji, Mingchun; Ge, Xiaoqun; Gong, Weijuan

    2017-03-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 plays an important role in natural killer (NK) and CD8+ T-cell proliferation and function and is more effective than IL-2 for tumor immunotherapy. The trans-presentation of IL-15 by neighboring cells is more effective for NK cell activation than its soluble IL-15. In this study, the fusion protein dsNKG2D-IL-15, which consisted of two identical extracellular domains of human NKG2D coupled to human IL-15 via a linker, was engineered in Escherichia coli. DsNKG2D-IL-15 could efficiently bind to major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A (MICA) of human tumor cells with the two NKG2D domains and trans-present IL-15 to NK or CD8+ T cells. We transplanted human gastric cancer (SGC-7901) cells into nude mice and mouse melanoma cells with ectopic expression of MICA (B16BL6-MICA) into C57BL/6 mice. Then, we studied the anti-tumor effects mediated by dsNKG2D-IL-15 in the two xenografted tumor models. Human dsNKG2D-IL-15 exhibited higher efficiency than IL-15 in suppressing gastric cancer growth. Exogenous human dsNKG2D-IL-15 was centrally distributed in the mouse tumor tissues based on in vivo live imaging. The frequencies of human CD56+ cells infiltrated into the tumor tissues following the injection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells into nude mice bearing human gastric cancer were significantly increased by human dsNKG2D-IL-15 treatment. Human dsNKG2D-IL-15 also delayed the growth of transplanted melanoma (B16BL6-MICA) by activating and recruiting mouse NK and CD8+ T cells. The anti-melanoma effect of human dsNKG2D-IL-15 in C57BL/6 mice was mostly decreased by the in vivo depletion of mouse NK cells. These data highlight the potential use of human dsNKG2D-IL-15 for tumor therapy.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 14 September 2015; doi:10.1038/cmi.2015.81.

  9. MMSET is highly expressed and associated with aggressiveness in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudlebusch, Heidi Rye; Skotte, Julie; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Zimling, Zarah Glad; Lees, Michael James; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Rota, Rossella; De Ioris, Maria Antonietta; Quarto, Micaela; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Jørgensen, Mette; Rechnitzer, Catherine; Maroun, Lisa Leth; Schrøder, Henrik; Petersen, Bodil Laub; Helin, Kristian

    2011-06-15

    MMSET (WHSC1/NSD2) is a SET domain-containing histone lysine methyltransferase the expression of which is deregulated in a subgroup of multiple myelomas with the t(4;14)(p16;q32) translocation associated with poor prognosis. Recent studies have shown that MMSET mRNA levels are increased in other tumor types as well. We have carried out immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays and found that MMSET protein is frequently and highly expressed in neuroblastoma (MMSET positive in 75% of neuroblastomas, n = 164). The expression level of MMSET in neuroblastomas was significantly associated with poor survival, negative prognostic factors, and metastatic disease. Moreover, a subset of neuroblastomas for which pre- and postchemotherapy biopsies were available displayed a strong decrease in MMSET protein levels after chemotherapy. In agreement with neuroblastomas becoming more differentiated after treatment, we show that retinoic acid-induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells in vitro also leads to a strong decrease in MMSET levels. Furthermore, we show that the high levels of MMSET in normal neural progenitor cells are strongly downregulated during differentiation. Importantly, we show that MMSET is required for proliferation of neuroblastoma cells and brain-derived neural stem cells. Taken together, our results suggest that MMSET is implicated in neuroblastomagenesis possibly by supporting proliferation of progenitor cells and negatively regulating their differentiation. In this respect, MMSET might be a strong candidate therapeutic target in a subset of neuroblastomas with unfavorable prognosis.

  10. Noninvasive Imaging of Human Immune Responses in a Human Xenograft Model of Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Elssen, Catharina H M J; Rashidian, Mohammad; Vrbanac, Vladimir; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Habre, Zeina El; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian; Jacobsen, Johanne T; Cragnolini, Juanjo; Ingram, Jessica; Plaisier, Loes; Spierings, Eric; Tager, Andrew M; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2017-06-01

    The immune system plays a crucial role in many diseases. Activation or suppression of immunity is often related to clinical outcome. Methods to explore the dynamics of immune responses are important to elucidate their role in conditions characterized by inflammation, such as infectious disease, cancer, or autoimmunity. Immuno-PET is a noninvasive method by which disease and immune cell infiltration can be explored simultaneously. Using radiolabeled antibodies or fragments derived from them, it is possible to image disease-specific antigens and immune cell subsets. Methods: We developed a method to noninvasively image human immune responses in a relevant humanized mouse model. We generated a camelid-derived single-domain antibody specific for human class II major histocompatibility complex products and used it to noninvasively image human immune cell reconstitution in nonobese diabetic severe combined immune deficiency γ-/- mice reconstituted with human fetal thymus, liver, and liver-derived hematopoietic stem cells (BLT mice). Results: We showed imaging of infiltrating immunocytes in BLT mice that spontaneously developed a graft-versus-host-like condition, characterized by alopecia and blepharitis. In diseased animals, we showed an increased PET signal in the liver, attributable to infiltration of activated class II major histocompatibility complex+ T cells. Conclusion: Noninvasive imaging of immune infiltration and activation could thus be of importance for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment of graft-versus-host disease and holds promise for other diseases characterized by inflammation. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  11. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  12. Combined 5-FU and ChoKα inhibitors as a new alternative therapy of colorectal cancer: evidence in human tumor-derived cell lines and mouse xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de la Cueva

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third major cause of cancer related deaths in the world. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU is widely used for the treatment of colorectal cancer but as a single-agent renders low response rates. Choline kinase alpha (ChoKα, an enzyme that plays a role in cell proliferation and transformation, has been reported overexpressed in many different tumors, including colorectal tumors. ChoKα inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials as a novel antitumor strategy.ChoKα specific inhibitors, MN58b and TCD-717, have demonstrated a potent antitumoral activity both in vitro and in vivo against several tumor-derived cell line xenografts including CRC-derived cell lines. The effect of ChoKα inhibitors in combination with 5-FU as a new alternative for the treatment of colon tumors has been investigated both in vitro in CRC-tumour derived cell lines, and in vivo in mouse xenografts models. The effects on thymidilate synthase (TS and thymidine kinase (TK1 levels, two enzymes known to play an essential role in the mechanism of action of 5-FU, were analyzed by western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis. The combination of 5-FU with ChoKα inhibitors resulted in a synergistic effect in vitro in three different human colon cancer cell lines, and in vivo against human colon xenografts in nude mice. ChoKα inhibitors modulate the expression levels of TS and TK1 through inhibition of E2F production, providing a rational for its mechanism of action.Our data suggest that both drugs in combination display a synergistic antitumoral effect due to ChoKα inhibitors-driven modulation of the metabolization of 5-FU. The clinical relevance of these findings is strongly supported since TCD-717 has recently entered Phase I clinical trials against solid tumors.

  13. Establishing human leukemia xenograft mouse models by implanting human bone marrow-like scaffold-based niches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonelli, Antonella; Noort, Willy A.; Jaques, Jenny; de Boer, Bauke; de Jong-Korlaar, Regina; Brouwers-Vos, Annet Z.; Lubbers-Aalders, Linda; van Velzen, Jeroen F.; Bloem, Andries C.; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost D.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Martens, Anton C. M.; Vellenga, Edo; Groen, Richard W. J.; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    To begin to understand the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal, differentiation, and transformation of human hematopoietic stem cells or to evaluate the efficacy of novel treatment modalities, stem cells need to be studied in their own species-specific microenvironment. By implanting ceramic

  14. 13-Cis retinoic acid can enhance the antitumor activity of non-replicating Sendai virus particle against neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Motonari; Shimbo, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yasuhide; Fukuzawa, Masahiro; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2013-02-01

    Hemagglutinating virus of Japan-envelope (HVJ-E) is a drug delivery vector based on inactivated Sendai virus. Recently, antitumor activities were found for HVJ-E itself and clinical trials of HVJ-E for some malignant tumors are now ongoing. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of HVJ-E against neuroblastoma, which is one of the most common malignant solid tumors in childhood. The sensitivity of human neuroblastoma cell lines to HVJ-E correlated with the expression level of gangliosides, Sialylparagloboside (SPG) and GD1a, receptors for HVJ. Among the cell lines, SK-N-SH was the most sensitive to HVJ-E in vitro and total SPG and GD1a expression was the highest. Complete eradication of subcutaneous tumors derived from SK-N-SH cells was achieved by intratumoral injection of HVJ-E in SCID mice and no recurrence was observed for more than 300 days after HVJ-E inoculation. In contrast, NB1 cells expressed the lowest amount of GD1a and SPG and were resistant to HVJ-E in vitro. The expression of GD1a increased by 13-cis retinoic acid (13cRA), which is a therapeutic drug for high risk neuroblastoma, thus leading to an improved sensitivity to HVJ-E in vitro. Only growth inhibition of the subcutaneous tumors derived from NB1 cells was achieved by HVJ-E in the SCID mice, but the combination of 13cRA and HVJ-E could achieve partial eradication of the xenograft and also lead to an improved prognosis. In conclusion, HVJ-E is a promising therapeutic modality for neuroblastoma and 13cRA can be used as an adjuvant to HVJ-E. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-1:HER-3) Fc-mediated heterodimer has broad antiproliferative activity in vitro and in human tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarup, Jay; Jin, Pei; Turin, Lisa; Bai, Xiaomei; Beryt, Malgorzata; Brdlik, Cathleen; Higaki, Jeffrey N; Jorgensen, Brett; Lau, Francis W; Lindley, Peter; Liu, Jim; Ni, Irene; Rozzelle, James; Kumari, Rajendra; Watson, Susan A; Zhang, Juan; Shepard, H Michael

    2008-10-01

    All four members of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (HER) family are implicated in human cancers. Although efficacious in a subset of patients, resistance to single-targeted anti-HER therapy [i.e., cetuximab (Erbitux) and trastuzumab (Herceptin)] is often associated with coexpression of other HER family members. This may be overcome by a HER ligand binding molecule that sequesters multiple EGF-like ligands, preventing ligand-dependent receptor activation. Toward this end, we have combined the HER-1/EGFR and HER-3 ligand binding domains, dimerized with fusion of an Fc fragment of human IgG1. This resulted in a mixture of HER-1/Fc homodimer (HFD100), HER-3/Fc homodimer (HFD300), and HER-1/Fc:HER-3/Fc heterodimer (RB200), also termed Hermodulins. The purified first-generation RB200 bound EGF and neuregulin 1 (NRG1)-beta1 ligands, determined by cross-linking and direct binding studies. The binding affinity for both was approximately 10 nmol/L by dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay using europium (Eu)-labeled ligands. Competition studies with RB200 using Eu-EGF or Eu-NRG1-beta1 revealed that RB200 bound HER-1 ligands, including transforming growth factor-alpha and heparin-binding EGF, and HER-3 ligands NRG1-alpha and NRG1-beta3. RB200 inhibited EGF- and NRG1-beta1-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of HER family proteins, proliferation of a diverse range of tumor cells in monolayer cell growth assays, tumor cell proliferation as a single agent and in synergy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, lysophosphatidic acid-stimulated cell proliferation, and tumor growth in two human tumor xenograft nude mouse models. Taken together, the data reveal that RB200 has the potential to sequester multiple HER ligands and interfere with signaling by HER-1, HER-2, and HER-3.

  16. Inhibition of Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth by Ketogenic Diet and/or Calorie Restriction in a CD1-Nu Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael Johannes Morscher; Sepideh Aminzadeh-Gohari; René Gunther Feichtinger; Johannes Adalbert Mayr; Roland Lang; Daniel Neureiter; Wolfgang Sperl; Barbara Kofler

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neuroblastoma is a malignant pediatric cancer derived from neural crest cells. It is characterized by a generalized reduction of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of calorie restriction and ketogenic diet on neuroblastoma tumor growth and monitor potential adaptive mechanisms of the cancer?s oxidative phosphorylation system. Methods Xenografts were established in CD-1 nude mice by subcutaneous injection of two ne...

  17. Anaplastic large cell neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowsky, Carlos R; Katzenstein, Howard M; Alvarado, Carlos S; Shehata, Bahig M

    2009-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell neuroblastomas (ALCNB) are a subset of undifferentiated neuroblastomas with marked pleomorphic and anaplastic features that render them diagnostically challenging. We reviewed the records of all patients diagnosed with ALCNB at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta (Egleston Children's Hospital) for their clinical, biologic, and pathologic characteristics and their treatment outcomes. From 1998 to 2006, 7 patients were diagnosed with ALCNB. All patients presented with abdominal-pelvic masses, 3 of them of adrenal origin and 2 with thoracic extension, with clinical stages 3 or 4, and were considered to have high-risk disease. The N-MYC oncogene was amplified in 3 cases and catecholamines were elevated in 5 of 6 patients tested. All pretreatment tumors demonstrate pleomorphic, anaplastic morphology with bizarre mitoses admixed with undifferentiated but monomorphic cells with minimal if any neuropil or neuro-ganglionic differentiation. Immunohistochemical markers for neuron specific enolase (NSE) and synaptophysin were strongly positive in all specimens and chromogranin in 4 of 5. Interestingly, all tumors showed strong Fli-1 nuclear positivity despite a negative CD-99 stain. However, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction or fluorescent in-situ hybridization testing for Ewing sarcoma transcripts was negative in 4 available specimens. This same Fli-1 antibody had tested negative on 30 conventional neuroblastomas, indicating a peculiar cross reactivity with this subset of ALCNB. Posttreatment biopsies showed maturation changes to more conventional neuroblastoma histology in 5 of the 7 cases. Follow-up ranged from 9 months to 4 years from diagnosis (median: 25 months). Five patients are still alive after treatment, 1 died 9 months after diagnosis, and another patient refused high-risk therapy and progressed and died 9 months from diagnosis. Anaplastic large cell neuroblastomas are a subset of undifferentiated neuroblastomas characterized by the

  18. Angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico; Marimpietri, Danilo; Pastorino, Fabio; Brignole, Chiara; Nico, Beatrice; Vacca, Angelo; Ponzoni, Mirco

    2004-12-01

    Angiogenesis is a biological process by which new capillaries are formed from preexisting vessels. It occurs in physiological and pathological conditions, such as tumors, where a specific turning point is the transition from the avascular to the vascular phase. Tumor angiogenesis depends mainly on the release by neoplastic cells of growth factors specific for endothelial cells able to stimulate the growth of the host's blood vessels. In neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of infancy and childhood, angiogenesis also appears to play an important role in determining tumor phenotype. The nature of the angiogenic balance in neuroblastoma is complex, and a spectrum of angiogenesis stimulators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and inhibitors, such as tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been detected in neuroblastoma tumors. Moreover, an increased production of MMP-2 and -9 has been also observed in advanced stages of tumor, favoring degradation of extracellular matrix and enhancing tumor dissemination. High tumor vascularity is correlated with widely disseminated disease, MYCN amplification, unfavorable histology, and poor outcome. In contrast, low tumor vascularity is associated with prognostically favorable features, such as a localized disease and favorable histology. It is becoming increasingly evident that agents that interfere with blood vessel formation also block tumor progression. Preclinical studies suggest that antiangiogenic strategies may be effective in the treatment of neuroblastoma. A major goal is the determination of whether inhibition of angiogenesis is a realistic way of inhibiting tumor cell dissemination and formation of metastasis in neuroblastoma.

  19. Activity of the Vascular-Disrupting Agent 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-Acetic Acid against Human Head and Neck Carcinoma Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund Seshadri

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC constitute a majority of the tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract and continue to present a significant therapeutic challenge. To explore the potential of vascular-targeted therapy in HNSCC, we investigated the antivascular, antitumor activity of the potent vascular-disrupting agent (VDA 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA against two HNSCC xenografts with markedly different morphologic and vascular characteristics. Athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous FaDu (human pharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma and A253 (human submaxillary gland epidermoid carcinoma tumors were administered a single dose of DMXAA (30 mg/kg, i.p. Changes in vascular function were evaluated 24 hours after treatment using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and immunohistochemistry (CD31. Signal enhancement (E and change in longitudinal relaxation rates (ΔR1 were calculated to measure alterations in vascular perfusion. MRI showed a 78% and 49% reduction in vascular perfusion in FaDu and A253 xenografts, respectively. CD31-immunostaining of tumor sections revealed three-fold (FaDu and two-fold (A253 reductions in microvessel density (MVD 24 hours after treatment. DMXAA was equally effective against both xenograffs, with significant tumor growth inhibition observed 30 days after treatment. These results indicate that DMXAA may be beneficial in the management of HNSCC, alone or in combination with other treatments.

  20. Neuroprotective Effect of Arctigenin via Upregulation of P-CREB in Mouse Primary Neurons and Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wen, Qingping; Ren, Lu; Liang, Wenbo; Xia, Yang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Dong; Hu, Yv; Hao, Haiguang; Yan, Yaping; Zhang, Guangxian; Yang, Jingxian; Kang, Tingguo

    2013-01-01

    Arctigenin (Arc) has been shown to act on scopolamine-induced memory deficit mice and to provide a neuroprotective effect on cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurodegeneration through mechanisms not completely defined. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Arc on H89-induced cell damage and its potential mechanisms in mouse cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We found that Arc prevented cell viability loss induced by H89 in human SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Arc reduced intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ) production induced by H89 in neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells, and Arc also inhibited the presenilin 1(PS1) protein level in neurons. In addition, neural apoptosis in both types of cells, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in human SH-SY5Y cells and reduction of synaptic marker synaptophysin (SYN) expression in neurons were also observed after H89 exposure. All these effects induced by H89 were markedly reversed by Arc treatment. Arc also significantly attenuated downregulation of the phosphorylation of CREB (p-CREB) induced by H89, which may contribute to the neuroprotective effects of Arc. These results demonstrated that Arc exerted the ability to protect neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against H89-induced cell injury via upregulation of p-CREB. PMID:24025424

  1. Neuroprotective Effect of Arctigenin via Upregulation of P-CREB in Mouse Primary Neurons and Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingguo Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctigenin (Arc has been shown to act on scopolamine-induced memory deficit mice and to provide a neuroprotective effect on cultured cortical neurons from glutamate-induced neurodegeneration through mechanisms not completely defined. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Arc on H89-induced cell damage and its potential mechanisms in mouse cortical neurons and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We found that Arc prevented cell viability loss induced by H89 in human SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, Arc reduced intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ production induced by H89 in neurons and human SH-SY5Y cells, and Arc also inhibited the presenilin 1(PS1 protein level in neurons. In addition, neural apoptosis in both types of cells, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in human SH-SY5Y cells and reduction of synaptic marker synaptophysin (SYN expression in neurons were also observed after H89 exposure. All these effects induced by H89 were markedly reversed by Arc treatment. Arc also significantly attenuated downregulation of the phosphorylation of CREB (p-CREB induced by H89, which may contribute to the neuroprotective effects of Arc. These results demonstrated that Arc exerted the ability to protect neurons and SH-SY5Y cells against H89-induced cell injury via upregulation of p-CREB.

  2. Optimizing the transduction efficiency of human hematopoietic stem cells using capsid-modified AAV6 vectors in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liujiang; Kauss, M. Ariel; Kopin, Etana; Chandra, Manasa; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Miller, Erin; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.; Rivers, Angela E.; Aslanidi, George V.; Ling, Chen; Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Li, Xiaomiao; Andino, Lourdes M.; Zhong, Li; Tarantal, Alice F.; Yoder, Mervin C.; Wong, Kamehameha K.; Tan, Mengqun; Chatterjee, Saswati; Srivastava, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Background Although recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vectors have gained attention owing to their safety and efficacy in number of Phase I/II clinical trials, their transduction efficiency in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been reported to be low. Only a handful of additional AAV serotype vectors have been evaluated, and comparative analyses of their transduction efficiency in HSCs from different species have not been performed. Methods Here, we evaluated the transduction efficiency of all available AAV serotype vectors (AAV1 through AAV10) in primary mouse, cynomolgus monkey, and human HSCs, respectively. The transduction efficiency of the optimized AAV vectors was also evaluated in human HSCs in a murine xenograft model in vivo. Results We observed that although there are only six amino acid differences between AAV1 and AAV6, AAV1, but not AAV6, transduce mouse HSCs cells well, whereas AAV6, but not AAV1, transduce human HSCs well. None of the 10 serotypes transduce cynomolgus monkey HSCs in vitro. We also evaluated the transduction efficiency of AAV6 vectors containing mutations in surface-exposed tyrosine residues, and observed that tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) point mutations in residues 445, 705, and 731, led to a significant increase in transgene expression in human HSCs in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model in vivo. Discussion These studies suggest that the tyrosine-mutant AAV6 serotype vectors are the most promising vectors for transducing human HSCs, and that it is possible to further increase the transduction efficiency of these vectors for their potential use in HSC-based gene therapy in humans. PMID:23830234

  3. Optimizing the transduction efficiency of capsid-modified AAV6 serotype vectors in primary human hematopoietic stem cells in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Liujiang; Kauss, M Ariel; Kopin, Etana; Chandra, Manasa; Ul-Hasan, Taihra; Miller, Erin; Jayandharan, Giridhara R; Rivers, Angela E; Aslanidi, George V; Ling, Chen; Li, Baozheng; Ma, Wenqin; Li, Xiaomiao; Andino, Lourdes M; Zhong, Li; Tarantal, Alice F; Yoder, Mervin C; Wong, Kamehameha K; Tan, Mengqun; Chatterjee, Saswati; Srivastava, Arun

    2013-08-01

    Although recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vectors have gained attention because of their safety and efficacy in numerous phase I/II clinical trials, their transduction efficiency in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has been reported to be low. Only a few additional AAV serotype vectors have been evaluated, and comparative analyses of their transduction efficiency in HSCs from different species have not been performed. We evaluated the transduction efficiency of all available AAV serotype vectors (AAV1 through AAV10) in primary mouse, cynomolgus monkey and human HSCs. The transduction efficiency of the optimized AAV vectors was also evaluated in human HSCs in a murine xenograft model in vivo. We observed that although there are only six amino acid differences between AAV1 and AAV6, AAV1, but not AAV6, transduced mouse HSCs well, whereas AAV6, but not AAV1, transduced human HSCs well. None of the 10 serotypes transduced cynomolgus monkey HSCs in vitro. We also evaluated the transduction efficiency of AAV6 vectors containing mutations in surface-exposed tyrosine residues. We observed that tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) point mutations in residues 445, 705 and 731 led to a significant increase in transgene expression in human HSCs in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model in vivo. These studies suggest that the tyrosine-mutant AAV6 serotype vectors are the most promising vectors for transducing human HSCs and that it is possible to increase further the transduction efficiency of these vectors for their potential use in HSC-based gene therapy in humans. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. All rights reserved.

  4. [Arsenic trioxide restores ERα expression in ERα-negative human breast cancer cells and its treatment efficacy in combination with tamoxifen in xenografts in nude mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei-jie; Xu, Deng-fei; Fan, Qing-xia; Wu, Xin-ai; Wang, Feng; Wang, Rui; Wang, Liu-xing

    2012-09-01

    To study the demethylation effect of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on ERα-negative human breast cancer MDA-MB-435s cells and its possible mechanisms, and to observe its treatment efficacy in combination with tamoxifen (TAM) after ERα re-expression. MTT assay was used to examine the inhibitory effect of As2O3 treatment alone or in combination with TAM on cell proliferation. A nude mouse xenograft model was used to further examine the treatment efficacy in vivo. MSP was used to detect the methylation status of ERα gene after treated with As2O3 in MDA-MB-435s cells and the transplanted tumor tissues. RT-PCR was used to detect the mRNA expression of DNMT1 and Erα. Western bolt was used to detect the DNMT1 and ERα protein expression. The diameter of xenograft tumors was measured weekly, and the tumor growth curve was drawn. The level of proliferation of the MDA-MB-435s cells was significantly suppressed after treatment with different concentration of As2O3 alone or As2O3 combined with TAM, and the 4 µmol/L As2O3 + TAM treatment for 72 h showed the highest inhibition rate (62.6%). 1, 2, 4 µmol/L As2O3 had demethylation effect on MDA-MB-435s cells, and the DNMT1 mRNA and protein expression was inhibited and accompanied by ERα mRNA and protein re-expression. The unmethylation specific bands of ERα gene were enhanced after treated by As2O3 alone or As2O3 combined with TAM in the xenograft tumors. The expression of DNMT1 mRNA and protein was inhibited, and accompanied by ERα mRNA and protein re-expression. An significant decrease of volume and weight of the xenograft tumors in the As2O3 treated alone or combined with TAM groups was observed compared with those of the normal saline group or TAM alone group (P breast cancer MDA-MB-435s cells after treated with As2O3 by inhibiting the DNMT1 activity. MDA-MB-435s cells are re-sensitized to endocrine therapy after ERα re-expression. As2O3 combined with TAM may provide a new therapeutic approach for patients with ER

  5. Negligible colon cancer risk from food-borne acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats and nude (nu/nu mice-bearing human colon tumor xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayadev Raju

    Full Text Available Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a "complete carcinogen", but acts as a "co-carcinogen" by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters.

  6. Negligible Colon Cancer Risk from Food-Borne Acrylamide Exposure in Male F344 Rats and Nude (nu/nu) Mice-Bearing Human Colon Tumor Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Jayadev; Roberts, Jennifer; Sondagar, Chandni; Kapal, Kamla; Aziz, Syed A.; Caldwell, Don; Mehta, Rekha

    2013-01-01

    Acrylamide, a possible human carcinogen, is formed in certain carbohydrate-rich foods processed at high temperature. We evaluated if dietary acrylamide, at doses (0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg diet) reflecting upper levels found in human foods, modulated colon tumorigenesis in two rodent models. Male F344 rats were randomized to receive diets without (control) or with acrylamide. 2-weeks later, rats in each group received two weekly subcutaneous injections of either azoxymethane (AOM) or saline, and were killed 20 weeks post-injections; colons were assessed for tumors. Male athymic nude (nu/nu) mice bearing HT-29 human colon adenocarcinoma cells-derived tumor xenografts received diets without (control) or with acrylamide; tumor growth was monitored and mice were killed 4 weeks later. In the F344 rat study, no tumors were found in the colons of the saline-injected rats. However, the colon tumor incidence was 54.2% and 66.7% in the control and the 2 mg/kg acrylamide-treated AOM-injected groups, respectively. While tumor multiplicity was similar across all diet groups, tumor size and burden were higher in the 2 mg/kg acrylamide group compared to the AOM control. These results suggest that acrylamide by itself is not a “complete carcinogen”, but acts as a “co-carcinogen” by exacerbating the effects of AOM. The nude mouse study indicated no differences in the growth of human colon tumor xenografts between acrylamide-treated and control mice, suggesting that acrylamide does not aid in the progression of established tumors. Hence, food-borne acrylamide at levels comparable to those found in human foods is neither an independent carcinogen nor a tumor promoter in the colon. However, our results characterize a potential hazard of acrylamide as a colon co-carcinogen in association with known and possibly other environmental tumor initiators/promoters. PMID:24040114

  7. Comparison of two new angiogenesis PET tracers 68Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2 and 64Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)]2; in vivo imaging studies in human xenograft tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxbøl, Jytte; Brandt-Larsen, Malene; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to synthesize and perform a side-by-side comparison of two new tumor-angiogenesis PET tracers (68)Ga-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) and (64)Cu-NODAGA-E[c(RGDyK)](2) in vivo using human xenograft tumors in mice. Human radiation burden was estimated to evaluate potent...

  8. Quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics reveals metabolic differences in attracting and non-attracting human-in-mouse glioma stem cell xenografts and stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norelle C. Wildburger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BM-hMSCs show promise as cell-based delivery vehicles for anti-glioma therapeutics, due to innate tropism for gliomas. However, in clinically relevant human-in-mouse glioma stem cell xenograft models, BM-hMSCs tropism is variable. We compared the proteomic profile of cancer and stromal cells in GSCXs that attract BM-hMSCs (“attractors” with those to do not (“non-attractors” to identify pathways that may modulate BM-hMSC homing, followed by targeted transcriptomics. The results provide the first link between fatty acid metabolism, glucose metabolism, ROS, and N-glycosylation patterns in attractors. Reciprocal expression of these pathways in the stromal cells suggests microenvironmental cross-talk.

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression Modulates Antitumor Efficacy of Vandetanib or Cediranib Combined With Radiotherapy in Human Glioblastoma Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsberger, Phyllis R., E-mail: Phyllis.wachsberger@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Liu Yi; Daroczi, Borbala [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xu Xia [Merck Research Laboratories, North Wales, Pennsylvania (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of radiation therapy (RT) combined with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) vandetanib (antiepidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR] plus antivascular endothelial growth factor receptor [anti-VEGFR]) and cediranib (anti-VEGFR) to inhibit glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) growth. A secondary aim was to investigate how this regimen is modulated by tumor EGFR expression. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic cell survival assay. VEGF secretion was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GBM (U87MG wild-type EGFR [wtEGFR] and U87MG EGFR-null) xenografts were treated with vandetanib, cediranib, and RT, alone or in combinations. Excised tumor sections were stained for proliferative and survival biomarkers. Results: In vitro, U87MG wtEGFR and U87 EGFR-null cells had similar growth kinetics. Neither TKI affected clonogenic cell survival following RT. However, in vivo, exogenous overexpression of wtEGFR decreased tumor doubling time (T2x) in U87MG xenografts (2.70 vs. 4.41 days for U87MG wtEGFR vs. U87MG vector, respectively). In U87MG EGFR-null cells, TKI combined with radiation was no better than radiation therapy alone. In U87MG wtEGFR, RT in combination with vandetanib (but not with cediranib) significantly increased tumor T2x compared with RT alone (T2x, 10.4 days vs. 4.8 days; p < 0.001). In vivo, growth delay correlated with suppression of pAkt, survivin, and Ki67 expression in tumor samples. The presence of EGFR augmented RT-stimulated VEGF release; this effect was inhibited by vandetanib. Conclusions: EGFR expression promoted tumor growth in vivo but not in vitro, suggesting a microenvironmental effect. GBM xenografts expressing EGFR exhibited greater sensitivity to both cediranib and vandetanib than EGFR-null tumors. Hence EGFR status plays a major role in determining a tumor's in vivo response to radiation combined with TKI, supporting a &apos

  10. Fluoxetine Increases the Expression of miR-572 and miR-663a in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundalil Vasu, Mahesh; Anitha, Ayyappan; Takahashi, Taro; Thanseem, Ismail; Iwata, Keiko; Asakawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests neuroprotective effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), on the developed neurons in the adult brain. In contrast, the drug may be deleterious to immature or undifferentiated neural cells, although the mechanism is unclear. Recent investigations have suggested that microRNAs (miRNA) may be critical for effectiveness of psychotropic drugs including SSRI. We investigated whether fluoxetine could modulate expressions of neurologically relevant miRNAs in two neuroblastoma SK-N-SH and SH-SY5Y cell lines. Initial screening results revealed that three (miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) and four (miR-320a, miR-489, miR-572 and miR-663a) miRNAs were up-regulated in SK-N-SH cells and SH-SY5Y cells, respectively, after 24 hours treatment of fluoxetine (1-25 μM). Cell viability was reduced according to the dose of fluoxetine. The upregulation of miR-572 and miR-663a was consistent in both the SH-SY5Y and SK-N-SH cells, confirmed by a larger scale culture condition. Our data is the first in vitro evidence that fluoxetine could increase the expression of miRNAs in undifferentiated neural cells, and that putative target genes of those miRNAs have been shown to be involved in fundamental neurodevelopmental processes.

  11. Protective Effect of Pycnogenol® in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells Following Acrolein Induced Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Mubeen A.; Keller, Jeffrey N.; Scheff, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the hypotheses involved in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Considerable attention has focused on increasing the intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in many neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. Pycnogenol® (PYC) has antioxidant properties and stabilizes intracellular antioxidant defense systems including glutathione (GSH) levels. The present study investigated the protective effects of PYC on acrolein-induced oxidative cell toxicity in cultured SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Decreased cell survival in SH-SY5Y cultures treated with acrolein correlated with oxidative stress, increased NADPH-oxidase activity, free radical production, protein oxidation/nitration (protein carbonyl, 3-nitrotyrosine) and lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal). Pretreatment with PYC significantly attenuated acrolein induced cytotoxicity, protein damages, lipid peroxidation, and cell death. A dose-response study suggested that PYC showed protective effects against acrolein toxicity by modulating oxidative stress and increasing GSH. These findings provide support that PYC may provide a promising approach for the treatment of oxidative stress related neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. PMID:18822368

  12. Effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy-rich phosphates and prediction of estrogen dependence monitored by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of four human breast cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N

    1995-01-01

    The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75-1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet. After......-clamped tumors prepared 14 days after estrogen removal were analyzed for ATP and phosphocreatine content. Our findings suggest a correlation between estrogen withdrawal and the steady-state concentrations of ATP, phosphocreatine, and Pi in human breast cancer xenografts. Discrimination analysis...

  13. Emblica officinalis extract induces autophagy and inhibits human ovarian cancer cell proliferation, angiogenesis, growth of mouse xenograft tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok De

    Full Text Available Patients with ovarian cancer (OC may be treated with surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, although none of these strategies are very effective. Several plant-based natural products/dietary supplements, including extracts from Emblicaofficinalis (Amla, have demonstrated potent anti-neoplastic properties. In this study we determined that Amla extract (AE has anti-proliferative effects on OC cells under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. We also determined the anti-proliferative effects one of the components of AE, quercetin, on OC cells under in vitro conditions. AE did not induce apoptotic cell death, but did significantly increase the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. Quercetin also increased the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. AE also significantly reduced the expression of several angiogenic genes, including hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α in OVCAR3 cells. AE acted synergistically with cisplatin to reduce cell proliferation and increase expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II under in vitro conditions. AE also had anti-proliferative effects and induced the expression of the autophagic proteins beclin1 and LC3B-II in mouse xenograft tumors. Additionally, AE reduced endothelial cell antigen - CD31 positive blood vessels and HIF-1α expression in mouse xenograft tumors. Together, these studies indicate that AE inhibits OC cell growth both in vitro and in vivo possibly via inhibition of angiogenesis and activation of autophagy in OC. Thus AE may prove useful as an alternative or adjunct therapeutic approach in helping to fight OC.

  14. 'Cross-talk' between Schwannian stroma and neuroblasts promotes neuroblastoma tumor differentiation and inhibits angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuqing; Tian, Yufeng; Chlenski, Alexandre; Yang, Qiwei; Salwen, Helen R; Cohn, Susan L

    2005-10-18

    Neuroblastoma (NB) tumors with abundant Schwannian stroma have a differentiated phenotype, low vascularity, and are associated with a favorable prognosis. These observations have led to the hypothesis that 'cross-talk' between Schwann cells and neuroblasts influences the biology and clinical behavior of NB tumors. In support of this hypothesis, laboratory studies have shown that factors secreted by Schwann cells are capable of promoting NB differentiation, inhibiting angiogenesis, and impairing NB growth. Recently, using a novel NB xenograft model that was designed to directly investigate the affects of infiltrating Schwann cells, we demonstrated that infiltrating mouse Schwann cells can directly impact the phenotype of human NB xenografts in vivo. Taken together, these studies indicate that tumor-stroma interactions are critical in determining the biology of NB tumors. Further research investigating the molecules involved in the 'cross-talk' between Schwann cells and neuroblasts may lead to new treatment strategies that will modify tumor biology and alter the clinically aggressive nature of Schwannian stroma-poor NB tumors.

  15. induced apoptosis of neuroblastoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Affiliated Hospital to Changchun Traditional Chinese Medicine University, 4Department of Pediatrics, The First Hospital of Jilin. University, Changchun ... treatment of cancer using a neuroblastoma (NB) cell model. Method: Cell viability assay ... long-term survival rate in the late-stage patients is less than 40 % even with ...

  16. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells and inhibits prostate cancer growth in a xenograft mouse model of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Qiong; Li, Zhuoneng; Yan, Jun; Zhu, Fan; Xu, Ruo-Jun; Cai, Yi-Zhong

    2009-08-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBPs) are important functional constituents in red-colored fruits of L. barbarum (Guo Qi Zi, a well-known traditional Chinese medicinal plant commonly known as Goji berry or wolfberry). The influence of LBP on human prostate cancer cells was systematically investigated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro effects of LBP on two cell lines (PC-3 and DU-145) were examined by using trypan blue exclusion staining, single-cell gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry, terminal dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and immunohistochemical assay (assessment of Bcl-2 and Bax expression). The in vivo effect of LBP on PC-3 cells was assessed in the nude mouse xenograft tumor model. The in vitro results showed that LBP can dose- and time-dependently inhibit the growth of both PC-3 and DU-145 cells. LBP caused the breakage of DNA strands of PC-3 and DU-145 cells; the tail frequency and tail length were significantly higher than that of control cells. LBP also markedly induced PC-3 and DU-145 cell apoptosis, with the highest apoptosis rates at 41.5% and 35.5%, respectively. The ratio of Bcl-2/Bax protein expression following LBP treatments decreased significantly with a dose-effect relationship, which suggested that LBP can regulate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax to induce apoptosis of PC-3 and DU-145 cells. The in vivo experimental results indicate that LBP might significantly inhibit PC-3 tumor growth in nude mice. Both the tumor volume and weight of the LBP treatment group were significantly lower than those of the control group.

  17. Chlorella sorokiniana induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping-Yi; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Chuang, Wan-Ling; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide. Marine microalgae are a source of biologically active compounds and are widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in East Asian countries. It has been reported that Chlorella or Chlorella extracts have various beneficial pharmacological compounds that modulate immune responses; however, no studies have investigated the anti-cancer effects of Chlorella sorokiniana (CS) on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we evaluated the anti-cancer effects of CS in two human NSCLC cell lines (A549 and CL1-5 human lung adenocarcinoma cells), and its effects on tumor growth in a subcutaneous xenograft tumor model. We also investigated the possible molecular mechanisms governing the pharmacological function of CS. Our results showed that exposure of the two cell lines to CS resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in cell viability. In addition, the percentage of apoptotic cells increased in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that CS might induce apoptosis in human NSCLC cells. Western blot analysis revealed that exposure to CS resulted in increased protein expression of the cleaved/activated forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP, except caspase-8. ZDEVD (caspase-3 inhibitor) and Z-LEHD (caspase-9 inhibitor) were sufficient at preventing apoptosis in both A549 and CL1-5 cells, proving that CS induced cell death via the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Exposure of A549 and CL1-5 cells to CS for 24 h resulted in decreased expression of Bcl-2 protein and increased expression of Bax protein as well as decreased expression of two IAP family proteins, survivin and XIAP. We demonstrated that CS induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in NSCLC cells via downregulation of Bcl-2, XIAP and survivin. In addition, we also found that the tumors growth of subcutaneous xenograft in vivo was markedly inhibited after oral intake of CS.

  18. Correlations of 3T DCE-MRI Quantitative Parameters with Microvessel Density in a Human-Colorectal-Cancer Xenograft Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Jun; An, Chan Sik; Koom, Woong Sub; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    To investigate the correlation between quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters and microvascular density (MVD) in a human-colon-cancer xenograft mouse model using 3 Tesla MRI. A human-colon-cancer xenograft model was produced by subcutaneously inoculating 1 X 106 DLD-1 human-colon-cancer cells into the right hind limbs of 10 mice. The tumors were allowed to grow for two weeks and then assessed using MRI. DCE-MRI was performed by tail vein injection of 0.3 mmol/kg of gadolinium. A region of interest (ROI) was drawn at the midpoints along the z-axes of the tumors, and a Tofts model analysis was performed. The quantitative parameters (Ktrans, Kep and Ve) from the whole transverse ROI and the hotspot ROI of the tumor were calculated. Immunohistochemical microvessel staining was performed and analyzed according to Weidner's criteria at the corresponding MRI sections. Additional Hematoxylin and Eosin staining was performed to evaluate tumor necrosis. The Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's rho correlation analysis were performed to prove the existence of a correlation between the quantitative parameters, necrosis, and MVD. Whole transverse ROI of the tumor showed no significant relationship between the MVD values and quantitative DCE-MRI parameters. In the hotspot ROI, there was a difference in MVD between low and high group of Ktrans and Kep that had marginally statistical significance (ps = 0.06 and 0.07, respectively). Also, Ktrans and Kep were found to have an inverse relationship with MVD (r -0.61, p = 0.06 in Ktrans; r = -0.60, p = 0.07 in Kep). Quantitative analysis of T1-weighted DCE-MRI using hotspot ROI may provide a better histologic match than whole transverse section ROI. Within the hotspots, Ktrans and Kep tend to have a reverse correlation with MVD in this colon cancer mouse model.

  19. Bone marrow-infiltrating human neuroblastoma cells express high levels of calprotectin and HLA-G proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morandi

    Full Text Available Metastases in the bone marrow (BM are grim prognostic factors in patients with neuroblastoma (NB. In spite of extensive analysis of primary tumor cells from high- and low-risk NB patients, a characterization of freshly isolated BM-infiltrating metastatic NB cells is still lacking. Our aim was to identify proteins specifically expressed by metastatic NB cells, that may be relevant for prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Sixty-six Italian children over 18 months of age, diagnosed with stage 4 NB, were included in the study. Metastatic NB cells were freshly isolated from patients' BM by positive immunomagnetic bead manipulation using anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody. Gene expression profiles were compared with those obtained from archived NB primary tumors from patients with 5 y-follow-up. After validation by RT-qPCR, expression/secretion of the proteins encoded by the up-regulated genes in the BM-infiltrating NB cells was evaluated by flow cytometry and ELISA. Compared to primary tumor cells, BM-infiltrating NB cells down-modulated the expression of CX3CL1, AGT, ATP1A2 mRNAs, whereas they up-regulated several genes commonly expressed by various lineages of BM resident cells. BM-infiltrating NB cells expressed indeed the proteins encoded by the top-ranked genes, S100A8 and A9 (calprotectin, CD177 and CD3, and secreted the CXCL7 chemokine. BM-infiltrating NB cells also expressed CD271 and HLA-G. We have identified proteins specifically expressed by BM-infiltrating NB cells. Among them, calprotectin, a potent inflammatory protein, and HLA-G, endowed with tolerogenic properties facilitating tumor escape from host immune response, may represent novel biomarkers and/or targets for therapeutic intervention in high-risk NB patients.

  20. Graphene Oxide–Silver Nanoparticles Nanocomposite Stimulates Differentiation in Human Neuroblastoma Cancer Cells (SH-SY5Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangiliyandi Gurunathan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, graphene and graphene related nanocomposite receive much attention due to high surface-to-volume ratio, and unique physiochemical and biological properties. The combination of metallic nanoparticles with graphene-based materials offers a promising method to fabricate novel graphene–silver hybrid nanomaterials with unique functions in biomedical nanotechnology, and nanomedicine. Therefore, this study was designed to prepare graphene oxide (GO silver nanoparticles (AgNPs nanocomposite (GO-AgNPs containing two different nanomaterials in single platform with distinctive properties using luciferin as reducing agents. In addition, we investigated the effect of GO-AgNPs on differentiation in SH-SY5Y cells. The synthesized GO-AgNPs were characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis, X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The differentiation was confirmed by series of cellular and biochemical assays. The AgNPs were distributed uniformly on the surface of graphene oxide with an average size of 25 nm. As prepared GO-AgNPOs induces differentiation by increasing the expression of neuronal differentiation markers and decreasing the expression of stem cell markers. The results indicated that the redox biology involved the expression of various signaling molecules, which play an important role in differentiation. This study suggests that GO-AgNP nanocomposite could stimulate differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, understanding the mechanisms of differentiation of neuroblastoma cells could provide new strategies for cancer and stem cell therapies. Therefore, these studies suggest that GO-AgNPs could target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor.

  1. Hypoxia Potentiates the Radiation-Sensitizing Effect of Olaparib in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts by Contextual Synthetic Lethality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yanyan; Verbiest, Tom; Devery, Aoife M.; Bokobza, Sivan M.; Weber, Anika M.; Leszczynska, Katarzyna B.; Hammond, Ester M.; Ryan, Anderson J., E-mail: anderson.ryan@oncology.ox.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors potentiate radiation therapy in preclinical models of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other types of cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization in vivo are incompletely understood. Herein, we investigated the impact of hypoxia on radiosensitization by the PARP inhibitor olaparib in human NSCLC xenograft models. Methods and Materials: NSCLC Calu-6 and Calu-3 cells were irradiated in the presence of olaparib or vehicle under normoxic (21% O{sub 2}) or hypoxic (1% O{sub 2}) conditions. In vitro radiosensitivity was assessed by clonogenic survival assay and γH2AX foci assay. Established Calu-6 and Calu-3 subcutaneous xenografts were treated with olaparib (50 mg/kg, daily for 3 days), radiation (10 Gy), or both. Tumors (n=3/group) were collected 24 or 72 hours after the first treatment. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase IX [CA9]), vessels (CD31), DNA double strand breaks (DSB) (γH2AX), and apoptosis (cleaved caspase 3 [CC3]). The remaining xenografts (n=6/group) were monitored for tumor growth. Results: In vitro, olaparib showed a greater radiation-sensitizing effect in Calu-3 and Calu-6 cells in hypoxic conditions (1% O{sub 2}). In vivo, Calu-3 tumors were well-oxygenated, whereas Calu-6 tumors had extensive regions of hypoxia associated with down-regulation of the homologous recombination protein RAD51. Olaparib treatment increased unrepaired DNA DSB (P<.001) and apoptosis (P<.001) in hypoxic cells of Calu-6 tumors following radiation, whereas it had no significant effect on radiation-induced DNA damage response in nonhypoxic cells of Calu-6 tumors or in the tumor cells of well-oxygenated Calu-3 tumors. Consequently, olaparib significantly increased radiation-induced growth inhibition in Calu-6 tumors (P<.001) but not in Calu-3 tumors. Conclusions: Our data suggest that hypoxia potentiates the radiation-sensitizing effects of

  2. Cellular Stress and p53-Associated Apoptosis by Juniperus communis L. Berry Extract Treatment in the Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina A. Lantto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant phenolics have shown to activate apoptotic cell death in different tumourigenic cell lines. In this study, we evaluated the effects of juniper berry extract (Juniperus communis L. on p53 protein, gene expression and DNA fragmentation in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, we analyzed the phenolic composition of the extract. We found that juniper berry extract activated cellular relocalization of p53 and DNA fragmentation-dependent cell death. Differentially expressed genes between treated and non-treated cells were evaluated with the cDNA-RDA (representational difference analysis method at the early time point of apoptotic process when p53 started to be activated and no caspase activity was detected. Twenty one overexpressed genes related to cellular stress, protein synthesis, cell survival and death were detected. Interestingly, they included endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress inducer and sensor HSPA5 and other ER stress-related genes CALM2 and YKT6 indicating that ER stress response was involved in juniper berry extract mediated cell death. In composition analysis, we identified and quantified low concentrations of fifteen phenolic compounds. The main groups of them were flavones, flavonols, phenolic acids, flavanol and biflavonoid including glycosides of quercetin, apigenin, isoscutellarein and hypolaetin. It is suggested that juniper berry extract induced the p53-associated apoptosis through the potentiation and synergism by several phenolic compounds.

  3. Paclitaxel enhances therapeutic efficacy of the F8-IL2 immunocytokine to EDA-fibronectin-positive metastatic human melanoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschetta, Michele; Pretto, Francesca; Berndt, Alexander; Galler, Kerstin; Richter, Petra; Bassi, Andrea; Oliva, Paolo; Micotti, Edoardo; Valbusa, Giovanni; Schwager, Kathrin; Kaspar, Manuela; Trachsel, Eveline; Kosmehl, Hartwig; Bani, Maria Rosa; Neri, Dario; Giavazzi, Raffaella

    2012-04-01

    The selective delivery of bioactive agents to tumors reduces toxicity and enhances the efficacy of anticancer therapies. In this study, we show that the antibody F8, which recognizes perivascular and stromal EDA-fibronectin (EDA-Fn), when conjugated to interleukin-2 (F8-IL2) can effectively inhibit the growth of EDA-Fn-expressing melanomas in combination with paclitaxel. We obtained curative effects with paclitaxel administered before the immunocytokine. Coadministration of paclitaxel increased the uptake of F8 in xenografted melanomas, enhancing tumor perfusion and permeability. Paclitaxel also boosted the recruitment of F8-IL2-induced natural killer (NK) cells to the tumor, suggesting a host response as part of the observed therapeutic benefit. In support of this likelihood, NK cell depletion impaired the antitumor effect of paclitaxel plus F8-IL2. Importantly, this combination reduced both the tumor burden and the number of pulmonary metastatic nodules. The combination did not cause cumulative toxicity. Together, our findings offer a preclinical proof that by acting on the tumor stroma paclitaxel potentiates the antitumor activity elicited by a targeted delivery of IL2, thereby supporting the use of immunochemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. ©2012 AACR.

  4. Growth inhibition by 8-chloro cyclic AMP of human HT29 colorectal and ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma xenografts is associated with selective modulation of protein kinase A isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, A D; Langdon, S P; Ritchie, A A; Burns, D J; Miller, W R

    1995-06-01

    Significant dose-related inhibition of growth of HT29 human colorectal cancer xenografts and ZR-75-1 breast cancer xenografts in immune-suppressed mice was induced by the cyclic AMP analogue, 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cyclic AMP) when given by alzet mini-pumps over a 7-day period at doses of either 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. Levels and types of cyclic AMP binding proteins were measured by ligand binding and photoaffinity labelling, respectively, in tumours harvested at the end of the treatment period. Compared with levels in tumours from control animals, values of tumour cyclic AMP binding proteins from treated animals were significantly reduced. These effects were associated with an apparent modulation of the types of cyclic AMP binding proteins, 8-Cl-cyclic AMP-treated xenografts displaying a reduced ratio of RI/RII isoforms compared with untreated control tumours.

  5. Involvement of the CXCR7/CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in the malignant progression of human neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Liberman

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is a typical childhood and heterogeneous neoplasm for which efficient targeted therapies for high-risk tumors are not yet identified. The chemokine CXCL12, and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 have been involved in tumor progression and dissemination. While CXCR4 expression is associated to undifferentiated tumors and poor prognosis, the role of CXCR7, the recently identified second CXCL12 receptor, has not yet been elucidated in NB. In this report, CXCR7 and CXCL12 expressions were evaluated using a tissue micro-array including 156 primary and 56 metastatic NB tissues. CXCL12 was found to be highly associated to NB vascular and stromal structures. In contrast to CXCR4, CXCR7 expression was low in undifferentiated tumors, while its expression was stronger in matured tissues and specifically associated to differentiated neural tumor cells. As determined by RT-PCR, CXCR7 expression was mainly detected in N-and S-type NB cell lines, and was slightly induced upon NB cell differentiation in vitro. The relative roles of the two CXCL12 receptors were further assessed by overexpressing CXCR7 or CXCR4 receptor alone, or in combination, in the IGR-NB8 and the SH-SY5Y NB cell lines. In vitro functional analyses indicated that, in response to their common ligand, both receptors induced activation of ERK1/2 cascade, but not Akt pathway. CXCR7 strongly reduced in vitro growth, in contrast to CXCR4, and impaired CXCR4/CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis. Subcutaneous implantation of CXCR7-expressing NB cells showed that CXCR7 also significantly reduced in vivo growth. Moreover, CXCR7 affected CXCR4-mediated orthotopic growth in a CXCL12-producing environment. In such model, CXCR7, in association with CXCR4, did not induce NB cell metastatic dissemination. In conclusion, the CXCR7 and CXCR4 receptors revealed specific expression patterns and distinct functional roles in NB. Our data suggest that CXCR7 elicits anti-tumorigenic functions, and may act as a

  6. Comparison of the monoclonal antibodies 17-1A and 323/A3 : The influence of the affinity on tumour uptake and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy in human ovarian cancer xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, E; Pinedo, HM; Schluper, HMM; Haisma, HJ; Boven, E

    The low-affinity monoclonal antibody (MAb) chimeric 17-1A(c-17-1A) and the high-affinity MAb mouse 323/A3 (m-323/A3) were used to study the effect of the MAb affinity on the tumour uptake and efficacy of radioimmunotherapy in nude mice bearing subcutaneously the human ovarian cancer xenografts FMa,

  7. Anti-angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    The nature of the angiogenic balance in neuroblastoma is complex, and a spectrum of angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors have been detected in neuroblastoma tumours. The complex relationships between angiogenic cascade and anti-angiogenic agents in the tumour vascular phase have indicated that anti-angiogenesis can be considered as a strategy for the adjuvant therapy of neuroblastoma. The major goal is to establish if inhibition of angiogenesis is a realistic therapeutic strategy for inhibiting tumour cell dissemination and the formation of metastasis in neuroblastoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Potent in vivo anticancer activity and stability of liposomes encapsulated with semi-purified Job's tear (Coix lacryma-jobi Linn.) extracts on human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) xenografted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainakham, Mathukorn; Manosroi, Aranya; Abe, Masahiko; Manosroi, Worapaka; Manosroi, Jiradej

    2016-11-01

    The in vivo anticancer activity and stability of liposomes encapsulated with semi-purified Job's tear (Coix lacryma-jobi Linn.) extracts (S5L), prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide fluid technique, on human colon adenocarcinoma (HT29) xenografted mice were investigated. For the stability and the physicochemical characteristics, S5L showed a high stability of pH, good dispersibility, small particle size and stable zeta potential. Liposomes can protect linoleic acid in the extract comparing with the free S5. S5L kept at 4 °C for 3 months showed the highest linoleic acid content of 63.50%, whereas at 45 °C, the lowest linoleic acid content of 42.66% was observed. The anticancer activity and toxicity on xenografted mice were observed for 14 days. At the end of the experiment, the relative tumor volume (RTV) in the S5L-treated xenografted mice showed a significant RTV reduction. The high dose of S5 and S5L were potent with the highest inhibition of tumor growth of 48.67 and 54.75%, which was 86.94% and 97.81% of 5-fluorouracil, respectively. The apoptotic activity was shown in xenografted mice treated with S5 at medium and high dose, S5L, 5-fluorouracil and commercial product. All treated xenografted mice showed no toxic signs and symptoms, abnormality of internal organs histopathology and blood chemistry. This study has demonstrated the high physicochemical stability of liposomes encapsulated with semi-purified Job's tear extract and their potent anticancer activity on human colon adenocarcinoma xenografted model with the potential for further development to anticolon cancer drug.

  9. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells display anti-cancer activity in SCID mice bearing disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Secchiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although multimodality treatment can induce high rate of remission in many subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, significant proportions of patients relapse with incurable disease. The effect of human bone marrow (BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on tumor cell growth is controversial, and no specific information is available on the effect of BM-MSC on NHL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effect of BM-MSC was analyzed in two in vivo models of disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with an indolent (EBV(- Burkitt-type BJAB, median survival = 46 days and an aggressive (EBV(+ B lymphoblastoid SKW6.4, median survival = 27 days behavior in nude-SCID mice. Intra-peritoneal (i.p. injection of MSC (4 days after i.p. injection of lymphoma cells significantly increased the overall survival at an optimal MSC:lymphoma ratio of 1:10 in both xenograft models (BJAB+MSC, median survival = 58.5 days; SKW6.4+MSC, median survival = 40 days. Upon MSC injection, i.p. tumor masses developed more slowly and, at the histopathological observation, exhibited a massive stromal infiltration coupled to extensive intra-tumor necrosis. In in vitro experiments, we found that: i MSC/lymphoma co-cultures modestly affected lymphoma cell survival and were characterized by increased release of pro-angiogenic cytokines with respect to the MSC, or lymphoma, cultures; ii MSC induce the migration of endothelial cells in transwell assays, but promoted endothelial cell apoptosis in direct MSC/endothelial cell co-cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that BM-MSC exhibit anti-lymphoma activity in two distinct xenograft SCID mouse models of disseminated NHL.

  10. Mechanisms of neuroblastoma regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Garrett M.; Bagatell, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic and biological studies of neuroblastoma have shed light on the dramatic heterogeneity in the clinical behaviour of this disease, which spans from spontaneous regression or differentiation in some patients, to relentless disease progression in others, despite intensive multimodality therapy. This evidence also suggests several possible mechanisms to explain the phenomena of spontaneous regression in neuroblastomas, including neurotrophin deprivation, humoral or cellular immunity, loss of telomerase activity and alterations in epigenetic regulation. A better understanding of the mechanisms of spontaneous regression might help to identify optimal therapeutic approaches for patients with these tumours. Currently, the most druggable mechanism is the delayed activation of developmentally programmed cell death regulated by the tropomyosin receptor kinase A pathway. Indeed, targeted therapy aimed at inhibiting neurotrophin receptors might be used in lieu of conventional chemotherapy or radiation in infants with biologically favourable tumours that require treatment. Alternative approaches consist of breaking immune tolerance to tumour antigens or activating neurotrophin receptor pathways to induce neuronal differentiation. These approaches are likely to be most effective against biologically favourable tumours, but they might also provide insights into treatment of biologically unfavourable tumours. We describe the different mechanisms of spontaneous neuroblastoma regression and the consequent therapeutic approaches. PMID:25331179

  11. Imaging neuroblastoma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kamini; Haller, Jack O; Legasto, Alan C

    2003-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common solid tumor of childhood that can involve the abdomen, thorax, pelvis, or the head and neck. The clinical manifestations are dependent on the widespread distribution of neural crest tissue and the length of the sympathetic chain involvement. Abdominal pain and hypertension may occur as a result of renal vasculature compression; respiratory distress may be evident in thoracic tumors; and Homer's syndrome or heterochromia of the iris may manifest from neuroblastoma of the head and neck. In addition, symptoms of cord compression and back pain may result from spinal cord compromise due to epidural invasion. Metastatic involvement of the liver, skin, periorbital regions, or bone may cause hepatomegaly, skin nodules, proptosis, or bone marrow failure, respectively. Clinical findings along with tumor metastasis may be studied by various imaging modalities to assess the nature and extent of the tumor. Diagnostic tests include plain radiography, ultrasonography, CT scanning, and MR imaging. Bone marrow studies, bone scans, and scintigraphy with 131I-metaiodobenzylmandelic may be utilized for metastatic evaluation. By using these imaging studies to detect the nature and behavior of neuroblastoma, early intervention may indeed improve patient survival.

  12. Tumor Growth Model with PK Input for Neuroblastoma Drug Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    the predicted effect maps against IHC using spatial analysis. We will orient the tumor tissue (before IHC processing) to the corresponding ultrasound ...neuroblastoma (NB5) xenograft tumors (n=3 CD1 nude mice/time point) using nonlinear contrast enhanced  ultrasound   technique  (CEUS). Tumor tissue and...The output from the individualized tumor compartment from the PBPK model will be used to predict individual tumor concentration-time data that could

  13. Assessing the Combined Toxicity of BMAA and Its Isomers 2,4-DAB and AEG In Vitro Using Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Brendan J; Rodgers, Kenneth J

    2017-06-20

    The non-protein amino acid (NPAA) ß-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is produced by a diverse range of cyanobacteria, diatoms and dinoflagellates, and is present in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems globally. Exposure to BMAA has been implicated in the development of neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). BMAA is often found in nature along with its structural isomers 2,4-diaminobutyric acid (2,4-DAB) and aminoethylglycine (AEG); however, the toxicity of these NPAAs in combination has not been examined. We have previously demonstrated that BMAA induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and increases caspase and cathepsin activity in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y), effects consistent with proteotoxic stress due to disturbances in protein synthesis, folding or turnover. The current study investigates whether 2,4-DAB and AEG share a similar mechanism of toxicity to BMAA, and if simultaneous exposure of cells to BMAA and its isomers results in increased toxicity in vitro. We show that a 48-h treatment with both 500 μM BMAA and 2,4-DAB decreases cell viability in vitro whereas AEG was not cytotoxic under the same conditions. Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with 2,4-DAB did not increase expression of ER stress markers. Combined treatment of cells with BMAA and 2,4-DAB resulted in increased caspase activity and increased apoptosis above that of BMAA or 2,4-DAB on their own. These results suggest that 2,4-DAB does not share the same mechanism of toxicity as BMAA but the presence of 2,4-DAB increases the toxicity of BMAA to human cells in vitro.

  14. Growth inhibitory effects of the dual ErbB1/ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor PKI-166 on human prostate cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Tran, Chris; Sawyers, Charles L

    2002-09-15

    Experiments with human prostate cancer cell lines have shown that forced overexpression of the ErbB2-receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) promotes androgen-independent growth and increases androgen receptor-transcriptional activity in a ligand-independent fashion. To investigate the relationship between ErbB-RTK signaling and androgen in genetically unmanipulated human prostate cancer, we performed biochemical and biological studies with the dual ErbB1/ErbB2 RTK inhibitor PKI-166 using human prostate cancer xenograft models with isogenic sublines reflecting the transition from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent growth. In the presence of low androgen concentrations, PKI-166 showed profound growth-inhibitory effects on tumor growth, which could be partially reversed by androgen add-back. At physiological androgen concentrations, androgen withdrawal greatly enhanced the ability of PKI-166 to retard tumor growth. The level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation correlated with the response to PKI-166 treatment, whereas the expression levels of ErbB1 and ErbB2 did not. These results suggest that ErbB1/ErbB2 RTKs play an important role in the biology of androgen-independent prostate cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of inhibitors targeted to this pathway.

  15. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular

  16. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xiao; Suhail, Mahmoud M; Yang, Qing; Cao, Amy; Fung, Kar-Ming; Postier, Russell G; Woolley, Cole; Young, Gary; Zhang, Jingzhe; Lin, Hsueh-Kung

    2012-12-13

    Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0-2 h, Fraction II at 8-10 h, and Fraction III at 11-12 h). Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11-12 h (Fraction IV). Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS); and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous) human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic

  17. Frankincense essential oil prepared from hydrodistillation of Boswellia sacra gum resins induces human pancreatic cancer cell death in cultures and in a xenograft murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Xiao

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regardless of the availability of therapeutic options, the overall 5-year survival for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer remains less than 5%. Gum resins from Boswellia species, also known as frankincense, have been used as a major ingredient in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of health-related conditions. Both frankincense chemical extracts and essential oil prepared from Boswellia species gum resins exhibit anti-neoplastic activity, and have been investigated as potential anti-cancer agents. The goals of this study are to identify optimal condition for preparing frankincense essential oil that possesses potent anti-tumor activity, and to evaluate the activity in both cultured human pancreatic cancer cells and a xenograft mouse cancer model. Methods Boswellia sacra gum resins were hydrodistilled at 78°C; and essential oil distillate fractions were collected at different durations (Fraction I at 0–2 h, Fraction II at 8–10 h, and Fraction III at 11–12 h. Hydrodistillation of the second half of gum resins was performed at 100°C; and distillate was collected at 11–12 h (Fraction IV. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Frankincense essential oil-modulated pancreatic tumor cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by colorimetric assays. Levels of apoptotic markers, signaling molecules, and cell cycle regulators expression were characterized by Western blot analysis. A heterotopic (subcutaneous human pancreatic cancer xenograft nude mouse model was used to evaluate anti-tumor capability of Fraction IV frankincense essential oil in vivo. Frankincense essential oil-induced tumor cytostatic and cytotoxic activities in animals were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Longer duration and higher temperature hydrodistillation produced more

  18. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

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    Kaylani, Samer Z. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda (United States); Pressey, Joseph G. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1600 7th Avenue South, ACC 414, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  19. T cells targeting NY-ESO-1 demonstrate efficacy against disseminated neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nathan; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Barrett, David M; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Jakobsen, Bent; Martinez, Daniel; Pawel, Bruce; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael D; Grupp, Stephan A

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 is expressed by many solid tumors and has limited expression by mature somatic tissues, making it a highly attractive target for tumor immunotherapy. Targeting NY-ESO-1 using engineered T cells has demonstrated clinical efficacy in the treatment of some adult tumors. Neuroblastoma is a significant cause of cancer mortality in children, and is a tumor type shown to be responsive to immunotherapies. We evaluated a large panel of primarily resected neuroblastoma samples and demonstrated that 23% express NY-ESO-1. After confirming antigen-specific activity of T cells genetically engineered to express an NY-ESO-1 directed high-affinity transgenic T cell receptor in vitro , we performed xenograft mouse studies assessing the efficacy of NY-ESO-1-targeted T cells in both localized and disseminated models of neuroblastoma. Disease responses were monitored by tumor volume measurement and in vivo bioluminescence. After delivery of NY-ESO-1 transgenic TCR T cells, we observed significant delay of tumor progression in mice bearing localized and disseminated neuroblastoma, as well as enhanced animal survival. These data demonstrate that NY-ESO-1 is an antigen target in neuroblastoma and that targeted T cells represent a potential therapeutic option for patients with neuroblastoma.

  20. Activating mutations in ALK provide a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Rani E; Sanda, Takaomi; Hanna, Megan; Fröhling, Stefan; Luther, William; Zhang, Jianming; Ahn, Yebin; Zhou, Wenjun; London, Wendy B; McGrady, Patrick; Xue, Liquan; Zozulya, Sergey; Gregor, Vlad E; Webb, Thomas R; Gray, Nathanael S; Gilliland, D Gary; Diller, Lisa; Greulich, Heidi; Morris, Stephan W; Meyerson, Matthew; Look, A Thomas

    2008-10-16

    Neuroblastoma, an embryonal tumour of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system, accounts for approximately 15% of all deaths due to childhood cancer. High-risk neuroblastomas are rapidly progressive; even with intensive myeloablative chemotherapy, relapse is common and almost uniformly fatal. Here we report the detection of previously unknown mutations in the ALK gene, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, in 8% of primary neuroblastomas. Five non-synonymous sequence variations were identified in the kinase domain of ALK, of which three were somatic and two were germ line. The most frequent mutation, F1174L, was also identified in three different neuroblastoma cell lines. ALK complementary DNAs encoding the F1174L and R1275Q variants, but not the wild-type ALK cDNA, transformed interleukin-3-dependent murine haematopoietic Ba/F3 cells to cytokine-independent growth. Ba/F3 cells expressing these mutations were sensitive to the small-molecule inhibitor of ALK, TAE684 (ref. 4). Furthermore, two human neuroblastoma cell lines harbouring the F1174L mutation were also sensitive to the inhibitor. Cytotoxicity was associated with increased amounts of apoptosis as measured by TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of ALK expression in neuroblastoma cell lines with the F1174L mutation also resulted in apoptosis and impaired cell proliferation. Thus, activating alleles of the ALK receptor tyrosine kinase are present in primary neuroblastoma tumours and in established neuroblastoma cell lines, and confer sensitivity to ALK inhibition with small molecules, providing a molecular rationale for targeted therapy of this disease.

  1. Dioctanoylglycerol stimulates accumulation of [methyl-14C]choline and its incorporation into acetylcholine and phosphatidylcholine in a human cholinergic neuroblastoma cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, B. E.; Richardson, U. I.; Nitsch, R. M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Dioctanoylglycerol, a synthetic diacylglycerol, stimulated [14C]choline uptake in cultured human neuroblastoma (LA-N-2) cells. As this effect has not, to our knowledge, been reported before, it was of interest to characterize it in more detail. In the presence of 500 microM dioctanoylglycerol the levels of [14C]choline attained during a 2 hour labeling period were elevated by 78 +/- 12%, while [14C]acetylcholine and long fatty acyl chain [14C]phosphatidylcholine levels increased by 26 +/- 2% and 19 +/- 5%, respectively (mean +/- S.E.M.). Total (long chain plus dioctanoyl-) [14C]phosphatidylcholine was increased by 198 +/- 33%. Kinetic analysis showed that dioctanoylglycerol reduced the apparent Km for choline uptake to 56 +/- 9% of control (n = 4). The Vmax was not significantly altered. The stimulation of [14C]choline accumulation by dioctanoylglycerol was not dependent on protein kinase C activation; the effect was not mimicked by phorbol ester or by 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, and was not inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitors H-7 or staurosporine, or by prolonged pretreatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The effect of dioctanoylglycerol was slightly (but not significantly) reduced by EGTA and strongly inhibited by the cell-permeant calcium chelator bis(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, tetra(acetoxymethyl)ester. Although these results implicate elevated intracellular calcium in the response, dioctanoylglycerol did not increase phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in LA-N-2 cells, and its effect was not inhibited by the diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R 59 022 (which blocks the conversion of diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid, a known stimulator of phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Regulation of apoptosis in human melanoma and neuroblastoma cells by statins, sodium arsenite and TRAIL: a role of combined treatment versus monotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N.; Hei, Tom K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of melanoma cells by sodium arsenite or statins (simvastatin and lovastatin) dramatically modified activities of the main cell signaling pathways resulting in the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and in a downregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels. Through heme degradation and the production of carbon monoxide and biliverdin, HO-1 plays a protective role in different scenario of oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial apoptosis. Both sodium arsenite and statins could be efficient inducers of apoptosis in some melanoma cell lines, but often exhibited only modest proapoptotic activity in others, due to numerous protective mechanisms. We demonstrated in the present study that treatment by sodium arsenite or statins with an additional inhibition of HO-1 expression (or activation) caused a substantial upregulation of apoptosis in melanoma cells. Sodium arsenite- or statin-induced apoptosis was independent of BRAF status (wild type versus V600E) in melanoma lines. Monotreatment required high doses of statins (20–40 μM) for effective induction of apoptosis. As an alternative approach, pretreatment of melanoma cells with statin at decreased doses (5–20 μM) dramatically enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis, due to suppression of the NF-κB and STAT3-transcriptional targets (including COX-2) and downregulation of cFLIP-L (a caspase-8 inhibitor) protein levels. Furthermore, combined treatment with sodium arsenite and TRAIL or simvastatin and TRAIL efficiently induced apoptotic commitment in human neuroblastoma cells. In summary, our findings on enhancing effects of combined treatment of cancer cells using statin and TRAIL provide the rationale for further preclinical evaluation. PMID:21910007

  3. Oxidative stress promotes autophagic cell death in human neuroblastoma cells with ectopic transfer of mitochondrial PPP2R2B (Bβ2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ming-Yi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multifunctional protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A is a heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase composed of a scaffolding, catalytic and regulatory subunits. By modifying various downstream signal transducers, the aberrant expression of the brain-targeted regulatory subunit PPP2R2B is associated with the onset of a panel of neuronal disorders. The alternatively splicing of PPP2R2B encodes two regulatory subunit isoforms that determine cellular distribution of the neuron-specific holoenzyme to mitochondria (Bβ2 and cytoplasm (Bβ1, respectively. Results Human neuroblastoma cells were transfected with PPP2R2B constructs encoding the complete sequences of Bβ2 and Bβ1, respectively. The colonies with antibiotic resistance were selected as stable cell lines. Both ectopic Bβ1 and Bβ2 clones exhibited characteristics of autophagy. To test how cells respond to reactive oxygen species generators, the cells were treated with either hydrogen peroxide or t-butyl hydroperoxide and Bβ2 clones induced cell death. Suppression of autophagy using either RNA interference of the essential autophagy gene or pharmacological inhibitor rescued cell death caused by oxidative stress. Conclusions Cells with ectopically expressed mitochondria-targeted regulatory subunit PPP2R2B of the holoenzyme PP2A were shown predisposed to autophagy and oxidative stress induced cell death that is related to apoptosis. The results promised a model for studying the mechanism and function of aberrant PPP2R2B expression in neuronal cells. The work provided a new target for understanding and prevention of neuropathogenesis.

  4. Comparison of the neurotoxicities between volatile organic compounds and fragrant organic compounds on human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and primary cultured rat neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasue; Ohtani, Kohei; Imajo, Akinori; Izu, Hanae; Nakamura, Hitomi; Shiraishi, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    These are many volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are synthesized, produced from petroleum or derived from natural compounds, mostly plants. Fragrant and volatile organic compounds from plants have been used as food additives, medicines and aromatherapy. Several clinical and pathological studies have shown that chronic abuse of VOCs, mainly toluene, causes several neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known about the mechanisms of neurotoxicity of the solvents. n-Octanal, nonanal, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, which are used catalyzers or intermediates of chemical reactions, are released into the environment. Essential oils have the functions of self-defense, sterilization, and antibiosis in plants. When volatile organic compounds enter the body, there is the possibility that they will pass through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and affect the central nervous system (CNS). However, the direct effects of volatile organic compounds on neural function and their toxicities are still unclear. We compared the toxicities of n-octanal, nonanal and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol with those of five naturally derived fragrant organic compounds (FOCs), linalool, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, isoamyl alcohol, n-propyl alcohol and n-phenethyl alcohol. MTT assay of human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells showed that the IC50 values of linalool, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, isoamyl alcohol, n-propyl alcohol and phenethyl alcohol were 1.33, 2.3, >5, >5, and 2.39 mM, respectively, and the IC50 values of toluene, n-octanal, nonanal and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were 850, 37.2, 8.31 and 15.1 μM, respectively. FOCs showed lower toxicities than those of VOCs. These results indicate that FOCs are safer than other compounds.

  5. Comparison of the neurotoxicities between volatile organic compounds and fragrant organic compounds on human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells and primary cultured rat neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasue Yamada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available These are many volatile organic compounds (VOCs that are synthesized, produced from petroleum or derived from natural compounds, mostly plants. Fragrant and volatile organic compounds from plants have been used as food additives, medicines and aromatherapy. Several clinical and pathological studies have shown that chronic abuse of VOCs, mainly toluene, causes several neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known about the mechanisms of neurotoxicity of the solvents. n-Octanal, nonanal, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, which are used catalyzers or intermediates of chemical reactions, are released into the environment. Essential oils have the functions of self-defense, sterilization, and antibiosis in plants. When volatile organic compounds enter the body, there is the possibility that they will pass through the blood–brain barrier (BBB and affect the central nervous system (CNS. However, the direct effects of volatile organic compounds on neural function and their toxicities are still unclear. We compared the toxicities of n-octanal, nonanal and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol with those of five naturally derived fragrant organic compounds (FOCs, linalool, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, isoamyl alcohol, n-propyl alcohol and n-phenethyl alcohol. MTT assay of human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells showed that the IC50 values of linalool, cis-3-hexen-1-ol, isoamyl alcohol, n-propyl alcohol and phenethyl alcohol were 1.33, 2.3, >5, >5, and 2.39 mM, respectively, and the IC50 values of toluene, n-octanal, nonanal and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were 850, 37.2, 8.31 and 15.1 μM, respectively. FOCs showed lower toxicities than those of VOCs. These results indicate that FOCs are safer than other compounds.

  6. Does MW Radiation Affect Gene Expression, Apoptotic Level, and Cell Cycle Progression of Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Handan; Esmekaya, Meric Arda; Saglam, Atiye Seda Yar; Tuysuz, Mehmed Zahid; Canseven, Ayşe Gulnihal; Yagci, Abdullah Munci; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2016-06-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a cancer that occurs in sympathetic nervous system arising from neuroblasts and nerve tissue of the adrenal gland, neck, chest, or spinal cord. It is an embryonal malignancy and affects infants and children. In this study, we investigated the effects of microwave (MW) radiation on apoptotic activity, cell viability, and cell cycle progression in human SH-SY5Y NB cells which can give information about MW radiation effects on neural cells covering the period from the embryonic stages to infants. SH-SY5Y NB cells were exposed to 2.1 GHz W-CDMA modulated MW radiation for 24 h at a specific absorption rate of 0.491 W/kg. Control samples were in the same conditions with MW-exposed samples but they were not exposed to MW radiation. The apoptotic activity of cells was measured by Annexin-V-FITC and propidium iodide staining. Moreover, mRNA levels of proliferative and cell cycle proteins were determined by real-time RT-PCR. The change in cell cycle progression was observed by using CycleTest-Plus DNA reagent. No significant change was observed in apoptotic activity of MW-exposed cells compared to control cells. The mRNA levels of c-myc and cyclin D1 were significantly reduced in MW group (p cells in G1 phase was significantly higher than the percentage of control cells in G1 phase. MW radiation caused cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. These results showed that 2.1 GHz W-CDMA modulated MW radiation did not cause apoptotic cell death but changed cell cycle progression.

  7. Bovine herpesvirus 1 can efficiently infect the human (SH-SY5Y) but not the mouse neuroblastoma cell line (Neuro-2A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunuguntla, Prasanth; El-Mayet, Fouad S; Jones, Clinton

    2017-03-15

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) is a significant bovine pathogen that establishes a life-long latent infection in sensory neurons. Previous attempts to develop immortalized bovine neuronal cells were unsuccessful. Consequently, our understanding of the BoHV-1 latency-reactivation cycle has relied on studying complex virus-host interactions in calves. In this study, we tested whether BoHV-1 can infect human (SH-SY5Y) or mouse (Neuro-2A) neuroblastoma cells. We provide new evidence that BoHV-1 efficiently infects SH-SY5Y cells and yields virus titers approximately 100 fold less than bovine kidney cells. Conversely, virus titers from productively infected Neuro-2A cells were approximately 10,000 fold less than bovine kidney cells. Using a β-Gal expressing virus (gC-Blue), we demonstrate that infection of Neuro-2A cells (actively dividing or differentiated) does not result in efficient virus spread, unlike bovine kidney or SH-SY5Y cells. Additional studies demonstrated that lytic cycle viral gene expression (bICP4 and gE) was readily detected in SH-SY5Y cells: conversely bICP4 was not readily detected in productively infected Neuro-2A cells. Finally, infection of SH-SY5Y and bovine kidney cells, but not Neuro-2A cells, led to rapid activation of the Akt protein kinase. These studies suggest that the Neuro-2A cell line may be a novel cell culture model to identify factors that regulate BoHV-1 productive infection in neuronal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adeno-associated virus vector-mediated delivery of pigment epithelium-derived factor restricts neuroblastoma angiogenesis and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, Christian J; Zhang, Youbin; Zhou, Junfang; Ng, Catherine; Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated delivery of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) to inhibit neuroblastoma (NB) xenograft growth. Pigment epithelium-derived factor was chosen for this study because, in addition to being a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis, it is capable of inducing neuronal differentiation. Cohorts of mice received either recombinant AAV encoding human PEDF (rAAV-hPEDF) at a range of doses or control vector via tail vein. Subsequent hPEDF expression was measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. After 6 weeks, the mice were given human NB cells by retroperitoneal injection and then killed 5 weeks later. Tumor weight, microvessel density, tumor differentiation, apoptosis, and levels of intratumoral vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression were determined at that time. In subsequent cohorts of mice, AAV-mediated murine PEDF expression was tested against both human NB xenografts and murine tumors. In a series of in vitro studies, PEDF was shown to inhibit endothelial cell activation and to stimulate differentiation of NB cell lines. After tail vein injection of rAAV-hPEDF, stable transgene expression was generated and correlated with levels of vector administration. Human NB xenograft growth was restricted by hPEDF in a dose-dependent fashion. Intratumoral VEGF expression and microvessel density were decreased, and tumor cell apoptosis was increased in PEDF-treated mice. Treatment with PEDF had a significant impact on NB growth in mice when delivered continuously using a gene therapy-mediated approach. The activity of PEDF appears to be mediated in part by inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis through down-regulation of tumor-elaborated VEGF, with subsequent intratumoral apoptosis. Furthermore, hPEDF was able to induce NB differentiation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, antitumor efficacy was seen when mouse PEDF was used to treat syngeneic murine tumors. In our

  9. Administration of the optimized β-Lapachone-poloxamer-cyclodextrin ternary system induces apoptosis, DNA damage and reduces tumor growth in a human breast adenocarcinoma xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Samuel; Díaz-Rodríguez, Patricia; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Gallego, Rosalia; Pérez-Fernández, Román; Landin, Mariana

    2013-08-01

    β-Lapachone (β-Lap) is a 1,2-orthonaphthoquinone that selectively induces cell death in human cancer cells through NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1). NQO1 is overexpressed in a variety of tumors, as compared to normal adjacent tissue. However, the low solubility and non-specific distribution of β-Lap limit its suitability for clinical assays. We formulated β-Lap in an optimal random methylated-β-cyclodextrin/poloxamer 407 mixture (i.e., β-Lap ternary system) and, using human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and immunodeficient mice, performed in vitro and in vivo evaluation of its anti-tumor effects on proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, DNA damage, and tumor growth. This ternary system is fluid at room temperature, gels over 29 °C, and provides a significant amount of drug, thus facilitating intratumoral delivery, in situ gelation, and the formation of a depot for time-release. Administration of β-Lap ternary system to MCF-7 cells induces an increase in apoptosis and DNA damage, while producing no changes in cell cycle. Moreover, in a mouse xenograft tumor model, intratumoral injection of the system significantly reduces tumor volume, while increasing apoptosis and DNA damage without visible toxicity to liver or kidney. These anti-tumoral effects and lack of visible toxicity make this system a promising new therapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Imaging of HER2/neu-positive BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in athymic mice using {sup 111}In-trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Ying [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2S2 (Canada); Wang, Judy [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Scollard, Deborah A. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Mondal, Hridya [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada); Holloway, Claire [Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5 (Canada); Kahn, Harriette J. [Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario, M4N 3M5 (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2C4 (Canada) and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 2S2 (Canada) and Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2 (Canada)]. E-mail: raymond.reilly@utoronto.ca

    2005-01-01

    Trastuzumab (Herceptin) Fab were prepared by digestion of intact IgG with immobilized papain, derivatized with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and radiolabeled with {sup 111}In. The dissociation constant (K{sub d}) for binding of Fab to HER2/neu-positive SK-BR-3 human breast cancer cells was two- to threefold higher than for intact IgG (14-36 vs. 8-14 nM). The binding affinity was not significantly decreased after DTPA derivatization (K{sub d}=47 nM). {sup 111}In-trastuzumab Fab localized specifically in HER2/neu-positive BT-474 human breast cancer xenografts in athymic mice with tumor uptake of 7.8{+-}0.7% injected dose (ID)/g and tumor/blood ratio of 25.2{+-}1.6 at 72 h postinjection compared with 2.7{+-}0.7% ID/g and 7.0{+-}0.9 for {sup 111}In-HuM195 anti-CD33 Fab (significantly different, P<.001). Small (3-5 mm in diameter) BT-474 tumors were imaged with {sup 111}In-trastuzumab Fab as early as 24 h postinjection.

  11. Effect of a novel oral chemotherapeutic agent containing a combination of trifluridine, tipiracil and the novel triple angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib, on human colorectal cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Norihiko; Nakagawa, Fumio; Matsuoka, Kazuaki; Takechi, Teiji

    2016-12-01

    Trifluridine/tipiracil (TFTD) is a combination drug that is used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer and was formerly known as TAS-102. It is a combination of two active pharmaceutical compounds, trifluridine, an antineoplastic thymidine-based nucleoside analog, and tipiracil, which enhances the bioavailability of trifluridine in vivo. TFTD is used for the treatment of patients with unresectable advanced or recurrent colorectal cancer that is resistant to standard therapies. In the present study, the anticancer effects of trifluridine in combination with nintedanib, an oral triple angiokinase inhibitor, on human colorectal cancer cell lines were investigated. The cytotoxicity against DLD-1, HT-29, and HCT116 cell lines was determined by the crystal violet staining method. The combination of trifluridine and nintedanib exerted an additive effect on the growth inhibition of DLD-1 and HT-29 cells and a sub-additive effect on HCT116 cells, as determined by isobologram analyses. Subsequently, the human colorectal cancer cell lines were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice to allow the evaluation of the in vivo tumor growth inhibitory effects of TFTD and nintedanib combination therapy. TFTD (150 mg/kg/day) and/or nintedanib (40 mg/kg/day) were orally administered to the mice twice daily from day 1 to day 14. The tumor growth inhibition with combination therapy was 61.5, 72.8, 67.6 and 67.5% for the DLD-1, DLD-1/5-FU, HT-29, and HCT116 xenografts, respectively. This was significantly (Pnintedanib. These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the combination of TFTD and nintedanib in the treatment of colorectal cancer xenografts. The concentration of trifluridine incorporated into DNA in the HT-29 and HCT116 tumors was determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The incorporation levels following treatment with TFTD and nintedanib for 14 consecutive days were higher than those associated with TFTD treatment alone. The

  12. Imaging small human prostate cancer xenografts after pretargeting with bispecific bombesin-antibody complexes and targeting with high specific radioactivity labeled polymer-drug conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vishwesh; Gada, Keyur; Panwar, Rajiv; Varvarigou, Alexandra; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Andrew; Ferris, Craig; Tekabe, Yared; Khaw, Ban-An

    2012-05-01

    Pretargeting with bispecific monoclonal antibodies (bsMAb) for tumor imaging was developed to enhance target to background activity ratios. Visualization of tumors was achieved by the delivery of mono- and divalent radiolabeled haptens. To improve the ability to image tumors with bsMAb, we have combined the pretargeting approach with targeting of high specific activity radiotracer labeled negatively charged polymers. The tumor antigen-specific antibody was replaced with bombesin (Bom), a ligand that binds specifically to the growth receptors that are overexpressed by many tumors including prostate cancer. Bomanti- diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) bispecific antibody complexes were used to demonstrate pretargeting and imaging of very small human prostate cancer xenografts targeted with high specific activity ¹¹¹In- or ⁹⁹mTc-labeled negatively charged polymers. Bispecific antibody complexes consisting of intact anti-DTPA antibody or Fab′ linked to Bom via thioether bonds (Bom-bsCx or Bom-bsFCx, respectively) were used to pretarget PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in SCID mice. Negative control mice were pretargeted with Bom or anti-DTPA Ab. 111In-Labeled DTPA-succinyl polylysine (DSPL) was injected intravenously at 24 h (7.03 ± 1.74 or 6.88 ± 1.89 MBq ¹¹¹In-DSPL) after Bom-bsCx or 50 ± 5.34 MBq of ⁹⁹mTc-DSPL after Bom-bsFCx pretargeting, respectively. Planar or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT gamma images were obtained for up to 3 h and only planar images at 24 h. After imaging, all mice were killed and biodistribution of 111In or 99mTc activities were determined by scintillation counting. Both planar and SPECT/CT imaging enabled detection of PC-3 prostate cancer lesions less than 1-2 mm in diameter in 1-3 h post 111In-DSPL injection. No lesions were visualized in Bom or anti-DTPA Ab pretargeted controls. 111In-DSPL activity in Bom-bsCx pretargeted tumors (1.21 ± 0.36 %ID/g) was 5.4 times that in tumors

  13. Imaging small human prostate cancer xenografts after pretargeting with bispecific bombesin-antibody complexes and targeting with high specific radioactivity labeled polymer-drug conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Vishwesh; Gada, Keyur; Panwar, Rajiv; Ferris, Craig; Khaw, Ban-An [Northeastern University, School of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Boston, MA (United States); Varvarigou, Alexandra [Institute of Radioisotopes and Radiodiagnostics, National Centre for Scientific Research ' ' Demokritos' ' , Athens (Greece); Majewski, Stan [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine Imaging Instrumentation Program, Center for Advanced Imaging, Morgantown, WV (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew [Jefferson LA, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tekabe, Yared [Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Pretargeting with bispecific monoclonal antibodies (bsMAb) for tumor imaging was developed to enhance target to background activity ratios. Visualization of tumors was achieved by the delivery of mono- and divalent radiolabeled haptens. To improve the ability to image tumors with bsMAb, we have combined the pretargeting approach with targeting of high specific activity radiotracer labeled negatively charged polymers. The tumor antigen-specific antibody was replaced with bombesin (Bom), a ligand that binds specifically to the growth receptors that are overexpressed by many tumors including prostate cancer. Bom-anti-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) bispecific antibody complexes were used to demonstrate pretargeting and imaging of very small human prostate cancer xenografts targeted with high specific activity {sup 111}In- or {sup 99m}Tc-labeled negatively charged polymers. Bispecific antibody complexes consisting of intact anti-DTPA antibody or Fab' linked to Bom via thioether bonds (Bom-bsCx or Bom-bsFCx, respectively) were used to pretarget PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts in SCID mice. Negative control mice were pretargeted with Bom or anti-DTPA Ab. {sup 111}In-Labeled DTPA-succinyl polylysine (DSPL) was injected intravenously at 24 h (7.03 {+-} 1.74 or 6.88 {+-} 1.89 MBq {sup 111}In-DSPL) after Bom-bsCx or 50 {+-} 5.34 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-DSPL after Bom-bsFCx pretargeting, respectively. Planar or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT gamma images were obtained for up to 3 h and only planar images at 24 h. After imaging, all mice were killed and biodistribution of {sup 111}In or {sup 99m}Tc activities were determined by scintillation counting. Both planar and SPECT/CT imaging enabled detection of PC-3 prostate cancer lesions less than 1-2 mm in diameter in 1-3 h post {sup 111}In-DSPL injection. No lesions were visualized in Bom or anti-DTPA Ab pretargeted controls. {sup 111}In-DSPL activity in Bom-bsCx pretargeted tumors (1

  14. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R. [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  15. Anti-cancer effects of artesunate in a panel of chemoresistant neuroblastoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, Martin; Kleinschmidt, Malte C.; Barth, Susanne; Rothweiler, Florian; Geiler, Janina; Breitling, Rainer; Mayer, Bernd; Deubzer, Hedwig; Witte, Olaf; Kreuter, Joerg; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Cinatl, Jindrich; Witt, Olaf; Cinatl Jr., Jindrich

    2010-01-01

    Artemisinin derivatives are well-tolerated anti-malaria drugs that also exert anti-cancer activity. Here, we investigated artemisinin and its derivatives dihydroartemisinin and artesunate in a panel of chemosensitive and chemoresistant human neuroblastoma cells as well as in primary neuroblastoma

  16. N-myc down regulates neural cell adhesion molecule expression in rat neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akeson, R.; Bernards, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    In human neuroblastoma, amplification of the N-myc oncogene is correlated with increased metastatic ability. We recently showed that transfection of the rat neuroblastoma cell line B104 with an N-myc expression vector resulted in an increase in metastatic ability and a significant reduction in the

  17. From the Cover: Manganese Stimulates Mitochondrial H2O2 Production in SH-SY5Y Human Neuroblastoma Cells Over Physiologic as well as Toxicologic Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Jolyn; Hao, Li; Bijli, Kaiser M; Chandler, Joshua D; Orr, Michael; Hu, Xin; Jones, Dean P; Go, Young-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an abundant redox-active metal with well-characterized mitochondrial accumulation and neurotoxicity due to excessive exposures. Mn is also an essential co-factor for the mitochondrial antioxidant protein, superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), and the range for adequate intake established by the Institute of Medicine Food and Nutrition Board is 20% of the interim guidance value for toxicity by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, leaving little margin for safety. To study toxic mechanisms over this critical dose range, we treated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with a series of MnCl 2 concentrations (from 0 to 100 μM) and measured cellular content to compare to human brain Mn content. Concentrations ≤10 μM gave cellular concentrations comparable to literature values for normal human brain, whereas concentrations ≥50 μM resulted in values comparable to brains from individuals with toxic Mn exposures. Cellular oxygen consumption rate increased as a function of Mn up to 10 μM and decreased with Mn dose ≥50 μM. Over this range, Mn had no effect on superoxide production as measured by aconitase activity or MitoSOX but increased H 2 O 2 production as measured by MitoPY1. Consistent with increased production of H 2 O 2 , SOD2 activity, and steady-state oxidation of total thiol increased with increasing Mn. These findings have important implications for Mn toxicity by re-directing attention from superoxide anion radical to H 2 O 2 -dependent mechanisms and to investigation over the entire physiologic range to toxicologic range. Additionally, the results show that controlled Mn exposure provides a useful cell manipulation for toxicological studies of mitochondrial H 2 O 2 signaling. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Development of induced glioblastoma by implantation of a human xenograft in Yucatan minipig as a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Mehrdad; Carozzo, Claude; Bonnefont-Rebeix, Catherine; Belluco, Sara; Leveneur, Olivia; Chuzel, Thomas; Pillet-Michelland, Elodie; Dreyfus, Matthieu; Roger, Thierry; Berger, François; Ponce, Frédérique

    2017-04-15

    Glioblastoma is the most common and deadliest primary brain tumor for humans. Despite many efforts toward the improvement of therapeutic methods, prognosis is poor and the disease remains incurable with a median survival of 12-14.5 months after an optimal treatment. To develop novel treatment modalities for this fatal disease, new devices must be tested on an ideal animal model before performing clinical trials in humans. A new model of induced glioblastoma in Yucatan minipigs was developed. Nine immunosuppressed minipigs were implanted with the U87 human glioblastoma cell line in both the left and right hemispheres. Computed tomography (CT) acquisitions were performed once a week to monitor tumor growth. Among the 9 implanted animals, 8 minipigs showed significant macroscopic tumors on CT acquisitions. Histological examination of the brain after euthanasia confirmed the CT imaging findings with the presence of an undifferentiated glioma. Yucatan minipig, given its brain size and anatomy (gyrencephalic structure) which are comparable to humans, provides a reliable brain tumor model for preclinical studies of different therapeutic METHODS: in realistic conditions. Moreover, the short development time, the lower cyclosporine and caring cost and the compatibility with the size of commercialized stereotactic frames make it an affordable and practical animal model, especially in comparison with large breed pigs. This reproducible glioma model could simulate human anatomical conditions in preclinical studies and facilitate the improvement of novel therapeutic devices, designed at the human scale from the outset. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiparametric MR diffusion-weighted imaging for monitoring the ultra-early treatment effect of sorafenib in human hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Ma, Zelan; Huang, Yanqi; He, Lan; Liang, Cuishan; Shi, Changzheng; Zhang, Zhongping; Liang, Changhong; Liu, Zaiyi

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for monitoring the ultra-early (within 24 hours) treatment effect of sorafenib in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenografts. With institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approval, 16 BALB/c nude mice bearing subcutaneous HCC xenografts underwent serial Gaussian and non-Gaussian DWI at baseline and 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours posttreatment using a 1.5T whole-body MRI system. Gaussian-DWI-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), D, D*, and f, and non-Gaussian-DWI-derived MD, MK, DDC, and α were calculated and compared between the control (n = 6) and sorafenib-treated groups (n = 10) with respect to each timepoint using Mann-Whitney or Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results were validated by pathology. Compared to baseline, ADC and D at 1 hour posttreatment (P = 0.005 and P = 0.013, respectively) and MD and DDC at 3 hours posttreatment (P = 0.009 and P = 0.005, respectively) significantly decreased and remained lower through 12 hours of follow-up (P = 0.005-0.022), followed by recovery to baseline levels at 24 hours posttreatment (P = 0.139-0.646). MK significantly increased at 1 hour posttreatment (P = 0.013) and remained higher through 24 hours of follow-up (P = 0.009-0.028). No significant differences were found in D*, f, and α at different timepoints (P = 0.188-0.714). Light microscopy did not reveal abnormal findings until 3 hours posttreatment, when central patchy necrosis was observed; more prominent diffuse necrosis was observed at 24 hours. Electron microscopy revealed swollen mitochondria at 1 hour posttreatment and accumulation of intracellular autophagosomes from 3 to 24 hours posttreatment. Multiparametric DWI might evaluate therapeutic effects of sorafenib in HCC, where metrics of ADC, D, and MK could potentially serve as imaging biomarkers for monitoring therapeutic effects as early as 1

  20. Embelin suppresses growth of human pancreatic cancer xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice by inhibiting Akt and Sonic hedgehog pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minzhao Huang

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease, and therefore effective treatment and/or prevention strategies are urgently needed. The objectives of this study were to examine the molecular mechanisms by which embelin inhibited human pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro, and xenografts in Balb C nude mice, and pancreatic cancer cell growth isolated from KrasG12D transgenic mice. XTT assays were performed to measure cell viability. AsPC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously into Balb c nude mice and treated with embelin. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were measured by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. The expression of Akt, and Sonic Hedgehog (Shh and their target gene products were measured by the immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. The effects of embelin on pancreatic cancer cells isolated from 10-months old KrasG12D mice were also examined. Embelin inhibited cell viability in pancreatic cancer AsPC-1, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and Hs 766T cell lines, and these inhibitory effects were blocked either by constitutively active Akt or Shh protein. Embelin-treated mice showed significant inhibition in tumor growth which was associated with reduced expression of markers of cell proliferation (Ki67, PCNA and Bcl-2 and cell cycle (cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK6, and induction of apoptosis (activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP, and increased expression of Bax. In addition, embelin inhibited the expression of markers of angiogenesis (COX-2, VEGF, VEGFR, and IL-8, and metastasis (MMP-2 and MMP-9 in tumor tissues. Antitumor activity of embelin was associated with inhibition of Akt and Shh pathways in xenografts, and pancreatic cancer cells isolated from KrasG12D mice. Furthermore, embelin also inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT by up-regulating E-cadherin and inhibiting the expression of Snail, Slug, and ZEB1. These data suggest that embelin can inhibit pancreatic cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis by suppressing Akt and

  1. Enhanced antitumor activity of 6-hydroxymethylacylfulvene in combination with irinotecan and 5-fluorouracil in the HT29 human colon tumor xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, C D; Hilsenbeck, S G; Eckhardt, S G; Marty, J; Mangold, G; MacDonald, J R; Rowinsky, E K; Von Hoff, D D; Weitman, S

    1999-03-01

    6-Hydroxymethylacylfulvene (MGI-114) is a semisynthetic analogue of the toxin illudin S, a product of the Omphalotus mushroom. MGI-114 induces cytotoxicity in a variety of solid tumors in vivo, including the refractory HT29 human colon cancer xenograft. In this study, the potential application of MGI-114 in the treatment of colon cancer was further explored by evaluating the activity of MGI-114 in combination with irinotecan (CPT-11) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Groups of 9 nude mice bearing HT29 xenografts were treated with either single agent MGI-114, CPT-11, or 5FU, or MGI-114 in combination with CPT-11 or 5FU. MGI-114 was administered at doses of 3.5 and 7 mg/kg i.p. daily on days 1 through 5, and CPT-11 and 5FU were administered at doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg i.p. on days 1, 12, and 19. In the single agent studies, MGI-114, CPT-11, and 5FU all resulted in decreased final tumor weights compared with vehicle-treated controls (P<0.05), but only MGI-114 at 7 mg/kg produced partial responses. When MGI-114 at 3.5 mg/kg was combined with CPT-11, significant decrements in final tumor weights occurred compared with monotherapy with the same doses of MGI-114 and CPT-11 (P< or =0.001). Also, administration of the low-dose combination (MGI-114 at 35 mg/kg and CPT-11 at 50 mg/kg) resulted in final tumor weights similar to those achieved after administration of high-dose MGI-114 as a single agent. Moreover, the combination of MGI-114 and CPT-11 produced partial responses in nearly all of the animals, with some animals achieving complete responses. The outcome with the combination of MGI-114 and 5FU was less striking, with fewer partial responses and no complete responses. These results suggest enhanced activity when MGI-114 is combined with CPT-11, and clinical trials to further evaluate this combination regimen are planned.

  2. Associations between the uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, HER2 density and response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous human tumour xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLarty, Kristin; Cornelissen, Bart; Scollard, Deborah A. [University of Toronto, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada); Done, Susan J. [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Biophysics, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University Health Network, Department of Pathology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chun, Kathy [North York General Hospital, Genetics Program, Toronto, ON (Canada); Reilly, Raymond M. [University of Toronto, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University Health Network, Toronto General Research Institute, Toronto, ON (Canada)]|[University of Toronto, Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations between uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, tumour HER2 density and response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) of human breast cancer (BC) xenografts in athymic mice. The tumour uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab in athymic mice bearing BC xenografts with increasing HER2 density (0 to 3+) was evaluated. Specific uptake ratios were established in biodistribution (SUR) and imaging studies (ROI-SUR) using {sup 111}In-labeled mouse IgG ({sup 111}In-DTPA-mIgG). Further corrections were made for circulating radioactivity using tumour-to-blood ratios defined as a localization index (LI) and region-of-interest localization index (ROI-LI), respectively. Mice were treated with trastuzumab (Herceptin). A tumour growth inhibition index (TGI) was calculated and relative TGIs calculated by dividing the TGI of control by that of trastuzumab-treated mice. Strong, nonlinear associations with HER2 density were obtained if the uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab was corrected for nonspecific IgG localization (i.e., SUR; r{sup 2}=0.99) and circulating radioactivity (i.e., LI; r{sup 2} =0.87), but without these corrections, the association between HER2 density and tumour uptake was poor (r{sup 2}=0.22). There was a strong association between ROI-SUR and ROI-LI values and HER2 expression (r{sup 2}=0.90 and r{sup 2}=0.95), respectively. All tumours were imaged. Relative TGI values were associated with increasing uncorrected tumour uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab but not always with HER2 density (i.e., MCF-HER2-18 cells with trastuzumab-resistance). HER2 expression (0 to 3+) can be differentiated using {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab, but requires correction of tumour uptake for nonspecific IgG localization and circulating radioactivity. The uncorrected uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-trastuzumab was associated with tumour response to trastuzumab. (orig.)

  3. Associations between the uptake of 111In-DTPA-trastuzumab, HER2 density and response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous human tumour xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarty, Kristin; Cornelissen, Bart; Scollard, Deborah A; Done, Susan J; Chun, Kathy; Reilly, Raymond M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations between uptake of (111)In-DTPA-trastuzumab, tumour HER2 density and response to trastuzumab (Herceptin) of human breast cancer (BC) xenografts in athymic mice. The tumour uptake of (111)In-DTPA-trastuzumab in athymic mice bearing BC xenografts with increasing HER2 density (0 to 3+) was evaluated. Specific uptake ratios were established in biodistribution (SUR) and imaging studies (ROI-SUR) using (111)In-labeled mouse IgG ((111)In-DTPA-mIgG). Further corrections were made for circulating radioactivity using tumour-to-blood ratios defined as a localization index (LI) and region-of-interest localization index (ROI-LI), respectively. Mice were treated with trastuzumab (Herceptin). A tumour growth inhibition index (TGI) was calculated and relative TGIs calculated by dividing the TGI of control by that of trastuzumab-treated mice. Strong, nonlinear associations with HER2 density were obtained if the uptake of (111)In-DTPA-trastuzumab was corrected for nonspecific IgG localization (i.e., SUR; r (2) = 0.99) and circulating radioactivity (i.e., LI; r (2) = 0.87), but without these corrections, the association between HER2 density and tumour uptake was poor (r (2) = 0.22). There was a strong association between ROI-SUR and ROI-LI values and HER2 expression (r (2) = 0.90 and r (2) = 0.95, respectively. All tumours were imaged. Relative TGI values were associated with increasing uncorrected tumour uptake of (111)In-DTPA-trastuzumab but not always with HER2 density (i.e., MCF-HER2-18 cells with trastuzumab-resistance). HER2 expression (0 to 3+) can be differentiated using (111)In-DTPA-trastuzumab, but requires correction of tumour uptake for nonspecific IgG localization and circulating radioactivity. The uncorrected uptake of (111)In-DTPA-trastuzumab was associated with tumour response to trastuzumab.

  4. An in vivo swine study for xeno-grafts of calcium sulfate-based bone grafts with human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzong-fu; Lee, Sheng-Yang; Wu, Hong-Da; Poma, Malosi; Wu, Yu-Wei; Yang, Jen-Chang

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this in vivo study was to evaluate the effect of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) on various resorbable calcium sulfate/calcium phosphate bone grafts in bone regeneration. Granular particles of calcium sulfate dehydrate (CSD), α-calcium sulfate hemihydrate/amorphous calcium phosphate (α-CSH/ACP), and CSD/β-tricalcium phosphates (β-TCP) were prepared for in vitro dissolution and implantation test. The chemical compositions of specimen residues after dissolution test were characterized by XRD. The ratios of new bone formation for implanted grafts/hDPSCs were evaluated using mandible bony defect model of Lanyu pig. All the graft systems exhibited a similar two-stage dissolution behavior and phase transformation of poor crystalline HAp. Eight weeks post-operation, the addition of hDPSCs to various graft systems showed statistically significant increasing in the ratio of new bone formation (pbone regeneration was rejected. The results suggest that the addition of hDPSCs to calcium sulfate based xenografts could enhance the bone regeneration in the bony defect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. RGD-based strategies for improving antitumor activity of paclitaxel-loaded liposomes in nude mice xenografted with human ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Jian-Cheng; Sun, Qi-Shi; Luo, Chun-Lei; Zhang, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-targeting drug delivery systems are being the ideal carrier for systemic administration of antiproliferative drugs. RGD peptide (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) modified liposomes containing paclitaxel (RGD-SSL-PTX). The arginine-glycine-aspartic acid tripeptide (RGD) modified sterically stabilized liposomes (SSL) containing paclitaxel (PTX) (RGD-SSL-PTX), which could increase targeting to tumor by binding with the integrin receptors overexpressed on tumor cells. The encapsulation efficiency was more than 90% and the mean particle size was of 120 nm with a narrow size distribution. It was indicated that significant cytotoxicity (3.5 times lower IC(50)) was found in the SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cells treated with RGD-SSL-PTX preparation, as well as the intracellular uptake of liposomes (a 6.21-fold increase in fluorescence intensity), when compared to those of non-targeted liposomes (SSL). For in vivo antitumor activity, it was shown in the present study that RGD-SSL-PTX preparation had the strongest tumor growth inhibition among the test formulations (P < 0.05) in BALB/c nude mice xenografted with SKOV-3 solid tumor. Meanwhile, there was no significant change in the body weight of the animals treated with RGD-SSL-PTX for intravenous injection at a dose of 12.5 mg/kg. It was suggested that the RGD-SSL-PTX preparation might have a great advantage over present-day chemotherapy with Taxol in curing those tumors overexpressing integrin receptors.

  6. An evaluation of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose and 3'-deoxy-3'-[18F]-fluorothymidine uptake in human tumor xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Heather; Pichler, Bernd; Kukuk, Damaris; Duchamp, Olivier; Raguin, Olivier; Shannon, Aoife; Whalley, Nichola; Jacobs, Vivien; Bales, Juliana; Gingles, Neill; Ricketts, Sally-Ann; Wedge, Stephen R

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the variability of 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D: -glucose ([(18)F]-FDG) and 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]-fluorothymidine ([(18)F]-FLT) uptake in pre-clinical tumor models and examine the relationship between imaging data and related histological biomarkers. [(18)F]-FDG and [(18)F]-FLT studies were carried out in nine human tumor xenograft models in mice. A selection of the models underwent histological analysis for endpoints relevant to radiotracer uptake. Comparisons were made between in vitro uptake, in vivo imaging, and ex vivo histopathology data using quantitative and semi-quantitative analysis. In vitro data revealed that [1-(14)C]-2-deoxy-D: -glucose ([(14)C]-2DG) uptake in the tumor cell lines was variable. In vivo, [(18)F]-FDG and [(18)F]-FLT uptake was highly variable across tumor types and uptake of one tracer was not predictive for the other. [(14)C]-2DG uptake in vitro did not predict for [(18)F]-FDG uptake in vivo. [(18)F]-FDG SUV was inversely proportional to Ki67 and necrosis levels and positively correlated with HKI. [(18)F]-FLT uptake positively correlated with Ki67 and TK1. When evaluating imaging biomarkers in response to therapy, the choice of tumor model should take into account in vivo baseline radiotracer uptake, which can vary significantly between models.

  7. Identification of ALK as the Major Familial Neuroblastoma Predisposition Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossë, Yalë P; Laudenslager, Marci; Longo, Luca; Cole, Kristina A; Wood, Andrew; Attiyeh, Edward F; Laquaglia, Michael J; Sennett, Rachel; Lynch, Jill E; Perri, Patrizia; Laureys, Geneviève; Speleman, Frank; Hakonarson, Hakon; Torkamani, Ali; Schork, Nicholas J; Brodeur, Garrett M; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Rappaport, Eric; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Survival rates for the childhood cancer neuroblastoma have not substantively improved despite dramatic escalation in chemotherapy intensity. Like most human cancers, this embryonal malignancy can be inherited, but the genetic etiology of familial and sporadically occurring neuroblastoma was largely unknown. Here we show that germline mutations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) explain the majority of hereditary neuroblastomas, and that activating mutations can also be somatically acquired. We first identified a significant linkage signal at the short arm of chromosome 2 (maximum nonparametric LOD=4.23 at rs1344063) using a whole-genome scan in neuroblastoma pedigrees. Resequencing of regional candidate genes identified three separate missense mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of ALK (G1128A, R1192P and R1275Q) that segregated with the disease in eight separate families. Examination of 491 sporadically occurring human neuroblastoma samples showed that the ALK locus was gained in 22.8%, and highly amplified in an additional 3.3%, and that these aberrations were highly associated with death from disease (P=0.0003). Resequencing of 194 high-risk neuroblastoma samples showed somatically acquired mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain in 12.4%. Nine of the ten mutations map to critical regions of the kinase domain and were predicted to be oncogenic drivers with high probability. Mutations resulted in constitutive phosphorylation consistent with activation, and targeted knockdown of ALK mRNA resulted in profound growth inhibition of 4 of 4 cell lines harboring mutant or amplified ALK, as well as 2 of 6 wild type for ALK. Our results demonstrate that heritable mutations of ALK are the major cause of familial neuroblastoma, and that germline or acquired activation of this cell surface kinase is a tractable therapeutic target for this lethal pediatric malignancy. PMID:18724359

  8. Biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody h-R3 in a xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Morales, Alejo; Duconge, Jorge; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando E-mail: normando@ict.cim.sld.cu

    1999-04-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) h-R3 is an (IgG{sub 1}), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R. It was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with H-125 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Results were compared with its murine version of the MAb ior-egf/r3. Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10 {mu}g/100 {mu}Ci of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled MAbs. Immunoreactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled MAbs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on H-125 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions was determined by the Lindmo method. Among all organs, significant accumulation was found in serum (27.05 {+-} 2.08 %ID/g) and tumor (3.903 {+-} 0.89 %ID/g) at 4 h after injection. These values decreased to 5.03 {+-} 0.50 %ID/g and 2.19 {+-} 0.56 %ID/g for serum and tumor, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was found to be 0.70, with a correlation coefficient r=0.9984. With the good biodistribution and tumor uptake of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled humanized antibody h-R3, a phase I diagnostic clinical trial of tumor with epithelial origin should be pursued.

  9. RNA-Seq Differentiates Tumour and Host mRNA Expression Changes Induced by Treatment of Human Tumour Xenografts with the VEGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, James R; Farren, Matthew; Powell, Steve J; Runswick, Sarah; Weston, Susie L; Brown, Helen; Delpuech, Oona; Wappett, Mark; Smith, Neil R; Carr, T Hedley; Dry, Jonathan R; Gibson, Neil J; Barry, Simon T

    2013-01-01

    Pre-clinical models of tumour biology often rely on propagating human tumour cells in a mouse. In order to gain insight into the alignment of these models to human disease segments or investigate the effects of different therapeutics, approaches such as PCR or array based expression profiling are often employed despite suffering from biased transcript coverage, and a requirement for specialist experimental protocols to separate tumour and host signals. Here, we describe a computational strategy to profile transcript expression in both the tumour and host compartments of pre-clinical xenograft models from the same RNA sample using RNA-Seq. Key to this strategy is a species-specific mapping approach that removes the need for manipulation of the RNA population, customised sequencing protocols, or prior knowledge of the species component ratio. The method demonstrates comparable performance to species-specific RT-qPCR and a standard microarray platform, and allowed us to quantify gene expression changes in both the tumour and host tissue following treatment with cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, including the reduction of multiple murine transcripts associated with endothelium or vessels, and an increase in genes associated with the inflammatory response in response to cediranib. In the human compartment, we observed a robust induction of hypoxia genes and a reduction in cell cycle associated transcripts. In conclusion, the study establishes that RNA-Seq can be applied to pre-clinical models to gain deeper understanding of model characteristics and compound mechanism of action, and to identify both tumour and host biomarkers.

  10. Long-term efficiency of mesenchymal stromal cell-mediated CD-MSC/5FC therapy in human melanoma xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucerova, L; Skolekova, S; Demkova, L; Bohovic, R; Matuskova, M

    2014-10-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) can be exploited as cellular delivery vehicles for the enzymes converting non-toxic prodrugs to toxic substances. Because of their inherent chemoresistance, they exert potent bystander and antitumor effect. Here we show that the human adipose tissue-derived MSC expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD-MSC) in combination with 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) mediated a long-term tumor-free survival in the 83.3% of tumor-bearing animals. CD-MSC/5FC treatment induced cytotoxicity against model human melanoma cells EGFP-A375. Only 4% of the therapeutic CD-MSC cells eliminated >98.5% of the tumor cells in vitro. Long-term tumor-free survival was confirmed in 15 out of the 18 animals. However, repeatedly used CD-MSC/5FC therapeutic regimen generated more aggressive and metastatic variant of the melanoma cells EGFP-A375/Rel3. These cells derived from the refractory xenotransplants exhibited increased resistance to the CD-MSC/5FC treatment, altered cell adhesion, migration, tumorigenic and metastatic properties. However, long-term curative effect was achieved by the augmentation of the CD-MSC/5FC regimen along with the inhibition of c-Met/hepatocyte growth factor signaling axis in this aggressive melanoma derivative. In summary, the CD-MSC/5FC regimen can be regarded as a very effective antitumor approach to achieve long-term tumor-free survival as demonstrated on a mouse model of aggressive human melanoma xenografts.

  11. RNA-Seq Differentiates Tumour and Host mRNA Expression Changes Induced by Treatment of Human Tumour Xenografts with the VEGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Cediranib.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Bradford

    Full Text Available Pre-clinical models of tumour biology often rely on propagating human tumour cells in a mouse. In order to gain insight into the alignment of these models to human disease segments or investigate the effects of different therapeutics, approaches such as PCR or array based expression profiling are often employed despite suffering from biased transcript coverage, and a requirement for specialist experimental protocols to separate tumour and host signals. Here, we describe a computational strategy to profile transcript expression in both the tumour and host compartments of pre-clinical xenograft models from the same RNA sample using RNA-Seq. Key to this strategy is a species-specific mapping approach that removes the need for manipulation of the RNA population, customised sequencing protocols, or prior knowledge of the species component ratio. The method demonstrates comparable performance to species-specific RT-qPCR and a standard microarray platform, and allowed us to quantify gene expression changes in both the tumour and host tissue following treatment with cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, including the reduction of multiple murine transcripts associated with endothelium or vessels, and an increase in genes associated with the inflammatory response in response to cediranib. In the human compartment, we observed a robust induction of hypoxia genes and a reduction in cell cycle associated transcripts. In conclusion, the study establishes that RNA-Seq can be applied to pre-clinical models to gain deeper understanding of model characteristics and compound mechanism of action, and to identify both tumour and host biomarkers.

  12. Neuroblastoma cells injected into experimental mature teratoma reveal a tropism for embryonic loose mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, S; Cedervall, J; Hultman, I; Ali, R; Margaryan, N V; Rasmuson, A; Johnsen, J I; Sveinbjörnsson, B; Dalianis, T; Kanter, L; Orrego, A; Strizzi, L; Hendrix, M J C; Sandstedt, B; Kogner, P; Ahrlund-Richter, L

    2013-09-01

    Embryonic neural tumors are responsible for a disproportionate number of cancer deaths in children. Although dramatic improvements in survival for pediatric malignancy has been achieved in previous years advancements seem to be slowing down. For the development of new enhanced therapy and an increased understanding of the disease, pre-clinical models better capturing the neoplastic niche are essential. Tumors of early childhood present in this respect a particular challenge. Here, we explore how components of the embryonic process in stem‑cell induced mature teratoma can function as an experimental in vivo microenvironment instigating the growth of injected childhood neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines. Three human NB cell lines, IMR-32, Kelly and SK-N-BE(2), were injected into mature pluripotent stem cell‑induced teratoma (PSCT) and compared to xenografts of the same cell lines. Proliferative NB cells from all lines were readily detected in both models with a typical histology of a poorly differentiated NB tumor with a variable amount of fibrovascular stroma. Uniquely in the PSCT microenvironment, NB cells were found integrated in a non‑random fashion. Neuroblastoma cells were never observed in areas with well-differentiated somatic tissue i.e. bone, muscle, gut or areas of other easily identifiable tissue types. Instead, the three cell lines all showed initial growth exclusively occurring in the embryonic loose mesenchymal stroma, resulting in a histology recapitulating NB native presentation in vivo. Whether this reflects the 'open' nature of loose mesenchyme more easily giving space to new cells compared to other more dense tissues, the rigidity of matrix providing physical cues modulating NB characteristics, or if embryonic loose mesenchyme may supply developmental cues that attracted or promoted the integration of NB, remains to be tested. We tentatively hypothesize that mature PSCT provide an embryonic niche well suited for in vivo studies on NB.

  13. Anti-cancer stemness and anti-invasive activity of bitter taste receptors, TAS2R8 and TAS2R10, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoona Seo

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB originates from immature neuronal cells and currently has a poor clinical outcome. NB cells possess cancer stem cells (CSCs characteristics that facilitate the initiation of a tumor, as well as its metastasis. Human bitter taste receptors, referred to as TAS2Rs, are one of five types of basic taste receptors and they belong to a family of G-protein coupled receptors. The recent finding that taste receptors are expressed in non-gustatory tissues suggest that they mediate additional functions distinct from taste perception. While it is generally admitted that the recognition of bitter tastes may be associated with a self-defense system to prevent the ingestion of poisonous food compounds, this recognition may also serve as a disease-related function in the human body. In particular, the anti-cancer stemness and invasion effects of TAS2Rs on NB cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, endogenous expression of TAS2R8 and TAS2R10 in SK-N-BE(2C and SH-SY5Y cells was examined. In addition, higher levels of TAS2R8 and TAS2R10 expression were investigated in more differentiated SY5Y cells. Both TAS2Rs were up-regulated following the induction of neuronal cell differentiation by retinoic acid. In addition, ectopic transfection of the two TAS2Rs induced neurite elongation in the BE(2C cells, and down-regulated CSCs markers (including DLK1, CD133, Notch1, and Sox2, and suppressed self-renewal characteristics. In particular, TAS2RS inhibited tumorigenicity. Furthermore, when TAS2Rs was over-expressed, cell migration, cell invasion, and matrix metalloproteinases activity were inhibited. Expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, a well-known regulator of tumor metastasis, as well as its downstream targets, vascular endothelial growth factor and glucose transporter-1, were also suppressed by TAS2Rs. Taken together, these novel findings suggest that TAS2Rs targets CSCs by suppressing cancer stemness characteristics and NB

  14. Protective effects of TRH and its analogues against various cytotoxic agents in retinoic acid (RA)-differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska-Feil, L; Jantas, D; Leskiewicz, M; Budziszewska, B; Kubera, M; Basta-Kaim, A; Lipkowski, A W; Lason, W

    2010-12-01

    TRH (thyroliberin) and its analogues were reported to possess neuroprotective effects in cellular and animal experimental models of acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study we evaluated effects of TRH and its three stable analogues, montirelin (CG-3703), RGH-2202 and Z-TRH (N-(carbobenzyloxy)-pGlutamyl-Histydyl-Proline) on the neuronally differentiated human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, which is widely accepted for studying potential neuroprotectants. We found that TRH and all the tested analogues at concentrations 0.1-50 μM attenuated cell damage induced by MPP(+) (2 mM), 3-nitropropionate (10 mM), hydrogen peroxide (0.5 mM), homocysteine (250 μM) and beta-amyloid (20μM) in retinoic acid differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TRH and its analogues decreased the staurosporine (0.5 μM)-induced LDH release, caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation, which indicate the anti-apoptotic proprieties of these peptides. The neuroprotective effects of TRH (10 μM) and RGH-2202 (10 μM) on St-induced cell death was attenuated by inhibitors of PI3-K pathway (wortmannin and LY294002), but not MAPK/ERK1/2 (PD98059 and U0126). Moreover, TRH and its analogues at neuroprotective concentrations (1 and 10 μM) increased expression of Bcl-2 protein, as confirmed by Western blot analysis. All in all, these results extend data on neuroprotective properties of TRH and its analogues and provide evidence that mechanism of anti-apoptotic effects of these peptides in SH-SY5Y cell line involves induction of PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the data obtained on human cell line with a dopaminergic phenotype suggest potential utility of TRH and its analogues in the treatment of some neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Why humans and Catarrhini lack the Galα1-3Gal epitope, related to xenograft rejection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Suchanowska

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Galα1-3Gal epitope (Galβ1-3Galα1-4GlcNAc-R is an oligosaccharide determinant present on the cell surface of most mammalian species with the exception of the higher primates, including Old World monkeys, apes, and humans. The synthesis of Galα1-3Gal epitope is catalyzed by α1,3-galactosyltransferase (α1,3GT. Inactivation of the α1,3GT gene in humans and the production of natural anti-Gal1-3Gal antibodies against the Galα1-3Gal epitope has resulted in the formation of a unique immunological barrier that prevents the transplantation of tissues and organs from Galα1-3Gal-positive animals to humans. The gene encoding α1,3-galactosyltransferase in higher primates is inactive due to point mutations and deletions leading to a change of reading frame. The human transcript of this gene consists of several splicing variants, most of which does not contain an exon encoding the catalytic domain. Thus no active protein is produced.

  16. Luteolin inhibits progestin-dependent angiogenesis, stem cell-like characteristics, and growth of human breast cancer xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Matthew T.; Liang, Yayun; BESCH-WILLIFORD, CYNTHIA; Goyette, Sandy; Mafuvadze, Benford; Hyder, Salman M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials and epidemiological evidence have shown that combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy, but not estrogen therapy alone, increases breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. Previously we have shown that natural and synthetic progestins, including the widely used synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), increase production of a potent angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in human breast cancer cells, potentially pro...

  17. Inhibiting effects of cidofovir (HPMPC) on the growth of the human cervical carcinoma (SiHa) xenografts in athymic nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, G; Snoeck, R; Piette, J; Delvenne, P; De Clercq, E

    1998-01-01

    At present more than 70 human papillomaviruses (HPV) genotypes have been described and each shows a predilection for a cutaneous or mucosal surface. There is a strong association between infection with specific genital viruses (i.e., types 16 and 18) and the development of cervical cancer. Thus, intervention with the natural history of HPV infection in the genital tract may form the basis for an effective anticancer strategy. We have shown that treatment of cell lines derived from human cervical carcinomas [i.e., SiHa and CaSki (HPV-16-positive)] and HeLa (HPV-18-positive)] with HPMPC (cidofovir) results in a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. We report here the effects of HPMPC on the growth of cervical carcinoma (SiHa) xenografts in athymic nude mice. Athymic mice between the age of 6 and 8 weeks were injected SC with 5 to 10x10(6) cells. Once tumors were established, the mice were injected with PBS (placebo), HPMPC, or cytarabine (AraC) at the tumor site. Animals that were injected intratumorally with HPMPC at a dose of 5 mg/ml (0.25 mg/injection) or 10 mg/ml (0.5 mg/injection) three or five times per week, once daily, during 4 weeks showed a statistically significant reduction in tumor size compared to the placebo group or AraC group. However, when HMPC was administered topically (as a cream) or systemically (intraperitoneally), no reduction of tumor growth was observed at nontoxic concentrations, suggesting that a high local concentration of HPMPC is required to achieve a significant decrease of tumor growth.

  18. Targeting Syndecan-1, a molecule implicated in the process of vasculogenic mimicry, enhances the therapeutic efficacy of the L19-IL2 immunocytokine in human melanoma xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchia, Paola; Conte, Romana; Balza, Enrica; Pietra, Gabriella; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Carnemolla, Barbara

    2015-11-10

    Anti-angiogenic therapy of solid tumors has until now failed to produce the long lasting clinical benefits desired, possibly due to the complexity of the neoangiogenic process. Indeed, a prominent role is played by "vasculogenic" or "vascular" mimicry (VM), a phenomenon in which aggressive cancer cells form an alternative microvascular circulation, independently of endothelial cell angiogenesis. In this study we observed, in melanoma patient cell lines having vasculogenic/stem-cell like phenotype and in melanoma tumors, the syndecan-1 co-expression with VM markers, such as CD144 and VEGFR-2. We show that melanoma cells lose their ability to form tubule-like structures in vitro after blocking syndecan-1 activity by the specific human recombinant antibody, OC-46F2. Moreover, in a human melanoma xenograft model, the combined therapy using OC-46F2 and L19-IL2, an immunocytokine specific for the tumor angiogenic-associated B-fibronectin isoform(B-FN), led to a complete inhibition of tumor growth until day 90 from tumor implantation in 71% of treated mice, with statistically significant differences compared to groups treated with OC-46F2 or L19-IL2 as monotherapy. Furthermore, in the tumors recovered from mice treated with OC-46F2 either as monotherapy or in combination with L19-IL2, we observed a dramatic decrease of vascular density and loss of VM structures. These findings indicate for the first time a role of syndecan-1 in melanoma VM and that targeting syndecan-1, together with B-FN, could be promising in improving the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

  19. Neuronal Subtype and Satellite Cell Tropism Are Determinants of Varicella-Zoster Virus Virulence in Human Dorsal Root Ganglia Xenografts In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Zerboni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV, a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella during primary infection. VZV reactivation from neuronal latency may cause herpes zoster, post herpetic neuralgia (PHN and other neurologic syndromes. To investigate VZV neuropathogenesis, we developed a model using human dorsal root ganglia (DRG xenografts in immunodeficient (SCID mice. The SCID DRG model provides an opportunity to examine characteristics of VZV infection that occur in the context of the specialized architecture of DRG, in which nerve cell bodies are ensheathed by satellite glial cells (SGC which support neuronal homeostasis. We hypothesized that VZV exhibits neuron-subtype specific tropism and that VZV tropism for SGC contributes to VZV-related ganglionopathy. Based on quantitative analyses of viral and cell protein expression in DRG tissue sections, we demonstrated that, whereas DRG neurons had an immature neuronal phenotype prior to implantation, subtype heterogeneity was observed within 20 weeks and SGC retained the capacity to maintain neuronal homeostasis longterm. Profiling VZV protein expression in DRG neurons showed that VZV enters peripherin+ nociceptive and RT97+ mechanoreceptive neurons by both axonal transport and contiguous spread from SGC, but replication in RT97+ neurons is blocked. Restriction occurs even when the SGC surrounding the neuronal cell body were infected and after entry and ORF61 expression, but before IE62 or IE63 protein expression. Notably, although contiguous VZV spread with loss of SGC support would be predicted to affect survival of both nociceptive and mechanoreceptive neurons, RT97+ neurons showed selective loss relative to peripherin+ neurons at later times in DRG infection. Profiling cell factors that were upregulated in VZV-infected DRG indicated that VZV infection induced marked pro-inflammatory responses, as well as proteins of the interferon pathway and neuroprotective responses. These neuropathologic changes

  20. A Hybrid Robotic Control System Using Neuroblastoma Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrández, J. M.; Lorente, V.; Cuadra, J. M.; Delapaz, F.; Álvarez-Sánchez, José Ramón; Fernández, E.

    The main objective of this work is to analyze the computing capabilities of human neuroblastoma cultured cells and to define connection schemes for controlling a robot behavior. Multielectrode Array (MEA) setups have been designed for direct culturing neural cells over silicon or glass substrates, providing the capability to stimulate and record simultaneously populations of neural cells. This paper describes the process of growing human neuroblastoma cells over MEA substrates and tries to modulate the natural physiologic responses of these cells by tetanic stimulation of the culture. We show that the large neuroblastoma networks developed in cultured MEAs are capable of learning: establishing numerous and dynamic connections, with modifiability induced by external stimuli and we propose an hybrid system for controlling a robot to avoid obstacles.

  1. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-Y. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nuclear Medicine Department, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pang Fei [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both {sup 131}I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  2. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  3. Ferulic acid regulates the Nrf2/heme oxygenase-1 system and counteracts trimethyltin-induced neuronal damage in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eCatino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, several lines of evidence have pointed out the efficacy of ferulic acid (FA in counteracting oxidative stress elicited by β-amyloid or free radical initiators, based on the ability of this natural antioxidant to up-regulate the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and biliverdin reductase (BVR system. However, scarce results can be found in literature regarding the cytoprotective effects of FA in case of damage caused by neurotoxicants. The aim of this work is to investigate the mechanisms through which FA exerts neuroprotection in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells exposed to the neurotoxin trimethyltin. Ferulic acid (1-10 μM for 6 h dose-dependently increased both basal and TMT (10 μM for 24 h-induced HO-1 expression in SH-SY5Y cells by fostering the nuclear translocation of the transcriptional activator Nrf2. In particular, the co-treatment of FA (10 μM with TMT was also responsible for the nuclear translocation of HO-1 in an attempt to further increase cell stress response in SH-SY5Y cells. In addition to HO-1, FA (1-10 μM for 6 h dose-dependently increased the basal expression of BVR. The antioxidant and neuroprotective features of FA, through the increase of HO activity, were supported by the evidence that FA inhibited TMT (10 μM-induced lipid peroxidation (evaluated by detecting 4-hydroxy-nonenal and DNA fragmentation in SH-SY5Y cells and that this antioxidant effect was reversed by the HO inhibitor Zinc-protoporphyrin-IX (5 μM. Among the by-products of the HO/BVR system, carbon monoxide (CORM-2, 50 nM and bilirubin (50 nM significantly inhibited TMT-induced superoxide anion formation in SH-SY5Y cells. All together, these results corroborate the neuroprotective effect of FA through the up-regulation of the HO-1/BVR system, via carbon monoxide and bilirubin formation, and provide the first evidence on the role of HO-1/Nrf2 axis in FA-related enhancement of cell stress response in human neurons.

  4. Ginkgolide B revamps neuroprotective role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation against Aβ25-35 -induced neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navrattan; Dhiman, Monisha; Perez-Polo, J Regino; Mantha, Anil K

    2015-06-01

    Accumulating evidence points to roles for oxidative stress, amyloid beta (Aβ), and mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In neurons, the base excision repair pathway is the predominant DNA repair (BER) pathway for repairing oxidized base lesions. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a multifunctional enzyme with DNA repair and reduction-oxidation activities, has been shown to enhance neuronal survival after oxidative stress. This study seeks to determine 1) the effect of Aβ25-35 on reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS) levels, 2) the activities of respiratory complexes (I, III, and IV), 3) the role of APE1 by ectopic expression, and 4) the neuromodulatory role of ginkgolide B (GB; from the leaves of Ginkgo biloba). The pro-oxidant Aβ25-35 peptide treatment increased the levels of ROS/RNS in human neuroblastoma IMR-32 and SH-SY5Y cells, which were decreased after pretreatment with GB. Furthermore, the mitochondrial APE1 level was found to be decreased after treatment with Aβ25-35 up to 48 hr, and the level was increased significantly in cells pretreated with GB. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS; activities of complexes I, III, and IV) indicated that Aβ25-35 treatment decreased activities of complexes I and IV, and pretreatment with GB and ectopic APE1 expression enhanced these activities significantly compared with Aβ25-35 treatment. Our results indicate that ectopic expression of APE1 potentiates neuronal cells to overcome the oxidative damage caused by Aβ25-35 . In addition, GB has been shown to modulate the mitochondrial OXPHOS against Aβ25-35 -induced oxidative stress and also to regulate the levels of ROS/RNS in the presence of ectopic APE1. This study presents findings from a new point of view to improve therapeutic potential for AD via the synergistic neuroprotective role played by APE1 in combination with the phytochemical GB. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Raloxifene Regulates Arginine-Vasopressin Gene Expression in Human Female Neuroblastoma Cells Through G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor and ERK Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Daniela; Ghorbanpoor, Samar; Acaz-Fonseca, Estefania; Ruiz-Palmero, Isabel; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2015-10-01

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator raloxifene reduces blood pressure in hypertensive postmenopausal women. In the present study we have explored whether raloxifene regulates gene expression of arginine vasopressin (AVP), which is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The effect of raloxifene was assessed in human female SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, which have been recently identified as a suitable cellular model to study the estrogenic regulation of AVP. Raloxifene, within a concentration ranging from 10(-10) M to 10(-6) M, decreased the mRNA levels of AVP in SH-SY5Y cells with maximal effect at 10(-7) M. This effect of raloxifene was imitated by an agonist (±)-1-[(3aR*,4S*,9bS*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinolin-8-yl]-ethanone of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER) and blocked by an antagonist (3aS*,4R*,9bR*)-4-(6-bromo-1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-3a,4,5,9b-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline of GPER and by GPER silencing. Raloxifene induced a time-dependent increase in the level of phosphorylated ERK1 and ERK2, by a mechanism blocked by the GPER antagonist. The treatment of SH-SY5Y cells with either a MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2-specific inhibitor (1,4-diamino-2, 3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadine) or a protein kinase C inhibitor (sotrastaurin) blocked the effects of raloxifene on the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and the regulation of AVP mRNA levels. These results reveal a mechanism mediating the regulation of AVP expression by raloxifene, involving the activation of GPER, which in turn activates protein kinase C, MAPK/ERK kinase, and ERK. The regulation of AVP by raloxifene and GPER may have implications for the treatment of blood hypertension(.).

  6. Neuroblastoma: Molecular Pathogenesis and Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Louis, Chrystal U; Shohet, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a developmental tumor of young children arising from the embryonic sympathoadrenal lineage of the neural crest. Currently neuroblastoma is the primary cause of death from pediatric cancer for children between the age of 1 and 5 years and accounts for approximately 13% of all pediatric cancer mortality. Its clinical impact and its unique biology have made this aggressive malignancy the focus of a large concerted translational research effort. New insights into tumor biology ar...

  7. Transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 in pigs confers resistance against xenograft rejection during ex vivo perfusion of porcine kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Björn; Ramackers, Wolf; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Lemme, Erika; Hassel, Petra; Queisser, Anna-Lisa; Herrmann, Doris; Barg-Kues, Brigitte; Carnwath, Joseph W; Klose, Johannes; Tiede, Andreas; Friedrich, Lars; Baars, Wiebke; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Winkler, Michael; Niemann, Heiner

    2011-01-01

    The major immunological hurdle to successful porcine-to-human xenotransplantation is the acute vascular rejection (AVR), characterized by endothelial cell (EC) activation and perturbation of coagulation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its derivatives have anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory effects and protect against reactive oxygen species, rendering HO-1 a promising molecule to control AVR. Here, we report the production and characterization of pigs transgenic for human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) and demonstrate significant protection in porcine kidneys against xenograft rejection in ex vivo perfusion with human blood and transgenic porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) in a TNF-α-mediated apoptosis assay. Transgenic and non-transgenic PAEC were tested in a TNF-α-mediated apoptosis assay. Expression of adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin) was measured by real-time PCR. hHO-1 transgenic porcine kidneys were perfused with pooled and diluted human AB blood in an ex vivo perfusion circuit. MHC class-II up-regulation after induction with IFN-γ was compared between wild-type and hHO-1 transgenic PAEC. Cloned hHO-1 transgenic pigs expressed hHO-1 in heart, kidney, liver, and in cultured ECs and fibroblasts. hHO-1 transgenic PAEC were protected against TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. Real-time PCR revealed reduced expression of adhesion molecules like ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. These effects could be abrogated by the incubation of transgenic PAECs with the specific HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphorine IX (Zn(II)PPIX, 20 μm). IFN-γ induced up-regulation of MHC class-II molecules was significantly reduced in PAECs from hHO-1 transgenic pigs. hHO-1 transgenic porcine kidneys could successfully be perfused with diluted human AB-pooled blood for a maximum of 240 min (with and without C1 inh), while in wild-type kidneys, blood flow ceased after ∼60 min. Elevated levels of d-Dimer and TAT were detected, but no significant consumption of fibrinogen and

  8. Severe combined immunodeficiency mouse-psoriatic human skin xenograft model: A modern tool connecting bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Kundu-Raychaudhuri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease. Research into the pathogenesis of this disease is hindered by the lack of a proper animal model. Over the past two decades, many scientists were involved in the development of animal models that nearly mirror the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. One such model, which has opened doors to the study of molecular complexities of psoriasis as well as its treatment, is the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse-human skin chimera model. This model not only mirrors the clinical and histopathological features of psoriasis but also help in the study of cell proliferation, angiogenesis, function of T cells, neurogenic inflammation and cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. In this article, we have reviewed the prospects and the limitations of the SCID mouse model of psoriasis.

  9. Mitochondrial Effects of PGC-1alpha Silencing in MPP+ Treated Human SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells

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    Qinyong Ye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The dopaminergic neuron degeneration and loss that occurs in Parkinson’s disease (PD has been tightly linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the aged-related cause of the mitochondrial defect observed in PD patients remains unclear, nuclear genes are of potential importance to mitochondrial function. Human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1α is a multi-functional transcription factor that tightly regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity. The goal of the present study was to explore the potential pathogenic effects of interference by the PGC-1α gene on N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+-induced SH-SY5Y cells. We utilized RNA interference (RNAi technology to probe the pathogenic consequences of inhibiting PGC-1α in the SH-SY5Y cell line. Remarkably, a reduction in PGC-1α resulted in the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP content and intracellular H2O2 generation, leading to the translocation of cytochrome c (cyt c to the cytoplasm in the MPP+-induced PD cell model. The expression of related proteins in the signaling pathway (e.g., estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1, NRF-2 and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ also decreased. Our finding indicates that small interfering RNA (siRNA interference targeting the PGC-1α gene could inhibit the function of mitochondria in several capacities and that the PGC-1α gene may modulate mitochondrial function by regulating the expression of ERRα, NRF-1, NRF-2 and PPARγ. Thus, PGC-1α can be considered a potential therapeutic target for PD.

  10. Heterogeneous intratumoral distribution of gadolinium nanoparticles within U87 human glioblastoma xenografts unveiled by micro-PIXE imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Asuncion; Roudeau, Stéphane; L'Homel, Baptiste; Pouzoulet, Frédéric; Bonnet-Boissinot, Sarah; Prezado, Yolanda; Ortega, Richard

    2017-04-15

    Metallic nanoparticles have great potential in cancer radiotherapy as theranostic drugs since, they serve simultaneously as contrast agents for medical imaging and as radio-therapy sensitizers. As with other anticancer drugs, intratumoral diffusion is one of the main limiting factors for therapeutic efficiency. To date, a few reports have investigated the intratumoral distribution of metallic nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to determine the quantitative distribution of gadolinium (Gd) nanoparticles after direct intratumoral injection within U87 human glioblastoma tumors grafted in mice, using micro-PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) imaging. AGuIX (Activation and Guiding of Irradiation by X-ray) 3 nm particles composed of a polysiloxane network surrounded by gadolinium chelates were used. PIXE results indicate that the direct injection of Gd nanoparticles in tumors results in their heterogeneous diffusion, probably related to variations in tumor density. All tumor regions contain Gd, but with markedly different concentrations, with a more than 250-fold difference. Also Gd can diffuse to the healthy adjacent tissue. This study highlights the usefulness of mapping the distribution of metallic nanoparticles at the intratumoral level, and proposes PIXE as an imaging modality to probe the quantitative distribution of metallic nanoparticles in tumors from experimental animal models with micrometer resolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nifurtimox induces apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier Sholler, Giselle L; Brard, Laurent; Straub, Jennifer A; Dorf, Lee; Illeyne, Sharon; Koto, Karen; Kalkunte, Satyan; Bosenberg, Marcus; Ashikaga, Taka; Nishi, Rae

    2009-03-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children and, when disseminated, carries a poor prognosis. Even with aggressive combinations of chemotherapy, surgery, autologous bone marrow transplant, and radiation, long-term survival remains at 30% and new therapies are needed. Recently, a patient with neuroblastoma who acquired Chagas disease was treated with nifurtimox with subsequent reduction in tumor size. The effect of nifurtimox on the neuroblastoma cell lines CHLA-90, LA1-55n, LA-N2, SMS-KCNR, and SY5Y was examined. Nifurtimox decreased cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell morphology, terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay, and caspase-3 activation indicate that cell death was primarily due to apoptosis. Nifurtimox also suppressed basal and TrkB-mediated Akt phosphorylation, and the cytotoxicity of nifurtimox was attenuated by a tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor (alpha-methyl-tyrosine). Nifurtimox killed catecholaminergic, but not cholinergic, autonomic neurons in culture. In vivo xenograft models showed inhibition of tumor growth with a histologic decrease in proliferation and increase in apoptosis. These results suggest that nifurtimox induces cell death in neuroblastoma. Therefore, further studies are warranted to develop nifurtimox as a promising new treatment for neuroblastoma.

  12. Reduced 64Cu uptake and tumor growth inhibition by knockdown of human copper transporter 1 in xenograft mouse model of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huawei; Wu, Jiu-sheng; Muzik, Otto; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Lee, Robert J; Peng, Fangyu

    2014-04-01

    Copper is an element required for cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Human prostate cancer xenografts with increased (64)Cu radioactivity were visualized previously by PET using (64)CuCl2 as a radiotracer ((64)CuCl2 PET). This study aimed to determine whether the increased tumor (64)Cu radioactivity was due to increased cellular uptake of (64)Cu mediated by human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) or simply due to nonspecific binding of ionic (64)CuCl2 to tumor tissue. In addition, the functional role of hCtr1 in proliferation of prostate cancer cells and tumor growth was also assessed. A lentiviral vector encoding short-hairpin RNA specific for hCtr1 (Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA) was constructed for RNA interference-mediated knockdown of hCtr1 expression in prostate cancer cells. The degree of hCtr1 knockdown was determined by Western blot, and the effect of hCtr1 knockdown on copper uptake and proliferation were examined in vitro by cellular (64)Cu uptake and cell proliferation assays. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor uptake of (64)Cu were determined by PET quantification and tissue radioactivity assay. The effects of hCtr1 knockdown on tumor growth were assessed by PET/CT and tumor size measurement with a caliper. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of hCtr1 was associated with the reduced cellular uptake of (64)Cu and the suppression of prostate cancer cell proliferation in vitro. At 24 h after intravenous injection of the tracer (64)CuCl2, the (64)Cu uptake by the tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (4.02 ± 0.31 percentage injected dose per gram [%ID/g] in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 and 2.30 ± 0.59 %ID/g in Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) was significantly lower than the (64)Cu uptake by the control tumors without knockdown of hCtr1 (7.21 ± 1.48 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-PC-3 and 5.57 ± 1.20 %ID/g in Lenti-SCR-shRNA-DU-145, P cancer xenograft tumors with knockdown of hCtr1 (179 ± 111 mm(3) for Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-PC-3 or 39 ± 22 mm(3) for Lenti-hCtr1-shRNA-DU-145) were

  13. Intravenous siRNA Silencing of Survivin Enhances Activity of Mitomycin C in Human Bladder RT4 Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Minjian; Au, Jessie L-S; Wientjes, M Guillaume; O'Donnell, Michael A; Loughlin, Kevin R; Lu, Ze

    2015-07-01

    Survivin inhibits apoptosis and enables tumor cells to escape from therapy induced senescence. High survivin expression is associated with bladder cancer aggressiveness and recurrence. We evaluated whether survivin expression is reduced by siRNA and whether survivin silencing would enhance mitomycin C activity in human RT4 bladder transitional cell tumors in vitro and in vivo. We assessed the effectiveness of siRNA therapy using 2 newly developed pegylated cationic liposome carriers, PCat and PPCat. Each has a fusogenic lipid to destabilize the endosomal membrane. PPCat further contains paclitaxel to enhance in vivo delivery and transfection of survivin siRNA. In vitro antitumor activity was evaluated by short-term MTT and long-term clonogenicity cytotoxicity assays. In vivo intravenous therapy was assessed in mice bearing subcutaneous tumors. Nontarget siRNA showed no antitumor activity in vitro or in vivo. Treatment of cultured cells with mitomycin C at a 50% cytotoxic concentration enhanced survivin mRNA and protein levels. Adding PPCat or PCat containing survivin siRNA reversed survivin induction and enhanced mitomycin C activity (p <0.05). In tumor bearing mice single agent mitomycin C delayed tumor growth and almost tripled the survivin protein level in residual tumors. Adding PPCat-survivin siRNA, which alone resulted in a minor survivin decrease of less than 10%, completely reversed mitomycin C induced survivin and enhanced mitomycin C activity (p <0.05). Results indicate that there is effective in vivo survivin silencing and synergism between mitomycin C and PPCat-survivin siRNA. This combination represents a potentially useful chemo-gene therapy for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Successful inhibition of intracranial human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft growth via systemic adenoviral delivery of soluble endostatin and soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2: laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentirmai, Oszkar; Baker, Cheryl H; Bullain, Szofia S; Lin, Ning; Takahashi, Masaya; Folkman, Judah; Mulligan, Richard C; Carter, Bob S

    2008-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized by neovascularization, raising the question of whether angiogenic blockade may be a useful therapeutic strategy for this disease. It has been suggested, however, that, to be useful, angiogenic blockade must be persistent and at levels sufficient to overcome proangiogenic signals from tumor cells. In this report, the authors tested the hypothesis that sustained high concentrations of 2 different antiangiogenic proteins, delivered using a systemic gene therapy strategy, could inhibit the growth of established intracranial U87 human GBM xenografts in nude mice. Mice harboring established U87 intracranial tumors received intravenous injections of adenoviral vectors encoding either the extracellular domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2-Fc fusion protein (Ad-VEGFR2-Fc) alone, soluble endostatin (Ad-ES) alone, a combination of Ad-VEGFR2-Fc and Ad-ES, or immunoglobulin 1-Fc (Ad-Fc) as a control. Three weeks after treatment, magnetic resonance imaging-based determination of tumor volume showed that treatment with Ad-VEGFR2-Fc, Ad-ES, or Ad-VEGFR2-Fc in combination with Ad-ES, produced 69, 59, and 74% growth inhibition, respectively. Bioluminescent monitoring of tumor growth revealed growth inhibition in the same treatment groups to be 62, 74, and 72%, respectively. Staining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling showed reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in all antiangiogenic treatment groups. These results suggest that systemic delivery and sustained production of endostatin and soluble VEGFR2 can slow intracranial glial tumor growth by both reducing cell proliferation and increasing tumor apoptosis. This work adds further support to the concept of using antiangiogenesis therapy for intracranial GBM.

  15. Successful inhibition of intracranial human glioblastoma multiforme xenograft growth via systemic adenoviral delivery of soluble endostatin and soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentirmai, Oszkar; Baker, Cheryl H.; Bullain, Szofia S.; Lin, Ning; Takahashi, Masaya; Folkman, Judah; Mulligan, Richard C.; Carter, Bob S.

    2015-01-01

    Object Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized by neovascularization, raising the question of whether angiogenic blockade may be a useful therapeutic strategy for this disease. It has been suggested, however, that, to be useful, angiogenic blockade must be persistent and at levels sufficient to overcome proangiogenic signals from tumor cells. In this report, the authors tested the hypothesis that sustained high concentrations of 2 different antiangiogenic proteins, delivered using a systemic gene therapy strategy, could inhibit the growth of established intracranial U87 human GBM xenografts in nude mice. Methods Mice harboring established U87 intracranial tumors received intravenous injections of adenoviral vectors encoding either the extracellular domain of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2-Fc fusion protein (Ad-VEGFR2-Fc) alone, soluble endostatin (Ad-ES) alone, a combination of Ad-VEGFR2-Fc and Ad-ES, or immunoglobulin 1-Fc (Ad-Fc) as a control. Results Three weeks after treatment, magnetic resonance imaging-based determination of tumor volume showed that treatment with Ad-VEGFR2-Fc, Ad-ES, or Ad-VEGFR2-Fc in combination with Ad-ES, produced 69, 59, and 74% growth inhibition, respectively. Bioluminescent monitoring of tumor growth revealed growth inhibition in the same treatment groups to be 62, 74, and 72%, respectively. Staining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen and with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase–mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling showed reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in all antiangiogenic treatment groups. Conclusions These results suggest that systemic delivery and sustained production of endostatin and soluble VEGFR2 can slow intracranial glial tumor growth by both reducing cell proliferation and increasing tumor apoptosis. This work adds further support to the concept of using antiangiogenesis therapy for intracranial GBM. PMID:18447716

  16. 1’-Acetoxychavicol acetate inhibits growth of human oral carcinoma xenograft in mice and potentiates cisplatin effect via proinflammatory microenvironment alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Lionel LA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral cancers although preventable, possess a low five-year survival rate which has remained unchanged over the past three decades. In an attempt to find a more safe, affordable and effective treatment option, we describe here the use of 1’S-1’-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA, a component of Malaysian ginger traditionally used for various medicinal purposes. Methods Whether ACA can inhibit the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells alone or in combination with cisplatin (CDDP, was explored both in vitro using MTT assays and in vivo using Nu/Nu mice. Occurrence of apoptosis was assessed using PARP and DNA fragmentation assays, while the mode of action were elucidated through global expression profiling followed by Western blotting and IHC assays. Results We found that ACA alone inhibited the growth of oral SCC cells, induced apoptosis and suppressed its migration rate, while minimally affecting HMEC normal cells. ACA further enhanced the cytotoxic effects of CDDP in a synergistic manner as suggested by combination index studies. We also found that ACA inhibited the constitutive activation of NF-κB through suppression of IKKα/β activation. Human oral tumor xenografts studies in mice revealed that ACA alone was as effective as CDDP in reducing tumor volume, and further potentiated CDDP effects when used in combination with minimal body weight loss. The effects of ACA also correlated with a down-regulation of NF-κB regulated gene (FasL and Bim, including proinflammatory (NF-κB and COX-2 and proliferative (cyclin D1 biomarkers in tumor tissue. Conclusion Overall, our results suggest that ACA inhibits the growth of oral SCC and further potentiates the effect of standard CDDP treatment by modulation of proinflammatory microenvironment. The current preclinical data could form the basis for further clinical trials to improve the current standards for oral cancer care using this active component from the Malaysian

  17. Lidocaine Induces Apoptosis and Suppresses Tumor Growth in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and in a Xenograft Model In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Chen, Dong-Tai; Pan, Jia-Hao; Chen, Yong-Hua; Yan, Yan; Li, Qiang; Xue, Rui-Feng; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Zeng, Wei-An

    2017-05-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have focused on the potential beneficial effects of regional anesthetics, and the differences in cancer prognosis may be the result of anesthetics on cancer biologic behavior. However, the function and underlying mechanisms of lidocaine in hepatocellular carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo have been poorly studied. Human HepG2 cells were treated with lidocaine. Cell viability, colony formation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were assessed. The effects of lidocaine on apoptosis-related and mitogen-activated protein kinase protein expression were evaluated by Western blot analysis. The antitumor activity of lidocaine in hepatocellular carcinoma with or without cisplatin was investigated with in vitro experiments and also with animal experiments. Lidocaine inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The authors also found that lidocaine arrested cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle (63.7 ± 1.7% vs. 72.4 ± 3.2%; P = 0.0143) and induced apoptosis (1.7 ± 0.3% vs. 5.0 ± 0.7%; P = 0.0009). Lidocaine may exert these functions by causing an increase in Bax protein and activated caspase-3 and a corresponding decrease in Bcl-2 protein through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 pathways. More importantly, for the first time, xenograft experiments (n = 8 per group) indicated that lidocaine suppressed tumor development (P lidocaine vs. control) and enhanced the sensitivity of cisplatin (P = 0.0008; lidocaine plus cisplatin vs. cisplatin). The authors' findings suggest that lidocaine may exert potent antitumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma. Furthermore, combining lidocaine with cisplatin may be a novel treatment option for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  18. Chemoresistance acquisition induces a global shift of expression of aniogenesis-associated genes and increased pro-angogenic activity in neuroblastoma cells

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    Doerr Hans W

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoresistance acquisition may influence cancer cell biology. Here, bioinformatics analysis of gene expression data was used to identify chemoresistance-associated changes in neuroblastoma biology. Results Bioinformatics analysis of gene expression data revealed that expression of angiogenesis-associated genes significantly differs between chemosensitive and chemoresistant neuroblastoma cells. A subsequent systematic analysis of a panel of 14 chemosensitive and chemoresistant neuroblastoma cell lines in vitro and in animal experiments indicated a consistent shift to a more pro-angiogenic phenotype in chemoresistant neuroblastoma cells. The molecular mechanims underlying increased pro-angiogenic activity of neuroblastoma cells are individual and differ between the investigated chemoresistant cell lines. Treatment of animals carrying doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma xenografts with doxorubicin, a cytotoxic drug known to exert anti-angiogenic activity, resulted in decreased tumour vessel formation and growth indicating chemoresistance-associated enhanced pro-angiogenic activity to be relevant for tumour progression and to represent a potential therapeutic target. Conclusion A bioinformatics approach allowed to identify a relevant chemoresistance-associated shift in neuroblastoma cell biology. The chemoresistance-associated enhanced pro-angiogenic activity observed in neuroblastoma cells is relevant for tumour progression and represents a potential therapeutic target.

  19. Targeting gastrin-releasing peptide suppresses neuroblastoma progression via upregulation of PTEN signaling.

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    Pritha Paul

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP as an autocrine growth factor for neuroblastoma. Here, we report that GRP silencing regulates cell signaling involved in the invasion-metastasis cascade. Using a doxycycline inducible system, we demonstrate that GRP silencing decreased anchorage-independent growth, inhibited migration and neuroblastoma cell-mediated angiogenesis in vitro, and suppressed metastasis in vivo. Targeted inhibition of GRP decreased the mRNA levels of oncogenes responsible for neuroblastoma progression. We also identified PTEN/AKT signaling as a key mediator of the tumorigenic properties of GRP in neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, PTEN overexpression decreased GRP-mediated migration and angiogenesis; a novel role for this, otherwise, understated tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma. Furthermore, activation of AKT (pAKT positively correlated with neuroblastoma progression in an in vivo tumor-metastasis model. PTEN expression was slightly decreased in metastatic lesions. A similar phenomenon was observed in human neuroblastoma sections, where, early-stage localized tumors had a higher PTEN expression relative to pAKT; however, an inverse expression pattern was observed in liver lesions. Taken together, our results argue for a dual purpose of targeting GRP in neuroblastoma--1 decreasing expression of critical oncogenes involved in tumor progression, and 2 enhancing activation of tumor suppressor genes to treat aggressive, advanced-stage disease.

  20. Validated detection of human anti-chimeric immune responses in serum of neuroblastoma patients treated with ch14.18/CHO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Nikolai; Eger, Christin; Seidel, Diana; Jüttner, Madlen; Lode, Holger N

    2014-05-01

    Human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) ch14.18/CHO is directed against disialoganglioside GD2. Activity and efficacy of this mAb are currently determined in ongoing clinical Phase II and -III studies in high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). Based on the chimeric nature of this mAb, some patients may develop a human anti-chimeric immune response (Mirick et al., 2004) which impacts on pharmacokinetics and may induce anti-anti-idiotype (Id) mAb with a potential survival benefit. Therefore, a validated method of quantitative detection of human anti-chimeric antibodies (HACA) in serum samples of NB patients treated with ch14.18/CHO is an important tool for monitoring of clinical trials. Here, we report a validated sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) according to the one arm binding principle using ch14.18/CHO as a capture mAb and biotinylated ch14.18/CHO mAb for detection. Ganglidiomab, a monoclonal anti-Id Ab to ch14.18/CHO (Lode et al., 2013), was used as a standard for assay validation and HACA quantification. Systematic evaluation of the established ELISA procedure revealed an optimal serum sample dilution factor of 1:160. Assay validation was accomplished with a set of tailored quality controls (QC) containing distinct concentrations of ganglidiomab (3 and 15μg/ml). The coefficients of variation (CV) for all within-assay and inter-assay measurements using QCs were under 20% and the limit of detection (LOD) was 1.1μg/ml. Three patients (P1, P2, P3) treated with a 10day continuous infusion of 100mg/m(2) of ch14.18/CHO were selected for analysis with this assay. Selection was based on ch14.18/CHO drug level on day 8 in cycle 2 of >10μg/ml (expected) (P1) and of <2μg/ml (unexpected) (P2 and P3). Both patients with unexpected low ch14.18/CHO levels revealed a strong signal in the HACA ELISA. Interestingly, ch14.18/CHO-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) could not be detected in P2 in contrast to P3 suggesting anti-NB activity even in the

  1. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

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    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  2. The Use of Longitudinal 18F-FET MicroPET Imaging to Evaluate Response to Irinotecan in Orthotopic Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Mette K; Kristoffersen, Karina; Michaelsen, Signe R

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Brain tumor imaging is challenging. Although 18F-FET PET is widely used in the clinic, the value of 18F-FET MicroPET to evaluate brain tumors in xenograft has not been assessed to date. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate the performance of in vivo 18F-FET MicroPET in dete...

  3. Human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase and thymidine kinase inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells in cellular and xenograft mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Yi, B-R; Lee, H J; Jeung, E-B; Kim, S U; Choi, K-C

    2012-06-01

    As human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs) are capable of multiple lineage differentiation, extensive self-renewal and tumor targeting, they may be valuable for clinical anticancer therapies. In this study, we used hAFSCs as vehicles for targeted delivery of therapeutic suicide genes to breast cancer cells. hAFSCs were engineered to produce AF2.CD-TK cells in order to express two suicide genes encoding bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD) and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) that convert non-toxic prodrugs, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and mono-phosphorylate ganciclovir (GCV-MP), into cytotoxic metabolites, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and triphosphate ganciclovir (GCV-TP), respectively. In cell viability test in vitro, AF2.CD-TK cells inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells in the presence of the 5-FC or GCV prodrugs, or a combination of these two reagents. When the mixture of 5-FC and GCV was treated together, an additive cytotoxic effect was observed in the cell viability. In animal experiments using female BALB/c nude mouse xenografts, which developed by injecting MDA-MB-231 cells, treatment with AF2.CD-TK cells in the presence of 5-FC and GCV significantly reduced tumor volume and weight to the same extent seen in the mice treated with 5-FU. Histopathological and fluorescent staining assays further showed that AF2.CD-TK cells were located exactly at the site of tumor formation. Furthermore, breast tissues treated with AF2.CD-TK cells and two prodrugs maintained their normal structures (for example, the epidermis and reticular layers) while breast tissue structures in 5-FU-treated mice were almost destroyed by the potent cytotoxicity of the drug. Taken together, these results indicate that AF2.CD-TK cells can serve as excellent vehicles in a novel therapeutic cell-based gene-directed prodrug system to selectively target breast malignancies.

  4. Antitumor effect and mechanism of Gecko on human esophageal carcinoma cell lines in vitro and xenografted sarcoma 180 in Kunming mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Jian-Gang; Wang, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan; Wu, Yin-Ping; Xi, Shou-Min

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-tumor effect of Chinese medicine Gecko on human esophageal carcinoma cell lines and xenografted sarcoma 180 in Kunming mice and its mechanism. METHODS: The serum pharmacological method was used in vitro. The growth rates of the human esophageal carcinoma cells (EC9706 or EC1) were measured by a modified 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The transplanted tumor model of the mouse S180 sarcoma was established. Fifty mice were randomly divided into five groups (n = 10). Three Gecko groups were treated respectively with oral administration of Gecko powder at a daily dose of 13.5 g/kg, 9 g/kg, and 4.5 g/kg. The negative group (NS group) was treated with oral administration of an equal volume of saline and the positive group (CTX group) was treated with 100 mg/kg Cytoxan by intraperitoneal injection at the first day. After 2 wk of treatment, the anti-tumor activity was evaluated by tumor tissue weighing. The impact on immune organ was detected based on the thymus index, spleen index, phagocytic rate and phagocytic index. The protein expression of vascular endothelin growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were detected by immunohistochemistry. The cell apoptotic rate was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. RESULTS: The A value in each group treated with Gecko after 72 h was reduced significantly in EC9706 and in EC1. The tumor weight in each group of Gecko was decreased significantly (1.087 ± 0.249 vs 2.167 ± 0.592; 1.021 ± 0.288 vs 2.167 ± 0.592; 1.234 ± 0.331 vs 2.167 ± 0.592; P Gecko groups had no significant difference compared with the NS group. The immunoreactive score of VEGF and bFGF protein expression of each Gecko group by immunohistochemical staining were lowered significantly. The apoptosis index (AI) of each group was increased progressively with increase of dose of Gecko by TUNEL. CONCLUSION

  5. Biosynthesized Platinum Nanoparticles Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Lung-Cancer Cells in vitro and Delay the Growth of a Human Lung-Tumor Xenograft in vivo -In vitro and in vivo Anticancer Activity of bio-Pt NPs-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendale Yogesh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lung cancer remains a deadly disease with unsatisfactory overall survival. Cisplatin, a standard platinum (Pt-based chemotherapeutic agent, has the potential to inhibit the growth of lung cancer. Its use, however, is occasionally limited by severe organ toxicity. However, until now, no systematic study has been conducted to verify its efficacy with proper experimental support in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether biosynthesized Pt nanoparticles (NPs inhibited human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo to validate their use in alternative and complementary medicine. Methods: We evaluated the in vitro and the in vivo anticancer efficiencies of biosynthesized Pt NPs in a subcutaneous xenograft model with A549 cells. Severe combined immune deficient mice (SCID were divided into four groups: group 1 being the vehicle control group and groups 2, 3 and 4 being the experimental groups. Once the tumor volume had reached 70 ─ 75 mm3, the progression profile of the tumor growth kinetics and the body weights of the mice were measured every week for 6 weeks after oral administration of Pt NPs. Doses of Pt NPs of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups and a dose of honey was administered to the vehicle control group. The efficacy was quantified by using the delay in tumor growth following the administration of Pt NPs of A549 human-lung-cancer xenografts growing in SCID mice. Results: The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicated that Pt NPs, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of A549 cells, and the in vivo evaluation showed that Pt NPs at the mid and high doses effectively inhibited and delayed the growth of lung cancer in SCID mice. Conclusion: These findings confirm the antitumor properties of biosynthesized Pt NPs and suggest that they may be a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of patients with lung cancer.

  6. Neuroblastoma: molecular pathogenesis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Chrystal U; Shohet, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a developmental tumor of young children arising from the embryonic sympathoadrenal lineage of the neural crest. Neuroblastoma is the primary cause of death from pediatric cancer for children between the ages of one and five years and accounts for ∼13% of all pediatric cancer mortality. Its clinical impact and unique biology have made this aggressive malignancy the focus of a large concerted translational research effort. New insights into tumor biology are driving the development of new classification schemas. Novel targeted therapeutic approaches include small-molecule inhibitors as well as epigenetic, noncoding-RNA, and cell-based immunologic therapies. In this review, recent insights regarding the pathogenesis and biology of neuroblastoma are placed in context with the current understanding of tumor biology and tumor/host interactions. Systematic classification of patients coupled with therapeutic advances point to a future of improved clinical outcomes for this biologically distinct and highly aggressive pediatric malignancy.

  7. 64Cu-ATSM Reflects pO2 Levels in Human Head and Neck Cancer Xenografts but Not in Colorectal Cancer Xenografts: Comparison with 64CuCl2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper T.; Forman, Julie

    2016-01-01

    -ATSM as a hypoxia marker. In this study, accumulation and distribution of 64Cu-ATSM and 64CuCl2 in tumor tissue were compared with partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) probe measurements. Methods: One-hour dynamic PET scans were performed on nude mice bearing subcutaneous human head and neck tumors (FaDu) and human...

  8. 64Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) Is a Promising New Angiogenesis PET Tracer: Correlation between Tumor Uptake and Integrin αvβ3 Expression in Human Neuroendocrine Tumor Xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxbøl, Jytte; Schjøth-Eskesen, Christina; El Ali, Henrik H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate a new PET tracer (64)Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) for imaging of tumor angiogenesis using gene expression of angiogenesis markers as reference and to estimate radiation dosimetry for humans. Procedures. Nude mice with human neuroendocrine tumor xenografts (H...... human radiation-absorbed doses were estimated using OLINDA/EXM. Results. Tumor uptake was 1.2%ID/g with strong correlations between gene expression and tracer uptake, for integrin α(V) R = 0.76, integrin β(3) R = 0.75 and VEGF-A R = 0.81 (all P body effective dose for humans...... was estimated to be 0.038 and 0.029 mSv/MBq for females and males, respectively, with highest absorbed dose in bladder wall. Conclusion. (64)Cu-NODAGA-c(RGDyK) is a promising new angiogenesis PET tracer with potential for human use....

  9. Using droplet digital PCR to analyze MYCN and ALK copy number in plasma from patients with neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodrini, Marco; Sprüssel, Annika; Astrahantseff, Kathy; Tiburtius, Daniela; Konschak, Robert; Lode, Holger N; Fischer, Matthias; Keilholz, Ulrich; Eggert, Angelika; Deubzer, Hedwig E

    2017-10-17

    The invasive nature of surgical biopsies deters sequential application, and single biopsies often fail to reflect tumor dynamics, intratumor heterogeneity and drug sensitivities likely to change during tumor evolution and treatment. Implementing molecular characterization of cell-free neuroblastoma-derived DNA isolated from blood plasma could improve disease assessment for treatment selection and monitoring of patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. We established droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) protocols for MYCN and ALK copy number status in plasma from neuroblastoma patients. Our ddPCR protocol accurately discriminated between MYCN and ALK amplification, gain and normal diploid status in a large panel of neuroblastoma cell lines, and discrepancies with reported MYCN and ALK status were detected, including a high-level MYCN amplification in NB-1, a MYCN gain in SH-SY5Y, a high-level ALK amplification in IMR-32 and ALK gains in BE(2)-C, Kelly, SH-SY5Y and LAN-6. MYCN and ALK status were also reliably determined from cell-free DNA derived from medium conditioned by the cell lines. MYCN and ALK copy numbers of subcutaneous neuroblastoma xenograft tumors were accurately determined from cell-free DNA in the mouse blood plasma. In a final validation step, we accurately distinguished MYCN and ALK copy numbers of the corresponding primary tumors using retrospectively collected blood plasma samples from 10 neuroblastoma patients. Our data justify the further development of molecular disease characterization using cell-free DNA in blood plasma from patients with neuroblastoma. This expanded molecular diagnostic palette may improve monitoring of disease progression including relapse and metastatic events as well as therapy success or failure in high-risk neuroblastoma patients.

  10. Method for the validation of immunohistochemical staining using SCID mouse xenografts: expression of CD40 and CD154 in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Keidai; Miyamoto, Masaki; Yoshioka, Tatsuya; Kadoya, Masatoshi; Li, Li; Mishra, Roshan; Ichinokawa, Kazuomi; Shoji, Yasuhito; Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kaga, Kichizo; Kato, Tatsuya; Kaji, Mitsuhito; Ohbuchi, Toshiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Matsui, Yoshiro; Hirano, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    This report proposes a concept for the standardization of immunohistochemical evaluation. Immunohistochemical staining has several problems associated with the sensitivity of the technical process and standardization of the assessment of potent staining. We provided data focusing on this concept through immunostaining for CD154 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We used two types of anti-CD154 antibody as primary antibodies in immunohistochemical staining, as previously reported. Western blot analysis confirmed strong CD154 expression in the cultured cell line PC10, but not in LK2. We also assessed CD154 expression in SCID mouse xenografts of these cell lines. SCID xenograft data on western blot analysis were consistent with those of cultured cell lines. These xenografts could thus be used as positive or negative tissue controls for CD154 immunostaining. Primary antibodies should therefore be confirmed as recognizing target lesions, while control tissue specimens should be objectively confirmed as having target products using another experimental method. Our method would allow results to be unified at more than one laboratory and could act as an objective control assessment method in immunohistochemistry.

  11. Establishment of human patient-derived endometrial cancer xenografts in NOD scid gamma mice for the study of invasion and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Unno

    Full Text Available Most endometrial cancers are detected early and have a good prognosis, while some endometrial cancers are highly invasive, metastasize early, and respond suboptimally to therapy. Currently, appropriate model systems to study the aggressive nature of these tumors are lacking. The objective of this study was to establish a mouse xenograft model of endometrial tumors derived from patients in order to study the biological aggressive characteristics that underlie invasion and metastasis.Endometrial tumor tissue fragments (1.5 mm × 1.5 mm from patients undergoing surgery, were transplanted under the renal capsule of NOD scid gamma mice. After 6-8 weeks, tumors were excised and serially transplanted into additional mice for propagation. Immunohistochemical analysis of the tumors was done for various tumor markers.Four cases of different subtypes of endometrial cancer were grown and propagated in mice. Three of the four tumor cases invaded into the kidneys and to adjacent organs. While all tumors exhibited minimal to no staining for estrogen receptor α, progesterone receptor staining was observed for tumor grafts. In addition, levels and localization of E-cadherin, cytokeratin and vimentin varied depending on subtype. Finally, all tumor xenografts stained positively for urokinase plasminogen activator while 3 tumor xenografts, which showed invasive characteristics, stained positively for urokinase plasminogen activator receptor.Endometrial tumors transplanted under the renal capsule exhibit growth, invasion and local spread. These tumors can be propagated and used to study aggressive endometrial cancer.

  12. Mesenchymal change and drug resistance in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiditch, Jessica A; Jie, Chunfa; Lautz, Timothy B; Yu, Songtao; Clark, Sandra; Voronov, Dimitry; Chu, Fei; Madonna, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic initiation has many phenotypic similarities to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including loss of cell-cell adhesion, increased invasiveness, and increased cell mobility. We have previously demonstrated that drug resistance is associated with a metastatic phenotype in neuroblastoma (NB). The purpose of this project was to determine if the development of doxorubicin resistance is associated with characteristics of mesenchymal change in human NB cells. Total RNA was isolated from wild type (WT) and doxorubicin-resistant (DoxR) human NB cell lines (SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C) and analyzed using the Illumina Human HT-12 version 4 Expression BeadChip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Volcano plots and heat maps were generated. Genes of interest with a fold change in expression >1.5 and an adjusted P change via multiple pathways in the transition to a drug-resistant state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antagonism by 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetraline and other serotonin agonists of muscarinic M1-type receptors coupled to inositol phospholipid breakdown in human IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, C.J. (Astra Research Centre AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden) Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)); Ahlgren, P.C. (Karolinska Institutet (Sweden)); O' Neill, C. (Huddinge Univ. Hospital (Sweden))

    1991-01-01

    IMR-32 and SK-N-MC cells were found to contain ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate specific binding sites inhibited by pirenzepine in a manner suggesting the presence of both M1-type and M2-type muscarinic receptor recognition sites. Neither cell had detectable ({sup 3}H)8-OH-DPAT binding sites. Carbachol stimulated the rate of inositol phospholipid breakdown in IMR-32 and SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells with an EC{sub 50} value of about 50 {mu}M in both cases. Pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown in both cells with Hill slopes of unity and IC{sub 50} values of 15 nM (IMR-32) and 12 nM (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT competitively inhibited carbachol-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown with pA{sub 2} values of 5.78 (IMR-32) and 5.61 (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT agonists 5-MeODMT and buspirone at micromolar concentrations inhibited carbachol-stimulated breakdown in IMR-32 cells. The inhibition by 8-OH-DPAT and 5-MeODMT was not affected by preincubation with (-)alprenolol. 5-HT was without effect on either basal or carbachol-stimulated breakdown. It is concluded that IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells express muscarinic M1-type but not serotoninergic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. 8-OH-DPAT acts as a weak antagonist at these muscarinic receptors.

  14. Maintenance Treatment with Cetuximab and BAY86-9766 Increases Antitumor Efficacy of Irinotecan plus Cetuximab in Human Colorectal Cancer Xenograft Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Teresa; Napolitano, Stefania; Martini, Giulia; Martinelli, Erika; Cardone, Claudia; Normanno, Nicola; Vitagliano, Donata; Morgillo, Floriana; Fenizia, Francesca; Lambiase, Matilde; Formisano, Luigi; Bianco, Roberto; Ciardiello, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-09-15

    The use of cetuximab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer is limited by development of resistance. We have investigated in three models of highly epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent colorectal cancer xenografts, the effect of maintenance therapy with different kinase inhibitors alone or in combination with cetuximab, after cytotoxic treatment induction with irinotecan plus cetuximab. SW48, LIM 1215, and GEO colorectal cancer cell lines were engrafted into nude mice and treated for 3 weeks with irinotecan and/or cetuximab. The combined treatment induced a significant reduction of tumor size. A subsequent experiment was performed in all three xenograft models in which after an induction treatment with irinotecan plus cetuximab, mice were randomly assigned to one of the following treatments: control, cetuximab, regorafenib, a selective PIK3CA inhibitor (PIK3CAi), a selective MEK inhibitor (MEKi), and/or the combination of each inhibitor with cetuximab. The cetuximab plus MEKi treatment determined the best antitumor activity with suppression of tumor growth. This effect was prolonged for 13 to 15 weeks after cessation of therapy and was accompanied by prolonged survival. Antitumor activity was accompanied by inhibition of the MAPK and MEK pathways. Moreover, in the cetuximab plus MEKi-treated SW48 xenograft group, KRAS mutations as a mechanism of acquired resistance were detected in 25% of cases compared with 75% KRAS mutations in the MEKi-treated group. A possible strategy to prevent and/or overcome resistance to anti-EGFR inhibitors in metastatic colorectal cancer is a maintenance therapy with cetuximab plus MEKi after an initial treatment with irinotecan plus cetuximab. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Biau

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery.

  16. Graphene Oxide Nanoribbons Induce Autophagic Vacuoles in Neuroblastoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Mari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since graphene nanoparticles are attracting increasing interest in relation to medical applications, it is important to understand their potential effects on humans. In the present study, we prepared graphene oxide (GO nanoribbons by oxidative unzipping of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and analyzed their toxicity in two human neuroblastoma cell lines. Neuroblastoma is the most common solid neoplasia in children. The hallmark of these tumors is the high number of different clinical variables, ranging from highly metastatic, rapid progression and resistance to therapy to spontaneous regression or change into benign ganglioneuromas. Patients with neuroblastoma are grouped into different risk groups that are characterized by different prognosis and different clinical behavior. Relapse and mortality in high risk patients is very high in spite of new advances in chemotherapy. Cell lines, obtained from neuroblastomas have different genotypic and phenotypic features. The cell lines SK-N-BE(2 and SH-SY5Y have different genetic mutations and tumorigenicity. Cells were exposed to low doses of GO for different times in order to investigate whether GO was a good vehicle for biological molecules delivering individualized therapy. Cytotoxicity in both cell lines was studied by measuring cellular oxidative stress (ROS, mitochondria membrane potential, expression of lysosomial proteins and cell growth. GO uptake and cytoplasmic distribution of particles were studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM for up to 72 h. The results show that GO at low concentrations increased ROS production and induced autophagy in both neuroblastoma cell lines within a few hours of exposure, events that, however, are not followed by growth arrest or death. For this reason, we suggest that the GO nanoparticle can be used for therapeutic delivery to the brain tissue with minimal effects on healthy cells.

  17. Urinary catecholamine metabolites: Capillary gas chromatography method and experience with 12 cases of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grkovic, Sanja; Nikolic, Rajko; Dordevic, Maja; Stojanov, Ljubomir

    2005-07-01

    We propose a rapid, simple metodology for routine analysis of human urine to detect vanillylmandelic and homovanillic acid related to neuroblastoma. The assay were specific capillary gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. In this methodology an internal standard is used and the procedure involves ethyl ester formation without isolation of the compounds of interest. The run time is 36 minutes. We also report quantitative results for urinary vanillylmandelic and homovanillic acid in neuroblastoma patients, demonstrating the diagnostic value of this method.

  18. Molecular targeting of retinoic acid metabolism in neuroblastoma: the role of the CYP26 inhibitor R116010 in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, J. L.; Taylor, G A; Thomas, H.D.; Boddy, A V; Redfern, C P F; Veal, G J

    2007-01-01

    Isomerisation to all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) is widely accepted as the key mechanism underlying the favourable clinical properties of 13-cis-retinoic acid (13cisRA). As intracellular metabolism of ATRA by CYP26 may result in clinical resistance to 13cisRA, an increase in efficacy may be achieved through modulation of this metabolic pathway. We have evaluated the effect of the CYP26 inhibitor R116010 on retinoid metabolism in neuroblastoma cell lines and a xenograft model. In neuroblastoma ...

  19. Cerebellar neuroblastoma in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, S; Inamura, T; Morioka, T; Ishihara, S; Hirano, K; Murakami, N; Fukui, M

    2000-03-01

    A cerebellar neoplasm in an 8-month-old boy is reported. While this tumour was composed of small cells and had regions resembling desmoplastic medulloblastoma, it showed ultrastructural neuronal characteristics including bundles of microtubules in the cell processes, numerous synaptic vesicles, and occasional abortive or complete synapses. These characteristic features warranted the diagnosis of a neuroblastoma of the cerebellum. The nature of this rare intraparenchymal tumour in infants is also briefly discussed.

  20. Congenital neuroblastoma with placental involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Kume, Ayako; Morikawa, Teppei; Ogawa, Makiko; Yamashita, Aki; Yamaguchi, Shunichi; Fukayama, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    We describe an extremely rare case of congenital neuroblastoma with placental involvement. A fetus with a left abdominal mass detected during ultrasonography at 23 weeks’ gestation developed hydrops fetalis by 26 weeks’ gestation. The mother developed hypertension at 26 5/7 weeks’ gestation. Based on a clinical diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension, labor was induced at 26 6/7 weeks. However, intrauterine fetal death was diagnosed during delivery. Postmortern examination revealed a soli...

  1. Lycopene protects human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced death via inhibition of oxidative stress and mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    FENG, CHUNSHENG; LUO, TIANFEI; ZHANG, SHUYAN; LIU, KAI; ZHANG, YANHONG; LUO, YINAN; GE, PENGFEI

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress, which is characterized by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is a common pathway that results in neuronal injury or death due to various types of pathological stress. Although lycopene has been identified as a potent antioxidant, its effect on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced neuronal damage remains unclear. In the present study, pretreatment with lycopene was observed to protect SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells against H2O2-induced death via inhibition of apoptosis resulting from activation of caspase-3 and translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus. Furthermore, the over-produced ROS, as well as the reduced activities of anti-oxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, were demonstrated to be alleviated by lycopene. Additionally, lycopene counteracted H2O2-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, which was evidenced by suppression of mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, attenuation of the decline of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibition of the increase of Bax and decrease of Bcl-2 levels within the mitochondria. The release of cytochrome c and AIF from the mitochondria was also reduced. These results indicate that lycopene is a potent neuroprotectant against apoptosis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and could be administered to prevent neuronal injury or death. PMID:27035331

  2. Widespread dispersion of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 and adeno-associated virus serotype 6 vectors in the rat central nervous system and in human glioblastoma multiforme xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszthy, Peter C; Svendsen, Agnete; Wilson, James M; Kotin, Robert M; Lønning, Per Eystein; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Hoover, Frank

    2005-03-01

    The transduction patterns of recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) and serotype 6 (AAV6) vectors were assessed in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines, in human GBM biopsy spheroids, and in tumor xenografts growing in nude rat brains. All the cell lines tested (A172, D37, GaMg, HF66, and U373Mg) were found to be permissive to both AAV1 and AAV6 vectors, and thus displayed a transduction pattern similar to AAV2 vectors. For every cell line tested, the transduction efficiency displayed by AAV2 vectors was better than by isogenic and isopromoter AAV1 vectors. Transduction efficiency was dependent on the viral particle number used, suggesting that the receptors for these vectors are widely distributed in GBM tissues. Interestingly, AAV1, AAV2, and AAV6 vectors were able to infect and transduce the same cells when added simultaneously to monolayer cultures. Infection of human GBM biopsy spheroids with AAV1 and AAV6 vectors resulted in transgene expression both at the surface layers and in the core of the spheroids. Following injection of AAV1 and AAV6 vectors into human GBM biopsy xenografts growing in nude rat brains, reporter gene expression was seen both in the periphery as well as in the central regions of the tumors. When injected into the normal rat brain, both AAV1 and AAV6 vectors were found to transduce several central nervous system (CNS) regions. The presented results suggest a potential therapeutic role for AAV1 and AAV6 vectors in gene therapy for GBM and also for other CNS malignancies.

  3. Phase I trial of lestaurtinib for children with refractory neuroblastoma: a new approaches to neuroblastoma therapy consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minturn, Jane E; Evans, Audrey E; Villablanca, Judith G; Yanik, Gregory A; Park, Julie R; Shusterman, Suzanne; Groshen, Susan; Hellriegel, Edward T; Bensen-Kennedy, Debra; Matthay, Katherine K; Brodeur, Garrett M; Maris, John M

    2011-10-01

    TrkB acts as an oncogenic kinase in a subset of human neuroblastomas. Lestaurtinib, a multi-kinase inhibitor with potent activity against Trk kinases, has demonstrated activity in preclinical models of neuroblastoma. Patients with refractory high-risk neuroblastoma received lestaurtinib twice daily for 5 days out of seven in 28-day cycles, starting at 70% of the adult recommended Phase 2 dose. Lestaurtinib dose was escalated using a 3 + 3 design. Pharmacokinetics and plasma phospho-TrkB inhibitory activity were evaluated in the first cycle. Forty-seven subjects were enrolled, and 10 dose levels explored starting at 25 mg/M(2)/dose BID. Forty-six subjects were evaluable for response, and 42 subjects were fully evaluable for determination of dose escalation. Asymptomatic and reversible grade 3-4 transaminase elevation was dose limiting in 4 subjects. Reversible pancreatitis (grade 2) was observed in 3 subjects after prolonged treatment at higher dose levels. Other toxicities were mild and reversible. Pharmacokinetic analyses revealed rapid drug absorption, however inter-patient variability was large. Plasma inhibition of phospho-TrkB activity was observed 1 h post-dosing at 85 mg/M(2) with uniform inhibition at 120 mg/M(2). There were two partial responses and nine subjects had prolonged stable disease at dose levels ≥ 5, (median: 6 cycles). A biologically effective and recommended phase 2 dose of 120 mg/M(2)/dose BID was established. Lestaurtinib was well tolerated in patients with refractory neuroblastoma, and a dose level sufficient to inhibit TrkB activity was established. Safety and signs of activity at the higher dose levels warrant further evaluation in neuroblastoma.

  4. Targeting Suppressive Myeloid Cells Potentiates Checkpoint Inhibitors to Control Spontaneous Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yumeng; Eissler, Nina; Blanc, Katarina Le; Johnsen, John Inge; Kogner, Per; Kiessling, Rolf

    2016-08-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid cancer type in childhood, and high-risk patients have poor prognosis despite aggressive multimodal treatment. Neuroblastoma-driven inflammation contributes to the induction of suppressive myeloid cells that hamper efficient antitumor immune responses. Therefore, we sought to enhance antitumor immunity by removing immunosuppression mediated by myeloid cells. The prognostic values of myeloid cells are demonstrated by analyzing genomic datasets of neuroblastoma patients. The impact of tumor-derived factors on myelopoiesis and local induction of suppressive myeloid cells is dissected by in vitro culture models using freshly isolated human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, primary human monocytes, and murine bone marrow cells. To test the therapeutic efficacy of BLZ945 as a monotherapy or in combination with checkpoint inhibitors, we used a transgenic murine model (TH-MYCN) that develops aggressive spontaneous neuroblastoma. We report that infiltrating CSF-1R(+) myeloid cells predict poor clinical outcome in patients with neuroblastoma. In vitro, neuroblastoma-derived factors interfere with early development of myeloid cells and enable suppressive functions on human monocytes through M-CSF/CSF-1R interaction. In a transgenic mouse model (TH-MYCN) resembling high-risk human neuroblastoma, antagonizing CSF-1R with a selective inhibitor (BLZ945) modulates the induction of human and murine suppressive myeloid cells and efficiently limit tumor progression. While checkpoint inhibitors are insufficient in controlling tumor growth, combining BLZ945 with PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies results in superior tumor control. Our results demonstrate the essential role of CSF-1R signaling during the induction of suppressive myeloid cells and emphasize its clinical potential as an immunotherapy for human cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 22(15); 3849-59. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of the glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in combination with chemotherapy in xenograft models of human lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Frank; Friess, Thomas; Bader, Sabine; Muth, Gunter; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Rieder, Natascha; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody in development for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We compared the anti-tumor activity of obinutuzumab and rituximab in preclinical studies using subcutaneous Z138 and WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse models. Obinutuzumab and rituximab were assessed alone and in combination with bendamustine, fludarabine, chlorambucil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide/vincristine. Owing to strong single-agent efficacy in these models, suboptimal doses of obinutuzumab were applied to demonstrate a combination effect. Obinutuzumab plus bendamustine achieved superior tumor growth inhibition versus rituximab plus bendamustine and showed a statistically significant effect versus the respective single treatments. Combinations of obinutuzumab with fludarabine, chlorambucil or cyclophosphamide/vincristine demonstrated significantly superior activity to rituximab-based treatment. Obinutuzumab monotherapy was at least as effective as rituximab plus chemotherapy in vivo, and obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy was superior to the respective monotherapies. These data support further clinical investigation of obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy.

  6. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhenhai, E-mail: tomsyu@163.com [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China); Huang, Liangqian [Institute of Health Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) & Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine -SJTUSM, Shanghai, 200025 (China); Qiao, Pengyun; Jiang, Aifang; Wang, Li; Yang, Tingting [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China); Tang, Shengjian; Zhang, Wei [Plastic Surgery Institute of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261041 (China); Ren, Chune, E-mail: ren@wfmc.edu.cn [Center for Reproductive Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University, Weifang, Shandong, 261031 (China)

    2016-05-13

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. These findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  7. 68Ga-DOTATOC and FDG PET Imaging of Preclinical Neuroblastoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Claire; Prignon, Aurélie; Cazes, Alex; Combaret, Valérie; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Montravers, Françoise; Talbot, Jean-Noël

    2016-09-01

    Somatostatine receptors subtype 2 (SSTR2) are regarded as a potential target in neuroblastoma (NB) for imaging and promising therapeutic approaches. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the SSTR2 status by (68)Ga-[tetraxetan-D-Phe1, Tyr3]-octreotide ((68)Ga-DOTATOC) positron-emission tomography (PET) and the tumour metabolic activity by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET in different experimental models of NB. Three cell lines of human NB with different levels of expression of SSTR2 were grafted into nude mice. Animals were imaged with FDG and (68)Ga-DOTATOC and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was determined to quantify tracer uptake. Ex vivo biodistribution of (68)Ga-DOTATOC and immunohistochemical analysis of NB xenografts were performed. Compared with FDG, the SUVmax of (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake by the tumour was lower but the ratio to background was higher; there was a strong positive correlation between SUVmax values observed with the two tracers (r(2)=0.65). Sorting the cell lines according to uptake of FDG or (68)Ga-DOTATOC, injected activity per gram of tissue, Ki67 index or expression of SSTR2 assessed visually led to the same classification. (68)Ga-DOTATOC allows preclinical imaging of NB according to the intensity of the expression of SSTR2. In contrast with what has been reported for neuroendocrine tumours, in this NB model, the (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake was positively correlated with FDG uptake and with Ki67 index, usual markers of tumour aggressiveness. If confirmed in humans, this result would favour a theranostic application of (68)Ga-DOTATOC in NB, even in advanced stages. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Bispecific antibody complex pre-targeting and targeted delivery of polymer drug conjugates for imaging and therapy in dual human mammary cancer xenografts. Targeted polymer drug conjugates for cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaw, Ban-An; Gada, Keyur S.; Patil, Vishwesh; Panwar, Rajiv; Mandapati, Savitri [Northeastern University, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Bouve College of Health Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Boston, MA (United States); Hatefi, Arash [Rutgers University, Department of Pharmaceutics, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Majewski, Stan [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Morgantown, WV (United States); Weisenberger, Andrew [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Doxorubicin, a frontline chemotherapeutic agent, limited by its cardiotoxicity and other tissue toxicities, was conjugated to N-terminal DTPA-modified polyglutamic acid (D-Dox-PGA) to produce polymer pro-drug conjugates. D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m labeled DTPA-succinyl-polylysine polymers (DSPL) were targeted to HER2-positive human mammary carcinoma (BT-474) in a double xenografted SCID mouse model also hosting HER2-negative human mammary carcinoma (BT-20). After pretargeting with bispecific anti-HER2-affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab complexes (BAAC), anti-DTPA-Fab or only phosphate buffered saline, D-Dox-PGA or Tc-99 m DSPL were administered. Positive therapeutic control mice were injected with Dox alone at maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Only BT-474 lesions were visualized by gamma imaging with Tc-99 m-DSPL; BT-20 lesions were not. Therapeutic efficacy was equivalent in mice pretargeted with BAAC/targeted with D-Dox-PGA to mice treated only with doxorubicin. There was no total body weight (TBW) loss at three times the doxorubicin equivalent MTD with D-Dox-PGA, whereas mice treated with doxorubicin lost 10 % of TBW at 2 weeks and 16 % after the second MTD injection leading to death of all mice. Our cancer imaging and pretargeted therapeutic approaches are highly target specific, delivering very high specific activity reagents that may result in the development of a novel theranostic application. HER/2 neu specific affibody-anti-DTPA-Fab bispecific antibody pretargeting of HER2 positive human mammary xenografts enabled exquisite targeting of polymers loaded with radioisotopes for molecular imaging and doxorubicin for effective therapy without the associating non-tumor normal tissue toxicities. (orig.)

  9. Significance of pleural effusion in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Himesh; Conrad, John; Khoury, Joseph D; McGregor, Lisa M; Krasin, Matthew J; Dome, Jeffrey S; Santana, Victor M; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2007-12-01

    Pleural effusion is uncommon at diagnosis of neuroblastoma in children. Because the presence of malignant cells in pleural fluid may significantly change the management and outcome of patients with neuroblastoma, we retrospectively analyzed a cohort of neuroblastoma patients who presented with pleural effusion at the time of diagnosis to determine the incidence, presentation, stage, treatment, and outcome of these patients. We reviewed the presenting features of 295 patients with the diagnosis of neuroblastoma who received treatment at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital between 1991 and 2005. Patients were chosen for further analysis if pleural effusion had been identified on chest radiographs or computed tomography (CT) scans at diagnosis Thirty-one out of 295(10.5%) patients with neuroblastoma had pleural effusion identified at time of presentation. International neuroblastoma staging system (INSS) risk stratification was high risk in 29 cases and intermediate risk and low risk in 1 case each. The primary site of disease was abdomen in 26 patients; mediastinum in 5. We conducted cytologic analysis of pleural fluid of nine patients; the specimen of seven contained malignant cells. Eighteen of 31 patients died of progressive or recurrent disease. In patients with neuroblastoma, pleural effusion is usually associated with unfavorable biologic features and high-risk disease. Pleural fluid should be examined cytologically and at a time when the results would change the risk stratification. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival rate of the patients with high-risk neuroblastoma with or without malignant pleural effusion. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  10. Phenotypic and transcriptional fidelity of patient-derived colon cancer xenografts in immune-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Chou

    Full Text Available Xenografts of human colorectal cancer (CRC in immune-deficient mice have great potential for accelerating the study of tumor biology and therapy. We evaluated xenografts established in NOD/scid/IL2Rγ-null mice from the primary or metastatic tumors of 27 patients with CRC to estimate their capacity for expanding tumor cells for in vitro studies and to assess how faithfully they recapitulated the transcriptional profile of their parental tumors. RNA-seq analysis of parental human CRC tumors and their derivative xenografts demonstrated that reproducible transcriptional changes characterize the human tumor to murine xenograft transition. In most but not all cases, the human stroma, vasculature, and hematopoietic elements were systematically replaced by murine analogues while the carcinoma component persisted. Once established as xenografts, human CRC cells that could be propagated by serial transplantation remained transcriptionally stable. Three histologically atypical xenografts, established from patients with peritoneal metastases, contained abundant human stromal elements and blood vessels in addition to human tumor cells. The transcriptomes of these mixed tumor/stromal xenografts did not closely resemble those of their parental tumors, and attempts to propagate such xenografts by serial transplantation were unsuccessful. Stable expression of numerous genes previously identified as high priority targets for immunotherapy was observed in most xenograft lineages. Aberrant expression in CRC cells of human genes that are normally only expressed in hematopoietic cells was also observed. Our results suggest that human CRC cells expanded in murine xenografts have great utility for studies of tumor immunobiology and targeted therapies such as immunotherapy but also identify potential limitations.

  11. Intracellular fragment of NLRR3 (NLRR3-ICD) stimulates ATRA-dependent neuroblastoma differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akter, Jesmin [Laboratory of Innovative Cancer Therapeutics, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Takatori, Atsushi, E-mail: atakatori@chiba-cc.jp [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Islam, Md. Sazzadul [Laboratory of Innovative Cancer Therapeutics, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Nakazawa, Atsuko [Department of Pathology, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo (Japan); Ozaki, Toshinori, E-mail: tozaki@chiba-cc.jp [Laboratory of DNA Damage Signaling, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Nagase, Hiroki [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Chiba Cancer Center Research Institute, Chiba 260-8717 (Japan); Nakagawara, Akira [Saga Medical Centre, 840-8571 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • NLRR3 is a membrane protein highly expressed in favorable neuroblastoma. • NLRR3-ICD was produced through proteolytic processing by secretases. • NLRR3-ICD was induced to be translocated into cell nucleus following ATRA exposure. • NLRR3-ICD plays a pivotal role in ATRA-mediated neuroblastoma differentiation. - Abstract: We have previously identified neuronal leucine-rich repeat protein-3 (NLRR3) gene which is preferentially expressed in favorable human neuroblastomas as compared with unfavorable ones. In this study, we have found for the first time that NLRR3 is proteolytically processed by secretases and its intracellular domain (NLRR3-ICD) is then released to translocate into cell nucleus during ATRA-mediated neuroblastoma differentiation. According to our present observations, NLRR3-ICD was induced to accumulate in cell nucleus of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells following ATRA treatment. Since the proteolytic cleavage of NLRR3 was blocked by α- or γ-secretase inhibitor, it is likely that NLRR3-ICD is produced through the secretase-mediated processing of NLRR3. Intriguingly, forced expression of NLRR3-ICD in neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells significantly suppressed their proliferation as examined by a live-cell imaging system and colony formation assay. Similar results were also obtained in neuroblastoma TGW cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NLRR3-ICD stimulated ATRA-dependent neurite elongation in SK-N-BE cells. Together, our present results strongly suggest that NLRR3-ICD produced by the secretase-mediated proteolytic processing of NLRR3 plays a crucial role in ATRA-mediated neuronal differentiation, and provide a clue to develop a novel therapeutic strategy against aggressive neuroblastomas.

  12. Regression of human prostate cancer xenografts in mice by AMG 212/BAY2010112, a novel PSMA/CD3-Bispecific BiTE antibody cross-reactive with non-human primate antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Matthias; Raum, Tobias; Lutterbuese, Ralf; Voelkel, Markus; Deegen, Petra; Rau, Doris; Kischel, Roman; Hoffmann, Patrick; Brandl, Christian; Schuhmacher, Joachim; Mueller, Peter; Finnern, Ricarda; Fuergut, Melanie; Zopf, Dieter; Slootstra, Jerry W; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Rattel, Benno; Kufer, Peter

    2012-12-01

    For treatment of patients with prostate cancer (PCa), we developed a novel T cell-engaging (BiTE) antibody designated AMG 212 or BAY2010112 that is bispecific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) and the CD3 epsilon subunit of the T cell receptor complex. AMG 212/BAY2010112 induced target cell-dependent activation and cytokine release of T cells, and efficiently redirected T cells for lysis of target cells. In addition to Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing human or cynomolgus monkey PSMA, T cells redirected by AMG 212/BAY2010112 also lysed human PCa cell lines VCaP, 22Rv1, MDA PCa 2b, C4-2, PC-3-huPSMA, and LnCaP at half maximal BiTE concentrations between 0.1 and 4 ng/mL (1.8-72 pmol/L). No lysis of PSMA-negative human PCa cell lines PC-3 and DU145 was observed. The subcutaneous (s.c.) formation of tumors from PC-3-huPSMA cells in NOD/SCID mice was significantly prevented by once daily intravenous (i.v.) injection of AMG 212/BAY2010112 at a dose level as low as 0.005 mg/kg/d. Rapid tumor shrinkage with complete remissions were observed in NOD/SCID mice bearing established s.c. 22Rv1 xenografts after repeated daily treatment with AMG 212/BAY2010112 by either the i.v. or s.c. route. Of note, 22Rv1 tumors were grown in the absence of human T cells followed by intraperitoneal injection of T cells 3 days before BiTE treatment. No effects on tumor growth were observed in the absence of human T cells or AMG 212/BAY2010112. On the basis of these preclinical results, AMG 212/BAY2010112 appears as a promising new BiTE antibody for the treatment of patients with PSMA-expressing PCa.

  13. Intracellular fragment of NLRR3 (NLRR3-ICD) stimulates ATRA-dependent neuroblastoma differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Jesmin; Takatori, Atsushi; Islam, Md Sazzadul; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Ozaki, Toshinori; Nagase, Hiroki; Nakagawara, Akira

    2014-10-10

    We have previously identified neuronal leucine-rich repeat protein-3 (NLRR3) gene which is preferentially expressed in favorable human neuroblastomas as compared with unfavorable ones. In this study, we have found for the first time that NLRR3 is proteolytically processed by secretases and its intracellular domain (NLRR3-ICD) is then released to translocate into cell nucleus during ATRA-mediated neuroblastoma differentiation. According to our present observations, NLRR3-ICD was induced to accumulate in cell nucleus of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells following ATRA treatment. Since the proteolytic cleavage of NLRR3 was blocked by α- or γ-secretase inhibitor, it is likely that NLRR3-ICD is produced through the secretase-mediated processing of NLRR3. Intriguingly, forced expression of NLRR3-ICD in neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells significantly suppressed their proliferation as examined by a live-cell imaging system and colony formation assay. Similar results were also obtained in neuroblastoma TGW cells. Furthermore, overexpression of NLRR3-ICD stimulated ATRA-dependent neurite elongation in SK-N-BE cells. Together, our present results strongly suggest that NLRR3-ICD produced by the secretase-mediated proteolytic processing of NLRR3 plays a crucial role in ATRA-mediated neuronal differentiation, and provide a clue to develop a novel therapeutic strategy against aggressive neuroblastomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Regression of orthotopic neuroblastoma in mice by targeting the endothelial and tumor cell compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stridsberg Mats

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-risk neuroblastoma has an overall five-year survival of less than 40%, indicating a need for new treatment strategies such as angiogenesis inhibition. Recent studies have shown that chemotherapeutic drugs can inhibit angiogenesis if administered in a continuous schedule. The aim of this study was primarily to characterize tumor spread in an orthotopic, metastatic model for aggressive, MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma and secondarily to study the effects of daily administration of the chemotherapeutic agent CHS 828 on tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, and spread. Methods MYCN-amplified human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32, 2 × 106 were injected into the left adrenal gland in SCID mice through a flank incision. Nine weeks later, a new laparotomy was performed to confirm tumor establishment and to estimate tumor volume. Animals were randomized to either treatment with CHS 828 (20 mg/kg/day; p.o. or vehicle control. Differences between groups in tumor volume were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and in metastatic spread using Fisher's exact test. Differences with p Results The orthotopic model resembled clinical neuroblastoma in respect to tumor site, growth and spread. Treatment with CHS 828 resulted in tumor regression (p Conclusion The metastatic animal model in this study resembled clinical neuroblastoma and is therefore clinically relevant for examining new treatment strategies for this malignancy. Our results indicate that daily scheduling of CHS 828 may be beneficial in treating patients with high-risk neuroblastoma.

  15. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin and Fulvestrant (Falsodex, as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin and fulvestrant (falsodex either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue.Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined.Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P0.05. Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05, and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05 and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1 expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a single agent.We demonstrate that the administration of trastuzumab and fulvestrant in combination results in positive synergistic effects on both, ZR-75-1 and BT-474 cell lines. This combinatorial approach is

  16. An Experimental Analysis of the Molecular Effects of Trastuzumab (Herceptin) and Fulvestrant (Falsodex), as Single Agents or in Combination, on Human HR+/HER2+ Breast Cancer Cell Lines and Mouse Tumor Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Weng, Ziyi; Lu, Yunshu; Jia, Yijun; Ding, Longlong; Bai, Fang; Ge, Meixin; Lin, Qing; Wu, Kejin

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of trastuzumab (herceptin) and fulvestrant (falsodex) either in combination or alone, on downstream cell signaling pathways in lab-cultured human HR+/HER2+ breast cancer cell lines ZR-75-1 and BT-474, as well as on protein expression levels in mouse xenograft tissue. Cells were cultivated in the presence of trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both. Molecular events that resulted in an inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression or in an increased rate of apoptosis were studied. The distribution and abundance of the proteins p-Akt and p-Erk expressed in these cells in response to single agents or combinatorial treatment were also investigated. In addition, the effects of trastuzumab and fulvestrant, either as single agents or in combination on tumor growth as well as on expression of the protein p-MED1 expressed in in vivo mouse xenograft models was also examined. Cell proliferation was increasingly inhibited by trastuzumab or fulvestrant or both, with a CI1 in both human cell lines. The rate of apoptosis increased only in the BT-474 cell line and not in the ZR-75-1 cell line upon treatment with fulvestrant and not trastuzumab as a single agent (P0.05). Cell accumulation in the G1 phase of cell cycle was investigated in all treatment groups (P<0.05), and the combination of trastuzumab and fulvestrant reversed the effects of fulvestrant alone on p-Akt and p-Erk protein expression levels. Using ZR-75-1 or BT-474 to generate in vivo tumor xenografts in BALB/c athymic mouse models, we showed that a combination of both drugs resulted in a stronger inhibition of tumor growth (P<0.05) and a greater decrease in the levels of activated MED1 (p-MED1) expressed in tumor issues compared with the use of either drug as a single agent. We demonstrate that the administration of trastuzumab and fulvestrant in combination results in positive synergistic effects on both, ZR-75-1 and BT-474 cell lines. This combinatorial approach is likely to reduce

  17. Zebrafish Xenograft: An Evolutionary Experiment in Tumour Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Rachael A; Trieu, Nhu P V; Crawford, Bryan D

    2017-09-05

    Though the cancer research community has used mouse xenografts for decades more than zebrafish xenografts, zebrafish have much to offer: they are cheap, easy to work with, and the embryonic model is relatively easy to use in high-throughput assays. Zebrafish can be imaged live, allowing us to observe cellular and molecular processes in vivo in real time. Opponents dismiss the zebrafish model due to the evolutionary distance between zebrafish and humans, as compared to mice, but proponents argue for the zebrafish xenograft's superiority to cell culture systems and its advantages in imaging. This review places the zebrafish xenograft in the context of current views on cancer and gives an overview of how several aspects of this evolutionary disease can be addressed in the zebrafish model. Zebrafish are missing homologs of some human proteins and (of particular interest) several members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of proteases, which are known for their importance in tumour biology. This review draws attention to the implicit evolutionary experiment taking place when the molecular ecology of the xenograft host is significantly different than that of the donor.

  18. Melatonin prevents cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial damage and cell death due to toxically high doses of dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Abramov, Andrey Y; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-07-01

    Stressor exposure activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes elevations in the levels of glucocorticoids (GC) from the adrenal glands. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that prolonged exposure to high GC levels can lead to oxidative stress, calcium deregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, melatonin, via its antioxidant activity, exhibits a neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the protective effect of melatonin in GC-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cellular treatment with the toxically high doses of the synthetic GC receptor agonist, dexamethasone (DEX) elicited marked decreases in the levels of glutathione and increases in ROS production, lipid peroxidation and cell death. DEX toxicity also induced increases in the levels of cytosolic calcium and mitochondrial fusion proteins (Mfn1 and Opa1) but decreases in the levels of mitochondrial fission proteins (Fis1 and Drp1). Mitochondrial damage was observed in large proportions of the DEX-treated cells. Pretreatment of the cells with melatonin substantially prevented the DEX-induced toxicity. These results suggest that melatonin might exert protective effects against oxidative stress, cytosolic calcium overload and mitochondrial damage in DEX-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gecko Crude Peptides Induce Apoptosis in Human Liver Carcinoma Cells In Vitro and Exert Antitumor Activity in a Mouse Ascites H22 Xenograft Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the anti-tumor effects and mechanisms of gecko crude peptides (GCPs in vitro and in vivo. Methods. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT assay was applied to measure the effects of GCPs on the HepG2 cell viability. Fluorescence morphology was used to identify apoptotic cells. A xenograft H22 liver cancer model was established in Kunming mice. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of normal saline (NS group or GCPs (80, 40 or 20 mg/kg for 10 days, or once per two days with 2 mg/kg doxorubicin (ADR group; n=10 each. Serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6 were quantified using ELISA assay. Results. GCPs significantly inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells and induced typical apoptotic morphological features through increasing bcl-2/bax ratio in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. The tumor weights of the ADR group, GCPs (H group, GCPs (M group, GCPs (L group were smaller compared to the NS group. While the white blood cell count, thymus index, spleen index were higher in the high dose GCPs group than the NS group (P<0.05, the VEGF expression in tumor tissue and serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels in the GCPs groups were lower than the NS group (P<0.05.

  20. Olfactory neuroblastoma in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamate, Jyoji; Izawa, Takeshi; Ogata, Keiko; Kobayashi, Osamu; Okajima, Ryoko; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Kotani, Takao; Aoki, Mika

    2006-05-01

    An 11-year-old thoroughbred gelding was euthanatized because of right nasal cavity tumor. The tumor consisted of round to oval cells with a scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei. Homer-Wright rosettes and pseudorosettes, as well as microcysts were seen. Neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to vimentin, S-100 protein, and neuron-specific enolase, glial fibrillary acidic protein and microtube-associated protein in varying degrees, indicating neurogenic nature. Based on these findings, this tumor was diagnosed as an olfactory neuroblastoma. Since this type is an uncommon tumor showing histological variety, the nature is discussed.

  1. Role of trace metals in cell proliferation in the human neuroblastoma: relations with the oncogene N-myc; Le role des metaux trace dans la proliferation des cellules de neuroblastome humaine: relations avec l`oncogene N-myc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, Ph.; Michelet, C. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); Gouget, B.; Ortega, R.; Sergiant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M. [URA 451, Gradignan (France); Benard, J. [Laboratoire de Pharmacologie Clinique et Moleculaire, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1997-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common tumors in young children. Iron is known to be necessary for cellular proliferation. Several studies have suggested that neuroblastoma cells appear to be relatively sensitive to growth inhibition by specific Fe chelators, in vitro. In addition, it appeared that an increased serum ferritin level at diagnosis was associated with a poorer outcome than a normal level. On the other hand it was reported that untreated primary neuroblastoma had multiple copies of the N-myc oncogene. A significant association between genomic amplification and rapid tumor progression after diagnosis has been demonstrated. In order to study the relationship between iron N-myc amplification, we propose to determine the trace metal content of neuroblastoma cells. Preliminary results obtained with two distinct cell lines: SK-N-SH, a neuroblastoma cell line with a single copy of N-myc and IGR-N-91, a metastatic cell line exhibiting 60 copies of N-myc are presented. (authors) 8 refs.

  2. In vivo bioluminescence imaging using orthotopic xenografts towards patient's derived-xenograft Medulloblastoma models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Fatemeh; Ferrucci, Veronica; DE Antonellis, Pasqualino; Zollo, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Medulloblastoma is a cerebellar neoplasia of the central nervous system. Four molecular subgrups have been identified (MBWNT, MBSHH, MBgroup3 and MBgroup4) with distinct genetics and clinical outcome. Among these, MBgroup3-4 are highly metastatic with the worst prognosis. The current standard therapy includes surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Thus, specific treatments adapted to cure those different molecular subgroups are needed. The use of orthotopic xenograft models, together with the non-invasive in vivo biolumiscence imaging (BLI) technology, is emerging during preclinical studies to test novel therapeutics for medulloblastoma treatment. Orthotopic MB xenografts were performed by injection of Daoy-luc cells, that had been previously infected with lentiviral particles to stably express luciferase gene, into the fourth right ventricle of the cerebellum of ten nude mice. For the implantation, specific stereotactic coordinates were used. Seven days after the implantation the mice were imaged by acquisitions of bioluminescence imaging (BLI) using IVIS 3D Illumina Imaging System (Xenogen). Tumor growth was evaluated by quantifying the bioluminescence signals using the integrated fluxes of photons within each area of interest using the Living Images Software Package 3.2 (Xenogen-Perkin Elmer). Finally, histological analysis using hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to confirm the presence of tumorigenic cells into the cerebellum of the mice. We describe a method to use the in vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI) showing the potential to be used to investigate the potential antitumorigenic effects of a drug for in vivo medulloblastoma treatment. We also discuss other studies in which this technology has been applied to obtain a more comprehensive knowledge of medulloblastoma using orthotopic xenograft mouse models. There is a need to develop patient's derived-xenograft (PDX) model systems to test novel drugs for medulloblastoma treatment within each molecular sub

  3. Oncogenic mutations of ALK kinase in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuyan; Takita, Junko; Choi, Young Lim; Kato, Motohiro; Ohira, Miki; Sanada, Masashi; Wang, Lili; Soda, Manabu; Kikuchi, Akira; Igarashi, Takashi; Nakagawara, Akira; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Mano, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Seishi

    2008-10-16

    Neuroblastoma in advanced stages is one of the most intractable paediatric cancers, even with recent therapeutic advances. Neuroblastoma harbours a variety of genetic changes, including a high frequency of MYCN amplification, loss of heterozygosity at 1p36 and 11q, and gain of genetic material from 17q, all of which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma. However, the scarcity of reliable molecular targets has hampered the development of effective therapeutic agents targeting neuroblastoma. Here we show that the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), originally identified as a fusion kinase in a subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NPM-ALK) and more recently in adenocarcinoma of lung (EML4-ALK), is also a frequent target of genetic alteration in advanced neuroblastoma. According to our genome-wide scans of genetic lesions in 215 primary neuroblastoma samples using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping microarrays, the ALK locus, centromeric to the MYCN locus, was identified as a recurrent target of copy number gain and gene amplification. Furthermore, DNA sequencing of ALK revealed eight novel missense mutations in 13 out of 215 (6.1%) fresh tumours and 8 out of 24 (33%) neuroblastoma-derived cell lines. All but one mutation in the primary samples (12 out of 13) were found in stages 3-4 of the disease and were harboured in the kinase domain. The mutated kinases were autophosphorylated and displayed increased kinase activity compared with the wild-type kinase. They were able to transform NIH3T3 fibroblasts as shown by their colony formation ability in soft agar and their capacity to form tumours in nude mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that downregulation of ALK through RNA interference suppresses proliferation of neuroblastoma cells harbouring mutated ALK. We anticipate that our findings will provide new insights into the pathogenesis of advanced neuroblastoma and that ALK-specific kinase inhibitors might improve its clinical outcome.

  4. Potent therapeutic activity of folate receptor-targeted liposomal carboplatin in the localized treatment of intraperitoneally grown human ovarian tumor xenograft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Anumita; Das, Surajit; Bunte, Ralph M; Chiu, Gigi NC

    2012-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) therapy with platinum (Pt)-based drugs has shown promising results clinically; however, high locoregional concentration of the drug could lead to adverse side effects. In this study, IP administration was coupled with a folate receptor-targeted (FRT) liposomal system, in an attempt to achieve intracellular delivery of the Pt-based drug carboplatin in order to increase therapeutic efficacy and to minimize toxicity. In vitro and in vivo activity of FRT carboplatin liposomes was compared with the activity of free drug and nontargeted (NT) carboplatin liposomes using FR-overexpressing IGROV-1 ovarian cancer cells as the model. Significant reduction in cell viability was observed with FRT liposomes, which, compared with the free drug, provided an approximately twofold increase in carboplatin potency. The increase in drug potency was correlated with significantly higher cellular accumulation of Pt resulting from FRT liposomal delivery. Further evaluation was conducted in mice bearing intraperitoneally inoculated IGROV-1 ovarian tumor xenografts. A superior survival rate (five out of six animals) was achieved in animals treated with FRT carboplatin liposomes, injected intraperitoneally with a dose of 15 mg/kg and following a schedule of twice-weekly administration for 3 weeks. In contrast, no survivors were observed in the free drug or NT carboplatin liposome groups. The presence of cancer cells in lung and liver tissues was observed in the saline, free carboplatin, and NT carboplatin liposome groups. However, there was no sign of cancer cells or drug-related toxicity detected in tissues from the animals treated with FRT carboplatin liposomes. The results of this study have demonstrated for the first time that the approach of coupling IP administration with FRT liposomal delivery could provide significantly improved therapeutic efficacy of carboplatin in the treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer. PMID:22359453

  5. Potent therapeutic activity of folate receptor-targeted liposomal carboplatin in the localized treatment of intraperitoneally grown human ovarian tumor xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Anumita; Das, Surajit; Bunte, Ralph M; Chiu, Gigi N C

    2012-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) therapy with platinum (Pt)-based drugs has shown promising results clinically; however, high locoregional concentration of the drug could lead to adverse side effects. In this study, IP administration was coupled with a folate receptor-targeted (FRT) liposomal system, in an attempt to achieve intracellular delivery of the Pt-based drug carboplatin in order to increase therapeutic efficacy and to minimize toxicity. In vitro and in vivo activity of FRT carboplatin liposomes was compared with the activity of free drug and nontargeted (NT) carboplatin liposomes using FR-overexpressing IGROV-1 ovarian cancer cells as the model. Significant reduction in cell viability was observed with FRT liposomes, which, compared with the free drug, provided an approximately twofold increase in carboplatin potency. The increase in drug potency was correlated with significantly higher cellular accumulation of Pt resulting from FRT liposomal delivery. Further evaluation was conducted in mice bearing intraperitoneally inoculated IGROV-1 ovarian tumor xenografts. A superior survival rate (five out of six animals) was achieved in animals treated with FRT carboplatin liposomes, injected intraperitoneally with a dose of 15 mg/kg and following a schedule of twice-weekly administration for 3 weeks. In contrast, no survivors were observed in the free drug or NT carboplatin liposome groups. The presence of cancer cells in lung and liver tissues was observed in the saline, free carboplatin, and NT carboplatin liposome groups. However, there was no sign of cancer cells or drug-related toxicity detected in tissues from the animals treated with FRT carboplatin liposomes. The results of this study have demonstrated for the first time that the approach of coupling IP administration with FRT liposomal delivery could provide significantly improved therapeutic efficacy of carboplatin in the treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer.

  6. In Vivo Induction of Apoptosis by Fucoxanthin, a Marine Carotenoid, Associated with Down-Regulating STAT3/EGFR Signaling in Sarcoma 180 (S180 Xenografts-Bearing Mice

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    Xiaolu Cao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous in vitro researches have showed that fucoxanthin, a natural carotenoid isolated from sargassum, can inhibit proliferation or induce apoptosis in human neuroblastoma, hepatoma, leukemia, colon carcinoma, prostate cancer or urinary bladder cancer cells. But the precise mechanism by which fucoxanthin exerts anticarcinogenic effects is not yet fully understood. In this study, we performed an in vivo study to investigate the anti-tumor effect and mechanisms of fucoxanthin on xenografted sarcoma 180 (S180 in mice. Results revealed that fucoxanthin significantly inhibited the growth of sarcoma at the dose of 50 or 100 mg/kg. TUNEL analysis showed that the number of positive cells in the fucoxanthin-treated group was higher than that in the control group. Western blotting analysis also revealed the suppressed expression of bcl-2 and enhanced expression of cleaved caspase-3 by fucoxanthin. In addition, immunohistochemistry analysis and Western blotting analysis showed that fucoxanthin significantly decreased the expressions of survivin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Most importantly, fucoxanthin inhibited the expressions of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and STAT3 and phosphorylated STAT3 proteins. These results indicated that in vivo induction of apoptosis by fucoxanthin is associated with down-regulating STAT3/EGFR signaling in S180 xenografts-bearing mice.

  7. Genetic engineering of cytolytic T lymphocytes for adoptive T-cell therapy of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Naranjo, Araceli; Serrano, Lisa M; Chang, Wen-Chung; Wright, Christine L; Jensen, Michael C

    2004-06-01

    Disease relapse is the leading cause of mortality for children diagnosed with disseminated neuroblastoma. The adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T cells is an attractive approach to target minimal residual disease following conventional therapies. We describe here the genetic engineering of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to express a chimeric immunoreceptor for re-directed HLA-independent recognition of neuroblastoma. The CE7R chimeric immunoreceptor was constructed by PCR splice overlap extension and is composed of a single-chain antibody extracellular domain (scFv) derived from the L1-CAM-specific murine CE7 hybridoma fused to human IgG1 hinge-Fc, the transmembrane portion of human CD4, and the cytoplasmic tail of huCD3-zeta chain (scFvFc:zeta). Primary human T cells were genetically modified by naked DNA electrotransfer of plasmid expression vector CE7R-pMG then analyzed by Western blotting, flow cytometry for CE7R expression and cell surface trafficking, 4-h chromium release assay for re-directed neuroblastoma lysis, and ELISA for tumor-specific activation of cytokine production. CE7R is expressed as an intact chimeric protein that trafficks to the cell surface as a type I transmembrane protein. Primary human CE7R-expressing CD8(+) CTL clones specifically recognize human neuroblastoma tumor cells and are activated for tumor cell lysis and T(c)1 cytokine production. These data demonstrate the utility of CE7R for re-directing the effector function of CTL to neuroblastoma and have provided the rationale to initiate a FDA-authorized (BB-IND#9149) pilot clinical trial to establish the feasibility and safety of adoptive transfer of autologous CE7R(+)CD8(+) CTL clones to children with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model

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    Claudia Tulotta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC.

  9. Targeting the Human T-Cell Inducible COStimulator Molecule with a Monoclonal Antibody Prevents Graft-vs-Host Disease and Preserves Graft vs Leukemia in a Xenograft Murine Model

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    Aude Burlion

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGraft-vs-host disease (GVHD is a major complication of allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Targeting costimulatory molecules with antagonist antibodies could dampen the excessive immune response that occurs, while preserving the beneficial graft vs leukemia (GVL of the allogeneic response. Previous studies using a mouse model of GVHD have shown that targeting the T-cell Inducible COStimulator (ICOS, CD278 molecule is beneficial, but it is unclear whether the same applies to human cells.MethodsHere, we assessed whether a monoclonal antibody (mAb to human ICOS was able to antagonize the costimulatory signal delivered in vivo to human T cells. To test this hypothesis, we used a xenogeneic model of GVHD where human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were adoptively transferred in immunocompromised NOD.SCID.gc-null mice (NSG.ResultsIn this model, control mice invariably lost weight and died by day 50. In contrast, 65% of the mice receiving a single injection of the anti-hICOS mAb survived beyond 100 days. Moreover, a significant improvement in survival was obtained in a curative xeno-GVHD setting. Mechanistically, administration of the anti-hICOS mAb was associated with a strong reduction in perivascular infiltrates in liver and lungs and reduction in frequencies and numbers of human T cells in the spleen. In addition, the mAb prevented T-cell expansion in the blood during xeno-GVHD. Importantly, GVHD-protected mice retained the ability to control the P815 mastocytoma cell line, mimicking GVL in humans.ConclusionA mAb-targeting human ICOS alleviated GVHD without impairing GVL in a xenograft murine model. Thus, ICOS represents a promising target in the management of BMT, preventing GVHD while preserving GVL.

  10. Narcolepsy/Cataplexy and Occult Neuroblastoma

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; University Hospital Southampton, UK; and Kiev Paediatric Hospital, Ukraine, report three children with narcolepsy and cataplexy subsequently diagnosed with neuroblastoma.

  11. The regulation of angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlenski, Alexandre; Liu, Shuqing; Cohn, Susan L

    2003-07-18

    Angiogenesis is required for the growth and metastasis of malignant tumors, and high vascular density has been correlated with aggressive tumor growth in many types of cancer. This process is regulated by the local balance of stimulatory and inhibitory molecules produced by tumor cells, stromal cells, and the organ-specific environment. In neuroblastoma, a pediatric malignancy that is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical behavior, angiogenesis also appears to play an important role in determining tumor phenotype. The nature of the angiogenic balance in neuroblastoma is complex, and a spectrum of angiogenesis stimulators and inhibitors has been detected in neuroblastoma tumors. This review summarizes our current understanding of the regulation of angiogenesis in neuroblastoma.

  12. Copy number variation at 1q21.1 associated with neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diskin, Sharon J; Hou, Cuiping; Glessner, Joseph T; Attiyeh, Edward F; Laudenslager, Marci; Bosse, Kristopher; Cole, Kristina; Mossé, Yaël P; Wood, Andrew; Lynch, Jill E; Pecor, Katlyn; Diamond, Maura; Winter, Cynthia; Wang, Kai; Kim, Cecilia; Geiger, Elizabeth A; McGrady, Patrick W; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; London, Wendy B; Shaikh, Tamim H; Bradfield, Jonathan; Grant, Struan F A; Li, Hongzhe; Devoto, Marcella; Rappaport, Eric R; Hakonarson, Hakon; Maris, John M

    2009-06-18

    Common copy number variations (CNVs) represent a significant source of genetic diversity, yet their influence on phenotypic variability, including disease susceptibility, remains poorly understood. To address this problem in human cancer, we performed a genome-wide association study of CNVs in the childhood cancer neuroblastoma, a disease in which single nucleotide polymorphism variations are known to influence susceptibility. We first genotyped 846 Caucasian neuroblastoma patients and 803 healthy Caucasian controls at approximately 550,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, and performed a CNV-based test for association. We then replicated significant observations in two independent sample sets comprised of a total of 595 cases and 3,357 controls. Here we describe the identification of a common CNV at chromosome 1q21.1 associated with neuroblastoma in the discovery set, which was confirmed in both replication sets. This CNV was validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, fluorescent in situ hybridization and analysis of matched tumour specimens, and was shown to be heritable in an independent set of 713 cancer-free parent-offspring trios. We identified a previously unknown transcript within the CNV that showed high sequence similarity to several neuroblastoma breakpoint family (NBPF) genes and represents a new member of this gene family (NBPF23). This transcript was preferentially expressed in fetal brain and fetal sympathetic nervous tissues, and the expression level was strictly correlated with CNV state in neuroblastoma cells. These data demonstrate that inherited copy number variation at 1q21.1 is associated with neuroblastoma and implicate a previously unknown neuroblastoma breakpoint family gene in early tumorigenesis of this childhood cancer.

  13. Histone deacetylase 8 in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehme, Ina; Deubzer, Hedwig E; Wegener, Dennis; Pickert, Diana; Linke, Jan-Peter; Hero, Barbara; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Westermann, Frank; Ulrich, Scott M; von Deimling, Andreas; Fischer, Matthias; Witt, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    The effects of pan-histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on cancer cells have shown that HDACs are involved in fundamental tumor biological processes such as cell cycle control, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, because of the unselective nature of these compounds, little is known about the contribution of individual HDAC family members to tumorigenesis and progression. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of individual HDACs in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have investigated the mRNA expression of all HDAC1-11 family members in a large cohort of primary neuroblastoma samples covering the full spectrum of the disease. HDACs associated with disease stage and survival were subsequently functionally evaluated in cell culture models. Only HDAC8 expression was significantly correlated with advanced disease and metastasis and down-regulated in stage 4S neuroblastoma associated with spontaneous regression. High HDAC8 expression was associated with poor prognostic markers and poor overall and event-free survival. The knockdown of HDAC8 resulted in the inhibition of proliferation, reduced clonogenic growth, cell cycle arrest, and differentiation in cultured neuroblastoma cells. The treatment of neuroblastoma cell lines as well as short-term-culture neuroblastoma cells with an HDAC8-selective small-molecule inhibitor inhibited cell proliferation and clone formation, induced differentiation, and thus reproduced the HDAC8 knockdown phenotype. Global histone 4 acetylation was not affected by HDAC8 knockdown or by selective inhibitor treatment. Our data point toward an important role of HDAC8 in neuroblastoma pathogenesis and identify this HDAC family member as a specific drug target for the differentiation therapy of neuroblastoma.

  14. Neuroblastoma: Developmental Biology, Cancer Genomics, and Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Dyer, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a solid tumor that arises from the developing sympathetic nervous system. Over the past decade, our understanding of this disease has advanced tremendously. The future challenge is to apply the knowledge gained toward developing risk-based therapies and ultimately improving outcome. Here we review the key discoveries in the developmental biology, molecular genetics, and immunology of neuroblastoma, as well as new translational tools to bring these promising scientific advances into the clinic. PMID:23702928

  15. Antitumor activity of nifurtimox observed in a patient with neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier Sholler, Giselle L; Kalkunte, Satyan; Greenlaw, Carla; McCarten, Kathleen; Forman, Edwin

    2006-10-01

    Chemotherapy-resistant neuroblastoma is a difficult disease to treat with poor survival. We treated a patient with neuroblastoma who had progressed on conventional chemotherapy. This 5-year-old girl with chemotherapy-resistant neuroblastoma developed Chagas disease at the start of salvage chemotherapy for which she was also started on nifurtimox. The neuroblastoma response to these treatments resulted in clinical remission. In vitro, treatment of a neuroblastoma cell line with nifurtimox resulted in decreased cell viability whereas no effect was seen on an endothelial cell line. Nifurtimox shows promise as a potential new treatment for neuroblastoma and warrants further testing.

  16. Radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine for the treatment of neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, Steven G. [Department of Pediatrics, UCSF School of Medicine, Box 0106, San Francisco, CA 94143-0106 (United States); Matthay, Katherine K. [Department of Pediatrics, UCSF School of Medicine, Box 0106, San Francisco, CA 94143-0106 (United States)], E-mail: matthayk@peds.ucsf.edu

    2008-08-15

    Introduction: Neuroblastoma is the most common pediatric extracranial solid cancer. This tumor is characterized by metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) avidity in 90% of cases, prompting the use of radiolabeled MIBG for targeted radiotherapy in these tumors. Methods: The available English language literature was reviewed for original research investigating in vitro, in vivo and clinical applications of radiolabeled MIBG for neuroblastoma. Results: MIBG is actively transported into neuroblastoma cells by the norepinephrine transporter. Preclinical studies demonstrate substantial activity of radiolabeled MIBG in neuroblastoma models, with {sup 131}I-MIBG showing enhanced activity in larger tumors compared to {sup 125}I-MIBG. Clinical studies of {sup 131}I-MIBG in patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma have identified myelosuppression as the main dose-limiting toxicity, necessitating stem cell reinfusion at higher doses. Most studies report a response rate of 30-40% with {sup 131}I-MIBG in this population. More recent studies have focused on the use of {sup 131}I-MIBG in combination with chemotherapy or myeloablative regimens. Conclusions: {sup 131}I-MIBG is an active agent for the treatment of patients with neuroblastoma. Future studies will need to define the optimal role of this targeted radiopharmaceutical in the therapy of this disease.

  17. SIRB, sans iron oxide rhodamine B, a novel cross-linked dextran nanoparticle, labels human neuroprogenitor and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and serves as a USPIO cell labeling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wei-Bin; Vaccaro, Dennis E; Fishman, Paul S; Groman, Ernest V; Yarowsky, Paul

    2016-05-01

    This is the first report of the synthesis of a new nanoparticle, sans iron oxide rhodamine B (SIRB), an example of a new class of nanoparticles. SIRB is designed to provide all of the cell labeling properties of the ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticle Molday ION Rhodamine B (MIRB) without containing the iron oxide core. MIRB was developed to label cells and allow them to be tracked by MRI or to be manipulated by magnetic gradients. SIRB possesses a similar size, charge and cross-linked dextran coating as MIRB. Of great interest is understanding the biological and physiological changes in cells after they are labeled with a USPIO. Whether these effects are due to the iron oxide buried within the nanoparticle or to the surface coating surrounding the iron oxide core has not been considered previously. MIRB and SIRB represent an ideal pairing of nanoparticles to identify nanoparticle anatomy responsible for post-labeling cytotoxicity. Here we report the effects of SIRB labeling on the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line and primary human neuroprogenitor cells (hNPCs). These effects are contrasted with the effects of labeling SH-SY5Y cells and hNPCs with MIRB. We find that SIRB labeling, like MIRB labeling, (i) occurs without the use of transfection reagents, (ii) is packaged within lysosomes distributed within cell cytoplasm, (iii) is retained within cells with no loss of label after cell storage, and (iv) does not alter cellular viability or proliferation, and (v) SIRB labeled hNPCs differentiate normally into neurons or astrocytes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET imaging for monitoring everolimus effect on tumor-growth in neuroendocrine tumors: studies in human tumor xenografts in mice.

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    Camilla Bardram Johnbeck

    Full Text Available The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging.The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline with 18F-FDG or 18F-FLT and then treated with either placebo or everolimus (5 mg/kg daily for 10 days. PET/CT scans were repeated at day 1,3 and 10.Everolimus showed significant inhibition of H727 cell proliferation in vitro at concentrations above 1 nM. In vivo tumor volumes measured relative to baseline were significantly lower in the everolimus group compared to the control group at day 3 (126±6% vs. 152±6%; p = 0.016, day 7 (164±7% vs. 226±13%; p<0.001 and at day 10 (194±10% vs. 281±18%; p<0.001. Uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT showed little differences between control and treatment groups, but individual mean uptake of 18F-FDG at day 3 correlated with tumor growth day 10 (r2 = 0.45; P = 0.034, 18F-FLT mean uptake at day 1 correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.63; P = 0.019 and at day 3 18F-FLT correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.87; P<0.001 and day 10 (r2 = 0.58; P = 0.027.Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders and non-responders.

  19. Amarogentin secoiridoid inhibits in vivo cancer cell growth in xenograft mice model and induces apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells (SNU-16) through G2/M cell cycle arrest and PI3K/Akt signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Ling; Xiang, Xiao-Jun; Yu, Feng; Ye, Wan-Li; Wu, Dong-Ping; Wang, Jian-Fang; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of amarogentin in SNU-16 human gastric cancer cells as well as in nude mice xenograft model. The effects of this compound on cell apoptosis, cell cycle phase distribution and PI3K/Akt and m-TOR signalling pathways were also studied in detail. MTT assay was used to study the effect of amarogentin on SNU-16 cell viability while clonogenic assay indicated the effect of the compound on colony formation tendency of these cells. Phase contrast microscopy revealed the effect on cellular morphology while flow cytometry was engaged to study the effects on cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. SNU-16 cancer cells were subcutaneously inoculated into nude mice to investigate the in vivo antitumor effects of amarogentin. Amarogentin induced potent, dose-dependent as well as time-dependent cytotoxic effects on the growth of SNU-16 human gastric cancer cells. Amarogentin also inhibited the colony forming capability of these tumor cells and its treatment led to morphological alterations in these cells in which the cells became withered and rounded, detached from one another and adopted irregular shapes while floating freely in the culture medium. In comparison to untreated control cells, the amarogentin treated cells with 10, 50 and 75 μM exhibited 32.5, 45.2 and 57.1 % apoptotic cells, respectively. Amarogentin induced potent and dose-dependent G2/M cell cycle arrest in these cells and led to downregulation of m-TOR, p-PI3K, PI3K, p-Akt and Akt and upregulation of cyclin D1 and cyclin E protein expressions. The tumor tissues obtained from the amarogentin-treated mice were much smaller than the tumor tissues derived from the control group. Amarogentin exerts potent in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects in SNU-16 cell model as well as in nude mice xenograft model. These antitumor effects were found to be mediated through apoptosis induction, G2/M cell cycle arrest and downregulation of PI3K/Akt/m-TOR signalling pathways.

  20. Next-generation sequence analysis of cancer xenograft models.

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    Fernando J Rossello

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS studies in cancer are limited by the amount, quality and purity of tissue samples. In this situation, primary xenografts have proven useful preclinical models. However, the presence of mouse-derived stromal cells represents a technical challenge to their use in NGS studies. We examined this problem in an established primary xenograft model of small cell lung cancer (SCLC, a malignancy often diagnosed from small biopsy or needle aspirate samples. Using an in silico strategy that assign reads according to species-of-origin, we prospectively compared NGS data from primary xenograft models with matched cell lines and with published datasets. We show here that low-coverage whole-genome analysis demonstrated remarkable concordance between published genome data and internal controls, despite the presence of mouse genomic DNA. Exome capture sequencing revealed that this enrichment procedure was highly species-specific, with less than 4% of reads aligning to the mouse genome. Human-specific expression profiling with RNA-Seq replicated array-based gene expression experiments, whereas mouse-specific transcript profiles correlated with published datasets from human cancer stroma. We conclude that primary xenografts represent a useful platform for complex NGS analysis in cancer research for tumours with limited sample resources, or those with prominent stromal cell populations.

  1. Improved antitumour immunity in murine neuroblastoma using a combination of IL-2 and IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siapati, K E; Barker, S; Kinnon, C; Michalski, A; Anderson, R; Brickell, P; Thrasher, A J; Hart, S L

    2003-05-19

    Neuroblastoma immunotherapy using cytokine-modified tumour cells has been tested in clinical trials. However, because of the complex nature of antitumour immune responses, a number of therapies may be required for complete tumour eradication and generation of systemic immunity. We report here the improved antitumour effect of two cytokines, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), when coexpressed by neuroblastoma cell lines. Initially, transfection of human and mouse neuroblastoma cell lines resulted in high expression levels of biologically active IL-2 and IL-12 in vitro. These cytokines when expressed by transfected Neuro-2A cells completely abolished their in vivo tumorigenicity in a syngeneic neuroblastoma model. Vaccination of established tumours with IL-12-producing cells exhibited a clear effect with reduced tumour growth in the presence of IL-2. In vivo depletion studies showed that CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells mediate the response against cytokine-producing cells. These results suggest that IL-2 and IL-12, when cotransfected in tumour cells, are effective against established disease and provide a promising immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer action of garlic compounds in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Surajit; Choudhury, Subhasree Roy; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2011-05-01

    The medicinal properties of garlic (Allium sativum) have been well known and widely used since historical times. Garlic compounds have received increasing attention during the last few years due to their cancer chemopreventive properties. The anti-cancer activity of garlic-derived organosulfur compounds (OSCs) are extensively reported in many cancers but only a few in the pediatric tumor neuroblastoma, which warrants exploration of new therapy for its management. There are some recent reports suggesting that garlic-derived OSCs cause cell cycle arrest, generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), activate stress kinases, and also stimulate the mitochondrial pathway for apoptosis in malignant neuroblastoma. The comprehensive mechanisms of anti-cancer action of OSCs still remain unclear and require more studies in neuroblastoma. This review is designed to highlight the molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer actions of garlic-derived OSCs in neuroblastoma and as well as in several other cancers. Further studies should be conducted to establish the clinical expediency of garlic-derived OSCs for treatment of malignant neuroblastoma in humans.

  3. Variant G6PD levels promote tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis via the STAT3/5 pathway in the human melanoma xenograft mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Tao; Zhang, Chunhua; Tang, Qiongling; Su, Yanan; Li, Bo; Chen, Long; Zhang, Zheng; Cai, Tianchi; Zhu, Yuechun

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), elevated in tumor cells, catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose-phosphate pathway. The regulation mechanism of G6PD and pathological change in human melanoma growth remains unknown. Methods HEM (human epidermal melanocyte) cells and human melanoma cells with the wild-type G6PD gene (A375-WT), G6PD deficiency (A375-G6PD?), G6PD cDNA overexpression (A375-G6PD?-G6PD-WT), and mutant G6PD cDNA (A375-G6PD?-G6PD-G487A) were subcutaneously inj...

  4. A New Class of Safe, Potent, and Specific P-gp Modulator: Flavonoid Dimer FD18 Reverses P-gp-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Human Breast Xenograft in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Clare S W; Wong, Iris L K; Chan, Kin-Fai; Kan, Jason W Y; Chong, Tsz Cheung; Law, Man Chun; Zhao, Yunzhe; Chan, Shun Wan; Chan, Tak Hang; Chow, Larry M C

    2015-10-05

    Flavonoid dimer FD18 is a new class of dimeric P-gp modulator that can reverse cancer drug resistance. FD18 is a potent (EC50 = 148 nM for paclitaxel), safe (selective index = 574), and selective P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulator. FD18 can modulate multidrug resistance toward paclitaxel, vinblastine, vincristine, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and mitoxantrone in human breast cancer LCC6MDR in vitro. FD18 (1 μM) can revert chemosensitivity of LCC6MDR back to parental LCC6 level. FD18 was 11- to 46-fold more potent than verapamil. FD18 (1 μM) can increase accumulation of doxorubicin by 2.7-fold, daunorubicin (2.1-fold), and rhodamine 123 (5.2-fold) in LCC6MDR. FD18 inhibited P-gp-mediated doxorubicin efflux and has no effect on influx. FD18 at 1 μM did not affect the protein expression level of P-gp. Pharmacokinetics studies indicated that intraperitoneal administration of 45 mg/kg FD18 was enough to maintain a plasma level above EC50 (148 nM) for more than 600 min. Toxicity studies with FD18 (90 mg/kg, i.p. for 12 times in 22 days) with paclitaxel (12 mg/kg, i.v. for 12 times in 22 days) revealed no obvious toxicity or death in mice. In vivo efficacy studies indicated that FD18 (45 mg/kg, i.p. for 12 times in 22 days) together with paclitaxel (12 mg/kg, i.v. for 12 times in 22 days) resulted in a 46% reduction in LCC6MDR xenograft volume (n = 11; 648 ± 84 mm(3)) compared to paclitaxel control (n = 8; 1201 ± 118 mm(3)). There were no animal deaths or significant drop in body weight and vital organ wet weight. FD18 can increase paclitaxel accumulation in LCC6MDR xenograft by 1.8- to 2.2-fold. The present study suggests that FD18 represents a new class of safe and potent P-gp modulator in vivo.

  5. Functional dissection of HOXD cluster genes in regulation of neuroblastoma cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhong Zha

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA can induce growth arrest and neuronal differentiation of neuroblastoma cells and has been used in clinic for treatment of neuroblastoma. It has been reported that RA induces the expression of several HOXD genes in human neuroblastoma cell lines, but their roles in RA action are largely unknown. The HOXD cluster contains nine genes (HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, and HOXD8-13 that are positioned sequentially from 3' to 5', with HOXD1 at the 3' end and HOXD13 the 5' end. Here we show that all HOXD genes are induced by RA in the human neuroblastoma BE(2-C cells, with the genes located at the 3' end being activated generally earlier than those positioned more 5' within the cluster. Individual induction of HOXD8, HOXD9, HOXD10 or HOXD12 is sufficient to induce both growth arrest and neuronal differentiation, which is associated with downregulation of cell cycle-promoting genes and upregulation of neuronal differentiation genes. However, induction of other HOXD genes either has no effect (HOXD1 or has partial effects (HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD11 and HOXD13 on BE(2-C cell proliferation or differentiation. We further show that knockdown of HOXD8 expression, but not that of HOXD9 expression, significantly inhibits the differentiation-inducing activity of RA. HOXD8 directly activates the transcription of HOXC9, a key effector of RA action in neuroblastoma cells. These findings highlight the distinct functions of HOXD genes in RA induction of neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

  6. Investigating tumor perfusion by hyperpolarized (13) C MRI with comparison to conventional gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI and pathology in orthotopic human GBM xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Ilwoo; von Morze, Cornelius; Lupo, Janine M

    2016-01-01

    was to validate hyperpolarized perfusion imaging methods by comparing with conventional gadolinium (Gd)-based perfusion MRI techniques and pathology. Dynamic (13) C data using metabolically inactive hyperpolarized bis-1,1-(hydroxymethyl)-[1-(13) C]cyclopropane-d8 (HMCP) were obtained from an orthotopic human...

  7. Partial Correction of Psoriasis upon Genetic Knock-Down of Human TNF-α by Lentivirus-Encoded shRNAs in a Xenograft Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Maria; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia

    vectors demonstrated efficient transduction of human psoriatic skin. Grafted psoriatic skin was exposed to viral vector-encoded TNF- shRNAs by a single intradermal injection of purified VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (150 l containing 46.4 ng p24/ l was injected at a single site). Biopsies were...

  8. Zr-89-trastuzumab PET visualises HER2 downregulation by the HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 in a human tumour xenograft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnink, Thijs H. Oude; de Korte, Maarten A.; Nagengast, Wouter B.; Timmer-Bosscha, Hetty; Schroder, Carolina P.; de Jong, Johan R.; van Dongen, Guus A. M. S.; Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Quadt, Cornelia; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.

    NVP-AUY922, a potent heat shock protein (HSP) 90 inhibitor, downregulates the expression of many oncogenic proteins, including the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). Because HER2 downregulation is a potential biomarker for early response to HSP90-targeted therapies, we used the

  9. Chlorella sorokiniana induces mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in human non-small cell lung cancer cells and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lin, Ping-Yi; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Chuang, Wan-Ling; Chao, Ya-Hsuan; Pan, I-Horng; Chen, Yu-Kuo; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wang, Bing-Yen

    2017-01-01

    ..., minerals, vitamins, fatty acids, and antioxidants [3]. Chlorella is a unicellular green microalgae and is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement in East Asian countries. Chlorella or Chlorella extracts have been demonstrated to modulate immune response [4, 5], decrease hepatitis C virus viral load [6], and to have anti-cancer effects in human...

  10. Dilated cardiomyopathy in a child with abdominal neuroblastoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumour of childhood. Dilated cardiomyopathy as an initial presentation of neuroblastoma is rare. We report the case of a three-year-old child with giant abdominal neuroblastoma encasing the abdominal aorta who presented with dilated cardiomyopathy in heart failure ...

  11. No mutations found by RET mutation scanning in sporadic and hereditary neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, RMW; Cheng, NC; Stulp, RP; Stelwagen, T; Clausen, N; Tommerup, N; Caron, H; Westerveld, A; Buys, CHCM

    Neuroblastoma occasionally occurs in diseases associated with abnormal neurocrest differentiation, e.g. Hirschsprung disease. Expression studies in developing mice suggest that the proto-oncogene RET plays a role in neurocrest differentiation. In humans expression of RT is limited to certain tumor

  12. No mutations found by RET mutation scanning in sporadic and hereditary neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, R. M.; Cheng, N. C.; Hansen, C.; Stulp, R. P.; Stelwagen, T.; Clausen, N.; Tommerup, N.; Caron, H.; Westerveld, A.; Versteeg, R.; Buys, C. H.

    1996-01-01

    Neuroblastoma occasionally occurs in diseases associated with abnormal neurocrest differentiation, e.g. Hirschsprung disease. Expression studies in developing mice suggest that the proto-oncogene RET plays a role in neurocrest differentiation. In humans expression of RET is limited to certain tumor

  13. Neuroblastoma management in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Dong, Kuiran; Gao, Jiechun; Yao, Wei; Xiao, Xianmin; Zheng, Shan

    2012-04-01

    This study assesses the clinical features of neuroblastoma and survival. Data for 98 patients between January 2000 and December 2006 at Children's Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China, were retrospectively analyzed. Diagnostic methods included imaging, 24-hr urine catecholamines, bone marrow biopsies, and histopathology analyses. Treatment followed the modified Japanese Study Group Protocol. Clinical characteristics, treatment, and outcome were depicted, and difficulties encountered were analyzed. The median age of patients was 48 months. There were 3, 13, 31, 49, and 2 patients in stages 1, 2, 3, 4, and 4s disease, respectively. Positive urinary vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) prevalence was low in localized disease (51.1%) and high in disseminated disease (70.6%, p = .03). Gross total resection rate was 60.8%. The five-year overall survival (OS) rate was 80% for stages 1 and 2, 48.3% for stage 3, and 2