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Sample records for human neocartilage formation

  1. Neocartilage formation from predifferentiated human adipose derived stem cells in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bing JIN; Yong-sheng SUN; Ke ZHANG; Jing WANG; Xiao-dong JU; Si-quan LOU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To examine the chondrogenic potential of human adipose derived stem cells (hASC) induced by human transforming growth factor beta2 (hTGF beta2) in vitro, and to investigate if predifferentiated hASC can produce neocartilage in vivo. Methods: hASC were isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissue and cul-tured in pellets with the addition of hTGF beta2. Chondrogenic differentiation was assayed by RT-PCR, Western blotting, toluidine blue staining, and immuno-histochemistry staining for collagen type Ⅱ. For the in vivo study, intact induced cell pellets or the released cells embedded in alginate gel with different concentra-tions were implanted subcutaneously in nude mice. Specimens were harvested at different time points and carried with histological and immunohistochemistry ex-amination to evaluate the cartilage formation. Results: RT-PCR analysis revealed that hASC produced aggrecan and collagen type Ⅱ after 7 d of induction and continued throughout the culture period. This was also demonstrated by the Western blot analysis, positive staining of toluidine blue, and immunohistochem-istry for collagen type Ⅱ. After reseeding in the monolayer, the cells isolated from the pellets displayed a polygonal morphology compared with the primary spindle shape, hASC were released from the induced cell pellets when embedded in alginate gel (implanted cell concentration=5x106/mL or higher). They produced neocartilage after 12 weeks in vivo culture; however, intact induced cell pellets implanted subcutaneously rapidly lost their differentiated phenotype. Conclusion:Chondrogenesis of hASC in vitro can be induced by combining pellet culture and hTGF beta2 treatment. Predifferentiated hASC embedded in alginate gel have the ability of producing neocartilage in vivo.

  2. Micromass co-culture of human articular chondrocytes and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to investigate stable neocartilage tissue formation in vitro

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    S Giovannini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies for articular cartilage defects rely on expanded chondrocytes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternative cell source should their hypertrophic differentiation pathway be prevented. Possible cellular instruction between human articular chondrocytes (HAC and human bone marrow MSC was investigated in micromass pellets. HAC and MSC were mixed in different percentages or incubated individually in pellets for 3 or 6 weeks with and without TGF-beta1 and dexamethasone (±T±D as chondrogenic factors. Collagen II, collagen X and S100 protein expression were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated applying the Bern score and quantified using dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP was detected on cryosections and soluble ALP measured in pellet supernatants. HAC alone generated hyaline-like discs, while MSC formed spheroid pellets in ±T±D. Co-cultured pellets changed from disc to spheroid shape with decreasing number of HAC, and displayed random cell distribution. In -T-D, HAC expressed S100, produced GAG and collagen II, and formed lacunae, while MSC did not produce any cartilage-specific proteins. Based on GAG, collagen type II and S100 expression chondrogenic differentiation occurred in -T-D MSC co-cultures. However, quantitative experimental GAG and DNA values did not differ from predicted values, suggesting only HAC contribution to GAG production. MSC produced cartilage-specific matrix only in +T+D but underwent hypertrophy in all pellet cultures. In summary, influence of HAC on MSC was restricted to early signs of neochondrogenesis. However, MSC did not contribute to the proteoglycan deposition, and HAC could not prevent hypertrophy of MSC induced by chondrogenic stimuli.

  3. Neocartilage formation from mesenchymal stem cells grown in type II collagen-hyaluronan composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsi-Yi; Lin, Ting-Yu; Lin, Chen-Huan; Yen, B Linju; Tsai, Ching-Lin; Hsu, Shan-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) collagen type II-hyaluronan (HA) composite scaffolds (CII-HA) which mimics the extracellular environment of natural cartilage were fabricated in this study. Rheological measurements demonstrated that the incorporation of HA increased the compression modulus of the scaffolds. An initial in vitro evaluation showed that scaffolds seeded with porcine chondrocytes formed cartilaginous-like tissue after 8 weeks, and HA functioned to promote the growth of chondrocytes into scaffolds. Placenta-derived multipotent cells (PDMC) and gingival fibroblasts (GF) were seeded on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), CII-HA films, and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) sheets for comparing their chondrogenesis differentiation potentials with those of adipose-derived adult stem cells (ADAS) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC). Among different cells, PDMC showed the greatest chondrogenic differentiation potential on both CII-HA films and SIS sheets upon TGF-β3 induction, followed by GF. This was evidenced by the up-regulation of chondrogenic genes (Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II), which was not observed for cells grown on TCPS. This finding suggested the essential role of substrate materials in the chondrogenic differentiation of PDMC and GF. Neocartilage formation was more obvious in both PDMC and GF cells plated on CII-HA composite scaffolds vs. 8-layer SIS at 28 days in vitro. Finally, implantation of PDMC/CII-HA constructs into NOD-SCID mice confirmed the formation of tissue-engineered cartilage in vivo.

  4. Cell-engineered human elastic chondrocytes regenerate natural scaffold in vitro and neocartilage with neoperichondrium in the human body post-transplantation.

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    Yanaga, Hiroko; Imai, Keisuke; Koga, Mika; Yanaga, Katsu

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a unique method that allows us to culture large volumes of chondrocyte expansion from a small piece of human elastic cartilage. The characteristic features of our culturing method are that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2), which promotes proliferation of elastic chondrocytes, is added to a culture medium, and that cell-engineering techniques are adopted in the multilayered culture system that we have developed. We have subsequently discovered that once multilayered chondrocytes are transplanted into a human body, differentiation induction that makes use of surrounding tissue occurs in situ, and a large cartilage block is obtained through cartinogenesis and matrix formation. We have named this method two-stage transplantation. We have clinically applied this transplantation method to the congenital ear defect, microtia, and reported successful ear reconstruction. In our present study, we demonstrated that when FGF2 was added to elastic chondrocytes, the cell count increased and the level of hyaluronic acid, which is a major extracellular matrix (ECM) component, increased. We also demonstrated that these biochemical changes are reflected in the morphology, with the elastic chondrocytes themselves producing a matrix and fibers in vitro to form a natural scaffold. We then demonstrated that inside the natural scaffold thus formed, the cells overlap, connect intercellularly to each other, and reconstruct a cartilage-like three-dimensional structure in vitro. We further demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and electron microscopic analysis that when the multilayered chondrocytes are subsequently transplanted into a living body (abdominal subcutaneous region) in the two-stage transplantation process, neocartilage and neoperichondrium of elastic cartilage origin are regenerated 6 months after transplantation. Further, evaluation by dynamic mechanical analysis showed the regenerated neocartilage to have the same viscoelasticity as normal auricular

  5. BMP-2, hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs favor neo-cartilage hyaline matrix formation in chondrocytes.

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    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets.

  6. Biochemical and structural characterization of neocartilage formed by mesenchymal stem cells in alginate hydrogels.

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    Magnus Ø Olderøy

    meaningful insight into ECM assembly of neocartilage, which will lead to better understanding of cartilage formation and development of new tissue engineering strategies.

  7. Scaffold-free approach produces neocartilage tissue of similar quality as the use of HyStem™ and Hydromatrix™ scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylärinne, Janne H; Qu, Chengjuan; Lammi, Mikko J

    2017-04-01

    Numerous biomaterials are being considered for cartilage tissue engineering, while scaffold-free systems have also been introduced. Thus, it is important to know do the scaffolds improve the formation of manufactured neocartilages. This study compares scaffold-free cultures to two scaffold-containing ones. Six million bovine primary chondrocytes were embedded in HyStem™ or HydroMatrix™ scaffolds, or suspended in scaffold-free chondrocyte culture medium, and then loaded into agarose gel supported culture well pockets. Neocartilages were grown in the presence of hypertonic high glucose DMEM medium for up to 6 weeks. By the end of culture periods, the formed tissues were analyzed by histological staining for proteoglycans (PGs) and type II collagen, gene expression measurements of aggrecan, Sox9, procollagen α1(II), and procollagen α2(I) were performed using quantitative RT-PCR, and analyses of PG contents and structure were conducted by spectrophotometric and agarose gel electrophoretic methods. Histological stainings showed that the PGs and type II collagen were abundantly present in both the scaffold-free and the scaffold-containing tissues. The PG content gradually increased following the culture period. However, the mRNA expression levels of the cartilage-specific genes of aggrecan, procollagen α1(II) and Sox9 gradually decreased following culture period, while procollagen α2(I) levels increased. After 6-week-cultivations, the PG concentrations in neocartilage tissues manufactured with HyStem™ or HydroMatrix™ scaffolds, and in scaffold-free agarose gel-supported cell cultures, were similar to native cartilage. No obvious benefits could be seen on the extracellular matrix assembly in HyStem™ or HydroMatrix™ scaffolds cultures.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of hyaline cartilage regeneration in neocartilage graft implantation.

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    Tan, C F; Ng, K K; Ng, S H; Cheung, Y C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage in a neocartilage graft implant with the aid of MR cartilage imaging using a rabbit model. Surgical osteochondral defects were created in the femoral condyles of 30 mature New Zealand rabbits. The findings of neocartilage in autologous cartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects were compared with control group of no implant to the osteochondral defect. The outcome of the implantations was correlated with histologic and MR cartilage imaging findings over a 3-month interval. Neocartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects showed regeneration of hyaline cartilage at the outer layer of the implant using MR cartilage imaging. Fibrosis of fibrocartilage developed at the outer layer of the autologous cartilage graft together with an inflammatory reaction within the osteochondral defect. This animal study provides evidence of the regenerative ability of hyaline cartilage in neocartilage transplants to repair articular cartilage.

  9. Natural resources, redistribution and Human capital formation

    OpenAIRE

    Aguero, Jorge; Balcazar, Carlos Felipe; Maldonado, Stanislao; Ñopo, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    How do resource booms affect human capital accumulation? We exploit time and spatial variation generated by the commodity boom across local governments in Peru to measure the effect of natural resources on human capital formation. We explore the effect of both mining production and tax revenues on test scores, finding a substantial and statistically significant effect for the latter. Transfers to local governments from mining tax revenues are linked to an increase in math test scores of aroun...

  10. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Curt Einarsson; Ewa Ellis; Anna Abrahamsson; Bo-G6ran Ericzon; Ingemar Bj rkhem; Magnus Axelson

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate a culture system for bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells. METHODS Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-free William's E medium. The medium was collected and renewed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors in media were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. RESULTS Cholic acid ( CA ) andchenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurine accounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. A third of CDCA was also conjugated with sulphuric acid. Dexamathasone and thyroid hormorm alone or in combination did not significantly effect bile acid formation. The addition of cyclosporin A (10 μmol/L) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%, respectively. CONCLUSION Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by converting cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells, which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium.

  11. Bile acid formation in primary human hepatocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Curt Einarsson; Ewa Ellis; Anna Abrahamsson; Bo-G ran Ericzon; Ingemar Bj rkhem; Magnus Axelson

    2000-01-01

    AIM To evaluate a system for bile acid formation in human hepatocytes in comparison with HepG2 cells.METHODS Hepatocytes were isolated from normal human liver tissue and were cultured in serum-freeWilliam's E medium. The medium was collected and renewed every 24 h. Bile acids and their precursors inmedia were finally analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.RESULTS Cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) conjugated with glycine or taurineaccounted for 70% and 25% of total steroids. One third of CDCA was also conjugated with sulphuric acid.Dexamethasone and thyroid hormone alone or in combination did not significantly affect bile acid formation.The addition of cyclosporin A (10 tm) inhibited the synthesis of CA and CDCA by about 13% and 30%,respectively.CONCLUSION Isolated human hepatocytes in primary culture behave as in the intact liver by convertingalmost quantitatively cholesterol to conjugated CA and CDCA. This is in contrast to cultured HepG2 cells,which release large amounts of bile acid precursors and unconjugated bile acids into the medium.

  12. Influence of Workforce Ageing on Human Capital Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Stonawski, M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of how workforce ageing influences human capital formation, human capital deterioration, and future productivity growth. The method presented in this paper focuses on the magnitude of human capital that has been accumulated in an individual. It takes into consideration education, acquiring knowledge and experience, knowledge becoming obsolete or forgotten, as well as the impact of health. The estimated human capital curve (based on the net effect of the vario...

  13. THE FORMATION OF HUMAN CAPITAL IN UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

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    Evgeniya Alekseevna Kurenkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human development is the basis of social progress in the modern world. University education has an important role in the formation of human capital. The form of human capital has tangible and intangible investments. Intangible investment is higher education. The aim of the article is to show the formation of the human capital in university education. The modern university is a dynamic category, aimed at training competent mobile specialists ready to continuous self-education, self-improvement and self-development. New educational environment determines unified laws in management of industrial enterprises, businesses, and educational institutions. Modern university educational process implies certain freedom of students and teachers in selection of training methods, forms of monitoring and evaluation of competencies, as well as the choice of tasks for independent work, enhancing the development of students’ competencies, which are formed individually. This creates difficulty in assessing the formation of competences, which can be made based on the results of the rating, examinations and results of online exams on the studied discipline, as well as by forming a portfolio that reflects the qualitative aspect of the assessment of a student’s progress.

  14. Typhoid Fever, Water Quality, and Human Capital Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Beach; Joseph Ferrie; Martin Saavedra; Werner Troesken

    2014-01-01

    Investment in water purification technologies led to large mortality declines by helping eradicate typhoid fever and other waterborne diseases. This paper seeks to understand how these technologies affected human capital formation. We use typhoid fatality rates during early life as a proxy for water quality. To carry out the analysis, city-level data are merged with a unique dataset linking individuals between the 1900 and 1940 censuses. Parametric and semi-parametric estimates suggest that e...

  15. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  16. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

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    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-06-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics.

  17. Improved Human Erythropoiesis and Platelet Formation in Humanized NSGW41 Mice

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    Susann Rahmig

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human erythro-megakaryopoiesis does not occur in humanized mouse models, preventing the in vivo analysis of human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC differentiation into these lineages in a surrogate host. Here we show that stably engrafted KIT-deficient NOD/SCID Il2rg−/− KitW41/W41 (NSGW41 mice support much improved human erythropoiesis and platelet formation compared with irradiated NSG recipients. Considerable numbers of human erythroblasts and mature thrombocytes are present in the bone marrow and blood, respectively. Morphology, composition, and enucleation capacity of de novo generated human erythroblasts in NSGW41 mice are comparable with those in human bone marrow. Overexpression of human erythropoietin showed no further improvement in human erythrocyte output, but depletion of macrophages led to the appearance of human erythrocytes in the blood. Human erythropoiesis up to normoblasts and platelet formation is fully supported in NSGW41 mice, allowing the analysis of human HSC differentiation into these lineages, the exploration of certain pathophysiologies, and the evaluation of gene therapeutic approaches.

  18. Articular cartilage generation applying PEG-LA-DM/PEGDM copolymer hydrogels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Xing; Papadopoulos, Anestis; Ibusuki, Shinichi; Bichara, David A; Saris, Daniel B; Malda, Jos; Anseth, Kristi S; Gill, Thomas J; Randolph, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    ...) production for neocartilage formation. In this study, we demonstrated the feasibility of neocartilage regeneration using swine articular chondrocytes photoencapsualted into poly (ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDM...

  19. Glucocorticoids boost stimulus-response memory formation in humans.

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    Guenzel, Friederike M; Wolf, Oliver T; Schwabe, Lars

    2014-07-01

    Stress affects memory beyond hippocampus-dependent spatial or episodic memory processes. In particular, stress may influence also striatum-dependent stimulus-response (S-R) memory processes. Rodent studies point to an important role of glucocorticoids in the modulation of S-R memory. However, whether glucocorticoids influence S-R memory processes in humans is still unknown. Therefore, we examined in the current experiment the impact of glucocorticoids on the formation of S-R memories in humans. For this purpose, healthy men and women received either hydrocortisone or a placebo 45 min before completing an S-R association learning task and an S-R navigation task. In addition, participants performed also a virtual spatial navigation task and a spatial navigation task in a real environment. Memory of all four learning tasks was tested one week later. Our data showed that hydrocortisone before learning enhanced memory of the S-R association learning task. Moreover, hydrocortisone enhanced the memory of the virtual spatial navigation task, mainly in women. Memory performance in the other tasks remained unaffected by hydrocortisone. These findings provide first evidence that glucocorticoids may facilitate S-R memory formation processes in humans.

  20. Bone formation induced in mouse thigh by cultured human cells.

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    Anderson, H C; Coulter, P R

    1967-04-01

    Cultured FL human amnion cells injected intramuscularly into cortisone-conditioned mice proliferate to form discrete nodules which become surrounded by fibroblasts. Within 12 days, fibroblastic zones differentiate into cartilage which calcifies to form bone. Experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that FL cells behave as an inductor of bone formation. In the electron microscope, FL cells were readily distinguished from surrounding fibroblasts. Transitional forms between the two cell types were not recognized. Stains for acid mucopolysaccharides emphasized the sharp boundary between metachromatic fibroblastic and cartilaginous zones and nonmetachromatic FL cells. (35)S was taken up preferentially by fibroblasts and chondrocytes and then deposited extracellularly in a manner suggesting active secretion of sulfated mucopolysaccharides. FL cells showed negligible (35)S utilization and secretion. FL cells, labeled in vitro with thymidine-(3)H, were injected and followed radioautographically, during bone formation. Nuclear label of injected FL cells did not appear in adjacent fibroblasts in quantities sufficient to indicate origin of the latter from FL cells. The minimal fibroblast nuclear labeling seen may represent reutilization of label from necrotic FL cells. It is suggested that FL cells injected into the mouse thigh induced cartilage and bone formation by host fibroblasts.

  1. Some problems on the studies of the late Pleistocene human evolution and formation of modern human populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wu

    2006-01-01

    For the past two decades, studies and debates on the modern human origins around the world have attracted attentions to the late Pleistocene human evolution and formation of modern human populations, and some controversial hypotheses and problems have been proposed. In the present paper, some problems on the late Pleistocene human evolution, and the formation and differentiations of modern human populations in China are studied with a brief description and comments on the research advances in this field.

  2. Reputation drives cooperative behaviour and network formation in human groups.

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    Cuesta, Jose A; Gracia-Lázaro, Carlos; Ferrer, Alfredo; Moreno, Yamir; Sánchez, Angel

    2015-01-19

    Cooperativeness is a defining feature of human nature. Theoreticians have suggested several mechanisms to explain this ubiquitous phenomenon, including reciprocity, reputation, and punishment, but the problem is still unsolved. Here we show, through experiments conducted with groups of people playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma on a dynamic network, that it is reputation what really fosters cooperation. While this mechanism has already been observed in unstructured populations, we find that it acts equally when interactions are given by a network that players can reconfigure dynamically. Furthermore, our observations reveal that memory also drives the network formation process, and cooperators assort more, with longer link lifetimes, the longer the past actions record. Our analysis demonstrates, for the first time, that reputation can be very well quantified as a weighted mean of the fractions of past cooperative acts and the last action performed. This finding has potential applications in collaborative systems and e-commerce.

  3. Biofilm formation in Hafnia alvei HUMV-5920, a human isolate

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    Itziar Chapartegui-González

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hafnia alvei is a Gram-negative, rodshaped, facultative anaerobic bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae that has been isolated from various mammals, fish, insects and birds. In humans, case reports of Hafnia-associated enteric infections have been chiefly reported in Spain. Although H. alvei shares some virulence mechanisms with other Gram-negative enteropathogens little is known about the factors that contribute to its pathogenesis or virulence factors and regulatory circuits that may enhance the establishment and survival of H. alvei in the environment. The goal of the present study was to analyze the capacity of a H. alvei clinical isolate (strain HUMV-5920 to form biofilms. Biofilm formation by this strain increases during growth at 28 °C compared to 37 °C. Investigation of multicellular behavior by confocal microscopy, crystal violet and calcofluor staining in this strain showed biofilm formation associated with the production of cellulose. Importantly, several genes related to cellulose production including bcsABZC and yhjQ are present in the H. alvei HUMV-5920 chromosome. The ability of H. alvei to adhere to abiotic surfaces and to form biofilms likely contributes to its persistence in the hospital environment or food processing environments, increasing the probability of causing infections. Therefore, a better understanding of the adherence properties of this species will provide greater insights into the diseases it causes.

  4. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

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    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  5. Anthropo-Calcretisation: Human Effects on Calcrete Formation

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    Itkin, Danny

    2014-05-01

    Calcretes are near-surface terrestrial accumulations of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) that form in soils and permeable rocks in regions of arid to dry-summer subtropical climates. While the formation of calcrete under natural conditions has been extensively studied, no reports of anthropogenically induced calcretisation exist in current literature. Following a detailed study of soil micromorphology at the Binyanei Ha-Uma site (Jerusalem) (Itkin, submitted), it becomes evident that a natural Nari-calcrete (Wieder et al. 1993; Itkin et al. 2012) has been overprinted by a secondary calcretisation, specifically arising from human activity ~2 ka ago (related to the production centre of the Tenth Roman Legion in Jerusalem). I hereby introduce the concept of 'Anthropo-Calcretisation', as the sum of processes, by which human actions lead to the accumulation of pedogenic calcium carbonate. Based on soil micromorphological analysis of the Binyanei Ha-Uma site (Itkin, submitted), and other archaeological sites, two characteristic Anthropo-Calcretisation modes can be discerned. The first pathway, termed 'biogeochemical', is dominated by pedogenic chemical reactions, resulting from soil liming, agriculture, and an unintentional soil contamination by calcined lime. The second pathway, termed 'hydropedological', arises from modified soil-water relations due to man-made reshaping of geomorphological units (e.g., agricultural terraces). Anthropo-Calcretisation can follow either of the pathways, and even include both. The study of Anthropo-Calcrete can be applicable (i) to quantify the extent by which (pre)historic human beings have utilised and affected their environment; (ii) to reconstruct paleoclimate, and (iii) to constrain soil development in time by dating associated archaeological artefacts. Furthermore, Anthropo-Calcrete can be also used as a diagnostic tool for evaluating modern human actions (e.g. soil liming, intentional enrichment of soil biomass, or soil

  6. Generation of Scaffoldless Hyaline Cartilaginous Tissue from Human iPSCs

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    Akihiro Yamashita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects.

  7. Generation of scaffoldless hyaline cartilaginous tissue from human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Morioka, Miho; Yahara, Yasuhito; Okada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2015-03-10

    Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human declarative memory formation: segregating rhinal and hippocampal contributions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, G.S.E.; Klaver, P.; Fell, J.; Grunwald, T.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is the core structure of the declarative memory system, but which specific operation is performed by anatomically defined MTL substructures? One hypothesis proposes that the hippocampus carries out an exclusively mnemonic operation during declarative memory formation

  9. Formation of human cementum following different modalities of regenerative therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sculean, A.; Stavropoulos, A.; Berakdar, M.; Windisch, P.; Karring, T.; Brecx, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare newly formed cementum following different types of regenerative therapy in humans. Eighteen patients, each displaying one advanced intrabony defect around teeth scheduled for extraction, were included in this study. The defects were treated with either gui

  10. ROLE OF HUMAN CAPITAL FORMATION IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TĂNASE DIANA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the role of education in the growth of economic competitiveness and efficiency of human capital, in accordance with the quality of education and investments in human resources, in order to enhance labour productiveness. The paper starts by a brief analysis of Romania’s educational system, by comparison with the EU countries, analysing the number of high school students / college students per teacher, the percentage of education expenditure in the GDP, the correlation between the labour force’s training level and insertion into the labour market. The paper also presents the EU countries’ ranking related to higher education and professional training, pointing out the importance of lifelong professional training at the place of work. The paper draws conclusions regarding the importance of the labour force training, as the operation of a modern economy requires the existence of a well-trained labour force, education representing one of the fundamental pillars of any society’s development.

  11. Curriculum, human development and integral formation within the colombian caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Rodríguez Akle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the reality of the colombian Caribbean from the perspective of human development integral to start to understand that problematic situations are opportunities to enhance the transformations that allow to retrieve the subject social and collective. So the reconstruction of regional identity from the contributions of educational communities that build-oriented curriculum to become full, proactive, people with leadership and management capacity for sustainable development in a changing world. The article proposes some strategies to address alternatives to a society in which the quality of life and human dignity are the sense of the daily work in the context of the caribbean colombianidad and globalism in practice.  

  12. Lipid body formation during maturation of human mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichlberger, Andrea; Schlager, Stefanie; Lappalainen, Jani; Käkelä, Reijo; Hattula, Katarina; Butcher, Sarah J; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Kovanen, Petri T

    2011-12-01

    Lipid droplets, also called lipid bodies (LB) in inflammatory cells, are important cytoplasmic organelles. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics and functions of LBs in human mast cells (MC). Here, we have analyzed the genesis and components of LBs during differentiation of human peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) progenitors into connective tissue-type MCs. In our serum-free culture system, the maturing MCs, derived from 18 different donors, invariably developed triacylglycerol (TG)-rich LBs. Not known heretofore, the MCs transcribe the genes for perilipins (PLIN)1-4, but not PLIN5, and PLIN2 and PLIN3 display different degrees of LB association. Upon MC activation and ensuing degranulation, the LBs were not cosecreted with the cytoplasmic secretory granules. Exogenous arachidonic acid (AA) enhanced LB genesis in Triacsin C-sensitive fashion, and it was found to be preferentially incorporated into the TGs of LBs. The large TG-associated pool of AA in LBs likely is a major precursor for eicosanoid production by MCs. In summary, we demonstrate that cultured human MCs derived from CD34(+) progenitors in peripheral blood provide a new tool to study regulatory mechanisms involving LB functions, with particular emphasis on AA metabolism, eicosanoid biosynthesis, and subsequent release of proinflammatory lipid mediators from these cells.

  13. Capsular polysaccharide of Group B Streptococcus mediates biofilm formation in the presence of human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fan Di; Mallet, Adeline; Caliot, Elise; Gao, Cherry; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Dramsi, Shaynoor

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an asymptomatic colonizer of human mucosal surfaces that is responsible for sepsis and meningitis in neonates. Bacterial persistence and pathogenesis often involves biofilm formation. We previously showed that biofilm formation in medium supplemented with glucose is mediated by the PI-2a pilus. Here, biofilm formation was tested in cell culture medium supplemented with human plasma. GBS strains were able to form biofilms in these conditions unlike Group A Streptococcus (GAS) or Staphylococcus aureus. Analysis of mutants impaired for various surface components revealed that the GBS capsule is a key component in this process.

  14. Formation of propionate and butyrate by the human colonic microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Petra; Flint, Harry J

    2017-01-01

    The human gut microbiota ferments dietary non-digestible carbohydrates into short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). These microbial products are utilized by the host and propionate and butyrate in particular exert a range of health-promoting functions. Here an overview of the metabolic pathways utilized by gut microbes to produce these two SCFA from dietary carbohydrates and from amino acids resulting from protein breakdown is provided. This overview emphasizes the important role played by cross-feeding of intermediary metabolites (in particular lactate, succinate and 1,2-propanediol) between different gut bacteria. The ecophysiology, including growth requirements and responses to environmental factors, of major propionate and butyrate producing bacteria are discussed in relation to dietary modulation of these metabolites. A detailed understanding of SCFA metabolism by the gut microbiota is necessary to underpin effective strategies to optimize SCFA supply to the host.

  15. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R; Horvath, Anelia D; Azevedo, Monalisa F; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R; Wit, Jan M; Bernard, Daniel J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-02-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in the sections of GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia, and in normal pituitary. We identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function, in two male patients and one female with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increased IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared with a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and with normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation.

  16. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Horvath, Anelia D.; Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D.; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Wit, Jan M.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2014-01-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in sections from GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia and in normal pituitary. In two male patients, and in one female, with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family, we identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant, and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increase IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared to a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and to normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation. PMID:25527509

  17. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol enhances platelet formation from human megakaryoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperi, Valeria; Avigliano, Luciana; Evangelista, Daniela; Oddi, Sergio; Chiurchiù, Valerio; Lanuti, Mirko; Maccarrone, Mauro; Valeria Catani, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Platelets modulate vascular system integrity, and their loss is critical in haematological pathologies and after chemotherapy. Therefore, identification of molecules enhancing platelet production would be useful to counteract thrombocytopenia. We have previously shown that 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) acts as a true agonist of platelets, as well as it commits erythroid precursors toward the megakaryocytic lineage. Against this background, we sought to further interrogate the role of 2-AG in megakaryocyte/platelet physiology by investigating terminal differentiation, and subsequent thrombopoiesis. To this end, we used MEG-01 cells, a human megakaryoblastic cell line able to produce in vitro platelet-like particles. 2-AG increased the number of cells showing ruffled surface and enhanced surface expression of specific megakaryocyte/platelet surface antigens, typical hallmarks of terminal megakaryocytic differentiation and platelet production. Changes in cytoskeleton modeling also occurred in differentiated megakaryocytes and blebbing platelets. 2-AG acted by binding to CB1 and CB2 receptors, because specific antagonists reverted its effect. Platelets were split off from megakaryocytes and were functional: they contained the platelet-specific surface markers CD61 and CD49, whose levels increased following stimulation with a natural agonist like collagen. Given the importance of 2-AG for driving megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis, not surprisingly we found that its hydrolytic enzymes were tightly controlled by classical inducers of megakaryocyte differentiation. In conclusion 2-AG, by triggering megakaryocyte maturation and platelet release, may have clinical efficacy to counteract thrombocytopenia-related diseases.

  18. Effect of indomethacin and lactoferrin on human tenocyte proliferation and collagen formation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yaonan [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Department of Orthopaedic, Beijing Hospital of Ministry of Public Health, Beijing, China 100730 (China); Wang, Xiao; Qiu, Yiwei [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Cornish, Jillian [Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Carr, Andrew J. [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Xia, Zhidao, E-mail: z.xia@swansea.ac.uk [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • Indomethacin, a classic NSAID, inhibited human tenocyte proliferation at high concentration (100 µM). • Lactoferrin at 50-100 µg/ml promoted human tenocyte survival, proliferation and collagen synthesis. • Lactoferrin is anabolic to human tenocytes in vitro and reverses potential inhibitory effects of NSAIDs on human tenocytes. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in patients with injuries and inflammation of tendon and ligament, and as post-surgical analgesics. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of indomethacin, a classic NSAID and its combinational effect with an anabolic agent of skeletal tissue, lactoferrin, on the proliferation and collagen formation of human tenocytes in vitro. A factorial experimental design was employed to study the dose-dependent effect of the combination of indomethacin and lactoferrin. The results showed that indomethacin at high concentration (100 μM) inhibited human tenocyte proliferation in culture medium with 1–10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in vitro. Also, high dose of indomethacin inhibited the collagen formation of human tenocytes in 1% FBS culture medium. Lactoferrin at 50–100 μg/ml promoted human tenocyte survival in serum-free culture medium and enhanced proliferation and collagen synthesis of human tenocytes in 1% FBS culture medium. When 50–100 μg/ml lactoferrin was used in combination with 100–200 μM indomethacin, it partially rescued the inhibitory effects of indomethacin on human tenocyte proliferation, viability and collagen formation. To our knowledge, it is the first evidence that lactoferrin is anabolic to human tenocytes in vitro and reverses potential inhibitory effects of NSAIDs on human tenocytes.

  19. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  20. Rosuvastatin increases extracellular adenosine formation in humans in vivo: a new perspective on cardiovascular protection.

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, P; Oyen, W.J.G.; Dekker, D.; Broek, P.H.H. van den; Wouters, C.W.; Boerman, O.C.; Scheffer, G. J.; Smits, P; Rongen, G.A.P.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Statins may increase extracellular adenosine formation from adenosine monophosphate by enhancing ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity. This theory was tested in humans using dipyridamole-induced vasodilation as a read-out for local adenosine formation. Dipyridamole inhibits the transport of extracellular adenosine into the cytosol resulting in increased extracellular adenosine and subsequent vasodilation. In addition, we studied the effect of statin therapy in a forearm model of ischemia-...

  1. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-01-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, eri...

  2. Distinct Differences on Neointima Formation in Immunodeficient and Humanized Mice after Carotid or Femoral Arterial Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jill; van Ark, Joris; van Dijk, Marcory C.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is widely adopted to treat patients with coronary artery disease. However, restenosis remains an unsolved clinical problem after vascular interventions. The role of the systemic and local immune response in the development of restenosis is not fully understood. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the human immune system on subsequent neointima formation elicited by vascular injury in a humanized mouse model. Immunodeficient NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIL2rgtm1Wjl(NSG) mice were reconstituted with human (h)PBMCs immediately after both carotid wire and femoral cuff injury were induced in order to identify how differences in the severity of injury influenced endothelial regeneration, neointima formation, and homing of human inflammatory and progenitor cells. In contrast to non-reconstituted mice, hPBMC reconstitution reduced neointima formation after femoral cuff injury whereas hPBMCs promoted neointima formation after carotid wire injury 4 weeks after induction of injury. Neointimal endothelium and smooth muscle cells in the injured arteries were of mouse origin. Our results indicate that the immune system may differentially respond to arterial injury depending on the severity of injury, which may also be influenced by the intrinsic properties of the arteries themselves, resulting in either minimal or aggravated neointima formation. PMID:27759053

  3. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janice H.; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-01

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  4. Elevated levels of G-quadruplex formation in human stomach and liver cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Giulia; Tannahill, David; Miller, Jodi; Howat, William J; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Four-stranded G-quadruplex DNA secondary structures have recently been visualized in the nuclei of human cultured cells. Here, we show that BG4, a G-quadruplex-specific antibody, can be used to stain DNA G-quadruplex structures in patient-derived tissues using immunohistochemistry. We observe a significantly elevated number of G-quadruplex-positive nuclei in human cancers of the liver and stomach as compared to background non-neoplastic tissue. Our results suggest that G-quadruplex formation can be detected and measured in patient-derived material and that elevated G-quadruplex formation may be a characteristic of some cancers.

  5. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-06-18

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils.

  6. Formation mechanism and biological activity of novel thiolated human-like collagen iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Liu, Lingyun; Deng, Jianjun; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Hui, Junfeng; Fan, Daidi

    2016-03-01

    To develop an iron supplement that is effectively absorbed and utilized, thiolated human-like collagen was created to improve the iron binding capacity of human-like collagen. A thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex was prepared in a phosphate buffer, and one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 28.83 moles of iron. The characteristics of thiolated human-like collagen-iron were investigated by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex retained the secondary structure of human-like collagen and had greater thermodynamic stability than human-like collagen, although interactions between iron ions and human-like collagen occurred during the formation of the complex. In addition, to evaluate the bioavailability of thiolated human-like collagen-iron, an in vitro Caco-2 cell model and an in vivo iron deficiency anemia mouse model were employed. The data demonstrated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex exhibited greater bioavailability and was more easily utilized than FeSO4, ferric ammonium citrate, or ferrous glycinate. These results indicated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex is a potential iron supplement in the biomedical field.

  7. Forskolin enhances in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, J.; Siddappa, R.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Boer, de J.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (db-cAMP) was recently shown to enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) in vitro and bone formation in vivo. The major drawback of this compound is its inhibitory effe

  8. Human CYP2E1 mediates the formation of glycidamide from acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settels, Eva; Bernauer, Ulrike; Palavinskas, Richard; Klaffke, Horst S; Gundert-Remy, Ursula; Appel, Klaus E

    2008-10-01

    Regarding the cancer risk assessment of acrylamide (AA) it is of basic interest to know, as to what amount of the absorbed AA is metabolized to glycidamide (GA) in humans, compared to what has been observed in laboratory animals. GA is suspected of being the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of AA. From experiments with CYP2E1-deficient mice it can be concluded that AA is metabolized to GA primarily by CYP2E1. We therefore examined whether CYP2E1 is involved in GA formation in non-rodent species with the focus on humans by using human CYP2E1 supersomes, marmoset and human liver microsomes and in addition, genetically engineered V79 cells expressing human CYP2E1 (V79h2E1 cells). Special emphasis was placed on the analytical detection of GA, which was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The results show that AA is metabolized to GA in human CYP2E1 supersomes, in marmoset and human liver microsomes as well as in V79h2E1 cells. The activity of GA formation is highest in supersomes; in human liver it is somewhat higher than in marmoset liver. A monoclonal CYP2E1 human selective antibody (MAB-2E1) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) were used as specific inhibitors of CYP2E1. The generation of GA could be inhibited by MAB-2E1 to about 80% in V79h2E1 cells and to about 90% in human and marmoset liver microsomes. Also DDC led to an inhibition of about 95%. In conclusion, AA is metabolized to GA by human CYP2E1. Overall, the present work describes (1) the application and refinement of a sensitive methodology in order to determine low amounts of GA, (2) the applicability of genetically modified V79 cell lines in order to investigate specific questions concerning metabolism and (3) the involvement, for the first time, of human CYP2E1 in the formation of GA from AA. Further studies will compare the activities of GA formation in genetically engineered V79 cells expressing CYP2E1 from different species.

  9. Human CYP2E1 mediates the formation of glycidamide from acrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settels, Eva; Appel, Klaus E. [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Center for Experimental Toxicology, Berlin (Germany); Bernauer, Ulrike; Gundert-Remy, Ursula [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Safety of Substances and Preparations, Berlin (Germany); Palavinskas, Richard; Klaffke, Horst S. [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Center for Analytical Chemistry, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Regarding the cancer risk assessment of acrylamide (AA) it is of basic interest to know, as to what amount of the absorbed AA is metabolized to glycidamide (GA) in humans, compared to what has been observed in laboratory animals. GA is suspected of being the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of AA. From experiments with CYP2E1-deficient mice it can be concluded that AA is metabolized to GA primarily by CYP2E1. We therefore examined whether CYP2E1 is involved in GA formation in non-rodent species with the focus on humans by using human CYP2E1 supersomes trademark, marmoset and human liver microsomes and in addition, genetically engineered V79 cells expressing human CYP2E1 (V79h2E1 cells). Special emphasis was placed on the analytical detection of GA, which was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The results show that AA is metabolized to GA in human CYP2E1 supersomes trademark, in marmoset and human liver microsomes as well as in V79h2E1 cells. The activity of GA formation is highest in supersomes trademark; in human liver it is somewhat higher than in marmoset liver. A monoclonal CYP2E1 human selective antibody (MAB-2E1) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) were used as specific inhibitors of CYP2E1. The generation of GA could be inhibited by MAB-2E1 to about 80% in V79h2E1 cells and to about 90% in human and marmoset liver microsomes. Also DDC led to an inhibition of about 95%. In conclusion, AA is metabolized to GA by human CYP2E1. Overall, the present work describes (1) the application and refinement of a sensitive methodology in order to determine low amounts of GA, (2) the applicability of genetically modified V79 cell lines in order to investigate specific questions concerning metabolism and (3) the involvement, for the first time, of human CYP2E1 in the formation of GA from AA. Further studies will compare the activities of GA formation in genetically engineered V79 cells expressing CYP2E1 from different species. (orig.)

  10. Modeling Mycobacterium tuberculosis early granuloma formation in experimental human lung tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Ramanarao Parasa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The widely used animal models for tuberculosis (TB display fundamental differences from human TB. Therefore, a validated model that recapitulates human lung TB is attractive for TB research. Here, we describe a unique method for establishment of TB infection in an experimental human lung tissue model. The model is based on cell lines derived from human lungs and primary macrophages from peripheral blood, and displays characteristics of human lung tissue, including evenly integrated macrophages throughout the epithelium, production of extracellular matrix, stratified epithelia and mucus secretion. Establishment of experimental infection in the model tissue with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes TB, resulted in clustering of macrophages at the site of infection, reminiscent of early TB granuloma formation. We quantitated the extent of granuloma formation induced by different strains of mycobacteria and validated our model against findings in other TB models. We found that early granuloma formation is dependent on ESAT-6, which is secreted via the type VII secretion machinery of virulent mycobacteria. Our model, which can facilitate the discovery of the interactions between mycobacteria and host cells in a physiological environment, is the first lung tissue model described for TB.

  11. Structural characteristics of green tea catechins for formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takeshi; Mori, Taiki; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Kaku, Maiko; Kusaka, Koji; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Aihara, Yoshiyuki; Furuta, Takumi; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Kan, Toshiyuki; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2010-07-15

    Catechins are polyphenolic antioxidants found in green tea leaves. Recent studies have reported that various polyphenolic compounds, including catechins, cause protein carbonyl formation in proteins via their pro-oxidant actions. In this study, we evaluate the formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin (HSA) by tea catechins and investigate the relationship between catechin chemical structure and its pro-oxidant property. To assess the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA, HSA was incubated with four individual catechins under physiological conditions to generate biotin-LC-hydrazide labeled protein carbonyls. Comparison of catechins using Western blotting revealed that the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA was higher for pyrogallol-type catechins than the corresponding catechol-type catechins. In addition, the formation of protein carbonyl was also found to be higher for the catechins having a galloyl group than the corresponding catechins lacking a galloyl group. The importance of the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring and the galloyl group was confirmed using methylated catechins and phenolic acids. These results indicate that the most important structural element contributing to the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA by tea catechins is the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring, followed by the galloyl group. The oxidation stability and binding affinity of tea catechins with proteins are responsible for the formation of protein carbonyl, and consequently the difference in these properties of each catechin may contribute to the magnitude of their biological activities.

  12. Apigenin prevents ultraviolet-B radiation induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers formation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, S Mary; Shanthakumari, D; Agilan, B; Radhiga, T; Kanimozhi, G; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation leads to the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). We investigated the protective effect of apigenin against UVB-induced CPDs formation in human dermal fibroblasts cells (HDFa). For this purpose, HDFa cells were treated with apigenin (15μM) prior to UVB irradiation (20mJ/cm(2)); DNA damage and subsequent molecular end points were observed. Exposure to UVB radiation increased significant CPDs formation in HDFa cells and the frequencies of CPDs were reduced by treatment with apigenin (15μM). UVB-induced CPDs downregulates the expression of nucleotide excision repair (NER) genes such as xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C, B, G and F (XPC, XPB, XPG and XPF), transcription factor II human (TFIIH) and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) in HDFa cells. Conversely, apigenin treatment restored UVB-induced loss of NER proteins in HDFa cells, which indicates its preventive effect against CPDs formation. Besides, single low dose UVB-exposure induced nuclear fragmentation, apoptotic frequency and apoptotic proteins expression (Bax and Caspase-3) have been prevented by the apigenin pretreatment. Furthermore, apigenin exhibits strong UV absorbance property and showed 10.08 SPF value. Thus, apigenin can protect skin cells against UVB-induced CPDs formation probably through its sunscreen effect. Hence, apigenin can be considered as an effective protective agent against UV induced skin damages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Troglitazone thiol adduct formation in human liver microsomes: enzyme kinetics and reaction phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinping; Qu, Qinling; He, Bing; Shyu, Wen C; Rodrigues, A David; He, Kan

    2008-08-01

    Troglitazone (TGZ) induced hepatotoxicity has been linked to cytochrome P450 (CYP)-catalyzed reactive metabolite formation. Therefore, the kinetics and CYP specificity of reactive metabolite formation were studied using dansyl glutathione (dGSH) as a trapping agent after incubation of TGZ with human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human CYP proteins. CYP2C8 exhibited the highest rate of TGZ adduct (TGZ-dGS) formation, followed by CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP2C19. The involvement of CYP2C8 and CYP3A4 was confirmed with CYP form-selective chemical inhibitors. The impact of TGZ concentration on the rate of TGZ-dGS formation was also evaluated. In this instance, two distinctly different profiles were observed with recombinant CYP3A4 and CYP2C8. It is concluded that both CYP3A4/5 and CYP2C8 play a major role in the formation of TGZ adduct in HLM. However, the contribution of these CYPs varies depending on their relative expression and the concentration of TGZ.

  14. Formation of gamma-glutamylpropargylglycylglycine from propargylglycine in human blood and erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamine N

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-Glutamylpropargylglycylglycine (gamma-Glu-PPG-Gly was isolated as a metabolite of propargylglycine (2-amino-4-pentynoic acid, a natural and synthetic inhibitor of cystathionine gamma-lyase from human blood incubated with D,L-propargylglycine in the presence of L-glutamate and glycine, and identified by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry, indicating that human blood can metabolize propargylglycine to gamma-Glu-PPG-Gly. When whole blood was incubated with 2 mM D,L-propargylglycine in the presence of 10 mM L-glutamate and 10 mM glycine at 37 degrees C for 16h, 0.094+/-0.013 micromol of gamma-Glu-PPG-Gly was formed per ml of whole blood. When erythrocytes were incubated under the same conditions for 16h, 0.323+/-0.060 micromol of gamma-Glu-PPG-Gly was formed per ml of erythrocytes, suggesting a large contribution of erythrocytes to gamma-Glu-PPG-Gly formation in whole blood. The apparent Km value of gamma-Glu-PPG-Gly formation in human erythrocytes for D,L-propargylglycine was 0.32 mM. The observed rate of gamma-Glu-PPG-Gly formation and the Km value for D,L-propargylglycine suggest that metabolism of propargylglycine to gamma-Glu-PPG-Gly can play a definite biological role in human subjects who are loaded with propargylglycine.

  15. Human geminin promotes pre-RC formation and DNA replication by stabilizing CDT1 in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabeni, Andrea; Melixetian, Marina; Zamponi, Raffaella

    2004-01-01

    -mediated degradation by inhibiting its ubiquitination. In particular, Geminin ensures basal levels of CDT1 during S phase and its accumulation during mitosis. Consistently, inhibition of Geminin synthesis during M phase leads to impairment of pre-RC formation and DNA replication during the following cell cycle....... Moreover, we show that inhibition of CDK1 during mitosis, and not Geminin depletion, is sufficient for premature formation of pre-RCs, indicating that CDK activity is the major mitotic inhibitor of licensing in human cells. Taken together with recent data from our laboratory, our results demonstrate...

  16. Teratoma formation of human embryonic stem cells in three-dimensional perfusion culture bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachelscheid, H; Wulf-Goldenberg, A; Eckert, K; Jensen, J; Edsbagge, J; Björquist, P; Rivero, M; Strehl, R; Jozefczuk, J; Prigione, A; Adjaye, J; Urbaniak, T; Bussmann, P; Zeilinger, K; Gerlach, J C

    2013-09-01

    Teratoma formation in mice is today the most stringent test for pluripotency that is available for human pluripotent cells, as chimera formation and tetraploid complementation cannot be performed with human cells. The teratoma assay could also be applied for assessing the safety of human pluripotent cell-derived cell populations intended for therapeutic applications. In our study we examined the spontaneous differentiation behaviour of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a perfused 3D multi-compartment bioreactor system and compared it with differentiation of hESCs and human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs) cultured in vitro as embryoid bodies and in vivo in an experimental mouse model of teratoma formation. Results from biochemical, histological/immunohistological and ultrastuctural analyses revealed that hESCs cultured in bioreactors formed tissue-like structures containing derivatives of all three germ layers. Comparison with embryoid bodies and the teratomas revealed a high degree of similarity of the tissues formed in the bioreactor to these in the teratomas at the histological as well as transcriptional level, as detected by comparative whole-genome RNA expression profiling. The 3D culture system represents a novel in vitro model that permits stable long-term cultivation, spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation and tissue formation of pluripotent cells that is comparable to in vivo differentiation. Such a model is of interest, e.g. for the development of novel cell differentiation strategies. In addition, the 3D in vitro model could be used for teratoma studies and pluripotency assays in a fully defined, controlled environment, alternatively to in vivo mouse models.

  17. Intragastric formation and modulation of N-nitrosodimethylamine in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model under human physiological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, C.A.M.; Zeilmaker, M.J.; Schothorst, R.C.; Havenaar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exposure to carcinogenic N-alkylnitrosamines can occur exogenously via food consumption or endogenously by formation of these compounds through nitrosation of amine precursors. Information on the intragastric formation of NDMA from complex mixtures of precursors and inhibitors in humans is not

  18. The in vitro myelin formation in neurospheres of human neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立业; 郑佳坤; 刘相名; 惠国桢; 郭礼和

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the culture conditions of human neural stem cells and to investigate the ultrastructure of neurospheres.Methods: The cells from the embryonic human cortices were mechanically dissociated. N2 medium was adapted to culture and expand the cells. The cells were identified by immunocytochemistry and EM was applied to examine the ultrastructure of neurospheres.Results: The neural stem cells from human embryonic brains were successfully cultured and formed typical neurospheres in suspension, and most of the cells expressed vimentin, which was a marker for neural progenitor cells, and the cells could differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. In vitro myelin formation in neurospheres were observed at an early stage of culture.Conclusions: Human neural stem cells can be cultured from embryonic brains, can form the typical neurospheres in suspension in vitro and have the ability of myelinating, and may be potential source for transplantation in treating myelin disorders.

  19. Formation and Human Risk of Carcinogenic Heterocyclic Amines Formed from Natural Precursors in Meat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knize, M G; Felton, J S

    2004-11-22

    A group of heterocyclic amines that are mutagens and rodent carcinogens form when meat is cooked to medium and well-done states. The precursors of these compounds are natural meat components: creatinine, amino acids and sugars. Defined model systems of dry-heated precursors mimic the amounts and proportions of heterocyclic amines found in meat. Results from model systems and cooking experiments suggest ways to reduce their formation and, thus, to reduce human intake. Human cancer epidemiology studies related to consumption of well-done meat products are listed and compared.

  20. How does domain replacement affect fibril formation of the rabbit/human prion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yan

    Full Text Available It is known that in vivo human prion protein (PrP have the tendency to form fibril deposits and are associated with infectious fatal prion diseases, while the rabbit PrP does not readily form fibrils and is unlikely to cause prion diseases. Although we have previously demonstrated that amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and macromolecular crowding has different effects on fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs, we do not know which domains of PrPs cause such differences. In this study, we have constructed two PrP chimeras, rabbit chimera and human chimera, and investigated how domain replacement affects fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs.As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays and Sarkosyl-soluble SDS-PAGE, the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes fibril formation of both chimeras. As evidenced by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and proteinase K digestion assays, amyloid fibrils formed by human chimera have secondary structures and proteinase K-resistant features similar to those formed by the human PrP. However, amyloid fibrils formed by rabbit chimera have proteinase K-resistant features and secondary structures in crowded physiological environments different from those formed by the rabbit PrP, and secondary structures in dilute solutions similar to the rabbit PrP. The results from transmission electron microscopy show that macromolecular crowding caused human chimera but not rabbit chimera to form short fibrils and non-fibrillar particles.We demonstrate for the first time that the domains beyond PrP-H2H3 (β-strand 1, α-helix 1, and β-strand 2 have a remarkable effect on fibrillization of the rabbit PrP but almost no effect on the human PrP. Our findings can help to explain why amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and why macromolecular crowding has different

  1. Interstitial and plasma adenosine stimulate nitric oxide and prostacyclin formation in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Thaning, Pia;

    2010-01-01

    One major unresolved issue in muscle blood flow regulation is that of the role of circulating versus interstitial vasodilatory compounds. The present study determined adenosine-induced formation of NO and prostacyclin in the human muscle interstitium versus in femoral venous plasma to elucidate....... In young healthy humans, microdialysate was collected at rest, during arterial infusion of adenosine, and during interstitial infusion of adenosine through microdialysis probes inserted into musculus vastus lateralis. Muscle interstitial NO and prostacyclin increased with arterial and interstitial infusion...... levels. These findings provide novel insight into the role of adenosine in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation and vascular function by revealing that both interstitial and plasma adenosine have a stimulatory effect on NO and prostacyclin formation. In addition, both skeletal muscle and microvascular...

  2. "Danger" conditions increase sulfamethoxazole-protein adduct formation in human antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, S N; Wang, H; Callan, H E; Park, B K; Naisbitt, D J

    2009-11-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APC) are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of drug-induced immune reactions. Various pathological factors can activate APC and therefore influence the immune equilibrium. It is interesting that several diseases have been associated with an increased rate of drug allergy. The aim of this project was to evaluate the impact of such "danger signals" on sulfamethoxazole (SMX) metabolism in human APC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Epstein-Barr virus-modified B lymphocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and two cell lines). APC were incubated with SMX (100 microM-2 mM; 5 min-24 h), in the presence of pathological factors: bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide and staphylococcal enterotoxin B), flu viral proteins, cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factor-alpha; interferon-gamma; and transforming growth factor-beta], inflammatory molecules (prostaglandin E2, human serum complement, and activated protein C), oxidants (buthionine sulfoximine and H(2)O(2)), and hyperthermia (37.5-39.5 degrees C). Adduct formation was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and confocal microscopy. SMX-protein adduct formation was time- and concentration-dependent for each cell type tested, in both physiological and danger conditions. A danger environment significantly increased the formation of SMX-protein adducts and significantly shortened the delay for their detection. An additive effect was observed with a combination of danger signals. Dimedone (chemical selectively binding cysteine sulfenic acid) and antioxidants decreased both baseline and danger-enhanced SMX-adduct formation. Various enzyme inhibitors were associated with a significant decrease in SMX-adduct levels, with a pattern varying depending on the cell type and the culture conditions. These results illustrate that danger signals enhance the formation of intracellular SMX-protein adducts in human APC. These findings might be relevant

  3. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognitio...

  4. Inhibition of PAD4 activity is sufficient to disrupt mouse and human NET formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Huw D.; Liddle, John; Coote, Jim E.; Atkinson, Stephen J.; Barker, Michael D.; Bax, Benjamin, D.; Bicker, Kevin L.; Bingham, Ryan P.; Campbell, Matthew; Chen, Yu Hua; Chung, Chun-wa; Craggs, Peter D.; Davis, Rob P.; Eberhard, Dirk; Joberty, Gerard; Lind, Kenneth E.; Locke, Kelly; Maller, Claire; Martinod, Kimberly; Patten, Chris; Polyakova, Oxana; Rise, Cecil E.; Rüdiger, Martin; Sheppard, Robert J.; Slade, Daniel J.; Thomas, Pamela; Thorpe, Jim; Yao, Gang; Drewes, Gerard; Wagner, Denisa D.; Thompson, Paul R.; Prinjha, Rab K.; Wilson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    PAD4 has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune, cardiovascular and oncological diseases, through clinical genetics and gene disruption in mice. Novel, selective PAD4 inhibitors binding to a calcium-deficient form of the PAD4 enzyme have, for the first time, validated the critical enzymatic role of human and mouse PAD4 in both histone citrullination and neutrophil extracellular trap formation. The therapeutic potential of PAD4 inhibitors can now be explored. PMID:25622091

  5. The Rho Target PRK2 Regulates Apical Junction Formation in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Sean W.; Magalhaes, Ana; Hall, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate multiple signaling pathways to control a number of cellular processes during epithelial morphogenesis. To investigate the downstream pathways through which Rho regulates epithelial apical junction formation, we screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting 28 known Rho target proteins in 16HBE human bronchial epithelial cells. This led to the identification of the serine-threonine kinase PRK2 (protein kinase C-related kinase 2, also called PKN2). Depletion of...

  6. Effect of NADPH on formation and decay of human metarhodopsin III at physiological temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szundi, I; Lewis, J W; van Kuijk, F J; Kliger, D S

    2000-01-01

    Difference absorption spectra were recorded during the formation and decay of metarhodopsin III after sonicated membrane suspensions of rhodopsin were bleached at 37 degrees C. The data were analyzed using SVD, spectral decomposition and global exponential fitting. By comparison of the results in the presence or absence of 70 microM NADPH and those for bovine or human rhodopsin, a single comprehensive scheme was fit to all the data, including reduction of retinal to retinol by the intrinsic retinol dehydrogenase. On the time scale studied the mechanism involves two 382 nm absorbing species and two 468 nm, absorbing species, supporting the notion that human metarhodopsin III is not a homogeneous species. The results confirm that metarhodopsin III forms and persists sufficiently long in the human retina under physiological conditions that it could undergo secondary photoisomerization.

  7. The contributions of Nan Goldin’s photographic work with the formation of a plural humanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Darío Moreno Acero

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last two centuries the photography in its function to retain the immediately brief and momentary present, has been a central narrator of the human history, not only as a passive narrator of events, but also as an active one, to say it as a tenacious sensitizer of the situation that the human being and its society has lived. The photographic work of Nan Goldin in the investigation group “Ehics, pedagogy and literature” has been assumed as a narrative that thinks about human condition throughout history, as well as a vehicle that goes beyond established limits. In general, we propose that photography is a central element in the humanist formation because it makes the individual thinks about himself in a new way.

  8. Human SepSecS or SLA/LP: selenocysteine formation and autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palioura, Sotiria; Herkel, Johannes; Simonović, Miljan; Lohse, Ansgar W; Söll, Dieter

    2010-07-01

    Selenocysteine, the 21st genetically encoded amino acid, is the major form of the antioxidant trace element selenium in the human body. In eukaryotes and archaea its synthesis proceeds through a phosphorylated intermediate in a tRNA-dependent fashion. The final step of selenocysteine formation is catalyzed by O-phosphoseryl-tRNA:selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS) that converts phosphoseryl-tRNA(Sec) to selenocysteinyl-tRNA(Sec). The human SepSecS protein is also known as soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas (SLA/LP), which represents one of the antigens of autoimmune hepatitis. Here we review the discovery of human SepSecS and the current understanding of the immunogenicity of SLA/LP in autoimmune hepatitis.

  9. Expression analysis of candidate genes regulating successional tooth formation in the human embryo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eOlley

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human dental development is characterized by formation of the primary teeth, which are subsequently replaced by the secondary dentition. The secondary dentition consists of incisors, canines and premolars derived from the successional dental lamina of the corresponding primary tooth germs; and molar teeth, which develop as a continuation of the dental lamina. Currently, very little is known about the molecular regulation of human successional tooth formation. Here, we have investigated expression of three candidate regulators for human successional tooth formation; the Fibroblast Growth Factor-antagonist SPROUTY2, the Hedgehog co-receptor GAS1 and the RUNT-related transcription factor RUNX2. At around 8 weeks of development, only SPROUTY2 showed strong expression in both epithelium and mesenchyme of the early bud. During the cap stage between 12-14 weeks, SPROUTY2 predominated in the dental papilla and inner enamel epithelium of the developing tooth. No specific expression was seen in the successional dental lamina. GAS1 was expressed in the dental papilla and follicle, and associated with mesenchyme adjacent to the primary dental lamina during the late cap stage. In addition, GAS1 transcripts were identifiable in mesenchyme adjacent to the successional lamina, particularly in the developing primary first molar. For RUNX2, expression predominated in the dental papilla and follicle. Localized expression was seen in mesenchyme adjacent to the primary dental lamina at the late cap stage; but surprisingly, not in the early successional lamina at these stages. These findings confirm that SPROUTY2, GAS1 and RUNX2 are all expressed during early human tooth development. The domains of GAS1 and RUNX2 are consistent with a role influencing function of the primary dental lamina but only GAS1 transcripts were identifiable in the successional lamina at these early stages of development.

  10. Modelling university human capital formation and measuring its efficiency: evidence from Florence University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Ferrari

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an analysis of the technical efficiency in the formation of 2,236 graduates in 1998 in the University of Florence, that is, in the university human capital formation, is performed, by modelling the production process as one in which the student produces himself as a graduate. The tool utilized is the DEA methodology, under the hypothesis of variable returns to scale. The production factors are represented by a set of human and capital resources provided by the faculties, along with individual factors represented by secondary school diploma score and by the length of university study. The analysis is conducted both for the overall graduates, and at a faculty level, in order to emphasize the contribution provided by the latter to efficiency. There is evidence that the students graduated with an average efficiency greater than 90% and therefore with an unexploited productive capacity lower than 10%. At a faculty level, Formation Science appears to be the most efficient, whereas Economics is the less efficient one. By and large, the contribution to efficiency provided by faculties is greater than that brought by students individual characteristics.

  11. Control of superoxide and nitric oxide formation during human sperm capacitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lamirande, Eve; Lamothe, Geneviève; Villemure, Michèle

    2009-05-15

    We studied the modulation of superoxide anion (O(2).(-)) and nitric oxide (NO.) generation during human sperm capacitation (changes needed for the acquisition of fertility). The production of NO. (diaminofluorescein-2 fluorescence assay), but not that of O(2).(-) (luminescence assay), related to sperm capacitation was blocked by inhibitors of protein kinase C, Akt, protein tyrosine kinase, etc., but not by those of protein kinase A. Extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) controlled O(2).(-) synthesis but extra- and intracellular Ca(2+) regulated NO. formation. Zinc inhibited capacitation and formation of O(2).(-) and NO.. Zinc chelators (TPEN and EDTA) and sulfhydryl-targeted compounds (diamide and N-ethylmaleimide) stimulated capacitation and formation of O(2).(-) and NO.; superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NMMA) prevented these events. Diphenyliodonium (flavoenzyme inhibitor) blocked capacitation and related O(2).(-) synthesis but promoted NO. formation, an effect canceled by SOD and L-NMMA. NADPH induced capacitation and NO. (but not O(2).(-)) synthesis and these events were blocked by L-NMMA and not by SOD. Integration of these data on O(2).(-) and NO. production during capacitation reinforces the concept that a complex, but flexible, network of factors is involved and probably is associated with rescue mechanisms, so that spermatozoa can achieve successful fertilization.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-11-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, erionite, and wollastonite) than in mixtures with the manmade fibres (rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres). In the presence of externally added iron, all the fibres were found to generate OH. and the natural fibres caused about three times more OH. formation than the manmade fibres. In the absence of external iron, there was less OH. formation; however, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite still generated considerable amounts of OH., also under circumstances in which only small amounts of OH. were produced in mixtures with the manmade fibres. These findings indicate that natural fibres generate more H2O2 and OH. than manmade fibres when incubated with PMNLs in the presence of external iron. They also suggest that the natural fibres, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite may act catalytically in the dissociation of H2O2 to OH. in the absence of external iron, whereas manmade fibres such as rock wool, glass wool, and ceramic fibres, do not seem to be able to generate OH. in the absence of external iron.

  13. Reactivation of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 by telomeric circle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh K Prusty

    Full Text Available More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even death. We have previously shown that Chlamydia trachomatis infection reactivates ciHHV-6 and induces the formation of extra-chromosomal viral DNA in ciHHV-6 cells. Here, we propose a model and provide experimental evidence for the mechanism of ciHHV-6 reactivation. Infection with Chlamydia induced a transient shortening of telomeric ends, which subsequently led to increased telomeric circle (t-circle formation and incomplete reconstitution of circular viral genomes containing single viral direct repeat (DR. Correspondingly, short t-circles containing parts of the HHV-6 DR were detected in cells from individuals with genetically inherited ciHHV-6. Furthermore, telomere shortening induced in the absence of Chlamydia infection also caused circularization of ciHHV-6, supporting a t-circle based mechanism for ciHHV-6 reactivation.

  14. Improved epidermal barrier formation in human skin models by chitosan modulated dermal matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieremet, Arnout; Rietveld, Marion; Absalah, Samira; van Smeden, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Full thickness human skin models (FTMs) contain an epidermal and a dermal equivalent. The latter is composed of a collagen dermal matrix which harbours fibroblasts. Current epidermal barrier properties of FTMs do not fully resemble that of native human skin (NHS), which makes these human skin models less suitable for barrier related studies. To further enhance the resemblance of NHS for epidermal morphogenesis and barrier formation, we modulated the collagen dermal matrix with the biocompatible polymer chitosan. Herein, we report that these collagen-chitosan FTMs (CC-FTMs) possess a well-organized epidermis and maintain both the early and late differentiation programs as in FTMs. Distinctively, the epidermal cell activation is reduced in CC-FTMs to levels observed in NHS. Dermal-epidermal interactions are functional in both FTM types, based on the formation of the basement membrane. Evaluation of the barrier structure by the organization of the extracellular lipid matrix of the stratum corneum revealed an elongated repeat distance of the long periodicity phase. The ceramide composition exhibited a higher resemblance of the NHS, based on the carbon chain-length distribution and subclass profile. The inside-out barrier functionality indicated by the transepidermal water loss is significantly improved in the CC-FTMs. The expression of epidermal barrier lipid processing enzymes is marginally affected, although more restricted to a single granular layer. The novel CC-FTM resembles the NHS more closely, which makes them a promising tool for epidermal barrier related studies. PMID:28333992

  15. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

  16. T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation in skeletal muscle and implication in human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Qusairi Lama

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In skeletal muscle, the excitation-contraction (EC coupling machinery mediates the translation of the action potential transmitted by the nerve into intracellular calcium release and muscle contraction. EC coupling requires a highly specialized membranous structure, the triad, composed of a central T-tubule surrounded by two terminal cisternae from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. While several proteins located on these structures have been identified, mechanisms governing T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation remain largely unknown. Here, we provide a description of triad structure and plasticity and review the role of proteins that have been linked to T-tubule biogenesis and triad formation and/or maintenance specifically in skeletal muscle: caveolin 3, amphiphysin 2, dysferlin, mitsugumins, junctophilins, myotubularin, ryanodine receptor, and dihydhropyridine Receptor. The importance of these proteins in triad biogenesis and subsequently in muscle contraction is sustained by studies on animal models and by the direct implication of most of these proteins in human myopathies.

  17. Statistical analysis of clone formation in cultures of human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, N P; Vinogradova, M S; Volkov, I K; Voronina, E S; Kuleshov, N P

    2011-08-01

    We performed a statistical analysis of clone formation from aneuploid cells (chromosomes 6, 8, 11, X) in cultures of bone marrow-derived human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells by spontaneous level of aneuploidy at different terms of culturing (from 2 to 19 cell cycles). It was found that the duration of cell cycle increased from 65.6 h at passages 2-3 to 164.5 h at passage 12. The expected ratio of aneuploid cells was calculated using modeled 5, 10, 20 and 30% selective preference in reproduction. The size of samples for detecting 10, 25, and 50% increased level of aneuploidy was calculated. The presented principles for evaluation of aneuploid clone formation may be used to distinguish clones of any abnormal cells.

  18. Malnutrition has no effect on the timing of human tooth formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadil Elamin

    Full Text Available The effect of nutrition on the timing of human tooth formation is poorly understood. Delays and advancements in dental maturation have all been reported as well as no effect. We investigated the effect of severe malnutrition on the timing of human tooth formation in a large representative sample of North Sudanese children. The sample (1102 males, 1013 females consisted of stratified randomly selected healthy individuals in Khartoum, Sudan, aged 2-22 years using a cross-sectional design following the STROBE statement. Nutritional status was defined using WHO criteria of height and weight. Body mass index Z-scores and height for age Z-scores of ≤-2 (cut-off were used to identify the malnourished group (N = 474 while the normal was defined by Z-scores of ≥0 (N = 799. Clinical and radiographic examination of individuals, with known ages of birth was performed including height and weight measurements. Mandibular left permanent teeth were assessed using eight crown and seven root established tooth formation stages. Mean age at entry and mean age within tooth stages were calculated for each available tooth stage in each group and compared using a t-test. Results show the mean age at entry and mean age within tooth stages were not significantly different between groups affected by severe malnutrition and normal children (p>0.05. This remarkable finding was evident across the span of dental development. We demonstrate that there is little measurable effect of sustained malnutrition on the average timing of tooth formation. This noteworthy finding supports the notion that teeth have substantial biological stability and are insulated from extreme nutritional conditions compared to other maturing body systems.

  19. Malnutrition has no effect on the timing of human tooth formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elamin, Fadil; Liversidge, Helen M

    2013-01-01

    The effect of nutrition on the timing of human tooth formation is poorly understood. Delays and advancements in dental maturation have all been reported as well as no effect. We investigated the effect of severe malnutrition on the timing of human tooth formation in a large representative sample of North Sudanese children. The sample (1102 males, 1013 females) consisted of stratified randomly selected healthy individuals in Khartoum, Sudan, aged 2-22 years using a cross-sectional design following the STROBE statement. Nutritional status was defined using WHO criteria of height and weight. Body mass index Z-scores and height for age Z-scores of ≤-2 (cut-off) were used to identify the malnourished group (N = 474) while the normal was defined by Z-scores of ≥0 (N = 799). Clinical and radiographic examination of individuals, with known ages of birth was performed including height and weight measurements. Mandibular left permanent teeth were assessed using eight crown and seven root established tooth formation stages. Mean age at entry and mean age within tooth stages were calculated for each available tooth stage in each group and compared using a t-test. Results show the mean age at entry and mean age within tooth stages were not significantly different between groups affected by severe malnutrition and normal children (p>0.05). This remarkable finding was evident across the span of dental development. We demonstrate that there is little measurable effect of sustained malnutrition on the average timing of tooth formation. This noteworthy finding supports the notion that teeth have substantial biological stability and are insulated from extreme nutritional conditions compared to other maturing body systems.

  20. A GATA4-regulated tumor suppressor network represses formation of malignant human astrocytomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Wolf, Amparo; Munoz, Diana M.; Smith, Christopher J.; Gajadhar, Aaron; Restrepo, Andres; Clarke, Ian D.; Fuller, Gregory N.; Kesari, Santosh; Dirks, Peter B.; McGlade, C. Jane; Stanford, William L.; Aldape, Kenneth; Mischel, Paul S.; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal primary human brain tumor, exhibits multiple molecular aberrations. We report that loss of the transcription factor GATA4, a negative regulator of normal astrocyte proliferation, is a driver in glioma formation and fulfills the hallmarks of a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). Although GATA4 was expressed in normal brain, loss of GATA4 was observed in 94/163 GBM operative samples and was a negative survival prognostic marker. GATA4 loss occurred through promoter hypermethylation or novel somatic mutations. Loss of GATA4 in normal human astrocytes promoted high-grade astrocytoma formation, in cooperation with other relevant genetic alterations such as activated Ras or loss of TP53. Loss of GATA4 with activated Ras in normal astrocytes promoted a progenitor-like phenotype, formation of neurospheres, and the ability to differentiate into astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes. Re-expression of GATA4 in human GBM cell lines, primary cultures, and brain tumor–initiating cells suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo through direct activation of the cell cycle inhibitor P21CIP1, independent of TP53. Re-expression of GATA4 also conferred sensitivity of GBM cells to temozolomide, a DNA alkylating agent currently used in GBM therapy. This sensitivity was independent of MGMT (O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase), the DNA repair enzyme which is often implicated in temozolomide resistance. Instead, GATA4 reduced expression of APNG (alkylpurine-DNA-N-glycosylase), a DNA repair enzyme which is poorly characterized in GBM-mediated temozolomide resistance. Identification and validation of GATA4 as a TSG and its downstream targets in GBM may yield promising novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:21464220

  1. Carbamylation of Human Lens γ-crystaUins:Relevance to Cataract Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a main source of cyanide in human body,which can be taken as a risk factor of cataract formation.In this study,combined gas chromatography and mass spectrum (GC/MS) was used todetermine the amino acid hydantoin after the incubation of soluble humanlens γ-crystallins with cyanate.The carbamylated amino acids obtained bythis procedure are alanine and hlycine,which are N-terminal amino acids ofγ-crystallin,and leucine.The aggregate,which can be observed incarbamylated γ_1-crystallin on...

  2. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  3. FORMATION OF THE HUMAN CAPITAL IN MODEL OF INTEGRATION OF HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE IN INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Mityakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed the problems of reproduction of human resources in the scientific and educational cooperation and collaboration of university research with industry. Proposed a model integration high school science to industry of the region, including the internal and external levels. On the internal level, proposed a scheme of transfer technology in a technical university, where the formation of human capital is produced in two related areas: training of competitive labor market specialists with higher education, as well as consolidation in the universities of highly qualified personnel. On the external level, proposed creation of an integrated research and education production cluster, which brings together the personnel and technological capabilities of the industrial region.

  4. The postischemic environment differentially impacts teratoma or tumor formation after transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seminatore, Christine; Polentes, Jerome; Ellman, Ditte

    2010-01-01

    Risk of tumorigenesis is a major obstacle to human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell therapy. Likely linked to the stage of differentiation of the cells at the time of implantation, formation of teratoma/tumors can also be influenced by factors released by the host tissue. We have...... analyzed the relative effects of the stage of differentiation and the postischemic environment on the formation of adverse structures by transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors....

  5. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy Bondarenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patient-derived xenograft (PDX tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients’ personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients’ samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers.

  6. Trace elements during primordial plexiform network formation in human cerebral organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela C. Sartore

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Systematic studies of micronutrients during brain formation are hindered by restrictions to animal models and adult post-mortem tissues. Recently, advances in stem cell biology have enabled recapitulation of the early stages of human telencephalon development in vitro. In the present work, we analyzed cerebral organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence in order to measure biologically valuable micronutrients incorporated and distributed into the exogenously developing brain. Our findings indicate that elemental inclusion in organoids is consistent with human brain tissue and involves P, S, K, Ca, Fe and Zn. Occurrence of different concentration gradients also suggests active regulation of elemental transmembrane transport. Finally, the analysis of pairs of elements shows interesting elemental interaction patterns that change from 30 to 45 days of development, suggesting short- or long-term associations, such as storage in similar compartments or relevance for time-dependent biological processes. These findings shed light on which trace elements are important during human brain development and will support studies aimed to unravel the consequences of disrupted metal homeostasis for neurodevelopmental diseases, including those manifested in adulthood.

  7. Human germ cell formation in xenotransplants of induced pluripotent stem cells carrying X chromosome aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Antonia A; Chiang, H Rosaria; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Reijo Pera, Renee A

    2014-09-22

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial loss of the second sex chromosome and is characterized by spontaneous fetal loss in >90% of conceptions. Survivors possess an array of somatic and germline clinical characteristics. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an opportunity for insight into genetic requirements of the X chromosome linked to Turner syndrome. We derived iPSCs from Turner syndrome and control individuals and examined germ cell development as a function of X chromosome composition. We demonstrate that two X chromosomes are not necessary for reprogramming or maintenance of pluripotency and that there are minimal differences in gene expression, at the single cell level, linked to X chromosome aneuploidies. Formation of germ cells, as assessed in vivo through a murine xenotransplantation model, indicated that undifferentiated iPSCs, independent of X chromosome composition, are capable of forming germ-cell-like cells (GCLCs) in vivo. In combination with clinical data regarding infertility in women with X chromosome aneuploidies, results suggest that two intact X chromosomes are not required for human germ cell formation, qualitatively or quantitatively, but rather are likely to be required for maintenance of human germ cells to adulthood.

  8. Human disturbance causes the formation of a hybrid swarm between two naturally sympatric fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselman, Daniel J; Argo, Emily E; McBride, Meghan C; Bentzen, Paul; Schultz, Thomas F; Perez-Umphrey, Anna A; Palkovacs, Eric P

    2014-03-01

    Most evidence for hybrid swarm formation stemming from anthropogenic habitat disturbance comes from the breakdown of reproductive isolation between incipient species, or introgression between allopatric species following secondary contact. Human impacts on hybridization between divergent species that naturally occur in sympatry have received considerably less attention. Theory predicts that reinforcement should act to preserve reproductive isolation under such circumstances, potentially making reproductive barriers resistant to human habitat alteration. Using 15 microsatellites, we examined hybridization between sympatric populations of alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (A. aestivalis) to test whether the frequency of hybridization and pattern of introgression have been impacted by the construction of a dam that isolated formerly anadromous populations of both species in a landlocked freshwater reservoir. The frequency of hybridization and pattern of introgression differed markedly between anadromous and landlocked populations. The rangewide frequency of hybridization among anadromous populations was generally 0-8%, whereas all landlocked individuals were hybrids. Although neutral introgression was observed among anadromous hybrids, directional introgression leading to increased prevalence of alewife genotypes was detected among landlocked hybrids. We demonstrate that habitat alteration can lead to hybrid swarm formation between divergent species that naturally occur sympatrically, and provide empirical evidence that reinforcement does not always sustain reproductive isolation under such circumstances.

  9. Complex formation between human prostate-specific antigen and protease inhibitors in mouse plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekim, Can; Riipi, Tero; Zhu, Lei; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    When secreted from the prostate, most of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is free and enzymatically active. Upon reaching circulation, active PSA is inactivated by complex formation with protease inhibitors. To justify the use of mouse models for evaluation of the function of PSA and for studies on therapeutic modalities based on modulation of PSA activity, it is important to know whether PSA complexation is similar in mouse and man. To characterize the circulating forms of PSA in mouse, we used subcutaneous LNCaP and 22RV1 human prostate cancer cell xenograft tumor models. We also added PSA directly to mouse serum. Free and total PSA were measured by immunoassay, and PSA complexes were extracted by immunopurification followed by SDS-PAGE, in-gel trypsin digestion and identification of signature peptides by mass spectrometry. In mice bearing xenograft tumors, 68% of the immunoreactive PSA occurred in complex, and when added to mouse serum, over 70% of PSA forms complexes that comprises alpha(2)-macroglobulin and members of the alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) family. In mouse plasma, PSA forms complexes similar to those in man, but the major immunoreactive complex contains AAT rather than alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, which is the main complex forming serpin in man. The complex formation of PSA produced by xenograft tumor models in mice is similar to that of human prostate tumors with respect to the complexation of PSA. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. The enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) enhances human tongue carcinoma cells gelatinase production, migration and metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Matti; Suojanen, Juho; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Läärä, Esa; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula

    2008-08-01

    Enamel matrix derivative Emdogain (EMD) is widely used in periodontal treatment to regenerate lost connective tissue and to improve the attachment of the teeth. Gelatinases (MMP-2 and -9) have an essential role in the promotion and progression of oral cancer growth and metastasis formation. We studied the effects of EMD on human tongue squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3) cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, EMD (100 microg/ml and 200 microg/ml) remarkably induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from HSC-3 cells analysed by zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EMD also slightly induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from benign human mucosal keratinocytes (HMK). Furthermore, EMD clearly induced the transmigration of HSC-3 cells but had no effect on the HMK migration in transwell assays. The in vitro wound closure of HSC-3 cells was notably accelerated by EMD, whereas it had only minor effect on the wound closure of HMKs. The migration of both cell lines was inhibited by a selective cyclic anti-gelatinolytic peptide CTT-2. EMD had no effect on HSC-3 cell proliferation or apoptosis and only a limited effect on cell attachment to various extracellular matrix components. The in vivo mice experiment revealed that EMD substantially induced HSC-3 xenograft metastasis formation. Our results suggest that the use of EMD for patients with oral mucosal carcinomas or premalignant lesions should be carefully considered, possibly avoided.

  11. A New Controller for a Smart Walker Based on Human-Robot Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Valadão

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a smart walker that uses a formation controller in its displacements. Encoders, a laser range finder and ultrasound are the sensors used in the walker. The control actions are based on the user (human location, who is the actual formation leader. There is neither a sensor attached to the user’s body nor force sensors attached to the arm supports of the walker, and thus, the control algorithm projects the measurements taken from the laser sensor into the user reference and, then, calculates the linear and angular walker’s velocity to keep the formation (distance and angle in relation to the user. An algorithm was developed to detect the user’s legs, whose distances from the laser sensor provide the information necessary to the controller. The controller was theoretically analyzed regarding its stability, simulated and validated with real users, showing accurate performance in all experiments. In addition, safety rules are used to check both the user and the device conditions, in order to guarantee that the user will not have any risks when using the smart walker. The applicability of this device is for helping people with lower limb mobility impairments.

  12. RAGE inhibits human respiratory syncytial virus syncytium formation by interfering with F-protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jane; Huang, Kelly; Krishnan, Subramaniam; Svabek, Catherine; Rowe, Daniel C; Brewah, Yambasu; Sanjuan, Miguel; Patera, Andriani C; Kolbeck, Roland; Herbst, Ronald; Sims, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection. Infection is critically dependent on the RSV fusion (F) protein, which mediates fusion between the viral envelope and airway epithelial cells. The F protein is also expressed on infected cells and is responsible for fusion of infected cells with adjacent cells, resulting in the formation of multinucleate syncytia. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor that is constitutively highly expressed by type I alveolar epithelial cells. Here, we report that RAGE protected HEK cells from RSV-induced cell death and reduced viral titres in vitro. RAGE appeared to interact directly with the F protein, but, rather than inhibiting RSV entry into host cells, virus replication and budding, membrane-expressed RAGE or soluble RAGE blocked F-protein-mediated syncytium formation and sloughing. These data indicate that RAGE may contribute to protecting the lower airways from RSV by inhibiting the formation of syncytia, viral spread, epithelial damage and airway obstruction.

  13. A case study of a high-status human skeleton from Pacopampa in Formative Period Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Tomohito; Seki, Yuji; Morita, Wataru; Uzawa, Kazuhiro; Alemán Paredes, Diana; Morales Chocano, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    The Pacopampa site is located in the northern highlands of Peru and is an archaeological site belonging to the Formative Period (2500-1 BC). The excavation of the Pacopampa site yielded unusual human skeletons from the main platform of a ceremonial center of the site during the 2009 field season. The skeletal remains were associated with a pair of gold earplugs, a pair of gold earrings, and shell objects. This specimen is possibly a female aged 20-39 years. Detailed examination of the neurocranium revealed the presence of artificial cranial deformation with decreased cranial length, increased cranial breadth, and lateral bulging of the parietal bones. The estimated stature of this individual was 162 cm, which is about 15 cm higher than that of contemporary females of Pacopampa and about 20-25 cm higher than that of other Formative Period sites in northern Peru. The peculiarity of this individual, detected not only in the cultural artifacts but also in the physical features, is possible evidence for social stratification in the Formative Period.

  14. The Rho target PRK2 regulates apical junction formation in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sean W; Magalhaes, Ana; Hall, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate multiple signaling pathways to control a number of cellular processes during epithelial morphogenesis. To investigate the downstream pathways through which Rho regulates epithelial apical junction formation, we screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting 28 known Rho target proteins in 16HBE human bronchial epithelial cells. This led to the identification of the serine-threonine kinase PRK2 (protein kinase C-related kinase 2, also called PKN2). Depletion of PRK2 does not block the initial formation of primordial junctions at nascent cell-cell contacts but does prevent their maturation into apical junctions. PRK2 is recruited to primordial junctions, and this localization depends on its C2-like domain. Rho binding is essential for PRK2 function and also facilitates PRK2 recruitment to junctions. Kinase-dead PRK2 acts as a dominant-negative mutant and prevents apical junction formation. We conclude that PRK2 is recruited to nascent cell-cell contacts through its C2-like and Rho-binding domains and promotes junctional maturation through a kinase-dependent pathway.

  15. A New Controller for a Smart Walker Based on Human-Robot Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadão, Carlos; Caldeira, Eliete; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano; Frizera-Neto, Anselmo; Carelli, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a smart walker that uses a formation controller in its displacements. Encoders, a laser range finder and ultrasound are the sensors used in the walker. The control actions are based on the user (human) location, who is the actual formation leader. There is neither a sensor attached to the user’s body nor force sensors attached to the arm supports of the walker, and thus, the control algorithm projects the measurements taken from the laser sensor into the user reference and, then, calculates the linear and angular walker’s velocity to keep the formation (distance and angle) in relation to the user. An algorithm was developed to detect the user’s legs, whose distances from the laser sensor provide the information necessary to the controller. The controller was theoretically analyzed regarding its stability, simulated and validated with real users, showing accurate performance in all experiments. In addition, safety rules are used to check both the user and the device conditions, in order to guarantee that the user will not have any risks when using the smart walker. The applicability of this device is for helping people with lower limb mobility impairments. PMID:27447634

  16. Micronucleus formation in human keratinocytes is dependent on radiation quality and tissue architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Antoine M; Mannion, Brandon J; Leung, Stanley G; Moon, Sol C; Kronenberg, Amy; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (MN) assay was used to assess the genotoxicity of low doses of different types of space radiation. Normal human primary keratinocytes and immortalized keratinocytes grown in 2D monolayers each were exposed to graded doses of 0.3 or 1.0 GeV/n silicon ions or similar energies of iron ions. The frequencies of induced MN were determined and compared to γ-ray data. RBE(max) values ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 for primary keratinocytes and from 2.4 to 6.3 for immortalized keratinocytes. At low radiation doses ≤ 0.4 Gy, 0.3 GeV/n iron ions were the most effective at inducing MN in normal keratinocytes. An "over-kill effect" was observed for 0.3 GeV/n iron ions at higher doses, wherein 1.0 GeV/n iron ions were most efficient in inducing MN. In immortalized keratinocytes, 0.3 GeV/n iron ions produced MN with greater frequency than 1.0 GeV/n iron ions, except at the highest dose tested. MN formation was higher in immortalized keratinocytes than in normal keratinocytes for all doses and radiation qualities investigated. MN induction was also assessed in human keratinocytes cultured in 3D to simulate the complex architecture of human skin. RBE values for MN formation in 3D were reduced for normal keratinocytes exposed to iron ions, but were elevated for immortalized keratinocytes. Overall, MN induction was significantly lower in keratinocytes cultured in 3D than in 2D. Together, the results suggest that tissue architecture and immortalization status modulate the genotoxic response to space radiation, perhaps via alterations in DNA repair fidelity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Building Innovation Capacity: The Role of Human Capital Formation in Enterprises--A Review of the Literature. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Courvisanos, Jerry; Tuck, Jacqueline; McEachern, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This literature review examines the role of human capital formation in building innovative capacity in firms. The aim of the review is to develop a model of human capital development factors to be used as a basis for a larger research project where the factors that develop innovation capacity in enterprises will be investigated. The review finds…

  18. Tamoxifen-DNA adduct formation in monkey and human reproductive organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Ramon, Elena E; Sandoval, Nicole A; John, Kaarthik; Cline, J Mark; Wood, Charles E; Woodward, Ruth A; Poirier, Miriam C

    2014-05-01

    The estrogen analog tamoxifen (TAM), used for adjuvant therapy of breast cancer, induces endometrial and uterine tumors in breast cancer patients. Proliferation stimulus of the uterine endometrium is likely involved in tumor induction, but genotoxicity may also play a role. Formation of TAM-DNA adducts in human tissues has been reported but remains controversial. To address this issue, we examined TAM-DNA adducts in uteri from two species of monkeys, Erythrocebus patas (patas) and Macaca fascicularis (macaque), and in human endometrium and myometrium. Monkeys were given 3-4 months of chronic TAM dosing scaled to be equivalent to the daily human dose. In the uteri, livers and brains from the patas (n = 3), and endometrium from the macaques (n = 4), TAM-DNA adducts were measurable by TAM-DNA chemiluminescence immunoassay. Average TAM-DNA adduct values for the patas uteri (23 adducts/10(8) nucleotides) were similar to those found in endometrium of the macaques (19 adducts/10(8) nucleotides). Endometrium of macaques exposed to both TAM and low-dose estradiol (n = 5) averaged 34 adducts/10(8) nucleotides. To examine TAM-DNA persistence in the patas, females (n = 3) were exposed to TAM for 3 months and to no drug for an additional month, resulting in low or non-detectable TAM-DNA in livers and uteri. Human endometrial and myometrial samples from women receiving (n = 8) and not receiving (n = 8) TAM therapy were also evaluated. Women receiving TAM therapy averaged 10.3 TAM-DNA adducts/10(8) nucleotides, whereas unexposed women showed no detectable TAM-DNA. The data indicate that genotoxicity, in addition to estrogen agonist effects, may contribute to TAM-induced human endometrial cancer.

  19. Growth plate regulation and osteochondroma formation: insights from tracing proteoglycans in zebrafish models and human cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrea, Carlos E; Prins, Frans A; Wiweger, Malgorzata I; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2011-06-01

    Proteoglycans are secreted into the extracellular matrix of virtually all cell types and function in several cellular processes. They consist of a core protein onto which glycosaminoglycans (e.g., heparan or chondroitin sulphates), are attached. Proteoglycans are important modulators of gradient formation and signal transduction. Impaired biosynthesis of heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans causes osteochondroma, the most common bone tumour to occur during adolescence. Cytochemical staining with positively charged dyes (e.g., polyethyleneimine-PEI) allows, visualisation of proteoglycans and provides a detailed description of how proteoglycans are distributed throughout the cartilage matrix. PEI staining was studied by electron and reflection contrast microscopy in human growth plates, osteochondromas and five different proteoglycan-deficient zebrafish mutants displaying one of the following skeletal phenotypes: dackel (dak/ext2), lacking heparan sulphate and identified as a model for human multiple osteochondromas; hi307 (β3gat3), deficient for most glycosaminoglycans; pinscher (pic/slc35b2), presenting with defective sulphation of glycosaminoglycans; hi954 (uxs1), lacking most glycosaminoglycans; and knypek (kny/gpc4), missing the protein core of the glypican-4 proteoglycan. The panel of genetically well-characterized proteoglycan-deficient zebrafish mutants serves as a convincing and comprehensive study model to investigate proteoglycan distribution and the relation of this distribution to the model mutation status. They also provide insight into the distributions and gradients that can be expected in the human homologue. Human growth plate, wild-type zebrafish and fish mutants with mild proteoglycan defects (hi307 and kny) displayed proteoglycans distributed in a gradient throughout the matrix. Although the mutants pic and hi954, which had severely impaired proteoglycan biosynthesis, showed no PEI staining, dak mutants demonstrated reduced PEI staining and no

  20. Hyperthermia-induced micronucleus formation in a human keratinocyte cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintzsche, Henning; Riese, Thorsten [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Versbacher Str. 9, 97078 Wuerzburg (Germany); Stopper, Helga, E-mail: Stopper@toxi.uni-wuerzburg.de [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Pharmakologie und Toxikologie, Versbacher Str. 9, 97078 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Elevated temperature can cause biological effects in vitro and in vivo. Many studies on effects of hypo- and hyperthermia have been conducted, but only few studies systematically investigated the formation of genomic damage in the micronucleus test in human cells in vitro as a consequence of different temperatures. In the present study, HaCaT human keratinocytes were exposed to different temperatures from 37 Degree-Sign C to 42 Degree-Sign C for 24 h in a regular cell culture incubator. Micronucleus frequency as a marker of genomic damage was elevated in a temperature-dependent and statistically significant manner. Apoptosis occurred at temperatures of 39 Degree-Sign C or higher. Cell proliferation was unaffected up to 40 Degree-Sign C and decreased at 41 Degree-Sign C and 42 Degree-Sign C. Expression of the heat shock protein Hsp70 was elevated, particularly at temperatures of 40 Degree-Sign C and higher. These findings are in agreement with several in vivo studies and some in vitro studies looking at single, specific temperatures, but a systematically investigated temperature-dependent increase of genomic damage in human keratinocytes in vitro is demonstrated for the first time here.

  1. G(i-coupled GPCR signaling controls the formation and organization of human pluripotent colonies.

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    Kenta Nakamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reprogramming adult human somatic cells to create human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS cell colonies involves a dramatic morphological and organizational transition. These colonies are morphologically indistinguishable from those of pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES cells. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are required in diverse developmental processes, but their role in pluripotent colony morphology and organization is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that G(i-coupled GPCR signaling contributes to the characteristic morphology and organization of human pluripotent colonies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Specific and irreversible inhibition of G(i-coupled GPCR signaling by pertussis toxin markedly altered pluripotent colony morphology. Wild-type hES and hiPS cells formed monolayer colonies, but colonies treated with pertussis toxin retracted inward, adopting a dense, multi-layered conformation. The treated colonies were unable to reform after a scratch wound insult, whereas control colonies healed completely within 48 h. In contrast, activation of an alternative GPCR pathway, G(s-coupled signaling, with cholera toxin did not affect colony morphology or the healing response. Pertussis toxin did not alter the proliferation, apoptosis or pluripotency of pluripotent stem cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Experiments with pertussis toxin suggest that G(i signaling plays a critical role in the morphology and organization of pluripotent colonies. These results may be explained by a G(i-mediated density-sensing mechanism that propels the cells radially outward. GPCRs are a promising target for modulating the formation and organization of hiPS and hES cell colonies and may be important for understanding somatic cell reprogramming and for engineering pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic applications.

  2. Monitoring process of human keloid formation based on second harmonic generation imaging

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    Jiang, X. S.; Chen, S.; Chen, J. X.; Zhu, X. Q.; Zheng, L. Q.; Zhuo, S. M.; Wang, D. J.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, the morphological variation of collagen among the whole dermis from keloid tissue was investigated using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. In the deep dermis of keloids, collagen bundles show apparently regular gap. In the middle dermis, the collagen bundles are randomly oriented and loosely arranged in the pattern of fine mesh while the collagen bundles are organized in a parallel manner in the superficial dermis near the epidermis. The developed parameters COI and BD can be used to further quantitatively describe these changes. Our results demonstrate the potential of SHG microscopy to understand the formation process of human keloid scar at the cellular level through imaging collagen variations in different depth of dermis.

  3. In vitro methemoglobin formation in human blood exposed to NO/sub 2/

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    Chiodi, H.; Collier, C.R.; Mohler, J.G.

    1983-02-01

    The in vitro formation of methemoglobin in human blood was determined for various NO/sub 2/ concentrations and exposure times. Blood was exposed either to measured amounts of NO/sub 2/ in air or to a continuous flow of known concentrations of NO/sub 2/ in air. CO/sub 2/ was added to the gas phase to maintain pH and PCO/sub 2/ in a normal range. Exposure of 45 ppm NO/sub 2/ oxidized 95% of the total hemoglobin (THb) in 5 hr. Six ppm NO/sub 2/ oxidized 17% of THb in 3 hr. Differences between in vitro and in vivo NO/sub 2/ results are discussed.

  4. The effect of human cytomegalovirus on the formation of CFU-MK in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junxia; Song, Sanjun; Hu, Lihua

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism and the suppressive effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) on colony forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-MK), semi-solid culture system was used to observe the effect of HCMV AD169 strain on CFU-MK's growth of 18 cord blood samples. HCMV DNA and immediate early (IE) protein mRNA in CFU-MK was detected by PCR and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Our results showed that HCMV AD169 significantly suppressed the formation of CFU-MK in vitro. Compared with the mock group, the CFU-MK colonies decreased by 21.6%, 33.8% and 46.3%, respectively, in all the 3 infected groups (PCFU-MK by directly infecting their progenitors. There was early transcription of HCMV IE protein in CFU-MK infected by virus.

  5. Effect of Genistein on vasculogenic mimicry formation by human uveal melanoma cells

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    Gu Haijuan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vasculogenic mimicry (VM was increasingly recognized as a form of aggressive melanoma acquiring blood supply. Genistein had attracted much attention as a potential anticancer agent. Therefore, we examined the effect of Genistein on VM in human uveal melanoma cells. Methods VM structure was detected by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS staining for uveal melanoma C918 cells cultured on the three-dimensional type I collagen gels after exposed to Genistein. We used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western Blot analysis to examine the effect of Genistein on vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin mRNA and protein expression. The nude mice models of human uveal melanoma C918 cells were established to assess the number of VM using immunohistochemical and PAS double-staining. Results Genistein inhibited the survival of C918 cells in vitro. The ectopic model study showed that VM in tumor tissue sections were significantly reduced by Genistein in vivo. In vitro, the VM structure was found in control, 25 and 50 μM Genistein-treatment groups but not in 100 and 200 μM. RT-PCR and Western Blot showed that 100 and 200 μM concentration of Genistein could significantly decrease VE-cadherin mRNA and protein expression of C918 cells compared with control (P 0.05. Conclusion Genistein inhibits VM formation of uveal melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro. One possible underlying molecular mechanism by which Genistein could inhibit VM formation of uveal melanoma is related to down-regulation of VE-cadherin.

  6. In vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue formation with porous poly-L-lactide matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen; Okada, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Okita, Naoya; Inami, Kaoru; Nishiura, Aki; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue (HPdLLT) by three-dimensional culturing of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLFs) in a porous poly-L-lactide (PLLA) matrix modified hydrophilically with ammonia solution. After ammonia modification, the surface roughness and culture-medium-soaking-up ability of the PLLA matrix increased, whereas the contact angle of water drops decreased. The thickness, porosity, and pore size of the PLLA matrix were 400±50 μm, 83.3%, and 75-150 μm, respectively. HPdLFs (1×10(5) cells) were seeded on the modified PLLA matrix and centrifuged to facilitate seeding into its interior and cultured for 14 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, proliferation assay, picrosirius-red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for type-1 collagen (COL1), periodontal ligament associated protein-1 (PLAP-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA were conducted on days 1, 3, 7, and 14. HPdLFs were observed entirely from the surface to the rear side of the matrix. Cell proliferation analysis, SEM observation, and picrosirius-red staining showed both progressive growth of 3D-cultured HPdLFs and extracellular matrix maturation by the secretion of COL1 and type 3 collagen (COL3) from days 1 to 14. Expressions of COL1, PLAP-1, and FGF-2 mRNA suggested the formation of cellular components and supplementation of extracellular components. Expressions of ALP, COL1, and PLAP-1 mRNA suggested the osteogenic potential of the HPdLLT. The results indicated in vitro HPdLLT formation, and it could be used in future periodontal ligament tissue engineering to achieve optimal periodontal regeneration.

  7. Serial imaging of human embryonic stem-cell engraftment and teratoma formation in live mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin G Pomper; Holly Hammond; Xiaobing Yu; Zhaohui Ye; Catherine A Foss; Doris D Lin; James J Fox; Linzhao Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Two new types of lentiviral vectors expressing a reporter transgene encoding either firefly lueiferase (fLue) for bioluminescence imaging or the HSV1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) for radiopharmaceutical-based imaging were constructed to monitor human embryonic stem cell (hESC) engraftment and proliferation in live mice after trans-plantation. The constitutive expression of either transgene did not alter the properties of hESCs in the culture. We next monitored the formation of teratomas in SCID mice to test (1) whether the gene-modified hESCs maintain their developmental pluripotency, and (2) whether sustained reporter gene expression allows noninvasive, whole-body im-aging of hESC derivatives in a live mouse model. We observed teratoma formation from both types of gene-modified cells as well as wild-type bESCs 2-4 months after inoculation. Using an optical imaging system, bioluminescence from the fLuc-transduced hESCs was easily detected in mice bearing teratomas long before palpable tumors could be de-tected. To develop a noninvasive imaging method more readily translatable to the clinic, we also utilized HSV1-TK and its specific substrate, 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[125I]iodouracil ([125I]FIAU), as a reporter/ probe pair. After systemic administration, [125I]FIAU is phosphorylated only by the transgene-encoded HSV1-TK enzyme and retained within transduced (and transplanted) cells, allowing sensitive and quantitative imaging by single-photon emission computed tomography. Noninvasive imaging methods such as these may enable us to moni-tor the presence and distribution of transplanted human stem cells repetitively within live recipients over a long term through the expression of a reporter gene.

  8. A coverslip-based technique for evaluating Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on human plasma

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    Jennifer N Walker

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, to form biofilms is increasingly being viewed as an important contributor to chronic infections. In vitro methods for analyzing S. aureus biofilm formation have focused on bacterial attachment and accumulation on abiotic surfaces, such as in microtiter plate and flow cell assays. Microtiter plates provide a rapid measure of relative biomass levels, while flow cells have limited experimental throughput but are superior for confocal microscopy biofilm visualization. Although these assays have proven effective at identifying mechanisms involved in cell attachment and biofilm accumulation, the significance of these assays in vivo remains unclear. Studies have shown that when medical devices are implanted they are coated with host factors, such as matrix proteins, that facilitate S. aureus attachment and biofilm formation. To address the challenge of integrating existing biofilm assay features with a biotic surface, we have established an in vitro biofilm technique utilizing UV-sterilized coverslips coated with human plasma. The substratum more closely resembles the in vivo state and provides a platform for S. aureus to establish a robust biofilm. Importantly, these coverslips are amenable to confocal microscopy imaging to provide a visual reference of the biofilm growth stage, effectively merging the benefits of the microtiter and flow cell assays. We confirmed the approach using clinical S. aureus isolates and mutants with known biofilm phenotypes. Altogether, this new biofilm assay can be used to assess the function of S. aureus virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and for monitoring the efficacy of biofilm treatment modalities.

  9. Acrylamide: inhibition of formation in processed food and mitigation of toxicity in cells, animals, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2015-06-01

    Potentially toxic acrylamide is largely derived from the heat-inducing reactions between the amino group of the amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose in plant-derived foods including cereals, coffees, almonds, olives, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. This review surveys and consolidates the following dietary aspects of acrylamide: distribution in food, exposure and consumption by diverse populations, reduction of the content in different food categories, and mitigation of adverse in vivo effects. Methods to reduce acrylamide levels include selecting commercial food with a low acrylamide content, selecting cereal and potato varieties with low levels of asparagine and reducing sugars, selecting processing conditions that minimize acrylamide formation, adding food-compatible compounds and plant extracts to food formulations before processing that inhibit acrylamide formation during processing of cereal products, coffees, teas, olives, almonds, and potato products, and reducing multiorgan toxicity (antifertility, carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, teratogenicity). The herein described observations and recommendations are of scientific interest for food chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology, but also have the potential to benefit nutrition, food safety, and human health.

  10. Linking DNA adduct formation and human cancer risk in chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Miriam C

    2016-08-01

    Over two centuries ago, Sir Percival Pott, a London surgeon, published a pioneering treatise showing that soot exposure was the cause of high incidences of scrotal cancers occurring in young men who worked as chimney sweeps. Practicing at a time when cellular pathology was not yet recognized, Sir Percival nonetheless observed that the high incidence and short latency of the chimney sweep cancers, was fundamentally different from the rare scrotal cancers typically found in elderly men. Furthermore, his diagnosis that the etiology of these cancers was related to chimney soot exposure, was absolutely accurate, conceptually novel, and initiated the field of "occupational cancer epidemiology." After many intervening years of research focused on mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis, briefly described here, it is clear that DNA damage, or DNA adduct formation, is "necessary but not sufficient" for tumor induction, and that many additional factors contribute to carcinogenesis. This review includes a synopsis of carcinogen-induced DNA adduct formation in experimental models and in the human population, with particular attention paid to molecular dosimetry and molecular cancer epidemiology. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:499-507, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Regularities of formation of chlorophyll-human serum albumin functionally active complexes in the aqueous medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semichaevskiĭ, V D

    1975-01-01

    In the system with constant content of the chlorophyll a and increasing amounts of human serum albumin, dependence of pigment incorporation into the complex upon interaction of its aqueous associates with protein solutions was studied by applying the gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and by measuring light scattering and rate of sensitized photoreduction of the methyl red by ascorbic-acid. The curves were obtained after extraction of the chlorophyll by acetone from dry pigment-protein films formed after desiccation of the aqueous systems. Sigmoid character of the above dependences, their linearization in Hill's coordinates and the value of cooperativity coefficient close to 2 testifies in favour of the cooperative character of the complex formation, two pigment molecules reacting with a single protein molecule. Measurement of adsorption isotherms and their treatment with use of the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory of polymolecular adsorption make it possible to evaluate the maximum molar ratio of the pigment to the protein in the complex (close to 2). The pigment-pigment interaction suggests that the chlorophyll molecules adsorbed on the protein are in the state of loosely packed dimers. Deaggregation of aqueus pigment associates by the protein in the course of complex formation results in a considerable increase of the protosensitizing chlorophyll activity.

  12. Synthetic niches for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells bypassing embryoid body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yarong; Fox, Victoria; Lei, Yuning; Hu, Biliang; Joo, Kye-Il; Wang, Pin

    2014-07-01

    The unique self-renewal and pluripotency features of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offer the potential for unlimited development of novel cell therapies. Currently, hESCs are cultured and differentiated using methods, such as monolayer culture and embryoid body (EB) formation. As such, achieving efficient differentiation into higher order structures remains a challenge, as well as maintaining cell viability during differentiation into homogeneous cell populations. Here, we describe the application of highly porous polymer scaffolds as synthetic stem cell niches. Bypassing the EB formation step, these scaffolds are capable of three-dimensional culture of undifferentiated hESCs and subsequent directed differentiation into three primary germ layers. H9 hESCs were successfully maintained and proliferated in biodegradable polymer scaffolds based on poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The results showed that cells within PLGA scaffolds retained characteristics of undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells. Moreover, the scaffolds allowed differentiation towards the lineage of interest by the addition of growth factors to the culture system. The in vivo transplantation study revealed that the scaffolds could provide a microenvironment that enabled hESCs to interact with their surroundings, thereby promoting cell differentiation. Therefore, this approach, which provides a unique culture/differentiation system for hESCs, will find its utility in various stem cell-based tissue-engineering applications.

  13. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS in the Formation of Extracellular Traps (ETs in Humans

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    Walter Stoiber

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular traps (ETs are reticulate structures of extracellular DNA associated with antimicrobial molecules. Their formation by phagocytes (mainly by neutrophils: NETs has been identified as an essential element of vertebrate innate immune defense. However, as ETs are also toxic to host cells and potent triggers of autoimmunity, their role between pathogen defense and human pathogenesis is ambiguous, and they contribute to a variety of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Since the discovery of ET formation (ETosis a decade ago, evidence has accumulated that most reaction cascades leading to ET release involve ROS. An important new facet was added when it became apparent that ETosis might be directly linked to, or be a variant of, the autophagy cell death pathway. The present review analyzes the evidence to date on the interplay between ROS, autophagy and ETosis, and highlights and discusses several further aspects of the ROS-ET relationship that are incompletely understood. These aspects include the role of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS, the molecular requirements of NADPH oxidase-dependent ETosis, the roles of NADPH oxidase subtypes, extracellular ROS and of ROS from sources other than NADPH oxidase, and the present evidence for ROS-independent ETosis. We conclude that ROS interact with ETosis in a multidimensional manner, with influence on whether ETosis shows beneficial or detrimental effects.

  14. Characterization of metastasis formation and virotherapy in the human C33A cervical cancer model.

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    Ulrike Donat

    Full Text Available More than 90% of cancer mortalities are due to cancer that has metastasized. Therefore, it is crucial to intensify research on metastasis formation and therapy. Here, we describe for the first time the metastasizing ability of the human cervical cancer cell line C33A in athymic nude mice after subcutaneous implantation of tumor cells. In this model, we demonstrated a steady progression of lumbar and renal lymph node metastases during tumor development. Besides predominantly occurring lymphatic metastases, we visualized the formation of hematogenous metastases utilizing red fluorescent protein (RFP expressing C33A-RFP cells. RFP positive cancer cells were found migrating in blood vessels and forming micrometastases in lungs of tumor-bearing mice. Next, we set out to analyze the influence of oncolytic virotherapy in the C33A-RFP model and demonstrated an efficient virus-mediated reduction of tumor size and metastatic burden. These results suggest the C33A-RFP cervical cancer model as a new platform to analyze cancer metastases as well as to test novel treatment options to combat metastases.

  15. Formation of bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in tetraploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Susumu; Seyama, Atsushi

    2012-09-01

    Tetraploid cells with unstable chromosomes frequently arise as an early step in tumorigenesis and lead to the formation of aneuploid cells. The mechanisms responsible for the chromosome instability of polyploid cells are not fully understood, although the supernumerary centrosomes in polyploid cells have been considered the major cause of chromosomal instability. The aim of this study was to examine the integrity of mitotic spindles and centrosomes in proliferative polyploid cells established from normal human fibroblasts. TIG-1 human fibroblasts were treated with demecolcine (DC) for 4 days to induce polyploidy, and the change in DNA content was monitored. Localization of centrosomes and mitotic spindles in polyploid mitotic cells was examined by immunohistochemistry and laser scanning cytometry. TIG-1 cells treated with DC became almost completely tetraploid at 2 weeks after treatment and grew at the same rate as untreated diploid cells. Most mitotic cells with 8C DNA content had only two centrosomes with bipolar spindles in established tetraploid cells, although they had four or more centrosomes with multipolar spindles at 3 days after DC treatment. The frequency of aneuploid cells increased as established tetraploid cells were propagated. These results indicate that tetraploid cells that form bipolar spindles with two centrosomes in mitosis can proliferate as diploid cells. These cells may serve as a useful model for studying the chromosome instability of polyploid cells.

  16. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  17. The Contribution of the Human Body in Young Children's Explanations About Shadow Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakleioti, Evagelia; Pantidos, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    This paper begins with the view that the generation of meaning is a multimodal process. Props, drawings, graphs, gestures, as well as speech and written text are all mediators through which students construct new knowledge. Each semiotic context makes a unique contribution to the conceptualization of scientific entities. The human body, in particular, can function as a factor in both representation and explanation, serving as a link between verbal discourse and setting. Considering this perspective, a body-based activity was designed for kindergarten children, involving the concept of a shadow. The 3-D arrangement of the light from the light source, the human body (the obstacle), and the resulting shadow plays a central role. Using their own bodies as obstacles to the light, the children were able to explore the direction of the light and to change the relative positions of the light source and the obstacle. They formed hypotheses and were able to test them by moving on the stage. This body-centered activity explicitly incorporates the rectilinear movement of light into the process of shadow formation, while also providing learning through direct experience. Positive effects on learning were achieved for the group of children who participated in the activity, while the video analysis showed that many of the children were able to use their bodies to transfer to a different setting the embodied knowledge they acquired. This, according to researchers in the field of science education, is a powerful indication of conceptual change.

  18. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Colpitts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (reemerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  19. Formation of Main Elements of the System Motivation of Human Capital of Construction Enterprises

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    Malykhina Oksana M.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on a necessity to develop system motivation of human capital of construction enterprises. The author gives her own vision of this process on the basis of the system situational approach. The article identifies main requirements, which are made stronger with the necessity of establishment of the system motivation. It generalises the aggregate of components of internal and external environments, which form the structure, requirements to functioning and directions of managerial impact on the genesis of this process, which would facilitate achievement of long-term goals of construction enterprises on the basis of the innovation model of development. Efficiency of functioning of the system motivation of human capital of construction enterprises would depend on accounting in the process of its formation and development of such basic properties as: target orientation, synergetic integrity, availability of the internal organisational structure, ability to restore and resistance to influence of external environment factors, flexibility and dynamism and ecologo-socio-economic efficiency.

  20. In vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue formation with porous poly-L-lactide matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Wen [Graduate School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Sakamoto, Fumito; Okita, Naoya [Graduate School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Inami, Kaoru; Nishiura, Aki [Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiya, E-mail: yoshiya@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Matsumoto, Naoyuki [Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue (HPdLLT) by three-dimensional culturing of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLFs) in a porous poly-L-lactide (PLLA) matrix modified hydrophilically with ammonia solution. After ammonia modification, the surface roughness and culture-medium-soaking-up ability of the PLLA matrix increased, whereas the contact angle of water drops decreased. The thickness, porosity, and pore size of the PLLA matrix were 400 ± 50 μm, 83.3%, and 75–150 μm, respectively. HPdLFs (1 × 10{sup 5} cells) were seeded on the modified PLLA matrix and centrifuged to facilitate seeding into its interior and cultured for 14 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, proliferation assay, picrosirius-red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for type-1 collagen (COL1), periodontal ligament associated protein-1 (PLAP-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA were conducted on days 1, 3, 7, and 14. HPdLFs were observed entirely from the surface to the rear side of the matrix. Cell proliferation analysis, SEM observation, and picrosirius-red staining showed both progressive growth of 3D-cultured HPdLFs and extracellular matrix maturation by the secretion of COL1 and type 3 collagen (COL3) from days 1 to 14. Expressions of COL1, PLAP-1, and FGF-2 mRNA suggested the formation of cellular components and supplementation of extracellular components. Expressions of ALP, COL1, and PLAP-1 mRNA suggested the osteogenic potential of the HPdLLT. The results indicated in vitro HPdLLT formation, and it could be used in future periodontal ligament tissue engineering to achieve optimal periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • First report on ammonia treated PLLA matrix for in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue generation. • Good combination of matrix thickness, pore size, and porosity. • Biodegradable PLLA is also possible to be used in vivo.

  1. Modern Trends in the Formation of Human Resources as a Factor in Sustainable Development of China’s Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Viktorovna Krasova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The processes of human resources formation and development are among the topical areas of research on the growth of national economies. China, like other developing countries, is building an innovation economy, and considers its national human capital as a key factor in its further growth. China has the greatest amount of human resources among all countries of the world, which largely ensures its success in the global economy; however, birth control policy and other factors led to the emergence of several issues that may have a significant impact on the formation of human capital and further economic growth of the country. The purpose of the present study is to reveal modern trends in the formation of human resources of China by considering the demographic, urban and economic aspects. The paper defines the concept of national human resources, substantiates the urgency of a comprehensive research into the accumulation of human potential in a populous country such as China. The authors consider population dynamics in China, including able-bodied population, analyze the age structure of population, level of dependency, level of urbanization and specifics of spatial distribution of the population. Particular emphasis is placed on the problem of reduction in the share of working-age population, assessment of the role of internal migration flows in the formation of human capital in cities, assessment of the total economic effect of urbanization, analysis of the uneven spatial distribution of human resources of China and its impact on the volume of production in regions. Several key indicators are presented in the context of major Chinese cities or provinces

  2. Respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein promotes TLR-4-dependent neutrophil extracellular trap formation by human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle A Funchal

    Full Text Available Acute viral bronchiolitis by Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the most common respiratory illness in children in the first year of life. RSV bronchiolitis generates large numbers of hospitalizations and an important burden to health systems. Neutrophils and their products are present in the airways of RSV-infected patients who developed increased lung disease. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs are formed by the release of granular and nuclear contents of neutrophils in the extracellular space in response to different stimuli and recent studies have proposed a role for NETs in viral infections. In this study, we show that RSV particles and RSV Fusion protein were both capable of inducing NET formation by human neutrophils. Moreover, we analyzed the mechanisms involved in RSV Fusion protein-induced NET formation. RSV F protein was able to induce NET release in a concentration-dependent fashion with both neutrophil elastase and myeloperoxidase expressed on DNA fibers and F protein-induced NETs was dismantled by DNase treatment, confirming that their backbone is chromatin. This viral protein caused the release of extracellular DNA dependent on TLR-4 activation, NADPH Oxidase-derived ROS production and ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Together, these results demonstrate a coordinated signaling pathway activated by F protein that led to NET production. The massive production of NETs in RSV infection could aggravate the inflammatory symptoms of the infection in young children and babies. We propose that targeting the binding of TLR-4 by F protein could potentially lead to novel therapeutic approaches to help control RSV-induced inflammatory consequences and pathology of viral bronchiolitis.

  3. Assessment and characterization of biofilm formation among human isolates of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genteluci, Gabrielle Limeira; Silva, Ligia Guedes; Souza, Maria Clara; Glatthardt, Thaís; de Mattos, Marcos Corrêa; Ejzemberg, Regina; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    The capacity to form biofilm is considered a protective mechanism that allows the bacteria to survive and proliferate in hostile environments, facilitating the maintenance of the infectious process. Recently, biofilm has become a topic of interest in the study of the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Although GAS has not been associated with infection on medical implants, the presence of microcolonies embedded in an extracellular matrix on infected tissues has been reported. Despite the similarity between GAS and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE), there are no studies in the literature describing the production of biofilm by SDSE. In this work, we assessed and characterized biofilm development among SDSE human isolates of group C. The in vitro data showed that 59.3% of the 118 isolates tested were able to form acid-induced biofilm on glass, and 28% formed it on polystyrene surfaces. More importantly, biofilm was also formed in a foreign body model in mice. The biofilm structure was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Long fibrillar-like structures were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the expression of a pilus associated gene of SDSE was increased for in vitro sessile cells compared with planktonics, and when sessile cells were collected from biofilms formed in the animal model compared with that of in vitro model. Results obtained from the immunofluorescence microscopy indicated the biofilm was immunogenic. Our data also suggested a role for proteins, exopolysaccharide and extracellular DNA in the formation and accumulation of biofilm by SDSE.

  4. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  5. Exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells accelerate wound healing and inhibit scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yijie; Han, Shichao; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Hao; Liu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jihong; Su, Linlin; Hu, Dahai

    2017-04-01

    Wound healing is a highly orchestrated physiological process consisting of a complex events, and scarless wound healing is highly desired for the development and application in clinical medicine. Recently, we have demonstrated that human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs) promoted wound healing and inhibited scar formation through a paracrine mechanism. However, exosomes (Exo) are one of the most important paracrine factors. Whether exosomes derived from human amniotic epithelial cells (hAECs-Exo) have positive effects on scarless wound healing have not been reported yet. In this study, we examined the role of hAECs-Exo on wound healing in a rat model. We found that hAECs, which exhibit characteristics of both embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells, have the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. hAECs-Exo ranged from 50 to 150 nm in diameter, and positive for exosomal markers CD9, CD63, CD81, Alix, TSG101 and HLA-G. Internalization of hAECs-Exo promoted the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts. Moreover, the deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) were partly abolished by the treatment of high concentration of hAECs-Exo (100 μg/mL), which may be through stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). In vivo animal experiments showed that hAECs-Exo improved the skin wound healing with well-organized collagen fibers. Taken together, These findings represent that hAECs-Exo can be used as a novel hope in cell-free therapy for scarless wound healing.

  6. Deficit of mitonuclear genes on the human X chromosome predates sex chromosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Rebecca; Zimmer, Fabian; Mank, Judith E

    2015-01-29

    Two taxa studied to date, the therian mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, display underrepresentations of mitonuclear genes (mt-N genes, nuclear genes whose products are imported to and act within the mitochondria) on their X chromosomes. This pattern has been interpreted as the result of sexual conflict driving mt-N genes off of the X chromosome. However, studies in several other species have failed to detect a convergent biased distribution of sex-linked mt-N genes, leading to questions over the generality of the role of sexual conflict in shaping the distribution of mt-N genes. Here we tested whether mt-N genes moved off of the therian X chromosome following sex chromosome formation, consistent with the role of sexual conflict, or whether the paucity of mt-N genes on the therian X is a chance result of an underrepresentation on the ancestral regions that formed the X chromosome. We used a synteny-based approach to identify the ancestral regions in the platypus and chicken genomes that later formed the therian X chromosome. We then quantified the movement of mt-N genes on and off of the X chromosome and the distribution of mt-N genes on the human X and ancestral X regions. We failed to find an excess of mt-N gene movement off of the X. The bias of mt-N genes on ancestral therian X chromosomes was also not significantly different from the biases on the human X. Together our results suggest that, rather than conflict driving mt-N genes off of the mammalian X, random biases on chromosomes that formed the X chromosome could explain the paucity of mt-N genes in the therian lineage.

  7. Oxidation Enhances Human Serum Albumin Thermal Stability and Changes the Routes of Amyloid Fibril Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancataldo, Giuseppe; Vetri, Valeria; Foderà, Vito; Di Cara, Gianluca; Militello, Valeria; Leone, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative damages are linked to several aging-related diseases and are among the chemical pathways determining protein degradation. Specifically, interplay of oxidative stress and protein aggregation is recognized to have a link to the loss of cellular function in pathologies like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Interaction between protein and reactive oxygen species may indeed induce small changes in protein structure and lead to the inhibition/modification of protein aggregation process, potentially determining the formation of species with different inherent toxicity. Understanding the temperate relationship between these events can be of utmost importance in unraveling the molecular basis of neurodegeneration. In this work, we investigated the effect of hydrogen peroxide oxidation on Human Serum Albumin (HSA) structure, thermal stability and aggregation properties. In the selected conditions, HSA forms fibrillar aggregates, while the oxidized protein undergoes aggregation via new routes involving, in different extents, specific domains of the molecule. Minute variations due to oxidation of single residues affect HSA tertiary structure leading to protein compaction, increased thermal stability, and reduced association propensity. PMID:24416244

  8. Effects of oxidative and thermal stresses on stress granule formation in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palangi, Freshteh; Samuel, Samson M; Thompson, I Richard; Triggle, Chris R; Emara, Mohamed M

    2017-01-01

    Stress Granules (SGs) are dynamic ribonucleoprotein aggregates, which have been observed in cells subjected to environmental stresses, such as oxidative stress and heat shock (HS). Although pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) are highly sensitive to oxidative stress, the role of SGs in regulating PSC self-renewal and differentiation has not been fully elucidated. Here we found that sodium arsenite (SA) and HS, but not hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induce SG formation in human induced (hi) PSCs. Particularly, we found that these granules contain the well-known SG proteins (G3BP, TIAR, eIF4E, eIF4A, eIF3B, eIF4G, and PABP), were found in juxtaposition to processing bodies (PBs), and were disassembled after the removal of the stress. Moreover, we showed that SA and HS, but not H2O2, promote eIF2α phosphorylation in hiPSCs forming SGs. Analysis of pluripotent protein expression showed that HS significantly reduced all tested markers (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, KLF4, L1TD1, and LIN28A), while SA selectively reduced the expression levels of NANOG and L1TD1. Finally, in addition to LIN28A and L1TD1, we identified DPPA5 (pluripotent protein marker) as a novel component of SGs. Collectively, these results provide new insights into the molecular cues of hiPSCs responses to environmental insults.

  9. Time course of the angiogenic response during normotrophic and hypertrophic scar formation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, Willem M; Niessen, Frank B; Ferreira, José A; Zwiers, Peter J; de Jong, Etty H; Middelkoop, Esther; Molema, Grietje

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that in hypertrophic scars (HSs), an excess of microvessels is present compared with normotrophic scars (NSs). The aim of our study was to quantify vascular densities in HSs and normotrophic scars and to provide an insight into the kinetics of changes in the expression of angiogenic factors in time during wound healing and HS formation. Human presternal wound healing after cardiothoracic surgery through a sternotomy incision was investigated in a standardized manner. Skin biopsies were collected at consecutive time points, i.e., during surgery and 2, 4, 6, 12, and 52 weeks postoperatively. The expression levels of angiopoietin-1, angiopoietin-2, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator were measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Quantification of angiogenesis and cellular localization of the proteins of interest were based on immunohistochemical analysis. Microvessel densities were higher in the HSs compared with the normotrophic scars 12 weeks (p=0.017) and 52 weeks (p=0.030) postoperatively. Angiopoietin-1 expression was lower in the hypertrophic group (pdecrease in the angiopoietin-1/angiopoietin-2 ratio in the hypertrophic group 4 weeks (p=0.053), 12 weeks (pscars.

  10. Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Carpentier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs including embryonic (ESC and induced pluripotent (iPSC stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3 weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.

  11. The Effect of Human Cytomegalovirus on the Formation of CFU-MK In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚军霞; 宋善俊; 胡丽华

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism and the suppressive effect of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) on colony forming unit-megakaryocyte (CFU-MK), semi-solid culture system was used to observe the effect of HCMV AD169 strain on CFU-MK's growth of 18 cord blood samples. HCMV DNA and immediate early (IE) protein mRNA in CFU-MK was detected by PCR and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Our results showed that HCMV AD169 significantly suppressed the formation of CFU-MK in vitro. Compared with the mock group, the CFUMK colonies decreased by 21. 6 %, 33. 8 % and 46.3 %, respectively, in all the 3 infected groups (P<0. 05), suggesting the suppression and the titer of the virus was dose-dependent. Both HCMV DNA and the expression of HCMV IE protein mRNA were positively detected in the colony cells of viral infected group,. It is concluded that HCMV AD169 strain could inhibit the differentiation and proliferation of CFU-MK by directly infecting their progenitors. There was early transcription of HCMV IE protein in CFU-MK infected by virus.

  12. Induction of bone formation by smart biphasic hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate biomimetic matrices in the non-human primate Papio ursinus

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ripamonti, U

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies in the non-human primate Chacma baboon Papio ursinus were set to investigate the induction of bone formation by biphasic hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) biomimetic matrices. HA/β-TCP biomimetic matrices in a pre...

  13. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure Enhances Extracellular Trap Formation by Human Neutrophils through the NADPH Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Scheer, Marleen H; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency (LF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are abundantly present in modern society, and the potential biological consequences of exposure to these fields are under intense debate. Immune cells are suggested as possible target cells, though a clear mechanism is lacking. Considering their crucial role in innate immune activation, we selected an ex vivo exposure set-up with human neutrophils to investigate a possible correlation between neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation and LF EMF exposure. Our study shows that formation of NETs is enhanced by LF EMF exposure. Enhanced NET formation leads to increased antimicrobial properties as well as damage to surrounding cells. We found that LF-EMF-induced NET formation is dependent on the NADPH oxidase pathway and production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, LF EMF exposure does not influence autophagy and PAD4 activity. Our study provides a mechanism by which exposure to LF EMFs could influence the innate immune system.

  14. Establishment and Characterization of Human Germline Stem Cell Line with Unlimited Proliferation Potentials and no Tumor Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingmei; Niu, Minghui; Liu, Linhong; Zhu, Zijue; Wang, Xiaobo; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Yang, Shi; Zeng, Wenxian; Liu, Yang; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2015-11-20

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have significant applications in both reproductive and regenerative medicine. However, primary human SSCs are very rare, and a human SSC line has not yet been available. In this study, we have for the first time reported a stable human SSC line by stably expressing human SV40 large T antigen. RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blots revealed that this cell line was positive for a number of human spermatogonial and SSC hallmarks, including VASA, DAZL, MAGEA4, GFRA1, RET, UCHL1, GPR125, PLZF and THY1, suggesting that these cells are human SSCs phenotypically. Proliferation analysis showed that the cell line could be expanded with significant increases of cells for 1.5 years, and high levels of PCNA, UCHL1 and SV40 were maintained for long-term culture. Transplantation assay indicated that human SSC line was able to colonize and proliferate in vivo in the recipient mice. Neither Y chromosome microdeletions of numerous genes nor tumor formation was observed in human SSC line although there was abnormal karyotype in this cell line. Collectively, we have established a human SSC line with unlimited proliferation potentials and no tumorgenesis, which could provide an abundant source of human SSCs for their mechanistic studies and translational medicine.

  15. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  16. Fibronectin promotes proplatelet formation in the human megakaryocytic cell line UT-7/TPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Hatano, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Kyoji; Nawa, Katsuhiko; Hashimoto, Ryuji; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    We investigated PPF (proplatelet formation) in the human megakaryocytic cell line UT-7/TPO in vitro and signal transduction pathways responsible for PPF. The megakaryocytic cell lines are useful for studying megakaryocyte biology, although PPF is induced only in the presence of phorbol ester. TPO (thrombopoietin) stimulates megakaryocyte proliferation and differentiation; however, no PPF occurred in the megakaryocytic cell lines, even after the addition of TPO. Therefore, factors other than TPO may play an important role in the process of PPF. As PPF occurs in the bone marrow in vivo, we noted extracellular matrix proteins and found that soluble FN (fibronectin) induced potent PPF in UT-7/TPO without phorbol ester. A Western blot analysis showed that the expression of integrins was not increased by FN treatment. Anti-β1 antibody and the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartate) peptide inhibited FN-induced PPF. This result indicates that the signal originated from integrin β1, which is essential to inducing PPF in UT-7/TPO. Results of the experiments using several inhibitors suggest that activation of the MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) kinase]-ERK and PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) pathways are necessary for PPF. The phosphorylation of ERK gradually increased for 2 h after the addition of soluble FN, which suggests that activation of ERK is essential for the initial induction of FN-induced PPF in UT-7/TPO. UT-7/TPO is a useful cell line that enables us to study the signals of PPF without effects of chemical compounds.

  17. Rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin in exercising humans exposed to carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikuisis, P; Kane, D M; McLellan, T M; Buick, F; Fairburn, S M

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the CFK equation for its prediction of the rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in exercising humans by use of measured values of the respiratory variables and to characterize the rate of appearance of HbCO with frequent blood sampling. Ten nonsmoking male subjects were exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) on two separate occasions distinguished by the level of activity. Steady-state exercise was conducted on a cycle ergometer at either a low (approximately 45 W) or moderate (approximately 90 W) power output. Each experiment began with an exposure of 3,000 ppm CO for 3 min during a rest period followed by three intermittent exposures ranging from 3,000 ppm CO for 1 min at low exercise to 667 ppm CO for 3 min at moderate exercise. Increases in HbCO were normalized against predicted values to account for individual differences in the variables that govern CO uptake. No difference in the normalized uptake of CO was found between the low- and moderate-exercise trials. However, the CFK equation underpredicted the increase in HbCO for the exposures at rest and the first exposure at exercise, whereas it overpredicted for the latter two exposures at exercise. The net increase in HbCO after all exposures (approximately 10% HbCO) deviated by less than 1% HbCO between the measured and predicted values. The rate of appearance of HbCO fits a sigmoidal shape with considerable overshoot at the end of exposure. This can be explained by delays in the delivery of CO to the blood sampling point (dorsal hand vein) and by a relatively small blood circulation time compared with other regions of the body. A simple circulation model is used to demonstrate the overshoot phenomenon.

  18. Rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin in exercising humans exposed to carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikuisis, P.; Kane, D.M.; McLellan, T.M.; Buick, F.; Fairburn, S.M. (Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine, North York, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the CFK equation for its prediction of the rate of formation of carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) in exercising humans by use of measured values of the respiratory variables and to characterize the rate of appearance of HbCO with frequent blood sampling. Ten nonsmoking male subjects were exposed to carbon monoxide (CO) on two separate occasions distinguished by the level of activity. Steady-state exercise was conducted on a cycle ergometer at either a low ([approximately]45 W) or moderate ([approximately]90W) power output. Each experiment began with an exposure of 3,000 ppm CO for 3 min during a rest period followed by three intermittent exposures ranging from 3,000 ppm CO for 1 min at low exercise to 667 ppm CO for 3 min at moderate exercise. Increases in HbCO were normalized against predicted values to account for individual differences in the variables that govern CO uptake. No difference in the normalized uptake of CO was found between the low-and moderate-exercise trials. However, the CFK equation underpredicted the increase in HbCO for the exposures at rest and the first exposure at exercise, whereas it overpredicted for the latter two exposures at exercise. The net increase in HbCO after all exposures ([approximately]10% HbCO) deviated by <1% HbCO between the measured and predicted values. The rate of appearance of HbCO fits a sigmoidal shape with considerable overshoot at the end of exposure. This can be explained by delays in the delivery of CO to the blood sampling point (dorsal hand vein) and by a relatively small blood circulation time compared with other regions of the body. A simple circulation model is used to demonstrate the overshoot phenomenon. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Rebamipide, an Amino Acid Analog of 2(1H)-Quinolinone, Inhibits the Formation of Human Osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanke, Yuki; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Kotake, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Drug repositioning or drug reprofiling (DR) has recently been growing in importance. DR has a significant advantage over traditional drug development because the repositioned drug has already passed toxicity tests; its safety is known, and the risk of adverse toxicology is reduced. In the current study, we investigated the role of rebamipide, a mucosa-protecting agent, with recently reported anti-inflammatory function, in human osteoclastogenesis. Methods. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in the presence of M-CSF and sRANKL. Osteoclast formation was evaluated by immunohistological staining for CD51/61 (vitronectin receptors). Osteoclast formation, in the presence or absence of rebamipide (0, 1, and 3 mM), was observed by time-lapse photography and actin ring formation. The number of absorption sites and area of absorption were calculated using Osteologic™ plates. Pit formation was studied by 3D-SEM. Results. Rebamipide inhibited human osteoclast formation at 3 mM, a pharmacological concentration, and inhibited resorbing activity dose-dependently. Rebamipide induced the degradation of actin rings in mature osteoclasts. This mechanism may involve inhibiting the osteoclast fusion pathway through reducing the expression of DC-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). Conclusions. The present study suggests that rebamipide would be useful as a novel agent for osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Rebamipide, an Amino Acid Analog of 2(1H-Quinolinone, Inhibits the Formation of Human Osteoclasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nanke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Drug repositioning or drug reprofiling (DR has recently been growing in importance. DR has a significant advantage over traditional drug development because the repositioned drug has already passed toxicity tests; its safety is known, and the risk of adverse toxicology is reduced. In the current study, we investigated the role of rebamipide, a mucosa-protecting agent, with recently reported anti-inflammatory function, in human osteoclastogenesis. Methods. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were cultured in the presence of M-CSF and sRANKL. Osteoclast formation was evaluated by immunohistological staining for CD51/61 (vitronectin receptors. Osteoclast formation, in the presence or absence of rebamipide (0, 1, and 3 mM, was observed by time-lapse photography and actin ring formation. The number of absorption sites and area of absorption were calculated using Osteologic™ plates. Pit formation was studied by 3D-SEM. Results. Rebamipide inhibited human osteoclast formation at 3 mM, a pharmacological concentration, and inhibited resorbing activity dose-dependently. Rebamipide induced the degradation of actin rings in mature osteoclasts. This mechanism may involve inhibiting the osteoclast fusion pathway through reducing the expression of DC-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP. Conclusions. The present study suggests that rebamipide would be useful as a novel agent for osteoporosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. The role of calcium and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) in human osteoclast formation and resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X; Hookway, E S; Kashima, T; Oppermann, U; Galione, A; Athanasou, N A

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorbing cells which form by fusion of circulating mononuclear phagocyte precursors. Bone resorption results in the release of large amounts of calcium into the extracellular fluid (ECF), but it is not certain whether changes in extracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)]e influence osteoclast formation and resorption. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of [Ca(2+)]e and NAADP, a potent calcium mobilising messenger that induces calcium uptake, on human osteoclast formation and resorption. CD14+ human monocytes were cultured with M-CSF and RANKL in the presence of different concentrations of calcium and NAADP and the effect on osteoclast formation and resorption evaluated. We found that the number of TRAP+ multinucleated cells and the extent of lacunar resorption were reduced when there was an increase in extracellular calcium and NAADP. This was associated with a decrease in RANK mRNA expression by CD14+ cells. At high concentrations (20 mM) of [Ca(2+)]e mature osteoclast resorption activity remained unaltered relative to control cultures. Our findings indicate that osteoclast formation is inhibited by a rise in [Ca(2+)]e and that RANK expression by mononuclear phagocyte osteoclast precursors is also [Ca(2+)]e dependent. Changes in NAADP also influence osteoclast formation, suggesting a role for this molecule in calcium handling. Osteoclasts remained capable of lacunar resorption, even at high ECF [Ca(2+)]e, in keeping with their role in physiological and pathological bone resorption.

  2. Teratoma Formation by Human Embryonic Stem Cells is site-dependent and enhanced by the presence of Matrigel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Harkness, Linda M; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2008-01-01

    When implanted into immunodeficient mice, human embryonic stem cells (hESC) give rise to teratoma, tumour-like formations containing tissues belonging to all three germ layers. The ability to form teratoma is a sine qua non characteristic of pluripotent stem cells. However, limited data...... of differentiated to un-differentiated tissues was significantly decreased suggesting defective pluripotency of the cells. In conclusion, subcutaneous implantation of hESC in presence of Matrigel appears to be the most efficient, reproducible and the easiest approach for teratoma formation by hESC. Also, teratoma...

  3. Flat bones and sutures formation in the human cranial vault during prenatal development and infancy: A computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Flórez, F J; Gavilán-Alfonso, M E; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2016-03-21

    The processes of flat bones growth, sutures formation and interdigitation in the human calvaria are controlled by a complex interaction between genetic, biochemical and environmental factors that regulate bone formation and resorption during prenatal development and infancy. Despite previous experimental evidence accounting for the role of the main biochemical factors acting on these processes, the underlying mechanisms controlling them are still unknown. Therefore, we propose a mathematical model of the processes of flat bone and suture formation, taking into account several biological events. First, we model the growth of the flat bones and the formation of sutures and fontanels as a reaction diffusion system between two proteins: TGF-β2 and TGF-β3. The former is expressed by osteoblasts and allows adjacent mesenchymal cells differentiation on the bone fronts of each flat bone. The latter is expressed by mesenchymal cells at the sutures and inhibits their differentiation into osteoblasts at the bone fronts. Suture interdigitation is modelled using a system of reaction diffusion equations that develops spatio-temporal patterns of bone formation and resorption by means of two molecules (Wnt and Sclerostin) which control mesenchymal cells differentiation into osteoblasts at these sites. The results of the computer simulations predict flat bone growth from ossification centers, sutures and fontanels formation as well as bone formation and resorption events along the sutures, giving rise to interdigitated patterns. These stages were modelled and solved by the finite elements method. The simulation results agree with the morphological characteristics of calvarial bones and sutures throughout human prenatal development and infancy.

  4. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Kaitlin M; Song, Ihn Young; Jauch, Anna; Holtgreve-Grez, Heidi; Hayden, Karen E; Bridger, Joanna M; Sullivan, Beth A

    2010-08-12

    Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics) that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  5. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  6. Rapid oriented fibril formation of fish scale collagen facilitates early osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Rena; Uemura, Toshimasa; Xu, Zhefeng; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of fibril formation of fish scale collagen on the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We found that hMSCs adhered easily to tilapia scale collagen, which remarkably accelerated the early stage of osteoblastic differentiation in hMSCs during in vitro cell culture. Osteoblastic markers such as ALP activity, osteopontin, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 were markedly upregulated when the hMSCs were cultured on a tilapia collagen surface, especially in the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. We hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to specific fibril formation of tilapia collagen. Thus, we examined the time course of collagen fibril formation using high-speed atomic force microscopy. Moreover, to elucidate the effect of the orientation of fibril formation on the differentiation of hMSCs, we measured ALP activity of hMSCs cultured on two types of tilapia scale collagen membranes with different degrees of fibril formation. The ALP activity in hMSCs cultured on a fibrous collagen membrane was significantly higher than on a non-fibrous collagen membrane even before adding osteoblastic differentiation medium. These results showed that the degree of the fibril formation of tilapia collagen was essential for the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs.

  7. Effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of proton transfer pathways in human carbonic anhydrase II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arijit Roy; Srabani Taraphder

    2007-09-01

    We report here a theoretical study on the effect of electrostatic interactions on the formation of dynamical, proton-conducting hydrogen-bonded networks in the protein HCA II. The conformational fluctuations of His-64 is found to contribute crucially to the mechanism of such path formation irrespective of the way electrostatic interactions are modelled.

  8. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, L.J.; van der Veer, W.M.; de Jong, E.H.; Gibbs, S.; Niessen, F.B.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic

  9. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, L.J.; van der Veer, W.M.; de Jong, E.H.; Gibbs, S.; Niessen, F.B.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic sca

  10. 3D tissue formation : the kinetics of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera Sierra, Gustavo Andrés

    2010-01-01

    The main thesis in this book proposes that physical phenomena underlies the formation of three-dimensional (3D) tissue. In this thesis, tissue regeneration with mesenchymal stem cells was studied through the law of conservation of mass. MSCs proliferation and 3D tissue formation were explored from 2

  11. Multidimensional human capital formation in a developing country: Health, cognition and locus of control in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Kira M

    2017-07-08

    Economic success depends on multiple human capital stocks whose production is interrelated and occurs over many life stages. Yet, much empirical work fails to account for human capital's multidimensional nature and limits its focus to specific childhood stages. Using longitudinal data from the Philippines, I estimate a model of multidimensional human capital formation from birth through adulthood where health, cognitive, and noncognitive dimensions are jointly produced. I examine during which developmental stages parental investment is most influential and address the endogeneity of investment using a policy function where investment depends on child characteristics, exogenous conditions at birth and local prices. Findings imply that not only will early human capital disparities persist into adulthood without early remediation but also that cognitive gains yielded from early remediation will be lost without complementary investment in adolescence. Findings further suggest that interventions will be undervalued if their multidimensional effects are not accounted for. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. THE PHILOSOPHICAL AND IDEOLOGICAL UNDERSTANDING OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND THE FORMATION OF HIS HEALTH

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Goncharenko

    2016-01-01

    As the title implies the article describes the philosophical and ideological notion of human development, the evolution of human body representations and its health, the impact on human health of its interaction with the outside world and its spiritual component. It is spoken in detail about the idea of holographic mechanisms of human mind functioning, its structural energy organization, biochemical and biophysical mechanisms underlying wave operation, which is t...

  13. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M;

    2001-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...... the alternative pathway. Blockade of the CR2 ligand-binding site with the monoclonal antibody FE8 resulted in 56 +/- 13% and 71 +/- 9% inhibition of the C3-fragment and MAC deposition, respectively, whereas the monoclonal antibody HB135, directed against an irrelevant CR2 epitope, had no effect. Blockade...

  14. Glycation of human cortical and cancellous bone captures differences in the formation of Maillard reaction products between glucose and ribose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Siddula, Alankrita; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    To better understand some aspects of bone matrix glycation, we used an in vitro glycation approach. Within two weeks, our glycation procedures led to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) at the levels that corresponded to approx. 25-30 years of the natural in vivo glycation. Cortical and cancellous bones from human tibias were glycated in vitro using either glucose (glucosylation) or ribose (ribosylation). Both glucosylation and ribosylation led to the formation of higher levels of AGEs and pentosidine (PEN) in cancellous than cortical bone dissected from all tested donors (young, middle-age and elderly men and women). More efficient glycation of bone matrix proteins in cancellous bone most likely depended on the higher porosity of this tissue, which facilitated better accessibility of the sugars to the matrix proteins. Notably, glycation of cortical bone from older donors led to much higher AGEs levels as compared to young donors. Such efficient in vitro glycation of older cortical bone could result from aging-related increase in porosity caused by the loss of mineral content. In addition, more pronounced glycation in vivo would be driven by elevated oxidation processes. Interestingly, the levels of PEN formation differed pronouncedly between glucosylation and ribosylation. Ribosylation generated very high levels of PEN (approx. 6- vs. 2.5-fold higher PEN level than in glucosylated samples). Kinetic studies of AGEs and PEN formation in human cortical and cancellous bone matrix confirmed higher accumulation of fluorescent crosslinks for ribosylation. Our results suggest that in vitro glycation of bone using glucose leads to the formation of lower levels of AGEs including PEN, whereas ribosylation appears to support a pathway toward PEN formation. Our studies may help to understand differences in the progression of bone pathologies related to protein glycation by different sugars, and raise awareness for excessive sugar supplementation in food and

  15. Beyond the functional matrix hypothesis: a network null model of human skull growth for the formation of bone articulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2014-09-01

    Craniofacial sutures and synchondroses form the boundaries among bones in the human skull, providing functional, developmental and evolutionary information. Bone articulations in the skull arise due to interactions between genetic regulatory mechanisms and epigenetic factors such as functional matrices (soft tissues and cranial cavities), which mediate bone growth. These matrices are largely acknowledged for their influence on shaping the bones of the skull; however, it is not fully understood to what extent functional matrices mediate the formation of bone articulations. Aiming to identify whether or not functional matrices are key developmental factors guiding the formation of bone articulations, we have built a network null model of the skull that simulates unconstrained bone growth. This null model predicts bone articulations that arise due to a process of bone growth that is uniform in rate, direction and timing. By comparing predicted articulations with the actual bone articulations of the human skull, we have identified which boundaries specifically need the presence of functional matrices for their formation. We show that functional matrices are necessary to connect facial bones, whereas an unconstrained bone growth is sufficient to connect non-facial bones. This finding challenges the role of the brain in the formation of boundaries between bones in the braincase without neglecting its effect on skull shape. Ultimately, our null model suggests where to look for modified developmental mechanisms promoting changes in bone growth patterns that could affect the development and evolution of the head skeleton. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  16. Scientific controversies on biological knowledge construction: investigating a continued formation course for teachers with respect for human biological evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Erdmann Bulla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The research here presented has as central theme the human biological evolution, its scientific controversies and the continued formation of science and biology teachers. We evaluate the development of a teaching sequence on the topic, emphasizing the scientific controversy regarding the supposed fossil hominid Ardipithecus ramidus (“Ardi” in a continued formation course for teachers of science and biology of basic public network Cascavel-PR and region. The empirical work involved collecting data from the responses provided by teachers to an initial questionnaire and a final. The analysis and data discussion has highlighted the importance of scientific controversy for the development of scientific knowledge and the urgency to insert the contents of human evolution in subjects on the initial formation of courses in licentiate of Biological Sciences. It is necessary also to offer continued formation courses to include such content for teachers already inserted in schools. We conclude that teaching biology and science using scientific controversies may be in satisfactory teaching tool to introduce the history and nature of science, since scientific activity is permeated by conflicts.

  17. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation-a detailed in vitro analysis of murine and human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauler, Maximilian; Seyfert, Julia; Haenel, David; Seeba, Hannah; Guenther, Janine; Stallmann, Daniela; Schoenichen, Claudia; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Ahrens, Ingo; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Platelets form complexes with neutrophils during inflammatory processes. These aggregates migrate into affected tissues and also circulate within the organism. Several studies have evaluated platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker of cardiovascular diseases in human and mouse. Although multiple publications have reported platelet-neutrophil complex counts, we noticed that different methods were used to analyze platelet-neutrophil complex formation, resulting in significant differences, even in baseline values. We established a protocol for platelet-neutrophil complex measurement with flow cytometry in murine and human whole blood samples. In vitro platelet-neutrophil complex formation was stimulated with ADP or PMA. We tested the effect of different sample preparation steps and cytometer settings on platelet-neutrophil complex detection and noticed false-positive counts with increasing acquisition speed. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation depends on platelet P-selectin expression, and antibody blocking of P-selectin consequently prevented ADP-induced platelet-neutrophil complex formation. These findings may help generating more comparable data among different research groups that examine platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker for cardiovascular disease and novel therapeutic interventions.

  18. Sustained embryoid body formation and culture in a non-laborious three dimensional culture system for human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Johan; Elovsson, Maria; Strehl, Raimund; Kilmare, Eva; Hyllner, Johan; Lindahl, Anders

    2011-05-01

    Pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines are a promising model system in developmental and tissue regeneration research. Differentiation of hESCs towards the three germ layers and finally tissue specific cell types is often performed through the formation of embryoid bodies (EBs) in suspension or hanging droplet culture systems. However, these systems are inefficient regarding embryoid body (EB) formation, structural support to the EB and long term differentiation capacity. The present study investigates if agarose, as a semi solid matrix, can facilitate EB formation and support differentiation of hESC lines. The results showed that agarose culture is able to enhance EB formation efficiency with 10% and increase EB growth by 300%. The agarose culture system was able to maintain expression of the three germ layers over 8 weeks of culture. All of the four hESC lines tested developed EBs in the agarose system although with a histological heterogeneity between cell lines as well as within cell lines. In conclusion, a 3-D agarose culture of spherical hESC colonies improves EB formation and growth in a cost effective, stable and non-laborious technique.

  19. Osteoprotegerin and osteoprotegerin ligand expression during human marrow stromal cell differentiation and their effect on osteoclast formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lin; HAI Yong; ZHOU Jun-lin

    2011-01-01

    ackground Osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteoprotegerin ligand (OPGL) play an important role in human bone metabolism. The aim of this research was to detect the expression of OPG and OPGL during human marrow stromal cells (hMSC) differentiation into osteoblasts (OB), and to observe their effect on osteoclasts (OC) formation in vitro to investigate bone metabolism mechanisms.Methods hMSCs were obtained from human bone marrow specimens using gradient centrifugation method, before being purified and incubated with differentiation medium to develop along the human osteoblasts (hOB) pathway. Morphology observation, biochemical detection and cell staining were performed during hMSC differentiation. OPG and OPGL mRNA levels were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. OPG and OPGL protein expression were determined by Western blotting. We further obtained OC progenitor cells from mice bone marrow and co-cultured with differentiating MSCs. We assessed the effect of OPG and OPGL on OC formation by identifying tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinuclear cells.Results Optimal hMSC survival and purification were observed, along with stable biochemical indexes. Alkaline phosphatase secretion increased significantly and mineralization nodules appeared in the process of cell differentiation. OPG mRNA and protein level increased significantly, while OPGL mRNA and protein level decreased. Average levels of OPG mRNA and protein were about 2.5-fold higher than the control, while OPGL mRNA and protein levels were reduced by about one-half. In the group co-culturing with undifferentiated MSC or added OPGL, we found TRAP positive and multinuclear OC formation. However, OC formation was absent in the group co-culturing with differentiated MSC or added OPG.Conclusions During hMSC differentiation into hOB, OPG secretion increased rapidly and OPGL production decreased significantly. The OPG/OPGL ratio was also increased, while OC formation was

  20. Mannose-containing oligosaccharides of non-specific human secretory immunoglobulin A mediate inhibition of Vibrio cholerae biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlesh K Murthy

    Full Text Available The role of antigen-specific secretory IgA (SIgA has been studied extensively, whereas there is a limited body of evidence regarding the contribution of non-specific SIgA to innate immune defenses against invading pathogens. In this study, we evaluated the effects of non-specific SIgA against infection with Vibrio cholerae O139 strain MO10 and biofilm formation. Seven day old infant mice deficient in IgA (IgA(-/- mice displayed significantly greater intestinal MO10 burden at 24 hr post-challenge when compared to IgA(+/+ pups. Importantly, cross-fostering of IgA(-/- pups with IgA(+/+ nursing dams reversed the greater susceptibility to MO10 infection, suggesting a role for non-specific SIgA in protection against the infection. Since biofilm formation is associated with virulence of MO10, we further examined the role of human non-specific SIgA on this virulence phenotype of the pathogen. Human non-specific SIgA, in a dose-dependent fashion, significantly reduced the biofilm formation by MO10 without affecting the viability of the bacterium. Such an inhibitory effect was not induced by human serum IgA, IgG, or IgM, suggesting a role for the oligosaccharide-rich secretory component (SC of SIgA. This was supported by the demonstration that SIgA treated with endoglycosidase H, to cleave the high-mannose containing terminal chitobiose residues, did not induce a reduction in biofilm formation by MO10. Furthermore, the addition of free mannose per se, across a wide dose range, induced significant reduction in MO10 biofilm formation. Collectively, these results suggest that mannose containing oligosaccharides within human non-specific secretory IgA can alter important virulence phenotypes of Vibrio cholerae such as biofilm formation, without affecting viability of the microorganism. Such effects may contribute significantly to innate immune defenses against invading pathogens in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Static and Dynamic Human Shape Modeling - Concept Formation and Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Abdomen Joint: 1) start at 10 th Rib Midspine coordinates; 2) translate 51 mm in the anterior direction. Thorax Joint: 1) start at Cervicale...respective joint centers to represent the articulated structure and segments of human body, as shown in Figure 1. Note that while the skeleton model... articulated structure. That is, the human body can be treated as a system of segments linked by joints. • The human pose changes as the joints

  2. Pore formation by human stefin B in its native and oligomeric states and the consequent amyloid induced toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor eAnderluh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that amyloid forming peptides and proteins interact with membranes and that this correlates with cytotoxicity. To introduce the theme we give a brief description of some amyloidogenic proteins and note their similarities with pore forming toxins and cell penetrating peptides. Human stefin B, a member of the family of cystatins, is an amyloidogenic protein in vitro. This review describes our studies of the interaction of stefin B oligomers and prefibrillar aggregates with model membranes leading to pore formation. We have studied the interaction between human stefin B and artificial membranes of various compositions. We also have prepared distinct sizes and morphologies of stefin B prefibrillar states and assessed their toxicity. Furthermore, we have measured electrical currents through pores formed by stefin B prefibrillar oligomers in a planar lipid bilayer setup. We finally discuss the possible functional and pathological significance of such pores formed by human stefin B.

  3. Insular dentin formation pattern in human odontogenesis in relation to the scalloped dentino-enamel junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    This study is a first report on the modality of early dentin formation in respect to the scalloped pattern of the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ). We applied scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), histological serial sections, and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. TEM and SEM showed scallops and secondary scallops on the DEJ of deciduous dental primordia and on deciduous teeth with the enamel cap removed. This peculiar outline of the DEJ requires a specific dentin formation pattern; histological sections showed that dentin formation began at the brims of the scallops, seen as triangular spikes in serial sections. The dentin formation front was not uniform; instead, it was characterized by multiple, insular forming centers, as revealed by our 3D reconstructions. As thicker dentin layers formed, the islands became confluent. Factors are discussed, which may lead to crimpling of the inner enamel epithelium, and maintained as the scalloped pattern of the DEJ develops. Signaling patterns in accordance with the insular dentin formation are unknown so far.

  4. Students' Illustrations of the Human Nervous System as a Formative Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Sisika Priyani Nelum; Montplaisir, Lisa Marie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' knowledge and learning of the human nervous system (HNS) in an introductory undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course. Classroom observations, demographic data, a preinstructional unit test with drawings, and a postinstructional unit test with drawings were used to identify students'…

  5. Fourier polarimetry of human skin in the tasks of differentiation of benign and malignant formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, A G; Dubolazov, O V; Ushenko, V A; Novakovskaya, O Yu; Olar, O V

    2016-04-20

    The optical model of polycrystalline networks of human tissue has been proposed. The values of statistical parameters (statistical moments of the first to fourth order) characterizing the polarization-inhomogeneous images of skin surface in the Fourier domain have been measured. The diagnostic criteria of pathological processes in human skin and the differentiation of its severity degree have been determined.

  6. Students' Illustrations of the Human Nervous System as a Formative Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Sisika Priyani Nelum; Montplaisir, Lisa Marie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' knowledge and learning of the human nervous system (HNS) in an introductory undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course. Classroom observations, demographic data, a preinstructional unit test with drawings, and a postinstructional unit test with drawings were used to identify students'…

  7. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority: evidence based policy formation in a contested context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Angus

    2004-03-01

    This article briefly reviews the various papers contained in this volume. They were originally presented at a research work shop held at Keele University in the UK in February 2003. It is suggested that the different papers raise a series of related legal, social and ethical issues and can be collectively seen to demonstrate the fact that policy formation in relation to reproductive matters is highly contested. It is concluded that ethical policy formation in this area needs to be based on actual evidence of harm rather than assumed harm and that this therefore entails more empirical research into reproductive matters.

  8. Differential roles of CIDEA and CIDEC in insulin-induced anti-apoptosis and lipid droplet formation in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Minoru; Nagasawa, Michiaki; Hara, Tomoko; Ide, Tomohiro; Murakami, Koji

    2010-07-01

    Both insulin and the cell death-inducing DNA fragmentation factor-alpha-like effector (CIDE) family play important roles in apoptosis and lipid droplet formation. However, regulation of the CIDE family by insulin and the contribution of the CIDE family to insulin actions remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether insulin regulates expression of the CIDE family and which subtypes contribute to insulin-induced anti-apoptosis and lipid droplet formation in human adipocytes. Insulin decreased CIDEA and increased CIDEC but not CIDEB mRNA expression. Starvation-induced apoptosis in adipocytes was significantly inhibited when insulin decreased the CIDEA mRNA level. Small interfering RNA-mediated depletion of CIDEA inhibited starvation-induced apoptosis similarly to insulin and restored insulin deprivation-reduced adipocyte number, whereas CIDEC depletion did not. Lipid droplet size of adipocytes was increased when insulin increased the CIDEC mRNA level. In contrast, insulin-induced enlargement of lipid droplets was markedly abrogated by depletion of CIDEC but not CIDEA. Furthermore, depletion of CIDEC, but not CIDEA, significantly increased glycerol release from adipocytes. These results suggest that CIDEA and CIDEC are novel genes regulated by insulin in human adipocytes and may play key roles in the effects of insulin, such as anti-apoptosis and lipid droplet formation.

  9. Pathways of hepatic glycogen formation in humans following ingestion of a glucose load in the fed state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Schumann, W.C.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R.

    1989-06-01

    The relative contributions of the direct and the indirect pathways to hepatic glycogen formation following a glucose load given to humans four hours after a substantial breakfast have been examined. Glucose loads labeled with (6-(/sup 14/)C)glucose were given to six healthy volunteers along with diflunisal (1 g) or acetaminophen (1.5 g), drugs excreted in urine as glucuronides. Distribution of /sup 14/C in the glucose unit of the glucuronide was taken as a measure of the extent to which glucose was deposited directly in liver glycogen (ie, glucose----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen) rather than indirectly (ie, glucose----C3-compound----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen). The maximum contribution to glycogen formation by the direct pathway was estimated to be 77% +/- 4%, which is somewhat higher than previous estimates in humans fasted overnight (65% +/- 1%, P less than 0.05). Thus, the indirect pathway of liver glycogen formation following a glucose load is operative in both the overnight fasted and the fed state, although its contribution may be somewhat less in the fed state.

  10. Human Motivation in the Digital Commons: Reflections on Robbie McClintock's Conception of Formative Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marzio, Derryl; Ignaffo, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background & Purpose: According to McClintock, persons and groups exercise formative justice as a strategy of selecting the behaviors, powers, and potentials that ought to receive educational attention to achieve their maximization. We argue that the question of what motivates individuals and collectives to utilize certain capacities to…

  11. Activation of Midbrain Structures by Associative Novelty and the Formation of Explicit Memory in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Bjorn H.; Sellner, Daniela B.; Lauer, Corinna-J.; Habib, Reza; Frey, Julietta U.; Guderian, Sebastian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Duzel, Emrah

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a close functional relationship between memory formation in the hippocampus and dopaminergic neuromodulation originating in the ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra of the midbrain. Here we report midbrain activation in two functional MRI studies of visual memory in healthy young adults. In the first study,…

  12. FORMATION OF HEMOGLOBIN AND ALBUMIN ADDUCTS OF BENZENE OXIDE IN MOUSE, RAT, AND HUMAN BLOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the formation and disposition of benzene oxide (BO), the initial metabolite arising from oxidation of benzene by cytochrome P450. In this study, reactions of BO with hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) were investigated in blood from B6C3F1 mice, F344 rats, ...

  13. The sciatic nerve in human cadavers - high division or low formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A A; Asari, M A; Pasha, M A

    2016-01-01

    Variations of the sciatic nerve have been extensively studied in the past including its relationship with the piriformis muscle and associated clinical conditions like piriformis syndrome and sciatica. In the present study we noticed some interesting variations of the sciatic nerve, which were slightly different from the cases described earlier. In the previous studies most of the authors described the higher division of sciatic nerve and none of them discussed its formation. In this study we tried to look its formation from the sacral plexus and its divisions in the thigh. We noticed that in one cadaver the two components of the sciatic nerve originated directly from the sacral plexus and coursed down without merging in the thigh. Should this be called a higher division or non formation of the sciatic nerve? On the other hand in two other cadavers, the two divisions after emerging separately from the sacral plexus, united in the gluteal region and in the thigh respectively. Should we call this as higher division or low formation of the sciatic nerve? In two other cadavers the sciatic nerve emerged from the greater sciatic foramen below the piriformis and divided in the gluteal region itself. Ideally this should be called as higher division of sciatic nerve.

  14. Activation of Midbrain Structures by Associative Novelty and the Formation of Explicit Memory in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Bjorn H.; Sellner, Daniela B.; Lauer, Corinna-J.; Habib, Reza; Frey, Julietta U.; Guderian, Sebastian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Duzel, Emrah

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a close functional relationship between memory formation in the hippocampus and dopaminergic neuromodulation originating in the ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra of the midbrain. Here we report midbrain activation in two functional MRI studies of visual memory in healthy young adults. In the first study,…

  15. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  16. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage anal...

  17. MicroRNA-34a inhibits osteoblast differentiation and in vivo bone formation of human stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Holmstrøm, Kim; Qiu, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    Osteoblast differentiation and bone formation (osteogenesis) are regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) were identified as novel key regulators of human stromal (skeletal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) differentiation. Here, we identified miRNA......-34a (miR-34a) and its target protein networks as modulator of osteoblastic (OB) differentiation of hMSC. miRNA array profiling and further validation by quantitative RT-PCR revealed that miR-34a was upregulated during OB differentiation of hMSC, and in situ hybridization confirmed its OB expression...... A were among miR-34a targets. Furthermore, in a preclinical model of in vivo bone formation, overexpression of miR-34a in hMSC reduced heterotopic bone formation by 60%, and conversely, in vivo bone formation was increased by 200% in miR-34a-deficient hMSC. miRNA-34a exhibited unique dual regulatory...

  18. Cholesterol supports the retinoic acid-induced synaptic vesicle formation in differentiating human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanen, Jertta-Riina; Nykky, Jonna; Siikanen, Jutta; Selinummi, Jyrki; Ylikomi, Timo; Jalonen, Tuula O

    2007-09-01

    Synaptic vesicle formation, vesicle activation and exo/endocytosis in the pre-synaptic area are central steps in neuronal communication. The formation and localization of synaptic vesicles in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, differentiated with 12-o-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) and cholesterol, was studied by fluorescence microscopy and immunocytochemical methods. RA alone or together with cholesterol, produced significant neurite extension and formation of cell-to-cell contacts. Synaptic vesicle formation was followed by anti-synaptophysin (SypI) and AM1-43 staining. SypI was only weakly detected, mainly in cell somata, before 7 days in vitro, after which it was found in neurites. Depolarization of the differentiated cells with high potassium solution increased the number of fluorescent puncta, as well as SypI and AM1-43 co-localization. In addition to increase in the number of synaptic vesicles, RA and cholesterol also increased the number and distribution of lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 labeled lysosomes. RA-induced Golgi apparatus fragmentation was partly avoided by co-treatment with cholesterol. The SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line, differentiated by RA and cholesterol and with good viability in culture, is a valuable tool for basic studies of neuronal metabolism, specifically as a model for dopaminergic neurons.

  19. Highly miniaturized formats for in vitro drug metabolism assays using vivid fluorescent substrates and recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, Olga V; Gibson, Jasmin R; Marks, Bryan D

    2005-02-01

    Highly miniaturized P450 screening assays designed to enable facile analysis of P450 drug interactions in a 1536-well plate format with the principal human cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP3A4, 2D6, 2C9, 2C19, and 1A2) and Vivid fluorogenic substrates were developed. The detailed characterization of the assays included stability, homogeneity, and reproducibility of the recombinant P450 enzymes and the kinetic parameters of their reactions with Vivid fluorogenic substrates, with a focus on the specific characteristics of each component that enable screening in a low-volume 1536-well plate assay format. The screening assays were applied for the assessment of individual cytochrome P450 inhibition profiles with a panel of selected assay modifiers, including isozyme-specific substrates and inhibitors. IC(50) values obtained for the modifiers in 96- and 1536-well plate formats were similar and comparable with values obtained in assays with conventional substrates. An overall examination of the 1536-well assay statistics, such as signal-to-background ratio and Z' factor, demonstrated that these assays are a robust, successful, and reliable tool to screen for cytochrome P450 metabolism and inhibition in an ultra-high-throughput screening format.

  20. Formation of Reactive Sulfite-Derived Free Radicals by the Activation of Human Neutrophils: An ESR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Garantziotis, Stavros; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to determine the effect of (bi)sulfite (hydrated sulfur dioxide) on human neutrophils and the ability of these immune cells to produce reactive free radicals due to (bi)sulfite oxidation. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant heme protein in neutrophils that catalyzes the formation of cytotoxic oxidants implicated in asthma and inflammatory disorders. In the present study sulfite (•SO3−) and sulfate (SO4•−) anion radicals are characterized with the ESR spin-trapping technique using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) in the reaction of (bi)sulfite oxidation by human MPO and human neutrophils via sulfite radical chain reaction chemistry. After treatment with (bi)sulfite, PMA-stimulated neutrophils produced DMPO-sulfite anion radical, -superoxide, and -hydroxyl radical adducts. The latter adduct probably resulted, in part, from the conversion of DMPO-sulfate to DMPO-hydroxyl radical adduct via a nucleophilic substitution reaction of the radical adduct. This anion radical (SO4•−) is highly reactive and, presumably, can oxidize target proteins to protein radicals, thereby initiating protein oxidation. Therefore, we propose that the potential toxicity of (bi)sulfite during pulmonary inflammation or lung-associated diseases such as asthma may be related to free radical formation. PMID:22326772

  1. In vivo formation of complex microvessels lined by human endothelial cells in an immunodeficient mouse

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We have identified conditions for forming cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) into tubes within a three-dimensional gel that on implantation into immunoincompetent mice undergo remodeling into complex microvessels lined by human endothelium. HUVEC suspended in mixed collagen/fibronectin gels organize into cords with early lumena by 24 h and then apoptose. Twenty-hour constructs, s.c. implanted in immunodeficient mice, display HUVEC-lined thin-walled microvessels within the...

  2. Definitive Endoderm Formation from Plucked Human Hair-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and SK Channel Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Illing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells present an extraordinary powerful tool to investigate embryonic development in humans. Essentially, they provide a unique platform for dissecting the distinct mechanisms underlying pluripotency and subsequent lineage commitment. Modest information currently exists about the expression and the role of ion channels during human embryogenesis, organ development, and cell fate determination. Of note, small and intermediate conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels have been reported to modify stem cell behaviour and differentiation. These channels are broadly expressed throughout human tissues and are involved in various cellular processes, such as the after-hyperpolarization in excitable cells, and also in differentiation processes. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs generated from plucked human hair keratinocytes have been exploited in vitro to recapitulate endoderm formation and, concomitantly, used to map the expression of the SK channel (SKCa subtypes over time. Thus, we report the successful generation of definitive endoderm from hiPSCs of ectodermal origin using a highly reproducible and robust differentiation system. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence that SKCas subtypes are dynamically regulated in the transition from a pluripotent stem cell to a more lineage restricted, endodermal progeny.

  3. A triple stranded G-quadruplex formation in the promoter region of human myosin β(Myh7) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anju; Kukreti, Shrikant

    2017-09-19

    Regulatory regions in human genome, enriched in guanine-rich DNA sequences have the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex structures. On exploring the genome for search of G-tracts, it was interesting to find that promoter of Human Myosin Gene (MYH7) contains a conserved 23-mer G-rich sequence (HM-23). Mutations in this gene are associated with familial cardiomyopathy. Enrichment of MYH7 gene in G-rich sequences could possibly play a critical role in its regulation. We used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), UV-Thermal denaturation (UV-Tm) and Circular Dichroism (CD), to demonstrate the formation of a G-quadruplex by 23-mer G-rich sequence HM23 in promoter location of MYH7 gene. We observed that the wild G-rich sequence HM23 containing consecutive G5 stretch in two stacks adopt G-quadruplexes of diverse molecularity by involvement of four-strand, three-strand and two-strands with same parallel topology. Interestingly, the mutated sequence in the absence of continuous G5 stretch obstructs the formation of three-stranded G-quadruplex. We demonstrated that continuous G5 stretch is mandatory for the formation of a unique three-stranded G-quadruplex. Presence of various transcription factors (TF) in vicinity of the sequence HM23 leave fair possibility of recognition by TF binding sites, and so modulate gene expression. These findings may add on our understanding about the effect of base change in the formation of varied structural species in similar solution condition. This study may give insight about structural polymorphism arising due to recognition of non-Watson-Crick G-quadruplex structures by cellular proteins and designing structure specific molecules.

  4. New insights in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius pathogenicity: antibiotic-resistant biofilm formation by a human wound-associated strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompilio, Arianna; De Nicola, Serena; Crocetta, Valentina; Guarnieri, Simone; Savini, Vincenzo; Carretto, Edoardo; Di Bonaventura, Giovanni

    2015-05-21

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is an opportunistic pathogen recognized as the leading cause of skin, ear, and post-operative bacterial infections in dogs and cats. Zoonotic infections have also recently been reported causing endocarditis, infection of surgical wounds, rhinosinusitis, and catheter-related bacteremia. The aim of the present study is to evaluate, for the first time, the pathogenic potential of S. pseudintermedius isolated from a human infection. To this end, strain DSM 25713, which was recently isolated from a wound of a leukemic patient who underwent a bone marrow transplantation, was investigated for biofilm formation and antibiotic-resistance under conditions relevant for wound infection. The effect of pH (5.5, 7.1, and 8.7) and the presence of serum (diluted at 1:2, 1:10, and 1:100) on biofilm formation was assessed through a crystal violet assay. The presence of serum significantly reduced the ability to form biofilm, regardless of the pH value tested. In vitro activity of eight antibiotics against biofilm formation and mature 48 h-old biofilms was comparatively assessed by crystal violet assay and viable cell count, respectively. Antibiotics at sub-inhibitory concentrations reduced biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner, although cefoxitin was the most active, causing a significant reduction already at 1/8xMIC. Rifampicin showed the highest activity against preformed biofilms (MBEC90: 2xMIC). None of the antibiotics completely eradicated the preformed biofilms, regardless of tested concentrations. Confocal and electron microscopy analyses of mature biofilm revealed a complex "mushroom-like" architecture consisting of microcolonies embedded in a fibrillar extracellular matrix. For the first time, our results show that human wound-associated S. pseudintermedius is able to form inherently antibiotic-resistant biofilms, suggestive of its pathogenic potential, and consistent with recent reports of zoonotic infections.

  5. Amyloid fibril formation and seeding by wild-type human lysozyme and its disease-related mutational variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova-Roche, L A; Zurdo, J; Spencer, A; Noppe, W; Receveur, V; Archer, D B; Joniau, M; Dobson, C M

    2000-06-01

    Wild-type human lysozyme and its two stable amyloidogenic variants have been found to form partially folded states at low pH. These states are characterized by extensive disruption of tertiary interactions and partial loss of secondary structure. Incubation of the proteins at pH 2.0 and 37 degrees C (Ile56Thr and Asp67His variants) or 57 degrees C (wild-type) results in the formation of large numbers of fibrils over several days of incubation. Smaller numbers of fibrils could be observed under other conditions, including neutral pH. These fibrils were analyzed by electron microscopy, Congo red birefringence, thioflavine-T binding, and X-ray fiber diffraction, which unequivocally show their amyloid character. These data demonstrate that amyloidogenicity is an intrinsic property of human lysozyme and does not require the presence of specific mutations in its primary structure. The amyloid fibril formation is greatly facilitated, however, by the introduction of "seeds" of preformed fibrils to the solutions of the variant proteins, suggesting that seeding effects could be important in the development of systemic amyloidosis. Fibril formation by wild-type human lysozyme is greatly accelerated by fibrils of the variant proteins and vice versa, showing that seeding is not specific to a given protein. The fact that wild-type lysozyme has not been found in ex vivo deposits from patients suffering from this disease is likely to be related to the much lower population of incompletely folded states for the wild-type protein compared to its amyloidogenic variants under physiological conditions. These results support the concept that the ability to form amyloid is a generic property of proteins, but one that is mitigated against in a normally functioning organism. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. A physical mechanism for coupling bone resorption and formation in adult human bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Levin; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Skorzynska, Katarzyna Ewa

    2009-01-01

    During skeletal remodeling, pre-osteoclasts and pre-osteoblasts are targeted to critical sites of the bone to resorb and reconstruct bone matrix, respectively. Coordination of site-specific recruitment of these two cell types is a prerequisite to maintain the specific architecture of each bone...... within strict limits throughout adult life. Here, we determined that the bone marrow microanatomy adjacent to remodeling areas is a central player in this process. By using histomorphometry and multiple immunostainings, we demonstrated in biopsies exhibiting coupled bone resorption and formation...... that osteoclasts and osteoblasts on the bone surface were always covered by a canopy of flat cells expressing osteoblast markers. In contrast, in biopsies in which this canopy was disrupted, bone formation was deficient. Three-dimensional visualizations revealed that this canopy covered the entire remodeling site...

  7. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G;

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage......), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another...... patient, who also exhibited Down syndrome, showed evidence of a third mechanism of ring formation. The likely initial event was breakage and reunion of the short and long arms, resulting in a small r(21), followed by a sister-chromatid exchange resulting in a double-sized and symmetrically dicentric r(21...

  8. In-vitro model for the ultrastructural study of the formation of thrombi in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerecedo, Doris; González, Sirenia; Mondragón, Mónica; Reyes, Elba; Mondragón, Ricardo

    2006-03-01

    Platelets are cell fragments with dynamic properties involved in clot formation after tissue damage. Platelet activation causes a change in shape, secretion of intracellular granules and aggregation with each other through the cytoskeleton components and biochemical changes. Platelet adhesion, considered as the major event in haemostasis, has been studied in several in-vitro and in-vivo models to evaluate the feasible thrombogenicity of some materials, the dynamics of specific receptors, as well as the effect of different buffers and inhibitors in this process. In spite of the numerous reports about platelet activation, to date there is no information available about the fine structure of the platelet-platelet and platelet-substrate interactions. In the present report we describe an in-vitro system that allows the visualization of these interactions: platelets are adhered to an inert substrate, and interactions with suspended platelets as a process to initiate the formation of thrombi was followed by ultramicrotomy and transmission electron microscopy.

  9. Reaggregation of human, chick, and human embryonic brain cells. Factors influencing the formation of a histiotypic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodin, Z; Fleischmannová, V; Hájková, B; Faltin, J; Hartman, J

    1981-01-01

    1. Aggregation of embryo human, mouse, and chick brain cells was studied. The optimum age interval of donors from different species was determined. 2. The significance of different dissociation procedures (mild trypsinisation followed by sieving, trypsinisation + DNA digestion, mechanical dissociation in 1 or 2 steps, and Ca2+ chelation by EGTA) for the rate of aggregation was estimated. A significant reduction of aggregation was observed after one step mechanical dissociation. Nonspecific adhesion of cells on DNA molecules was found only during the first stages of aggregation. 3. The curve of aggregation kinetics follows the curve of floculation kinetics. 90% free cells disappear from the medium after 2 h of aggregation and a large number of microaggregates are formed which condense after 20 to 24 h into compact aggregates. The time course of aggregation was similar for all cells dissociated by different means. Small differences in the rate of aggregation, caused by dissociation procedures, were apparent only during the first stages of aggregation. 4. The histiotypic unit formed by aggregation of human, mouse, and chick embryo brain cells exhibits some common and some specific features. During aggregation a multiple structural reconstruction takes place and a limited number of cells are exchanged or sorted out from aggregates into the medium. 5. The structural organisation of aggregates from differently dissociated cells differs in several aspects. This indicates that membrane surface structures are influenced differently by dissociation and behave differently during distinct stages of aggregation.

  10. Ear-Shaped Stable Auricular Cartilage Engineered from Extensively Expanded Chondrocytes in an Immunocompetent Experimental Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Bichara, David A; Tseng, Alan; Cronce, Michael J; Cervantes, Thomas M; Kimura, Anya M; Neville, Craig M; Roscioli, Nick; Vacanti, Joseph P; Randolph, Mark A; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2016-02-01

    Advancement of engineered ear in clinical practice is limited by several challenges. The complex, largely unsupported, three-dimensional auricular neocartilage structure is difficult to maintain. Neocartilage formation is challenging in an immunocompetent host due to active inflammatory and immunological responses. The large number of autologous chondrogenic cells required for engineering an adult human-sized ear presents an additional challenge because primary chondrocytes rapidly dedifferentiate during in vitro culture. The objective of this study was to engineer a stable, human ear-shaped cartilage in an immunocompetent animal model using expanded chondrocytes. The impact of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) supplementation on achieving clinically relevant expansion of primary sheep chondrocytes by in vitro culture was determined. Chondrocytes expanded in standard medium were either combined with cryopreserved, primary passage 0 chondrocytes at the time of scaffold seeding or used alone as control. Disk and human ear-shaped scaffolds were made from porous collagen; ear scaffolds had an embedded, supporting titanium wire framework. Autologous chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in sheep after 2 weeks of in vitro incubation. The quality of the resulting neocartilage and its stability and retention of the original ear size and shape were evaluated at 6, 12, and 20 weeks postimplantation. Neocartilage produced from chondrocytes that were expanded in the presence of bFGF was superior, and its quality improved with increased implantation time. In addition to characteristic morphological cartilage features, its glycosaminoglycan content was high and marked elastin fiber formation was present. The overall shape of engineered ears was preserved at 20 weeks postimplantation, and the dimensional changes did not exceed 10%. The wire frame within the engineered ear was able to withstand mechanical forces during wound healing and neocartilage

  11. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces-from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or "homophily").

  12. Human group formation in online guilds and offline gangs driven by a common team dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Zhenyuan; Ducheneaut, Nicolas; Yee, Nicholas; Tita, George; Hui, Pak Ming

    2009-06-01

    Quantifying human group dynamics represents a unique challenge. Unlike animals and other biological systems, humans form groups in both real (offline) and virtual (online) spaces—from potentially dangerous street gangs populated mostly by disaffected male youths to the massive global guilds in online role-playing games for which membership currently exceeds tens of millions of people from all possible backgrounds, age groups, and genders. We have compiled and analyzed data for these two seemingly unrelated offline and online human activities and have uncovered an unexpected quantitative link between them. Although their overall dynamics differ visibly, we find that a common team-based model can accurately reproduce the quantitative features of each simply by adjusting the average tolerance level and attribute range for each population. By contrast, we find no evidence to support a version of the model based on like-seeking-like (i.e., kinship or “homophily”).

  13. The Public Benefits of Higher Education: Examining the Relationship Between State Spending on Higher Education and the Formation of Human Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, Matthew Craig

    2008-01-01

    This study contributes to the literature on the economic value of higher education by examining the extent to which a set of independent variables, including two measures of state spending on higher education predict the formation of human capital. The findings suggest that, in most states, increases in state spending per full-time equivalent enrollment in public higher education predict decreases in the formation of human capital, while increases in state spending per capita on public and pr...

  14. Testing the Role of p21-Activated Kinases in Schwannoma Formation Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Murine Model that Closely Phenocopies Human NF2 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Kinases in Schwannoma Formation Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Murine Model that Closely Phenocopies Human NF2 Disease The views, opinions and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing the Role of p21-Activated Kinases in Schwannoma Formation Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Murine Model that Closely...1.20 calendar Testing the Role of p21 Activated Kinases in Schwannoma Formation Using a Novel Genetically Engineered Murine Model that Closely

  15. Enhancement of human ACAT1 gene expression to promote the macrophage-derived foam cell formation by dexamethasone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li YANG; Ta Yuan CHANG; Bo Liang LI; Jin Bo YANG; Jia CHEN; Guang Yao YU; Pei ZHOU; Lei LEI; Zhen Zhen WANG; Catherine CY CHANG; XinYing YANG

    2004-01-01

    In macrophages, the accumulation of cholesteryl esters synthesized by the activated acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) results in the foam cell formation, a hallmark of early atherosclerotic lesions. In this study,with the treatment of a glucocorticoid hormone dexamethasone (Dex), lipid staining results clearly showed the large accumulation of lipid droplets containing cholesteryl esters in THP- 1-derived macrophages exposed to lower concentration of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). More notably, when treated together with specific anti-ACAT inhibitors, the abundant cholesteryl ester accumulation was markedly diminished in THP-l-derived macrophages, confirming that ACAT is the key enzyme responsible for intracellular cholesteryl ester synthesis. RT-PCR and Western blot results indicated that Dex caused up-regulation of human ACAT1 expression at both the mRNA and protein levels in THP-1 and THP- 1-derived macrophages. The luciferase activity assay demonstrated that Dex could enhance the activity of human ACAT1 gene P1 promoter, a major factor leading to the ACAT1 activation, in a cell-specific manner.Further experimental evidences showed that a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) located within human ACAT1gene P1 promoter to response to the elevation of human ACAT1 gene expression by Dex could be functionally bound with glucocorticoid receptor (GR) proteins. These data supported the hypothesis that the clinical treatment with Dex,which increased the incidence of atherosclerosis, may in part due to enhancing the ACAT1 expression to promote the accumulation of cholesteryl esters during the macrophage-derived foam cell formation, an early stage of atherosclerosis.

  16. Formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites in human liver microsomes, S9 fraction, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Toni; Rousu, Timo; Mattila, Sampo; Chesné, Christophe; Pelkonen, Olavi; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-11-10

    The objective was to compare several in vitro human liver-derived subcellular and cellular incubation systems for the formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites. Incubations of pooled human liver microsomes, human liver S9 fractions, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes were performed with glutathione as a trapping agent. Experiments with liver S9 were performed under two conditions, using only NADPH and using a full set of cofactors enabling also conjugative metabolism. Ten structurally different compounds were used as a test set, chosen as either "positive" (ciprofloxacin, clozapine, diclofenac, ethinyl estradiol, pulegone, and ticlopidine) or "negative" (caffeine, citalopram, losartan, montelukast) compounds, based on their known adverse reactions on liver or bone marrow. GSH conjugates were observed for seven of the ten compounds; while no conjugates were observed for caffeine, citalopram, or ciprofloxacin. Hepatocyte and HepaRG assays produced a clearly lower number and lower relative abundance of GSH conjugates compared to assays with microsomes and S9 fractions. The major GSH conjugates were different for many compounds in cellular subfractions and cell-based systems. Hepatocytes generally produced a higher number of GSH conjugates than HepaRG cells, although the differences were minor. The results show that the hepatic enzyme system used for screening of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites do have a high impact on the results, and results between different systems are comparable only qualitatively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Redox- and non-redox-metal-induced formation of free radicals and their role in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Marian; Jomova, Klaudia; Rhodes, Christopher J; Kuča, Kamil; Musílek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    -tocopherol, glutathione (GSH), carotenoids, flavonoids and antioxidant enzymes which include SOD, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. This review summarizes current views regarding the role of redox-active/inactive metal-induced formation of ROS, and modifications to biomolecules in human disease such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disease, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, renal disease, blood disorders and other disease. The involvement of metals in DNA repair mechanisms, tumor suppressor functions and interference with signal transduction pathways are also discussed.

  18. Intracranial EEG correlates of expectancy and memory formation in the human hippocampus and nucleus accumbens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Axmacher, N.; Cohen, M.X.; Fell, J.; Haupt, S.; Dümpelmann, M.; Elger, C.E.; Schlaepfer, T.E.; Lenartz, D.; Sturm, V.; Ranganath, C.

    2010-01-01

    The human brain is adept at anticipating upcoming events, but in a rapidly changing world, it is essential to detect and encode events that violate these expectancies. Unexpected events are more likely to be remembered than predictable events, but the underlying neural mechanisms for these effects

  19. The role of human capital formation in the transition to modern economic growth, 1300-1900

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pleijt, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of the Industrial Revolution increasingly emphasize the key role of human capital in promoting economic growth, and empirical studies have shown that education is a strong predictor of per capita GDP. Contrary to the theory, however, economic historians have described the role of

  20. The role of human capital formation in the transition to modern economic growth, 1300-1900

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pleijt, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of the Industrial Revolution increasingly emphasize the key role of human capital in promoting economic growth, and empirical studies have shown that education is a strong predictor of per capita GDP. Contrary to the theory, however, economic historians have described the role of hum

  1. Challenges to Popular and Human Rights Education: The Formation of Producer, Citizen, and Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Luis

    1994-01-01

    Contends that popular, or a form of alternative, education stands in the background of most efforts in human rights education in Latin America. Maintains that education must educate people as producers, citizens, and individuals. Discusses challenges to this task in light of liberation theology and the Peruvian experience. (CFR)

  2. The role of human capital formation in the transition to modern economic growth, 1300-1900

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pleijt, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375805621

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of the Industrial Revolution increasingly emphasize the key role of human capital in promoting economic growth, and empirical studies have shown that education is a strong predictor of per capita GDP. Contrary to the theory, however, economic historians have described the role of hum

  3. Challenges to Popular and Human Rights Education: The Formation of Producer, Citizen, and Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Luis

    1994-01-01

    Contends that popular, or a form of alternative, education stands in the background of most efforts in human rights education in Latin America. Maintains that education must educate people as producers, citizens, and individuals. Discusses challenges to this task in light of liberation theology and the Peruvian experience. (CFR)

  4. Formation and blood supply of the large intestine in human neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haina N.I.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the large intestine has been carried out on 24 specimens of human newborns. It has been established that the form and size of the neonates large intestine demonstrated a sidnificant individual variability. The hepatic and splenic flexures of the colon had different relations with the inferior border of the liver and spleen.

  5. The Contribution of the Human Body in Young Children's Explanations about Shadow Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakleioti, Evagelia; Pantidos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    This paper begins with the view that the generation of meaning is a multimodal process. Props, drawings, graphs, gestures, as well as speech and written text are all mediators through which students construct new knowledge. Each semiotic context makes a unique contribution to the conceptualization of scientific entities. The human body, in…

  6. Formation of a carcinogenic aromatic amine from an azo dye by human skin bacteria in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Lang, C; Grohmann, G; Gi, U S; Baltes, W

    1999-09-01

    Azo dyes represent the major class of dyestuffs. They are metabolised to the corresponding amines by liver enzymes and the intestinal microflora following incorporation by both experimental animals and humans. For safety evaluation of the dermal exposure of consumers to azo dyes from wearing coloured textiles, a possible cleavage of azo dyes by the skin microflora should be considered since, in contrast to many dyes, aromatic amines are easily absorbed by the skin. A method for measuring the ability of human skin flora to reduce azo dyes was established. In a standard experiment, 3x10(11) cells of a culture of Staphylococcus aureus were incubated in synthetic sweat (pH 6.8, final volume 20 mL) at 28 degrees C for 24 h with Direct Blue 14 (C.I. 23850, DB 14). The reaction products were extracted and analysed using HPLC. The reduction product o-tolidine (3,3'-dimethylbenzidine, OT) could indeed be detected showing that the strain used was able to metabolise DB 14 to the corresponding aromatic amine. In addition to OT, two further metabolites of DB 14 were detected. Using mass spectrometry they were identified as 3,3'-dimethyl-4-amino-4'-hydroxybiphenyl and 3, 3'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl. The ability to cleave azo dyes seems to be widely distributed among human skin bacteria, as, under these in vitro conditions, bacteria isolated from healthy human skin and human skin bacteria from strain collections also exhibited azo reductase activity. Further studies are in progress in order to include additional azo dyes and coloured textiles. At the moment, the meaning of the results with regard to consumer health cannot be finally assessed.

  7. ISL1 directly regulates FGF10 transcription during human cardiac outflow formation.

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    Christelle Golzio

    Full Text Available The LIM homeodomain gene Islet-1 (ISL1 encodes a transcription factor that has been associated with the multipotency of human cardiac progenitors, and in mice enables the correct deployment of second heart field (SHF cells to become the myocardium of atria, right ventricle and outflow tract. Other markers have been identified that characterize subdomains of the SHF, such as the fibroblast growth factor Fgf10 in its anterior region. While functional evidence of its essential contribution has been demonstrated in many vertebrate species, SHF expression of Isl1 has been shown in only some models. We examined the relationship between human ISL1 and FGF10 within the embryonic time window during which the linear heart tube remodels into four chambers. ISL1 transcription demarcated an anatomical region supporting the conserved existence of a SHF in humans, and transcription factors of the GATA family were co-expressed therein. In conjunction, we identified a novel enhancer containing a highly conserved ISL1 consensus binding site within the FGF10 first intron. ChIP and EMSA demonstrated its direct occupation by ISL1. Transcription mediated by ISL1 from this FGF10 intronic element was enhanced by the presence of GATA4 and TBX20 cardiac transcription factors. Finally, transgenic mice confirmed that endogenous factors bound the human FGF10 intronic enhancer to drive reporter expression in the developing cardiac outflow tract. These findings highlight the interest of examining developmental regulatory networks directly in human tissues, when possible, to assess candidate non-coding regions that may be responsible for congenital malformations.

  8. Pyk2 controls filamentous actin formation in human glomerular mesangial cells via modulation of profilin expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoriya A Rufanova

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Victoriya A Rufanova1, Anna Alexanian1, Tetsuro Wakatsuki2,3, Andrey Sorokin11Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Kidney Disease Center Milwaukee, WI, USA; 2Department of Physiology, 3Bioengineering and Biotechnology Center, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: In glomerular mesangial cell (GMC, important regulators of glomerular filtration, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of calcium regulated nonkinase (CRNK, a dominant interfering calcium-regulated nonreceptor proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2 construct, inhibited Pyk2 activity and caused enhanced RhoA activity, enriched cortical actin formation at time of cell replating, and reduction of spreading. We aimed to further explore Pyk2 regulation of the actin dynamic during cell spreading as a vital characteristic of GMC function. GMC were infected with adenovirus encoding CRNK or green fluorescent protein (GFP as a control and 48 hours after infection cells were harvested and either re-plated or left in suspension for one hour. De novo adhesion to substrate was significantly decreased after Pyk2 activity inhibition and was further diminished after treatment with Rho-associated kinase inhibitor. Inhibition of Pyk2 was associated with increased filamentous actin formation and a corresponding decrease in globular to filamentous actin ratio during cell spreading. Phosphorylation and expression of cofilin, a RhoA-regulated filamentous actin destabilizing factor, were similar in CRNK-expressing and control GMC. Expression of profilin, an activator of actin polymerization, was enhanced, whereas phosphorylation of Pyk2 and p130Cas was decreased. Our data suggest that Pyk2 signaling controls the filamentous actin formation during cell spreading via upregulation of profilin expression.Keywords: Pyk2, profilin, cell spreading, adhesion, glomerular mesangial cells, p130Cas, actin dynamic, ROCK inhibition

  9. Molecular definition of breakpoints associated with human Xq isochromosomes: implications for mechanisms of formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, D J; Miller, A P; Van Dyke, D L; Schwartz, S; Willard, H F

    1996-01-01

    To test the centromere misdivision model of isochromosome formation, we have defined the breakpoints of cytogenetically monocentric and dicentric Xq isochromosomes (i(Xq)) from Turner syndrome probands, using FISH with cosmids and YACs derived from a contig spanning proximal Xp. Seven different pericentromeric breakpoints were identified, with 10 of 11 of the i(Xq)s containing varying amounts of material from Xp. Only one of the eight cytogenetically monocentric i(Xq)s demonstrated a single alpha-satellite (DXZ1) signal, consistent with classical models involving centromere misdivision. The remaining seven were inconsistent with such a model and had breakpoints that spanned proximal Xp11.21: one was between DXZ1 and the most proximal marker, ZXDA; one occurred between the duplicated genes, ZXDA and ZXDB; two were approximately 2 Mb from DXZ1; two were adjacent to ALAS2 located 3.5 Mb from DXZ1; and the largest had a breakpoint just distal to DXS1013E, indicating the inclusion of 8 Mb of Xp DNA between centromeres. The three cytologically dicentric i(Xq)s had breakpoints distal to DXS423E in Xp11.22 and therefore contained > or = 12 Mb of DNA between centromeres. These data demonstrate that the majority of breakpoints resulting in i(Xq) formation are in band Xp11.2 and not in the centromere itself. Therefore, we hypothesize that the predominant mechanism of i(Xq) formation involves sequences in the proximal short arm that are prone to breakage and reunion events between sister chromatids or homologous X chromosomes.

  10. Formation of short chain fatty acids by the gut microbiota and their impact on human metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas J. Morrison; Preston, Tom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of SCFA is the result of a complex interplay between diet and the gut microbiota within the gut lumen environment. The discovery of receptors, across a range of cell and tissue types for which short chain fatty acids SCFA appear to be the natural ligands, has led to increased interest in SCFA as signaling molecules between the gut microbiota and the host. SCFA represent the major carbon flux from the diet through the gut microbiota to the host and evidence is emerging f...

  11. The Human SepSecS-tRNA[superscript Sec] Complex Reveals the Mechanism of Selenocysteine Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palioura, Sotiria; Sherrer, R. Lynn; Steitz, Thomas A.; Söll, Dieter; Simonovic, Miljan; (Yale); (UIC)

    2009-08-13

    Selenocysteine is the only genetically encoded amino acid in humans whose biosynthesis occurs on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA). O-Phosphoseryl-tRNA:selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase (SepSecS) catalyzes the final step of selenocysteine formation by a poorly understood tRNA-dependent mechanism. The crystal structure of human tRNA{sup Sec} in complex with SepSecS, phosphoserine, and thiophosphate, together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays, supports a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent mechanism of Sec-tRNA{sup Sec} formation. Two tRNA{sup Sec} molecules, with a fold distinct from other canonical tRNAs, bind to each SepSecS tetramer through their 13-base pair acceptor-T{Upsilon}C arm (where {Upsilon} indicates pseudouridine). The tRNA binding is likely to induce a conformational change in the enzyme's active site that allows a phosphoserine covalently attached to tRNA{sup Sec}, but not free phosphoserine, to be oriented properly for the reaction to occur.

  12. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Riwaldt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS and spheroid non-forming (AD thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation.

  13. The caroticoclinoid foramen formation in the human skull and its clinical correlations

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    Freire AR

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerous structures of the skull are well defined in literature. But there are some inconstant structures, which when present may be located in the sphenoid bone by the junction of the anterior and middle clinoid processes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of caroticoclinoid foramen in Brazilian human skull. This case report shows a female dry human skull with 2 caroticoclinoid foramina. The largest diameter of this structure was found 5.5 mm on the right side and 5.4 mm on the left. Although being an uncommon foramen, the knowledge is important because it is located in the sphenoid bone, an important region for neurosurgery.

  14. Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taku; Yano, Fumiko; Mori, Daisuke; Kawata, Manabu; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Hideki; Otsu, Makoto; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

  15. Human oxidation-specific antibodies reduce foam cell formation and atherosclerosis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    We sought to assess the in vivo importance of scavenger receptor (SR)-mediated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) in atherogenesis and to test the efficacy of human antibody IK17-Fab or IK17 single-chain Fv fragment (IK17-scFv), which lacks immunologic properties of intact antibod...... antibodies other than the ability to inhibit uptake of OxLDL by macrophages, to inhibit atherosclerosis....

  16. Human JCV infections as a bio-anthropological marker of the formation of Brazilian Amazonian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayres-Vallinoto, Izaura M V; Vallinoto, Antonio C R; Azevedo, Vânia N; Machado, Luis Fernando Almeida; Ishak, Marluísa de Oliveira Guimarães; Ishak, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) is a member of the Polyomaviridae family. It presents a tropism to kidney cells, and the infection occurs in a variety of human population groups of different ethnic background. The present study investigated the prevalence of JCV infection among human populations from the Brazilian Amazon region, and describes the molecular and phylogenetic features of the virus. Urine samples from two urban groups of Belém (healthy subjects), one Brazilian Afro-descendant "quilombo" from the Rio Trombetas region, and native Indians from the Wai-Wai, Urubu-Kaapor, Tembé, Assurini, Arara do Laranjal, Aukre, Parakanã, Surui and Munduruku villages were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (230 bp) and IG (610 bp) regions using a polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequences (440 nucleotides, nt) from 48 samples were submitted to phylogenetic analysis. The results confirmed the occurrence of types A (subtype EU), B (subtypes Af-2, African and MY, Asiatic) and C (subtype Af-1) among healthy subjects; type B, subtypes Af-2 and MY, among the Afro-Brazilians; and type B, subtype MY, within the Surui Indians. An unexpected result was the detection of another polyomavirus, the BKV, among Afro-descendants. The present study shows, for the first time, the occurrence of JC and BK polyomaviruses infecting humans from the Brazilian Amazon region. The results show a large genetic variability of strains circulating in the region, infecting a large group of individuals. The presence of European, Asiatic and African subtypes associated to the ethnic origin of the population samples investigated herein, highlights the idea that JCV is a fairly good marker for studying the early migration of human populations, reflecting their early and late history. Furthermore, the identification of the specific mutations associated to the virus subtypes, suggests that these mutations have occurred after the entrance of the virus in the Amazon region of Brazil.

  17. Human JCV infections as a bio-anthropological marker of the formation of Brazilian Amazonian populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura M V Cayres-Vallinoto

    Full Text Available JC polyomavirus (JCV is a member of the Polyomaviridae family. It presents a tropism to kidney cells, and the infection occurs in a variety of human population groups of different ethnic background. The present study investigated the prevalence of JCV infection among human populations from the Brazilian Amazon region, and describes the molecular and phylogenetic features of the virus. Urine samples from two urban groups of Belém (healthy subjects, one Brazilian Afro-descendant "quilombo" from the Rio Trombetas region, and native Indians from the Wai-Wai, Urubu-Kaapor, Tembé, Assurini, Arara do Laranjal, Aukre, Parakanã, Surui and Munduruku villages were investigated for the presence of the virus by amplifying VP1 (230 bp and IG (610 bp regions using a polymerase chain reaction. Nucleotide sequences (440 nucleotides, nt from 48 samples were submitted to phylogenetic analysis. The results confirmed the occurrence of types A (subtype EU, B (subtypes Af-2, African and MY, Asiatic and C (subtype Af-1 among healthy subjects; type B, subtypes Af-2 and MY, among the Afro-Brazilians; and type B, subtype MY, within the Surui Indians. An unexpected result was the detection of another polyomavirus, the BKV, among Afro-descendants. The present study shows, for the first time, the occurrence of JC and BK polyomaviruses infecting humans from the Brazilian Amazon region. The results show a large genetic variability of strains circulating in the region, infecting a large group of individuals. The presence of European, Asiatic and African subtypes associated to the ethnic origin of the population samples investigated herein, highlights the idea that JCV is a fairly good marker for studying the early migration of human populations, reflecting their early and late history. Furthermore, the identification of the specific mutations associated to the virus subtypes, suggests that these mutations have occurred after the entrance of the virus in the Amazon region of

  18. Recombinant Human Endostatin Suppresses Mouse Osteoclast Formation by Inhibiting the NF-κB and MAPKs Signaling Pathways

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    Non eChen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and progressive joint destruction. As reported previously, recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin is associated with inhibition of joint bone destruction present in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis; however, the effect of rhEndostatin on bone destruction is not known. This study was designed to assess the inhibitory effect and mechanisms of rhEndostatin on formation and function of osteoclasts in vitro, and to gain insight into the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of bone destruction. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from BALB/c mice were stimulated with receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor to establish osteoclast formation. Osteoclast formation was determined by TRAP staining. Cell viability of BMMs affected by rhEndostatin was determined using a MTT assay. Bone resorption was examined with a bone resorption pits assay. The expression of osteoclast-specific markers was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. The related signaling pathways were examined using a Luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis. Indeed, rhEndostatin showed a significant reduction in the number of osteoclast-like cells and early-stage bone resorption. Moreover, molecular analysis demonstrated that rhEndostatin attenuated RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IκBα and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Furthermore, rhEndostatin significantly inhibited the activation of RANKL-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, such as ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Hence, we demonstrated for the first time that preventing the formation and function of osteoclasts is an important anti-bone destruction mechanism of rhEndostatin, which might be useful in the prevention and treatment of bone destruction in RA.

  19. Modification of the catalytic function of human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase hSULT2A1 by formation of disulfide bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Teesch, Lynn M; Duffel, Michael W

    2013-05-01

    The human cytosolic sulfotransferase hSULT2A1 catalyzes the sulfation of a broad range of xenobiotics, as well as endogenous hydroxysteroids and bile acids. Reversible modulation of the catalytic activity of this enzyme could play important roles in its physiologic functions. Whereas other mammalian sulfotransferases are known to be reversibly altered by changes in their redox environment, this has not been previously shown for hSULT2A1. We have examined the hypothesis that the formation of disulfide bonds in hSULT2A1 can reversibly regulate the catalytic function of the enzyme. Three thiol oxidants were used as model compounds to investigate their effects on homogeneous preparations of hSULT2A1: glutathione disulfide, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid), and 1,1'-azobis(N,N-dimethylformamide) (diamide). Examination of the effects of disulfide bond formation with these agents indicated that the activity of the enzyme is reversibly altered. Studies on the kinetics of the hSULT2A1-catalyzed sulfation of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) showed the effects of disulfide bond formation on the substrate inhibition characteristics of the enzyme. The effects of these agents on the binding of substrates and products, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identification of the disulfides formed, and structural modeling of the modified enzyme were examined. Our results indicate that conformational changes at cysteines near the nucleotide binding site affect the binding of both the nucleotide and DHEA to the enzyme, with the specific effects dependent on the structure of the resulting disulfide. Thus, the formation of disulfide bonds in hSULT2A1 is a potentially important reversible mechanism for alterations in the rates of sulfation of both endogenous and xenobiotic substrates.

  20. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 suspended in fibrin glue enhances bone formation during distraction osteogenesis in rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunfeng; Li, Rui; Hu, Jing; Song, Donghui; Jiang, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) has high potential for bone formation, but its in vivo effects are unpredictable due to the short life time. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of recombinant human (rh) BMP-2 suspended in fibrin on bone formation during distraction osteogenesis (DO) in rabbits. Material and methods The in vitro release kinetics of rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin was tested using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Unilateral tibial lengthening for 10 mm was achieved in 48 rabbits. At the completion of osteodistraction, vehicle, fibrin, rhBMP-2 or rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin (rhBMP-2 + fibrin) was injected into the center of the lengthened gap, with 12 animals in each group. Eight weeks later, the distracted callus was examined by histology, micro-CT and biomechanical testing. Radiographs of the distracted tibiae were taken at both 4 and 8 weeks after drug treatment. Results It was found that fibrin prolonged the life span of rhBMP-2 in vitro with sustained release during 17 days. The rhBMP-2 + fibrin treated animals showed the best results in bone mineral density, bone volume fraction, cortical bone thickness by micro-CT evaluation and mechanical properties by the three-point bending test when compared to the other groups (p < 0.05). In histological images, rhBMP-2 + fibrin treatment showed increased callus formation and better gap bridging compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that fibrin holds promise to be a good carrier of rhBMP-2, and rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin showed a stronger promoting effect on bone formation during DO in rabbits. PMID:27279839

  1. Specific Human and Candida Cellular Interactions Lead to Controlled or Persistent Infection Outcomes during Granuloma-Like Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misme-Aucouturier, Barbara; Albassier, Marjorie; Alvarez-Rueda, Nidia; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    A delayed type of multicellular process could be crucial during chronic candidiasis in determining the course of infection. This reaction, consisting of organized immune cells surrounding the pathogen, initiates an inflammatory response to avoid fungal dissemination. The goal of the present study was to examine, at an in vitro cellular scale, Candida and human immune cell interaction dynamics during a long-term period. By challenging human peripheral blood immune cells from 10 healthy donors with 32 Candida albicans and non-albicans (C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. lusitaniae, C. krusei, and C. kefyr) clinical isolates, we showed that Candida spp. induced the formation of granuloma-like structures within 6 days after challenge, but their sizes and the respective fungal burdens differed according to the Candida species. These two parameters are positively correlated. Phenotypic characteristics, such as hypha formation and higher axenic growth rate, seem to contribute to yeast persistence within granuloma-like structures. We showed an interindividual variability of the human response against Candida spp. Higher proportions of neutrophils and elevated CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell ratios during the first days after challenge were correlated with early production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and associated with controlled infection. In contrast, the persistence of Candida could result from upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and a poor anti-inflammatory negative feedback (IL-10). Importantly, regulatory subsets of NK cells and CD4(lo) CD8(hi) doubly positive (DP) lymphocytes at late stage infiltrate granuloma-like structures and could correlate with the IL-10 and TNF-α production. These data offer a base frame to explain cellular events that guide infection control or fungal persistence. Copyright © 2016 Misme-Aucouturier et al.

  2. Crystal structure of human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I.; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical to β-sheet rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide bond linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into an β-sheet rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates, and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such non-amyloid oligomers. PMID:23808589

  3. Crystal structure of a human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K

    2013-07-17

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical- to β-sheet-rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide-bond-linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into a β-sheet-rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such nonamyloid oligomers.

  4. Estradiol formation by human osteoblasts via multiple pathways: relation with osteoblast function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J M; Bland, R; Hewison, M; Coughtrie, M W; Sharp, S; Arts, J; Pols, H A; van Leeuwen, J P

    1999-12-01

    The importance of estrogens in bone metabolism is illustrated by the accelerated bone loss and increase in osteoporotic fractures associated with postmenopausal estrogen deficiency. In this study, the expression and activity of the enzymes involved in estrogen metabolism in human osteoblastic cells were investigated in relation to differentiation of these cells. PCR reactions using mRNA from an in vitro differentiating human cell line (SV-HFO) were performed to assess mRNA expression of the enzymes aromatase, different subtypes of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD), and steroid sulfatase. Aromatase, sulfatase, and 17beta-HSD type 2 and 4 were found to be expressed throughout differentiation. Expression of 17beta-HSD type 3, however, was relatively weak, except for early time points in differentiation. Type 1 17beta-HSD expression was not detected. Aromatase activity decreased during differentiation, as was demonstrated by the conversion of androstenedione (A) and testosterone (T) into estrone (E(1)) and estradiol (E(2)), respectively. The 17beta-HSD isozymes catalysing a reductive reaction convert androstenedione and estrone into testosterone and estradiol, respectively. Their activity declined with differentiation. Analysis of 17beta-HSD activity indicated both oxidative (E(2) to E(1); T to A) and reductive (E(1) to E(2); A to T) metabolism at all stages of osteoblast differentiation. Both activities declined as cells moved toward a differentiating mineralizing phenotype. However, the oxidative reaction was increasingly in favor of the reductive reaction at all times during differentiation. Sulfatase activity, as demonstrated by the conversion of estrone-sulfate into estrone, was constant during differentiation. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that all enzymes necessary for estrogen metabolism are expressed and biologically active in differentiating human osteoblasts. The activity of aromatase and 17beta-HSD was found to be dependent on the stage

  5. Ontogeny of calbindin immunoreactivity in the human hippocampal formation with a special emphasis on granule cells of the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahám, Hajnalka; Veszprémi, Béla; Kravják, András; Kovács, Krisztina; Gömöri, Eva; Seress, László

    2009-04-01

    Calbindin (CB) is a calcium-binding protein that is present in principal cells as well as in interneurons of the hippocampal formation of various species including humans. Studies with transgenic mice revealed that CB is essential for long-term potentiation and synaptic plasticity which are the cellular basis of learning and memory. In a previous study we have shown that CB expression in granule cells of the dentate gyrus correlates with the functional maturation of the hippocampal formation in the rat. In the present study we examined the ontogeny of CB using immunohistochemistry in the human hippocampal formation paying special attention to the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. As early as the 14(th) week of gestation (GW), CB was being expressed by pyramidal cells of CA1-3 regions in the deepest cell rows of the pyramidal layer towards the ventricular zone. Later, CB sequentially appears in more superficial cell rows. After midgestation, CB disappears from CA3 pyramidal neurons. Expression of CB by granule cells starts at the 22(nd)-23(rd) GW, first by the most superficial neurons of the ectal end of the dorsal blade. At the 24(th) GW, CB is expressed by granule cells of the crest and medial portion of the ventral blade whereas later the entire ventral blade revealed CB immunoreactivity. At term, and in the first few postnatal months, CB-immunoreaction is detected in granule cells of both blades except for those neurons in the deepest cell rows at the hilar border. At around 2-3 years of age, all granule cells of the entire cell layer are CB-immunoreactive. Axons of granule cells, the mossy fibers, start to express CB around the 30(th) GW in stratum lucidum of CA3a. With further development, CB is expressed in CA3b and c, as well as in the hilus. An adult-like pattern of CB-immunoreactivity could be observed at 11 years of age. Our results indicate that (i) CB is expressed by hippocampal pyramidal cells a few weeks before midgestation; (ii) similarly to

  6. Endogenous biosynthesis of arachidonic acid epoxides in humans: Increased formation in pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catella, F.; Lawson, J.A.; Fitzgerald, D.J.; FitzGerald, G.A. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Arachidonic acid is metabolized by means of P450 isoenzyme(s) to form epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and their corresponding dihydroxy derivatives (DHETs). In the present study, we established the presence in human urine of 8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EETs and their corresponding DHETs by developing quantitative assays and using negative ion, chemical ionization GC/MS and octadeuterated internal standards. Urinary excretion of 8,9- and 11,12-DHET increased in healthy pregnant women compared with nonpregnant female volunteers. By contrast, excretion of 11,12-DHET and 14,15-DHET, but not the 8,9-DHET regioisomer, increased even further in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension. Intravenous administration of (3H)14,15-EET to three dogs markedly increased its DHET in plasma. The terminal half-life ranged from 7.9-12.3 min and the volume of distribution (3.5-5.3 liters) suggested limited distribution outside the plasma compartment. Negligible radioactivity was detected in urine; this fact infers that under physiological circumstances, urinary DHETs largely derive from the kidney. That P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid are formed in humans supports the hypothesis that these metabolites contribute to the physiological response to normal pregnancy and the pathophysiology of pregnancy-induced hypertension.

  7. Recapitulation of physiological spatiotemporal signals promotes in vitro formation of phenotypically stable human articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Bernhard, Jonathan; Robinson, Samuel; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, X. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Standard isotropic culture fails to recapitulate the spatiotemporal gradients present during native development. Cartilage grown from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is poorly organized and unstable in vivo. We report that human cartilage with physiologic organization and in vivo stability can be grown in vitro from self-assembling hMSCs by implementing spatiotemporal regulation during induction. Self-assembling hMSCs formed cartilage discs in Transwell inserts following isotropic chondrogenic induction with transforming growth factor β to set up a dual-compartment culture. Following a switch in the basal compartment to a hypertrophic regimen with thyroxine, the cartilage discs underwent progressive deep-zone hypertrophy and mineralization. Concurrent chondrogenic induction in the apical compartment enabled the maintenance of functional and hyaline cartilage. Cartilage homeostasis, chondrocyte maturation, and terminal differentiation markers were all up-regulated versus isotropic control groups. We assessed the in vivo stability of the cartilage formed under different induction regimens. Cartilage formed under spatiotemporal regulation in vitro resisted endochondral ossification, retained the expression of cartilage markers, and remained organized following s.c. implantation in immunocompromised mice. In contrast, the isotropic control groups underwent endochondral ossification. Cartilage formed from hMSCs remained stable and organized in vivo. Spatiotemporal regulation during induction in vitro recapitulated some aspects of native cartilage development, and potentiated the maturation of self-assembling hMSCs into stable and organized cartilage resembling the native articular cartilage. PMID:28228529

  8. LAMP for human African trypanosomiasis: a comparative study of detection formats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally L Wastling

    Full Text Available Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP is at the forefront of the search for innovative diagnostics for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT. Several simple endpoint detection methods have been developed for LAMP and here we compare four of these: (i visualization of turbidity; (ii addition of hydroxynaphthol blue before incubation; (iii addition of calcein with MnCl₂ before incubation and (iv addition of Quant-iT PicoGreen after incubation. These four methods were applied to four LAMP assays for the detection of human African trypanosomiasis, including two Trypanozoon specific and two Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense specific reactions using DNA extracted from cryo-preserved procyclic form T. b. rhodesiense. A multi-observer study was performed to assess inter-observer reliability of two of these methods: hydroxynapthol blue and calcein with MnCl₂, using DNA prepared from blood samples stored on Whatman FTA cards. Results showed that hydroxynaphthol blue was the best of the compared methods for easy, inexpensive, accurate and reliable interpretation of LAMP assays for HAT. Hydroxynapthol blue generates a violet to sky blue colour change that was easy to see and was consistently interpreted by independent observers. Visible turbidity detection is not possible for all currently available HAT LAMP reactions; Quant-iT PicoGreen is expensive and addition of calcein with MnCl₂ adversely affects reaction sensitivity and was unpopular with several observers.

  9. Inhibition of biofilm formation and antibacterial properties of a silver nano-coating on human dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besinis, Alexandros; De Peralta, Tracy; Handy, Richard D

    2014-11-01

    The survival of pathogenic bacteria in the oral cavity depends on their successful adhesion to dental surfaces and their ability to develop into biofilms, known as dental plaque. Bacteria from the dental plaque are responsible for the development of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis, stomatitis and peri-implantitis. Certain metal nanoparticles have been suggested for infection control and the management of the oral biofilm. Here, it is shown that application of a silver nano-coating directly on dentine can successfully prevent the biofilm formation on dentine surfaces as well as inhibit bacterial growth in the surrounding media. This silver nano-coating was found to be stable (>98.8%) and to maintain its integrity in biological fluids. Its antibacterial activity was compared to silver nitrate and the widely used clinical antiseptic, chlorhexidine. The bacterial growth and cell viability were quantitatively assessed by measuring the turbidity, proportion of live and dead cells and lactate production. All three bioassays showed that silver nanoparticles and silver nitrate dentine coatings were equally highly bactericidal (>99.5%), while inhibiting bacterial adhesion. However, the latter caused significant dentine discolouration (ΔE* = 50.3). The chlorhexidine coating showed no antibacterial effect. Thus, silver nanoparticles may be a viable alternative to both chlorhexidine and silver nitrate, protecting from dental plaque and secondary caries when applied as a dentine coating, while they may provide the platform for creating anti-biofilm surfaces in medical devices and other biomedical applications.

  10. Superstitious conditioning as a model of delusion formation following chronic but not acute ketamine in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Tom P; Morgan, Celia J A; Klaassen, Elissa; Das, Ravi K; Stefanovic, Ana; Brandner, Brigitta; Curran, H Valerie

    2009-11-01

    Ketamine has previously been shown to induce delusion-like or referential beliefs, both acutely in healthy volunteers and naturalistically among nonintoxicated users of the drug. Delusions are theoretically underpinned by increased superstitious conditioning or the erroneous reinforcement of random events. Using a novel and objectively measured superstitious conditioning task, experiment 1 assessed healthy volunteers before and during placebo (n = 16), low-dose (n = 15), and high-dose ketamine (n = 16) under randomized and double-blind conditions. Experiment 2 used the same task to compare ketamine users (n = 18), polydrug controls (n = 19), and nondrug-using controls (n = 17). In experiment 1, ketamine produced dose-dependent psychotomimetic effects but did not cause changes in superstitious conditioning. Experiment 2 found increased levels of superstitious conditioning among ketamine users compared to polydrug and nondrug-using controls, respectively, as evidenced by both objective task responses and subjective beliefs following the task. Results indicate that chronic but not acute exposure to ketamine may increase the propensity to adopt superstitious conditioning. These findings are discussed in terms of acute and chronic ketamine models of delusion-like belief formation in schizophrenia.

  11. Influence of different radiographic contrast media on the echinocyte formation of human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowietz, C; Franke, R P; Jung, F

    2012-01-01

    Echinocyte formation is associated with a rigidification of the cells that may affect capillary perfusion and, consequently, the tissue oxygen supply. This study examines how many echinocytes appeared after the addition of radiographic contrast media (RCM) (Iodixanol320, Ioversol300, Iopamidol300, and Iomeprol400) compared to red blood cells in autologous plasma and in isotonic saline solution. Isotonic saline solution, Iodixanol, Ioversol, Iopamidol and Iomeprol in concentrations of 10 vol%, 20 vol%, and 40 vol% were added to the plasma of seven healthy subjects. Subsequently, the erythrocytes were resuspended in these plasma/RCM mixtures, incubated for 5 minutes and then examined under the microscope. The concentrations and the RCM in the mixture had a significant effect on the number of discocytes (factor concentration: p < 0.0001; factor RCM: p < 0.0001). The percentage of discocytes for all concentrations depended significantly on the RCM/plasma mixture (concentration × RCM: p < 0.002). Of all RCM/plasma mixtures used, the Iodixanol/plasma mixture showed the most similar discocyte fraction compared to red blood cells in the autologous plasma. Importantly, while Iodixanol differed from all other RCMs, the other RCMs did not differ from one another with respect to the discocyte fraction.

  12. Webquest and Comics in the Formation of Human Resources in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruxo, Harriet Bárbara; Prado, Cláudia; Almeida, Denise Maria de; Tobase, Lucia; Grossi, Manoela Gomes; Vaz, Débora Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Objective To describe the process of constructing and implementation of Webquest as pedagogical strategy as guiding the study about the pedagogical concepts using Comic. Method The first stage of the study was outlined applied research of technological production. The second stage was characterized as research exploratory, descriptive documentary for the analysis of Comic. in the teaching diploma in Nursing of EEUSP in 2013. Results The proposed Webquest was implemented, resulting in 18 Comic. All Pedagogical Concepts studied were addressed; used the software indicated and the power point, the plots developed in different scenarios and most Comic contemplated mandatory items. Conclusion The use of different technological resources provide learning, by mobilizing multiple potentialities, abilities and interests of students, favoring the construction of collective and collaborative learning, strengthening important and necessary features in training that will influence the human resource profile in tune with the aspirations of the labor market.

  13. Human Placenta-Derived Adherent Cells Prevent Bone loss, Stimulate Bone formation, and Suppress Growth of Multiple Myeloma in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Ling, Wen; Pennisi, Angela; Wang, Yuping; Khan, Sharmin; Heidaran, Mohammad; Pal, Ajai; Zhang, Xiaokui; He, Shuyang; Zeitlin, Andy; Abbot, Stewart; Faleck, Herbert; Hariri, Robert; Shaughnessy, John D.; van Rhee, Frits; Nair, Bijay; Barlogie, Bart; Epstein, Joshua; Yaccoby, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    Human placenta has emerged as a valuable source of transplantable cells of mesenchymal and hematopoietic origin for multiple cytotherapeutic purposes, including enhanced engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells, modulation of inflammation, bone repair, and cancer. Placenta-derived adherent cells (PDACs) are mesenchymal-like stem cells isolated from postpartum human placenta. Multiple myeloma is closely associated with induction of bone disease and large lytic lesions, which are often not repaired and are usually the sites of relapses. We evaluated the antimyeloma therapeutic potential, in vivo survival, and trafficking of PDACs in the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)–rab model of medullary myeloma-associated bone loss. Intrabone injection of PDACs into non-myelomatous and myelomatous implanted bone in SCID-rab mice promoted bone formation by stimulating endogenous osteoblastogenesis, and most PDACs disappeared from bone within 4 weeks. PDACs inhibitory effects on myeloma bone disease and tumor growth were dose-dependent and comparable with those of fetal human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Intrabone, but not subcutaneous, engraftment of PDACs inhibited bone disease and tumor growth in SCID-rab mice. Intratumor injection of PDACs had no effect on subcutaneous growth of myeloma cells. A small number of intravenously injected PDACs trafficked into myelomatous bone. Myeloma cell growth rate in vitro was lower in coculture with PDACs than with MSCs from human fetal bone or myeloma patients. PDACs also promoted apoptosis in osteoclast precursors and inhibited their differentiation. This study suggests that altering the bone marrow microenvironment with PDAC cytotherapy attenuates growth of myeloma and that PDAC cytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach for myeloma osteolysis. PMID:21732484

  14. Type III methyltransferase M.NgoAX from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 regulates biofilm formation and human cell invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eKwiatek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological factor of the sexually transmitted gonorrhea disease that may lead, under specific conditions, to systemic infections. The gonococcal genome encodes many Restriction Modification (RM systems, which main biological role is to defend the pathogen from potentially harmful foreign DNA. However, RM systems seem also to be involved in several other functions. In this study, we examined the effect of inactivation the N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 ngo0545 gene encoding M.NgoAX methyltransferase on the global gene expression, biofilm formation, interactions with human epithelial host cells and overall bacterial growth. Expression microarrays showed at least a two-fold deregulation of a total of 121 genes in the NgoAX knock-out mutant compared to the wt strain under standard grow conditions. As determined by the assay with crystal violet, the NgoAX knock-out strain formed a slightly larger biofilm biomass per cell than the wt strain (OD570/600 = 13.8  2.24 and 9.35  2.06, respectively. SCLM observations showed that the biofilm formed by the gonococcal ngo0545 gene mutant is more relaxed and dispersed than the one formed by the wt strain. Thickness of the biofilm formed by both strains was 48.3 (14.9 µm for the mutant and 28.6 (4.0 µm for the wt. This more relaxed feature of the biofilm in respect to adhesion and bacterial interactions seems advantageous for pathogenesis of the NgoAX-deficient gonococci at the stage of human epithelial cell invasion. Indeed, the overall adhesion of mutant bacterial cells to human cells was lower than adhesion of the wt gonococci (adhesion index = 0.672 ( 0.2 and 2.15 ( 1.53, respectively; yet, a higher number of mutant than wt bacteria were found inside the Hec-1-B epithelial cells (invasion index = 3.38 ( 0.93  105 for mutant and 4.67 ( 3.09  104 for the wt strain. These results indicate that NgoAX-deficient cells have lower ability to attach to human cells

  15. High level of deoxycholic acid in human bile does not promote cholesterol gallstone formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulf Gustafsson; Staffan Sahlin; Curt Einarsson

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study whether patients with excess deoxycholic acid (DCA) differ from those with normal percentage of DCA with respect to biliary lipid composition and cholesterol saturation of gallbladder bile.METHODS: Bile was collected during operation through puncturing into the gallbladder from 122 cholesterol gallstone patients and 46 gallstone-free subjects undergoing cholecystectomy. Clinical data, biliary lipids, bile acid composition,presence of crystals and nucleation time were analyzed.RESULTS: A subgroup of gallstone patients displayeda higher proportion of DCA in bile than gallstone free subjects.By choosing a cut-off level of the 90th percentile, a group of 13 gallstone patients with high DCA levels (mean 50percent of total bile acids) and a large group of 109 patients with normal DCA levels (mean 21 percent of total bile acids)were obtained. The mean age of the patients with high DCA levels was higher than that of the group with normal levels (mean age: 62 years vs45 years) and so was the mean BMI (28.3 vs. 24.7). Plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides were slightly higher in the DCA excess groups compared with those in the normal DCA group. There was no difference in biliary lipid composition, cholesterol saturation, nucleation time or occurrence of cholesterol crystals in bile between patients with high and normal levels of DCA.CONCLUSION: Gallstone patients with excess DCA were of older age and had higher BMI than patients with normal DCA. The two groups of patients did not differ with respect to biliary lipid composition, cholesterol saturation, nucleation time or occurrence of cholesterol crystals. It is concluded that DCA in bile does not seem to contribute to gallstone formation in cholesterol gallstone patients.

  16. Ultrastructure of the human aortic fibrolipid lesion. Formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocan, T. M.; Schifani, T. A.; Guyton, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core has been elucidated by electron microscopy of the core region in small, raised fibrolipid lesions. The relationship among lipid deposits, extracellular matrix, and cells found in distinct regions of the fibrolipid lesion was examined. Extracellular lipid droplets, verified by osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium staining, made up approximately 40% of the lipid-rich core volume. The lipid droplets were often found distinctly associated with elastin and/or collagen; these associations were dependent upon the location examined within or near the lipid-rich core. Within areas of intense extracellular lipid deposits, crystalline clefts suggesting cholesterol monohydrate were observed. Stereologic analysis of the lipid-rich core components revealed marked reductions in the volume fractions of cells, reticular ground substance, and basement membrane; while the extent of extracellular lipid increased 7-10-fold. Eleven percent or less of lipid in the core region was found within cells, usually smooth muscle cells. Above the core region in the lesion cap, monocyte-macrophage foam cells were prominent. Cellular lipid droplets were much larger (profile diameters sixfold higher) than extracellular droplets. With these data as well as transitional morphologic features at the boundaries of the core region, it is suggested that the abundant extracellular lipid does not derive from cell necrosis, and lipid deposition in association with extracellular matrix constituents is an early event in the development of the lipid-rich core. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3717297

  17. Laser-induced periodic surface structures on polymers for formation of gold nanowires and activation of human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barb, R.-A.; Hrelescu, C.; Dong, L.; Heitz, J.; Siegel, J.; Slepicka, P.; Vosmanska, V.; Svorcik, V.; Magnus, B.; Marksteiner, R.; Schernthaner, M.; Groschner, K.

    2014-10-01

    Frequently observed coherent structures in laser-surface processing are ripples, also denoted as laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS). For polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polystyrene (PS), LIPSS can be induced by irradiation with linearly polarized ns-pulsed UV laser light. Under an angle of incidence of θ, their lateral period is close to the laser wavelength λ divided by ( n eff - sin θ). Here, n eff is the effective refractive index which is 1.32 and 1.23 for PET and PS, respectively. We describe potential applications of LIPSS for alignment and activation of human cells cultivated on polymer substrates, as well as for formation of separated gold nanowires which show pronounced surface plasmon resonances, e.g., at 775 nm for PET.

  18. Human Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (Tudor-SN) protein modulates the kinetics of AGTR1-3'UTR granule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xingjie; Shi, Xuebin; Fu, Xue; Ge, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Su, Chao; Yang, Xi; Silvennoinen, Olli; Yao, Zhi; He, Jinyan; Wei, Minxin; Yang, Jie

    2014-06-13

    Human Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (Tudor-SN) interacts with the G3BP protein and is recruited into stress granules (SGs), the main type of discrete RNA-containing cytoplasmic foci structure that is formed under stress conditions. Here, we further demonstrate that Tudor-SN binds and co-localizes with AGTR1-3'UTR (3'-untranslated region of angiotensin II receptor, type 1 mRNA) into SG. Tudor-SN plays an important role in the assembly of AGTR1-3'UTR granules. Moreover, endogenous Tudor-SN knockdown can decrease the recovery kinetics of AGTR1-3'UTR granules. Collectively, our data indicate that Tudor-SN modulates the kinetics of AGTR1-3'UTR granule formation, which provides an additional biological role of Tudor-SN in RNA metabolism during stress. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. De novo centriole formation in human cells is error-prone and does not require SAS-6 self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Won-Jing; Acehan, Devrim; Kao, Chien-Han; Jane, Wann-Neng; Uryu, Kunihiro; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2015-11-26

    Vertebrate centrioles normally propagate through duplication, but in the absence of preexisting centrioles, de novo synthesis can occur. Consistently, centriole formation is thought to strictly rely on self-assembly, involving self-oligomerization of the centriolar protein SAS-6. Here, through reconstitution of de novo synthesis in human cells, we surprisingly found that normal looking centrioles capable of duplication and ciliation can arise in the absence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. Moreover, whereas canonically duplicated centrioles always form correctly, de novo centrioles are prone to structural errors, even in the presence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. These results indicate that centriole biogenesis does not strictly depend on SAS-6 self-assembly, and may require preexisting centrioles to ensure structural accuracy, fundamentally deviating from the current paradigm.

  20. A novel model system for the study of experimental guided bone formation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerle, C H; Schmid, J; Olah, A J; Lang, N P

    1996-03-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to test a novel model system, designed to obtain human specimens of regenerated and also newly regenerated jaw bone, for the study of the biological events under a variety of conditions. Following information and disclosure of possible risks associated with a minor oral surgical procedure, 9 systemically healthy subjects (5 men, 4 women, mean age 31.7 years) signed consent forms and volunteered to participate in this study. Hollow test cylinders with an outer diameter of 3.5 mm, an inner diameter of 2.5 mm, and 4 mm in height were used. They were manufactured from commercially pure titanium and exhibited a highly polished inner surface and a titanium plasma sprayed outer rough surface. A mucoperiosteal flap was raised in the retromolar area of the mandible corresponding to standard retrained third molar surgery. Following flap reflection a standardized hole was drilled through the cortical bone into the bone marrow using round burs. The congruent test cylinders were firmly placed into the prepared bony bed yielding primary stability. One-and-a-half to 2 mm of the test device were submerged below the level of the surrounding bone, while the remainder surpassed the level of the bone surface. The bone-facing end of the cylinder was left open, while the coronal soft tissue facing end was closed by an ePTFE-membrane. The flap was sutured to obtain primary wound closure. In order to prevent infection, penicillin was prescribed systemically and oral rinses of chlorhexidine were administered. After 2, 7, and 12 weeks one test device including the regenerated tissue was surgically harvested, while after 16, 24 and 36 weeks respectively, 2 devices were harvested and processed for soft or hard tissue histology or histochemistry. The two surgical procedures and the presence of the test cylinders during the time of healing were well tolerated by the volunteers. In all 9 subjects generated tissue could successfully be harvested. The tissue

  1. Equilibrium and kinetic analysis of human interleukin-13 and IL-13 receptor alpha-2 complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Eilyn R

    2012-03-01

    Interleukin 13 (IL-13) is a pleiotropic cytokine secreted by activated T cells. Both IL-13 and its polymorphic variant (IL-13-R110Q) have been shown to be associated with multiple diseases such as asthma and allergy. Two IL-13 receptors have been identified, IL-13R alpha-1 receptor (IL-13Rα1) and IL-13R alpha-2 receptor (IL-13Rα2). It has been well established that IL-13 binds to IL-13Rα1 alone with low nM affinity while binding to the IL-13Rα1/IL-4R receptor complex is significantly tighter (pM). The affinity between IL-13 and IL-13Rα2, however, remains elusive. Several values have been reported in the literature varying from 20 pM to 2.5 nM. The affinities previously reported were obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or Scatchard analysis of (125) I-IL-13 binding data. This report presents the results for the kinetics and equilibrium binding analysis studies performed using label-free kinetic exclusion assay (KEA) for the interaction of human IL-13 and IL-13Rα2. KEA equilibrium analysis showed that the affinities of IL-13Rα2 are 107 and 56 pM for IL-13 and its variant (IL-13-R110Q), respectively. KEA kinetic analysis showed that a tight and very stable complex is formed between IL-13Rα2 and IL-13, as shown by calculated dissociation rate constants slower than 5 × 10(-5) per second. Kinetic analysis also showed significant differences in the kinetic behavior of wild type (wt) versus IL-13-R110Q. IL-13-R110Q not only associates to IL-13Rα2 slower than wt human IL-13 (wt-IL-13), as previously reported, but IL-13-R110Q also dissociates slower than wt-IL-13. These results show that IL-13Rα2 is a high affinity receptor and provide a new perspective on kinetic behavior that could have significant implications in the understanding of the role of IL-13-R110Q in the disease state.

  2. Ectopic Hard Tissue Formation by Odonto/Osteogenically In Vitro Differentiated Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghye; Song, Je Seon; Jeon, Mijeong; Shin, Dong Min; Kim, Seong-Oh; Lee, Jae Ho

    2015-07-01

    There have been many attempts to use the pulp tissue from human deciduous teeth for dentin or bone regeneration. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of deciduous teeth pulp stem cells (DTSCs) on their in vivo hard tissue-forming potential. DTSCs were isolated from extracted deciduous teeth using the outgrowth method. These cells were exposed to odonto/osteogenic stimuli for 4 and 8 days (Day 4 and Day 8 groups, respectively), while cells in the control group were cultured in normal medium. The in vitro differentiated DTSCs and the control DTSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice with macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate and sacrificed at 8 weeks post-implantation. The effect of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation was evaluated using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The in vivo effect was evaluated by qualitative RT-PCR, assessment of ALP activity, histologic analysis, and immunohistochemical staining. The amount of hard tissue was greater in Day 4 group than Day 8 group (p = 0.014). However, Day 8 group generated lamellar bone-like structure, which was immunonegative to anti-human dentin sialoprotein with significantly low expression level of DSPP compared with the control group (p = 0.008). This study demonstrates that odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs enhances the formation of bone-like tissue, instead of dentin-like tissue, when transplanted subcutaneously using MBCP as a carrier. The odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs may be an effective modification that enhances in vivo bone formation by DTSCs.

  3. Dramatic attenuation of hypusine formation on eukaryotic initiation factor 5A during senescence of IMR-90 human diploid fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z P; Chen, K Y

    1997-03-01

    Deoxyhypusine synthase catalyzes the conversion of lysine to deoxyhypusine residue on the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (elF-5A) precursor using spermidine as the substrate. Subsequent hydroxylation of the deoxyhypusine residue completes hypusine formation on elF-5A. Hypusine formation is one of the most specific polyamine-dependent biochemical events in eukaryotic cells. Although changes in polyamine metabolism have been demonstrated in human diploid fibroblasts during senescence (Chen and Chang, 1986, J. Cell. Physiol., 128:27-32.), it is unclear whether or not polyamine-dependent hypusine formation itself is an age-dependent biochemical event. In the present study, hypusine-forming activity was measured by a radiolabeling assay in cells whose polyamines have been depleted by prior treatment of alpha-difluoromethyl ornithine (DFMO). In addition, an in vitro cross-labeling assay was developed for simultaneous measurement of the deoxyhypusine synthase activity and protein substrate (elF-5A precursor) amount. We showed that the hypusine-forming activity in low-passage presenescent IMR-90 cells [population doubling level (PDL) = 15-23, termed young cells] was prominently induced by serum whereas little or no hypusine-forming activity could be detected in late-passage senescent cells (PDL = 46-54, termed old cells). The striking difference in hypusine-forming activity between young and old cells was due to changes in both deoxyhypusine synthase activity and elF-5A precursor amount in IMR-90 cells during senescence. However, Northern blot analysis showed no significant difference in the elF-5A messenger RNA (mRNA) between young and old cells, suggesting that the age-dependent attenuation of elF-5A precursor protein may be regulated at either translational or post-translational level.

  4. Cysteine amide adduct formation from carboxylic acid drugs via UGT-mediated bioactivation in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, H; Toyoda, Y; Endo, T; Kobayashi, M

    2015-10-01

    Although chemical trapping has been widely used to evaluate cytochrome P450-mediated drug bioactivation, thus far, only a few in vitro-trapping studies have been performed on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)-mediated drug bioactivation. In this study, we used cysteine (Cys) as trapping agent to gain new insights into the UGT-mediated bioactivation involving acyl glucuronides of carboxylic acid drugs. Diclofenac, ketoprofen and ibuprofen were incubated in human liver microsomes with UDPGA and Cys, followed by analysis using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF/MS). The N-acyl-Cys amide adduct of diclofenac was characterized by mass analysis and was detectable even in photodiode array analysis. Our data indicated that the formation of such adducts reflects the reactivity of the corresponding acyl glucuronides. In addition, it was suggested that the adduct formation requires an N-terminal Cys moiety with both a free amine and a free thiol group, from the results using various cysteine derivatives. We propose that the S-acyl-Cys thioester adduct can form via transacylation of an acyl glucuronide and can then form to an N-acyl-Cys amide adduct through intramolecular S- to N-acyl rearrangement. This series of the reactions has important implications as a possible bioactivation mechanism for covalent binding of carboxylic acid drugs to macromolecules.

  5. Effects of cathepsin K on Emdogain-induced hard tissue formation by human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fen; Zhou, Zhi-Fei; An, Ying; Yu, Yang; Wu, Rui-Xin; Yin, Yuan; Xue, Yang; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2016-07-12

    Recent studies have shown that patients with pycnodysostosis caused by cathepsin K (CTSK) genetic mutations exhibit significantly abnormal periodontal hard tissue structure. This finding suggests that CTSK may play a role in regulating the development of alveolar bone and cementum. However, the source of CTSK in the periodontal environment and the role of CTSK in periodontal regeneration, particularly hard tissue regeneration and development, remain unclear. After the isolation, cultivation, identification, and multi-lineage induction of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs), the present study used light and scanning electron microscopy, reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, micro-computed tomography, immunohistochemical assays and ectopic hard tissue formation experiments to examine CTSK expression in hPDLSCs. The results indicated that CTSK expression was significantly upregulated in hPDLSCs during Emdogain induction but underwent minimal change during osteogenic or adipogenic induction. The present study also showed that the downregulation of CTSK expression inhibited osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation and ectopic hard tissue formation of hPDLSCs. It is therefore concluded that hPDLSCs expressed CTSK and that CTSK levels were significantly upregulated during Emdogain induction. Furthermore, CTSK promoted not only the osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of hPDLSCs but also their ability to form ectopic hard tissue. These new findings may enhance the understanding of periodontal hard tissue development and functional regeneration. However, the specific underlying mechanisms require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Dependence of the bystander effect for micronucleus formation on dose of heavy-ion radiation in normal human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Aoki-Nakano, Mizuho; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Wada, Seiichi; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2015-09-01

    Ionising radiation-induced bystander effects are well recognised, but its dependence on dose or linear energy transfer (LET) is still a matter of debate. To test this, 49 sites in confluent cultures of AG01522D normal human fibroblasts were targeted with microbeams of carbon (103 keV µm(-1)), neon (375 keV µm(-1)) and argon ions (1260 keV µm(-1)) and evaluated for the bystander-induced formation of micronucleus that is a kind of a chromosome aberration. Targeted exposure to neon and argon ions significantly increased the micronucleus frequency in bystander cells to the similar extent irrespective of the particle numbers per site of 1-6. In contrast, the bystander micronucleus frequency increased with increasing the number of carbon-ion particles in a range between 1 and 3 particles per site and was similar in a range between 3 and 8 particles per site. These results suggest that the bystander effect of heavy ions for micronucleus formation depends on dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Escape Mutations, Ganciclovir Resistance, and Teratoma Formation in Human iPSCs Expressing an HSVtk Suicide Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriana G Kotini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs hold great promise for cell therapy. However, a major concern is the risk of tumor formation by residual undifferentiated cells contaminating the hPSC-derived cell product. Suicide genes could safeguard against such adverse events by enabling elimination of cells gone astray, but the efficacy of this approach has not yet been thoroughly tested. Here, we engineered a lentivirally encoded herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk with expression restricted to undifferentiated hPSCs through regulation by the let7 family of miRNAs. We show that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs expressing a let7-regulated HSVtk transgene are selectively killed by ganciclovir (GCV, whereas differentiated cells are fully protected. However, in contrast to previous studies, we find that in vivo GCV administration results in longer latency but does not prevent teratoma formation by iPSCs expressing either a constitutive or a let7-regulated HSVtk, without evidence of silencing of the HSVtk. Clonal analyses of iPSCs expressing HSVtk revealed frequent emergence of GCV resistance which, at least in some cases, could be attributed to preexisting inactivating mutations in the HSVtk coding sequence, selected for upon GCV treatment. Our findings have important consequences for the future use of suicide genes in hPSC-based cell therapies.

  8. In-vitro carbofuran induced micronucleus formation in human blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R K; Rai, D K; Sharma, B

    2012-12-22

    The farmers in general get exposed to different chemicals including pesticides. Many of these compounds are capable of inducing mutations in DNA and lead to several diseases including cancer. Carbofuran is a broad spectrum pesticide and frequently used in agricultural practices in India. In this study we intended to evaluate DNA damage inflicted by pesticide exposure in human blood lymphocytes under in vitro condition. The lymphocytes were exposed to varying concentrations of carbofuran (0—50μM) and analyzed by means of the micronucleus (MN) test. The results obtained showed significant increase in MN frequency after exposure to 5, 10, 25 and 50μM of carbofuran as compared to the control group. The frequencies of MN were observed to be in concentration dependent manner. As we further increase the concentration of carbofuran, we observed significant decrease in the mean percentage of binucleated cells (70—49%) and increase in the number of micronuclei formed per 1000 binucleated cells. Simultaneously, we also observed reduction in Cytokinesis—Block Proliferation index (CBPI) with increase in the carbofuran concentrations. The results indicate that this pesticide may exhibit genotoxic effect at higher concentrations. This study emphasizes the need to reinforce the good practices campaigns in order to enlighten those who work with pesticides and also to make them aware about the importance of using protective measures.

  9. Protoporphyrin IX formation and photobleaching in different layers of normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Idorn, Luise W; Philipsen, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    human skin was tape-stripped and incubated with 20% methylaminolevulinate (MAL) or 20% hexylaminolevulinate (HAL) for 3 h. Fluorescence microscopy quantified PpIX accumulation in epidermis, superficial, mid and deep dermis, down to 2 mm. PpIX photobleaching by light-emitting diode (LED, 632 nm, 18......Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for various skin disorders, and selective targeting of specific skin structures is desirable. The objective was to assess accumulation of PpIX fluorescence and photobleaching within skin layers using different photosensitizers and light sources. Normal...... and 37 J/cm(2)), intense pulsed light (IPL, 500-650 nm, 36 and 72 J/cm(2)) and long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL, 595 nm, 7.5 and 15 J/cm(2)) was measured using fluorescence photography and microscopy. We found higher PpIX fluorescence intensities in epidermis and superficial dermis in HAL-incubated skin than...

  10. Syringotoxin pore formation and inactivation in human red blood cell and model bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsófia; Gróf, Pál; Schagina, Ludmila V; Gurnev, Philip A; Takemoto, Jon Y; Mátyus, Edit; Blaskó, Katalin

    2002-12-23

    The effect of syringotoxin (ST), a member of the cyclic lipodepsipeptides family (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae on the membrane permeability of human red blood cells (RBCs) and model bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied and compared to that of two recently investigated CLPs, syringomycin E (SRE) and syringopeptin 22A (SP22A) [Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1466 (2000) 79 and Bioelectrochemistry 52 (2000) 161]. The permeability-increasing effect of ST on RBCs was the least among the three CLPs. A time-dependent ST pore inactivation was observed on RBCs at 20 and 37 degrees C but not at 8 degrees C. From the kinetic model worked out parameters as permeability coefficient of RBC membrane for 86Rb(+) and pores mean lifetime were calculated. A shorter pores mean lifetime was calculated at 37 degrees C then at 20 degrees C, which gave us an explanation for the unusual slower rate of tracer efflux measured at 37 degrees C then that at 20 degrees C. The results obtained on BLM showed that the pore inactivation was due to a decrease in the number of pores but not to a change of their dwell time or conductance.

  11. Humanized mouse model of ovarian cancer recapitulates patient solid tumor progression, ascites formation, and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B Bankert

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from gynecological cancer. Understanding the biology of this disease, particularly how tumor-associated lymphocytes and fibroblasts contribute to the progression and metastasis of the tumor, has been impeded by the lack of a suitable tumor xenograft model. We report a simple and reproducible system in which the tumor and tumor stroma are successfully engrafted into NOD-scid IL2Rγ(null (NSG mice. This is achieved by injecting tumor cell aggregates derived from fresh ovarian tumor biopsy tissues (including tumor cells, and tumor-associated lymphocytes and fibroblasts i.p. into NSG mice. Tumor progression in these mice closely parallels many of the events that are observed in ovarian cancer patients. Tumors establish in the omentum, ovaries, liver, spleen, uterus, and pancreas. Tumor growth is initially very slow and progressive within the peritoneal cavity with an ultimate development of tumor ascites, spontaneous metastasis to the lung, increasing serum and ascites levels of CA125, and the retention of tumor-associated human fibroblasts and lymphocytes that remain functional and responsive to cytokines for prolonged periods. With this model one will be able to determine how fibroblasts and lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment may contribute to tumor growth and metastasis, and will make it possible to evaluate the efficacy of therapies that are designed to target these cells in the tumor stroma.

  12. Basil extract inhibits the sulfotransferase mediated formation of DNA adducts of the procarcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole by rat and human liver S9 homogenates and in HepG2 human hepatoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Delatour, T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a basil extract on the sulfation and concomitant DNA adduct formation of the proximate carcinogen 1¿-hydroxyestragole were studied using rat and human liver S9 homogenates and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Basil was chosen since it contains the procarcinogen estragole that can b

  13. Human disc cells in monolayer vs 3D culture: cell shape, division and matrix formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between cell shape, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM production, important aspects of cell behavior, is examined in a little-studied cell type, the human annulus cell from the intervertebral disc, during monolayer vs three-dimensional (3D culture. Results Three experimental studies showed that cells respond specifically to culture microenvironments by changes in cell shape, mitosis and ECM production: 1 Cell passages showed extensive immunohistochemical evidence of Type I and II collagens only in 3D culture. Chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were abundant in both monolayer and 3D cultures. 2 Cells showed significantly greater proliferation in monolayer in the presence of platelet-derived growth factor compared to cells in 3D. 3 Cells on Matrigel™-coated monolayer substrates became rounded and formed nodular colonies, a finding absent during monolayer growth. Conclusions The cell's in vivo interactions with the ECM can regulate shape, gene expression and other cell functions. The shape of the annulus cell changes markedly during life: the young, healthy disc contains spindle shaped cells and abundant collagen. With aging and degeneration, many cells assume a strikingly different appearance, become rounded and are surrounded by unusual accumulations of ECM products. In vitro manipulation of disc cells provides an experimental window for testing how disc cells from given individuals respond when they are grown in environments which direct cells to have either spindle- or rounded-shapes. In vitro assessment of the response of such cells to platelet-derived growth factor and to Matrigel™ showed a continued influence of cell shape even in the presence of a growth factor stimulus. These findings contribute new information to the important issue of the influence of cell shape on cell behavior.

  14. Biobankonomics: developing a sustainable business model approach for the formation of a human tissue biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Carolin, Todd; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The preservation of high-quality biospecimens and associated data for research purposes is being performed in variety of academic, government, and industrial settings. Often these are multimillion dollar operations, yet despite these sizable investments, the economics of biobanking initiatives is not well understood. Fundamental business principles must be applied to the development and operation of such resources to ensure their long-term sustainability and maximize their impact. The true costs of developing and maintaining operations, which may have a variety of funding sources, must be better understood. Among the issues that must be considered when building a biobank economic model are: understanding the market need for the particular type of biobank under consideration and understanding and efficiently managing the biobank's "value chain," which includes costs for case collection, tissue processing, storage management, sample distribution, and infrastructure and administration. By using these value chain factors, a Total Life Cycle Cost of Ownership (TLCO) model may be developed to estimate all costs arising from owning, operating, and maintaining a large centralized biobank. The TLCO approach allows for a better delineation of a biobank's variable and fixed costs, data that will be needed to implement any cost recovery program. This article represents an overview of the efforts made recently by the National Cancer Institute's Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research as part of its effort to develop an appropriate cost model and cost recovery program for the cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB) initiative. All of these economic factors are discussed in terms of maximizing caHUB's potential for long-term sustainability but have broad applicability to the wide range of biobanking initiatives that currently exist.

  15. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Michael E; Weafer, Jessica; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH), administered either before (encoding phase) or immediately after (consolidation phase) study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60) were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29) or a consolidation group (N = 31). Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg) either 45 min before (encoding) or immediately after (consolidation) viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29) or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31) prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg) administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative), compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies.

  16. Integrative modeling reveals the principles of multi-scale chromatin boundary formation in human nuclear organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Benjamin L; Aitken, Stuart; Semple, Colin A

    2015-05-27

    Interphase chromosomes adopt a hierarchical structure, and recent data have characterized their chromatin organization at very different scales, from sub-genic regions associated with DNA-binding proteins at the order of tens or hundreds of bases, through larger regions with active or repressed chromatin states, up to multi-megabase-scale domains associated with nuclear positioning, replication timing and other qualities. However, we have lacked detailed, quantitative models to understand the interactions between these different strata. Here we collate large collections of matched locus-level chromatin features and Hi-C interaction data, representing higher-order organization, across three human cell types. We use quantitative modeling approaches to assess whether locus-level features are sufficient to explain higher-order structure, and identify the most influential underlying features. We identify structurally variable domains between cell types and examine the underlying features to discover a general association with cell-type-specific enhancer activity. We also identify the most prominent features marking the boundaries of two types of higher-order domains at different scales: topologically associating domains and nuclear compartments. We find parallel enrichments of particular chromatin features for both types, including features associated with active promoters and the architectural proteins CTCF and YY1. We show that integrative modeling of large chromatin dataset collections using random forests can generate useful insights into chromosome structure. The models produced recapitulate known biological features of the cell types involved, allow exploration of the antecedents of higher-order structures and generate testable hypotheses for further experimental studies.

  17. Effects of acute methamphetamine on emotional memory formation in humans: encoding vs consolidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Ballard

    Full Text Available Understanding how stimulant drugs affect memory is important for understanding their addictive potential. Here we examined the effects of acute d-methamphetamine (METH, administered either before (encoding phase or immediately after (consolidation phase study on memory for emotional and neutral images in healthy humans. Young adult volunteers (N = 60 were randomly assigned to either an encoding group (N = 29 or a consolidation group (N = 31. Across three experimental sessions, they received placebo and two doses of METH (10, 20 mg either 45 min before (encoding or immediately after (consolidation viewing pictures of emotionally positive, neutral, and negative scenes. Memory for the pictures was tested two days later, under drug-free conditions. Half of the sample reported sleep disturbances following the high dose of METH, which affected their memory performance. Therefore, participants were classified as poor sleepers (less than 6 hours; n = 29 or adequate sleepers (6 or more hours; n = 31 prior to analyses. For adequate sleepers, METH (20 mg administered before encoding significantly improved memory accuracy relative to placebo, especially for emotional (positive and negative, compared to neutral, stimuli. For poor sleepers in the encoding group, METH impaired memory. METH did not affect memory in the consolidation group regardless of sleep quality. These results extend previous findings showing that METH can enhance memory for salient emotional stimuli but only if it is present at the time of study, where it can affect both encoding and consolidation. METH does not appear to facilitate consolidation if administered after encoding. The study also demonstrates the important role of sleep in memory studies.

  18. ABO (histo) blood group phenotype development and human reproduction as they relate to ancestral IgM formation: A hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The formation of a histo (blood) group) ABO phenotype and the exclusion of an autoreactive IgM or isoagglutinin activity arise apparently in identical glycosylation of complementary domains on cell surfaces and plasma proteins. The fundamental O-glycan emptiness of the circulating IgM, which during the neonatal amino acid sequencing of the variable regions is exerting germline-specific O-GalNAc glycan-reactive serine/threonine residues that in the plasma of the adult human blood group O individuals apparently remain associated with the open glycosidic sites on the ABOH convertible red cell surface, must raise suggestions on a transient expression of developmental glycans, which have been "lost" over the course of maturation. In fact, while the mammalian non-somatic, embryogenic stem cell (ESC)- germ cell (GC) transformation is characterized by a transient and genetically as-yet-undefined trans-species-functional O-GalNAc glycan expression, in the C57BL/10 mouse such expression was potentially identified in growth-dependent, blood group A-like GalNAc glycan-bearing, ovarian glycolipids complementary with the syngeneic anti-A reactive IgM, which does not appear in early ovariectomized animals. This non-somatically encoded, polyreactive, ancestral IgM molecule has not undergone clonal selection and does primarily not differentiate between self and non-self and might, due to amino acid hydroxyl groups, highly suggest substrate competition with subsequent O-glycosylations in ongoing ESC-GC transformations and affecting GC maturation. However, the membrane-bound somatic N/O-glycotransferases, which initiate, after formation of the zygote, the complex construction of the human ABO phenotypes in the trans cisternae of the Golgi apparatus, are associated and/or completed with soluble enzyme versions exerting identical specificities in plasma and likely competing vice versa by glycosylation of neonatal IgM amino acids, where they suggest to accomplish the clearance of anti

  19. A campaign to convey the scientific consensus about human-caused climate change: rationale, formative research, and campaign overview. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, E.; Leiserowitz, A.; Gould, R.

    2013-12-01

    Large numbers of Americans mistakenly believe that there is disagreement among the experts about the reality of climate change. For example, in our nationally representative survey conducted in April 2013, only 42% of respondents reported 'most scientists think global warming is happening;' conversely, 33% reported 'there is a lot of disagreement among scientists about whether or not global warming is happening,' and an additional 20% responded they 'don't know enough to say.' Our research has also shown that this common misperception is highly consequential: people who misunderstand the scientific consensus are less convinced that climate change is occurring, is human-caused, serious, and solvable; they are also less likely to support societal responses to address the problem. In this paper, we will present the results of a series of randomized controlled message experiments conducted to determine the most effective means of conveying the extent of the scientific consensus about human-caused climate change. The variables tested include quantitative vs. qualitative consensus descriptions, more vs. less precise descriptions, contextualizing metaphors, graphical representations, and explanations regarding why people may have developed a misperception. The findings from this formative research are being used to create a communication campaign that will be launched in fall 2013 by a leading American scientific society prior to the AGU Annual Meeting. A full description of the campaign will be presented.

  20. 3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) induced micronucleus formation and DNA damage in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Evelyn; Kassie, Fekadu; Gminski, Richard; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2004-01-15

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), identified in diesel exhaust and in airborne particulate matter, is a potent mutagen in Salmonella, induces micronuclei formation in mice and in human cells and DNA adducts in rats. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic potency of 3-NBA in human HepG2 cells using the micronucleus (MN) assay and the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). 3-NBA caused a genotoxic effect at concentrations > or =12 nM in both assays. In the micronucleus assay, we found 98.7+/-10.3 MN/1000 BNC at a concentration of 100 nM 3-NBA in comparison to 27.3+/-0.6 MN/1000 BNC with the negative control. At the same concentration, the DNA-migration (SCGE) showed an Olive tail moment (OTM) of 2.7+/-0.45 and %DNA in the tail of 8.28+/-0.76; OTM and %DNA in the tail of cells treated with the negative control were 0.73+/-0.08 and 2.81+/-0.30, respectively. The results are discussed under consideration of former studies.

  1. FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiong; Song, Xu; Wang, Jun; Gu, Jia; Zhang, Weijian; Hu, Jinxia; Zhou, Xiuping; Yu, Rutong

    2015-01-01

    Fyn-related kinase (FRK), a member of Src-related tyrosine kinases, is recently reported to function as a potent tumor suppressor in several cancer types. Our previous study has also shown that FRK over-expression inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. However, the mechanism of FRK effect on glioma cell migration and invasion, a feature of human malignant gliomas, is still not clear. In this study, we found that FRK over-expression increased the protein level of N-cadherin, but not E-cadherin. Meanwhile, FRK over-expression promoted β-catenin translocation to the plasma membrane, where it formed complex with N-cadherin, while decreased β-catenin level in the nuclear fraction. In addition, down-regulation of N-cadherin by siRNA promoted the migration and invasion of glioma U251 and U87 cells and abolished the inhibitory effect of FRK on glioma cell migration and invasion. In summary, these results indicate that FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

  2. GABA and Topiramate Inhibit the Formation of Human Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells by Modulating Cholesterol-Metabolism-Associated Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, acts on GABA receptors to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage functions. The present study examined the effects of GABA and a GABA receptor agonist on modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs. Methods: ORO stain, HPLC, qRT-PCR, Western blot and EMSA were carried out using HMDMs exposed to ox-LDL with or without GABAergic agents as the experimental model. Results: GABA and topiramate reduced the percentage of cholesterol ester in lipid-laden HMDMs by down-regulating SR-A, CD36 and LOX-1 expression and up-regulating ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI expression in lipid-laden HMDMs. The production of TNF-a was decreased in GABA-and topiramate-treated lipid-laden HMDMs, and levels of interleukin (IL-6 did not change. The activation of two signaling pathways, p38MAPK and NF-γB, was repressed by GABA and topiramate in lipid-laden HMDMs. Conclusion: GABA and topiramate inhibit the formation of human macrophage-derived foam cells and may be a possibility for macrophage targeted therapy of atherosclerotic lesions.

  3. Birds of a feather flock together: experience-driven formation of visual object categories in human ventral temporal cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van der Linden

    Full Text Available The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study provides direct evidence on visual object-category formation in the human brain. Although brain imaging has demonstrated object-category specific representations in the occipitotemporal cortex, the crucial question of how the brain acquires this knowledge has remained unresolved. We designed a stimulus set consisting of six highly similar bird types that can hardly be distinguished without training. All bird types were morphed with one another to create different exemplars of each category. After visual training, fMRI showed that responses in the right fusiform gyrus were larger for bird types for which a discrete category-boundary was established as compared with not-trained bird types. Importantly, compared with not-trained bird types, right fusiform responses were smaller for visually similar birds to which subjects were exposed during training but for which no category-boundary was learned. These data provide evidence for experience-induced shaping of occipitotemporal responses that are involved in category learning in the human brain.

  4. BMP4 promotes formation of primitive vascular networks in human embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, N L; Dhara, S K; Rekaya, R; Godbey, E A; Hasneen, K; Rao, R R; West, F D; Gerwe, B A; Stice, S L

    2007-06-01

    The vasculature develops primarily through two processes, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Although much work has been published on angiogenesis, less is known of the mechanisms regulating the de novo formation of the vasculature commonly called vasculogenesis. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have the capability to produce all of the cells of the body and have been used as in vitro models to study the molecular signals controlling differentiation and vessel assembly. One such regulatory molecule is bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4), which is required for mesoderm formation and vascular/hematopoietic specification in several species. However, hESC grown in feeder-free conditions and treated with BMP4 differentiate into a cellular phenotype highly expressing a trophoblast gene profile. Therefore, it is unclear what role, if any, BMP4 plays in regulating vascular development in hESC. Here we show in two National Institutes of Health-registered hESC lines (BG02 and WA09) cultured on a 3D substrate of Matrigel in endothelial cell growth medium-2 that the addition of BMP4 (100 ng/ml) for 3 days significantly increases the formation and outgrowth of a network of cells reminiscent of capillary-like structures formed by mature endothelial cells (P<0.05). Analysis of the expression of 45 genes by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction on a low-density array of the entire culture indicates a rapid and significant downregulation of pluripotent and most ectodermal markers with a general upregulation of endoderm, mesoderm, and endothelial markers. Of the genes assayed, BMPR2 and RUNX1 were differentially affected by exposure to BMP4 in both cell lines. Immunocytochemistry indicates the morphological structures formed were negative for the mature endothelial markers CD31 and CD146 as well as the neural marker SOX2, yet positive for the early vascular markers of endothelium (KDR, NESTIN) and smooth muscle cells (alpha-smooth muscle actin [alpha SMA]). Together, these

  5. Evaluation of Interindividual Human Variation in Bioactivation and DNA Adduct Formation of Estragole in Liver Predicted by Physiologically Based Kinetic/Dynamic and Monte Carlo Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Ans; Paini, Alicia; Spenkelink, Albertus; Scholz, Gabriele; Schilter, Benoit; van Bladeren, Peter J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2016-04-18

    Estragole is a known hepatocarcinogen in rodents at high doses following metabolic conversion to the DNA-reactive metabolite 1'-sulfooxyestragole. The aim of the present study was to model possible levels of DNA adduct formation in (individual) humans upon exposure to estragole. This was done by extending a previously defined PBK model for estragole in humans to include (i) new data on interindividual variation in the kinetics for the major PBK model parameters influencing the formation of 1'-sulfooxyestragole, (ii) an equation describing the relationship between 1'-sulfooxyestragole and DNA adduct formation, (iii) Monte Carlo modeling to simulate interindividual human variation in DNA adduct formation in the population, and (iv) a comparison of the predictions made to human data on DNA adduct formation for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol. Adequate model predictions could be made, with the predicted DNA adduct levels at the estimated daily intake of estragole of 0.01 mg/kg bw ranging between 1.6 and 8.8 adducts in 10(8) nucleotides (nts) (50th and 99th percentiles, respectively). This is somewhat lower than values reported in the literature for the related alkenylbenzene methyleugenol in surgical human liver samples. The predicted levels seem to be below DNA adduct levels that are linked with tumor formation by alkenylbenzenes in rodents, which were estimated to amount to 188-500 adducts per 10(8) nts at the BMD10 values of estragole and methyleugenol. Although this does not seem to point to a significant health concern for human dietary exposure, drawing firm conclusions may have to await further validation of the model's predictions.

  6. Coffee components inhibit amyloid formation of human islet amyloid polypeptide in vitro: possible link between coffee consumption and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Biao; Liu, Xinran; Gong, Hao; Huang, Lianqi; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Xin; Li, Chuanzhou; Yang, Muyang; Ma, Bingjun; Jiao, Lihua; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2011-12-28

    Global epidemic studies have suggested that coffee consumption is reversely correlated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a metabolic disease. The misfolding of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is regarded as one of the causative factors of T2DM. Coffee extracts have three major active components: caffeine, caffeic acid (CA), and chlorogenic acid (CGA). In this study, the effects of these major coffee components, as well as dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA) (a major metabolite of CGA and CA), on the amyloidogenicity of hIAPP were investigated by thioflavin-T based fluorescence emission, transmission electronic microscopy, circular dichroism, light-induced cross-linking, dynamic light scattering, and MTT-based cell viability assays. The results suggest that all components show varied inhibitory effects on the formation of toxic hIAPP amyloids, in which CA shows the highest potency in delaying the conformational transition of the hIAPP molecule with the most prolonged lag time, whereas caffeine shows the lowest potency. At a 5-fold excess molar ratio of compound to hIAPP, all coffee-derived compounds affect the secondary structures of incubated hIAPP as suggested by the circular dichroism spectra and CDPro deconvolution analysis. Further photoinduced cross-linking based oligomerization and dynamic light scattering studies suggested CA and CGA significantly suppressed the formation of hIAPP oligomers, whereas caffeine showed no significant effect on oligomerization. Cell protection effects were also observed for all three compounds, with the protection efficiency being greatest for CA and least for CGA. These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of coffee consumption on T2DM may be partly due to the ability of the major coffee components and metabolites to inhibit the toxic aggregation of hIAPP.

  7. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  8. Analysis of gene selection in reassortant formation between canine rotavirus K9 and human rotaviruses with different antigenic specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, N; Taniguchi, K; Urasawa, T; Urasawa, S

    1993-01-01

    A number of antigenic mosaic reassortants which have neutralization proteins VP4 and VP7 derived from different parental strains were analysed in order to study gene selection in reassortant formation between animal and human rotaviruses (HRV). These reassortants were isolated from mixed infection of MA-104 cells with canine rotavirus strain K9 (subgroup I and G serotype 3) and HRV strains (with subgroup I or II antigen and G serotype 1-4, 9 or 12 antigen), through repeated selections with anti-VP4 and anti-VP7 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies directed specifically at HRV and K9, respectively. By serological and genomic analyses, all the isolated clones were found to be antigenic mosaic reassortants possessing VP4 of K9 and VP7 of HRV. In the reassortants between strain K9 and one of the six strains of subgroup II HRV, a single or a few genotypes with particular constellations of RNA segments were predominant, with only a few RNA segments including gene 4 (encoding VP4) being derived from K9. In contrast, in the reassortants between strain K9 and any one of the subgroup I HRV, more than nine different genotypes were identified and various RNA segments, except for segments 8 and 10, were derived from K9. These findings indicated that the RNA segments of K9 might be reassorted more readily with those of subgroup I HRV than with those of subgroup II HRV, suggesting the possible existence of functional mechanisms which determine the extent of diversity of genome selection depending on the pairs of parent strains in the reassortant formation.

  9. Human aortic fibrolipid lesions. Progenitor lesions for fibrous plaques, exhibiting early formation of the cholesterol-rich core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocan, T. M.; Guyton, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The early development of the lipid-rich core and other features of atherosclerotic fibrous plaques has been elucidated by examining discrete, small regions of raised intima in human aorta, which often bear a resemblance to both fatty streaks and fibrous plaques. Approximately one-fourth of small raised lesions (less than 16 sq mm of surface area) contained little or no stainable lipid, while three-fourths had a characteristic appearance, which included a superficial layer of foam cells, a core of noncrystalline and/or crystalline lipid, and a developed or developing collagenous cap. Total intimal volumes of the lipid-containing lesions, termed "fibrolipid lesions," ranged from 3 to 43 microliters, with the majority less than 16 microliters. Core lipid in the smallest lesions was located in the musculoelastic layer of the intima. In larger lesions the core extended luminally into the elastic hyperplastic layer, and cholesterol crystals were found more frequently. Total cholesterol concentration in fibrolipid lesions was similar to that in fatty streaks; however, the ratio of unesterified to total cholesterol was relatively high, similar to that found in fibrous plaques. It is concluded that 1) the formation of a lipid-rich core and cholesterol crystallization are early events in the development of many raised lesions; 2) the consistent association between the superficial layer of foam cells and the deep-lying lipid-rich core raises the possibility of an influence, possibly indirect, of foam-cell lipid metabolism on core formation; and 3) the fibrolipid lesion may represent one stage in a potential transitional morphologic sequence between fatty streak and fibrous plaque. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:4025509

  10. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) increase human mesangial foam cell formation by increasing Golgi SCAP glycosylation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Zhao, Lei; Chen, Yaxi; Moorhead, John F; Varghese, Zac; Powis, Stephen H; Minogue, Shane; Sun, Zilin; Ruan, Xiong Z

    2011-07-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is one of the causative factors of diabetic nephropathy, which is associated with lipid accumulation in glomeruli. This study was designed to investigate whether N(ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML; a member of the AGEs family) increases lipid accumulation by impairing the function of sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein (SCAP) in human mesangial cells (HMCs). Intracellular cholesterol content was assessed by Oil Red O staining and quantitative assay. The expression of molecules controlling cholesterol homeostasis was examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. The activity of Golgi-processing enzymes was determined using enzyme-based methods, and the translocation of SCAP from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi was detected by confocal microscopy. CML increased cholesterol accumulation in HMCs. Exposure to CML increased expression and abnormal translocation of SCAP from the ER to the Golgi even in the presence of a high concentration of LDL. The increased SCAP translocation carried more SREBP-2 to the Golgi for activation by proteolytic cleavages, enhancing transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylclutaryl-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor. CML increased Golgi mannosidase activity, which may enhance glycosylation of SCAP. This prolonged the half-life and enhanced recycling of SCAP between the ER and the Golgi. The effects of CML were blocked by inhibitors of Golgi mannosidases. AGEs (CML) increased lipid synthesis and uptake, thereby causing foam cell formation via increasing transcription and protein glycosylation of SCAP in HMCs. These data imply that inhibitors of Golgi-processing enzymes might have a potential renoprotective role in prevention of mesangial foam cell formation.

  11. Preliminary observations on polar body extrusion and pronuclear formation in human oocytes using time-lapse video cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, D; Flaherty, S P; Barry, M F; Matthews, C D

    1997-03-01

    In this study, we have used time-lapse video cinematography to study fertilization in 50 human oocytes that had undergone intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Time-lapse recording commenced shortly after ICSI and proceeded for 17-20 h. Oocytes were cultured in an environmental chamber which was maintained under standard culture conditions. Overall, 38 oocytes (76%) were fertilized normally, and the fertilization rate and embryo quality were not significantly different from 487 sibling oocytes cultured in a conventional incubator. Normal fertilization followed a defined course of events, although the timing of these events varied markedly between oocytes. In 35 of the 38 fertilized oocytes (92%), there were circular waves of granulation within the ooplasm which had a periodicity of 20-53 min. The sperm head decondensed during this granulation phase. The second polar body was then extruded, and this was followed by the central formation of the male pronucleus. The female pronucleus formed in the cytoplasm adjacent to the second polar body at the same time as, or slightly after, the male pronucleus, and was subsequently drawn towards the male pronucleus until the two abutted. Both pronuclei then increased in size, the nucleoli moved around within the pronuclei and some nucleoli coalesced. During pronuclear growth, the organelles contracted from the cortex towards the centre of the oocyte, leaving a clear cortical zone. The oocyte decreased in diameter from 112 to 106 microm (P cinematography is an excellent tool for studying fertilization and early embryo development, and have demonstrated that human fertilization comprises numerous complex dynamic events.

  12. The metabolomics of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide in the mouse and its formation by human flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Sarbani; Krausz, Kristopher W; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2007-02-15

    The alkaloid arecoline is a main constituent of areca nuts that are chewed by approximately 600 million persons worldwide. A principal metabolite of arecoline is arecoline 1-oxide whose metabolism has been poorly studied. To redress this, synthetic (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide was administered to mice (20mg/kg p.o.) and a metabolomic study performed on 0-12h urine using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOFMS) with multivariate data analysis. A total of 16 mass/retention time pairs yielded 13 metabolites of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide, most of them novel. Identity of metabolites was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. The principal pathways of metabolism of (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide were mercapturic acid formation, with catabolism to mercaptan and methylmercaptan metabolites, apparent CC double-bond reduction, carboxylic acid reduction to the aldehyde (a novel pathway in mammals), N-oxide reduction, and de-esterification. Relative percentages of metabolites were determined directly from the metabolomic data. Approximately, 50% of the urinary metabolites corresponded to unchanged (+/-)-arecoline 1-oxide, 25% to other N-oxide metabolites, while approximately, 30% corresponded to mercapturic acids or their metabolites. Many metabolites, principally mercapturic acids and their derivatives, were excreted as diastereomers that could be resolved by UPLC-TOFMS. Arecoline was converted to arecoline 1-oxide in vitro by human flavin-containing monooxygenases FMO1 (K(M): 13.6+/-4.9muM; V(MAX): 0.114+/-0.01nmolmin(-1)microg(-1) protein) and FMO3 (K(M): 44.5+/-8.0microM; V(MAX): 0.014+/-0.001nmolmin(-1)microg(-1) protein), but not by FMO5 or any of 11 human cytochromes P450. This report underscores the power of metabolomics in drug metabolite mining.

  13. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n{sub b}) and apparent association constant (K{sub app}) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n{sub b} = 23.7 and log K{sub app} = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe{sup 2+} sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided.

  14. On the formation of lipid droplets in human adipocytes: the organization of the perilipin-vimentin cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Heid

    Full Text Available We report on the heterogeneity and diversity of lipid droplets (LDs in early stages of adipogenesis by elucidating the cell and molecular biology of amphiphilic and cytoskeletal proteins regulating and stabilizing the generation of LDs in human adipose cells. A plethora of distinct and differently sized LDs was detected by a brief application of adipocyte differentiation medium and additional short treatment with oleic acid. Using these cells and highly specific antibodies for LD-binding proteins of the perilipin (PLIN family, we could distinguish between endogenously derived LDs (endogenous LDs positive for perilipin from exogenously induced LDs (exogenous LDs positive for adipophilin, TIP47 and S3-12. Having optimized these stimulation conditions, we used early adipogenic differentiation stages to investigate small-sized LDs and concentrated on LD-protein associations with the intermediate-sized filament (IF vimentin. This IF protein was described earlier to surround lipid globules, showing spherical, cage-like structures. Consequently - by biochemical methods, by immunofluorescence microscopy and by electron- and immunoelectron microscopy - various stages of emerging lipid globules were revealed with perilipin as linking protein between LDs and vimentin. For this LD-PLIN-Vimentin connection, a model is now proposed, suggesting an interaction of proteins via opposed charged amino acid domains respectively. In addition, multiple sheaths of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cisternae surrounding concentrically nascent LDs are shown. Based on our comprehensive localization studies we present and discuss a novel pathway for the LD formation.

  15. Effect of low-energy laser irradiation on colony formation capability in different human tumor cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesini, R.; Dasdia, T.; Melloni, E.; Rocca, E.

    1989-01-01

    Fibroblasts and lymphocytes are the most widely used cells for studying the so-called biostimulative effect of low-power laser in vitro. In contrast, stimulation of cancer cells by laser light has not been investigated extensively. The present study attempted to evaluate whether or not human tumor cells could exhibit an increase in colony-forming capability following low-watt laser irradiation. LoVo and HT29 (colon carcinoma), MCF7 (breast carcinoma), M14 and JR1 (malignant melanoma) cell lines were irradiated at different doses of light delivered from an argon or an argon-dye laser. Radiant exposures between 4.2 and 150 kJ/m2 at irradiances ranging from 35 to 500 W/m2 were delivered. Results were mixed. Of the 41 experiments performed, five showed a significant statistical increase in the number of colonies (P less than 0.05), whereas three showed a decrease (P less than 0.05). Nevertheless, the trend of most data was toward an increase in colony formation, and Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test suggested that light increases tumor cell culture growth (P less than 0.03).

  16. Formation of brushite, monetite and whitlockite during equilibration of human enamel with acid solutions at 37 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellis, R P; Heywood, B R; Wahab, F K

    1997-01-01

    The residues of 5 samples of powdered human enamel, each subjected to 5 sequential equilibrations at 37 degrees C with either 17 or 4 mmol/l phosphoric acid, were examined microscopically. With 17 mmol/l acid, both brushite and monetite were found after 1 equilibration but, after further equilibrations, brushite was no longer present and the abundance of monetite crystals increased. Formation of monetite probably contributed to the lower metastability of this system compared to similar low-pH systems at 25 degrees C, where monetite does not form. Neither brushite nor monetite were present after equilibration with 4 mmol/l acid. Whitlockite was identified by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction in all residues. In the 4 mmol/l systems, the ionic activity product (IMWH) for magnesium whitlockite, Ca9Mg(HPO4)(PO4)6, became constant after 1-3 equilibrations, at a mean value of 3.6 (+/-0.51 SE).10(-105), which may reflect saturation with respect to this solid. For the 17 mmol/l systems, higher values of IMWH, and supersaturation with respect to monetite, were interpreted as evidence for persistent metastability due to slow crystal growth of whitlockite and monetite. It is concluded that neither brushite nor monetite are likely to form within carious lesions, but the results are consistent with the known association of whitlockite with caries.

  17. Formation of post-confluence structure in human parotid gland acinar cells on PLGA through regulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yen-Hui; Huang, Tsung-Wei; Chou, Ya-Shuan; Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Su, Wei-Fang; Lou, Pei-Jen; Young, Tai-Horng

    2012-01-01

    As a potential solution for patients to retrieve their lost salivary gland functions, tissue engineering of an auto-secretory device is profoundly needed. Under serum-free environment, primary human parotid gland acinar (PGAC) cells can be obtained. After reaching confluence, PGAC cells spontaneously form three-dimension (3D) cell aggregations, termed post-confluence structure (PCS), and change their behaviors. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) has been widely used in the field of biomedical applications because of its biodegradable properties for desired functions. Nonetheless, the role of PLGA in facilitating PGAC cells to form PCS has seldom been explored to recover epithelial characteristics. In this study, PGAC cells were found to have a greater tendency to form PCS on PLGA than on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). By tracing cell migration paths and modulating E-cadherin activity with specific inhibitor or antibody, we demonstrated that the static force of homophilic interaction on surfaces of individual cells, but not the dynamics of cell migration, played a more important role in PCS formation. Thus, PLGA was successfully confirmed to support PGAC cells to form more PCS through the effects on enhancing E-cadherin expression, which is associated with FAK/ILK/Snail expression in PGAC cells. This result indicates that selective appropriate biomaterials may be potentially useful in generating 3D PCS on two-dimension (2D) substrate without fabricating a complex 3D scaffold.

  18. Human placentation from nidation to 5 weeks of gestation. Part I: What do we know about formative placental development following implantation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, J L; Carter, Anthony Michael; Chamley, L W

    2012-01-01

    The implantation of the blastocyst and early development of the placenta are crucial for the success of implantation and pregnancy. However, the formative stages of human placental development are largely unknown because of their existence in a 'black box' where access to samples is extremely...

  19. A Story of Large Land Owners and Math Skills: Inequality and Human Capital Formation in the Long-Run Development, 1820-2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baten, J.; Juif, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    We create a new dataset to test the influence of land inequality on long-run human capital formation in a global cross-country study and assess the importance of land inequality relative to income inequality. Our results show that early land inequality has a detrimental influence on math and science

  20. Protection by quercetin and quercetin-rich fruit juice against induction of oxidative DNA damage and formation of BPDE-DNA adducts in human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, L.C.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Boots, A.W.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids are claimed to protect against cardiovascular disease, certain forms of cancer and ageing, possibly by preventing initial DNA damage. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of the flavonoid quercetin against the formation of oxidative DNA damage and bulky DNA adducts in human l

  1. Protection by quercetin and quercetin-rich fruit juice against induction of oxidative DNA damage and formation of BPDE-DNA adducts in human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, L.C.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Boots, A.W.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids are claimed to protect against cardiovascular disease, certain forms of cancer and ageing, possibly by preventing initial DNA damage. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of the flavonoid quercetin against the formation of oxidative DNA damage and bulky DNA adducts in human

  2. Human Capital Formation and Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries. OECD Development Centre Working Paper No. 211 (Formerly Technical Paper No. 211)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Koji

    2003-01-01

    This paper synthesises the existing literature on human capital formation and foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing countries. The aim is to take a bird's eye view of the complex linkages between the activities of multinational enterprises (MNEs) and policies of host developing countries. In doing so, general trends, best practices and…

  3. A Story of Large Land Owners and Math Skills: Inequality and Human Capital Formation in the Long-Run Development, 1820-2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baten, J.; Juif, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    We create a new dataset to test the influence of land inequality on long-run human capital formation in a global cross-country study and assess the importance of land inequality relative to income inequality. Our results show that early land inequality has a detrimental influence on math and science

  4. The ferric yersiniabactin uptake receptor FyuA is required for efficient biofilm formation by urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ferrieres, Lionel; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in patients with indwelling urinary catheters, and bacterial biofilm formation is a major problem in this type of infection. Escherichia coli is responsible for the large majority of UTIs. Free iron is strictly limited in the human urinary...... tract and there is fierce competition between the host and infectious bacteria for this essential metal. Urinary tract infectious E coli have highly efficient mechanisms of iron acquisition, one of which is the yersiniabactin system. The fyuA gene, encoding the yersiniabactin receptor, is one...... of the most upregulated genes in biofilm; it was upregulated 63-fold in the E coli UTI strain VR50. FyuA was found to be highly important for biofilm formation in iron-poor environments such as human urine. Mutants in fyuA show aberrant biofilm formation and the cells become filamentous; a VR50fyuA mutant...

  5. Nitrite reductase activity of rat and human xanthine oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidase: evaluation of their contribution to NO formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Luisa B; Pereira, Vânia; Mira, Lurdes; Moura, José J G

    2015-01-27

    Nitrite is presently considered a NO "storage form" that can be made available, through its one-electron reduction, to maintain NO formation under hypoxia/anoxia. The molybdoenzymes xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase (XO/XD) and aldehyde oxidase (AO) are two of the most promising mammalian nitrite reductases, and in this work, we characterized NO formation by rat and human XO/XD and AO. This is the first characterization of human enzymes, and our results support the employment of rat liver enzymes as suitable models of the human counterparts. A comprehensive kinetic characterization of the effect of pH on XO and AO-catalyzed nitrite reduction showed that the enzyme's specificity constant for nitrite increase 8-fold, while the Km(NO2(-)) decrease 6-fold, when the pH decreases from 7.4 to 6.3. These results demonstrate that the ability of XO/AO to trigger NO formation would be greatly enhanced under the acidic conditions characteristic of ischemia. The dioxygen inhibition was quantified, and the Ki(O2) values found (24.3-48.8 μM) suggest that in vivo NO formation would be fine-tuned by dioxygen availability. The potential in vivo relative physiological relevance of XO/XD/AO-dependent pathways of NO formation was evaluated using HepG2 and HMEC cell lines subjected to hypoxia. NO formation by the cells was found to be pH-, nitrite-, and dioxygen-dependent, and the relative contribution of XO/XD plus AO was found to be as high as 50%. Collectively, our results supported the possibility that XO/XD and AO can contribute to NO generation under hypoxia inside a living human cell. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of XO/AO-catalyzed nitrite reduction was revised.

  6. Exhaled nitric oxide concentration and decompression-induced bubble formation: An index of decompression severity in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, J-M; Buzzacott, P; Nastorg, J; Dinh-Xuan, A T; Lambrechts, K

    2014-05-30

    Previous studies have highlighted a decreased exhaled nitric oxide concentration (FE NO) in divers after hyperbaric exposure in a dry chamber or following a wet dive. The underlying mechanisms of this decrease remain however unknown. The aim of this study was to quantify the separate effects of submersion, hyperbaric hyperoxia exposure and decompression-induced bubble formation on FE NO after a wet dive. Healthy experienced divers (n=31) were assigned to either (i) a group making a scuba-air dive (Air dive), (ii) a group with a shallow oxygen dive protocol (Oxygen dive) or (iii) a group making a deep dive breathing a trimix gas mixture (deep-dive). Bubble signals were graded with the KISS score. Before and after each dive FE NO values were measured using a hand-held electrochemical analyzer. There was no change in post-dive values of FE NO values (expressed in ppb=parts per billion) in the Air dive group (15.1 ± 3.6 ppb vs. 14.3 ± 4.7 ppb, n=9, p=0.32). There was a significant decrease in post-dive values of FE NO in the Oxygen dive group (15.6 ± 6 ppb vs. 11.7 ± 4.7 ppb, n=9, p=0.009). There was an even more pronounced decrease in the deep dive group (16.4 ± 6.6 ppb vs. 9.4 ± 3.5 ppb, n=13, p0 (n=13) and percentage decrease in post-dive FE NO values (r=-0.53, p=0.03). Submersion and hyperbaric hyperoxia exposure cannot account entirely for these results suggesting the possibility that, in combination, one effect magnifies the other. A main finding of the present study is a significant relationship between reduction in exhaled NO concentration and dive-induced bubble formation. We postulate that exhaled NO concentration could be a useful index of decompression severity in healthy human divers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal Structure of Aspirin-Acetylated Human Cyclooxygenase-2: Insight into the Formation of Products with Reversed Stereochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucido, Michael J; Orlando, Benjamin J; Vecchio, Alex J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs target the cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) to block the formation of prostaglandins. Aspirin is unique in that it covalently modifies each enzyme by acetylating Ser-530 within the cyclooxygenase active site. Acetylation of COX-1 leads to complete loss of activity, while acetylation of COX-2 results in the generation of the monooxygenated product 15(R)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15R-HETE). Ser-530 has also been shown to influence the stereochemistry for the addition of oxygen to the prostaglandin product. We determined the crystal structures of S530T murine (mu) COX-2, aspirin-acetylated human (hu) COX-2, and huCOX-2 in complex with salicylate to 1.9, 2.0, and 2.4 Å, respectively. The structures reveal that (1) the acetylated Ser-530 completely blocks access to the hydrophobic groove, (2) the observed binding pose of salicylate is reflective of the enzyme-inhibitor complex prior to acetylation, and (3) the observed Thr-530 rotamer in the S530T muCOX-2 crystal structure does not impede access to the hydrophobic groove. On the basis of these structural observations, along with functional analysis of the S530T/G533V double mutant, we propose a working hypothesis for the generation of 15R-HETE by aspirin-acetylated COX-2. We also observe differential acetylation of COX-2 purified in various detergent systems and nanodiscs, indicating that detergent and lipid binding within the membrane-binding domain of the enzyme alters the rate of the acetylation reaction in vitro.

  8. THE CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF ASPIRIN ACETYLATED HUMAN CYCLOOXYGENASE-2: INSIGHT INTO THE FORMATION OF PRODUCTS WITH REVERSED STEREOCHEMISTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucido, Michael J.; Orlando, Benjamin J.; Vecchio, Alex J.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin and other nonsterroidal anti-inflammatory drugs target the Cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) to block the formation of prostaglandins. Aspirin is unique in that it covalently modifies each enzyme by acetylating Ser-530 within the cyclooxygenase active site. Acetylation of COX-1 leads to complete loss of activity, while acetylation of COX-2 results in the generation of the mono-oxygenated product 15(R)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15R-HETE). Ser-530 has also been shown to influence the stereochemistry for oxygen addition into the prostaglandin product. We determined the crystal structures of S530T murine (mu) COX-2, aspirin-acetylated human (hu) COX-2, and huCOX-2 in complex with salicylate to 1.9Å, 2.0Å, and 2.4Å, respectively. The structures reveal that: 1) the acetylated Ser-530 completely blocks access to the hydrophobic groove; 2) the observed binding pose of salicylate is reflective of the enzyme-inhibitor complex prior to acetylation; and 3) the observed Thr-530 rotamer in the S530T muCOX-2 crystal structure does not impede access to the hydrophobic groove. Based on these structural observations, along with functional analysis of the S530T/G533V double mutant, we propose a working hypothesis for the generation of 15R-HETE by aspirin-acetylated COX-2. We also observe differential acetylation of COX-2 purified in various detergent systems and nanodiscs, indicating that detergent and lipid binding within the membrane-binding domain of the enzyme alters the rate of the acetylation reaction in vitro. PMID:26859324

  9. Phospholipase D is involved in the formation of Golgi associated clathrin coated vesicles in human parotid duct cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Brito de Souza

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D (PLD has been implicated in many cellular functions, such as vesicle trafficking, exocytosis, differentiation, and proliferation. The aim of this study was to characterize the role of PLD in HSY cells, a human cell line originating from the intercalated duct of the parotid gland. As the function and intracellular localization of PLD varies according to cell type, initially, the intracellular localization of PLD1 and PLD2 was determined. By immunofluorescence, PLD1 and PLD2 both showed a punctate cytoplasmic distribution with extensive co-localization with TGN-46. PLD1 was also found in the nucleus, while PLD2 was associated with the plasma membrane. Treatment of cells with the primary alcohol 1-butanol inhibits the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcoline by PLD thereby suppressing phosphatidic acid (PA production. In untreated HSY cells, there was only a slight co-localization of PLD with the clathrin coated vesicles. When HSY cells were incubated with 1-butanol the total number of clathrin coated vesicles increased, especially in the juxtanuclear region and the co-localization of PLD with the clathrin coated vesicles was augmented. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the number of Golgi-associated coated vesicles was greater. Treatment with 1-butanol also affected the Golgi apparatus, increasing the volume of the Golgi saccules. The decrease in PA levels after treatment with 1-butanol likewise resulted in an accumulation of enlarged lysosomes in the perinuclear region. Therefore, in HSY cells PLD appears to be involved in the formation of Golgi associated clathrin coated vesicles as well as in the structural maintenance of the Golgi apparatus.

  10. 人类外显记忆脑机制研究进展%The Neural Mechanisms of Human Explicit Memory Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程灶火; 王力

    2002-01-01

    The fMRI and ERPs have played important role s in understanding neura l mechanisms of human memory. Recent studies have revealed that distinct regions in medial temporal and prefrontal areas exhibit more neural activity during suc cessful than unsuccessful memory formation. The results from different studies s uggest that relational and non-relational memories are mediated by distinct sub- regions in medial temporal and prefrontal cortex and there are extensive interac tions between them in a parallel and bi-directional fashions. Emotionally arousi ng events enhance neural activity in amygdala, which in turn may modulate proces sing in other brain regions responsible for declarative memory formation.

  11. The classical and alternative pathways of complement activation play distinct roles in spontaneous C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2004-01-01

    The contributions of the classical (CP) and alternative (AP) pathways of complement activation to the spontaneous deposition of C3 fragments and the formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC) on human B lymphocytes, were assessed by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with autologous ...... of MAC formation was also found to be highly pathway dependent, with the AP being about 15-fold more efficient at initiating this process than the CP. A model accounting for the effectiveness of the AP in both preserving C3 fragment integrity and initiating MAC is presented....

  12. A physiologically based in silico model for trans-2-hexenal detoxification and DNA adduct formation in human including interindividual variation indicates efficient detoxification and a negligible genotoxicity risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwamoto, R; Spenkelink, A; Rietjens, I M C M; Punt, A

    2013-09-01

    A number of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes are present in food both as natural constituents and as flavouring agents. Their reaction with DNA due to their electrophilic α,β-unsaturated aldehyde moiety may result in genotoxicity as observed in some in vitro models, thereby raising a safety concern. A question that remains is whether in vivo detoxification would be efficient enough to prevent DNA adduct formation and genotoxicity. In this study, a human physiologically based kinetic/dynamic (PBK/D) model of trans-2-hexenal (2-hexenal), a selected model α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, was developed to examine dose-dependent detoxification and DNA adduct formation in humans upon dietary exposure. The kinetic model parameters for detoxification were quantified using relevant pooled human tissue fractions as well as tissue fractions from 11 different individual subjects. In addition, a Monte Carlo simulation was performed so that the impact of interindividual variation in 2-hexenal detoxification on the DNA adduct formation in the population as a whole could be examined. The PBK/D model revealed that DNA adduct formation due to 2-hexenal exposure was 0.039 adducts/10⁸ nucleotides (nt) at the estimated average 2-hexenal dietary intake (0.04 mg 2-hexenal/kg bw) and 0.18 adducts/10⁸ nt at the 95th percentile of the dietary intake (0.178 mg 2-hexenal/kg bw) in the most sensitive people. These levels are three orders of magnitude lower than natural background DNA adduct levels that have been reported in disease-free humans (6.8-110 adducts/10⁸ nt), suggesting that the genotoxicity risk for the human population at realistic dietary daily intakes of 2-hexenal may be negligible.

  13. DNA Adduct Formation from Metabolic 5'-Hydroxylation of the Tobacco-Specific Carcinogen N'-Nitrosonornicotine in Human Enzyme Systems and in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarth, Adam T; Upadhyaya, Pramod; Yang, Jing; Hecht, Stephen S

    2016-03-21

    N'-Nitrosonornicotine (NNN) is carcinogenic in multiple animal models and has been evaluated as a human carcinogen. NNN can be metabolized by cytochrome P450s through two activation pathways: 2'-hydroxylation and 5'-hydroxylation. While most previous studies have focused on 2'-hydroxylation in target tissues of rats, available evidence suggests that 5'-hydroxylation is a major activation pathway in human enzyme systems, in nonhuman primates, and in target tissues of some other rodent carcinogenicity models. In the study reported here, we investigated DNA damage resulting from NNN 5'-hydroxylation by quantifying the adduct 2-(2-(3-pyridyl)-N-pyrrolidinyl)-2'-deoxyinosine (py-py-dI). In rats treated with NNN in the drinking water (7-500 ppm), py-py-dI was the major DNA adduct resulting from 5'-hydroxylation of NNN in vivo. Levels of py-py-dI in the lung and nasal cavity were the highest, consistent with the tissue distribution of CYP2A3. In rats treated with (S)-NNN or (R)-NNN, the ratios of formation of (R)-py-py-dI to (S)-py-py-dI were not the expected mirror image, suggesting that there may be a carrier for one of the unstable intermediates formed upon 5'-hydroxylation of NNN. Rat hepatocytes treated with (S)- or (R)-NNN or (2'S)- or (2'R)-5'-acetoxyNNN exhibited a pattern of adduct formation similar to that of live rats. In vitro studies with human liver S9 fraction or human hepatocytes incubated with NNN (2-500 μM) demonstrated that py-py-dI formation was greater than the formation of pyridyloxobutyl-DNA adducts resulting from 2'-hydroxylation of NNN. (S)-NNN formed more total py-py-dI adducts than (R)-NNN in human liver enzyme systems, which is consistent with the critical role of CYP2A6 in the 5'-hydroxylation of NNN in human liver. The results of this study demonstrate that the major DNA adduct resulting from NNN metabolism by human enzymes is py-py-dI and provide potentially important new insights into the metabolic activation of NNN in rodents and humans.

  14. Platelet-rich plasma improves expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells and retains differentiation capacity and in vivo bone formation in calcium phosphate ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Julia P; Szalay, Krisztian; Geiger, Florian; Kramer, Martin; Richter, Wiltrud; Kasten, Philip

    2006-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) applied to bone substitution materials can improve bone healing. Bone formation in biocomposites is highly dependent on the kind of biomaterial, its pre-treatment and the applied cells. Potentially immunogenic or infectious supplements such as fetal calf serum (FCS) should be avoided in cell expansion media. Therefore, we developed an expansion protocol free of xenogenic supplements. Cells expanded with two different media were tested on distinct biomaterials for their bone formation capacity after ectopic implantation in vivo, as well as for their growth rate and differentiation capacity in vitro. MSC of six donors were expanded with cell expansion medium containing FCS (2%) or platelet-rich plasma (PRP, 3%). Their growth rate and osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation capacity were compared in vitro. For the in vivo bone formation assay, expanded cells (2 x 105 or 2 x 106) were seeded on calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA; n = 12) and on beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP; n = 12) blocks, which had been coated with either fibronectin or human serum. They were then implanted subcutaneously in severe combined immunodeficient mice (SCID), harvested after 8 weeks and analysed by histology. Bone formation was assessed by a semi-quantitative bone score, after toluidine blue and alizarin red staining. Human cells were detected by an in situ hybridisation for human-specific alu sequences. PRP-supplemented expansion medium yielded two-fold higher cell numbers compared to medium with FCS (P = 0.046) after 3 weeks (four passages) and retained a similar capacity to differentiate towards the osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineage. In vivo bone formation was equal for cells expanded with PRP and FCS and depended on the specific surface area of the carrier. CDHA (specific surface area (SSA) 48 m2/g) showed a significantly better bone formation in deep layers (P = 0.005) than beta-TCP (SSA 0.5 m2/g). Fibronectin

  15. Human stem cell osteoblastogenesis mediated by novel glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors induces bone formation and a unique bone turnover biomarker profile in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, Peter S., E-mail: Peter.Gilmour@astrazeneca.com [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); O' Shea, Patrick J.; Fagura, Malbinder [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Pilling, James E. [Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Sanganee, Hitesh [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Wada, Hiroki [R and I IMed, AstraZeneca R and D, Molndal (Sweden); Courtney, Paul F. [DMPK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Kavanagh, Stefan; Hall, Peter A. [Safety Assessment, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Escott, K. Jane [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Wnt activation by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) causes bone anabolism in rodents making GSK-3 a potential therapeutic target for osteoporotic and osteolytic metastatic bone disease. To understand the wnt pathway related to human disease translation, the ability of 3 potent inhibitors of GSK-3 (AZD2858, AR79, AZ13282107) to 1) drive osteoblast differentiation and mineralisation using human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSC) in vitro; and 2) stimulate rat bone formation in vivo was investigated. Bone anabolism/resorption was determined using clinically relevant serum biomarkers as indicators of bone turnover and bone formation assessed in femurs by histopathology and pQCT/μCT imaging. GSK-3 inhibitors caused β-catenin stabilisation in human and rat mesenchymal stem cells, stimulated hADSC commitment towards osteoblasts and osteogenic mineralisation in vitro. AZD2858 produced time-dependent changes in serum bone turnover biomarkers and increased bone mass over 28 days exposure in rats. After 7 days, AZD2858, AR79 or AZ13282107 exposure increased the bone formation biomarker P1NP, and reduced the resorption biomarker TRAcP-5b, indicating increased bone anabolism and reduced resorption in rats. This biomarker profile was differentiated from anabolic agent PTH{sub 1–34} or the anti-resorptive Alendronate-induced changes. Increased bone formation in cortical and cancellous bone as assessed by femur histopathology supported biomarker changes. 14 day AR79 treatment increased bone mineral density and trabecular thickness, and decreased trabecular number and connectivity assessed by pQCT/μCT. GSK-3 inhibition caused hADSC osteoblastogenesis and mineralisation in vitro. Increased femur bone mass associated with changes in bone turnover biomarkers confirmed in vivo bone formation and indicated uncoupling of bone formation and resorption. - Highlights: • Wnt modulation with 3 novel GSK-3 inhibitors alters bone growth. • Human stem cell osteoblastogenesis

  16. Determining How Tertiary Education and Human Capital Formation Influenced Economic Expansion in Israel, Japan, and Norway from 2000-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkbrenner, Erin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have calculated the relationship between human capital development and economic output by various means of econometric modeling and by use of numerous indicators under the context of an assortment of human capital theory. This study was conducted to identify new interpretations of the expansion of human capital in the form of tertiary…

  17. Determining How Tertiary Education and Human Capital Formation Influenced Economic Expansion in Israel, Japan, and Norway from 2000-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkbrenner, Erin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have calculated the relationship between human capital development and economic output by various means of econometric modeling and by use of numerous indicators under the context of an assortment of human capital theory. This study was conducted to identify new interpretations of the expansion of human capital in the form of tertiary…

  18. Study on Cultural Pattern and Human Migration along the Chinese Silk Road (Gansu-Qinghai Stretch): taking the Salar's Ethnic Formation and Development as an Example

    OpenAIRE

    PREVIATO, TOMMASO

    2012-01-01

    The present paper “Study on cultural pattern and human migration along the Chinese Silk Road (Gansu-Qinghai stretch): taking the Salar’s ethnic formation and development as an example” has a rather simple framework which unceasingly oscillates between structural analysis and historical narration. Starting from a cross-cultural perspective, it combines traditional historical insights and postmodern paradigms of conceiving history. It consists on three parts - concept definition, historical ...

  19. DNA damage in human spermatozoa is highly correlated with the efficiency of chromatin remodeling and the formation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Iuliis, Geoffry N; Thomson, Laura K; Mitchell, Lisa A; Finnie, Jane M; Koppers, Adam J; Hedges, Andrew; Nixon, Brett; Aitken, R John

    2009-09-01

    DNA damage in human spermatozoa has been associated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes, including infertility, abortion, and disease in the offspring. We have advanced a two-step hypothesis to explain this damage involving impaired chromatin remodeling during spermiogenesis followed by a free radical attack to induce DNA strand breakage. The objective of the present study was to test this hypothesis by determining whether impaired chromatin protamination is correlated with oxidative base damage and DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa. DNA fragmentation, chromatin protamination, mitochondrial membrane potential, and formation of the oxidative base adduct, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG), were monitored by flow cytometry/fluorescence microscopy. Impairment of DNA protamination during late spermatogenesis was highly correlated (P human spermatozoa. The disruption of chromatin remodeling also was associated with a significant elevation in the levels of 8OHdG (P < 0.001), and the latter was itself highly correlated with DNA fragmentation (P < 0.001). The significance of oxidative stress in 8OHdG formation was demonstrated experimentally using H2O2/Fe2+ and by the correlation observed between this base adduct and superoxide generation (P < 0.001). That 8OHdG formation was inversely associated with mitochondrial membrane potential (P < 0.001) suggested a possible role for these organelles in the creation of oxidative stress. These results clearly highlight the importance of oxidative stress in the induction of sperm DNA damage and carry significant implications for the clinical management of this condition.

  20. Inhibitory effect of parvovirus H—1 on the formation of colonies of human hepatoma cell line in vitro and its tumors in nude mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANSHANGJUN; CHENGWUMA; 等

    1994-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of parvovirus H-1 on the colonyforming ability.in vitro of QGY-7703,a cultured human hepatoma cell line,and on the formation and growth of its tumors in nude mice was studied.With higher multiplicity of infection(MOI) of H-1 given,survival of the QGY-7703 cells was found to be decreased.H-1 DNA amplification level at 30h postinfection(p.i.) was detected to be 7.4 times higher than that at 2h by dispersed cells assay,while the cells were delayed to enter into S phase.Plaques were formed in the indicator cells(new-born human kidney cell line,NBK) by progeny H-1 virus particles released from the infected QGY-7703 cells by infectious cell center assay.The formation of tumors in nude mice by QGY-7703 cells which were injected s c at 2h postinfection was observed to by prevented in 2 proups with given MOI 25 and 50.The tumor growth of MOI 10 group occurred at a lower exponential rate than that of control,after a 20d latent period.It was evident that parvovirus H-1 exhibited a direct inhibitory effect on the formation and growth of human hepatoma cells in vivo as well as in vitro.

  1. Culture supernatants of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 treated with parthenolide inhibit the proliferation, migration, and lumen formation capacity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cai-juan; GUO Su-fen; SHI Tie-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Parthenolide has been tested for anti-tumor activities,such as anti-proliferation and pro-apoptosis in recent studies.However,little is known about its role in the process of tumor angiogenesis.This study aims to investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of parthenolide on the proliferation,migration and lumen formation capacity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells.Methods Different concentrations of parthenolide were applied to the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 cells.After 24-hour incubation,the culture supematants were harvested and used to treat human umbilical vein endothelial cells for 24 hours.Then an inverted fluorescence phase contrast microscope was used to evaluate the human umbilical vein endothelial cells.The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF),interleukin (IL)-8 and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-9 in the culture supernatant of the MDA-MB-231 cells was then measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assays.Results Suppression of proliferation,migration,and the lumen formation capacity of human umbilical vein endothelial cells was observed in the presence of the culture supernatants from the breast cancer cell line treated with different concentrations of parthenolide.Parthenolide decreased the levels of the angiogenic factors MMP-9,VEGF,and IL-8secreted by the MDA-MB-231 cells.Conclusions Parthenolide may suppress angiogenesis through decreasing angiogenic factors secreted by breast cancer cells to interfere with the proliferation,migration and lumen-like structure formation of endothelial cells,thereby inhibiting tumor growth.It is a promising potential anti-angiogenic drug.

  2. Early events in xenograft development from the human embryonic stem cell line HS181--resemblance with an initial multiple epiblast formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertow, Karin; Cedervall, Jessica; Jamil, Seema; Ali, Rouknuddin; Imreh, Marta P; Gulyas, Miklos; Sandstedt, Bengt; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Xenografting is widely used for assessing in vivo pluripotency of human stem cell populations. Here, we report on early to late events in the development of mature experimental teratoma from a well-characterized human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line, HS181. The results show an embryonic process, increasingly chaotic. Active proliferation of the stem cell derived cellular progeny was detected already at day 5, and characterized by the appearance of multiple sites of engraftment, with structures of single or pseudostratified columnar epithelium surrounding small cavities. The striking histological resemblance to developing embryonic ectoderm, and the formation of epiblast-like structures was supported by the expression of the markers OCT4, NANOG, SSEA-4 and KLF4, but a lack of REX1. The early neural marker NESTIN was uniformly expressed, while markers linked to gastrulation, such as BMP-4, NODAL or BRACHYURY were not detected. Thus, observations on day 5 indicated differentiation comparable to the most early transient cell populations in human post implantation development. Confirming and expanding on previous findings from HS181 xenografts, these early events were followed by an increasingly chaotic development, incorporated in the formation of a benign teratoma with complex embryonic components. In the mature HS181 teratomas not all types of organs/tissues were detected, indicating a restricted differentiation, and a lack of adequate spatial developmental cues during the further teratoma formation. Uniquely, a kinetic alignment of rare complex structures was made to human embryos at diagnosed gestation stages, showing minor kinetic deviations between HS181 teratoma and the human counterpart.

  3. Large, stratified, and mechanically functional human cartilage grown in vitro by mesenchymal condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhumiratana, Sarindr; Eton, Ryan E.; Oungoulian, Sevan R.; Wan, Leo Q.; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    The efforts to grow mechanically functional cartilage from human mesenchymal stem cells have not been successful. We report that clinically sized pieces of human cartilage with physiologic stratification and biomechanics can be grown in vitro by recapitulating some aspects of the developmental process of mesenchymal condensation. By exposure to transforming growth factor-β, mesenchymal stem cells were induced to condense into cellular bodies, undergo chondrogenic differentiation, and form cartilagenous tissue, in a process designed to mimic mesenchymal condensation leading into chondrogenesis. We discovered that the condensed mesenchymal cell bodies (CMBs) formed in vitro set an outer boundary after 5 d of culture, as indicated by the expression of mesenchymal condensation genes and deposition of tenascin. Before setting of boundaries, the CMBs could be fused into homogenous cellular aggregates giving rise to well-differentiated and mechanically functional cartilage. We used the mesenchymal condensation and fusion of CMBs to grow centimeter-sized, anatomically shaped pieces of human articular cartilage over 5 wk of culture. For the first time to our knowledge biomechanical properties of cartilage derived from human mesenchymal cells were comparable to native cartilage, with the Young’s modulus of >800 kPa and equilibrium friction coeffcient of CMBs have capability to form mechanically strong cartilage–cartilage interface in an in vitro cartilage defect model. The CMBs, which acted as “lego-like” blocks of neocartilage, were capable of assembling into human cartilage with physiologic-like structure and mechanical properties. PMID:24778247

  4. Lipid droplets formation in human endothelial cells in response to polyunsaturated fatty acids and 1-methyl-nicotinamide (MNA); confocal Raman imaging and fluorescence microscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzner, Katarzyna; Chlopicki, Stefan; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-04-01

    In this work the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in human endothelial cells culture in response to the uptake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was studied. Additionally, an effect of 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA) on the process of LDs formation was investigated. LDs have been previously described structurally and to some degree biochemically, however neither the precise function of LDs nor the factors responsible for LD induction have been clarified. Lipid droplets, sometimes referred in the literature as lipid bodies are organelles known to regulate neutrophil, eosinophil, or tumor cell functions but their presence and function in the endothelium is largely unexplored. 3D linear Raman spectroscopy was used to study LDs formation in vitro in a single endothelial cell. The method provides information about distribution and size of LDs as well as their composition. The incubation of endothelial cells with various PUFAs resulted in formation of LDs. As a complementary method for LDs identification a fluorescence microscopy was applied. Fluorescence measurements confirmed the Raman results suggesting endothelial cells uptake of PUFAs and subsequent LDs formation in the cytoplasm of the endothelium. Furthermore, MNA seem to potentiate intracellular uptake of PUFAs to the endothelium that may bear physiological and pharmacological significance. Confocal Raman imaging of HAoEC cell with LDs.

  5. The role of human cytochrome P450 enzymes in the formation of 2-hydroxymetronidazole: CYP2A6 is the high affinity (low Km) catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Robin E; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Sampson, Mario R; Kearns, Gregory L

    2013-09-01

    Despite metronidazole's widespread clinical use since the 1960s, the specific enzymes involved in its biotransformation have not been previously identified. Hence, in vitro studies were conducted to identify and characterize the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in the formation of the major metabolite, 2-hydroxymetronidazole. Formation of 2-hydroxymetronidazole in human liver microsomes was consistent with biphasic, Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Although several cDNA-expressed P450 enzymes catalyzed 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation at a supratherapeutic concentration of metronidazole (2000 μM), at a "therapeutic concentration" of 100 μM only CYPs 2A6, 3A4, 3A5, and 3A7 catalyzed metronidazole 2-hydroxylation at rates substantially greater than control vector, and CYP2A6 catalyzed 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation at rates 6-fold higher than the next most active enzyme. Kinetic studies with these recombinant enzymes revealed that CYP2A6 has a Km = 289 μM which is comparable to the Km for the high-affinity (low-Km) enzyme in human liver microsomes, whereas the Km values for the CYP3A enzymes corresponded with the low-affinity (high-Km) component. The sample-to-sample variation in 2-hydroxymetronidazole formation correlated significantly with CYP2A6 activity (r ≥ 0.970, P concentrations of 100 and 300 μM. Selective chemical inhibitors of CYP2A6 inhibited metronidazole 2-hydroxylation in a concentration-dependent manner and inhibitory antibodies against CYP2A6 virtually eliminated metronidazole 2-hydroxylation (>99%). Chemical and antibody inhibitors of other P450 enzymes had little or no effect on metronidazole 2-hydroxylation. These results suggest that CYP2A6 is the primary catalyst responsible for the 2-hydroxylation of metronidazole, a reaction that may function as a marker of CYP2A6 activity both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. 21 CFR 201.56 - Requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and biological products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... human prescription drug and biological products. 201.56 Section 201.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... human prescription drug and biological products. (a) General requirements. Prescription drug labeling... requirements in §§ 201.56(d) and 201.57. (1) The following categories of prescription drug products are...

  7. The transcriptional regulatory network of Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 and its interaction with metabolic routes contributing to human body odor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzantny, Helena; Schröder, Jasmin; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Fredrich, Eugenie; Brune, Iris; Tauch, Andreas

    2012-06-15

    Lipophilic corynebacteria are involved in the generation of volatile odorous products in the process of human body odor formation by degrading skin lipids and specific odor precursors. Therefore, these bacteria represent appropriate model systems for the cosmetic industry to examine axillary malodor formation on the molecular level. To understand the transcriptional control of metabolic pathways involved in this process, the transcriptional regulatory network of the lipophilic axilla isolate Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 was reconstructed from the complete genome sequence. This bioinformatic approach detected a gene-regulatory repertoire of 83 candidate proteins, including 56 DNA-binding transcriptional regulators, nine two-component systems, nine sigma factors, and nine regulators with diverse physiological functions. Furthermore, a cross-genome comparison among selected corynebacterial species of the taxonomic cluster 3 revealed a common gene-regulatory repertoire of 44 transcriptional regulators, including the MarR-like regulator Jk0257, which is exclusively encoded in the genomes of this taxonomical subline. The current network reconstruction comprises 48 transcriptional regulators and 674 gene-regulatory interactions that were assigned to five interconnected functional modules. Most genes involved in lipid degradation are under the combined control of the global cAMP-sensing transcriptional regulator GlxR and the LuxR-family regulator RamA, probably reflecting the essential role of lipid degradation in C. jeikeium. This study provides the first genome-scale in silico analysis of the transcriptional regulation of metabolism in a lipophilic bacterium involved in the formation of human body odor.

  8. SU-E-J-93: Development of Pre-Contoured Human Model Library in DICOM-RT Format for the Epidemiological Study of the Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Jung, J [East Carolina Univ, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D beams-eye-view from the conventional simulator. To analyze the outcomes of such treatments for radiation late effects, 3D computational human models are often used in commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, several underlying difficulties such as time-consuming manual delineation procedures of a large number of structures in the model have always limited its applications. Primary objective of this work was to develop a human model library for the epidemiological study by converting 3D-surface model organs to DICOM-RT format (DICOM-RT structure) using an in-house built software. We converted the ICRP reference human models to DICOM-RT models, which can be readily adopted for various dose calculations. Methods: MATLAB based code were utilized to convert the contour drawings extracted in text-format from the 3D graphic-tool, Rhinoceros into DICOM-RT structure format for 50 different organs of each model using a 16GB dual-core processor. The conversion periods were measured for each DICOM-RT models, and the reconstructed structure volumes were validated against the original 3D-surface models in the TPS. Ten reference hybrid whole-body models (8-pediatric and 2-adults) were automatically processed to create DICOM-RT computational human model library. Results: Mean contour conversion period was found to be 580 (N=2) and 394.5 (N=8) seconds for 50 organs in the adult and pediatric models respectively. A good agreement for large organs (NRMSD <1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD <7.7%) was also observed between the original volumes and corresponding DICOM-RT structure volumes of the organs. Conclusion: The ICRP reference human models were converted into DICOM-RT format to support the epidemiological study using a large cohort of conventional radiotherapy patients. Due to its DICOM-compatibility, the library may be implemented to many other different

  9. cAMP/PKA pathway activation in human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro results in robust bone formation in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Martens, Anton; Doorn, Joyce; Leusink, Anouk; Olivo, Cristina; Licht, Ruud; van Rijn, Linda; Gaspar, Claudia; Fodde, Riccardo; Janssen, Frank; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering of large bone defects is approached through implantation of autologous osteogenic cells, generally referred to as multipotent stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Animal-derived MSCs successfully bridge large bone defects, but models for ectopic bone formation as well a

  10. Human RNase P ribonucleoprotein is required for formation of initiation complexes of RNA polymerase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serruya, Raphael; Orlovetskie, Natalie; Reiner, Robert; Dehtiar-Zilber, Yana; Wesolowski, Donna; Altman, Sidney; Jarrous, Nayef

    2015-01-01

    Human RNase P is implicated in transcription of small non-coding RNA genes by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), but the precise role of this ribonucleoprotein therein remains unknown. We here show that targeted destruction of HeLa nuclear RNase P inhibits transcription of 5S rRNA genes in whole cell extracts, if this precedes the stage of initiation complex formation. Biochemical purification analyses further reveal that this ribonucleoprotein is recruited to 5S rRNA genes as a part of proficient initiation complexes and the activity persists at reinitiation. Knockdown of RNase P abolishes the assembly of initiation complexes by preventing the formation of the initiation sub-complex of Pol III. Our results demonstrate that the structural intactness, but not the endoribonucleolytic activity per se, of RNase P is critical for the function of Pol III in cells and in extracts. PMID:25953854

  11. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity.

  12. RNAi mediated acute depletion of Retinoblastoma protein (pRb promotes aneuploidy in human primary cells via micronuclei formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovino Flora

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in chromosome number or structure as well as supernumerary centrosomes and multipolar mitoses are commonly observed in human tumors. Thus, centrosome amplification and mitotic checkpoint dysfunctions are believed possible causes of chromosomal instability. The Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB participates in the regulation of synchrony between DNA synthesis and centrosome duplication and it is involved in transcription regulation of some mitotic genes. Primary human fibroblasts were transfected transiently with short interfering RNA (siRNA specific for human pRb to investigate the effects of pRb acute loss on chromosomal stability. Results Acutely pRb-depleted fibroblasts showed altered expression of genes necessary for cell cycle progression, centrosome homeostasis, kinetochore and mitotic checkpoint proteins. Despite altered expression of genes involved in the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC the checkpoint seemed to function properly in pRb-depleted fibroblasts. In particular AURORA-A and PLK1 overexpression suggested that these two genes might have a role in the observed genomic instability. However, when they were post-transcriptionally silenced in pRb-depleted fibroblasts we did not observe reduction in the number of aneuploid cells. This finding suggests that overexpression of these two genes did not contribute to genomic instability triggered by RB acute loss although it affected cell proliferation. Acutely pRb-depleted human fibroblasts showed the presence of micronuclei containing whole chromosomes besides the presence of supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Conclusion Here we show for the first time that RB acute loss triggers centrosome amplification and aneuploidy in human primary fibroblasts. Altogether, our results suggest that pRb-depleted primary human fibroblasts possess an intact spindle checkpoint and that micronuclei, likely caused by mis-attached kinetochores that in turn trigger

  13. Prolonged in vitro precultivation alleviates post-implantation inflammation and promotes stable subcutaneous cartilage formation in a goat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Dan; Yin, Zongqi; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wenjie; Zhang, Zhiyong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Guangdong

    2016-12-02

    Synthetic biodegradable scaffolds such as polylactic acid coated polyglycolic acid (PLA-PGA) are especially suitable for engineering shaped cartilage such as auricle, but they induce a serious inflammatory reaction particularly in the immunologically aggressive subcutaneous site, leading to resorption of the engineered autologous cartilage. Our previous study in a rabbit model has demonstrated 2 weeks of in vitro precultivation could significantly alleviate the post-implantation inflammation induced by PLA-PGA engineered cartilaginous grafts, but reproduction of this result failed in a preclinical goat model. The aims of the current study were to investigate whether prolonged in vitro precultivation could form a mature cartilaginous graft to resist the acute host response and promote stable subcutaneous cartilage formation in a preclinical goat model. Goat chondrocytes were seeded onto PLA-PGA scaffolds, in vitro precultivated for 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks, and then implanted subcutaneously in autologous goats for 1 and 8 weeks. The in vitro engineered cartilage (vitro-EC) was examined histologically (hematoxylin and eosin, safranin-O, collagen II). The 1 week explants were examined histologically and stained for CD3, CD68, collagen I, and apoptosis. The 8 week explants were evaluated by histology, wet weight, volume, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification and Young's modulus. With prolonged in vitro time, the quality of vitro-EC improved and the amount of scaffold residue decreased; more pronounced cartilage formation with fewer immune cells (CD3 and CD68 positive), apoptotic cells, and less collagen I expression were observed in explants that had been in vitro precultivated for a longer period. The subcutaneously regenerated neocartilage became more mature after prolonged implantation. These results suggested that prolonged in vitro precultivation allowed formation of a mature cartilaginous graft to resist the acute host response and promoted stable subcutaneous

  14. Adenosine contributes to blood flow regulation in the exercising human leg by increasing prostaglandin and nitric oxide formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan; Nyberg, Michael; Thaning, Pia

    2009-01-01

    /min); (2) whether adenosine-induced vasodilation is mediated via formation of prostaglandins and/or NO; and (3) the femoral arterial and venous plasma adenosine concentrations during leg exercise with the microdialysis technique in a total of 24 healthy, male subjects. Inhibition of adenosine receptors......+/-8%, and 66+/-8%, respectively (Pplasma adenosine concentrations were similar at rest and during exercise. These results suggest that adenosine contributes to the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow by stimulating prostaglandin and NO synthesis.......Adenosine can induce vasodilation in skeletal muscle, but to what extent adenosine exerts its effect via formation of other vasodilators and whether there is redundancy between adenosine and other vasodilators remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that adenosine, prostaglandins, and NO act...

  15. Formation of mono(ethylhexyl)phthalate from di(ethylhexyl)phthalate in human plasma stored in PVC bags and its presence in fractionated plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessman, J; Rietz, G

    1978-01-01

    The formation of mono(ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP) from di(ethylhexyl)phthalate in human plasma stored in bags of polyvinylchloride has been studied. Substantial amounts were formed and in ten bags from 4 to 56microgram/ml were found. After 2 weeks at room temperature the concentration of MEHP had increased to values between 27 and 79 microgram/ml. However, MEHP was also disappearing as shown in a recovery experiment. Of the fractionated proteins albumin contained MEHP in amounts from less than 3 to 290 microgram/g.

  16. Pharmacological Inhibition of Protein Kinase G1 Enhances Bone Formation by Human Skeletal Stem Cells Through Activation of RhoA-Akt Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafari, Abbas; Siersbæk, Majken; Chen, Li;

    2015-01-01

    for several malignant and nonmalignant conditions. We screened a library of kinase inhibitors to identify small molecules that enhance bone formation by human skeletal (stromal or mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC). We identified H-8 (known to inhibit protein kinases A, C, and G) as a potent enhancer of ex vivo......Development of novel approaches to enhance bone regeneration is needed for efficient treatment of bone defects. Protein kinases play a key role in regulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways, and pharmacological targeting of protein kinases has led to development of novel treatments...

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced Polarization of Human Macrophage Orchestrates the Formation and Development of Tuberculous Granulomas In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zikun Huang

    Full Text Available The tuberculous granuloma is an elaborately organized structure and one of the main histological hallmarks of tuberculosis. Macrophages, which are important immunologic effector and antigen-presenting cells, are the main cell type found in the tuberculous granuloma and have high plasticity. Macrophage polarization during bacterial infection has been elucidated in numerous recent studies; however, macrophage polarization during tuberculous granuloma formation and development has rarely been reported. It remains to be clarified whether differences in the activation status of macrophages affect granuloma formation. In this study, the variation in macrophage polarization during the formation and development of tuberculous granulomas was investigated in both sections of lung tissues from tuberculosis patients and an in vitro tuberculous granuloma model. The roles of macrophage polarization in this process were also investigated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis infection was found to induce monocyte-derived macrophage polarization. In the in vitro tuberculous granuloma model, macrophage transformation from M1 to M2 was observed over time following M. tuberculosis infection. M2 macrophages were found to predominate in both necrotic and non-necrotic granulomas from tuberculosis patients, while both M1 and M2 polarized macrophages were found in the non-granulomatous lung tissues. Furthermore, it was found that M1 macrophages promote granuloma formation and macrophage bactericidal activity in vitro, while M2 macrophages inhibit these effects. The findings of this study provide insights into the mechanism by which M. tuberculosis circumvents the host immune system as well as a theoretical foundation for the development of novel tuberculosis therapies based on reprogramming macrophage polarization.

  18. Differential Distortion of Purine Substrates by Human and Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Catalyse the Formation of Mononucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnawat, Vishakha; Gogia, Spriha; Balaram, Hemalatha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2015-07-20

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a potential therapeutic target. Compared to structurally homologous human enzymes, it has expanded substrate specificity. In this study, 9-deazapurines are used as in situ probes of the active sites of human and Pf HGPRTs. Through the use of these probes it is found that non-covalent interactions stabilise the pre-transition state of the HGPRT-catalysed reaction. Vibrational spectra reveal that the bound substrates are extensively distorted, the carbonyl bond of nucleobase moiety is weakened and the substrate is destabilised along the reaction coordinate. Raman shifts of the human and Pf enzymes are used to quantify the differing degrees of hydrogen bonding in the homologues. A decreased Raman cross-section in enzyme-bound 9-deazaguanine (9DAG) shows that the phenylalanine residue (Phe186 in human and Phe197 in Pf) of HGPRT stacks with the nucleobase. Differential loss of the Raman cross-section suggests that the active site is more compact in human HGPRT as compared to the Pf enzyme, and is more so in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) complex 9DAG-PRPP-HGPRT than in 9-deazahypoxanthine (9DAH)-PRPP-HGPRT.

  19. Study origin of germ cells and formation of new primary follicles in adult human and rat ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Gupta, Satish K; Virant-Klun, Irma; Upadhyaya, Nirmala B; Copas, Pleas; Van Meter, Stuart E; Svetlikova, Marta; Ayala, Maria E; Dominguez, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The central thesis regarding the human ovaries is that, although primordial germ cells in embryonal ovaries are of extraovarian origin, those generated during the fetal period and in postnatal life are derived from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) bipotent cells. With the assistance of immune system-related cells, secondary germ cells and primitive granulosa cells originate from OSE stem cells in the fetal and adult human gonads. Fetal primary follicles are formed during the second trimester of intrauterine life, prior to the end of immune adaptation, possibly to be recognized as self-structures and renewed later. With the onset of menarche, a periodical oocyte and follicular renewal emerges to replace aging primary follicles and ensure that fresh eggs for healthy babies are always available during the prime reproductive period. The periodical follicular renewal ceases between 35 and 40 yr of age, and the remaining primary follicles are utilized during the premenopausal period until exhausted. However, the persisting oocytes accumulate genetic alterations and may become unsuitable for ovulation and fertilization. The human OSE stem cells preserve the character of embryonic stem cells, and they may produce distinct cell types, including new eggs in vitro, particularly when derived from patients with premature ovarian failure or aging and postmenopausal ovaries. Our observations also indicate that there are substantial differences in follicular renewal between adult human and rat ovaries. As part of this chapter, we present in detail protocols utilized to analyze oogenesis in humans and to study interspecies differences when compared to the ovaries of rat females.

  20. WSS25 inhibits Dicer, downregulating microRNA-210, which targets Ephrin-A3, to suppress human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC-1) tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fei; Qiu, Hong; Zhou, Ling; Shen, Xiaokun; Yang, Liping; Ding, Kan

    2013-05-01

    WSS25 is a sulfated polysaccharide that inhibits angiogenesis. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of angiogenesis by WSS25 is not well understood. Using microRNA (miRNA) microarray analysis, a total of 25 miRNAs were found to be upregulated and 12 (including miR-210) downregulated by WSS25 in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1). Interestingly, Dicer, a key enzyme for miRNA biosynthesis, was downregulated by WSS25 in HMEC-1 cells. Further studies indicated that HMEC-1 cell tube formation and miR-210 expression were suppressed while Ephrin-A3 expression was enhanced by the silencing of Dicer. In contrast, HMEC-1 cell tube formation and miR-210 expression were induced while Ephrin-A3 expression was suppressed by Dicer overexpression. Moreover, miR-210 was downregulated while Ephrin-A3 was upregulated by WSS25 in HMEC-1 cells. HMEC-1 cell migration and tube formation were arrested, while Ephrin-A3 expression was augmented by anti-miR-210. In addition, HMEC-1 cell tube formation was significantly attenuated or augmented when Ephrin-A3 was overexpressed or silenced, respectively. Nevertheless, the tube formation blocked by WSS25 could be partially rescued by manipulation of Dicer, miR-210 and Ephrin-A3. These results suggest a new pathway whereby WSS25 inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of Dicer, leading to downregulation of miR-210 and upregulation of Ephrin-A3.

  1. Strategies for the formation of human resources in the mexican nuclear field; Estrategias para la formacion de recursos humanos en el campo nuclear mexicano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez T, A.M. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Valle G, E. del [ESFM, IPN, Unidad Profesional ' Adolfo LopezMateos' , Av. Politecnico Nacional, 07738 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois L, J.L. [Facultad de Ingenieria, UNAM, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, Jiutepec, 62550 Morelos (Mexico); Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186 Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Mireles G, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, CREN, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico); Croche B, R. [Universidad Veracruzana, FIME-Xalapa Lomas de Estadio s/n, Xalapa, 91090 Veracruz (Mexico); Lartigue G, J. [Facultad de Quimica-D-UNAM Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: amgt@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    This work looks for to put in the discussion table the topic of the formation of human resources highly qualified that doubtless will need the country in the short term, same that will have to begin to be formed from now on to be able to satisfy the demand in the next future. They take like base several studies carried out by the NEA/OECD and the recommendations that have emanated of the same ones for later to make an approach of the current Mexican situation and to conclude with a series of recommendations that have been identified. The recommendations here exposed, they are only the thought of the authors and in no way they are based on an already carried out study. However it will be important to open the debate on the real strategies to have a national nuclear politics based on solid resultant foundations of the production and training of brilliant human resources. (Author)

  2. The interplay of IL-21 and BAFF in the formation and maintenance of human B cell memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi eKarnell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, IL-21 stands out as the most influential cytokine for human B cell activation and differentiation. Indeed, when compared to other important B cell-tropic cytokines such as IL-2, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10, IL-21 is clearly the most potent in terms of its ability to influence humoral immune responses in humans. IL-21 has wide reaching actions in determining how B cells will respond to co-stimulation ranging from induction of cell death upon BCR cross-linking to potent induction of class switch recombination and plasma cell differentiation when CD40 molecules are co-engaged. Another crucial B cell factor, exemplified in recent clinical trials, is BAFF/BLys. BAFF plays a critical role in the survival of human B cells and plasma blasts and influences B cell expansion and migration. Recent evidence has shown that IL-21 and BAFF can work in concert to promote and perhaps maintain humoral immunity in humans. Notably, BAFF has the unique ability to substitute for CD40L activities in regard to IL-21-costimulation and differentiation of a specific B cell subpopulation located in the human splenic marginal zone. However, and perhaps surprisingly, BAFF signals do not have the capability to override IL-21-driven cell death events when BCR is engaged. In stark contrast, anti-CD40 ligation of B cells co-activated with IL-21 and anti-IgM not only reverses this aforementioned activation-induced cell death, but transforms this death signal into one that drives plasma cell differentiation. Here we will discuss these two critical B cell factors, IL-21 and BAFF, and their distinct and complimentary effects on human B cell responses.

  3. Formation of nitrogen-containing metabolites from the main iridoids of Harpagophytum procumbens and H. zeyheri by human intestinal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdikian, B; Guiraud-Dauriac, H; Ollivier, E; N'Guyen, A; Dumenil, G; Balansard, G

    1999-03-01

    The study of the metabolism of iridoid glycosides from Harpagophytum procumbens and Harpagophytum zeyheri by human intestinal bacteria, was realized in order to elucidate compounds responsible for the pharmacological activities of Harpagophytum. Harpagide, harpagoside and 8-O-p-coumaroyl-harpagide were transformed into the pyridine monoterpene alkaloid aucubinine B by human fecal flora and by bacteria isolated from this flora. Aucubinine B was also prepared from harpagide, harpagoside and 8-O-p-coumaroylharpagide, by beta-glucosidase in the presence of NH4+.

  4. Task-Related Edge Density (TED-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Lohmann

    Full Text Available The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED. TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function.

  5. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function.

  6. In vitro bone formation by human marrow cell culture on the surface of zinc-releasing calcium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeuchi, M.; Noshi, T.; Horiuchi, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Sugimura, M. [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Dohi, Y. [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan). Dept. of Public Health; Ohgushi, H. [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedics; Ito, A. [National Inst. for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, MITI, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    We examined the effect of zinc on the osteogenic differentiation of cultured human marrow cells on the surface of zinc-releasing TCP/HAP (Zn-TCP/HAP) ceramics in the shape of a disk. Three ml of human bone marrow harvested from the ilium was cultured in a medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum to reach confluent. After trypsinization, the cells were seeded at 20 x 10{sup 3} cells/16 mm {phi} on Falcon tissue wells with the ceramic disks (TCP/HAP containing 0, 0.32, 0.42, 0.63, 0.88 and 1.26 wt% Zn). After 2 weeks of subculture in the presence of {beta}-glycerophosphate, vitamin C phosphate, and dexamethasone (Dex), the cells were stained for alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The ALP stain was strengthened as zinc content of the disk increased. The data demonstrated that Zn-TCP/HAP influenced cell differentiation in human marrow cell culture and resulted in high osteoblastic activity. Furthermore, ALP activities of the cell layer significantly increased depending on zinc content of the disk in the presence of Dex. These results indicate that the surface of Zn-TCP/HAP stimulates osteogenic differentiation in human cultured marrow cells as well as in rat ones. Thus, Zn-TCP/HAP ceramics are expected to be useful materials for bone reconstructive surgery. (orig.)

  7. 21 CFR 201.57 - Specific requirements on content and format of labeling for human prescription drug and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the human studies. If animal reproduction studies are also available and they fail to demonstrate a.... (2) Pregnancy category B. If animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the...: “Pregnancy Category B. Reproduction studies have been performed in (kind(s) of animal(s)) at doses up to...

  8. Glucuronidation of zearalenone, zeranol and four metabolites in vitro: formation of glucuronides by various microsomes and human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Erika; Hildebrand, Andreas; Mikula, Hannes; Metzler, Manfred

    2010-10-01

    Glucuronidation constitutes an important pathway in the phase II metabolism of the mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) and the growth promotor α-zearalanol (α-ZAL, zeranol), but the enzymology of their formation is yet unknown. In the present study, ZEN, α-ZAL and four of their major phase I metabolites were glucuronidated in vitro using hepatic microsomes from steer, pig, rat and human, intestinal microsomes from humans, and eleven recombinant human UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). After assigning chemical structures to the various glucuronides by using previously published information, the enzymatic activities of the various microsomes and UGT isoforms were determined together with the patterns of glucuronides generated. All six compounds were good substrates for all microsomes studied. With very few exceptions, glucuronidation occurred preferentially at the sterically unhindered phenolic 14-hydroxyl group. UGT1A1, 1A3 and 1A8 had the highest activities and gave rise to the phenolic glucuronide, whereas glucuronidation of the aliphatic hydroxyl group was mostly mediated by UGT2B7 with low activity. Based on these in vitro data, ZEN, α-ZAL and their metabolites must be expected to be readily glucuronidated both in the liver and intestine as well as in other extrahepatic organs of humans and various animal species.

  9. Walking paths to and from a goal differ: on the role of bearing angle in the formation of human locomotion paths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sreenivasa

    Full Text Available The path that humans take while walking to a goal is the result of a cognitive process modulated by the perception of the environment and physiological constraints. The path shape and timing implicitly embeds aspects of the architecture behind this process. Here, locomotion paths were investigated during a simple task of walking to and from a goal, by looking at the evolution of the position of the human on a horizontal (x,y plane. We found that the path while walking to a goal was not the same as that while returning from it. Forward-return paths were systematically separated by 0.5-1.9m, or about 5% of the goal distance. We show that this path separation occurs as a consequence of anticipating the desired body orientation at the goal while keeping the target in view. The magnitude of this separation was strongly influenced by the bearing angle (difference between body orientation and angle to goal and the final orientation imposed at the goal. This phenomenon highlights the impact of a trade-off between a directional perceptual apparatus-eyes in the head on the shoulders-and and physiological limitations, in the formation of human locomotion paths. Our results give an insight into the influence of environmental and perceptual variables on human locomotion and provide a basis for further mathematical study of these mechanisms.

  10. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce oxidative stress and DNA-adduct formation but not DNA-breakage in human lung cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schins Roel PF

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Titanium dioxide (TiO2, also known as titanium (IV oxide or anatase, is the naturally occurring oxide of titanium. It is also one of the most commercially used form. To date, no parameter has been set for the average ambient air concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles (NP by any regulatory agency. Previously conducted studies had established these nanoparticles to be mainly non-cyto- and -genotoxic, although they had been found to generate free radicals both acellularly (specially through photocatalytic activity and intracellularly. The present study determines the role of TiO2-NP (anatase, ∅ in vitro. For comparison, iron containing nanoparticles (hematite, Fe2O3, ∅ 2-NP did not induce DNA-breakage measured by the Comet-assay in both cell types. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was measured acellularly (without any photocatalytic activity as well as intracellularly for both types of particles, however, the iron-containing NP needed special reducing conditions before pronounced radical generation. A high level of DNA adduct formation (8-OHdG was observed in IMR-90 cells exposed to TiO2-NP, but not in cells exposed to hematite NP. Our study demonstrates different modes of action for TiO2- and Fe2O3-NP. Whereas TiO2-NP were able to generate elevated amounts of free radicals, which induced indirect genotoxicity mainly by DNA-adduct formation, Fe2O3-NP were clastogenic (induction of DNA-breakage and required reducing conditions for radical formation.

  11. Introduction of the human pro. cap alpha. 1(I) collagen gene into pro. cap alpha. 1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnieke, A.; Dziadek, M.; Bateman, J.; Mascara, T.; Harbers, K.; Gelinas, R.; Jaenisch, R.

    1987-02-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of pro..cap alpha..2 mRNA are synthesized. The authors have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse pro..cap alpha..1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse pro..cap alpha..2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human ..cap alpha..1 chains and one mouse ..cap alpha..2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both ..cap alpha..1(I) and ..cap alpha..2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the ..cap alpha..(I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse ..cap alpha..1 and ..cap alpha..2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human ..cap alpha.. chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow the authors to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected pro..cap alpha..1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I.

  12. Expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B is not required for pustule formation by Haemophilus ducreyi in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Diane; Luke, Nicole R; Fortney, Kate R; Katz, Barry P; Campagnari, Anthony A; Spinola, Stanley M

    2006-03-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi express two porin proteins, termed OmpP2A and OmpP2B. To test whether expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B was necessary for virulence in humans, eight volunteers were experimentally infected with the parent (35000HP) in one arm and a double OmpP2A OmpP2B mutant (35000HP::P2AB) in the other arm. The pustule formation rates were 58.3% (95% CI, 33.2-83.5%) for the parent and 41.7% (95% CI, 19.3-64.0%) for the mutant (P=0.25). Biopsy of 35000HP and 35000HP::P2AB-infected sites yielded similar amounts of bacteria in quantitative culture. These results indicate that expression of OmpP2A and OmpP2B is not necessary to initiate disease or to progress to pustule formation in humans.

  13. FGF signaling via MAPK is required early and improves Activin A-induced definitive endoderm formation from human embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Lina, E-mail: linasui@vub.ac.be [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Mfopou, Josue K. [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Geens, Mieke; Sermon, Karen [Department of Embryology and Genetics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Bouwens, Luc [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep study the FGF signaling role during DE specification in the context of hESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DE differentiation from hESCs has an early dependence on FGF signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A serum-free DE protocol is developed based on the findings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DE cells showed potential to differentiate into pancreatic progenitor cells. -- Abstract: Considering their unlimited proliferation and pluripotency properties, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) constitute a promising resource applicable for cell replacement therapy. To facilitate this clinical translation, it is critical to study and understand the early stage of hESCs differentiation wherein germ layers are defined. In this study, we examined the role of FGF signaling in Activin A-induced definitive endoderm (DE) differentiation in the absence of supplemented animal serum. We found that activated FGF/MAPK signaling is required at the early time point of Activin A-induced DE formation. In addition, FGF activation increased the number of DE cells compared to Activin A alone. These DE cells could further differentiate into PDX1 and NKX6.1 positive pancreatic progenitors in vitro. We conclude that Activin A combined with FGF/MAPK signaling efficiently induce DE cells in the absence of serum. These findings improve our understanding of human endoderm formation, and constitute a step forward in the generation of clinical grade hESCs progenies for cell therapy.

  14. Mitochondrial protein adducts formation and mitochondrial dysfunction during N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Du, Kuo; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    3′-Hydroxyacetanilide or N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally regarded as a non-hepatotoxic analog of acetaminophen (APAP). Previous studies demonstrated absence of toxicity after AMAP in mice, hamsters, primary mouse hepatocytes and several cell lines. In contrast, experiments with liver slices suggested that it may be toxic to human hepatocytes; however, the mechanism of toxicity is unclear. To explore this, we treated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with AMAP or APAP for up to 48 h and measured several parameters to assess metabolism and injury. Although less toxic than APAP, AMAP dose-dependently triggered cell death in PHH as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Similar to APAP, AMAP also significantly depleted glutathione (GSH) in PHH and caused mitochondrial damage as indicated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) release and the JC-1 assay. However, unlike APAP, AMAP treatment did not cause relevant c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol or phospho-JNK translocation to mitochondria. To compare, AMAP toxicity was assessed in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). No cytotoxicity was observed as indicated by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase release and no PI staining. Furthermore, there was no GSH depletion or mitochondrial dysfunction after AMAP treatment in PMH. Immunoblotting for arylated proteins suggested that AMAP treatment caused extensive mitochondrial protein adducts formation in PHH but not in PMH. In conclusion, AMAP is hepatotoxic in PHH and the mechanism involves formation of mitochondrial protein adducts and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26431796

  15. Fluorescent adduct formation with terbium: a novel strategy for transferrin glycoform identification in human body fluids and carbohydrate-deficient transferrin HPLC method validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorio, Daniela; De Palo, Elio Franco; Bertaso, Anna; Bortolotti, Federica; Tagliaro, Franco

    2017-02-01

    This paper puts forward a new method for the transferrin (Tf) glycoform analysis in body fluids that involves the formation of a transferrin-terbium fluorescent adduct (TfFluo). The key idea is to validate the analytical procedure for carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), a traditional biochemical serum marker to identify chronic alcohol abuse. Terbium added to a human body-fluid sample produced TfFluo. Anion exchange HPLC technique, with fluorescence detection (λ exc 298 nm and λ em 550 nm), permitted clear separation and identification of Tf glycoform peaks without any interfering signals, allowing selective Tf sialoforms analysis in human serum and body fluids (cadaveric blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and dried blood spots) hampered for routine test. Serum samples (n = 78) were analyzed by both traditional absorbance (Abs) and fluorescence (Fl) HPLC methods and CDT% levels demonstrated a significant correlation (p body fluid analysis. Its sensitivity and absence of interferences extend clinical applications being reliable for CDT assay on body fluids usually not suitable for routine test. Graphical Abstract The formation of a transferrin-terbium fluorescent adduct can be used to analyze the transferrin glycoforms. The HPLC method for carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT%) measurement was validated and employed to determine the levels in different body fluids.

  16. IGF-1 Signaling Plays an Important Role in the Formation of Three-Dimensional Laminated Neural Retina and Other Ocular Structures From Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellough, Carla B; Collin, Joseph; Khazim, Mahmoud; White, Kathryn; Sernagor, Evelyne; Steel, David H W; Lako, Majlinda

    2015-08-01

    We and others have previously demonstrated that retinal cells can be derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells under defined culture conditions. While both cell types can give rise to retinal derivatives in the absence of inductive cues, this requires extended culture periods and gives lower overall yield. Further understanding of this innate differentiation ability, the identification of key factors that drive the differentiation process, and the development of clinically compatible culture conditions to reproducibly generate functional neural retina is an important goal for clinical cell based therapies. We now report that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) can orchestrate the formation of three-dimensional ocular-like structures from hESCs which, in addition to retinal pigmented epithelium and neural retina, also contain primitive lens and corneal-like structures. Inhibition of IGF-1 receptor signaling significantly reduces the formation of optic vesicle and optic cups, while exogenous IGF-1 treatment enhances the formation of correctly laminated retinal tissue composed of multiple retinal phenotypes that is reminiscent of the developing vertebrate retina. Most importantly, hESC-derived photoreceptors exhibit advanced maturation features such as the presence of primitive rod- and cone-like photoreceptor inner and outer segments and phototransduction-related functional responses as early as 6.5 weeks of differentiation, making these derivatives promising candidates for cell replacement studies and in vitro disease modeling.

  17. TGF-{beta} signals the formation of a unique NF1/Smad4-dependent transcription repressor-complex in human diploid fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciakova, Katarina, E-mail: katarina.luciakova@savba.sk [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Vlarska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Kollarovic, Gabriel; Kretova, Miroslava; Sabova, Ludmila [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Vlarska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Nelson, B. Dean [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Arrhenius Laboratories, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} TGF-{beta} induces the formation of unique nuclear NF1/Smad4 complexes that repress expression of the ANT-2 gene. {yields} Repression is mediated through an NF1-dependent repressor element in the promoter. {yields} The formation of NF1/Smad4 complexes and the repression of ANT2 are prevented by inhibitors of p38 kinase and TGF-{beta} RI. {yields} NF1/Smad complexes implicate novel role for NF1 and Smad proteins in the regulation of growth. -- Abstract: We earlier reported the formation of a unique nuclear NF1/Smad complex in serum-restricted fibroblasts that acts as an NF1-dependent repressor of the human adenine nucleotide translocase-2 gene (ANT2) [K. Luciakova, G. Kollarovic, P. Barath, B.D. Nelson, Growth-dependent repression of human adenine nucleotide translocator-2 (ANT2) transcription: evidence for the participation of Smad and Sp family proteins in the NF1-dependent repressor complex, Biochem. J. 412 (2008) 123-130]. In the present study, we show that TGF-{beta}, like serum-restriction: (a) induces the formation of NF1/Smad repressor complexes, (b) increases binding of the complexes to the repressor elements (Go elements) in the ANT2 promoter, and (c) inhibits ANT2 expression. Repression of ANT2 by TGF-{beta} is eliminated by mutating the NF1 binding sites in the Go repressor elements. All of the above responses to TGF-{beta} are prevented by inhibitors of TGF-{beta} RI and MAPK p38. These inhibitors also prevent NF1/Smad4 repressor complex formation and repression of ANT2 expression in serum-restricted cells, suggesting that similar signaling pathways are initiated by TGF-{beta} and serum-restriction. The present finding that NF1/Smad4 repressor complexes are formed through TGF-{beta} signaling pathways suggests a new, but much broader, role for these complexes in the initiation or maintenance of the growth-inhibited state.

  18. Human glandular organoid formation in murine engineering chambers after collagenase digestion and flow cytometry isolation of normal human breast tissue single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Cecilia W; Huang, Dexing; Chew, Grace L; Hill, Prue; Vohora, Ambika; Ingman, Wendy V; Glynn, Danielle J; Godde, Nathan; Henderson, Michael A; Thompson, Erik W; Britt, Kara L

    2016-11-01

    Women with high mammographic density (MD) are at increased risk of breast cancer (BC) after adjustment for age and body mass index. We have developed a murine biochamber model in which both high MD (HMD) and low MD (LMD) tissue can be propagated. Here, we tested whether cells isolated by collagenase digestion and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) from normal breast can be reconstituted in our biochamber model, which would allow cell-specific manipulations to be tested. Fresh breast tissue was collected from women (n = 7) undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. The tissue underwent collagenase digestion overnight and, in some cases, additional FACS enrichment to obtain mature epithelial, luminal progenitor, mammary stem, and stromal cells. Cells were then transferred bilaterally into biochambers in SCID mice (n = 5-7) and incubated for 6 weeks, before harvesting for histological analyses, and immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratins (CK), vimentin, Ki-67, murine macrophages, and Cleaved Caspase-3. Biochambers inoculated with single cells after collagenase digestion or with flow cytometry contained glandular structures of human origin (human vimentin-positive), which expressed CK-14 and pan-CK, and were proliferating (Ki-67-positive). Glandular structures from the digested tissues were smaller than those in chambers seeded with finely chopped intact mammary tissue. Mouse macrophage infiltration was higher in the chambers arising from digested tissues. Pooled single cells and FACS fractionated cells were viable in the murine biochambers and formed proliferating glandular organoids of human origin. This is among the first report to demonstrate the success of formed human glandular organoids from isolated primary mammary cells in the murine biochamber model.

  19. 5-Azacytidine Induces Anoikis, Inhibits Mammosphere Formation and Reduces Metalloproteinase 9 Activity in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Wei Chang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells are a subset of cancer cells that initiate the growth of tumors. Low levels of cancer stem cells also exist in established cancer cell lines, and can be enriched in serum-free tumorsphere cultures. Since cancer stem cells have been reported to be resilient to common chemotherapeutic drugs in comparison to regular cancer cells, screening for compounds selectively targeting cancer stem cells may provide an effective therapeutic strategy. We found that 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC selectively induced anoikis of MCF-7 in suspension cultures with an EC50 of 8.014 µM, and effectively inhibited tumorsphere formation, as well as the migration and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9 activity of MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, 5-AzaC and radiation collaboratively inhibited MCF-7 tumorsphere formation at clinically relevant radiation doses. Investigating the underlying mechanism may provide insight into signaling pathways crucial for cancer stem cell survival and pave the way to novel potential therapeutic targets.

  20. Separation of oxalate, formate and glycolate in human body fluid samples by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubáň, Petr; Ďurč, Pavol; Bittová, Miroslava; Foret, František

    2014-01-17

    A new method for rapid determination of toxic metabolites after methanol and ethylene glycol intoxication - oxalate, formate and glycolate in various body fluid samples (blood serum, saliva, urine, exhaled breath condensate) by capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductometric detection was developed. A selective separation of the three target analytes from other constituents present in the analyzed biological matrices was achieved in less than 6min in a fused silica capillary of 25μm I.D. using an electrolyte comprising 50mM l-histidine and 50mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid at pH 6.1. The only sample preparation was dilution with deionized water. The limits of detection were 0.4, 0.6 and 1.3μM and limits of quantitation 1.3, 1.9 and 4.2μM for oxalate, formate and glycolate, respectively. The method provides a simple and rapid diagnostic test in suspected intoxication and is able to distinguish the ingested liquid, based on its metabolite trace. The method presents a fast screening tool that can be applicable in clinical practice.

  1. Anti-adhesion activity of two biosurfactants produced by Bacillus spp. prevents biofilm formation of human bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivardo, F; Turner, R J; Allegrone, G; Ceri, H; Martinotti, M G

    2009-06-01

    In this work, two biosurfactant-producing strains, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis, have been characterized. Both strains were able to grow at high salinity conditions and produce biosurfactants up to 10% NaCl. Both extracted-enriched biosurfactants showed good surface tension reduction of water, from 72 to 26-30 mN/m, low critical micelle concentration, and high resistance to pH and salinity. The potential of the two lipopeptide biosurfactants at inhibiting biofilm adhesion of pathogenic bacteria was demonstrated by using the MBEC device. The two biosurfactants showed interesting specific anti-adhesion activity being able to inhibit selectively biofilm formation of two pathogenic strains. In particular, Escherichia coli CFT073 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 biofilm formation was decreased of 97% and 90%, respectively. The V9T14 biosurfactant active on the Gram-negative strain was ineffective against the Gram-positive and the opposite for the V19T21. This activity was observed either by coating the polystyrene surface or by adding the biosurfactant to the inoculum. Two fractions from each purified biosurfactant, obtained by flash chromatography, fractions (I) and (II), showed that fraction (II), belonging to fengycin-like family, was responsible for the anti-adhesion activity against biofilm of both strains.

  2. Tomographic Evaluation of Reparative Dentin Formation after Direct Pulp Capping with Ca(OH)2, MTA, Biodentine, and Dentin Bonding System in Human Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Alicja; Wilk, Grażyna; Lipski, Mariusz; Kołecki, Janusz; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2015-08-01

    New materials can increase the efficiency of pulp capping through the formation of a complete reparative dentin bridge with no toxic effects. The present study involved tomographic evaluations of reparative dentin bridge formation after direct pulp capping with calcium hydroxide, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France), and Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) in human teeth. Forty-four caries-free, intact, human third molars scheduled for extraction were subjected to mechanical pulp exposure and assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups depending on the pulp capping agent used: calcium hydroxide, MTA, Biodentine, or Single Bond Universal. After 6 weeks, the teeth were extracted and processed for cone-beam computed tomographic imaging and histologic examination. Tomographic data, including the density and volume of formed reparative dentin bridges, were evaluated using a scoring system. The reparative dentin formed in the calcium hydroxide, MTA, and Biodentine groups was significantly superior to that formed in the Single Bond Universal group in terms of thickness and volume. The dentin bridges in the Biodentine group showed the highest average and maximum volumes. The mean density of dentin bridges was the highest in the MTA group and the lowest in the Single Bond Universal group. The volume of reparative dentin bridges formed after direct pulp capping is dependent on the material used. Biodentine and MTA resulted in the formation of bridges with a significantly higher average volume compared with Single Bond Universal, and cone-beam computed tomographic imaging allowed for the identification of the location of dentin bridges. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The American Nurses of the Special Public Health Service and the Formation of Human Resources in Brazilian Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Bárbara Barrionuevo; Freitas, Genival Fernandes de; Fairman, Julie; Mecone, Márcia Cristina da Cruz

    2015-12-01

    Objective To historicize the changes in training human resources in nursing in Brazil during the period from 1942 to 1961 based on the presence of 35 American nurses assigned to work in cooperation with Special Public Health Service. Method The sources used for the study were reports written by American nurses who described their impressions, suggestions, and the activities they carried out in the country. These were analyzed based on the discourse analysis of Michel Foucault. Results The period mentioned was marked by an American presence in nursing projects developed by the Special Public Health Service. The discourses indicated that the period was marked by many changes in Brazilian nursing, particularly with respect to attracting and training human resources for the profession. Conclusion The results indicate that the American nurses, through what they said and their influence, were central to the consolidation of a new paradigm in the training of nursing professionals in Brazil.

  4. Structural analysis of human 2'-O-ribose methyltransferases involved in mRNA cap structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smietanski, Miroslaw; Werner, Maria; Purta, Elzbieta; Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Nowotny, Marcin; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    The 5' cap of human messenger RNA contains 2'-O-methylation of the first and often second transcribed nucleotide that is important for its processing, translation and stability. Human enzymes that methylate these nucleotides, termed CMTr1 and CMTr2, respectively, have recently been identified. However, the structures of these enzymes and their mechanisms of action remain unknown. In the present study, we solve the crystal structures of the active CMTr1 catalytic domain in complex with a methyl group donor and a capped oligoribonucleotide, thereby revealing the mechanism of specific recognition of capped RNA. This mechanism differs significantly from viral enzymes, thus providing a framework for their specific targeting. Based on the crystal structure of CMTr1, a comparative model of the CMTr2 catalytic domain is generated. This model, together with mutational analysis, leads to the identification of residues involved in RNA and methyl group donor binding.

  5. Human aortic fibrolipid lesions. Progenitor lesions for fibrous plaques, exhibiting early formation of the cholesterol-rich core.

    OpenAIRE

    Bocan, T. M.; Guyton, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The early development of the lipid-rich core and other features of atherosclerotic fibrous plaques has been elucidated by examining discrete, small regions of raised intima in human aorta, which often bear a resemblance to both fatty streaks and fibrous plaques. Approximately one-fourth of small raised lesions (less than 16 sq mm of surface area) contained little or no stainable lipid, while three-fourths had a characteristic appearance, which included a superficial layer of foam cells, a cor...

  6. Human aortic fibrolipid lesions. Progenitor lesions for fibrous plaques, exhibiting early formation of the cholesterol-rich core.

    OpenAIRE

    Bocan, T. M.; Guyton, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The early development of the lipid-rich core and other features of atherosclerotic fibrous plaques has been elucidated by examining discrete, small regions of raised intima in human aorta, which often bear a resemblance to both fatty streaks and fibrous plaques. Approximately one-fourth of small raised lesions (less than 16 sq mm of surface area) contained little or no stainable lipid, while three-fourths had a characteristic appearance, which included a superficial layer of foam cells, a cor...

  7. Fluoranthene metabolism: Human and rat liver microsomes display different stereoselective formation of the trans-2,3-dihydrodiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, B.W.; Sahali, Y.; Hutchins, D.A.; Wildschuette, M.P.; Pastorelli, R.; Nguyen, T.T.; Naylor, S.; Skipper, P.L.; Wishnok, J.S.; Tannenbaum, S.R. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    The metabolism of the environmental carcinogen fluoroanthene by human liver microsomes was compared to that by liver microsomes from rats treated with Aroclor 1254. Although the human-derived system gave primarily one product, similar metabolites were noted from each system. Enantiomers of the major metabolic product, in both cases the trans-2,3-dihydrodiol, were separated by chiral stationary-phase chromatography. Absolute configurations were assigned by application of the benzoate exciton chirality rules to the CD spectra of the 4-(dimethylamino)benzoyl esters. Liver microsomes from Aroclor 1254-treated rats produced the R,R enantiomer of the diol in 75-78% enantiomeric excess, while human liver microsomes produced this enantiomer in only 6-12% excess. The activities of these enantiomers were compared in Salmonella typhimurium strain TM677 mutagenicity assays employing the 9000g supernatant of Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver homogenates. Both the syn- and anti-2,3-dihydrodiol 1,10b-epoxides, which had only been inferred to be metabolites in previous studies, were isolated from the microsomal incubations by preparative reverse-phase HPLC. The evident exceptional aqueous stabilities of these diol epoxides were further examined by half-life determination experiments. Their tetrahydrotetrol hydrolysis products were also noted in the metabolite HPLC profiles. The structures of the tetrahydrotetrols were confirmed by total synthesis.

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 Kinase Activity Is Required for the Hyperphosphorylation of Retinoblastoma Protein and Inhibits the Formation of Nuclear Aggresomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prichard, Mark N.; Sztul, Elizabeth; Daily, Shannon L.; Perry, Amie L.; Frederick, Samuel L.; Gill, Rachel B.; Hartline, Caroll B.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Varnum, Susan M.; Smith, Richard D.; Kern, Earl R.

    2008-05-01

    Cells infected with human cytomegalovirus in the absence of UL97 kinase activity produce large nuclear aggregates that sequester considerable quantities of viral proteins. A transient expression assay suggested that pp71 and IE1 were also involved in this process, and this suggestion was significant, since both proteins have been reported to interact with components of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies (ND10) and also interact functionally with retinoblastoma pocket proteins (RB). PML bodies have been linked to the formation of nuclear aggresomes, and colocalization studies suggested that viral proteins were recruited to these structures and that UL97 kinase activity inhibited their formation. Proteins associated with PML bodies were examined by Western blot analysis, and pUL97 appeared to specifically affect the phosphorylation of RB in a kinasedependent manner. Three consensus RB binding motifs were identified in the UL97 kinase, and recombinant viruses were constructed in which each was mutated to assess a potential role in the phosphorylation of RB and the inhibition of nuclear aggresome formation. The mutation of either the conserved LxCxE RB binding moti for the lysine required for kinase activity impaired the ability of the virus to stabilize and phosphorylate RB. We concluded from these studies that both UL97 kinase activity and the LxCxE RB binding motif are required for the phosphorylation and stabilization of RB in infected cells and that this effect can be antagonized by the antiviral drug maribavir. These data also suggest a potential link between RB function and the formation of aggresomes.

  9. The Effects of Topically Applied Glycolic Acid and Salicylic Acid on Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Erythema, DNA Damage and Sunburn Cell Formation in Human Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Wei, Rong-Rong; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Coelho, Sergio G.; Kaidbey, Kays; Barton, Curtis; Takahashi, Kaoruko; Beer, Janusz Z.; Miller, Sharon A.; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2009-01-01

    Background α-Hydroxy acids (αHA) are reported to reduce signs of aging in the skin and are widely used cosmetic ingredients. Several studies suggest that αHA can increase the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet radiation. More recently, β-hydroxy acids (βHA), or combinations of αHA and βHA have also been incorporated into antiaging skin care products. Concerns have also arisen about increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation following use of skin care products containing β-HA. Objective To determine whether topical treatment with glycolic acid, a representative αHA, or with salicylic acid, a βHA, modifies the short-term effects of solar simulated radiation (SSR) in human skin. Methods Fourteen subjects participated in this study. Three of the four test sites on the mid-back of each subject were treated daily Monday - Friday, for a total of 3.5 weeks, with glycolic acid (10%), salicylic acid (2%), or vehicle (control). The fourth site received no treatment. After the last treatment, each site was exposed to SSR, and shave biopsies from all 4 sites were obtained. The endpoints evaluated in this study were erythema (assessed visually and instrumentally), DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Results Treatment with glycolic acid resulted in increased sensitivity of human skin to SSR, measured as an increase in erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Salicylic acid did not produce significant changes in any of these biomarkers. Conclusions Short-term topical application of glycolic acid in a cosmetic formulation increased the sensitivity of human skin to SSR, while a comparable treatment with salicylic acid did not. PMID:19411163

  10. Formation of reactive aldehydes (MDA, HHE, HNE) during the digestion of cod liver oil: comparison of human and porcine in vitro digestion models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullberg, Cecilia; Larsson, Karin; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Comi, Irene; Scheers, Nathalie; Vegarud, Gerd; Undeland, Ingrid

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated lipid oxidation of cod liver oil during gastrointestinal (GI) digestion using two types of in vitro digestion models. In the first type of model, we used human GI juices, while we used digestive enzymes and bile from porcine origin in the second type of model. Human and porcine models were matched with respect to factors important for lipolysis, using a standardized digestion protocol. The digests were analysed for reactive oxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-hexenal (HHE) by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS), and for free fatty acids (FFA) obtained during the digestion by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The formation of the oxidation products MDA, HHE, and HNE was low during the gastric digestion, however, it increased during the duodenal digestion. The formation of the oxidation products reached higher levels when digestive juices of human origin were used (60 μM of MDA, 0.96 μM of HHE, and 1.6 μM of HNE) compared to when using enzymes and bile of porcine origin (9.8, and 0.36 μM of MDA; 0.16, and 0.026 μM of HHE; 0.23, and 0.005 μM of HNE, respectively, in porcine models I and II). In all models, FFA release was only detected during the intestinal step, and reached up to 31% of total fatty acids (FA). The findings in this work may be of importance when designing oxidation oriented lipid digestion studies.

  11. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  12. Vitamin D3 regulates the formation and degradation of gap junctions in androgen-responsive human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kelsey

    Full Text Available 1α-25(OH2 vitamin D3 (1-25D, an active hormonal form of Vitamin D3, is a well-known chemopreventive and pro-differentiating agent. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of several prostate cancer cell lines. Gap junctions, formed of proteins called connexins (Cx, are ensembles of cell-cell channels, which permit the exchange of small growth regulatory molecules between adjoining cells. Cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctional channels is an important homeostatic control mechanism for regulating cell growth and differentiation. We have investigated the effect of 1-25D on the formation and degradation of gap junctions in an androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, which expresses retrovirally-introduced Cx32. Connexin32 is expressed by the luminal and well-differentiated cells of normal prostate and prostate tumors. Our results document that 1-25D enhances the expression of Cx32 and its subsequent assembly into gap junctions. Our results further show that 1-25D prevents androgen-regulated degradation of Cx32, post-translationally, independent of androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling. Finally, our findings document that formation of gap junctions sensitizes Cx32-expressing LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of 1-25D and alters their morphology. These findings suggest that the growth-inhibitory effects of 1-25D in LNCaP cells may be related to its ability to modulate the assembly of Cx32 into gap junctions.

  13. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Inconsistent formation and nonfunction of insulin-positive cells from pancreatic endoderm derived from human embryonic stem cells in athymic nude rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveyenko, Aleksey V; Georgia, Senta; Bhushan, Anil; Butler, Peter C

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem cell therapy has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to restore β-cell mass and function in T1DM. Recently, a group from Novocell (now ViaCyte) reported successful development of glucose-responsive islet-like structures after implantation of pancreatic endoderm (PE) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into immune-deficient mice. Our objective was to determine whether implantation of hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm from Novocell into athymic nude rats results in development of viable glucose-responsive pancreatic endocrine tissue. Athymic nude rats were implanted with PE derived from hESC either via implantation into the epididymal fat pads or by subcutaneous implantation into TheraCyte encapsulation devices for 20 wk. Blood glucose, weight, and human insulin/C-peptide secretion were monitored by weekly blood draws. Graft β-cell function was assessed by a glucose tolerance test, and graft morphology was assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. At 20 wk postimplantation, epididymal fat-implanted PE progressed to develop islet-like structures in 50% of implants, with a mean β-cell fractional area of 0.8 ± 0.3%. Human C-peptide and insulin were detectable, but at very low levels (C-peptide = 50 ± 26 pmol/l and insulin = 15 ± 7 pmol/l); however, there was no increase in human C-peptide/insulin levels after glucose challenge. There was no development of viable pancreatic tissue or meaningful secretory function when human PE was implanted in the TheraCyte encapsulation devices. These data confirm that islet-like structures develop from hESC differentiated to PE by the protocol developed by NovoCell. However, the extent of endocrine cell formation and secretory function is not yet sufficient to be clinically relevant.

  15. Capsid protein VP4 of human rhinovirus induces membrane permeability by the formation of a size-selective multimeric pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Panjwani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran size-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane pore, with a channel size consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family.

  16. Studies on singlet oxygen formation and UVA light-mediated photobleaching of the yellow chromophores in human lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortwerth, Beryl J; Chemoganskiy, Vitaliy; Olesen, P R

    2002-02-01

    The protein-bound chromophores, which increase with aging in the human lens, act as UVA sensitizers, producing almost exclusively singlet oxygen in vitro. Direct irradiation of whole, aged human lenses with high intensity UVA light (200 mW cm(-2) for 24 hr), however, failed to produce singlet oxygen damage, as evidenced by the lack of either His or Trp photodestruction. Total homogenates of human lenses prepared in a cuvette under air did show destruction of His and Trp residues by UVA light, but no destruction was seen when equivalent homogenates were prepared under argon. These data are consistent with the idea that the low oxygen levels in the lens prevent singlet oxygen damage in vivo.UVA irradiation of aged human lenses in culture caused an extensive photobleaching of the yellow chromophores. A time course indicated that the photobleaching increased with time, with significant color loss apparent after 6 hr. Homogenization of the irradiated and dark control lenses in 6 M guanidine-HCl, followed by determination of the difference spectrum, showed approximately 50% bleaching of compounds with a lambda(max) at 355 nm. Similarly, fluorophores with a lambda(max) for excitation of 355 nm and for emission of 420 nm were 50% destroyed by the UVA light. Similar results were obtained in vitro by the anaerobic irradiation of a sonication-solubilized WI fraction from type II brunescent cataracts and from aged human lenses. In this system, there was an initial bleaching of 15% after 30 min of irradiation, followed by a slow increase over the next 6 hr to a final bleaching of 30%. The addition of 1.0 m M ascorbic acid, but not 1.0 m M glutathione (GSH), increased the photobleaching to 60% under argon, and the loss of ascorbate could be detected under these anaerobic conditions. In the presence of air, UVA light produced no photobleaching, but rather caused a three-fold increase in absorbance at 345 nm, which was prevented by the inclusion of 1.0 m M ascorbic acid and almost

  17. Toxin Profile, Biofilm Formation, and Molecular Characterization of Emetic Toxin-Producing Bacillus cereus Group Isolates from Human Stools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Su Kyung; Chang, Hyun-Joo; Choi, Sung-Wook; Ok, Gyeongsik; Lee, Nari

    2015-11-01

    Emetic toxin-producing Bacillus cereus group species are an important problem, because the staple food for Korean is grains such as rice. In this study, we determined the prevalence (24 of 129 isolates) of emetic B. cereus in 36,745 stool samples from sporadic food-poisoning cases in Korea between 2007 and 2008. The toxin gene profile, toxin production, and biofilm-forming ability of the emetic B. cereus isolates were investigated. Repetitive element sequence polymorphism polymerase chain reaction fingerprints (rep-PCR) were also used to assess the intraspecific biodiversity of these isolates. Emetic B. cereus was present in 0.07% of the sporadic food-poisoning cases. The 24 emetic isolates identified all carried the nheABC and entFM genes and produced NHE enterotoxin. However, they did not have hemolysin BL toxin or related genes. A relationship between biofilm formation and toxin production was not observed in this study. The rep-PCR fingerprints of the B. cereus isolates were not influenced by the presence of toxin genes, or biofilm-forming ability. The rep-PCR assay discriminated emetic B. cereus isolates from nonemetic isolates, even if this assay did not perfectly discriminate these isolates. Further study on emetic isolates possessing a high degree of diversity may be necessary to evaluate the performance of the subtyping assay to discriminate emetic and nonemetic B. cereus isolates and could provide a more accurate indication of the risk from B. cereus strains.

  18. Characterization of Mas-7-induced pore formation in SK-N-BE(2)C human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, B C; Lee, I S; Chae, H D; Han, S; Kim, K T

    1998-04-30

    Mastoparan, a peptide toxin from wasp venome, mimics receptors by stimulating the GTPase activity of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and the G-protein-coupled phospholipase C (PLC). By using Mas-7, the active analog of mastoparan, we showed that it makes pores in the plasma membrane. Treatment with Mas-7 but not Mas-17, the inactive analog, produced a concentration-dependent rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and facilitated the uptake of ethidium bromide (EtBr) (314 Da) to a sustained level during the stimulation. In addition, Mas-7 triggered the influx of lucifer yellow (457 Da), while it did not induce the influx of fura-2 (831 Da) and Evans blue (961 Da). However, the Mas-7-induced permeability was selectively prevented by the addition of La3+, Ni2+, and Co2+, but not Cd2+. This blocking activity was concentration-dependent. While the stimulatory effect of Mas-7 on PLC activity was dependent on extracellular Ca2+, the pore forming activity of Mas-7 was not effected by removal of extracellular Ca2+. These results, therefore, suggest that the mastoparan's action in pore formation is independent from its action in PLC stimulation and is negatively effected by inorganic cations.

  19. Superoxide dismutase activity of the naturally occurring human serum albumin-copper complex without hydroxyl radical formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryunosuke; Akiyama, Matofusa; Kawakami, Hiroyoshi; Komatsu, Teruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The superoxide radical anion (O2(.-)) is biologically toxic and contributes to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Here we describe the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of human serum albumin (HSA) complexed with a single Cu(II) ion at the N-terminal end (HSA-Cu complex). The structure of this naturally occurring copper-coordinated blood serum protein has been characterized by several physicochemical measurements. The O2(.-) dismutation ability of the HSA-Cu (1:1) complex is almost the same as that of the well-known SOD mimics, such as Mn(III) -tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium)porphyrin. Interestingly, the HSA-Cu complex does not induce a subsequent Fenton reaction to produce the hydroxyl radical (OH(.)), which is one of the most harmful reactive oxygen species.

  20. Apigenin-induced apoptosis is enhanced by inhibition of autophagy formation in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yujin; Sung, Bokyung; Kang, Yong Jung; Kim, Dong Hwan; Jang, Jung-Yoon; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Minjung; Lim, Hyun Sook; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2014-05-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) is a natural flavonoid, shown to have chemopreventive and/or anticancer properties in a variety of human cancer cells. The involvement of autophagy in apigenin-induced apoptotic cell death of HCT116 human colon cancer cells was investigated. Apigenin induced suppression of cell growth in a concentration-dependent manner in HCT116 cells. Flow cytometric analyses indicated that apigenin resulted in G2/M phase arrest. This flavone also suppressed the expression of both cyclin B1 and its activating partners, Cdc2 and Cdc25c, whereas the expression of cell cycle inhibitors, such as p53 and p53-dependent p21(CIP1/WAF1), was increased after apigenin treatment. Apigenin induced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and decreased the levels of procaspase-8, -9 and -3. In addition, the apigenin-treated cells exhibited autophagy, as characterized by the appearance of autophagosomes under fluorescence microscopy and the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the results of the western blot analysis revealed that the levels of LC3-II, the processed form of LC3-I, was increased by apigenin. Treatment with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) significantly enhanced the apoptosis induced by apigenin, which was accompanied by an increase in the levels of PARP cleavage. These results indicate that apigenin has apoptosis- and autophagy-inducing effects in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Autophagy plays a cytoprotective role in apigenin-induced apoptosis, and the combination of apigenin and an autophagy inhibitor may be a promising strategy for colon cancer control.

  1. Structural Basis for Fc[gamma]RIIa Recognition of Human IgG and Formation of Inflammatory Signaling Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsland, Paul A.; Farrugia, William; Bradford, Tessa M.; Sardjono, Caroline Tan; Esparon, Sandra; Trist, Halina M.; Powell, Maree S.; Tan, Peck Szee; Cendron, Angela C.; Wines, Bruce D.; Scott, Andrew M.; Hogarth, P. Mark (Burnet); (Monash); (LICR); (Melbourne)

    2011-09-20

    The interaction of Abs with their specific FcRs is of primary importance in host immune effector systems involved in infection and inflammation, and are the target for immune evasion by pathogens. Fc{gamma}RIIa is a unique and the most widespread activating FcR in humans that through avid binding of immune complexes potently triggers inflammation. Polymorphisms of Fc{gamma}RIIa (high responder/low responder [HR/LR]) are linked to susceptibility to infections, autoimmune diseases, and the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. In this article, we define the three-dimensional structure of the complex between the HR (arginine, R134) allele of Fc{gamma}RIIa (Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR) and the Fc region of a humanized IgG1 Ab, hu3S193. The structure suggests how the HR/LR polymorphism may influence Fc{gamma}RIIa interactions with different IgG subclasses and glycoforms. In addition, mutagenesis defined the basis of the epitopes detected by FcR blocking mAbs specific for Fc{gamma}RIIa (IV.3), Fc{gamma}RIIb (X63-21), and a pan Fc{gamma}RII Ab (8.7). The epitopes detected by these Abs are distinct, but all overlap with residues defined by crystallography to contact IgG. Finally, crystal structures of LR (histidine, H134) allele of Fc{gamma}RIIa and Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR reveal two distinct receptor dimers that may represent quaternary states on the cell surface. A model is presented whereby a dimer of Fc{gamma}RIIa-HR binds Ag-Ab complexes in an arrangement that possibly occurs on the cell membrane as part of a larger signaling assembly.

  2. Development of a valve-based cell printer for the formation of human embryonic stem cell spheroid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner-Jones, Alan; Greenhough, Sebastian; King, Jason A; Gardner, John; Courtney, Aidan; Shu, Wenmiao

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, the use of a simple inkjet technology for cell printing has triggered tremendous interest and established the field of biofabrication. A key challenge has been the development of printing processes which are both controllable and less harmful, in order to preserve cell and tissue viability and functions. Here, we report on the development of a valve-based cell printer that has been validated to print highly viable cells in programmable patterns from two different bio-inks with independent control of the volume of each droplet (with a lower limit of 2 nL or fewer than five cells per droplet). Human ESCs were used to make spheroids by overprinting two opposing gradients of bio-ink; one of hESCs in medium and the other of medium alone. The resulting array of uniform sized droplets with a gradient of cell concentrations was inverted to allow cells to aggregate and form spheroids via gravity. The resulting aggregates have controllable and repeatable sizes, and consequently they can be made to order for specific applications. Spheroids with between 5 and 140 dissociated cells resulted in spheroids of 0.25-0.6 mm diameter. This work demonstrates that the valve-based printing process is gentle enough to maintain stem cell viability, accurate enough to produce spheroids of uniform size, and that printed cells maintain their pluripotency. This study includes the first analysis of the response of human embryonic stem cells to the printing process using this valve-based printing setup.

  3. Interaction with the 5D3 monoclonal antibody is regulated by intramolecular rearrangements but not by covalent dimer formation of the human ABCG2 multidrug transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Laczkó, Rozália; Hegedűs, Csilla;

    2008-01-01

    Human ABCG2 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein working as a homodimer or homo-oligomer. The protein plays an important role in the protection/detoxification of various tissues and may also be responsible for the multidrug-resistant phenotype of cancer cells. In our previous study we found that the 5......D3 monoclonal antibody shows a function-dependent reactivity to an extracellular epitope of the ABCG2 transporter. In the current experiments we have further characterized the 5D3-ABCG2 interaction. The effect of chemical cross-linking and the modulation of extracellular S-S bridges...... on the transporter function and 5D3 reactivity of ABCG2 were investigated in depth. We found that several protein cross-linkers greatly increased 5D3 labeling in ABCG2 expressing HEK cells; however, there was no correlation between covalent dimer formation, the inhibition of transport activity, and the increase in 5...

  4. Surface modification of nano-silica on the ligament advanced reinforcement system for accelerated bone formation: primary human osteoblasts testing in vitro and animal testing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Jia; Sun, Jiashu; Li, Yuzhuo; Huang, Deyong; Long, Yun-Ze; Zheng, Wenfu; Chen, Shiyi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-05-07

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ∼21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction.

  5. Importance of Highly Conserved Peptide Sites of Human Cytomegalovirus gO for Formation of the gH/gL/gO Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Cora; Abdellatif, Mohamed E A; Laib Sampaio, Kerstin; Walther, Paul; Sinzger, Christian

    2017-01-01

    The glycoprotein O (gO) is betaherpesvirus specific. Together with the viral glycoproteins H and L, gO forms a covalent trimeric complex that is part of the viral envelope. This trimer is crucial for cell-free infectivity of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) but dispensable for cell-associated spread. We hypothesized that the amino acids that are conserved among gOs of different cytomegaloviruses are important for the formation of the trimeric complex and hence for efficient virus spread. In a mutational approach, nine peptide sites, containing all 13 highly conserved amino acids, were analyzed in the context of HCMV strain TB40-BAC4 with regard to infection efficiency and formation of the gH/gL/gO complex. Mutation of amino acids (aa) 181 to 186 or aa 193 to 198 resulted in the loss of the trimer and a complete small-plaque phenotype, whereas mutation of aa 108 or aa 249 to 254 caused an intermediate phenotype. While individual mutations of the five conserved cysteines had little impact, their relevance was revealed in a combined mutation, which abrogated both complex formation and cell-free infectivity. C343 was unique, as it was sufficient and necessary for covalent binding of gO to gH/gL. Remarkably, however, C218 together with C167 rescued infectivity in the absence of detectable covalent complex formation. We conclude that all highly conserved amino acids contribute to the function of gO to some extent but that aa 181 to 198 and cysteines 343, 218, and 167 are particularly relevant. Surprisingly, covalent binding of gO to gH/gL is required neither for its incorporation into virions nor for proper function in cell-free infection. Like all herpesviruses, the widespread human pathogen HCMV depends on glycoproteins gB, gH, and gL for entry into target cells. Additionally, gH and gL have to bind gO in a trimeric complex for efficient cell-free infection. Homologs of gO are shared by all cytomegaloviruses, with 13 amino acids being highly conserved. In a mutational

  6. TGFbeta-mediated formation of pRb-E2F complexes in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Tang

    2008-05-01

    TGFbeta is well known for its inhibitory effect on cell cycle G1 checkpoint kinases. However, its role in the control of pRb-E2F complexes is not well established. TGFbeta inhibits phosphorylation of pRb at several serine and threonine residues and regulates the association of E2F transcription factors with pRb family proteins. Recent studies found that predominantly E2F-4, p130, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) are found to bind to corresponding E2F-responsive promoters in G0/G1 phase. As cells progress through mid-G1, p130-E2F4 complex are replaced by p107-E2F4 followed by activators E2F1, 2, and 3. pRb was not detectable in the promoters containing the E2F-responsive site in cycling cells but was associated with E2F4-p130 complexes or E2F4-p107 complexes during G0/G1 phase. In human myeloid leukemia cell line, MV4-11, TGFbeta upregulated pRb-E2F-4 and p130-E2F-4, and downregulated p107-E2F-4 complexes. However, pRB-E2F1 and pRb-E2F3 complexes were found in proliferating cells but not in TGFbeta arrested G1 cells. In addition, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay (EMSA) could not detect pRb-E2F DNA-binding activities either in S or G1 phase but exhibited the existence of p107-E2F4 in proliferating cells and p130-E2F4 complexes in TGFbeta-arrested G1 cells, respectively. Our data suggest that p107 and p130, but not pRb, and the repressor E2F, but not activator E2Fs, play a critical role in regulating E2F-responsive gene expression in TGFbeta-mediated cell cycle control in human myeloid leukemia cells.

  7. Small molecule adduct formation with the components of the mobile phase as a way to analyse valproic acid in human serum with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadosz, Marek; Klintschar, Michael; Teske, Jörg

    2014-05-15

    A valproic acid (VPA) LC-MS/MS analytical method using analyte adduct formation was developed and validated in human serum. The fragmentation of the sodium acetate adduct (mass transition: 225/143) and acetic acid adduct (mass transition: 203/143) were used as the target and qualifier mass transition, respectively. A Luna 5 μm C18 (2) 100 A, 150 mm×2 mm analytical column and a mobile phase consisting of A (H2O/methanol=95/5, v/v) and B (H2O/methanol=3/97, v/v), both with 10mM ammonium acetate and 0.1% acetic acid (pH=3.2) were used. A binary flow pumping mode with a total flow rate of 0.4 mL/min was applied. Protein precipitation with 1 mL of the mobile phase B was used as sample preparation. The calculated limit of detection/quantification was 0.45/1.0 μg/mL and the inter-/intra-day precision was adduct formation reproducibility. The strategy applied made the VPA LC-MS/MS analysis in human serum on the basis of two mass transitions possible. Therefore, it is an interesting alternative for the VPA pseudo multiple reaction monitoring methods (mass transition 143/143) and a proof that the developed strategy is also useful for the analysis of compounds which do not produce any stable ion fragments detectable by tandem mass spectrometry.

  8. Effect of the Mode of Application of Cryopreserved Human Amniotic Membrane on Adhesion Formation after Abdomino-Pelvic Surgery in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, Joseph; Abbasi, Sehrish A; Kechli, Mohamad Karim; Boutary, Suzan S; Ghulmiyyah, Labib; Khalifeh, Ibrahim; Abou Ghaddara, Hussein; Nassar, Anwar H

    2016-01-01

    Adhesions after abdomino-pelvic surgery are a cause of morbidity and reoperations. The use of human amniotic membrane (HAM) for adhesion prevention has given controversial results. The mode of administration of the amniotic membrane has not been well studied. This study assessed the efficacy of two modes of application of cryopreserved HAM, patch or fragmented in Lactated Ringer (LR) solution, for the prevention of pelvic adhesion formation postabdomino-pelvic surgery in a mice model. After a midline laparotomy incision, a small cautery lesion was done on each side of the abdominal wall peritoneum in mice. In Group A (control; n = 42), the abdomen was closed directly, Group B (n = 42) received 2.5 ml of LR prior to closure. In Groups C (n = 42) and D (n = 42), a 2 cm × 2 cm patch of HAM and another one fragmented and dispersed in 2.5 ml of LR were applied prior to closure, respectively. Two weeks later, a laparotomy was performed, and gross and pathological evaluation of adhesions, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and inflammation were conducted. Group D exhibited a significantly lower rate of gross adhesion formation. Fibrosis was significantly lowest in Group C as compared to the control. Group B had the lowest vascular formation in the adhesions. The use of HAM fragmented in LR solution is associated with a significantly lower incidence of postoperative adhesions in mice when compared to LR alone, HAM patch, or control. The mechanism of action of this reduction needs to be elucidated by future studies.

  9. Recognition of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells is mediated by dectin-2 and results in formation of extracellular traps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio V Loures

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs were initially considered as critical for innate immunity to viruses. However, our group has shown that pDCs bind to and inhibit the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae and that depletion of pDCs renders mice hypersusceptible to experimental aspergillosis. In this study, we examined pDC receptors contributing to hyphal recognition and downstream events in pDCs stimulated by A. fumigatus hyphae. Our data show that Dectin-2, but not Dectin-1, participates in A. fumigatus hyphal recognition, TNF-α and IFN-α release, and antifungal activity. Moreover, Dectin-2 acts in cooperation with the FcRγ chain to trigger signaling responses. In addition, using confocal and electron microscopy we demonstrated that the interaction between pDCs and A. fumigatus induced the formation of pDC extracellular traps (pETs containing DNA and citrullinated histone H3. These structures closely resembled those of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. The microarray analysis of the pDC transcriptome upon A. fumigatus infection also demonstrated up-regulated expression of genes associated with apoptosis as well as type I interferon-induced genes. Thus, human pDCs directly recognize A. fumigatus hyphae via Dectin-2; this interaction results in cytokine release and antifungal activity. Moreover, hyphal stimulation of pDCs triggers a distinct pattern of pDC gene expression and leads to pET formation.

  10. Effect of temperature on the formation and inactivation of syringomycin E pores in human red blood cells and bimolecular lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, G; Kaulin, Y A; Schagina, L V; Takemoto, J Y; Blasko, K

    2000-06-01

    The effects of temperature on the formation and inactivation of syringomycin E (SRE) pores were investigated with human red blood cells (RBCs) and lipid bilayer membranes (BLMs). SRE enhanced the RBC membrane permeability of 86Rb and monomeric hemoglobin in a temperature dependent manner. The kinetics of 86Rb and hemoglobin effluxes were measured at different temperatures and pore formation was found to be only slightly affected, while inactivation was strongly influenced by temperature. At 37 degrees C, SRE pore inactivation began 15 min after and at 20 degrees C, 40 min after SRE addition. At 6 degrees C, below the phase transition temperature of the major lipid components of the RBC membrane, no inactivation occurred for as long as 90 min. With BLMs, SRE induced a large current that remained stable at 14 degrees C, but at 23 degrees C it decreased over time while the single channel conductance and dwell time did not change. The results show that the temperature dependent inactivation of SRE pores is due to a decrease in the number of open pores.

  11. Pipette-based Method to Study Embryoid Body Formation Derived from Mouse and Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Partially Recapitulating Early Embryonic Development Under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Brungs, Sonja; Hescheler, Jürgen; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2016-06-01

    The in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells partially recapitulates early in vivo embryonic development. More recently, embryonic development under the influence of microgravity has become a primary focus of space life sciences. In order to integrate the technique of pluripotent stem cell differentiation with simulated microgravity approaches, the 2-D clinostat compatible pipette-based method was experimentally investigated and adapted for investigating stem cell differentiation processes under simulated microgravity conditions. In order to keep residual accelerations as low as possible during clinorotation, while also guaranteeing enough material for further analysis, stem cells were exposed in 1-mL pipettes with a diameter of 3.5 mm. The differentiation of mouse and human pluripotent stem cells inside the pipettes resulted in the formation of embryoid bodies at normal gravity (1 g) after 24 h and 3 days. Differentiation of the mouse pluripotent stem cells on a 2-D pipette-clinostat for 3 days also resulted in the formation of embryoid bodies. Interestingly, the expression of myosin heavy chain was downregulated when cultivation was continued for an additional 7 days at normal gravity. This paper describes the techniques for culturing and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells and exposure to simulated microgravity during culturing or differentiation on a 2-D pipette clinostat. The implementation of these methodologies along with -omics technologies will contribute to understand the mechanisms regulating how microgravity influences early embryonic development.

  12. Development of glass-ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: characterisation, proliferation of human osteoblasts and nodule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale-Brovarone, C; Verné, E; Robiglio, L; Appendino, P; Bassi, F; Martinasso, G; Muzio, G; Canuto, R

    2007-03-01

    Glass-ceramic macroporous scaffolds for tissue engineering have been developed using a polyurethane sponge template and bioactive glass powders. The starting glass (CEL2) belongs to the system SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-CaO-MgO-Na(2)O-K(2)O and has been synthesised by a conventional melting-quenching route. A slurry of CEL2 powder, polyvinyl alcohol and water has been prepared in order to coat, by impregnation, the polymeric template. An optimised thermal treatment was then use to remove the sponge and to sinter the glass powders, leading to a glass-ceramic replica of the template. Morphological observations, image analyses, mechanical tests and in vitro tests showed that the obtained devices are good candidates as scaffolds for bone-tissue engineering, in terms of pore-size distribution, pore interconnection, surface roughness, and both bioactivity and biocompatibility. In particular, a human osteoblast cell line (MG-63) seeded onto the scaffold after a standardised preconditioning route in simulated body fluid showed a high degree of cell proliferation and a good ability to produce calcium nodules. The obtained results were enhanced by the addition of bone morphogenetic proteins after cell seeding.

  13. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. (Wyeth); (MBL)

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  14. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  15. The Impact of Environmental Design on Doffing Personal Protective Equipment in a Healthcare Environment: A Formative Human Factors Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihey, Tracey A; Gelmi, Stefano; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Hall, Trevor N T

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the impact of environmental design on doffing personal protective equipment in a simulated healthcare environment. METHODS A mixed-methods approach was used that included human-factors usability testing and qualitative questionnaire responses. A patient room and connecting anteroom were constructed for testing purposes. This experimental doffing area was designed to overcome the environmental failures identified in a previous study and was not constructed based on any generalizable hospital standard. RESULTS In total, 72 healthcare workers from Ontario, Canada, took part in the study and tested the simulated doffing area. The following environmental design changes were tested and were deemed effective: increasing prominence of color-coded zones; securing disinfectant wipes and hand sanitizer; outlining disposal bins locations; providing mirrors to detect possible contamination; providing hand rails to assist with doffing; and restricting the space to doff. Further experimentation and iterative design are required with regard to several important features: positioning the disposal bins for safety, decreasing the risk of contamination and user accessibility; optimal positioning of mirrors for safety; communication within the team; and positioning the secondary team member for optimal awareness. Additional design suggestions also emerged during this study, and they require future investigation. CONCLUSIONS This study highlights the importance of the environment on doffing personal protective equipment in a healthcare setting. Iterative testing and modification of the design of the environment (doffing area) are important to enhancing healthcare worker safety. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:712-717.

  16. Human Regulatory Protein Ki-1/57 Is a Target of SUMOylation and Affects PML Nuclear Body Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ângela; Souza, Edmarcia E; Costa, Fernanda C; Meirelles, Gabriela V; Gonçalves, Kaliandra A; Santos, Marcos T; Bressan, Gustavo C; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Whelan, Stephen A; Kobarg, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    Ki-1/57 is a nuclear and cytoplasmic regulatory protein first identified in malignant cells from Hodgkin's lymphoma. It is involved in gene expression regulation on both transcriptional and mRNA metabolism levels. Ki-1/57 belongs to the family of intrinsically unstructured proteins and undergoes phosphorylation by PKC and methylation by PRMT1. Previous characterization of its protein interaction profile by yeast two-hybrid screening showed that Ki-1/57 interacts with proteins of the SUMOylation machinery, the SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme UBC9 and the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS3, which suggested that Ki-1/57 could be involved with this process. Here we identified seven potential SUMO target sites (lysine residues) on Ki-1/57 sequence and observed that Ki-1/57 is modified by SUMO proteins in vitro and in vivo. We showed that SUMOylation of Ki-1/57 occurred on lysines 213, 276, and 336. In transfected cells expressing FLAG-Ki-1/57 wild-type, its paralog FLAG-CGI-55 wild-type, or their non-SUMOylated triple mutants, the number of PML-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) is reduced compared with the control cells not expressing the constructs. More interestingly, after treating cells with arsenic trioxide (As2O3), the number of PML-NBs is no longer reduced when the non-SUMOylated triple mutant Ki-1/57 is expressed, suggesting that the SUMOylation of Ki-1/57 has a role in the control of As2O3-induced PML-NB formation. A proteome-wide analysis of Ki-1/57 partners in the presence of either SUMO-1 or SUMO-2 suggests that the involvement of Ki-1/57 with the regulation of gene expression is independent of the presence of either SUMO-1 or SUMO-2; however, the presence of SUMO-1 strongly influences the interaction of Ki-1/57 with proteins associated with cellular metabolism, maintenance, and cell cycle.

  17. Differentiation of synovial CD-105(+) human mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocyte-like cells through spheroid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes-Boquete, I; De Toro, Francisco J; Blanco, Francisco J

    2009-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into several cell lineages, some of which can generate bone, cartilage, or adipose tissue. The presence of MSCs in the synovial membrane was recently reported. Data from comparative studies of MSCs derived from various mesenchymal tissues suggest that MSCs from synovial membranes have a superior chondrogenesis capacity. Previous chondrogenic differentiation studies have used the total population of MSCs, including cells with several MSC markers, such as CD44, CD90, CD105, or CD73. However the chondrogenic capacity of an individual population of MSCs has not been examined. Our aim was to study the chondrogenic capacity of the cellular MSC subset, CD105(+), derived from synovial membrane tissues of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal donors. The tissues were digested with a cocktail of collagenase/dispase and the isolated MSCs were seeded into plates. The subpopulation of CD105(+)-MSCs was separated using a magnetic separator. The MSCs were then differentiated towards chondrocyte-like cells using a specific medium to promote spheroid formation. Spheroids were collected after 14, 28, and 46 days in chondrogenic medium and stained with hematoxylin, eosin, Safranin O or Alcian blue to evaluate the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study collagen types I (COLI) and II (COLII) and aggrecan expression. Phenotypic characterization of the isolated CD105(+)-MSCs shows that these cells are also positive for CD90 and CD44, but negatives for CD34 and CD45. In addition, this cellular subset expressed Sox-9. Spheroids appeared after 7 days in culture in the presence of chondrogenic medium. Our studies show no differences between MSCs obtained from OA and normal synovial membranes during chondrogenesis. The morphological analysis of spheroids revealed characteristics typical of chondrocyte cells. The intensity of Safranin O, Alcian blue and aggrecan staining was positive and constant

  18. Defensive effects of fullerene-C60 dissolved in squalane against the 2,4-nonadienal-induced cell injury in human skin keratinocytes HaCaT and wrinkle formation in 3D-human skin tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinya; Aoshima, Hisae; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2010-02-01

    We dissolved fullerene-C60 in squalane (LipoFullerene; LF-SQ, C60-eq.: 500 ppm) and examined its defensive effects against 2,4-nonadienal (NDA)-induced cell injury in HaCaT keratinocytes and wrinkle formation in three dimensional (3D)-human skin tissue model. NDA is an analog of 4-hydroxynonenal, one of major causes for human body odor indicative of aging and a lipophilic cell injury factor. Cell viability (% of the control) decreased to 31.6% on treatment with NDA (40 microM), but it increased to 66.0-97.5% when LF-SQ of 1-4% (C60-eq.: 5-20 ppm) was administered for 5 hr before NDA addition. The defensive effect by LF-SQ was superior to that of "squalane" alone at the same doses. NDA-induced DNA-fragmentation in HaCaT cells was suppressed by LF-SQ administered for 5 hr before NDA treatment, and LF-SQ protected HaCaT cells against apoptosis-like cell death. LF-SQ did not appreciably defend against hydrogen peroxide, though LF-SQ effectively defended against tert-butylhydroperoxide, a type of the intermediate hydrophilicity-lipophilicity degree out of other reactive oxygen species. The scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that NDA caused wrinkles and abnormal scales on keratinocytes of 3D-human skin tissue model, and structural homogeneity of the interstratum was broken, any of which were, however, markedly suppressed with LF-SQ. Squalane alone exhibited defensive effect against the skin tissue injury to some extent, but which was inferior to LF-SQ. LF-SQ might effectively capture and scavenge lipid radicals generated inside the cell membrane, because squalane acts as a lipophilic carrier of C60. C60 dissolved in squalane can be expected to serve as a cosmeceutical ingredient for anti-wrinkle formation.

  19. Mechanisms of virus immune evasion lead to development from chronic inflammation to cancer formation associated with human papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masachika Senba

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV has developed strategies to escape eradication by innate and adaptive immunity. Immune response evasion has been considered an important aspect of HPV persistence, which is the main contributing factor leading to HPV-related cancers. HPV-induced cancers expressing viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are potentially recognized by the immune system. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules are patrolled by natural killer cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, respectively. This system of recognition is a main target for the strategies of immune evasion deployed by viruses. The viral immune evasion proteins constitute useful tools to block defined stages of the MHC class I presentation pathway, and in this way HPV avoids the host immune response. The long latency period from initial infection to persistence signifies that HPV evolves mechanisms to escape the immune response. It has now been established that there are oncogenic mechanisms by which E7 binds to and degrades tumor suppressor Rb, while E6 binds to and inactivates tumor suppressor p53. Therefore, interaction of p53 and pRb proteins can give rise to an increased immortalization and genomic instability. Overexpression of NF-kB in cervical and penile cancers suggests that NF-kB activation is a key modulator in driving chronic inflammation to cancer. HPV oncogene-mediated suppression of NF-kB activity contributes to HPV escape from the immune system. This review focuses on the diverse mechanisms of the virus immune evasion with HPV that leads to chronic inflammation and cancer.

  20. Overexpression of the human MNB/DYRK1A gene induces formation of multinucleate cells through overduplication of the centrosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraoka Yasushi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we cloned the human MNB/DYRK1A gene from the "Down syndrome critical region" on chromosome 21. This gene encodes a dual specificity protein kinase that catalyzes its autophosphorylation on serine/threonine and tyrosine residues. But, the functions of the MNB/DYRK1A gene in cellular processes are unknown. Results In this study, we examined HeLa cells transfected with cDNA encoding a green fluorescent protein (GFP-MNB/DYRK1A fusion protein and found 2 patterns of expression: In one group of transfected cells, GFP-MNB/DYRK1A was localized as dots within the nucleus; and in the other group, it was overexpressed and had accumulated all over the nucleus. In the cells overexpressing GFP-MNB/DYRK1A, multinucleation was clearly observed; whereas in those with the nuclear dots, such aberrant nuclei were not found. Furthermore, in the latter cells, essential processes such as mitosis and cytokinesis occurred normally. Multinucleation was dependent on the kinase activity of MNB/DYRK1A, because it was not observed in cells overexpressing kinase activity-negative mutants, GFP-MNB/DYRK1A (K179R and GFP-MNB/DYRK1A (Y310F/Y312F. Immunostaining of GFP-MNB/DYRK1A-overexpressing cells with specific antibodies against α- and γ-tubulin revealed that multiple copies of centrosomes and aberrant multipolar spindles were generated in these cells. Conclusions These results indicate that overexpression of MNB/DYRK1A induces multinucleation in HeLa cells through overduplication of the centrosome during interphase and production of aberrant spindles and missegregation of chromosomes during mitosis.

  1. Antibody formation in pregnant women with maternal-neonatal human platelet antigen mismatch from a hospital in northern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan-Hua; Cheng, Chuen-Sheng; Chang, Jin-Biou; Liu, Kuang-Ting; Chang, Junn-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is a clinical syndrome that resembles hemolytic disease of the newborn, affecting the platelets only. The thrombocytopenia results from the maternal alloantibodies reacting with specific human platelet antigens (HPAs) on the fetal platelets. Forty-four maternal plasma samples were screened for platelet alloantibodies using qualitative solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) commercial kit (LIFECODES Pakplus, Hologic Gen-Probe GTI Diagnostics, Waukesha, WI, USA), and both the maternal and the corresponding cord blood samples were genotyped (LIFECODES ThromboType, Hologic Gen-Probe GTI Diagnostics, Waukesha, WI, USA). HPA genotyping results correlated with the genetic frequencies in the Taiwan population. A total of 34 newborns (77.3%) had partial HPA genotyping mismatches with the corresponding mothers. The most common partial mismatches between mothers and neonates in HPA genotypes were 13 (29.5%) in both HPA-3b and HPA-15a, followed by 12 (27.3%) in HPA-15b, and 8 (18.2%) in HPA-3a. The frequencies of homozygotic mother with heterozygotic neonate were 15.9% in both HPA-3a and HPA-15b, 9.1% in HPA-15a, 6.8% in HPA-3b, and 2.3% in both HPA-2a and HPA-6a. In this study, maternal HPA antibodies were found in five samples, whereas HLA class I antibodies were found in seven maternal plasma samples from the antibody screen. The results from this study have demonstrated that HPA mismatch is not the main cause for the production of HPA alloantibodies.

  2. Microparticle formation after co-culture of human whole blood and umbilical artery in a novel in vitro model of flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtom, Emma; Usherwood, James R; Macey, Marion G; Lawson, Charlotte

    2012-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now the largest killer in western society, and the importance of interactions between vascular endothelium and circulating blood components in disease pathogenesis is well established. Microparticles are a heterogeneous population of laminar flow conditions. Here we have investigated microparticle production after perfusion of human whole blood through intact inflamed human umbilical artery. When blood was perfused through umbilical arteries which had been pre-stimulated with tumour necrosis factor (TNFα) for 18 h under flow conditions, there was significantly increased production of microparticles from both platelet and non-platelet sources, in particular from erythrocytes. To determine whether microparticles generated during interactions with inflamed endothelium could induce a pro-inflammatory response in trans, we isolated microparticles by centrifugation after co-culture and incubated with isolated quiescent endothelial cells followed by measurement of reactive oxygen species formation. Microparticles derived from co-culture with inflamed endothelium induced significantly enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These data suggest that presence of an inflamed endothelium causes release of pro-inflammatory microparticles from circulating blood cells, which could contribute to prolonged endothelial activation and subsequent atherosclerotic changes in blood vessels subjected to inflammatory insult.

  3. Novel anti-bacterial activities of β-defensin 1 in human platelets: suppression of pathogen growth and signaling of neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern F Kraemer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human β-defensins (hBD are antimicrobial peptides that curb microbial activity. Although hBD's are primarily expressed by epithelial cells, we show that human platelets express hBD-1 that has both predicted and novel antibacterial activities. We observed that activated platelets surround Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, forcing the pathogens into clusters that have a reduced growth rate compared to S. aureus alone. Given the microbicidal activity of β-defensins, we determined whether hBD family members were present in platelets and found mRNA and protein for hBD-1. We also established that hBD-1 protein resided in extragranular cytoplasmic compartments of platelets. Consistent with this localization pattern, agonists that elicit granular secretion by platelets did not readily induce hBD-1 release. Nevertheless, platelets released hBD-1 when they were stimulated by α-toxin, a S. aureus product that permeabilizes target cells. Platelet-derived hBD-1 significantly impaired the growth of clinical strains of S. aureus. hBD-1 also induced robust neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation by target polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, which is a novel antimicrobial function of β-defensins that was not previously identified. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hBD-1 is a previously-unrecognized component of platelets that displays classic antimicrobial activity and, in addition, signals PMNs to extrude DNA lattices that capture and kill bacteria.

  4. Anti-carcinogenic properties of omeprazole against human colon cancer cells and azoxymethane-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patlolla, Jagan M R; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Steele, Vernon E; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2012-01-01

    Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor, a widely used drug to treat ulcers and gastroesophageal refluxdisease. We have evaluated colon cancer chemopreventive properties of omeprazole using azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male F344 rats and analyzed cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induction in human colon cancer cells. Five-week-old male F344 rats were fed a control or experimental diet containing two doses of omeprazole (200 and 400 ppm). After one week, all animals were s.c. injected with AOM (15 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for two weeks). Rats continued on experimental diets for seven more weeks before being sacrificed. Colons were histopathologically evaluated for ACF. Human colon cancer HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells treated with omeprazole were evaluated for different markers associated with proliferation and apoptotic markers using Western blot technique. Rats fed with 200 and 400 ppm of omeprazole significantly suppressed total colonic ACF formation (~30%, Pcancer cell lines HCT-116 and HCA-7 cells resulted in induction of p21waf1/cip1 and decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Anticancer properties observed in colon cancer cell lines suggest that omeprazole may induce key signaling molecules of antiproliferation and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins.

  5. Determination of atenolol in human plasma using ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted in situ solvent formation microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeb, Mohsen; Farahani, Hadi; Papan, Mohammad Kazem

    2016-06-01

    An efficient analytical method called ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted in situ solvent formation microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of atenolol in human plasma. A hydrophobic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) was formed by the addition of a hydrophilic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) to a sample solution containing an ion-pairing agent during microextraction. The analyte was extracted into the ionic liquid phase while the microextraction solvent was dispersed throughout the sample by utilizing ultrasound. The sample was then centrifuged, and the extracting phase retracted into the microsyringe and injected to liquid chromatography. After optimization, the calibration curve showed linearity in the range of 2-750 ng/mL with the regression coefficient corresponding to 0.998. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) and quantification (S/N = 10) were 0.5 and 2 ng/mL, respectively. A reasonable relative recovery range of 90-96.7% and satisfactory intra-assay (4.8-5.1%, n = 6) and interassay (5.0-5.6%, n = 9) precision along with a substantial sample clean-up demonstrated good performance of the procedure. It was applied for the determination of atenolol in human plasma after oral administration and some pharmacokinetic data were obtained.

  6. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes......) bearing CR1, however, markedly reduced both C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation. Our data suggest that C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation on B lymphocytes in vivo may involve both AP and classical pathway activation, with CR1 contributing significantly to the latter. On the other hand...

  7. Protoporphyrin IX formation and photobleaching in different layers of normal human skin: methyl- and hexylaminolevulinate and different light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Idorn, Luise W; Philipsen, Peter A; Wulf, Hans Christian; Hædersdal, Merete

    2012-10-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for various skin disorders, and selective targeting of specific skin structures is desirable. The objective was to assess accumulation of PpIX fluorescence and photobleaching within skin layers using different photosensitizers and light sources. Normal human skin was tape-stripped and incubated with 20% methylaminolevulinate (MAL) or 20% hexylaminolevulinate (HAL) for 3 h. Fluorescence microscopy quantified PpIX accumulation in epidermis, superficial, mid and deep dermis, down to 2 mm. PpIX photobleaching by light-emitting diode (LED, 632 nm, 18 and 37 J/cm(2)), intense pulsed light (IPL, 500-650 nm, 36 and 72 J/cm(2)) and long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL, 595 nm, 7.5 and 15 J/cm(2)) was measured using fluorescence photography and microscopy. We found higher PpIX fluorescence intensities in epidermis and superficial dermis in HAL-incubated skin than MAL-incubated skin (P dermis, fluorescence intensities were higher (37%) in HAL-treated skin than MAL-treated skin, although not significant (P = ns). At skin surface, photobleaching was significantly higher (90-98%) after LED illumination (18 and 37 J/cm²) than IPL (29-53%, 36 and 72 J/cm²) and LPDL (43-62%, 7 and 15 J/cm²) (P epidermis to deep dermis by LED illumination (37 J/cm², P = ns), but declined from epidermis to mid and deep dermis for IPL-treated skin and LPDL-treated skin (IPL 72 J/cm²: 26-15%; LPDL 15 J/cm²: 37-23%) (P < 0.04). Clinically, erythema correlated linearly with MAL and HAL-induced photobleaching (r² = 0.175, P < 0.001). In conclusion, selective PpIX accumulation indicates HAL as an alternative to MAL for epidermal-targeted PDT. In clinically relevant doses, PpIX photobleaching throughout the skin was more profound following LED than LPDL and IPL exposure.

  8. Genotoxic effects of a particular mixture of acetamiprid and alpha-cypermethrin on chromosome aberration, sister chromatid exchange, and micronucleus formation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Ayşe Yavuz; Topaktaş, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    The genotoxic effects of a particular mixture of acetamiprid (Acm, neonicotinoid insecticide) and alpha-cypermethrin (alpha-cyp, pyrethroid insecticide) on human peripheral lymphocytes were examined in vitro by chromosomal aberrations (CAs), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and micronucleus (MN) tests. The human peripheral lymphocytes were treated with 12.5 + 2.5, 15 + 5, 17.5 + 7.5, and 20 + 10 microg/mL of Acm+alpha-cyp, respectively, for 24 and 48 h. The mixture of Acm+alpha-cyp induced the CAs and SCEs at all concentrations and treatment times when compared with both the control and solvent control and these increases were concentration-dependent in both treatment times. MN formation was significantly induced at 12.5 + 2.5, 15 + 5, 17.5 + 7.5, microg/mL of Acm+alpha-cyp when compared with both controls although these increases were not concentration-dependent. Binuclear cells could not be detected sufficiently in the highest concentration of the mixture (20 + 10 microg/mL) for both the 24- and 48-h treatment times. Mitotic index (MI), proliferation index (PI) and nuclear division index (NDI) significantly decreased because of the cytotoxic and cytostatic effects of the mixture, at all concentrations for two treatment periods. Significant decreases in MI and PI were concentration dependent at both treatment times. The decrease in NDI was also concentration-dependent at 48-h treatment period. In general, Acm+alpha-cyp inhibited nuclear division more than positive control, mitomycin C (MMC) and showed a higher cytostatic effect than MMC. Furthermore, in this article, the results of combined effects of Acm+alpha-cyp were compared with the results of single effects of Acm or alpha-cyp (Kocaman and Topaktas,2007,2009, respectively). In conclusion, the particular mixture of Acm+alpha-cyp synergistically induced the genotoxicity/cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  9. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Zilhão

    Full Text Available Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy, assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site's 1963-66 excavations shows that (a Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex's start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence.

  10. Analysis of Site Formation and Assemblage Integrity Does Not Support Attribution of the Uluzzian to Modern Humans at Grotta del Cavallo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilhão, João; Banks, William E.; d’Errico, Francesco; Gioia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Based on the morphology of two deciduous molars and radiocarbon ages from layers D and E of the Grotta del Cavallo (Lecce, Italy), assigned to the Uluzzian, it has been proposed that modern humans were the makers of this Early Upper Paleolithic culture and that this finding considerably weakens the case for an independent emergence of symbolism among western European Neandertals. Reappraisal of the new dating evidence, of the finds curated in the Taranto Antiquities depot, and of coeval publications detailing the site’s 1963–66 excavations shows that (a) Protoaurignacian, Aurignacian and Early Epigravettian lithics exist in the assemblages from layers D and E, (b) even though it contains both inherited and intrusive items, the formation of layer D began during Protoaurignacian times, and (c) the composition of the extant Cavallo assemblages is influenced in a non-negligible manner by the post-hoc assignment of items to stratigraphic units distinct from that of original discovery. In addition, a major disturbance feature affected the 1960s excavation trench down to Mousterian layer F, this feature went unrecognized until 1964, the human remains assigned to the Uluzzian were discovered that year and/or the previous year, and there are contradictions between field reports and the primary anthropological description of the remains as to their morphology and level of provenience. Given these major contextual uncertainties, the Cavallo teeth cannot be used to establish the authorship of the Uluzzian. Since this technocomplex’s start date is ca. 45,000 calendar years ago, a number of Neandertal fossils are dated to this period, and the oldest diagnostic European modern human fossil is the <41,400 year-old Oase 1 mandible, Neandertal authorship of the Uluzzian remains the parsimonious reading of the evidence. PMID:26154139

  11. An ancestral miR-1304 allele present in Neanderthals regulates genes involved in enamel formation and could explain dental differences with modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Valenzuela, Maria; Ramírez, Oscar; Rosas, Antonio; García-Vargas, Samuel; de la Rasilla, Marco; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2012-07-01

    Genetic changes in regulatory elements are likely to result in phenotypic effects that might explain population-specific as well as species-specific traits. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are posttranscriptional repressors involved in the control of almost every biological process. These small noncoding RNAs are present in various phylogenetic groups, and a large number of them remain highly conserved at the sequence level. MicroRNA-mediated regulation depends on perfect matching between the seven nucleotides of its seed region and the target sequence usually located at the 3' untranslated region of the regulated gene. Hence, even single changes in seed regions are predicted to be deleterious as they may affect miRNA target specificity. In accordance to this, purifying selection has strongly acted on these regions. Comparison between the genomes of present-day humans from various populations, Neanderthal, and other nonhuman primates showed an miRNA, miR-1304, that carries a polymorphism on its seed region. The ancestral allele is found in Neanderthal, nonhuman primates, at low frequency (~5%) in modern Asian populations and rarely in Africans. Using miRNA target site prediction algorithms, we found that the derived allele increases the number of putative target genes for the derived miRNA more than ten-fold, indicating an important functional evolution for miR-1304. Analysis of the predicted targets for derived miR-1304 indicates an association with behavior and nervous system development and function. Two of the predicted target genes for the ancestral miR-1304 allele are important genes for teeth formation, enamelin, and amelotin. MicroRNA overexpression experiments using a luciferase-based assay showed that the ancestral version of miR-1304 reduces the enamelin- and amelotin-associated reporter gene expression by 50%, whereas the derived miR-1304 does not have any effect. Deletion of the corresponding target sites for miR-1304 in these dental genes avoided their repression

  12. Giardia duodenalis Arginine Deiminase Modulates the Phenotype and Cytokine Secretion of Human Dendritic Cells by Depletion of Arginine and Formation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Stefanie; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Seeber, Frank; Klotz, Christian; Ignatius, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Depletion of arginine is a recognized strategy that pathogens use to evade immune effector mechanisms. Depletion depends on microbial enzymes such as arginases, which are considered virulence factors. The effect is mostly interpreted as being a consequence of successful competition with host enzymes for the substrate. However, both arginases and arginine deiminases (ADI) have been associated with pathogen virulence. Both deplete arginine, but their reaction products differ. An ADI has been implicated in the virulence of Giardia duodenalis, an intestinal parasite that infects humans and animals, causing significant morbidity. Dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role in host defense and also in a murine G. duodenalis infection model. The functional properties of these innate immune cells depend on the milieu in which they are activated. Here, the dependence of the response of these cells on arginine was studied by using Giardia ADI and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocyte-derived DC. Arginine depletion by ADI significantly increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and decreased interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12p40 secretion. It also reduced the upregulation of surface CD83 and CD86 molecules, which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Arginine depletion also reduced the phosphorylation of S6 kinase in DC, suggesting the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. The changes were due to arginine depletion and the formation of reaction products, in particular, ammonium ions. Comparison of NH4+ and urea revealed distinct immunomodulatory activities of these products of deiminases and arginases, respectively. The data suggest that a better understanding of the role of arginine-depleting pathogen enzymes for immune evasion will have to take enzyme class and reaction products into consideration. PMID:23589577

  13. Giardia duodenalis arginine deiminase modulates the phenotype and cytokine secretion of human dendritic cells by depletion of arginine and formation of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Stefanie; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Seeber, Frank; Klotz, Christian; Ignatius, Ralf; Aebischer, Toni

    2013-07-01

    Depletion of arginine is a recognized strategy that pathogens use to evade immune effector mechanisms. Depletion depends on microbial enzymes such as arginases, which are considered virulence factors. The effect is mostly interpreted as being a consequence of successful competition with host enzymes for the substrate. However, both arginases and arginine deiminases (ADI) have been associated with pathogen virulence. Both deplete arginine, but their reaction products differ. An ADI has been implicated in the virulence of Giardia duodenalis, an intestinal parasite that infects humans and animals, causing significant morbidity. Dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role in host defense and also in a murine G. duodenalis infection model. The functional properties of these innate immune cells depend on the milieu in which they are activated. Here, the dependence of the response of these cells on arginine was studied by using Giardia ADI and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocyte-derived DC. Arginine depletion by ADI significantly increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and decreased interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12p40 secretion. It also reduced the upregulation of surface CD83 and CD86 molecules, which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Arginine depletion also reduced the phosphorylation of S6 kinase in DC, suggesting the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. The changes were due to arginine depletion and the formation of reaction products, in particular, ammonium ions. Comparison of NH(4)(+) and urea revealed distinct immunomodulatory activities of these products of deiminases and arginases, respectively. The data suggest that a better understanding of the role of arginine-depleting pathogen enzymes for immune evasion will have to take enzyme class and reaction products into consideration.

  14. Essays on Human Capital Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castex Hernandez, Gonzalo A.

    2010-01-01

    I analyze two issues on the efficiency of schooling choice. The first chapter analyzes changes in the distribution of college enrollment rates that occurred between 1980 and 2000. It aims not only to explain the 69% increase in the overall college enrollment rates, but also changes in the distribution of college attendees by their ability and…

  15. In vivo functional brain mapping in a conditional mouse model of human tauopathy (taup301l reveals reduced neural activity in memory formation structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Pablo D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tauopathies are characterized by intracellular deposition of the microtubule-associated protein tau as filamentous aggregates. The rTg4510 mouse conditionally expresses mutant human tau protein in various forebrain areas under the Tet-off expression system. Mice develop neurofibrillary tangles, with significant neuronal loss and cognitive deficits by 6 months of age. Previous behavioral and biochemical work has linked the expression and aggregates of mutant tau to functional impairments. The present work used manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI to investigate basal levels of brain activity in the rTg4510 and control mice. Results Our results show an unmistakable curtailment of neural activity in the amygdala and hippocampus, two regions known for their role in memory formation, but not the cortex, cerebellum, striatum and hypothalamus in tau expressing mice. Conclusion Behavioral impairments associated with changes in activity in these areas may correspond to age progressive mutant tauP301L-induced neurodegeneration.

  16. Investigation of siRNA Nanoparticle Formation Using Mono-Cationic Detergents and Its Use in Gene Silencing in Human HeLa Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yuma; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Harashima, Hideyoshi, E-mail: harashima@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory for Molecular Design of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-6, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The focus of recent research has been on the development of siRNA vectors to achieve an innovative gene therapy. Most of the conventional vectors are siRNA nanoparticles complexed with cationic polymers and liposomes, making it difficult to release siRNA. In this study, we report on the use of MCD, a quaternary ammonium salt detergent containing a long aliphatic chain (L-chain) as an siRNA complexation agent using human HeLa cells (a model cancer cell). We prepared siRNA nanoparticles using various MCDs, and measured the diameters and zeta-potentials of the particles. The use of an MCD with a long L-chain resulted in the formation of a positively charged nanoparticle. In contrast, a negatively charged nanoparticle was formed when a MCD with a short L-chain was used. We next evaluated the gene silencing efficiency of the nanoparticles using HeLa cells expressing the luciferase protein. The results showed that the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles showed a higher gene silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000. We also found that the efficiency of gene silencing is a function of the length of the alkyl chain in MCD and zeta-potential of the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles. Such information provides another viewpoint for designing siRNA vectors.

  17. Sensitive and selective spectrophotometric assay of piroxicam in pure form, capsule and human blood serum samples via ion-pair complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2014-09-15

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid determination of piroxicam (PX) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method involves formation of stable yellow colored ion-pair complexes of the amino derivative (basic nitrogen) of PX with three sulphonphthalein acid dyes namely; bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) in acidic medium. The colored species exhibited absorption maxima at 438, 429 and 432 nm with molar absorptivity values of 9.400×10(3), 1.218×10(3) and 1.02×10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) for PX-BCG, PX-BTB and PX-BPB complexes, respectively. The effect of optimum conditions via acidity, reagent concentration, time and solvent were studied. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature and the absorbance values remained constant for 48h. Beer's law was obeyed with a good correlation coefficient in the concentration ranges 1-100 μg mL(-1) for BCG, BTB complexes and 1-95 μg mL(-1) for BPB complex. The composition ratio of the ion-pair complexes were found to be 1:1 in all cases as established by Job's method. No interference was observed from common additives and excipients which may be present in the pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PX in capsule and human blood serum samples with good accuracy and precision.

  18. Investigation of siRNA Nanoparticle Formation Using Mono-Cationic Detergents and Its Use in Gene Silencing in Human HeLa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyoshi Harashima

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of recent research has been on the development of siRNA vectors to achieve an innovative gene therapy. Most of the conventional vectors are siRNA nanoparticles complexed with cationic polymers and liposomes, making it difficult to release siRNA. In this study, we report on the use of MCD, a quaternary ammonium salt detergent containing a long aliphatic chain (L-chain as an siRNA complexation agent using human HeLa cells (a model cancer cell. We prepared siRNA nanoparticles using various MCDs, and measured the diameters and zeta-potentials of the particles. The use of an MCD with a long L-chain resulted in the formation of a positively charged nanoparticle. In contrast, a negatively charged nanoparticle was formed when a MCD with a short L-chain was used. We next evaluated the gene silencing efficiency of the nanoparticles using HeLa cells expressing the luciferase protein. The results showed that the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles showed a higher gene silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000. We also found that the efficiency of gene silencing is a function of the length of the alkyl chain in MCD and zeta-potential of the siRNA/MCD nanoparticles. Such information provides another viewpoint for designing siRNA vectors.

  19. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells abrogate plasmablast formation and induce regulatory B cells independently of T helper cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquesa, M; Mensah, F K; Huizinga, R; Strini, T; Boon, L; Lombardo, E; DelaRosa, O; Laman, J D; Grinyó, J M; Weimar, W; Betjes, M G H; Baan, C C; Hoogduijn, M J

    2015-03-01

    Mesenchymal or stromal stem cells (MSC) interact with cells of the immune system in multiple ways. Modulation of the immune system by MSC is believed to be a therapeutic option for autoimmune disease and transplant rejection. In recent years, B cells have moved into the focus of the attention as targets for the treatment of immune disorders. Current B-cell targeting treatment is based on the indiscriminate depletion of B cells. The aim of this study was to examine whether human adipose tissue-derived MSC (ASC) interact with B cells to affect their proliferation, differentiation, and immune function. ASC supported the survival of quiescent B cells predominantly via contact-dependent mechanisms. Coculture of B cells with activated T helper cells led to proliferation and differentiation of B cells into CD19(+) CD27(high) CD38(high) antibody-producing plasmablasts. ASC inhibited the proliferation of B cells and this effect was dependent on the presence of T cells. In contrast, ASC directly targeted B-cell differentiation, independently of T cells. In the presence of ASC, plasmablast formation was reduced and IL-10-producing CD19(+) CD24(high) CD38(high) B cells, known as regulatory B cells, were induced. These results demonstrate that ASC affect B cell biology in vitro, suggesting that they can be a tool for the modulation of the B-cell response in immune disease.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-mediated syncytium formation is compatible with adenovirus replication and facilitates efficient dispersion of viral gene products and de novo-synthesized virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Haviv, Y S; Derdeyn, C A; Lam, J; Coolidge, C; Hunter, E; Curiel, D T; Blackwell, J L

    2001-12-10

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are designed for specific oncolytic replication in tumor tissues with concomitant sparing of normal cells. As such, CRAds offer an unprecedented level of anticancer potential for malignancies that have been refractory to previous cancer gene therapy interventions. CRAd efficacy may, however, be compromised by inefficient dispersion of the replicating vector within the tumor tissue. To address this issue, we evaluated the utility of a fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (FMG), which induces the fusion of neighboring cellular membranes to form multinucleated syncytia. We hypothesized that the FMG-mediated syncytia would facilitate dispersion of the adenovirus (Ad) gene products and viral progeny. To test this, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, which induce syncytia in the presence of CD4+ target cells, were expressed by an Ad (Ad5HIVenv) in permissive (CD4-positive) and nonpermissive (CD4-negative) cell lines. After validating this Ad-FMG model, the efficiency of Ad replication in the presence or absence of syncytia was evaluated. The results demonstrated that syncytium formation was compatible with Ad replication and dramatically increased the dispersion of virus gene products within the cytoplasm of the syncytia as well as viral particles in the nuclei of the syncytial mass. Moreover, progeny virions were released more efficiently from syncytia compared with nonsyncytial cells. These data demonstrate the utility of FMGs as a dispersion agent and suggest that FMGs can improve the efficacy of CRAd gene therapy.

  1. Two novel DXZ4-associated long noncoding RNAs show developmental changes in expression coincident with heterochromatin formation at the human (Homo sapiens) macrosatellite repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Debbie M; Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2015-12-01

    On the male X and female active X chromosome (Xa), the macrosatellite repeat (MSR) DXZ4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin characterized by CpG methylation and histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine-9 (H3K9me3). In contrast, DXZ4 on the female inactive X chromosome (Xi), is packaged into euchromatin, is bound by the architectural protein CCCTC-binding factor, and mediates Xi-specific long-range cis contact with similarly packaged tandem repeats on the Xi. In cancer, male DXZ4 can inappropriately revert to a Xi-like state and other MSRs have been reported to adopt alternate chromatin configurations in response to disease. Given this plasticity, we sought to identify factors that might control heterochromatin at DXZ4. In human embryonic stem cells, we found low levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at DXZ4 and that this mark is lost upon differentiation as H3K9me3 is acquired. We identified two previously undescribed DXZ4 associated noncoding transcripts (DANT1 and DANT2) that are transcribed toward DXZ4 from promoters flanking the array. Each generates transcript isoforms that traverse the MSR. However, upon differentiation, enhancer of Zeste-2 silences DANT1, and DANT2 transcription terminates prior to entering DXZ4. These data support a model wherein DANT1 and/or DANT2 may function to regulate constitutive heterochromatin formation at this MSR.

  2. Pitavastatin, a new HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, induces phototoxicity in human keratinocytes NCTC-2544 through the formation of benzophenanthridine-like photoproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giampietro; Grobelny, Pawel; Linardi, Maria Antonella; Salvador, Alessia; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Sobotta, Łukasz; Mielcarek, Jadwiga; Dall'Acqua, Francesco; Vedaldi, Daniela; Basso, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    This study reports the results of an investigation of the phototoxicity mechanism induced by pitavastatin and its photoproducts, namely 6-cyclopropyl-10-fluoro-7,8-dihydrobenzo[k]phenanthridine (PP3) and 6-cyclopropyl-10-fluorobenzo[k]phenanthridine (PP4). The phototoxicity was tested in human keratinocytes cell lines NCTC-2544, and the results proved that under the same conditions, all three compounds exhibited phototoxic effects in the model tested. The reduction in cell viability was found to be both concentration- and UVA dose-dependent. A point of note is that both the photoproducts produced a dramatic decrease in cell viability with GI(50) values one order of magnitude lower compared to the parent compound. In particular, the fully aromatic derivative (PP4) showed the highest antiproliferative activity. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that pitavastatin and the photoproduct PP4 principally induced necrosis, as revealed by the large appearance of propidium iodide-positive cells and also confirmed by the rapid drop in cellular ATP levels. Further studies committed to better understanding of photoinduced cell death mechanism(s) revealed that neither pitavastatin nor PP4 induced mitochondrial depolarization or lysosomal damage, but, interestingly, extensive cell lipid membrane peroxidation along with a significant oxidation of model proteins occurred, suggesting that pitavastatin and PP4 exert their phototoxic effect mainly in the cellular membranes. The present results suggest that the phototoxicity of pitavastatin may be mediated by the formation of benzophenanthridine-like photoproducts that appear to have high potential as photosensitizers.

  3. Overexpression of the dynein light chain km23-1 in human ovarian carcinoma cells inhibits tumor formation in vivo and causes mitotic delay at prometaphase/metaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulipati, Nageswara R; Jin, Qunyan; Liu, Xin; Sun, Baodong; Pandey, Manoj K; Huber, Jonathan P; Ding, Wei; Mulder, Kathleen M

    2011-08-01

    km23-1 is a dynein light chain that was identified as a TGFβ receptor-interacting protein. To investigate whether km23-1 controls human ovarian carcinoma cell (HOCC) growth, we established a tet-off inducible expression system in SKOV-3 cells in which the expression of km23-1 is induced upon doxycycline removal. We found that forced expression of km23-1 inhibited both anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth of SKOV-3 cells. More importantly, induction of km23-1 expression substantially reduced the tumorigenicity of SKOV-3 cells in a xenograft model in vivo. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of SKOV-3 and IGROV-1 HOCCs demonstrated that the cells were accumulating at G2/M. Phospho-MEK, phospho-ERK and cyclin B1 were elevated, as was the mitotic index, suggesting that km23-1 suppresses HOCCs growth by inducing a mitotic delay. Immunofluorescence analyses demonstrated that the cells were accumulating at prometaphase/metaphase with increases in multipolar and multinucleated cells. Further, although the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 was present at the prometaphase kinetochore in Dox+/- cells, it was inappropriately retained at the metaphase kinetochore in Dox- cells. Thus, the mechanism by which high levels of km23-1 suppress ovarian carcinoma growth in vitro and inhibit ovary tumor formation in vivo appears to involve a BubR1-related mitotic delay.

  4. Two novel DXZ4-associated long noncoding RNAs show developmental changes in expression coincident with heterochromatin formation at the human (Homo sapiens) macrosatellite repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Debbie M.; Darrow, Emily M.; Chadwick, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    On the male X and female active X chromosome (Xa), the macrosatellite repeat (MSR) DXZ4 is packaged into constitutive heterochromatin characterized by CpG methylation and histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine-9 (H3K9me3). In contrast, DXZ4 on the female inactive X chromosome (Xi), is packaged into euchromatin, is bound by the architectural protein CCCTC-binding factor, and mediates Xi-specific long-range cis contact with similarly packaged tandem repeats on the Xi. In cancer, male DXZ4 can inappropriately revert to a Xi-like state and other MSRs have been reported to adopt alternate chromatin configurations in response to disease. Given this plasticity, we sought to identify factors that might control heterochromatin at DXZ4. In human embryonic stem cells, we found low levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine at DXZ4, and that this mark is lost upon differentiation as H3K9me3 is acquired. We identified two previously undescribed DXZ4 associated non-coding transcripts (DANT1 and DANT2) that are transcribed towards DXZ4 from promoters flanking the array. Each generates transcript isoforms that traverse the MSR. However, upon differentiation, Enhancer of Zeste-2 silences DANT1, and DANT2 transcription terminates prior to entering DXZ4. These data support a model wherein DANT1 and/or DANT2 may function to regulate constitutive heterochromatin formation at this MSR. PMID:26188586

  5. Juventude, espaços de formação e modos de vida / Youth, place of human formation and ways of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celecina de Maria Veras Sales

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Os jovens rurais têm diferentes inserções na sociedade. Considerando essas diversidades, pretende-se conhecer seus espaços de formação (escola, família, movimentos sociais, apreendendo as singularidades, as variações e as multiplicidades de suas práticas. Como os jovens na escola, nos cursos de formação, na família, no cotidiano, estão criando e recriando modos de vida? Como os jovens rurais constituem seus espaços de formação e sociabilidade, como exercitam corpo e o pensamento e como canalizam desejos, sonhos e ações afirmativas?Rural youth have different insertions in society. Considering these differences, we intend to know their place of human formation (school, family, social movements learning the singularities, variations and multiplicity of practices of these youths. How young people are creating and recreating lifestyles at school, training courses and in family? As rural youth are building their areas of training and sociability and how they exercise body and mind, how they can channel desires, dreams and affirmative action.

  6. Structural Basis for Dimer Formation of Human Condensin Structural Maintenance of Chromosome Proteins and Its Implications for Single-stranded DNA Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Susumu; Kawahara, Kazuki; Hosokawa, Yuki; Fukakusa, Shunsuke; Oki, Hiroya; Nakamura, Shota; Kojima, Yukiko; Noda, Masanori; Takino, Rie; Miyahara, Yuya; Maruno, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Yuji; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-12-01

    Eukaryotic structural maintenance of chromosome proteins (SMC) are major components of cohesin and condensins that regulate chromosome structure and dynamics during cell cycle. We here determine the crystal structure of human condensin SMC hinge heterodimer with ~30 residues of coiled coils. The structure, in conjunction with the hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry analyses, revealed the structural basis for the specific heterodimer formation of eukaryotic SMC and that the coiled coils from two different hinges protrude in the same direction, providing a unique binding surface conducive for binding to single-stranded DNA. The characteristic hydrogen exchange profiles of peptides constituted regions especially across the hinge-hinge dimerization interface, further suggesting the structural alterations upon single-stranded DNA binding and the presence of a half-opened state of hinge heterodimer. This structural change potentially relates to the DNA loading mechanism of SMC, in which the hinge domain functions as an entrance gate as previously proposed for cohesin. Our results, however, indicated that this is not the case for condensins based on the fact that the coiled coils are still interacting with each other, even when DNA binding induces structural changes in the hinge region, suggesting the functional differences of SMC hinge domain between condensins and cohesin in DNA recognition.

  7. Sensitive and selective spectrophotometric assay of piroxicam in pure form, capsule and human blood serum samples via ion-pair complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2014-09-01

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid determination of piroxicam (PX) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method involves formation of stable yellow colored ion-pair complexes of the amino derivative (basic nitrogen) of PX with three sulphonphthalein acid dyes namely; bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) in acidic medium. The colored species exhibited absorption maxima at 438, 429 and 432 nm with molar absorptivity values of 9.400 × 103, 1.218 × 103 and 1.02 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 for PX-BCG, PX-BTB and PX-BPB complexes, respectively. The effect of optimum conditions via acidity, reagent concentration, time and solvent were studied. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature and the absorbance values remained constant for 48 h. Beer’s law was obeyed with a good correlation coefficient in the concentration ranges 1-100 μg mL-1 for BCG, BTB complexes and 1-95 μg mL-1 for BPB complex. The composition ratio of the ion-pair complexes were found to be 1:1 in all cases as established by Job’s method. No interference was observed from common additives and excipients which may be present in the pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PX in capsule and human blood serum samples with good accuracy and precision.

  8. Yellow fever virus envelope protein expressed in insect cells is capable of syncytium formation in lepidopteran cells and could be used for immunodetection of YFV in human sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Yellow fever is an haemorrhagic disease caused by a virus that belongs to the genus Flavivirus (Flaviviridae family) and is transmitted by mosquitoes. Among the viral proteins, the envelope protein (E) is the most studied one, due to its high antigenic potencial. Baculovirus are one of the most popular and efficient eukaryotic expression system. In this study a recombinant baculovirus (vSynYFE) containing the envelope gene (env) of the 17D vaccine strain of yellow fever virus was constructed and the recombinant protein antigenicity was tested. Results Insect cells infected with vSynYFE showed syncytium formation, which is a cytopathic effect characteristic of flavivirus infection and expressed a polypeptide of around 54 kDa, which corresponds to the expected size of the recombinant E protein. Furthermore, the recombinant E protein expression was also confirmed by fluorescence microscopy of vSynYFE-infected insect cells. Total vSynYFE-infected insect extracts used as antigens detected the presence of antibodies for yellow fever virus in human sera derived from yellow fever-infected patients in an immunoassay and did not cross react with sera from dengue virus-infected patients. Conclusions The E protein expressed by the recombinant baculovirus in insect cells is antigenically similar to the wild protein and it may be useful for different medical applications, from improved diagnosis of the disease to source of antigens for the development of a subunit vaccine. PMID:21619598

  9. JM216-, JM118-, and cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in relation to platinum-DNA adduct formation, glutathione levels and p53 status in human tumour cell lines with different sensitivities to cisplatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, E; Groen, HJM; Helder, MN; de Vries, EGE; Meijer, C

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study is to establish anti-tumour potency of the new oral platinum drug JM216 and its metabolite JM118 in relation to the platinum (Pt)-DNA adduct formation, glutathione (GSH)-levels, and p53 status in human cancer cell lines with different sensitivities to cisplatin (CDDP). These pa

  10. Development of ADA Against Recombinant Human Interferon Beta in Immune Tolerant Mice Requires Rapid Recruitment of CD4(+) T Cells, Induces Formation of Germinal Centers but Lacks Susceptibility for (Most) Adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijanka, Grzegorz; Sauerborn, Melody; Boon, Louis; Schellekens, Huub; Brinks, Vera

    2015-01-01

    Immunological processes leading to formation of antidrug antibodies (Abs) against recombinant human proteins remain poorly understood. Animal and clinical studies revealed that immunogenicity shares both T-cell-dependent (requirement of CD4(+) T cells, isotype switching) and T-cell-independent (invo

  11. The use of carbon nanotubes to induce osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived MSCs in vitro and ectopic bone formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoming; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Yu, Bo; Fan, Yubo; Feng, Qingling; Cui, Fu-zhai; Watari, Fumio

    2012-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), one of the most concerned nanomaterials, with unique electrical, mechanical and surface properties, have been shown suitable for biomedical application. In this study, we evaluated attachment, proliferation, osteogenic gene expression, ALP/DNA, protein/DNA and mineralization of human adipose-derived stem cells cultured in vitro on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and graphite (GP) compacts with the same dimension. Moreover, we assessed the effect of these two kinds of compacts on ectopic bone formation in vivo. First of all, higher ability of the MWNTs compacts to adsorb proteins, comparing with the GP compacts, was shown. During the conventional culture, it was shown that MWNTs could induce the expression of ALP, cbfa1 and COLIA1 genes while GP could not. Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase (ALP)/DNA and protein/DNA of the cell on the MWNTs compacts, was significantly higher than those of the cells on the GP compacts. With the adsorption of the proteins in culture medium with 50% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in advance, the increments of the ALP/DNA and protein/DNA for the MWNTs compacts were found respectively significantly more than the increments of those for the GP compacts, suggesting that the larger amount of protein adsorbed on the MWNTs was crucial. More results showed that ALP/DNA and protein/DNA of the cells on the two kinds of compacts pre-soaked in culture medium having additional rhBMP-2 were both higher than those of the cells on the samples re-soaked in culture medium with 50% FBS, and that those values for the MWNTs compacts increased much more. Larger mineral content was found on the MWNTs compacts than on the GP compacts at day 7. In vivo experiment showed that the MWNTs could induce ectopic bone formation in the dorsal musculature of ddy mice while GP could not. The results indicated that MWNTs might stimulate inducible cells in soft tissues to form inductive bone by concentrating more proteins, including bone

  12. [Experimental research on the effects of different activators on the formation of platelet-rich gel and the release of bioactive substances in human platelet-rich plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Zhang, W; Cheng, B

    2017-01-20

    Objective: To explore the effects of calcium gluconate and thrombin on the formation of platelet-rich gel (PRG) and the release of bioactive substances in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the clinical significance. Methods: Six healthy blood donors who met the inclusion criteria were recruited in our unit from May to August in 2016. Platelet samples of each donor were collected for preparation of PRP. (1) PRP in the volume of 10 mL was collected from each donor and divided into thrombin activation group (TA, added with 0.5 mL thrombin solution in dose of 100 U/mL) and calcium gluconate activation group (CGA, added with 0.5 mL calcium gluconate solution in dose of 100 g/L) according to the random number table, with 5 mL PRP in each group. Then the PRP of the two groups was activated in water bath at 37 ℃ for 1 h. The formation time of PRG was recorded, and the formation situation of PRG was observed within 1 hour of activation. After being activated for 1 h, one part of PRG was collected to observe the distribution of fibrous protein with HE staining, and another part of PRG was collected to observe platelet ultrastructure under transmission electron microscope (TEM). After being activated for 1 h, the supernatant was collected to determine the content of transforming growth factor β(1, )platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB), vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor, and insulin-like growth factorⅠby enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. (2) Another 10 mL PRP from each donor was collected and grouped as above, and the platelet suspension was obtained after two times of centrifugation and resuspension with phosphate buffered saline, respectively. And then they were treated with corresponding activator for 1 h as that in experiment (1). Nanoparticle tracking analyzer was used to detect the concentrations of microvesicles with different diameters and total microvesicles derived from platelet. Data

  13. Galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph; Dvorkin, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In Lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In Lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  14. The Helicobacter pylori L-form: formation and isolation in the human bile cultures in vitro and in the gallbladders of patients with biliary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan N; Ding, Wen J; Pan, Yao Z; Tang, Ke L; Wang, Tao; She, Xiao L; Wang, He

    2015-04-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is considered the important causative agent causing biliary diseases, but the H. pylori can be isolated from very few gallbladder specimens with diseases. We studied the formation of H. pylori L-forms in bile in vitro and isolated the H. pylori L-forms from gallbladder of patients with biliary diseases. We inoculated the H. pylori into the human bile to induce the L-form in vitro. The gallbladder specimens were collected from patients with biliary diseases to isolate the bacterial L-forms by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the H. pylori L-forms in the L-form isolates were identified by the gene assay for the H. pylori-specific genes 16S rRNA and UreA. The H. Pylori cannot be isolated from the bile-induced cultures, but the H. pylori L-form can be isolated from the H. pylori-negative bile-induced cultures. The L-form isolates of bile-induced cultures showed a positive reaction of the H. pylori-specific genes by PCR, and the coincidence ratio of the nucleotide sequences between the L-forms and the H. pylori is 99%. The isolation rate of bacteria L-form is 93.2% in the gallbladder specimens with bacteria-negative isolation culture by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the positive rate of the H. pylori-specific genes in the L-form isolates is 7.1% in the bacterial L-form-positive isolation cultures by the PCR. H. pylori can be rapidly induced into the L-form in the human bile; the L-form, as the latent bacteria, can live in the host gallbladder for a long times, and they made the host became a latent carrier of the H. pylori L-form. The H. pylori L-form can be isolated by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the variant can be identified by the gene assay for the H. pylori-specific genes 16S rRNA and reA. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals, mobilis

  16. The formation of catalytically competent enzyme-substrate complex is not a bottleneck in lesion excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, N A; Kiryutin, A S; Kuznetsova, A A; Panov, M S; Barsukova, M O; Yurkovskaya, A V; Fedorova, O S

    2017-04-01

    Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) protects DNA from alkylated and deaminated purine lesions. AAG flips out the damaged nucleotide from the double helix of DNA and catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond to release the damaged base. To understand better, how the step of nucleotide eversion influences the overall catalytic process, we performed a pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of AAG interaction with specific DNA-substrates, 13-base pair duplexes containing in the 7th position 1-N6-ethenoadenine (εA), hypoxanthine (Hx), and the stable product analogue tetrahydrofuran (F). The combination of the fluorescence of tryptophan, 2-aminopurine, and 1-N6-ethenoadenine was used to record conformational changes of the enzyme and DNA during the processes of DNA lesion recognition, damaged base eversion, excision of the N-glycosidic bond, and product release. The thermal stability of the duplexes characterized by the temperature of melting, Tm, and the rates of spontaneous opening of individual nucleotide base pairs were determined by NMR spectroscopy. The data show that the relative thermal stability of duplexes containing a particular base pair in position 7, (Tm(F/T) < Tm(εA/T) < Tm(Hx/T) < Tm(A/T)) correlates with the rate of reversible spontaneous opening of the base pair. However, in contrast to that, the catalytic lesion excision rate is two orders of magnitude higher for Hx-containing substrates than for substrates containing εA, proving that catalytic activity is not correlated with the stability of the damaged base pair. Our study reveals that the formation of the catalytically competent enzyme-substrate complex is not the bottleneck controlling the catalytic activity of AAG.

  17. Early Bone Formation around Immediately Loaded Transitional Implants Inserted in the Human Posterior Maxilla: The Effects of Fixture Design and Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Jefferson Trabach; Luongo, Giuseppe; Piattelli, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the effects of fixture design and surface on the early bone formation around immediately loaded implants inserted in the human posterior maxilla. Materials and Methods. Ten totally edentulous subjects received two transitional implants: one tapered implant with knife-edge threads/nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface (test: Anyridge®, Megagen, Gyeongbuk, South Korea) and one cylindrical implant with self-tapping threads/sandblasted surface (control: EZPlus®, Megagen). The implants were placed according to a split-mouth design and immediately loaded to support an interim complete denture; after 8 weeks, they were removed for histologic/histomorphometric analysis. The bone-to-implant contact (BIC%) and the bone density (BD%) were calculated. The Wilcoxon test was used to evaluate the differences. Results. With test implants, a mean BIC% and BD% of 35.9 (±9.1) and 31.8 (±7.5) were found. With control implants, a mean BIC% and BD% of 29.9 (±7.6) and 32.5 (±3.9) were found. The mean BIC% was higher with test implants, but this difference was not significant (p = 0.16). Similar BD% were found in the two groups (p = 0.9). Conclusions. In the posterior maxilla, under immediate loading conditions, implants with a knife-edge thread design/nanostructured calcium-incorporated surface seem to increase the peri-implant endosseous healing properties, when compared to implants with self-tapping thread design/sandblasted surface.

  18. Junín virus infection of human hematopoietic progenitors impairs in vitro proplatelet formation and platelet release via a bystander effect involving type I IFN signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozner, Roberto G; Ure, Agustín E; Jaquenod de Giusti, Carolina; D'Atri, Lina P; Italiano, Joseph E; Torres, Oscar; Romanowski, Victor; Schattner, Mirta; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2010-04-15

    Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF) is an endemo-epidemic disease caused by Junín virus (JUNV), a member of the arenaviridae family. Although a recently introduced live attenuated vaccine has proven to be effective, AHF remains a potentially lethal infection. Like in other viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF), AHF patients present with fever and hemorrhagic complications. Although the causes of the bleeding are poorly understood, impaired hemostasis, endothelial cell dysfunction and low platelet counts have been described. Thrombocytopenia is a common feature in VHF syndromes, and it is a major sign for its diagnosis. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanism has not yet been elucidated. We hypothesized that thrombocytopenia results from a viral-triggered alteration of the megakaryo/thrombopoiesis process. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of JUNV on megakaryopoiesis using an in vitro model of human CD34+ cells stimulated with thrombopoietin. Our results showed that CD34+ cells are infected with JUNV in a restricted fashion. Infection was transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)-dependent and the surface expression of TfR1 was higher in infected cultures, suggesting a novel arenaviral dissemination strategy in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Although proliferation, survival, and commitment in JUNV-infected cultures were normal, viral infection impaired thrombopoiesis by decreasing in vitro proplatelet formation, platelet release, and P-selectin externalization via a bystander effect. The decrease in platelet release was also TfR1-dependent, mimicked by poly(I:C), and type I interferon (IFN alpha/beta) was implicated as a key paracrine mediator. Among the relevant molecules studied, only the transcription factor NF-E2 showed a moderate decrease in expression in megakaryocytes from either infected cultures or after type I IFN treatment. Moreover, type I IFN-treated megakaryocytes presented ultrastructural abnormalities resembling the reported thrombocytopenic NF-E2(-/-) mouse

  19. Chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate sulphation motifs and their proteoglycans are involved in articular cartilage formation during human foetal knee joint development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, James; Isaacs, Marc D; Smith, Susan M; Hughes, Clare E; Little, Christopher B; Caterson, Bruce; Hayes, Anthony J

    2012-09-01

    Novel sulphation motifs within the glycosaminoglycan chain structure of chondroitin sulphate (CS) containing proteoglycans (PGs) are associated with sites of growth, differentiation and repair in many biological systems and there is compelling evidence that they function as molecular recognition sites that are involved in the binding, sequestration or presentation of soluble signalling molecules (e.g. morphogens, growth factors and cytokines). Here, using monoclonal antibodies 3B3(-), 4C3 and 7D4, we examine the distribution of native CS sulphation motifs within the developing connective tissues of the human foetal knee joint, both during and after joint cavitation. We show that the CS motifs have broad, overlapping distributions within the differentiating connective tissues before the joint has fully cavitated; however, after cavitation, they all localise very specifically to the presumptive articular cartilage tissue. Comparisons with the labelling patterns of heparan sulphate (HS), HS-PGs (perlecan, syndecan-4 and glypican-6) and FGF-2, molecules with known signalling roles in development, indicate that these also become localised to the future articular cartilage tissue after joint cavitation. Furthermore, they display interesting, overlapping distributions with the CS motifs, reflective of early tissue zonation. The overlapping expression patterns of these molecules at this site suggests they are involved, or co-participate, in early morphogenetic events underlying articular cartilage formation; thus having potential clinical relevance to mechanisms involved in its repair/regeneration. We propose that these CS sulphation motifs are involved in modulating the signalling gradients responsible for the cellular behaviours (proliferation, differentiation, matrix turnover) that shape the zonal tissue architecture present in mature articular cartilage.

  20. Anti-human CD73 monoclonal antibody inhibits metastasis formation in human breast cancer by inducing clustering and internalization of CD73 expressed on the surface of cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terp, Mikkel G; Olesen, Kristina A; Christensen, Eva Arnspang

    2013-01-01

    -linking of CD73, because both whole IgG anti-CD73 AD2 mAb and Fab' fragments thereof exhibited this effect. Ex vivo treatment of different breast cancer cell lines with anti-CD73 AD2 mAb before i.v. injection into mice inhibited extravasation/colonization of circulating tumor cells and significantly reduced...... internalization and metastasis inhibition. Furthermore, anti-CD73 AD2 mAb inhibited development of metastasis in a spontaneous animal model of human metastatic breast cancer. Our study shows that some anti-CD73 mAbs cause cell-surface clustering of CD73 followed by internalization, thus inhibiting the ability...... another anticancer mechanism of anti-CD73 Abs and show that an anti-CD73 mAb (AD2) inhibits metastasis formation by a mechanism independent of CD73 catalytic activity and inhibition of primary tumor growth. This mechanism involves clustering and internalization of CD73, but does not require cross...

  1. HERC2 rs12913832 modulates human pigmentation by attenuating chromatin-loop formation between a long-range enhancer and the OCA2 promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Visser (Mijke); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); R.-J.T.S. Palstra (Robert-Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPigmentation of skin, eye, and hair reflects some of the most evident common phenotypes in humans. Several candidate genes for human pigmentation are identified. The SNP rs12913832 has strong statistical association with human pigmentation. It is located within an intron of the

  2. Claves de la formación y el desarrollo humano en pedagogía / Keys on the Formation and Human Development in Pedagogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alixon David Reyes Rodríguez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo que a continuación se ofrece ha sido desarrollado desde la experiencia y la anécdota de quien ha compartido diversos espacios educativos pasando por todos y cada uno de los niveles del sistema educativo venezolano. Tal posibilidad es pensada como una plataforma importante a fin de comprender las ideas de formación y desarrollo humano presentes en la institucionalidad venezolana en el tránsito escolar. Creemos que la idea de formación que tenemos como educadores debe ser repensada en tanto esta pase por el crisol de las historias personales, por el crisol de los rostros de aquellos que con nosotros comparten su tiempo, su interés y su disposición de vida. Niños, jóvenes o adultos; todos tienen una identidad, tienen particularidades, diferencias, pero también coincidencias. Tanto el maestro como la escuela, el currículo y el Estado no pueden pensar una educación para alguien a quien no conocen, para alguien a quien no descifran. En este sentido, presentamos algunas reflexiones producto de un trabajo etnográfico partiendo, en primer lugar, de la convivencia escolar, entrevistas, análisis de clases, observaciones, registros anecdóticos, entre otros. Como resultado reflexionamos sobre varias categorías, a saber: formación,  esperanza, diálogo, actitud y convivencia.This paper is based on the experiences of the author, who has worked in the various levels of the Venezuelan educational system. This has been a very important platform to understand the ideas of education and human development within the Venezuelan institutionality in the educational field. The idea of education that we have, as teachers, should be rethought in order to consider the personal stories of those who share with us their time, interests and willingness: children, young people or adults, all with particular identities, differences and coincidences. The teachers, the schools and the State cannot consider an education for someone they do not know. In

  3. Mutual Interplay between the Human Cytomegalovirus Terminase Subunits pUL51, pUL56, and pUL89 Promotes Terminase Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuber, Sebastian; Wagner, Karen; Goldner, Thomas; Lischka, Peter; Steinbrueck, Lars; Messerle, Martin; Borst, Eva Maria

    2017-06-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome encapsidation requires several essential viral proteins, among them pUL56, pUL89, and the recently described pUL51, which constitute the viral terminase. To gain insight into terminase complex assembly, we investigated interactions between the individual subunits. For analysis in the viral context, HCMV bacterial artificial chromosomes carrying deletions in the open reading frames encoding the terminase proteins were used. These experiments were complemented by transient-transfection assays with plasmids expressing the terminase components. We found that if one terminase protein was missing, the levels of the other terminase proteins were markedly diminished, which could be overcome by proteasome inhibition or providing the missing subunit in trans These data imply that sequestration of the individual subunits within the terminase complex protects them from proteasomal turnover. The finding that efficient interactions among the terminase proteins occurred only when all three were present together is reminiscent of a folding-upon-binding principle leading to cooperative stability. Furthermore, whereas pUL56 was translocated into the nucleus on its own, correct nuclear localization of pUL51 and pUL89 again required all three terminase constituents. Altogether, these features point to a model of the HCMV terminase as a multiprotein complex in which the three players regulate each other concerning stability, subcellular localization, and assembly into the functional tripartite holoenzyme.IMPORTANCE HCMV is a major risk factor in immunocompromised individuals, and congenital CMV infection is the leading viral cause for long-term sequelae, including deafness and mental retardation. The current treatment of CMV disease is based on drugs sharing the same mechanism, namely, inhibiting viral DNA replication, and often results in adverse side effects and the appearance of resistant virus strains. Recently, the HCMV terminase has emerged as

  4. Repair of Osteochondral Defects Using Human Umbilical Cord Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rabbit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cell (WJMSC is a new-found mesenchymal stem cell in recent years with multiple lineage potential. Due to its abundant resources, no damage procurement, and lower immunogenicity than other adult MSCs, WJMSC promises to be a good xenogenous cell candidate for tissue engineering. This in vivo pilot study explored the use of human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs containing a tissue engineering construct xenotransplant in rabbits to repair full-thickness cartilage defects in the femoral patellar groove. We observed orderly spatial-temporal remodeling of hWJMSCs into cartilage tissues during repair over 16 months, with characteristic architectural features, including a hyaline-like neocartilage layer with good surface regularity, complete integration with adjacent host cartilage, and regenerated subchondral bone. No immune rejection was detected when xenograft hWJMSCs were implanted into rabbit cartilage defects. The repair results using hWJMSCs were superior to those of chondrogenically induced hWJMSCs after assessing gross appearance and histological grading scores. These preliminary results suggest that using novel undifferentiated hWJMSCs as seed cells might be a better approach than using transforming growth factor-β-induced differentiated hWJMSCs for in vivo tissue engineering treatment of cartilage defects. hWJMSC allografts may be promising for clinical applications.

  5. Investigation of standing wave formation in a human skull for a clinical prototype of a large-aperture, transcranial MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) phased array: An experimental and simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Junho; Pulkkinen, Aki; Huang, Yuexi; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Standing wave formation in an ex vivo human skull was investigated using a clinical prototype of a 30 cm diameter with 15 cm radius of curvature, low frequency (230 kHz), hemispherical transcranial Magnetic Resonance guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) phased-array. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted with changing aperture size and f-number configurations of the phased array, and qualitatively and quantitatively examined the acoustic pressure variation at the focus due to stand...

  6. [The formative background of the philosophy on division of the human body circumference based on the figure of Taisu's Nine Zones and Eight Winds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kizen

    2011-11-01

    The figure of Nine Zone and Eight Winds is the only figure in Huangdi Neijing·Taisu. Recording in Lingshu·Jiuzhenlun identifies the origin of the division of the human body circumference. The human body division theory was consistent with archaeological discoveries of Shengui (sacred turtle) divinations and Renzitu (herringbone figure). By matching organs, and body surface with Ba Fang (eight directions), Ba Jie (eight solar terms) and Ba Feng (eight kinds of winds from eight directions), the figure of Nine Zone and Eight Winds connected time, space and human body, and the framework of the theory of the human body formed.

  7. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof......-the-art cosmological simulation, Illustris, follow a tight relation between star formation rate and stellar mass. This relation agrees well with the observed relation at a redshift of z = 0 and z = 4, but at intermediate redshifts of z ' 2 the normalisation is lower than in real observations. This is highlighted...

  8. Direct and indirect reputation formation in nonhuman great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus) and human children (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Esther; Keupp, Stefanie; Hare, Brian; Vaish, Amrisha; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Humans make decisions about when and with whom to cooperate based on their reputations. People either learn about others by direct interaction or by observing third-party interactions or gossip. An important question is whether other animal species, especially our closest living relatives, the nonhuman great apes, also form reputations of others. In Study 1, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, and 2.5-year-old human children experienced a nice experimenter who tried to give food/toys to the subject and a mean experimenter who interrupted the food/toy giving. In studies 2 and 3, nonhuman great apes and human children could only passively observe a similar interaction, in which a nice experimenter and a mean experimenter interacted with a third party. Orangutans and 2.5-year-old human children preferred to approach the nice experimenter rather than the mean one after having directly experienced their respective behaviors. Orangutans, chimpanzees, and 2.5-year-old human children also took into account experimenter actions toward third parties in forming reputations. These studies show that the human ability to form direct and indirect reputation judgment is already present in young children and shared with at least some of the other great apes.

  9. Comparative proteomics of uropathogenic Escherichia coli during growth in human urine identify UCA-like (UCL) fimbriae as an adherence factor involved in biofilm formation and binding to uroepithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurpel, Daniël J; Totsika, Makrina; Allsopp, Luke P; Webb, Richard I; Moriel, Danilo G; Schembri, Mark A

    2016-01-10

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the primary cause of urinary tract infection (UTI) in humans. For the successful colonisation of the human urinary tract, UPEC employ a diverse collection of secreted or surface-exposed virulence factors including toxins, iron acquisition systems and adhesins. In this study, a comparative proteomic approach was utilised to define the UPEC pan and core surface proteome following growth in pooled human urine. Identified proteins were investigated for subcellular origin, prevalence and homology to characterised virulence factors. Fourteen core surface proteins were identified, as well as eleven iron uptake receptor proteins and four distinct fimbrial types, including type 1, P, F1C/S and a previously uncharacterised fimbrial type, designated UCA-like (UCL) fimbriae in this study. These pathogenicity island (PAI)-associated fimbriae are related to UCA fimbriae of Proteus mirabilis, associated with UPEC and exclusively found in members of the E. coli B2 and D phylogroup. We further demonstrated that UCL fimbriae promote significant biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces and mediate specific attachment to exfoliated human uroepithelial cells. Combined, this study has defined the surface proteomic profiles and core surface proteome of UPEC during growth in human urine and identified a new type of fimbriae that may contribute to UTI.

  10. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof......-the-art cosmological simulation, Illustris, follow a tight relation between star formation rate and stellar mass. This relation agrees well with the observed relation at a redshift of z = 0 and z = 4, but at intermediate redshifts of z ' 2 the normalisation is lower than in real observations. This is highlighted...... of GRB host galaxies is affected by the fact that GRBs appear mainly to happen in low-metallicity galaxies. Solving this problem will make it possible to derive the total cosmic star formation rate more reliably from number counts of GRBs....

  11. In vitro and in vivo induction of bone formation based on adeno-associ-ated virus-mediated BMP-7 gene therapy using human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan KANG; Wei-ming LIAO; Zhen-hua YUAN; Pu-yi SHENG; Long-juan ZHANG; Xiang-wei YUAN; Lei LEI

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether adeno-associated virus (AAV)-2-mediated, bone mor-phogenetic protein (BMP)-7-expressing human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMS) cells would induce bone formation in vitro and in vivo.Methods:ADMS cells were harvested from patients undergoing selective suction-assisted fipectomy and transduced with AAV carrying the human BMP-7 gene. Non-trans-duced cells and cells transduced with AAV serotype 2 carrying the enhanced green fluorescence protein gene served as controls. ADMS cells were qualita-tively assessed for the production of BMP-7 and osteocalcin, and subjected to alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Chinalizarin staining. A total of 2.5x 106 cells mixed with type Ⅰ collagen were implanted into the hind limb of severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice and subjected to a histological analysis 3 weeks post implantation.Results: Transfection of the ADMS cells achieved an effi-ciency of 99% at d 7. Transduction with AAV2-BMP-7 induced the expression of BMP-7 until d 56, which was markedly increased by d 7. The cells were positively stained for ALP. Osteocalcin production and matrix mineralization further con-firmed that these cells differentiated into osteoblasts and induced bone formation in vitro. A histological examination demonstrated that implantation of BMP-7-expressing ADMS cells could induce new bone formation in vivo.Conclusion: The present in vitro and in vivo study demonstrated that human ADMS cells would be a promising source of autologous mesenchymal stem cells for BMP gene therapy and tissue engineering.

  12. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory ...

  13. Formation of the peak amplitude of blood flow oscillations at a frequency of 0.1 Hz in the human cardiovascular system by the noise effect on the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinevich, Andrey A.; Tankanag, Arina V.; Chemeris, Nikolay K.

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of our previous hypothesis about the participation of structural and hydrodynamic properties of the vascular bed in the formation of the 0.1-Hz component of blood flow oscillations in the human cardiovascular system and on the basis of the reduced hydrodynamic model, the role of additive stochastic perturbations of the operation of the single-chamber pump that simulates the heart was investigated. It was shown that aperiodic noise modulation of the rigidity of the walls of the pump or its valves generates low-frequency oscillations of pressure of arterial vascular bed with the spectral components at a frequency close to 0.1 Hz.

  14. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eLachance-Touchette

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X that were found in a cohort of families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1-/- GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  15. Enhanced prostaglandin F2α formation in human pregnancy and the effect of increased oily fish intake: results from the Salmon in Pregnancy Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna; Miles, Elizabeth A; Vlachava, Maria; Kremmyda, Lefkothea-Stella; Noakes, Paul S; Diaper, Norma D; Godfrey, Keith M; Calder, Philip C; Basu, Samar

    2012-01-01

    Oily fish intake during pregnancy may reduce the risk of allergic diseases in infancy possibly by shifts in the fatty acid balance and subsequent altered prostaglandin (PG) formation. This intervention is the first study to evaluate if increased oily fish intake affects in vivo PGF(2α) formation during pregnancy. British pregnant women were randomised to two portions of farmed salmon weekly (n=47), or maintenance of their normal diet low in fish (n=41), from pregnancy week 20 until parturition. The concentrations of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC) were higher and the concentration of arachidonic acid in plasma PC was lower in the salmon group than the control group at weeks 34 and 38 of pregnancy. PGF(2α) formation was evaluated by urinary measurement of 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2α), a major PGF(2α) metabolite, at 20, 34 and 38 weeks. In both the salmon and control groups urinary 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2α) concentrations increased significantly during pregnancy, which may be of physiological importance. Oily fish intervention altered fatty acid concentrations but did not affect urinary 15-keto-dihydro-PGF(2α) concentrations in pregnant women.

  16. Influence of human growth hormone on granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, and the aminoterminal propeptide of collagen type III in wound chambers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L H; Garbarsch, C; Schuppan, D; Moe, D; Hørslev-Pedersen, K; Gottrup, F; Steenfos, H

    1994-01-01

    The influence of growth hormone on granulation tissue formation was investigated in wire mesh cylinders implanted subcutaneously in rats. Two groups of 10 rats (study 1) and 1 group of 12 rats (study 2) were used for the investigation. Growth hormone, 0.02 and 0.2 IU (study 1), 0.05 and 0.2 IU (study 2), or vehicle only, was injected into the cylinders every third day for 16 days. In study 2, wound fluid was aspirated before injection of growth hormone and saved for later analysis of the aminoterminal propeptide of collagen type III. In both studies, growth hormone significantly increased the formation of granulation tissue and of total collagen content dose-dependently, whereas the relative amount of collagen was unaffected by growth hormone treatment. Wound fluid aminopropeptide increased significantly after implantation of the cylinders until day 7, before declining slightly, with no difference between the groups. We conclude that growth hormone stimulated granulation tissue formation and collagen deposition dose-dependently in the wound cylinders when injected every third day. The results suggest that growth hormone treatment does not cause excessive collagen deposition in newly formed granulation tissue.

  17. Hippocampal formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappaert, N.L.M.; van Strien, N.M.; Witter, M.P.; Paxinos, G.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal formation and parahippocampal region are prominent components of the rat nervous system and play a crucial role in learning, memory, and spatial navigation. Many new details regarding the entorhinal cortex have been discovered since the previous edition, and the growing interest in t

  18. Islet formation in mice and men: lessons for the generation of functional insulin-producing β-cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Gopika; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    The Islets of Langerhans are crucial 'micro-organs' embedded in the glandular exocrine pancreas that regulate nutrient metabolism. They not only synthesize, but also secrete endocrine hormones in a modulated fashion in response to physiologic metabolic demand. These highly sophisticated structures with intricate organization of multiple cell types, namely endocrine, vascular, neuronal and mesenchymal cells, have evolved to perform this task to perfection over time. Not surprisingly, islet architecture and function are dissimilar between humans and typically studied model organisms, such as rodents and zebrafish. Further, recent findings also suggest noteworthy differences in human islet development from that in mouse, including delayed appearance and gradual resolution of key differentiation markers, a single-phase of endocrine differentiation, and prenatal association of developing islets with neurovascular milieu. In light of these findings, it is imperative that a systematic study is undertaken to compare islet development between human and mouse. Illuminating inter-species differences in islet development will likely be critical in furthering our pursuit to generate an unlimited supply of truly functional and fully mature β-cells from human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) sources for therapeutic purposes.

  19. A study of the formation and branching pattern of brachial plexus and its variations in adult human cadavers of north Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal V Pattanshetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: The brachial plexus is highly variable, in its formation and branching pattern thus, knowledge of its anatomical patterns, may be insufficient for the surgeon operating on or around these nerves or for the regional anesthesiologist working in this area. Therefore, the present study was an attempt to study further about variations of brachial plexus encountered during routine dissection classes. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive study was carried out by dissection of 60 upper limbs of 30 cadavers, in the age group of 18 to 85 years, obtained during a study period of 2 years from the Department of Anatomy. The plexus was studied in its entire course commencing from the formation in cervical region, course through root of the neck and axilla, up to the main terminal branches of the upper extremity. During the dissection, variations of brachial plexus pertaining to its formation from the roots, trunks, divisions and cords and the branching pattern were observed and data was collected. Results: Out of the 60 cadaveric upper limbs studied for the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus, 2 limbs (3.33% were pre-fixed plexuses. Fusion of adjacent trunks was detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. Variations in branches of lateral cord were detected in 8 limbs (13.33%. Among Posterior cord variations 2-thoracodorsal nerves were detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. All the other branches from brachial plexus had been found to have no anatomical variations. Conclusion: In the present study, an attempt has been made to know the possible variations of the brachial plexus. Though the variations mentioned may not alter the normal functioning of the limb of the individual, but knowledge of the variations is of prime importance to be kept in mind, during anaesthetic and surgical procedures.

  20. Disruption of the ECM33 Gene in Candida albicans Prevents Biofilm Formation, Engineered Human Oral Mucosa Tissue Damage and Gingival Cell Necrosis/Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rouabhia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen. We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida.

  1. CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression and DNA adduct formation in normal human mammary epithelial cells exposed to benzo[a]pyrene in the absence or presence of chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Kaarthik; Divi, Rao L; Keshava, Channa; Orozco, Christine C; Schockley, Marie E; Richardson, Diana L; Poirier, Miriam C; Nath, Joginder; Weston, Ainsley

    2010-06-28

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) is a potent pro-carcinogen and ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Here, we examined the induction and modulation of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 and 10-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPdG) adduct formation in DNA from 20 primary normal human mammary epithelial cell (NHMEC) strains exposed to BP (4muM) in the absence or presence of chlorophyllin (5muM). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed strong induction of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 by BP, with high levels of inter-individual variability. Variable BPdG formation was found in all strains by r7, t8-dihydroxy-t-9, 10 epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BPDE)-DNA chemiluminescence assay (CIA). Chlorophyllin mitigated BP-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene expression in all 20 strains when administered with BP. Chlorophyllin, administered prior to BP-exposure, mitigated CYP1A1 expression in 18/20 NHMEC strains (pchlorophyllin followed by administration of the carcinogen with chlorophyllin (pchlorophyllin is likely to be a good chemoprotective agent for a large proportion of the human population.

  2. Galaxy formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peebles, P J

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z approximately 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation.

  3. Efficient export of human growth hormone, interferon α2b and antibody fragments to the periplasm by the Escherichia coli Tat pathway in the absence of prior disulfide bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanen, Heli I; Walker, Kelly L; Lourdes Velez Suberbie, M; Matos, Cristina F R O; Bönisch, Sarah; Freedman, Robert B; Keshavarz-Moore, Eli; Ruddock, Lloyd W; Robinson, Colin

    2015-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic proteins are expressed in Escherichia coli and targeted to the periplasm in order to facilitate purification and enable disulfide bond formation. Export is normally achieved by the Sec pathway, which transports proteins through the plasma membrane in a reduced, unfolded state. The Tat pathway is a promising alternative means of export, because it preferentially exports correctly folded proteins; however, the reducing cytoplasm of standard strains has been predicted to preclude export by Tat of proteins that contain disulfide bonds in the native state because, in the reduced state, they are sensed as misfolded and rejected. Here, we have tested a series of disulfide-bond containing biopharmaceuticals for export by the Tat pathway in CyDisCo strains that do enable disulfide bond formation in the cytoplasm. We show that interferon α2b, human growth hormone (hGH) and two antibody fragments are exported with high efficiency; surprisingly, however, they are efficiently exported even in the absence of cytoplasmic disulfide formation. The exported proteins acquire disulfide bonds in the periplasm, indicating that the normal disulfide oxidation machinery is able to act on the proteins. Tat-dependent export of hGH proceeds even when the disulfide bonds are removed by substitution of the Cys residues involved, suggesting that these substrates adopt tertiary structures that are accepted as fully-folded by the Tat machinery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction of apoptosis by 4-acetyl-12,13-epoxyl-9-trichothecene-3,15-diol from Isaria japonica Yasuda through intracellular reactive oxygen species formation and caspase-3 activation in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, H O; Oh, G S; Choi, B M; Seo, E A; Oh, H; Shin, M K; Kim, T H; Kwon, T O; Chung, H T

    2003-02-01

    Recently we have reported that the trichothecene mycotoxin 4-acetyl-12,13-epoxyl-9-trichothecene-3,15-diol (AETD) from the fruiting bodies of Isaria japonica Yasuda is a potent inducer of apoptosis in human promyelocytic HL-60 cells. The present study aims to characterize the molecular events leading to AETD-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. The percentage of apoptotic cells (annexin-V-positive cell population) increased dose- and time-dependently after AETD exposure. Apoptosis of HL-60 cells by AETD was associated with the formation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), the depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) and the activation of caspase-3. Pretreating the cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cystein (NAC) and the caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-fmk abrogated AETD-induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. NAC blocked intracellular ROS formation and GSH depletion, but Z-DEVD-fmk did not. These results indicate that AETD induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells by causing intracellular ROS formation and GSH depletion followed by the downstream event of caspase-3 activation.

  5. Cloud Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark Talmage

    2004-05-01

    Cloud formation is crucial to the heritage of modern physics, and there is a rich literature on this important topic. In 1927, Charles T.R. Wilson was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for applications of the cloud chamber.2 Wilson was inspired to study cloud formation after working at a meteorological observatory on top of the highest mountain in Scotland, Ben Nevis, and testified near the end of his life, "The whole of my scientific work undoubtedly developed from the experiments I was led to make by what I saw during my fortnight on Ben Nevis in September 1894."3 To form clouds, Wilson used the sudden expansion of humid air.4 Any structure the cloud may have is spoiled by turbulence in the sudden expansion, but in 1912 Wilson got ion tracks to show up by using strobe photography of the chamber immediately upon expansion.5 In the interim, Millikan's study in 1909 of the formation of cloud droplets around individual ions was the first in which the electron charge was isolated. This study led to his famous oil drop experiment.6 To Millikan, as to Wilson, meteorology and physics were professionally indistinct. With his meteorological physics expertise, in WWI Millikan commanded perhaps the first meteorological observation and forecasting team essential to military operation in history.7 But even during peacetime meteorology is so much of a concern to everyone that a regular news segment is dedicated to it. Weather is the universal conversation topic, and life on land could not exist as we know it without clouds. One wonders then, why cloud formation is never covered in physics texts.

  6. Evaluation of three different formats of a neutralizing single chain human antibody against toxin Cn2: neutralization capacity versus thermodynamic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Hernández, Veronica; Del Pozo-Yauner, Luis; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Juárez-González, Victor R; Alcántara-Recillas, Israel; Possani, Lourival D; Becerril, Baltazar

    2012-04-30

    The single-chain antibody fragment (scFv) 6009F, obtained by directed evolution, neutralizes the effects of the Cn2 toxin, which is the major toxic component of Centruroides noxius scorpion venom. In this work we compared the neutralization capacity and the thermodynamic stability of scFv 6009F with those of two other derived formats: Fab 6009F and diabody 6009F. Additionally, the affinity constants to Cn2 toxin of the three recombinant antibody fragments were determined by means of BIAcore. We found a correlation between the thermodynamic stability of these antibody fragments with their neutralization capacity. The order of thermodynamic stability determined was Fab≫scFv>diabody. The Fab and scFv were capable of neutralizing the toxic effects of Cn2 and whole venom but the diabody was unable to fully neutralize intoxication. In silico analysis of the diabody format indicates that the reduction of stability and neutralization capacity could be explained by a less cooperative interface between the heavy and the light variable domains.

  7. TGF-β1 induces the formation of vascular-like structures in embryoid bodies derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Qian, DE-Jian; Zhong, Wen-Yu; Lu, Jun-Hong; Guo, Xiang-Kai; Cao, Yi-Lin; Liu, Ju

    2014-07-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into endothelial cells in response to stimuli from extracellular cytokines. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling is involved in stem cell renewal and vascular development. Previously, human ESCs were isolated from inner cell mass and a stable ESC line was developed. In the present study, the effects of extracellular TGF-β1 were investigated on human ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EB) in suspension. The structures of the EBs were analyzed with light and electron microscopy, while the cellular composition of the EBs was examined via the expression levels of specific markers. Vascular-like tubular structures and cardiomyocyte-like beating cells were observed in the EBs at day 3 and 8, respectively. The frequencies of vascular-like structures and beating cells in the TGF-β1 treated group were significantly higher compared with the control group (84.31 vs. 12.77%; Pcell types for the clinical therapy of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of 14C/13C-labeled ortho-phenylphenol formation following dermal application to human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchalk, C; Selim, S; Sangha, G; Bartels, M J

    1998-08-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of uniformly labeled 14C/13C-ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) were followed in six human male volunteers given a single 8 h dermal dose of 6 microg OPP/kg body weight formulated as a 0.4% (w/v) solution in isopropyl alcohol. The application site was covered with a non-occlusive dome allowing free movement of air, but preventing the loss of radioactivity due to physical contact. At 8 h post-exposure the non-occlusive dome was removed, the dose site was wiped with isopropyl alcohol containing swabs and the skin surface repeatedly stripped with tape. Blood specimens, urine, and feces were collected from each volunteer over a 5 day post-exposure period and were analyzed for radioactivity and metabolites (urine only). 2. Following dermal application, peak plasma levels of radioactivity were obtained within 4 h post-exposure and rapidly declined with virtually all of the absorbed dose rapidly excreted into the urine within 24 h post-exposure. A one-compartment pharmacokinetic model was used to describe the time-course of OPP absorption and clearance in male human volunteers. Approximately 43% of the dermally applied dose was absorbed through the skin with an average absorption half-life of 10 h. Once absorbed the renal clearance of OPP was rapid with an average half-life of 0.8 h. The rate limiting step for renal clearance was the relatively slower rate of dermal absorption; therefore the pharmacokinetics of OPP in humans was described by a 'flip-flop' single compartment model. Overall, the pharmacokinetics were similar between individuals, and the model parameters were in excellent agreement with the experimental data. 3. Approximately 73% of the total urinary radioactivity was accounted for as free OPP, OPP-sulfate and OPP-glucuronide conjugates. The sulfate conjugate was the major metabolite (approximately 69%). Therefore, total urinary OPP equivalents (acid-labile conjugates+free OPP) can be used to estimate the systemically absorbed

  9. The mycotoxin zearalenone enhances cell proliferation, colony formation and promotes cell migration in the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi, Haila; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Shirley, Sarah; Abid, Salwa; Bacha, Hassen; Micheau, Olivier

    2016-07-08

    Zearalenone (ZEN) and Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) are fungal secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium and Aspergillus genera, respectively. These mycotoxins are found world-wide as corn and wheat contaminants. AFB1 is probably the most toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin. It has been demonstrated to be mutagenic, genotoxic, and hepatocarcinogenic. ZEN is a non-steroidal estrogenic mycotoxin that displays hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic properties have so far remained controversial and questionable. Using the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, we will show here that ZEN, at low concentrations, enhances cell proliferation, increases colony formation and fastens cell migration after wound healing. The highest effect of ZEN was observed at a concentration 10 times lower as compared to AFB1. Our findings suggest thus that this mycotoxin exhibits carcinogenesis-like properties in HCT116 cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bone formation of human mesenchymal stem cells harvested from reaming debris is stimulated by low-dose bone morphogenetic protein-7 application in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westhauser, Fabian; Höllig, Melanie; Reible, Bruno; Xiao, Kai; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Moghaddam, Arash

    2016-12-01

    Stimulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) by bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) leads to superior bone formation in vitro. In this in vivo-study we evaluated the use of BMP-7 in combination with MSC isolated from reaming debris (RIA-MSC) and iliac crest bone marrow (BMSC) with micro-computed tomography (mCT)-analysis. β-Tricalciumphosphate scaffolds coated with BMSC and RIA-MSC were stimulated with three different BMP-7-concentrations and implanted ectopically in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Our results demonstrate that RIA-MSC show a higher osteogenic potential in vivo compared to BMSC. Ossification increased in direct correlation with the BMP-7-dose applied, however low-dose-stimulation by BMP-7 was more effective for RIA-MSC.

  11. Effect of ingested human antibodies induced by RTS, S/AS01 malaria vaccination in children on Plasmodium falciparum oocyst formation and sporogony in mosquitoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Jongert, Erik; Deng, Bingbing

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The circumsporozoite protein (CS protein) on the malaria parasites in mosquitoes plays an important role in sporogony in mosquitoes. The RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine candidate, which has shown significant efficacy against clinical malaria in a large Phase 3 trial, targets the Plasmodium...... falciparum CS protein, but the ability of serum from vaccinated individuals to inhibit sporogony in mosquitoes has not been evaluated. METHODS: Previously a double-blind, randomized trial of RTS,S/AS01 vaccine, as compared with rabies vaccine, in five- to 17-month old children in Tanzania was conducted...... of antibodies to inhibit P. falciparum oocyst formation and/or sporogony in the mosquito host was evaluated by a standard membrane-feeding assay. The test antibodies were fed on day 0 (at the same time as the gametocyte feed), or on days 3 or 6 (serial-feed experiments). The oocyst and sporozoite counts were...

  12. Formation of DNA adducts in the skin of psoriasis patients, in human skin in organ culture, and in mouse skin and lung following topical application of coal-tar and juniper tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoket, B; Horkay, I; Kósa, A; Páldeák, L; Hewer, A; Grover, P L; Phillips, D H

    1990-02-01

    Preparations of coal-tar and juniper tar (cade oil) that are used in the treatment of psoriasis are known to contain numerous potentially carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Evidence of covalent binding to DNA by components of these mixtures was sought in a) human skin biopsy samples from 12 psoriasis patients receiving therapy with these agents, b) human skin explants maintained in organ culture and treated topically with the tars, and c) the skin and lungs of mice treated with repeated doses of the formulations following the regimen used in the clinic. DNA was isolated from the human and mouse tissues and digested enzymically to mononucleotides. 32P-Post-labeling analysis revealed the presence of aromatic DNA adducts in the biopsy samples at levels of up to 0.4 fmol total adducts/microgram DNA. Treatment of human skin in organ culture produced similar levels of adducts, while treatment with dithranol, a non-mutagenic therapeutic agent, resulted in chromatograms indistinguishable from those from untreated controls. In mouse skin, coal-tar ointment and juniper tar gave similar DNA adduct levels, with a similar time-course of removal: maximum levels (0.5 fmol/microgram DNA) at 24 h after the final treatment declined rapidly to 0.05 fmol/microgram at 7 d, thereafter declining slowly over the succeeding 25 d. However, while coal-tar ointment produced only very low levels of adducts in mouse lung (less than 0.03 fmol/microgram DNA), juniper tar produced adducts at a high level (0.7 fmol/microgram DNA) that were persistent in this tissue. These results provide direct evidence for the formation of potentially carcinogenic DNA damage in human and mouse tissue by components of these therapeutic tar preparations.

  13. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  14. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene transduction into human lung cancer cells differentially regulates metastasis formations in various organ microenvironments of natural killer cell-depleted SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, S; Nishioka, Y; Nokihara, H; Sone, S

    1997-02-15

    We investigated whether local production of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), responsible for migration and activation of monocytes/macrophages at a tumor growth site, affected the metastatic pattern of lung cancer. For this, highly metastatic human squamous (RERF-LC-AI) or small (H69/VP) cell lung carcinoma cells were transduced with the human M-CSF gene inserted into pRc/CMV-MCSF to establish M-CSF-producing clones (MCSF-AI-9-18, MCSF-AI-9-24, and MCSF-VP-5). M-CSF gene transduction had no effect on the expression of surface antigen or on in vitro proliferation. After s.c. injection into SCID mice, the growth rates of M-CSF-producing cells were slower than those of parent or mock-transduced cells. In the metastatic model in SCID mice depleted of natural killer cells, RERF-LC-AI cells formed metastases mainly in the liver and kidneys, whereas H69/VP cells metastasized mainly to the liver and systemic lymph nodes. The numbers of metastatic colonies of MCSF-AI-9-18 and MCSF-AI-9-24 cells in the liver but not the kidneys were significantly reduced. The development of lymph node metastases of MCSF-VP-5 cells was also less than that of parent or mock-transduced cells. Treatment of SCID mice with anti-human M-CSF antibody resulted in a significant increase in liver metastases of their M-CSF gene transfectants. No significant differences were observed in the distributions in mice or in the in vitro invasive potentials of MCSF-AI-9-18 cells and Neo-AI-3 cells. These findings indicate that the antimetastatic effect of M-CSF may be specific to particular organs, suggesting the influence of heterogeneity of organ microenvironments on the metastasis of lung cancer.

  15. Sediment sequence and site formation processes at the Arbreda Cave, NE Iberian Peninsula, and implications on human occupation and climate change during the Last Glacial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kehl

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The cave of Arbreda provides a detailed archaeological record of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic and is a key site for studying human occupation and cultural transitions in NE Iberia. Recently, studies of lake archives and archaeological sites presented new evidence on climate changes in NE Iberia correlating with Heinrich events. It, therefore, needs to be determined whether climate signals can be identified in the cave sequence of Arbreda, and if so, whether these signals can be correlated with stratigraphic indicators suggesting the continuity or discontinuity of human occupation. We conducted a high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical study, including micromorphological investigations, to shed light on stratigraphy, processes of sediment accumulation and post-depositional alteration in the cave. Seven major sediment units were distinguished which partly correlate with archaeological levels. The lower part of the sequence including Mousterian levels J and K consists of fluvial deposits truncated by a sharp erosional disconformity between Mousterian levels J and I. Strong enrichment with phosphorus and strontium reflect zoogenic inputs. The transition from Mousterian to Archaic Aurignacian in levels I and H, respectively, is reflected by more gradual changes in colour, grain size, and geochemical composition. However, a peak in potentially wind-blown particles (40–125 μm in diameter reflects higher aeolian input, and banded microstructure suggests reworking of sediments at the interface. Both properties correlate with low density of finds suggesting low intensity of human occupation related to a dry spell. More arid conditions than during the Holocene are indicated for the Gravettian to Solutrean levels. These findings are in agreement with previous palaeoclimatic interpretations as based on palaeontological proxies. The detailed multi-proxy analyses of the sequence adds to our understanding on sediment accumulation and alteration

  16. Sediment sequence and site formation processes at the Arbreda Cave, NE Iberian Peninsula, and implications on human occupation and climate change during the Last Glacial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kehl

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Arbreda Cave provides a detailed archaeological record of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic and is a key site for studying human occupation and cultural transitions in NE Iberia. Recently, studies of lake archives and archaeological sites presented new evidence on climate changes in NE Iberia correlating with Heinrich events. It, therefore, needs to be determined whether climate signals can be identified in the cave sequence of Arbreda, and if so, whether these signals can be correlated with stratigraphic indicators suggesting the continuity or discontinuity of human occupation. We conducted a high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical study, including micromorphological investigations, to shed light on stratigraphy, processes of sediment accumulation and post-depositional alteration in the cave. Seven major sediment units were distinguished which partly correlate with archaeological levels. The lower part of the sequence including Mousterian levels J and K consists of fluvial deposits truncated by a sharp erosional disconformity between Mousterian levels J and I. Strong enrichment with phosphorus and strontium reflect zoogenic inputs. The transition from Mousterian to Archaic Aurignacian in levels I and H, respectively, is reflected by more gradual changes in colour, grain size and geochemical composition. However, a peak in potentially wind-blown particles (40–125 μm in diameter reflects higher aeolian input, and banded microstructure suggests reworking of sediments at the interface. Both properties correlate with low density of finds suggesting low intensity of human occupation related to a dry spell. More arid conditions than during the Holocene are indicated for the Gravettian to Solutrean levels. These findings are in agreement with previous palaeoclimatic interpretations as based on palaeontological proxies. The detailed multi-proxy analyses of the sequence adds to our understanding on sediment accumulation and alteration in

  17. Humanidades Médicas,una contribución a la formación de recursos humanos en Salud Humanidades Médicas, a contribution to human resources formation within the Health Care sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alfredo Díaz Cruz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available El artículo aborda aspectos significativos de las Ciencias Sociales y Humanísticas que perfeccionan la práctica profesional en la Salud y expone algunos de los desafíos, iniciativas y progresos de la publicación científica latinoamericana; específicamente los de la revista Humanidades Médicas. Más adelante se describen el impacto científico y social de una estrategia organizativa para contribuir a la formación integral de recursos humanos en el sector de la Salud a través de la revista, los resultados esperados y las principales acciones dentro del proceso editorial y aquellas que aumentarán el impacto de la revista como producto editorial.This article deals with key aspects of the Social Sciences and Humanities that improve the professional practice in Health Care, and presents some of the challenges, projects, and advances of Latin American scientific publication, especially those of the journal Humanidades Médicas. Later on, it describes the scientific and social impact of an organizational strategy to contribute to the integrated formation of human resources in the Health Care sector through the journal. The strategys prospective results and main tasks within the editorial process and those to increase the journals impact as an editorial product are taken into account, as well.

  18. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tulotta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC.

  19. Automated liquid-liquid extraction based on 96-well plate format in conjunction with ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the quantitation of methoxsalen in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manish; Contractor, Pritesh; Upadhyay, Vivek; Gupta, Ajay; Guttikar, Swati; Singhal, Puran; Goswami, Sailendra; Shrivastav, Pranav S

    2008-09-01

    A sensitive, specific and high throughput bioanalytical method using automated sample processing via 96-well plate liquid-liquid extraction and ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) has been developed for the determination of methoxsalen in human plasma. Plasma samples with ketoconazole as internal standard (IS) were prepared by employing 0.2 mL human plasma in ethyl acetate:dichloromethane (80:20, v/v). The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using isocratic mobile phase, consisting of 10 mM ammonium formate and acetonitrile (60:40, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The linear dynamic range was established over the concentration range 1.1-213.1 ng/mL for methoxsalen. The method was rugged and rapid with a total run time of 1.5 min. It was successfully applied to a pivotal bioequivalence study in 12 healthy human subjects after oral administration of 10 mg extended release methoxsalen formulation under fasting condition.

  20. Roles of C-Terminal Region of Yeast and Human Rad52 in Rad51-Nucleoprotein Filament Formation and ssDNA Annealing.

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    Nilesh V Khade

    Full Text Available Yeast Rad52 (yRad52 has two important functions at homologous DNA recombination (HR; annealing complementary single-strand DNA (ssDNA molecules and recruiting Rad51 recombinase onto ssDNA (recombination mediator activity. Its human homolog (hRAD52 has a lesser role in HR, and apparently lacks mediator activity. Here we show that yRad52 can load human Rad51 (hRAD51 onto ssDNA complexed with yeast RPA in vitro. This is biochemically equivalent to mediator activity because it depends on the C-terminal Rad51-binding region of yRad52 and on functional Rad52-RPA interaction. It has been reported that the N-terminal two thirds of both yRad52 and hRAD52 is essential for binding to and annealing ssDNA. Although a second DNA binding region has been found in the C-terminal region of yRad52, its role in ssDNA annealing is not clear. In this paper, we also show that the C-terminal region of yRad52, but not of hRAD52, is involved in ssDNA annealing. This suggests that the second DNA binding site is required for the efficient ssDNA annealing by yRad52. We propose an updated model of Rad52-mediated ssDNA annealing.

  1. Hormone-dependent bacterial growth, persistence and biofilm formation--a pilot study investigating human follicular fluid collected during IVF cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise S Pelzer

    Full Text Available Human follicular fluid, considered sterile, is aspirated as part of an in vitro fertilization (IVF cycle. However, it is easily contaminated by the trans-vaginal collection route and little information exists in its potential to support the growth of microorganisms. The objectives of this study were to determine whether human follicular fluid can support bacterial growth over time, whether the steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone (present at high levels within follicular fluid contribute to the in vitro growth of bacterial species, and whether species isolated from follicular fluid form biofilms. We found that bacteria in follicular fluid could persist for at least 28 weeks in vitro and that the steroid hormones stimulated the growth of some bacterial species, specifically Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp. Streptococcus spp. and E. coli. Several species, Lactobacillus spp., Propionibacterium spp., and Streptococcus spp., formed biofilms when incubated in native follicular fluids in vitro (18/24, 75%. We conclude that bacteria aspirated along with follicular fluid during IVF cycles demonstrate a persistent pattern of growth. This discovery is important since it can offer a new avenue for investigation in infertile couples.

  2. Heterogeneous filament network formation by myosin light chain isoforms effects on contractile energy output of single cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeomi Mizutani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-CMs are expected to play an important role in heart therapies, in which hiPSC-CMs should generate sufficient contractile force to pump blood. However, recent studies have shown that the contractility of myocardial mimics composed of hiPSC-CMs is lower than that of adult human myocardium. To examine the mechanism by which contractile force output of hiPSC-CMs is weakened, we measured the contractile force of single hiPSC-CMs and observed the fibrous distribution of myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC of cardiac (contributes to beating and non-cardiac (does not contribute to beating isoforms. Single hiPSC-CMs were cultured on an extracellular matrix gel, and the contractile force and strain energy exerted on the gel were measured. Strain energy was not uniform between cells and ranged from 0.2 to 5.8 pJ. The combination of contractile force measurement and immunofluorescent microscopy for MRLC isoforms showed that cells with higher strain energy expressed the weakened non-cardiac myosin II fibers compared to those of cells with lower strain energy. Observation of cardiac and non-cardiac MRLC showed that the MRLC isoforms formed heterogeneous filament networks. These results suggest that strain energy output from single hiPSC-CMs depends both cardiac and non-cardiac myosin fibers, which prevent deformation of the cell body.

  3. Characterization of nitrogen mustard formamidopyrimidine adduct formation of bis(2-chloroethyl)ethylamine with calf thymus DNA and a human mammary cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruppi, Francesca; Hejazi, Leila; Christov, Plamen P; Krishnamachari, Sesha; Turesky, Robert J; Rizzo, Carmelo J

    2015-09-21

    A robust, quantitative ultraperformance liquid chromatography ion trap multistage scanning mass spectrometric (UPLC/MS(3)) method was established to characterize and measure five guanine adducts formed by reaction of the chemotherapeutic nitrogen mustard (NM) bis(2-chloroethyl)ethylamine with calf thymus (CT) DNA. In addition to the known N7-guanine (NM-G) adduct and its cross-link (G-NM-G), the ring-opened formamidopyrimidine (FapyG) monoadduct (NM-FapyG) and cross-links in which one (FapyG-NM-G) or both (FapyG-NM-FapyG) guanines underwent ring-opening to FapyG units were identified. Authentic standards of all adducts were synthesized and characterized by NMR and mass spectrometry. These adducts were quantified in CT DNA treated with NM (1 μM) as their deglycosylated bases. A two-stage neutral thermal hydrolysis was developed to mitigate the artifactual formation of ring-opened FapyG adducts involving hydrolysis of the cationic adduct at 37 °C, followed by hydrolysis of the FapyG adducts at 95 °C. The limit of quantification values ranged between 0.3 and 1.6 adducts per 10(7) DNA bases when the equivalent of 5 μg of DNA hydrolysate was assayed on column. The principal adduct formed was the G-NM-G cross-link, followed by the NM-G monoadduct; the FapyG-NM-G cross-link adduct; and the FapyG-NM-FapyG was below the limit of detection. The NM-FapyG adducts were formed in CT DNA at a level ∼20% that of the NM-G adduct. NM-FapyG has not been previously quanitified, and the FapyG-NM-G and FapyG-NM-FapyG adducts have not been previously characterized. Our validated analytical method was then applied to measure DNA adduct formation in the MDA-MB-231 mammary tumor cell line exposed to NM (100 μM) for 24 h. The major adduct formed was NM-G (970 adducts per 10(7) bases), followed by G-NM-G (240 adducts per 10(7) bases), NM-FapyG (180 adducts per 10(7) bases), and, last, the FapyG-NM-G cross-link adduct (6.0 adducts per 10(7) bases). These lesions are expected to

  4. Sustained induction of cytochrome P4501A1 in human hepatoma cells by co-exposure to benzo[a]pyrene and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole underlies the synergistic effects on DNA adduct formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gábelová, Alena, E-mail: alena.gabelova@savba.sk [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Poláková, Veronika [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Prochazka, Gabriela [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Kretová, Miroslava; Poloncová, Katarína; Regendová, Eva; Luciaková, Katarína [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Segerbäck, Dan [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    To gain a deeper insight into the potential interactions between individual aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture, several benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) binary mixtures were studied. The biological activity of the binary mixtures was investigated in the HepG2 and WB-F344 liver cell lines and the Chinese hamster V79 cell line that stably expresses the human cytochrome P4501A1 (hCYP1A1). In the V79 cells, binary mixtures, in contrast to individual carcinogens, caused a significant decrease in the levels of micronuclei, DNA adducts and gene mutations, but not in cell survival. Similarly, a lower frequency of micronuclei and levels of DNA adducts were found in rat liver WB-F344 cells treated with a binary mixture, regardless of the exposure time. The observed antagonism between B[a]P and DBC may be due to an inhibition of Cyp1a1 expression because cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC showed a decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA levels. In human liver HepG2 cells exposed to binary mixtures for 2 h, a reduction in micronuclei frequency was also found. However, after a 24 h treatment, synergism between B[a]P and DBC was determined based on DNA adduct formation. Accordingly, the up-regulation of CYP1A1 expression was detected in HepG2 cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC. Our results show significant differences in the response of human and rat cells to B[a]P:DBC mixtures and stress the need to use multiple experimental systems when evaluating the potential risk of environmental pollutants. Our data also indicate that an increased expression of CYP1A1 results in a synergistic effect of B[a]P and DBC in human cells. As humans are exposed to a plethora of noxious chemicals, our results have important implications for human carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • B[a]P:DBC mixtures were less genotoxic in V79MZh1A1 cells than B[a]P and DBC alone. • An antagonism between B[a]P and DBC was determined in rat liver WB-F344 cells. • The inhibition of CYP1a1 expression by B[a]P:DBC mixture

  5. Similarity of the yellow chromophores isolated from human cataracts with those from ascorbic acid-modified calf lens proteins: evidence for ascorbic acid glycation during cataract formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, R; Lin, B; Lee, K W; Ortwerth, B J

    2001-07-27

    Chromatographic evidence supporting the similarity of the yellow chromophores isolated from aged human and brunescent cataract lenses and calf lens proteins ascorbylated in vitro is presented. The water-insoluble fraction from early stage brunescent cataract lenses was solubilized by sonication (WISS) and digested with a battery of proteolytic enzymes under argon to prevent oxidation. Also, calf lens proteins were incubated with ascorbic acid for 4 weeks in air and submitted to the same digestion. The percent hydrolysis of the proteins to amino acids was approximately 90% in every case. The content of yellow chromophores was 90, 130 and 250 A(330) units/g protein for normal human WISS, cataract WISS and ascorbate-modified bovine lens proteins respectively. Aliquots equivalent to 2.0 g of digested protein were subjected to size-exclusion chromatography on a Bio-Gel P-2 column. Six peaks were obtained for both preparations and pooled. Side by side thin-layer chromatography (TLC) of each peak showed very similar R(f) values for the long wavelength-absorbing fluorophores. Glycation with [U-(14)C]ascorbic acid, followed by digestion and Bio-Gel P-2 chromatography, showed that the incorporated radioactivity co-eluted with the A(330)-absorbing peaks, and that most of the fluorescent bands were labeled after TLC. Peaks 2 and 3 from the P-2 were further fractionated by preparative Prodigy C-18 reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Two major A(330)-absorbing peaks were seen in peak 2 isolated from human cataract lenses and 5 peaks in fraction 3, all of which eluted at the same retention times as those from ascorbic acid glycated calf lens proteins. HPLC fractionation of P-2 peaks 4, 5 and 6 showed many A(330)-absorbing peaks from the cataract WISS, only some of which were identical to the asorbylated proteins. The major fluorophores, however, were present in both preparations. These data provide new evidence to support the hypothesis that the yellow

  6. 3D analysis of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation in monkeys vaccinated with the first peptide inducing sterilizing immunity against human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A Patarroyo

    Full Text Available T-cell receptor gene rearrangements were studied in Aotus monkeys developing high antibody titers and sterilizing immunity against the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite upon vaccination with the modified synthetic peptide 24112, which was identified in the Merozoite Surface Protein 2 (MSP-2 and is known to bind to HLA-DRbeta1*0403 molecules with high capacity. Spectratyping analysis showed a preferential usage of Vbeta12 and Vbeta6 TCR gene families in 67% of HLA-DRbeta1*0403-like genotyped monkeys. Docking of peptide 24112 into the HLA-DRbeta1*0401-HA peptide-HA1.7TCR complex containing the VDJ rearrangements identified in fully protected monkeys showed a different structural signature compared to nonprotected monkeys. These striking results show the exquisite specificity of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation needed for inducing sterilizing immunity and provide important hints for a logical and rational methodology to develop multiepitopic, minimal subunit-based synthetic vaccines against infectious diseases, among them malaria.

  7. The ascending reticular activating system from pontine reticular formation to the hypothalamus in the human brain: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2015-03-17

    The ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) is responsible for regulation of consciousness. Precise evaluation of the ARAS is important for diagnosis and management of patients with impaired consciousness. In the current study, we attempted to reconstruct the portion of the ARAS from the pontine reticular formation (RF) to the hypothalamus in normal subjects, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A total of 31 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. DTI scanning was performed using 1.5-T, and the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus was reconstructed. Values of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tract volume of the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus were measured. In all subjects, the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus originated from the RF at the level of the mid-pons, where the trigeminal nerve could be seen, ascended through the periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain anterolaterally to the anterior commissure level, and then terminated into the hypothalamus. No significant differences in DTI parameters were observed between the left and right hemispheres and between males and females (phypothalamus in normal subjects using DTI. We believe that the reconstruction methodology and the results of this study would be useful to clinicians involved in the care of patients with impaired consciousness and researchers in studies of the ARAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 多周期人机单元构建研究%Study of the Cell Formation in the Multi-cycle Human-Machine System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宝阳

    2013-01-01

    Cell formation(CF) is a key step of designing a CMS, which mainly used in solving the dividing between similar parts cluster and machine cluster. In this paper, the model for designing of CF based on the effect of learning-forgetting of the labor force during the multi-cycle was proposed. The model incorporates the inter-cell material handling time, the machine workload and the prepare time of the work force. Then utilizing the genetic algorithm to deal with the model and get the best solution of the CF plan in multi-cycle system.%单元构建是单元制造系统设计的重要步骤,其主要解决相似零件族和机床群的划分.文章在考虑员工学习-遗忘效应的基础上,以单元间物料处理时间、机床载荷偏差以及机床操作人员的加工准备时间之和最小为目标,构建多周期单元构建问题.并运用遗传算法得出在多个周期内的最优设备及人员单元划分方案.

  9. How Bioethics is Complementing Human Rights in Realizing Health Access for Clinical Trial Participants: The Case of Formative PrEP Access in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jerome

    2015-06-11

    Following the demise of apartheid, human rights in South Africa are now constitutionally enshrined.The right to health in South Africa's Constitution has been credited with transforming the lives of millions of people by triggering programmatic reforms in HIV treatment and the prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV.However, a constitutionally enshrined right to health offers no guarantee that clinical trial participants will enjoy post-trial access to beneficial interventions. Using access to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in South Africa as an example, this paper argues that adherence to bioethics norms could realize the right to health for trial participants following the end of a clinical trial.

  10. Chromosome damage and micronucleus formation in human blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to radiofrequency radiation at a cellular telephone frequency (847.74 MHz, CDMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Bisht, K S; Pickard, W F; Meltz, M L; Roti Roti, J L; Moros, E G

    2001-10-01

    Peripheral blood samples collected from four healthy nonsmoking human volunteers were diluted with tissue culture medium and exposed in