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Sample records for human neocartilage formation

  1. Micromass co-culture of human articular chondrocytes and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to investigate stable neocartilage tissue formation in vitro

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    S Giovannini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies for articular cartilage defects rely on expanded chondrocytes. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternative cell source should their hypertrophic differentiation pathway be prevented. Possible cellular instruction between human articular chondrocytes (HAC and human bone marrow MSC was investigated in micromass pellets. HAC and MSC were mixed in different percentages or incubated individually in pellets for 3 or 6 weeks with and without TGF-beta1 and dexamethasone (±T±D as chondrogenic factors. Collagen II, collagen X and S100 protein expression were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Proteoglycan synthesis was evaluated applying the Bern score and quantified using dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay. Alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP was detected on cryosections and soluble ALP measured in pellet supernatants. HAC alone generated hyaline-like discs, while MSC formed spheroid pellets in ±T±D. Co-cultured pellets changed from disc to spheroid shape with decreasing number of HAC, and displayed random cell distribution. In -T-D, HAC expressed S100, produced GAG and collagen II, and formed lacunae, while MSC did not produce any cartilage-specific proteins. Based on GAG, collagen type II and S100 expression chondrogenic differentiation occurred in -T-D MSC co-cultures. However, quantitative experimental GAG and DNA values did not differ from predicted values, suggesting only HAC contribution to GAG production. MSC produced cartilage-specific matrix only in +T+D but underwent hypertrophy in all pellet cultures. In summary, influence of HAC on MSC was restricted to early signs of neochondrogenesis. However, MSC did not contribute to the proteoglycan deposition, and HAC could not prevent hypertrophy of MSC induced by chondrogenic stimuli.

  2. BMP-2, hypoxia, and COL1A1/HtrA1 siRNAs favor neo-cartilage hyaline matrix formation in chondrocytes.

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    Ollitrault, David; Legendre, Florence; Drougard, Carole; Briand, Mélanie; Benateau, Hervé; Goux, Didier; Chajra, Hanane; Poulain, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Vivien, Denis; Shridhar, Vijayalakshmi; Baldi, Alfonso; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric; Boumediene, Karim; Demoor, Magali; Galera, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is an irreversible pathology that causes a decrease in articular cartilage thickness, leading finally to the complete degradation of the affected joint. The low spontaneous repair capacity of cartilage prevents any restoration of the joint surface, making OA a major public health issue. Here, we developed an innovative combination of treatment conditions to improve the human chondrocyte phenotype before autologous chondrocyte implantation. First, we seeded human dedifferentiated chondrocytes into a collagen sponge as a scaffold, cultured them in hypoxia in the presence of a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), BMP-2, and transfected them with small interfering RNAs targeting two markers overexpressed in OA dedifferentiated chondrocytes, that is, type I collagen and/or HtrA1 serine protease. This strategy significantly decreased mRNA and protein expression of type I collagen and HtrA1, and led to an improvement in the chondrocyte phenotype index of differentiation. The effectiveness of our in vitro culture process was also demonstrated in the nude mouse model in vivo after subcutaneous implantation. We, thus, provide here a new protocol able to favor human hyaline chondrocyte phenotype in primarily dedifferentiated cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Our study also offers an innovative strategy for chondrocyte redifferentiation and opens new opportunities for developing therapeutic targets.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of hyaline cartilage regeneration in neocartilage graft implantation.

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    Tan, C F; Ng, K K; Ng, S H; Cheung, Y C

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of hyaline cartilage in a neocartilage graft implant with the aid of MR cartilage imaging using a rabbit model. Surgical osteochondral defects were created in the femoral condyles of 30 mature New Zealand rabbits. The findings of neocartilage in autologous cartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects were compared with control group of no implant to the osteochondral defect. The outcome of the implantations was correlated with histologic and MR cartilage imaging findings over a 3-month interval. Neocartilage grafts packed into osteochondral defects showed regeneration of hyaline cartilage at the outer layer of the implant using MR cartilage imaging. Fibrosis of fibrocartilage developed at the outer layer of the autologous cartilage graft together with an inflammatory reaction within the osteochondral defect. This animal study provides evidence of the regenerative ability of hyaline cartilage in neocartilage transplants to repair articular cartilage.

  4. Natural resources, redistribution and Human capital formation

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    Aguero, Jorge; Balcazar, Carlos Felipe; Maldonado, Stanislao; Ñopo, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    How do resource booms affect human capital accumulation? We exploit time and spatial variation generated by the commodity boom across local governments in Peru to measure the effect of natural resources on human capital formation. We explore the effect of both mining production and tax revenues on test scores, finding a substantial and statistically significant effect for the latter. Transfers to local governments from mining tax revenues are linked to an increase in math test scores of aroun...

  5. The application of multiple biophysical cues to engineer functional neocartilage for treatment of osteoarthritis. Part I: cellular response.

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    Brady, Mariea A; Waldman, Stephen D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease of the joint for which current treatments are unsatisfactory, thus motivating development of tissue engineering (TE)-based therapies. To date, TE strategies have had some success, developing replacement tissue constructs with biochemical properties approaching that of native cartilage. However, poor biomechanical properties and limited postimplantation integration with surrounding tissue are major shortcomings that need to be addressed. Functional tissue engineering strategies that apply physiologically relevant biophysical cues provide a platform to improve TE constructs before implantation. In the previous decade, new experimental and theoretical findings in cartilage biomechanics and electromechanics have emerged, resulting in an increased understanding of the complex interplay of multiple biophysical cues in the extracellular matrix of the tissue. The effect of biophysical stimulation on cartilage, and the resulting chondrocyte-mediated biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and repair, has, therefore, been extensively explored by the TE community. This article compares and contrasts the cellular response of chondrocytes to multiple biophysical stimuli, and may be read in conjunction with its companion paper that compares and contrasts the subsequent intracellular signal transduction cascades. Mechanical, magnetic, and electrical stimuli promote proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of chondrocytes within established dose parameters or "biological windows." This knowledge will provide a framework for ongoing studies incorporating multiple biophysical cues in TE functional neocartilage for treatment of OA.

  6. Modeling human intention formation for human reliability assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.; Roth, E.M.; Pople, H. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic simulation capability for modeling how people form intentions to act in nuclear power plant emergency situations. This modeling tool, Cognitive Environment Simulation or CES, was developed based on techniques from artificial intelligence. It simulates the cognitive processes that determine situation assessment and intention formation. It can be used to investigate analytically what situations and factors lead to intention failures, what actions follow from intention failures (e.g. errors of omission, errors of commission, common mode errors), the ability to recover from errors or additional machine failures, and the effects of changes in the NPP person machine system. One application of the CES modeling environment is to enhance the measurement of the human contribution to risk in probabilistic risk assessment studies. (author)

  7. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein induces bone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, E.A.; Rosen, V.; D'Alessandro, J.S.; Bauduy, M.; Cordes, P.; Harada, T.; Israel, D.I.; Hewick, R.M.; Kerns, K.M.; LaPan, P.; Luxenberg, D.P.; McQuaid, D.; Moutsatsos, I.K.; Nove, J.; Wozney, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have purified and characterized active recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2A. Implantation of the recombinant protein in rats showed that a single BMP can induce bone formation in vivo. A dose-response and time-course study using the rat ectopic bone formation assay revealed that implantation of 0.5-115 μg of partially purified recombinant human BMP-2A resulted in cartilage by day 7 and bone formation by day 14. The time at which bone formation occurred was dependent on the amount of BMP-2A implanted; at high doses bone formation could be observed at 5 days. The cartilage- and bone-inductive activity of the recombinant BMP-2A is histologically indistinguishable from that of bone extracts. Thus, recombinant BMP-2A has therapeutic potential to promote de novo bone formation in humans

  8. Humanism of Marti and Fidel in the formation of values

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    José Luis Darias Concepción

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Humanism as an integrative concept of human values has always been present in thinking and revolutionary work of our main precursors. Two strong exponents in the formation of patriotic and human values in our country has been without doubt the work of Martí and Fidel, whose thoughts and actions correspond fully with the humanistic philosophical doctrine. In this paper we reflect on the presence of humanism as a philosophical current in the thinking of Marti and Fidel.

  9. Immunological aspects of antibody formation against recombinant human therapeutics

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    Sauerborn, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    With about 200 new products in the pipeline, recombinant human (rh) therapeutics are becoming the most dominant class of drugs. One of the reasons to create rh therapeutics was to avoid recognition by the immune system due to foreign origin. Nevertheless, rh therapeutics induced formation of

  10. Human Capital Formation in the Gulf and MENA Region.

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    Shaw, Ken E.

    2001-01-01

    Recent developments in human capital formation theories are particularly relevant to the Gulf and Middle Eastern and North African regions. Discusses recent western reconfigurations of the theory, noting how much local work must be done to reshape theory appropriately in the Middle East and explaining how issues relating to employment, education,…

  11. Micronucleus formation in cultured human keratinocytes: Involvement of intercellular bioactivation.

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    van Pelt, F N; Haring, R M; Weterings, P J

    1991-01-01

    Micronucleus formation in cultured human keratinocytes was studied after exposure to benzo[a]pyrene, cyclophosphamide and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate without the addition of an exogenous metabolizing system. The first two agents need bioactivation by specific isoenzymes of cytochrome P-450 to form genotoxic intermediates. Benzo[a]pyrene induced the micronucleus formation in both uninduced and Aroclor 1254-pretreated cultures. Clastogenic effects of cyclophosphamide were observed only in Aroclor 1254-pretreated cells. The tumour promotor 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate did not affect the frequency of micronuclei in human keratinocytes. The data indicate that cultured human keratinocytes can be used to study the tissue-specific response to genotoxic agents as well as interindividual variation in biotransformation capacity.

  12. Mechanisms of Formation of Human Culture in Education

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    Baboshina Helen B.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the research problem lies in the necessity of an axiological approach to the formation of the personality in education and the task of strengthening the ideal image of the function. The aim of this article is studying and understanding the culture of personality formation mechanisms in relation to future specialists. The leading method of research was the theoretical analysis of philosophical and cultural approaches to the cultural formation of the personality and to the content of human culture. Content analysis was based on the philosophical and cultural concepts of V. S. Bibler, M. Buber, J. G. Herder, I. Kant, L. N. Kogan, D. S. Likhachev, A. Schweitzer, M. Scheler, and others. The experiment method was the experimental realization of formation stages of the future specialist as a person of culture, which allowed revealing the positive role of cultural mechanisms in this process. The result is the stages of human culture formation as well as mechanisms for their implementation. The article may be useful for specialists of the educational sphere, social philosophers, and culturologists.

  13. Immunohistochemical study of sensory nerve formations in human glabrous skin.

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    Haro, J J; Vega, J A; del Valle, M E; Calzada, B; Zaccheo, D; Malinovsky, L

    1991-01-01

    The sensory nerve formations (or corpuscles) of normal human glabrous skin from hand and fingers, obtained by punch biopsies, were studied by the streptavidin-biotin method using monoclonal antibodies directed against neurofilament protein (NFP), S-100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), cytokeratins, and vimentin. NFP immunoreactivity (IR) was observed in the central axons of most sensory formations, while S-100 protein IR was restricted to non-neuronal cells forming the so-called inner cells core or lamellar cells. Furthermore, vimentin IR was found in the same cells of Meissner's and glomerular corpuscles. None of the sensory nerve formations were stained for GFAP or keratin. The present results suggest that the main nature of the intermediate filaments of the non-neuronal cells of sensory nerve formations from human glabrous skin is represented by vimentin and not by GFAP. Thus, our findings suggest that lamellar and inner core cells of SNF are modified and specialized Schwann cells and not epithelial or perineurial derived cells.

  14. Improved Human Erythropoiesis and Platelet Formation in Humanized NSGW41 Mice

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    Susann Rahmig

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human erythro-megakaryopoiesis does not occur in humanized mouse models, preventing the in vivo analysis of human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC differentiation into these lineages in a surrogate host. Here we show that stably engrafted KIT-deficient NOD/SCID Il2rg−/− KitW41/W41 (NSGW41 mice support much improved human erythropoiesis and platelet formation compared with irradiated NSG recipients. Considerable numbers of human erythroblasts and mature thrombocytes are present in the bone marrow and blood, respectively. Morphology, composition, and enucleation capacity of de novo generated human erythroblasts in NSGW41 mice are comparable with those in human bone marrow. Overexpression of human erythropoietin showed no further improvement in human erythrocyte output, but depletion of macrophages led to the appearance of human erythrocytes in the blood. Human erythropoiesis up to normoblasts and platelet formation is fully supported in NSGW41 mice, allowing the analysis of human HSC differentiation into these lineages, the exploration of certain pathophysiologies, and the evaluation of gene therapeutic approaches.

  15. Variations in the formation of the human caudal spinal cord.

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    Saraga-Babić, M; Sapunar, D; Wartiovaara, J

    1995-01-01

    Collection of 15 human embryos between 4-8 developmental weeks was used to histologically investigate variations in the development of the caudal part of the spinal cord and the neighboring axial organs (notochord and vertebral column). In the 4-week embryo, two types of neurulation were parallelly observed along the anteroposterior body axis: primary in the areas cranial to the neuroporus caudalis and secondary in the more caudal tail regions. In the 5-week embryos, both parts of the neural tube fused, forming only one continuous lumen in the developing spinal cord. In the three examined embryos we found anomalous pattern of spinal cord formation. Caudal parts of these spinal cords displayed division of their central canal into two or three separate lumina, each surrounded by neuroepithelial layer. In the caudal area of the spinal cord, derived by secondary neurulation, formation of separate lumina was neither connected to any anomalous notochord or vertebral column formation, nor the appearance of any major axial disturbances. We suggest that development of the caudal part of the spinal cord differs from its cranial region not only in the type of neurulation, but also in the destiny of its derivatives and possible modes of abnormality formation.

  16. Pre-stimulus thalamic theta power predicts human memory formation.

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    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Buentjen, Lars; Kopitzki, Klaus; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Knight, Robert T; Rugg, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Pre-stimulus theta (4-8Hz) power in the hippocampus and neocortex predicts whether a memory for a subsequent event will be formed. Anatomical studies reveal thalamus-hippocampal connectivity, and lesion, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological studies show that memory processing involves the dorsomedial (DMTN) and anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN). The small size and deep location of these nuclei have limited real-time study of their activity, however, and it is unknown whether pre-stimulus theta power predictive of successful memory formation is also found in these subcortical structures. We recorded human electrophysiological data from the DMTN and ATN of 7 patients receiving deep brain stimulation for refractory epilepsy. We found that greater pre-stimulus theta power in the right DMTN was associated with successful memory encoding, predicting both behavioral outcome and post-stimulus correlates of successful memory formation. In particular, significant correlations were observed between right DMTN theta power and both frontal theta and right ATN gamma (32-50Hz) phase alignment, and frontal-ATN theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling. We draw the following primary conclusions. Our results provide direct electrophysiological evidence in humans of a role for the DMTN as well as the ATN in memory formation. Furthermore, prediction of subsequent memory performance by pre-stimulus thalamic oscillations provides evidence that post-stimulus differences in thalamic activity that index successful and unsuccessful encoding reflect brain processes specifically underpinning memory formation. Finally, the findings broaden the understanding of brain states that facilitate memory encoding to include subcortical as well as cortical structures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biofilm formation in Hafnia alvei HUMV-5920, a human isolate

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    Itziar Chapartegui-González

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hafnia alvei is a Gram-negative, rodshaped, facultative anaerobic bacterium of the family Enterobacteriaceae that has been isolated from various mammals, fish, insects and birds. In humans, case reports of Hafnia-associated enteric infections have been chiefly reported in Spain. Although H. alvei shares some virulence mechanisms with other Gram-negative enteropathogens little is known about the factors that contribute to its pathogenesis or virulence factors and regulatory circuits that may enhance the establishment and survival of H. alvei in the environment. The goal of the present study was to analyze the capacity of a H. alvei clinical isolate (strain HUMV-5920 to form biofilms. Biofilm formation by this strain increases during growth at 28 °C compared to 37 °C. Investigation of multicellular behavior by confocal microscopy, crystal violet and calcofluor staining in this strain showed biofilm formation associated with the production of cellulose. Importantly, several genes related to cellulose production including bcsABZC and yhjQ are present in the H. alvei HUMV-5920 chromosome. The ability of H. alvei to adhere to abiotic surfaces and to form biofilms likely contributes to its persistence in the hospital environment or food processing environments, increasing the probability of causing infections. Therefore, a better understanding of the adherence properties of this species will provide greater insights into the diseases it causes.

  18. Formation and suppression of acoustic memories during human sleep.

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    Andrillon, Thomas; Pressnitzer, Daniel; Léger, Damien; Kouider, Sid

    2017-08-08

    Sleep and memory are deeply related, but the nature of the neuroplastic processes induced by sleep remains unclear. Here, we report that memory traces can be both formed or suppressed during sleep, depending on sleep phase. We played samples of acoustic noise to sleeping human listeners. Repeated exposure to a novel noise during Rapid Eye Movements (REM) or light non-REM (NREM) sleep leads to improvements in behavioral performance upon awakening. Strikingly, the same exposure during deep NREM sleep leads to impaired performance upon awakening. Electroencephalographic markers of learning extracted during sleep confirm a dissociation between sleep facilitating memory formation (light NREM and REM sleep) and sleep suppressing learning (deep NREM sleep). We can trace these neural changes back to transient sleep events, such as spindles for memory facilitation and slow waves for suppression. Thus, highly selective memory processes are active during human sleep, with intertwined episodes of facilitative and suppressive plasticity.Though memory and sleep are related, it is still unclear whether new memories can be formed during sleep. Here, authors show that people could learn new sounds during REM or light non-REM sleep, but that learning was suppressed when sounds were played during deep NREM sleep.

  19. Human pathogens in plant biofilms: Formation, physiology, and detection.

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    Ximenes, Eduardo; Hoagland, Lori; Ku, Seockmo; Li, Xuan; Ladisch, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Fresh produce, viewed as an essential part of a healthy life style is usually consumed in the form of raw or minimally processed fruits and vegetables, and is a potentially important source of food-borne human pathogenic bacteria and viruses. These are passed on to the consumer since the bacteria can form biofilms or otherwise populate plant tissues, thereby using plants as vectors to infect animal hosts. The life cycle of the bacteria in plants differs from those in animals or humans and results in altered physiochemical and biological properties (e.g., physiology, immunity, native microflora, physical barriers, mobility, and temperature). Mechanisms by which healthy plants may become contaminated by microorganisms, develop biofilms, and then pass on their pathogenic burden to people are explored in the context of hollow fiber microfiltration by which plant-derived microorganisms may be recovered and rapidly concentrated to facilitate study of their properties. Enzymes, when added to macerated plant tissues, hydrolyze or alter macromolecules that would otherwise foul hollow-fiber microfiltration membranes. Hence, microfiltration may be used to quickly increase the concentration of microorganisms to detectable levels. This review discusses microbial colonization of vegetables, formation and properties of biofilms, and how hollow fiber microfiltration may be used to concentrate microbial targets to detectable levels. The use of added enzymes helps to disintegrate biofilms and minimize hollow fiber membrane fouling, thereby providing a new tool for more time effectively elucidating mechanisms by which biofilms develop and plant tissue becomes contaminated with human pathogens. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1403-1418. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Formation of Hyaline Cartilage Tissue by Passaged Human Osteoarthritic Chondrocytes.

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    Bianchi, Vanessa J; Weber, Joanna F; Waldman, Stephen D; Backstein, David; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    When serially passaged in standard monolayer culture to expand cell number, articular chondrocytes lose their phenotype. This results in the formation of fibrocartilage when they are used clinically, thus limiting their use for cartilage repair therapies. Identifying a way to redifferentiate these cells in vitro is critical if they are to be used successfully. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) family members are known to be crucial for regulating differentiation of fetal limb mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal stromal cells to chondrocytes. As passaged chondrocytes acquire a progenitor-like phenotype, the hypothesis of this study was that TGFβ supplementation will stimulate chondrocyte redifferentiation in vitro in serum-free three-dimensional (3D) culture. Human articular chondrocytes were serially passaged twice (P2) in monolayer culture. P2 cells were then placed in high-density (3D) culture on top of membranes (Millipore) and cultured for up to 6 weeks in chemically defined serum-free redifferentiation media (SFRM) in the presence or absence of TGFβ. The tissues were evaluated histologically, biochemically, by immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanically. Passaged human chondrocytes cultured in SFRM supplemented with 10 ng/mL TGFβ3 consistently formed a continuous layer of articular-like cartilage tissue rich in collagen type 2 and aggrecan and lacking collagen type 1 and X in the absence of a scaffold. The tissue developed a superficial zone characterized by expression of lubricin and clusterin with horizontally aligned collagen fibers. This study suggests that passaged human chondrocytes can be used to bioengineer a continuous layer of articular cartilage-like tissue in vitro scaffold free. Further study is required to evaluate their ability to repair cartilage defects in vivo.

  1. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo

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    LS Moreira Teixeira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous matrix deposition and remodelling. To address this issue, we designed a micro-mould to enable controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates. Morphology, stability, gene expression profiles and chondrogenic potential of micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes were evaluated and compared to single-cells cultured in micro-wells and in 3D after encapsulation in Dextran-Tyramine (Dex-TA hydrogels in vitro and in vivo. We successfully formed micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes with highly controlled size, stability and viability within 24 hours. Micro-aggregates of 100 cells presented a superior balance in Collagen type I and Collagen type II gene expression over single cells and micro-aggregates of 50 and 200 cells. Matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 and 13 mRNA levels were decreased in micro-aggregates compared to single-cells. Histological and biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced matrix deposition in constructs seeded with micro-aggregates cultured in vitro and in vivo, compared to single-cell seeded constructs. Whole genome microarray analysis and single gene expression profiles using human chondrocytes confirmed increased expression of cartilage-related genes when chondrocytes were cultured in micro-aggregates. In conclusion, we succeeded in controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates of chondrocytes. Compared to single cell-seeded constructs, seeding of constructs with micro-aggregates greatly improved neo-cartilage formation. Therefore, micro-aggregation prior to chondrocyte implantation in current MACI procedures, may effectively accelerate hyaline cartilage formation.

  2. High throughput generated micro-aggregates of chondrocytes stimulate cartilage formation in vitro and in vivo.

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    Moreira Teixeira, L S; Leijten, J C H; Sobral, J; Jin, R; van Apeldoorn, A A; Feijen, J; van Blitterswijk, C; Dijkstra, P J; Karperien, M

    2012-06-05

    Cell-based cartilage repair strategies such as matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation (MACI) could be improved by enhancing cell performance. We hypothesised that micro-aggregates of chondrocytes generated in high-throughput prior to implantation in a defect could stimulate cartilaginous matrix deposition and remodelling. To address this issue, we designed a micro-mould to enable controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates. Morphology, stability, gene expression profiles and chondrogenic potential of micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes were evaluated and compared to single-cells cultured in micro-wells and in 3D after encapsulation in Dextran-Tyramine (Dex-TA) hydrogels in vitro and in vivo. We successfully formed micro-aggregates of human and bovine chondrocytes with highly controlled size, stability and viability within 24 hours. Micro-aggregates of 100 cells presented a superior balance in Collagen type I and Collagen type II gene expression over single cells and micro-aggregates of 50 and 200 cells. Matrix metalloproteinases 1, 9 and 13 mRNA levels were decreased in micro-aggregates compared to single-cells. Histological and biochemical analysis demonstrated enhanced matrix deposition in constructs seeded with micro-aggregates cultured in vitro and in vivo, compared to single-cell seeded constructs. Whole genome microarray analysis and single gene expression profiles using human chondrocytes confirmed increased expression of cartilage-related genes when chondrocytes were cultured in micro-aggregates. In conclusion, we succeeded in controlled high-throughput formation of micro-aggregates of chondrocytes. Compared to single cell-seeded constructs, seeding of constructs with micro-aggregates greatly improved neo-cartilage formation. Therefore, micro-aggregation prior to chondrocyte implantation in current MACI procedures, may effectively accelerate hyaline cartilage formation.

  3. Anthropo-Calcretisation: Human Effects on Calcrete Formation

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    Itkin, Danny

    2014-05-01

    Calcretes are near-surface terrestrial accumulations of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) that form in soils and permeable rocks in regions of arid to dry-summer subtropical climates. While the formation of calcrete under natural conditions has been extensively studied, no reports of anthropogenically induced calcretisation exist in current literature. Following a detailed study of soil micromorphology at the Binyanei Ha-Uma site (Jerusalem) (Itkin, submitted), it becomes evident that a natural Nari-calcrete (Wieder et al. 1993; Itkin et al. 2012) has been overprinted by a secondary calcretisation, specifically arising from human activity ~2 ka ago (related to the production centre of the Tenth Roman Legion in Jerusalem). I hereby introduce the concept of 'Anthropo-Calcretisation', as the sum of processes, by which human actions lead to the accumulation of pedogenic calcium carbonate. Based on soil micromorphological analysis of the Binyanei Ha-Uma site (Itkin, submitted), and other archaeological sites, two characteristic Anthropo-Calcretisation modes can be discerned. The first pathway, termed 'biogeochemical', is dominated by pedogenic chemical reactions, resulting from soil liming, agriculture, and an unintentional soil contamination by calcined lime. The second pathway, termed 'hydropedological', arises from modified soil-water relations due to man-made reshaping of geomorphological units (e.g., agricultural terraces). Anthropo-Calcretisation can follow either of the pathways, and even include both. The study of Anthropo-Calcrete can be applicable (i) to quantify the extent by which (pre)historic human beings have utilised and affected their environment; (ii) to reconstruct paleoclimate, and (iii) to constrain soil development in time by dating associated archaeological artefacts. Furthermore, Anthropo-Calcrete can be also used as a diagnostic tool for evaluating modern human actions (e.g. soil liming, intentional enrichment of soil biomass, or soil

  4. Empirical Studies of Human Capital Formation: The Role of Family, Sibling, and Neighborhood

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huei-Ling III

    1998-01-01

    The formation of human capital is the main issue in this dissertation. More specifically, this dissertation discusses two alternative types of transferring human capital, in contrast to the transfer of human capital from parents to their children's education. These two types of transfer are sibling effect and neighborhood effect on children's education. Chapter 1 discusses the sibling effect on children's education, "Household Models and Formations of Human Capital with Sibling Effect in I...

  5. Formation of Human Subjectivity in Psychological Interactions with Nature

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    S A Mudrak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the current trends in the environmental psychological research of the peculiarities of developing the subject-subjective human relationship with nature: considering human habitat environment as a set of natural objects; studying certain natural sites as psychologically attributive elements of the environment; determining the psychological meaning of the «Human Habitat Environment»; giving the analysis of the problem of the subjectivity development in human interaction with the natural objects.

  6. Interfaces between educational policies, pedagogical practices and human formation

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    Maria Terezinha Bellanda Galuch

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article analyzes the formation perspective found in official documents regarding Basic Education and the pedagogical practices suggested by them. It also points out the relationship between a curriculum-defining public policy and the didactic organization of what is taught in the schools. Results show that the formation proposed by the above-mentioned documents tries to attend our society’s market demands with its valorization of pedagogical practices for the development of attitudes, values, competences and abilities required by the globalized society. When such formation is placed first and foremost and to the detriment of the transmission and appropriation of disciplines, school education decreases its commitment with scientific culture. In fact, it distances itself from its role in offering the symbolic instruments which are necessary for the students’ integral development.

  7. Dual pathway for angiotensin II formation in human internal mammary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, A. A.; Pinto, Y. M.; Buikema, H.; Urata, H.; Oosterga, M.; Rooks, G.; Grandjean, J. G.; Ganten, D.; van Gilst, W. H.

    1998-01-01

    1. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is thought to be the main enzyme to convert antiotensin I to the vasoactive angiotensin II. Recently, in the human heart, it was found that the majority of angiotensin II formation was due to another enzyme, identified as human heart chymase. In the human

  8. Dual pathway for angiotensin II formation in human internal mammary arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, AA; Pinto, YM; Buikema, H; Urata, H; Oosterga, M; Roos, G; Grandjean, JG; Ganten, D; van Gilst, WH

    1 Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is thought to be the main enzyme to convect antiotensin I to the vasoactive angiotensin II. Recently, in the human heart, it was found that the majority of angiotensin ZI formation was due to another enzyme, identified as human heart chymase. In the human

  9. The ecological law and ecological human rights: to the question on necessity of formation

    OpenAIRE

    Khvorostov A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Necessity of the ecological law is determined by presence of ecological crisis and formed at formation of ecological function of the state. Ecological human rights and the citizen are natural human rights, however should be legally fixed and guaranteed by the state. The further functioning of a society is impossible without observance of norms of the ecological law and ecological human rights.

  10. Human platelet lysate supports the formation of robust human periodontal ligament cell sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Bei-Min; Wu, Rui-Xin; Bi, Chun-Sheng; He, Xiao-Tao; Yin, Yuan; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2018-04-01

    The use of stem cell-derived sheets has become increasingly common in a wide variety of biomedical applications. Although substantial evidence has demonstrated that human platelet lysate (PL) can be used for therapeutic cell expansion, either as a substitute for or as a supplement to xenogeneic fetal bovine serum (FBS), its impact on cell sheet production remains largely unexplored. In this study, we manufactured periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) sheets in vitro by incubating PDLSCs in sheet-induction media supplemented with various ratios of PL and FBS, i.e. 10% PL without FBS, 7.5% PL + 2.5% FBS, 5% PL + 5% FBS, 2.5% PL + 7.5% FBS or 10% FBS without PL. Cultures with the addition of all the designed supplements led to successful cell sheet production. In addition, all the resultant cellular materials exhibited similar expression profiles of matrix-related genes and proteins, such as collagen I, fibronectin and integrin β1. Interestingly, the cell components within sheets generated by media containing both PL and FBS exhibited improved osteogenic potential. Following in vivo transplantation, all sheets supported significant new bone formation. Our data suggest that robust PDLSC sheets can be produced by applying PL as either an alternative or an adjuvant to FBS. Further examination of the relevant influences of human PL that benefit cell behaviour and matrix production will pave the way towards optimized and standardized conditions for cell sheet production. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Human pathogens in plant biofilms: Formation, physiology, and detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh produce, viewed as an essential part of a healthy life style is usually consumed in the form of raw or minimally processed fruits and vegetables, and is a potentially important source of food-borne human pathogenic bacteria and viruses. These are passed on to the consumer since the bacteria ca...

  12. Human Capital Formation And Poverty Reduction Strategies In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study articulates the development thrust of the Nigerian government, (1999 – 2003), in the area of human capital information and poverty reduction. The policies to achieve its objectives and the gains of such policies to the common man in Nigeria. To achieve its objectives, the government emphasized, macroeconomic ...

  13. ROLE OF HUMAN CAPITAL FORMATION IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TĂNASE DIANA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights the role of education in the growth of economic competitiveness and efficiency of human capital, in accordance with the quality of education and investments in human resources, in order to enhance labour productiveness. The paper starts by a brief analysis of Romania’s educational system, by comparison with the EU countries, analysing the number of high school students / college students per teacher, the percentage of education expenditure in the GDP, the correlation between the labour force’s training level and insertion into the labour market. The paper also presents the EU countries’ ranking related to higher education and professional training, pointing out the importance of lifelong professional training at the place of work. The paper draws conclusions regarding the importance of the labour force training, as the operation of a modern economy requires the existence of a well-trained labour force, education representing one of the fundamental pillars of any society’s development.

  14. Curriculum, human development and integral formation within the colombian caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Rodríguez Akle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the reality of the colombian Caribbean from the perspective of human development integral to start to understand that problematic situations are opportunities to enhance the transformations that allow to retrieve the subject social and collective. So the reconstruction of regional identity from the contributions of educational communities that build-oriented curriculum to become full, proactive, people with leadership and management capacity for sustainable development in a changing world. The article proposes some strategies to address alternatives to a society in which the quality of life and human dignity are the sense of the daily work in the context of the caribbean colombianidad and globalism in practice.  

  15. Selectively altering belief formation in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharot, Tali; Kanai, Ryota; Marston, David; Korn, Christoph W.; Rees, Geraint; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2012-01-01

    Humans form beliefs asymmetrically; we tend to discount bad news but embrace good news. This reduced impact of unfavorable information on belief updating may have important societal implications, including the generation of financial market bubbles, ill preparedness in the face of natural disasters, and overly aggressive medical decisions. Here, we selectively improved people’s tendency to incorporate bad news into their beliefs by disrupting the function of the left (but not right) inferior frontal gyrus using transcranial magnetic stimulation, thereby eliminating the engrained “good news/bad news effect.” Our results provide an instance of how selective disruption of regional human brain function paradoxically enhances the ability to incorporate unfavorable information into beliefs of vulnerability. PMID:23011798

  16. Generation of Scaffoldless Hyaline Cartilaginous Tissue from Human iPSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yamashita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects.

  17. Generation of scaffoldless hyaline cartilaginous tissue from human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Morioka, Miho; Yahara, Yasuhito; Okada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2015-03-10

    Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pyrimidine dimer formation and repair in human skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Harber, L.C.; Kochevar, I.E.

    1980-01-01

    Cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers have been detected in the DNA of human skin following in vivo irradiation with suberythermal doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation from FS-20 sun lamp fluorescent tubes. Dimers were assayed by treatment of extracted DNA with Micrococus luteus UV-specific endonuclease, alkaline agarose electrophoresis, and ethidum bromide staining. This technique, in contrast to conventional dimer assays, can be used with nonradioactive DNA and is optimal at low UV light doses. These data suggest that some dimer disappearance by excision repair occurs within 20 min of UV irradiation and that photoreactivation of dimers can make a contribution to the total repair process

  19. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Omar Rafael; Mora, Nancy; Cortes-Vieyra, Ricarda; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. However the particular Fcγ receptor involved in triggering this function is a matter of controversy. In order to provide some insight into what Fcγ receptor is responsible for NET formation, each of the two human Fcγ receptors was stimulated individually by specific monoclonal antibodies and NET formation was evaluated. FcγRIIa cross-linking did not promote NET formation. Cross-linking other receptors such as integrins also did not promote NET formation. In contrast FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. NET formation was dependent on NADPH-oxidase, PKC, and ERK activation. These data show that cross-linking FcγRIIIb is responsible for NET formation by the human neutrophil.

  20. Differential Use of Human Neutrophil Fcγ Receptors for Inducing Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Rafael Alemán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils (PMN are the most abundant leukocytes in the blood. PMN migrate from the circulation to sites of infection, where they are responsible for antimicrobial functions. PMN use phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs to kill microbes. NETs are fibers composed of chromatin and neutrophil-granule proteins. Several pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites, and also some pharmacological stimuli such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA are efficient inducers of NETs. Antigen-antibody complexes are also capable of inducing NET formation. However the particular Fcγ receptor involved in triggering this function is a matter of controversy. In order to provide some insight into what Fcγ receptor is responsible for NET formation, each of the two human Fcγ receptors was stimulated individually by specific monoclonal antibodies and NET formation was evaluated. FcγRIIa cross-linking did not promote NET formation. Cross-linking other receptors such as integrins also did not promote NET formation. In contrast FcγRIIIb cross-linking induced NET formation similarly to PMA stimulation. NET formation was dependent on NADPH-oxidase, PKC, and ERK activation. These data show that cross-linking FcγRIIIb is responsible for NET formation by the human neutrophil.

  1. Selected aspects of organizational culture vs. formation of Human Capital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Kisiel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The awareness of employees in relation to organizational culture existing in a company and their knowledge in this subject - have a crucial meaning. In the face of intensity of transformations, constant searching for the best solutions which bring the organization closer to success seams necessary. The organizational culture can help employees among others to: engage in performance of tasks. Organizational culture helps to understand mission, strategy of the organization and assumptions carried out by it. The purpose of this paper is the description of different aspects of organizational culture with reference to actions taken in the scope of management of human resources. The nature of leadership was also stressed in shaping the organizational culture. The analysis of literature in the field of management, own experience and observation of the author in the above mentioned matter made it possible to respond to the research problem presented in this paper.

  2. Is IGSF1 involved in human pituitary tumor formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R; Horvath, Anelia D; Azevedo, Monalisa F; Levy, Isaac; Bak, Beata; Wang, Ying; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Gourgari, Evgenia; Manning, Allison D; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Lodish, Maya; Hofman, Paul; Anderson, Yvonne C; Holdaway, Ian; Oldfield, Edward; Chittiboina, Prashant; Nesterova, Maria; Biermasz, Nienke R; Wit, Jan M; Bernard, Daniel J; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-02-01

    IGSF1 is a membrane glycoprotein highly expressed in the anterior pituitary. Pathogenic mutations in the IGSF1 gene (on Xq26.2) are associated with X-linked central hypothyroidism and testicular enlargement in males. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IGSF1 is involved in the development of pituitary tumors, especially those that produce growth hormone (GH). IGSF1 was sequenced in 21 patients with gigantism or acromegaly and 92 healthy individuals. Expression studies with a candidate pathogenic IGSF1 variant were carried out in transfected cells and immunohistochemistry for IGSF1 was performed in the sections of GH-producing adenomas, familial somatomammotroph hyperplasia, and in normal pituitary. We identified the sequence variant p.N604T, which in silico analysis suggested could affect IGSF1 function, in two male patients and one female with somatomammotroph hyperplasia from the same family. Of 60 female controls, two carried the same variant and seven were heterozygous for other variants. Immunohistochemistry showed increased IGSF1 staining in the GH-producing tumor from the patient with the IGSF1 p.N604T variant compared with a GH-producing adenoma from a patient negative for any IGSF1 variants and with normal control pituitary tissue. The IGSF1 gene appears polymorphic in the general population. A potentially pathogenic variant identified in the germline of three patients with gigantism from the same family (segregating with the disease) was also detected in two healthy female controls. Variations in IGSF1 expression in pituitary tissue in patients with or without IGSF1 germline mutations point to the need for further studies of IGSF1 action in pituitary adenoma formation. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. A Human Right to Identity Formation? Identity, Politics, and the Universality of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Peterson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will build on ideas I presented at the previous conference (in 2003 on human rights at Mofid University. In that paper, I argued that it is a mistake to view human rights as the expression of a specific culture or historical identity (e.g., that of the “West”. Instead, human rights are better understood as historically emergent universals created in the conflict and interaction of various social groups with contrasting interests, cultural understandings, and identities. The aim of preserving a specific culture, religion, or historical identity against cultural imperialism or other kinds of domination can be supported by appealing to a human right to the formation of distinctive identities. Therefore this human right can contribute to a plurality of identities within the global network of societies that is emerging today. The aim of this paper is to develop this idea of a human right to identity formation دراین مقاله مخالفت خود را با تردید در جهان‌شمولی حقوق بشر اعلام کرده‌ام. این تردید، بر این باور مبتنی است که حقوق بشر، امری تحمیلی ازسوی غرب می‌باشد. من دلایلی برای انکار این نظر که حقوق بشر تماماً غربی است ارائه کرده، به وجوهی اشاره کردم که در واقع خیزش حقوق بشر، دست کم تا حدودی، ناشی از مبارزاتی است که با سلطة قدرت‌های غربی صورت می‌گیرد. این شیوه از استدلال، نیازمند انکار این مطلب نیست که زبان حقوق بشر گاه شکل سیاست‌هایی را گرفته که تمایز فرهنگ‌های دیگر را نمی‌توانند بفهمند (تشخیص دهند و از نابرابری جهانی ثروت و قدرت غفلت کرده‌اند، یا حتی از آن به نحو تلویحی حمایت

  4. Effect of indomethacin and lactoferrin on human tenocyte proliferation and collagen formation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yaonan [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Department of Orthopaedic, Beijing Hospital of Ministry of Public Health, Beijing, China 100730 (China); Wang, Xiao; Qiu, Yiwei [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Cornish, Jillian [Department of Medicine, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Carr, Andrew J. [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Xia, Zhidao, E-mail: z.xia@swansea.ac.uk [Centre for Nanohealth, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, UK SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • Indomethacin, a classic NSAID, inhibited human tenocyte proliferation at high concentration (100 µM). • Lactoferrin at 50-100 µg/ml promoted human tenocyte survival, proliferation and collagen synthesis. • Lactoferrin is anabolic to human tenocytes in vitro and reverses potential inhibitory effects of NSAIDs on human tenocytes. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in patients with injuries and inflammation of tendon and ligament, and as post-surgical analgesics. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of indomethacin, a classic NSAID and its combinational effect with an anabolic agent of skeletal tissue, lactoferrin, on the proliferation and collagen formation of human tenocytes in vitro. A factorial experimental design was employed to study the dose-dependent effect of the combination of indomethacin and lactoferrin. The results showed that indomethacin at high concentration (100 μM) inhibited human tenocyte proliferation in culture medium with 1–10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in vitro. Also, high dose of indomethacin inhibited the collagen formation of human tenocytes in 1% FBS culture medium. Lactoferrin at 50–100 μg/ml promoted human tenocyte survival in serum-free culture medium and enhanced proliferation and collagen synthesis of human tenocytes in 1% FBS culture medium. When 50–100 μg/ml lactoferrin was used in combination with 100–200 μM indomethacin, it partially rescued the inhibitory effects of indomethacin on human tenocyte proliferation, viability and collagen formation. To our knowledge, it is the first evidence that lactoferrin is anabolic to human tenocytes in vitro and reverses potential inhibitory effects of NSAIDs on human tenocytes.

  5. Effect of indomethacin and lactoferrin on human tenocyte proliferation and collagen formation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yaonan; Wang, Xiao; Qiu, Yiwei; Cornish, Jillian; Carr, Andrew J.; Xia, Zhidao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Indomethacin, a classic NSAID, inhibited human tenocyte proliferation at high concentration (100 µM). • Lactoferrin at 50-100 µg/ml promoted human tenocyte survival, proliferation and collagen synthesis. • Lactoferrin is anabolic to human tenocytes in vitro and reverses potential inhibitory effects of NSAIDs on human tenocytes. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used in patients with injuries and inflammation of tendon and ligament, and as post-surgical analgesics. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of indomethacin, a classic NSAID and its combinational effect with an anabolic agent of skeletal tissue, lactoferrin, on the proliferation and collagen formation of human tenocytes in vitro. A factorial experimental design was employed to study the dose-dependent effect of the combination of indomethacin and lactoferrin. The results showed that indomethacin at high concentration (100 μM) inhibited human tenocyte proliferation in culture medium with 1–10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) in vitro. Also, high dose of indomethacin inhibited the collagen formation of human tenocytes in 1% FBS culture medium. Lactoferrin at 50–100 μg/ml promoted human tenocyte survival in serum-free culture medium and enhanced proliferation and collagen synthesis of human tenocytes in 1% FBS culture medium. When 50–100 μg/ml lactoferrin was used in combination with 100–200 μM indomethacin, it partially rescued the inhibitory effects of indomethacin on human tenocyte proliferation, viability and collagen formation. To our knowledge, it is the first evidence that lactoferrin is anabolic to human tenocytes in vitro and reverses potential inhibitory effects of NSAIDs on human tenocytes

  6. Identification of Chloride Intracellular Channel Protein 3 as a Novel Gene Affecting Human Bone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brum, A M; Leije, M; J, Schreuders-Koedam

    2017-01-01

    is diminished and more adipocytes are seen in the bone marrow, suggesting a shift in MSC lineage commitment. Identification of specific factors that stimulate osteoblast differentiation from human MSCs may deliver therapeutic targets to treat osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to identify novel genes...... an in vivo human bone formation model in which hMSCs lentivirally transduced with the CLIC3 overexpression construct were loaded onto a scaffold (hydroxyapatite-tricalcium-phosphate), implanted under the skin of NOD-SCID mice, and analyzed for bone formation 8 weeks later. CLIC3 overexpression led to a 15...

  7. Human DAZL, DAZ and BOULE genes modulate primordial germ cell and haploid gamete formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Kehkooi; Angeles, Vanessa T; Flores, Martha; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Pera, Renee A Reijo

    2009-01-01

    The leading cause of infertility in men and women is quantitative and qualitative defects in human germ cell (oocyte and sperm) development. Yet, it has not been possible to examine the unique developmental genetics of human germ cell formation and differentiation due to inaccessibility of germ cells during fetal development. Although several studies have shown that germ cells can be differentiated from mouse and human embryonic stem cells, human germ cells differentiated in these studies generally did not develop beyond the earliest stages1-8. Here we used a germ cell reporter to quantitate and isolate primordial germ cells derived from both male and female hESCs. Then, by silencing and overexpressing genes that encode germ cell-specific cytoplasmic RNA-binding proteins (not transcription factors), we modulated human germ cell formation and developmental progression. We observed that human DAZL (Deleted in AZoospermia-Like) functions in primordial germ cell formation, whereas closely-related genes, DAZ and BOULE, promote later stages of meiosis and development of haploid gametes. These results are significant to the generation of gametes for future basic science and potential clinical applications. PMID:19865085

  8. Human Capital Formation during the First Industrial Revolution: Evidence from the Use of Steam Engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pleijt, Alexandra|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375805621; Nuvolari, A.; Weisdorf, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of technological change on human capital formation during the early phases of England’s Industrial Revolution. Following the methodology used in Franck and Galor (2016), we consider the adoption of steam engines as an indicator of technical change, examining the

  9. Microsomal UDP-glucuronyltransferase-catalyzed bilirubin diglucuronide formation in human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, W. H.; Jansen, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    Human liver microsomal bilirubin UDP-glucuronyltransferase catalyzes formation of bilirubin mono- and diglucuronide. KmUDPGA and Vmax of the enzyme are 0.6 mM and 1.69 nmol/mg protein X min. In vitro, bilirubin readily dissolves in the microsomal lipid phase. Taking this into account a Kmbilirubin

  10. Complex formation in mixtures of lysozyme-stabilized emulsions and human saliva

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silletti, E.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Norde, W.; Aken, van G.A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the interaction between human unstimulated saliva and lysozyme-stabilized oil-in-water emulsions (10 wt/wt% oil phase, 10 mM NaCl, pH 6.7), to reveal the driving force for flocculation of these emulsions. Confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed formation of

  11. Human CYP2E1 mediates the formation of glycidamide from acrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settels, Eva; Appel, Klaus E. [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Center for Experimental Toxicology, Berlin (Germany); Bernauer, Ulrike; Gundert-Remy, Ursula [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Department of Safety of Substances and Preparations, Berlin (Germany); Palavinskas, Richard; Klaffke, Horst S. [Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Center for Analytical Chemistry, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Regarding the cancer risk assessment of acrylamide (AA) it is of basic interest to know, as to what amount of the absorbed AA is metabolized to glycidamide (GA) in humans, compared to what has been observed in laboratory animals. GA is suspected of being the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of AA. From experiments with CYP2E1-deficient mice it can be concluded that AA is metabolized to GA primarily by CYP2E1. We therefore examined whether CYP2E1 is involved in GA formation in non-rodent species with the focus on humans by using human CYP2E1 supersomes trademark, marmoset and human liver microsomes and in addition, genetically engineered V79 cells expressing human CYP2E1 (V79h2E1 cells). Special emphasis was placed on the analytical detection of GA, which was performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The results show that AA is metabolized to GA in human CYP2E1 supersomes trademark, in marmoset and human liver microsomes as well as in V79h2E1 cells. The activity of GA formation is highest in supersomes trademark; in human liver it is somewhat higher than in marmoset liver. A monoclonal CYP2E1 human selective antibody (MAB-2E1) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) were used as specific inhibitors of CYP2E1. The generation of GA could be inhibited by MAB-2E1 to about 80% in V79h2E1 cells and to about 90% in human and marmoset liver microsomes. Also DDC led to an inhibition of about 95%. In conclusion, AA is metabolized to GA by human CYP2E1. Overall, the present work describes (1) the application and refinement of a sensitive methodology in order to determine low amounts of GA, (2) the applicability of genetically modified V79 cell lines in order to investigate specific questions concerning metabolism and (3) the involvement, for the first time, of human CYP2E1 in the formation of GA from AA. Further studies will compare the activities of GA formation in genetically engineered V79 cells expressing CYP2E1 from different species. (orig.)

  12. Indomethacin increases the formation of lipoxygenase products in calcium ionophore stimulated human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, J C; Wilson, T W

    1987-10-29

    Arachidonic acid metabolism in human neutrophils stimulated in vitro with the calcium ionophore A23187 was studied using combined HPLC and radioimmunoassays. Indomethacin (0.1 and 1.0 microM) caused a 300% increase in LTB4 formation in neutrophils stimulated with A23187. 5-, 12- and 15-HETE levels were also increased. In the presence of exogenous arachidonic acid 1.0 microM Indomethacin caused a 37% increase in LTB4 formation. Acetyl Salicylic Acid and Ibuprofen had no effect on the formation of lipoxygenase metabolites. The effect of indomethacin on LTB4 formation does not appear to be due to a simple redirection of substrate arachidonic acid from the cyclooxygenase to the lipoxygenase pathways.

  13. The Effect of Cryopreserved Human Placental Tissues on Biofilm Formation of Wound-Associated Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yong; Singh-Varma, Anya; Hoffman, Tyler; Dhall, Sandeep; Danilkovitch, Alla; Kohn, Joachim

    2018-01-08

    Biofilm, a community of bacteria, is tolerant to antimicrobial agents and ubiquitous in chronic wounds. In a chronic DFU (Diabetic Foot Ulcers) clinical trial, the use of a human cryopreserved viable amniotic membrane (CVAM) resulted in a high rate of wound closure and reduction of wound-related infections. Our previous study demonstrated that CVAM possesses intrinsic antimicrobial activity against a spectrum of wound-associated bacteria under planktonic culture conditions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of CVAM and cryopreserved viable umbilical tissue (CVUT) on biofilm formation of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa , the two most prominent pathogens associated with chronic wounds. Firstly, we showed that, like CVAM, CVUT released antibacterial activity against multiple bacterial pathogens and the devitalization of CVUT reduced its antibacterial activity. The biofilm formation was then measured using a high throughput method and an ex vivo porcine dermal tissue model. We demonstrate that the formation of biofilm was significantly reduced in the presence of CVAM- or CVUT-derived conditioned media compared to control assay medium. The formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm on CVAM-conditioned medium saturated porcine dermal tissues was reduced 97% compared with the biofilm formation on the control medium saturated dermal tissues. The formation of S. auerus biofilm on CVUT-conditioned medium saturated dermal tissues was reduced 72% compared with the biofilm formation on the control tissues. This study is the first to show that human cryopreserved viable placental tissues release factors that inhibit biofilm formation. Our results provide an explanation for the in vivo observation of their ability to support wound healing.

  14. The Effect of Cryopreserved Human Placental Tissues on Biofilm Formation of Wound-Associated Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Mao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm, a community of bacteria, is tolerant to antimicrobial agents and ubiquitous in chronic wounds. In a chronic DFU (Diabetic Foot Ulcers clinical trial, the use of a human cryopreserved viable amniotic membrane (CVAM resulted in a high rate of wound closure and reduction of wound-related infections. Our previous study demonstrated that CVAM possesses intrinsic antimicrobial activity against a spectrum of wound-associated bacteria under planktonic culture conditions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of CVAM and cryopreserved viable umbilical tissue (CVUT on biofilm formation of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, the two most prominent pathogens associated with chronic wounds. Firstly, we showed that, like CVAM, CVUT released antibacterial activity against multiple bacterial pathogens and the devitalization of CVUT reduced its antibacterial activity. The biofilm formation was then measured using a high throughput method and an ex vivo porcine dermal tissue model. We demonstrate that the formation of biofilm was significantly reduced in the presence of CVAM- or CVUT-derived conditioned media compared to control assay medium. The formation of P. aeruginosa biofilm on CVAM-conditioned medium saturated porcine dermal tissues was reduced 97% compared with the biofilm formation on the control medium saturated dermal tissues. The formation of S. auerus biofilm on CVUT-conditioned medium saturated dermal tissues was reduced 72% compared with the biofilm formation on the control tissues. This study is the first to show that human cryopreserved viable placental tissues release factors that inhibit biofilm formation. Our results provide an explanation for the in vivo observation of their ability to support wound healing.

  15. Extracellular vesicles from human pancreatic islets suppress human islet amyloid polypeptide amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Diana; Horvath, Istvan; Heath, Nikki; Hicks, Ryan; Forslöw, Anna; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2017-01-01

    Protein assembly into amyloid fibers underlies such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) also involves amyloid formation, although in the pancreas. Because there are no cures for amyloid diseases and T2D is on the rise due to an increasing prevalence of obesity, identifying involved mechanisms and control processes is of utmost importance. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) can mediate physiological and pathological communication both loc...

  16. Human geminin promotes pre-RC formation and DNA replication by stabilizing CDT1 in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabeni, Andrea; Melixetian, Marina; Zamponi, Raffaella

    2004-01-01

    -mediated degradation by inhibiting its ubiquitination. In particular, Geminin ensures basal levels of CDT1 during S phase and its accumulation during mitosis. Consistently, inhibition of Geminin synthesis during M phase leads to impairment of pre-RC formation and DNA replication during the following cell cycle....... Moreover, we show that inhibition of CDK1 during mitosis, and not Geminin depletion, is sufficient for premature formation of pre-RCs, indicating that CDK activity is the major mitotic inhibitor of licensing in human cells. Taken together with recent data from our laboratory, our results demonstrate...

  17. Teratoma formation of human embryonic stem cells in three-dimensional perfusion culture bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachelscheid, H; Wulf-Goldenberg, A; Eckert, K; Jensen, J; Edsbagge, J; Björquist, P; Rivero, M; Strehl, R; Jozefczuk, J; Prigione, A; Adjaye, J; Urbaniak, T; Bussmann, P; Zeilinger, K; Gerlach, J C

    2013-09-01

    Teratoma formation in mice is today the most stringent test for pluripotency that is available for human pluripotent cells, as chimera formation and tetraploid complementation cannot be performed with human cells. The teratoma assay could also be applied for assessing the safety of human pluripotent cell-derived cell populations intended for therapeutic applications. In our study we examined the spontaneous differentiation behaviour of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a perfused 3D multi-compartment bioreactor system and compared it with differentiation of hESCs and human induced pluripotent cells (hiPSCs) cultured in vitro as embryoid bodies and in vivo in an experimental mouse model of teratoma formation. Results from biochemical, histological/immunohistological and ultrastuctural analyses revealed that hESCs cultured in bioreactors formed tissue-like structures containing derivatives of all three germ layers. Comparison with embryoid bodies and the teratomas revealed a high degree of similarity of the tissues formed in the bioreactor to these in the teratomas at the histological as well as transcriptional level, as detected by comparative whole-genome RNA expression profiling. The 3D culture system represents a novel in vitro model that permits stable long-term cultivation, spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation and tissue formation of pluripotent cells that is comparable to in vivo differentiation. Such a model is of interest, e.g. for the development of novel cell differentiation strategies. In addition, the 3D in vitro model could be used for teratoma studies and pluripotency assays in a fully defined, controlled environment, alternatively to in vivo mouse models. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effect of Human Serum and 2 Different Types of Platelet Concentrates on Human Meniscus Cell Migration, Proliferation, and Matrix Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymann, Undine; Metzlaff, Sebastian; Krüger, Jan-Philipp; Hirsh, Glen; Endres, Michaela; Petersen, Wolf; Kaps, Christian

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of 10% human serum (HS), 5% platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and 5% autologous conditioned plasma (ACP) on migration, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis of human meniscus cells. Cell migration and proliferation on stimulation with HS, PRP, and ACP were assessed by chemotaxis assays and measurement of genomic DNA content. Meniscus cells were cultivated in pellets stimulated with 10% HS, 5% PRP, or 5% ACP. Meniscal ECM formation was evaluated by histochemical staining of collagen type I, type II, and proteoglycans and by analysis of fibrochondrocyte marker gene expression. Human meniscus cells were significantly attracted by all 3 blood-derived products (10% HS and 5% ACP: P = .0001, 5% PRP: P = .0002). Cell proliferation at day 9 was significantly increased on stimulation with 10% HS (P = .0001) and 5% PRP (P = .0002) compared with 5% ACP and controls. Meniscus cell pellet cultures showed the formation of a well-structured meniscal ECM with deposition of collagen type I, type II, and proteoglycans on stimulation with 10% HS, whereas 5% PRP or 5% ACP resulted in the formation of an inhomogeneous and more fibrous ECM. Stimulation with 10% HS and 5% ACP showed a significant induction of fibrochondrocyte marker genes such as aggrecan (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0147), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0005), and biglycan (HS: P = .0002, ACP: P = .0003), whereas PRP showed no inducing effect. Among all tested blood-derived products, only stimulation with HS showed the formation of a meniscal ECM as well as positive cell proliferating and migrating effects in vitro. Regarding a potential biological repair of nonvascular meniscus lesions, our results may point toward the use of HS as a beneficial augment in regenerative meniscus repair approaches. Our findings may suggest that HS might be a beneficial augment for meniscus repair. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published

  19. (±)-2-Chloropropionic acid elevates reactive oxygen species formation in human neutrophil granulocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aam, B.B.; Fonnum, F.

    2006-01-01

    (±)-2-Chloropropionic acid (2-CPA) is a neurotoxic compound which kills cerebellar granule cells in vivo, and makes cerebellar granule cells in vitro produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have studied the effect of 2-CPA on ROS formation in human neutrophil granulocytes in vitro. We found an increased formation of ROS after 2-CPA exposure using three different methods; the fluorescent probe DCFH-DA and the chemiluminescent probes lucigenin and luminol. Four different inhibitors of ROS formation were tested on the cells in combination with 2-CPA to characterize the signalling pathways. The spin-trap s-PBN, the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and the antioxidant Vitamin E inhibited the 2-CPA-induced ROS formation completely, while the mitochondrial transition permeability pore blocker cyclosporine A inhibited the ROS formation partly. We also found that 2-CPA induced an increased nitric oxide production in the cells by using the Griess reagent. The level of reduced glutathione, measured with the DTNB assay, was decreased after exposure to high concentrations of 2-CPA. Western blotting analysis showed that 2-CPA exposure led to an elevated phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. This phosphorylation was inhibited by U0126. Based on these experiments it seems like the mechanisms for 2-CPA induced toxicity involves ROS formation and is similar in neutrophil granulocytes as earlier shown in cerebellar granule cells. This also implies that 2-CPA may be immunotoxic

  20. Stem cells catalyze cartilage formation by neonatal articular chondrocytes in 3D biomimetic hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janice H; Kajiyama, Glen; Smith, Robert Lane; Maloney, William; Yang, Fan

    2013-12-19

    Cartilage loss is a leading cause of disability among adults and effective therapy remains elusive. Neonatal chondrocytes (NChons) are an attractive allogeneic cell source for cartilage repair, but their clinical translation has been hindered by scarce donor availability. Here we examine the potential for catalyzing cartilage tissue formation using a minimal number of NChons by co-culturing them with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in 3D hydrogels. Using three different co-culture models, we demonstrated that the effects of co-culture on cartilage tissue formation are dependent on the intercellular distance and cell distribution in 3D. Unexpectedly, increasing ADSC ratio in mixed co-culture led to increased synergy between NChons and ADSCs, and resulted in the formation of large neocartilage nodules. This work raises the potential of utilizing stem cells to catalyze tissue formation by neonatal chondrocytes via paracrine signaling, and highlights the importance of controlling cell distribution in 3D matrices to achieve optimal synergy.

  1. Intragastric formation and modulation of N-nitrosodimethylamine in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model under human physiological conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, C.A.M.; Zeilmaker, M.J.; Schothorst, R.C.; Havenaar, R.

    2004-01-01

    Human exposure to carcinogenic N-alkylnitrosamines can occur exogenously via food consumption or endogenously by formation of these compounds through nitrosation of amine precursors. Information on the intragastric formation of NDMA from complex mixtures of precursors and inhibitors in humans is not

  2. Centriole triplet microtubules are required for stable centriole formation and inheritance in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jennifer T; Kong, Dong; Hoerner, Christian R; Loncarek, Jadranka

    2017-01-01

    Centrioles are composed of long-lived microtubules arranged in nine triplets. However, the contribution of triplet microtubules to mammalian centriole formation and stability is unknown. Little is known of the mechanism of triplet microtubule formation, but experiments in unicellular eukaryotes indicate that delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin, two less-studied tubulin family members, are required. Here, we report that centrioles in delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin null mutant human cells lack triplet microtubules and fail to undergo centriole maturation. These aberrant centrioles are formed de novo each cell cycle, but are unstable and do not persist to the next cell cycle, leading to a futile cycle of centriole formation and disintegration. Disintegration can be suppressed by paclitaxel treatment. Delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin physically interact, indicating that these tubulins act together to maintain triplet microtubules and that these are necessary for inheritance of centrioles from one cell cycle to the next. PMID:28906251

  3. GABA promotes elastin synthesis and elastin fiber formation in normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Eriko; Hokazono, Hideki; Hida, Mariko; Sasaki, Takako; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu; Matsuo, Noritaka

    2017-06-01

    The multiple physiological effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a functional food component have been recently reported. We previously reported that GABA upregulated the expression of type I collagen in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), and that oral administration of GABA significantly increased skin elasticity. However, details of the regulatory mechanism still remain unknown. In this study, we further examined the effects of GABA on elastin synthesis and elastin fiber formation in HDFs. Real-time PCR indicated that GABA significantly increased the expression of tropoelastin transcript in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the expression of fibrillin-1, fibrillin-2, and fibulin-5/DANCE, but not lysyl oxidase and latent transforming factor-β-binding protein 4, were also significantly increased in HDFs. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that treatment with GABA dramatically increased the formation of elastic fibers in HDFs. Taken together, our results showed that GABA improves skin elasticity in HDFs by upregulating elastin synthesis and elastin fiber formation.

  4. Centriole triplet microtubules are required for stable centriole formation and inheritance in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jennifer T; Kong, Dong; Hoerner, Christian R; Loncarek, Jadranka; Stearns, Tim

    2017-09-14

    Centrioles are composed of long-lived microtubules arranged in nine triplets. However, the contribution of triplet microtubules to mammalian centriole formation and stability is unknown. Little is known of the mechanism of triplet microtubule formation, but experiments in unicellular eukaryotes indicate that delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin, two less-studied tubulin family members, are required. Here, we report that centrioles in delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin null mutant human cells lack triplet microtubules and fail to undergo centriole maturation. These aberrant centrioles are formed de novo each cell cycle, but are unstable and do not persist to the next cell cycle, leading to a futile cycle of centriole formation and disintegration. Disintegration can be suppressed by paclitaxel treatment. Delta-tubulin and epsilon-tubulin physically interact, indicating that these tubulins act together to maintain triplet microtubules and that these are necessary for inheritance of centrioles from one cell cycle to the next.

  5. Molecular mechanism in the formation of a human ring chromosome 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Stetten, G.; Earnshaw, W.C.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Van Keuren, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have characterized the structural rearrangements of a chromosome 21 that led to the de novo formation of a human ring chromosome 21 [r(21)]. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the DNA regions flanking the ring junction provide evidence for a long arm to long arm fusion in formation of the r(21). In addition, the centromere and proximal long arm region of a maternal chromosome 21 are duplicated in the r(21). Therefore, the mechanism in formation of the r(21) was complex involving two sequential chromosomal rearrangements. (i) Duplication of the centromere and long arm of one maternal chromosome 21 occurred forming a rearranged intermediate. (ii) Chromosomal breaks in both the proximal and telomeric long arm regions on opposite arms of this rearranged chromosome occurred with subsequent reunion producing the r(21)

  6. Opinion formation in a social network: The role of human activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Andrzej

    2009-03-01

    The model of opinion formation in human population based on social impact theory is investigated numerically. On the basis of a database received from the on-line game server, we examine the structure of social network and human dynamics. We calculate the activity of individuals, i.e. the relative time devoted daily to interactions with others in the artificial society. We study the influence of correlation between the activity of an individual and its connectivity on the process of opinion formation. We find that such correlations have a significant influence on the temperature of the phase transition and the effect of the mass media, modeled as an external stimulation acting on the social network.

  7. How does domain replacement affect fibril formation of the rabbit/human prion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yan

    Full Text Available It is known that in vivo human prion protein (PrP have the tendency to form fibril deposits and are associated with infectious fatal prion diseases, while the rabbit PrP does not readily form fibrils and is unlikely to cause prion diseases. Although we have previously demonstrated that amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and macromolecular crowding has different effects on fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs, we do not know which domains of PrPs cause such differences. In this study, we have constructed two PrP chimeras, rabbit chimera and human chimera, and investigated how domain replacement affects fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs.As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays and Sarkosyl-soluble SDS-PAGE, the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes fibril formation of both chimeras. As evidenced by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and proteinase K digestion assays, amyloid fibrils formed by human chimera have secondary structures and proteinase K-resistant features similar to those formed by the human PrP. However, amyloid fibrils formed by rabbit chimera have proteinase K-resistant features and secondary structures in crowded physiological environments different from those formed by the rabbit PrP, and secondary structures in dilute solutions similar to the rabbit PrP. The results from transmission electron microscopy show that macromolecular crowding caused human chimera but not rabbit chimera to form short fibrils and non-fibrillar particles.We demonstrate for the first time that the domains beyond PrP-H2H3 (β-strand 1, α-helix 1, and β-strand 2 have a remarkable effect on fibrillization of the rabbit PrP but almost no effect on the human PrP. Our findings can help to explain why amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and why macromolecular crowding has different

  8. Effect of polygonimitin C on bone formation and resorption in human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of polygonimitin C (PC) on bone formation and resorption in human osteoblast-like MG63 cells. Methods: MG63 cells were treated with PC at doses of 0, 20, 40 or 80 μg/mL for 48 h, with an untreated group as control. The effect of PC on alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MG63 cells ...

  9. Neuromuscular junction formation between human stem cell-derived motoneurons and human skeletal muscle in a defined system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiufang; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Vandenburgh, Herman H; Hickman, James J

    2011-12-01

    Functional in vitro models composed of human cells will constitute an important platform in the next generation of system biology and drug discovery. This study reports a novel human-based in vitro Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ) system developed in a defined serum-free medium and on a patternable non-biological surface. The motoneurons and skeletal muscles were derived from fetal spinal stem cells and skeletal muscle stem cells. The motoneurons and skeletal myotubes were completely differentiated in the co-culture based on morphological analysis and electrophysiology. NMJ formation was demonstrated by phase contrast microscopy, immunocytochemistry and the observation of motoneuron-induced muscle contractions utilizing time-lapse recordings and their subsequent quenching by d-Tubocurarine. Generally, functional human based systems would eliminate the issue of species variability during the drug development process and its derivation from stem cells bypasses the restrictions inherent with utilization of primary human tissue. This defined human-based NMJ system is one of the first steps in creating functional in vitro systems and will play an important role in understanding NMJ development, in developing high information content drug screens and as test beds in preclinical studies for spinal or muscular diseases/injuries such as muscular dystrophy, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord repair. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lactate has the potential to promote hydrogen sulphide formation in the human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Perrine; Duncan, Sylvia H; Chassard, Christophe; Bernalier-Donadille, Annick; Flint, Harry J

    2009-10-01

    High concentrations of sulphide are toxic for the gut epithelium and may contribute to bowel disease. Lactate is a favoured cosubstrate for the sulphate-reducing colonic bacterium Desulfovibrio piger, as shown here by the stimulation of sulphide formation by D. piger DSM749 by lactate in the presence of sulphate. Sulphide formation by D. piger was also stimulated in cocultures with the lactate-producing bacterium Bifidobacterium adolescentis L2-32. Other lactate-utilizing bacteria such as the butyrate-producing species Eubacterium hallii and Anaerostipes caccae are, however, expected to be in competition with the sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) for the lactate formed in the human colon. Strains of E. hallii and A. caccae produced 65% and 96% less butyrate from lactate, respectively, in a coculture with D. piger DSM749 than in a pure culture. In triculture experiments involving B. adolescentis L2-32, up to 50% inhibition of butyrate formation by E. hallii and A. caccae was observed in the presence of D. piger DSM749. On the other hand, sulphide formation by D. piger was unaffected by E. hallii or A. caccae in these cocultures and tricultures. These experiments strongly suggest that lactate can stimulate sulphide formation by SRB present in the colon, with possible consequences for conditions such as colitis.

  11. Formation of human hepatocyte-like cells with different cellular phenotypes by human umbilical cord blood-derived cells in the human-rat chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong; Zhang, Ruo-Shuang; Cui, Guang-Hui; Wang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Xi-Gu

    2007-01-01

    We took advantage of the proliferative and permissive environment of the developing pre-immune fetus to develop a noninjury human-rat xenograft small animal model, in which the in utero transplantation of low-density mononuclear cells (MNCs) from human umbilical cord blood (hUCB) into fetal rats at 9-11 days of gestation led to the formation of human hepatocyte-like cells (hHLCs) with different cellular phenotypes, as revealed by positive immunostaining for human-specific alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cytokeratin 19 (CK19), cytokeratin 8 (CK8), cytokeratin 18 (CK18), and albumin (Alb), and with some animals exhibiting levels as high as 10.7% of donor-derived human cells in the recipient liver. More interestingly, donor-derived human cells stained positively for CD34 and CD45 in the liver of 2-month-old rat. Human hepatic differentiation appeared to partially follow the process of hepatic ontogeny, as evidenced by the expression of AFP gene at an early stage and albumin gene at a later stage. Human hepatocytes generated in this model retained functional properties of normal hepatocytes. In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in the recipient liver for at least 6 months after birth. Taken together, these findings suggest that the donor-derived human cells with different cellular phenotypes are found in the recipient liver and hHLCs hold biological activity. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling the situations in human, provides an invaluable approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the future

  12. Human Metapneumovirus Induces Formation of Inclusion Bodies for Efficient Genome Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Branttie, Jean; Slaughter, Kerri Beth; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-12-15

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) causes significant upper and lower respiratory disease in all age groups worldwide. The virus possesses a negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome of approximately 13.3 kb encapsidated by multiple copies of the nucleoprotein (N), giving rise to helical nucleocapsids. In addition, copies of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large RNA polymerase (L) decorate the viral nucleocapsids. After viral attachment, endocytosis, and fusion mediated by the viral glycoproteins, HMPV nucleocapsids are released into the cell cytoplasm. To visualize the subsequent steps of genome transcription and replication, a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was established to detect different viral RNA subpopulations in infected cells. The FISH probes were specific for detection of HMPV positive-sense RNA (+RNA) and viral genomic RNA (vRNA). Time course analysis of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells infected with HMPV revealed the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) from early times postinfection. HMPV IBs were shown to be cytoplasmic sites of active transcription and replication, with the translation of viral proteins being closely associated. Inclusion body formation was consistent with an actin-dependent coalescence of multiple early replicative sites. Time course quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis suggested that the coalescence of inclusion bodies is a strategy to efficiently replicate and transcribe the viral genome. These results provide a better understanding of the steps following HMPV entry and have important clinical implications. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a recently discovered pathogen that affects human populations of all ages worldwide. Reinfections are common throughout life, but no vaccines or antiviral treatments are currently available. In this work, a spatiotemporal analysis of HMPV replication and transcription in bronchial epithelial cell-derived immortal cells was performed. HMPV was shown to

  13. Effect of 3D-scaffold formation on differentiation and survival in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortinau, Stefanie; Schmich, Jürgen; Block, Stephan; Liedmann, Andrea; Jonas, Ludwig; Weiss, Dieter G; Helm, Christiane A; Rolfs, Arndt; Frech, Moritz J

    2010-11-11

    3D-scaffolds have been shown to direct cell growth and differentiation in many different cell types, with the formation and functionalisation of the 3D-microenviroment being important in determining the fate of the embedded cells. Here we used a hydrogel-based scaffold to investigate the influences of matrix concentration and functionalisation with laminin on the formation of the scaffolds, and the effect of these scaffolds on human neural progenitor cells cultured within them. In this study we used different concentrations of the hydrogel-based matrix PuraMatrix. In some experiments we functionalised the matrix with laminin I. The impact of concentration and treatment with laminin on the formation of the scaffold was examined with atomic force microscopy. Cells from a human fetal neural progenitor cell line were cultured in the different matrices, as well as in a 2D culture system, and were subsequently analysed with antibody stainings against neuronal markers. In parallel, the survival rate of the cells was determined by a live/dead assay. Atomic force microscopy measurements demonstrated that the matrices are formed by networks of isolated PuraMatrix fibres and aggregates of fibres. An increase of the hydrogel concentration led to a decrease in the mesh size of the scaffolds and functionalisation with laminin promoted aggregation of the fibres (bundle formation), which further reduces the density of isolated fibres. We showed that laminin-functionalisation is essential for human neural progenitor cells to build up 3D-growth patterns, and that proliferation of the cells is also affected by the concentration of matrix. In addition we found that 3D-cultures enhanced neuronal differentiation and the survival rate of the cells compared to 2D-cultures. Taken together, we have demonstrated a direct influence of the 3D-scaffold formation on the survival and neuronal differentiation of human neural progenitor cells. These findings emphasize the importance of optimizing 3

  14. Radiological consequences associated with human intrusion into radioactive waste repositories in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.

    1989-01-01

    The assessment of the radiological impact of human intrusion scenarios is extremely important in the case of repositories located in salt formations, since salt is obviously a valuable economic resource. Salt formations also represent a suitable medium for mining storage caverns for oil and gas. The scenario considered in this report is that of solution mining in salt formations to produce salt for human consumption. It is postulated that the salt is extracted by excavating a cavern through solution-mining and that, in the course of cavern enlargement, the waste is intercepted and drops to the bottom of the cavern. We have assumed that the intrusion takes place 500 or even 2 500 years after the repository has been sealed. The cases considered involve high-level vitrified waste or cemented alpha waste. The paper describes the assumptions on which the scenario is based and uses a simplified model to assess the radiological consequences associated with the ingestion of contaminated salt. The paper also provides details of a sensitivity/uncertainty analysis which identified several areas in which experimental studies should be either initiated or continued [fr

  15. Culture temperature affects redifferentiation and cartilaginous extracellular matrix formation in dedifferentiated human chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Akira; Aoyama, Tomoki; Iijima, Hirotaka; Tajino, Junichi; Nagai, Momoko; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Zhang, Xiangkai; Kuroki, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    To date, there have been few studies on how temperature affects the phenotype and metabolism of human chondrocytes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of culture temperature on chondrocyte redifferentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation using dedifferentiated mature human chondrocytes in vitro. Dedifferentiated chondrocytes were cultured in a pellet culture system for up to 21 days. The pellets were randomly divided into three groups with different culture temperature (32, 37, and 41°C). Chondrocyte redifferentiation and ECM formation were evaluated by wet weight, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), histological, and biochemical analyses. The results showed that the wet weight and the mRNA expressions of collagen type II A1 and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein at 37°C were higher than the corresponding values at 32°C. The histological and biochemical analyses revealed that the syntheses of type II collagen and proteoglycan were promoted at 37°C compared to those at 32°C, whereas they were considerably inhibited at 41°C. In conclusion, the results obtained herein indicated that temperature affects chondrocyte redifferentiation and ECM formation, and modulation of temperature might thus represent an advantageous means to regulate the phenotype and biosynthetic activity of chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dynamic maps of UV damage formation and repair for the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adebali, Ogun; Adar, Sheera; Sancar, Aziz

    2017-06-27

    Formation and repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells are affected by cellular context. To study factors influencing damage formation and repair genome-wide, we developed a highly sensitive single-nucleotide resolution damage mapping method [high-sensitivity damage sequencing (HS-Damage-seq)]. Damage maps of both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts [(6-4)PPs] from UV-irradiated cellular and naked DNA revealed that the effect of transcription factor binding on bulky adducts formation varies, depending on the specific transcription factor, damage type, and strand. We also generated time-resolved UV damage maps of both CPDs and (6-4)PPs by HS-Damage-seq and compared them to the complementary repair maps of the human genome obtained by excision repair sequencing to gain insight into factors that affect UV-induced DNA damage and repair and ultimately UV carcinogenesis. The combination of the two methods revealed that, whereas UV-induced damage is virtually uniform throughout the genome, repair is affected by chromatin states, transcription, and transcription factor binding, in a manner that depends on the type of DNA damage.

  17. Reactivation of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 by telomeric circle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh K Prusty

    Full Text Available More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even death. We have previously shown that Chlamydia trachomatis infection reactivates ciHHV-6 and induces the formation of extra-chromosomal viral DNA in ciHHV-6 cells. Here, we propose a model and provide experimental evidence for the mechanism of ciHHV-6 reactivation. Infection with Chlamydia induced a transient shortening of telomeric ends, which subsequently led to increased telomeric circle (t-circle formation and incomplete reconstitution of circular viral genomes containing single viral direct repeat (DR. Correspondingly, short t-circles containing parts of the HHV-6 DR were detected in cells from individuals with genetically inherited ciHHV-6. Furthermore, telomere shortening induced in the absence of Chlamydia infection also caused circularization of ciHHV-6, supporting a t-circle based mechanism for ciHHV-6 reactivation.

  18. Development of steroid signaling pathways during primordial follicle formation in the human fetal ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Paul A; Anderson, Richard A; Saunders, Philippa T; Kinnell, Hazel; Mason, J Ian; Evans, Dean B; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Flannigan, Samantha; Franks, Stephen; Monteiro, Ana; O'Shaughnessy, Peter J

    2011-06-01

    Ovarian primordial follicle formation is critical for subsequent human female fertility. It is likely that steroid, and especially estrogen, signaling is required for this process, but details of the pathways involved are currently lacking. The aim was to identify and characterize key members of the steroid-signaling pathway expressed in the second trimester human fetal ovary. We conducted an observational study of the female fetus, quantifying and localizing steroid-signaling pathway members. The study was conducted at the Universities of Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and Glasgow. Ovaries were collected from 43 morphologically normal human female fetuses from women undergoing elective termination of second trimester pregnancies. We measured mRNA transcript levels and immunolocalized key steroidogenic enzymes and steroid receptors, including those encoded by ESR2, AR, and CYP19A1. Levels of mRNA encoding the steroidogenic apparatus and steroid receptors increased across the second trimester. CYP19A1 transcript increased 4.7-fold during this period with intense immunostaining for CYP19A detected in pregranulosa cells around primordial follicles and somatic cells around oocyte nests. ESR2 was localized primarily to germ cells, but androgen receptor was exclusively expressed in somatic cells. CYP17A1 and HSD3B2 were also localized to oocytes, whereas CYP11A1 was detected in oocytes and some pregranulosa cells. The human fetal ovary expresses the machinery to produce and detect multiple steroid signaling pathways, including estrogenic signaling, with the oocyte acting as a key component. This study provides a step-change in our understanding of local dynamics of steroid hormone signaling during the key period of human primordial follicle formation.

  19. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin

  20. Statistical analysis of clone formation in cultures of human stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, N P; Vinogradova, M S; Volkov, I K; Voronina, E S; Kuleshov, N P

    2011-08-01

    We performed a statistical analysis of clone formation from aneuploid cells (chromosomes 6, 8, 11, X) in cultures of bone marrow-derived human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells by spontaneous level of aneuploidy at different terms of culturing (from 2 to 19 cell cycles). It was found that the duration of cell cycle increased from 65.6 h at passages 2-3 to 164.5 h at passage 12. The expected ratio of aneuploid cells was calculated using modeled 5, 10, 20 and 30% selective preference in reproduction. The size of samples for detecting 10, 25, and 50% increased level of aneuploidy was calculated. The presented principles for evaluation of aneuploid clone formation may be used to distinguish clones of any abnormal cells.

  1. Hierarchical Spatial Concept Formation Based on Multimodal Information for Human Support Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yoshinobu; Inoue, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hiroyoshi; Taniguchi, Tadahiro

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a hierarchical spatial concept formation method based on the Bayesian generative model with multimodal information e.g., vision, position and word information. Since humans have the ability to select an appropriate level of abstraction according to the situation and describe their position linguistically, e.g., "I am in my home" and "I am in front of the table," a hierarchical structure of spatial concepts is necessary in order for human support robots to communicate smoothly with users. The proposed method enables a robot to form hierarchical spatial concepts by categorizing multimodal information using hierarchical multimodal latent Dirichlet allocation (hMLDA). Object recognition results using convolutional neural network (CNN), hierarchical k-means clustering result of self-position estimated by Monte Carlo localization (MCL), and a set of location names are used, respectively, as features in vision, position, and word information. Experiments in forming hierarchical spatial concepts and evaluating how the proposed method can predict unobserved location names and position categories are performed using a robot in the real world. Results verify that, relative to comparable baseline methods, the proposed method enables a robot to predict location names and position categories closer to predictions made by humans. As an application example of the proposed method in a home environment, a demonstration in which a human support robot moves to an instructed place based on human speech instructions is achieved based on the formed hierarchical spatial concept.

  2. Hierarchical Spatial Concept Formation Based on Multimodal Information for Human Support Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Hagiwara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a hierarchical spatial concept formation method based on the Bayesian generative model with multimodal information e.g., vision, position and word information. Since humans have the ability to select an appropriate level of abstraction according to the situation and describe their position linguistically, e.g., “I am in my home” and “I am in front of the table,” a hierarchical structure of spatial concepts is necessary in order for human support robots to communicate smoothly with users. The proposed method enables a robot to form hierarchical spatial concepts by categorizing multimodal information using hierarchical multimodal latent Dirichlet allocation (hMLDA. Object recognition results using convolutional neural network (CNN, hierarchical k-means clustering result of self-position estimated by Monte Carlo localization (MCL, and a set of location names are used, respectively, as features in vision, position, and word information. Experiments in forming hierarchical spatial concepts and evaluating how the proposed method can predict unobserved location names and position categories are performed using a robot in the real world. Results verify that, relative to comparable baseline methods, the proposed method enables a robot to predict location names and position categories closer to predictions made by humans. As an application example of the proposed method in a home environment, a demonstration in which a human support robot moves to an instructed place based on human speech instructions is achieved based on the formed hierarchical spatial concept.

  3. Enhancement of bone formation in rabbits by recombinant human growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrnberg, A.; Brosjoe, O.; Laaftman, P.; Nilsson, O.; Stroemberg, L.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the effect of human recombinant growth hormone on diaphyseal bone in 40 adult rabbits. The diaphyseal periosteum of one femur in each animal was mechanically stimulated by a nylon cerclage band. The bands induced an increase in bone formation, bone mineral content, and maximum torque capacity of the diaphyseal bone at 1 and 2 months. Growth hormone enhanced the anabolic effect of the cerclage bands on bone metabolism, evidenced by a further increase in torsional strength of the femurs. (au) (32 refs.)

  4. Prevention of Human Lymphoproliferative Tumor Formation in Ovarian Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina A. Butler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Interest in preclinical drug development for ovarian cancer has stimulated development of patient-derived xenograft (PDX or tumorgraft models. However, the unintended formation of human lymphoma in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV–infected human lymphocytes can be problematic. In this study, we have characterized ovarian cancer PDXs which developed human lymphomas and explore methods to suppress lymphoproliferative growth. Fresh human ovarian tumors from 568 patients were transplanted intraperitoneally in SCID mice. A subset of PDX models demonstrated atypical patterns of dissemination with mediastinal masses, hepatosplenomegaly, and CD45-positive lymphoblastic atypia without ovarian tumor engraftment. Expression of human CD20 but not CD3 supported a B-cell lineage, and EBV genomes were detected in all lymphoproliferative tumors. Immunophenotyping confirmed monoclonal gene rearrangements consistent with B-cell lymphoma, and global gene expression patterns correlated well with other human lymphomas. The ability of rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to suppress human lymphoproliferation from a patient's ovarian tumor in SCID mice and prevent growth of an established lymphoma led to a practice change with a goal to reduce the incidence of lymphomas. A single dose of rituximab during the primary tumor heterotransplantation process reduced the incidence of CD45-positive cells in subsequent PDX lines from 86.3% (n = 117 without rituximab to 5.6% (n = 160 with rituximab, and the lymphoma rate declined from 11.1% to 1.88%. Taken together, investigators utilizing PDX models for research should routinely monitor for lymphoproliferative tumors and consider implementing methods to suppress their growth.

  5. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R.; Siwarungsun, N.; Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2000-01-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for γ-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  6. Dose-rate effects for apoptosis and micronucleus formation in gamma-irradiated human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Dolling, J.-A.; Maves, S.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Siwarungsun, N. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Mitchel, R.E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    We have compared dose-rate effects for {gamma}-radiation-induced apoptosis and micronucleus formation in human lymphocytes. Long-term assessment of individual radiation-induced apoptosis showed little intraindividual variation but significant interindividual variation. The effectiveness of radiation exposure to cause apoptosis or micronucleus formation was reduced by low-dose-rate exposures, but the reduction was apparent at different dose rates for these two end points. Micronucleus formation showed a dose-rate effect when the dose rate was lowered to 0.29 cGy/min, but there was no accompanying cell cycle delay. A further increase in the dose-rate effect was seen at 0.15 cGy/min, but was now accompanied by cell cycle delay. There was no dose-rate effect for the induction of apoptosis until the dose rate was reduced to 0.15 cGy/min, indicating that the mechanisms or signals for processing radiation-induced lesions for these two end points must be different at least in part. There appear to be two mechanisms that contribute to the dose-rate effect for micronucleus formation. One of these does not affect binucleate cell frequency and occurs at dose rates higher than that required to produce a dose-rate effect for apoptosis, and one affects binucleate cell frequency, induced only at the very low dose rate which coincidentally produces a dose-rate effect for apoptosis. Since the dose rate at which cells showed reduced apoptosis as well as a further reduction in micronucleus formation was very low, we conclude that the processing of the radiation-induced lesions that induce apoptosis, and some micronuclei, is very slow in quiescent and PHA-stimulated lymphocytes, respectively. (author)

  7. Strategies for the formation of human resources in the mexican nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez T, A.M.; Valle G, E. del; Francois L, J.L.; Espinosa P, G.; Mireles G, F.; Croche B, R.; Lartigue G, J.

    2007-01-01

    This work looks for to put in the discussion table the topic of the formation of human resources highly qualified that doubtless will need the country in the short term, same that will have to begin to be formed from now on to be able to satisfy the demand in the next future. They take like base several studies carried out by the NEA/OECD and the recommendations that have emanated of the same ones for later to make an approach of the current Mexican situation and to conclude with a series of recommendations that have been identified. The recommendations here exposed, they are only the thought of the authors and in no way they are based on an already carried out study. However it will be important to open the debate on the real strategies to have a national nuclear politics based on solid resultant foundations of the production and training of brilliant human resources. (Author)

  8. Radiological consequences of a human intrusion in a nuclear waste repository in a salt formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.; Raimbault, P.

    1989-07-01

    The assessment of the consequences of human intrusion scenarios for a repository is very important for salt formations, since this material has an undeniable economic interest. In this work, the scenario considers the solution mining of salt for human consumption: salt is extracted from a cavern; by leaching, this cavern enlarges and uncovers the waste, which falls down into the sump. It was assumed that the intrusion takes place either 500 years or 2500 years after the closing of the repository. High-level vitrified waste or alpha cemented waste were considered. This paper displays the assumptions made and, using a simplified modelling of the phenomena, the estimation of the radiological consequences due to ingestion of contamined sals. A sensitivity/uncertainty analysis is presented which emphasizes several fields where experimental studies have to be pursued or launched [fr

  9. Hairpin formation within the enhancer region of the human enkephalin gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurray, C.T.; Douglass, J.O.; Wilson, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    The 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-inducible enhancer of the human enkephaline gene is located within an imperfect palindrom of 23 base pairs. The authors have found that a 23-base-pair oligonucleotide duplex containing the enhancer undergoes a reversible conformational transition from the duplex to two individual hairpin structures each formed from one strand of the duplex. Each individual hairpin forms with mismatched base pairs, one containing two GT pairs and the other containing two AC pairs. The conformational transition is stabilized by proton transfer to the hairpin containing AC mismatched pairs. The unique physical and thermodynamic properties of the enkephalin enhancer DNA suggest a model in which DNA secondary structure within the enhancer region plays and active role incAMP-inducible activation of the human enkephalin gene via formation of cruciform structures

  10. Radiological consequences associated with a human intrusion into a saliferous formation containing a radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.; Raimbault, P.

    1990-01-01

    Assessment of the consequences of human intrusion scenarios for a repository in salt formations is very important, since this material has an undeniable economic value: it is also a propitious medium for the storage of hydrocarbons, gases, etc. In this work the scenario considers solution mining of salt for human consumption: salt is extracted from a cavern by leaching, and this enlarges the cavern and uncovers the waste, which then falls down into the sump. It was assumed that the intrusion would take place at 500 or even 2500 years after closing of the repository. High activity vitrified waste or cement enrobed alpha waste was considered. This paper sets out the assumptions made and, using simplified modelling of the phenomena, makes an estimation of the radiological consequences associated with ingestion of contaminated salt. A sensitivity/uncertainty analysis which is presented emphasises several fields in which experimental studies should be launched or pursued. (author)

  11. FORMATION OF THE HUMAN CAPITAL IN MODEL OF INTEGRATION OF HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE IN INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Mityakov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed the problems of reproduction of human resources in the scientific and educational cooperation and collaboration of university research with industry. Proposed a model integration high school science to industry of the region, including the internal and external levels. On the internal level, proposed a scheme of transfer technology in a technical university, where the formation of human capital is produced in two related areas: training of competitive labor market specialists with higher education, as well as consolidation in the universities of highly qualified personnel. On the external level, proposed creation of an integrated research and education production cluster, which brings together the personnel and technological capabilities of the industrial region.

  12. Hairpin formation within the enhancer region of the human enkephalin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurray, C.T.; Douglass, J.O. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States)); Wilson, W.D. (Georgia State Univ., Atlanta (United States))

    1991-01-15

    The 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-inducible enhancer of the human enkephaline gene is located within an imperfect palindrom of 23 base pairs. The authors have found that a 23-base-pair oligonucleotide duplex containing the enhancer undergoes a reversible conformational transition from the duplex to two individual hairpin structures each formed from one strand of the duplex. Each individual hairpin forms with mismatched base pairs, one containing two GT pairs and the other containing two AC pairs. The conformational transition is stabilized by proton transfer to the hairpin containing AC mismatched pairs. The unique physical and thermodynamic properties of the enkephalin enhancer DNA suggest a model in which DNA secondary structure within the enhancer region plays and active role incAMP-inducible activation of the human enkephalin gene via formation of cruciform structures.

  13. The postischemic environment differentially impacts teratoma or tumor formation after transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seminatore, Christine; Polentes, Jerome; Ellman, Ditte

    2010-01-01

    Risk of tumorigenesis is a major obstacle to human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell therapy. Likely linked to the stage of differentiation of the cells at the time of implantation, formation of teratoma/tumors can also be influenced by factors released by the host tissue. We have...... analyzed the relative effects of the stage of differentiation and the postischemic environment on the formation of adverse structures by transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors....

  14. Trace elements during primordial plexiform network formation in human cerebral organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela C. Sartore

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Systematic studies of micronutrients during brain formation are hindered by restrictions to animal models and adult post-mortem tissues. Recently, advances in stem cell biology have enabled recapitulation of the early stages of human telencephalon development in vitro. In the present work, we analyzed cerebral organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence in order to measure biologically valuable micronutrients incorporated and distributed into the exogenously developing brain. Our findings indicate that elemental inclusion in organoids is consistent with human brain tissue and involves P, S, K, Ca, Fe and Zn. Occurrence of different concentration gradients also suggests active regulation of elemental transmembrane transport. Finally, the analysis of pairs of elements shows interesting elemental interaction patterns that change from 30 to 45 days of development, suggesting short- or long-term associations, such as storage in similar compartments or relevance for time-dependent biological processes. These findings shed light on which trace elements are important during human brain development and will support studies aimed to unravel the consequences of disrupted metal homeostasis for neurodevelopmental diseases, including those manifested in adulthood.

  15. Human T cell colony formation in microculture: analysis of growth requirements and functional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, E W; Lee, J W; Dosch, H M; Price, G B

    1981-03-01

    A microculture method in methylcellulose has been developed for the study of human T cell colony formation. The technique is simple, reliable, does not require preincubation with lectin and requires small numbers of cells. Colony formation was dependent on the presence of phytohemagglutin-conditioned medium, a T colony precursor cell (TCPC), and a "helper" or accessory T cell. Plating efficiency was increased 10-fold in the presence of irradiated feeder cells. Progenitors of the T colony cells were identified in peripheral blood, tonsil, and spleen but not in thymus or thoracic duct. They were isolated in the E-rosetting, theophylline-resistant, Fc-IgG-negative cell populations. In peripheral blood the frequency of TCPC and accessory cells, the T colony forming unit, was estimated to be 8 X 10(-3). Colony cells proliferated in response to lectins and allogeneic cells. Forty to 80% of the cells were Ia-positive and stimulated both autologous and allogeneic mixed lymphocyte responses. They were incapable of mediating antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. In contrast, they were effective in assays of spontaneous cytotoxicity but only against certain target cells. This method for the analysis of T colony formation should prove valuable in the functional analysis of T cell subsets in immunodeficiency states or the transplant recipient.

  16. Hypoxia enhances proliferation and tissue formation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, Warren L.; Zhao, Feng; Bunnell, Bruce; Ma, Teng

    2007-01-01

    Changes in oxygen concentrations affect many of the innate characteristics of stem and progenitor cells. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were maintained under hypoxic atmospheres (2% O 2 ) for up to seven in vitro passages. This resulted in approximately 30-fold higher hMSC expansion over 6 weeks without loss of multi-lineage differentiation capabilities. Under hypoxia, hMSCs maintained their growth-rates even after reaching confluence, resulting in the formation of multiple cell layers. Hypoxic hMSCs also displayed differences in the cell and nuclear morphologies as well as enhanced ECM formation and organization. These changes in cellular characteristics were accompanied by higher mRNA levels of Oct-4 and HIF-2α, as well as increased expression levels of connexin-43, a protein used in gap junction formation. The results from this study demonstrated that oxygen concentrations affected many aspects of stem-cell physiology, including growth and in vitro development, and may be a critical parameter during expansion and differentiation

  17. A New Controller for a Smart Walker Based on Human-Robot Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadão, Carlos; Caldeira, Eliete; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano; Frizera-Neto, Anselmo; Carelli, Ricardo

    2016-07-19

    This paper presents the development of a smart walker that uses a formation controller in its displacements. Encoders, a laser range finder and ultrasound are the sensors used in the walker. The control actions are based on the user (human) location, who is the actual formation leader. There is neither a sensor attached to the user's body nor force sensors attached to the arm supports of the walker, and thus, the control algorithm projects the measurements taken from the laser sensor into the user reference and, then, calculates the linear and angular walker's velocity to keep the formation (distance and angle) in relation to the user. An algorithm was developed to detect the user's legs, whose distances from the laser sensor provide the information necessary to the controller. The controller was theoretically analyzed regarding its stability, simulated and validated with real users, showing accurate performance in all experiments. In addition, safety rules are used to check both the user and the device conditions, in order to guarantee that the user will not have any risks when using the smart walker. The applicability of this device is for helping people with lower limb mobility impairments.

  18. Nuclear body formation and PML body remodeling by the human cytomegalovirus protein UL35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salsman, Jayme; Wang Xueqi; Frappier, Lori

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL35 gene encodes two proteins, UL35 and UL35a. Expression of UL35 in transfected cells results in the formation of UL35 nuclear bodies that associate with promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein. PML forms the basis for PML nuclear bodies that are important for suppressing viral lytic gene expression. Given the important relationship between PML and viral infection, we have further investigated the association of UL35 with PML bodies. We demonstrate that UL35 bodies form independently of PML and subsequently recruit PML, Sp100 and Daxx. In contrast, UL35a did not form bodies; however, it could bind UL35 and inhibit the formation of UL35 bodies. The HCMV tegument protein pp71 promoted the formation of UL35 bodies and the cytoplasmic localization of UL35a. Similarly, UL35a shifted pp71 to the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the interplay between UL35, UL35a and pp71 affects their subcellular localization and likely their functions throughout infection.

  19. Silver nanoparticle-human hemoglobin interface: time evolution of the corona formation and interaction phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, A. K.; Kamilya, T.; Saha, S.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we have used spectroscopic and electron microscopic analysis to monitor the time evolution of the silver nanoparticles (Ag NP)-human hemoglobin (Hb) corona formation and to characterize the interaction of the Ag NPs with Hb. The time constants for surface plasmon resonance binding and reorganization are found to be 9.51 and 118.48 min, respectively. The drop of surface charge and the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter indicated the corona of Hb on the Ag NP surface. The auto correlation function is found to broaden with the increasing time of the corona formation. Surface zeta potential revealed that positively charged Hb interact electrostatically with negatively charged Ag NP surfaces. The change in α helix and β sheet depends on the corona formation time. The visualization of the Hb corona from HRTEM showed large number of Hb domains aggregate containing essentially Ag NPs and without Ag NPs. Emission study showed the tertiary deformation, energy transfer, nature of interaction and quenching under three different temperatures.

  20. Event-related brain potential correlates of human auditory sensory memory-trace formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenschel, Corinna; Vernon, David J; Dwivedi, Prabuddh; Gruzelier, John H; Baldeweg, Torsten

    2005-11-09

    The event-related potential (ERP) component mismatch negativity (MMN) is a neural marker of human echoic memory. MMN is elicited by deviant sounds embedded in a stream of frequent standards, reflecting the deviation from an inferred memory trace of the standard stimulus. The strength of this memory trace is thought to be proportional to the number of repetitions of the standard tone, visible as the progressive enhancement of MMN with number of repetitions (MMN memory-trace effect). However, no direct ERP correlates of the formation of echoic memory traces are currently known. This study set out to investigate changes in ERPs to different numbers of repetitions of standards, delivered in a roving-stimulus paradigm in which the frequency of the standard stimulus changed randomly between stimulus trains. Normal healthy volunteers (n = 40) were engaged in two experimental conditions: during passive listening and while actively discriminating changes in tone frequency. As predicted, MMN increased with increasing number of standards. However, this MMN memory-trace effect was caused mainly by enhancement with stimulus repetition of a slow positive wave from 50 to 250 ms poststimulus in the standard ERP, which is termed here "repetition positivity" (RP). This RP was recorded from frontocentral electrodes when participants were passively listening to or actively discriminating changes in tone frequency. RP may represent a human ERP correlate of rapid and stimulus-specific adaptation, a candidate neuronal mechanism underlying sensory memory formation in the auditory cortex.

  1. Lumen Formation Is an Intrinsic Property of Isolated Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Taniguchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that dissociated human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs are intrinsically programmed to form lumens. PSCs form two-cell cysts with a shared apical domain within 20 hr of plating; these cysts collapse to form monolayers after 5 days. Expression of pluripotency markers is maintained throughout this time. In two-cell cysts, an apical domain, marked by EZRIN and atypical PKCζ, is surrounded by apically targeted organelles (early endosomes and Golgi. Molecularly, actin polymerization, regulated by ARP2/3 and mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (MDIA, promotes lumen formation, whereas actin contraction, mediated by MYOSIN-II, inhibits this process. Finally, we show that lumenal shape can be manipulated in bioengineered micro-wells. Since lumen formation is an indispensable step in early mammalian development, this system can provide a powerful model for investigation of this process in a controlled environment. Overall, our data establish that lumenogenesis is a fundamental cell biological property of human PSCs.

  2. Formation of the Periotic Space During the Early Fetal Period in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Aoi; Ohtsuki, Sae; Yamada, Shigehito; Uwabe, Chigako; Imai, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2018-04-01

    The inner ear is a very complicated structure, composed of a bony labyrinth (otic capsule; OC), membranous labyrinth, with a space between them, named the periotic labyrinth or periotic space. We investigated how periotic tissue fluid spaces covered the membranous labyrinth three-dimensionally, leading to formation of the periotic labyrinth encapsulated in the OC during human fetal development. Digital data sets from magnetic resonance images and phase-contrast X-ray tomography images of 24 inner ear organs from 24 human fetuses from the Kyoto Collection (fetuses in trimesters 1 and 2; crown-rump length: 14.4-197 mm) were analyzed. The membranous labyrinth was morphologically differentiated in samples at the end of the embryonic period (Carnegie stage 23), and had grown linearly to more than eight times in size during the observation period. The periotic space was first detected at the 35-mm samples, around the vestibule and basal turn of the cochlea, which elongated rapidly to the tip of the cochlea and semicircular ducts, successively, and almost covered the membranous labyrinth at the 115-mm CRL stage or later. In those samples, several ossification centers were detected around the space. This article thus demonstrated that formation of the membranous labyrinth, periotic space (labyrinth), and ossification of the OC occurs successively, according to an intricate timetable. Anat Rec, 301:563-570, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis

  4. Kalirin, a key player in synapse formation, is implicated in human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandela, Prashant; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Synapse formation is considered to be crucial for learning and memory. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms of synapse formation is a key to understanding learning and memory. Kalirin-7, a major isoform of Kalirin in adult rodent brain, is an essential component of mature excitatory synapses. Kalirin-7 interacts with multiple PDZ-domain-containing proteins including PSD95, spinophilin, and GluR1 through its PDZ-binding motif. In cultured hippocampal/cortical neurons, overexpression of Kalirin-7 increases spine density and spine size whereas reduction of endogenous Kalirin-7 expression decreases synapse number, and spine density. In Kalirin-7 knockout mice, spine length, synapse number, and postsynaptic density (PSD) size are decreased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons; these morphological alterations are accompanied by a deficiency in long-term potentiation (LTP) and a decreased spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) frequency. Human Kalirin-7, also known as Duo or Huntingtin-associated protein-interacting protein (HAPIP), is equivalent to rat Kalirin-7. Recent studies show that Kalirin is relevant to many human diseases such as Huntington's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, ischemic stroke, schizophrenia, depression, and cocaine addiction. This paper summarizes our recent understanding of Kalirin function.

  5. Building Innovation Capacity: The Role of Human Capital Formation in Enterprises--A Review of the Literature. Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Courvisanos, Jerry; Tuck, Jacqueline; McEachern, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This literature review examines the role of human capital formation in building innovative capacity in firms. The aim of the review is to develop a model of human capital development factors to be used as a basis for a larger research project where the factors that develop innovation capacity in enterprises will be investigated. The review finds…

  6. Book Review: The Architecture of Concepts: The Historical Formation of Human Rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Nicholas Romaniuk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available How do concepts come to be? And, in particular, how current conceptions of international human rights are built upon a particular conceptual architecture? Peter de Bolla, author of The Architecture of Concepts: The Historical Formation of Human Rights, addresses these questions in incremental steps, building on what scholars currently understand when it comes to concepts more generally. The methodology is based on the use of the Eighteenth Century Collection Online (ECCO digital archives predominantly, with the aim of constructing data-dependent descriptions of conceptual architectures. The author, thus, looks at conceptual networks and the extensive relationships found within them so as to direct researchers in conducting future plotting of connectivities within networks. The opening chapter looks at concepts as a way of thinking. Concepts are treated as a metaphorical “subway or tube maps project into multiple dimensions.” The author then focuses on the eighteenth century and its printed materials. The use of large data allows the author to extrapolate matters of language spanning large communities. The following chapters combine the issue of creating conceptual dispositions with poignant debates about rights that pervaded the First Continental Congress during the 1770s, while repositioning the items of inquiry, mentioned previously, by challenging the assumption of the origin(s of human rights.

  7. The timing of pronuclear formation, DNA synthesis and cleavage in the human 1-cell embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, G; Taylor, A; Braude, P R; Bolton, V N

    1996-05-01

    The timing of pronuclear formation and breakdown, DNA synthesis and cleavage during the first cell cycle of human embryogenesis are described. Pronuclei formed between 3 and 10 h post-insemination (hpi; median 8 hpi). S-phase commenced between 8 and 14 hpi, and was completed between 10 and 18 hpi. M-phase was observed between 22 and 31 hpi (median duration 3 h), and cleavage to the 2-cell stage took place between 25 and 33 hpi. The timing of the same events was determined in 1-cell embryos derived from re-inseminated human oocytes that had failed to fertilize during therapeutic in-vitro fertilization (IVF). In these embryos, pronuclei formed between 3 and 8 h post-re-insemination (hpr-i), coinciding with the beginning of S-phase. While S-phase was completed as early as 10 hpr-i in some embryos, it extended until at least 16 hpr-i in others. Pronuclear breakdown and cleavage occurred from 23 and 26 hpr-i respectively; however, they did not occur in some embryos until after 46 hpr-i. The results demonstrate a markedly greater degree of variation in the timing of these events in embryos derived from re-inseminated oocytes compared with embryos derived from conventional IVF, and thus throw into question the validity of using the former as models for studies of the first cell cycle of human embryogenesis.

  8. Hyperthermia-induced micronucleus formation in a human keratinocyte cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzsche, Henning; Riese, Thorsten; Stopper, Helga

    2012-01-01

    Elevated temperature can cause biological effects in vitro and in vivo. Many studies on effects of hypo- and hyperthermia have been conducted, but only few studies systematically investigated the formation of genomic damage in the micronucleus test in human cells in vitro as a consequence of different temperatures. In the present study, HaCaT human keratinocytes were exposed to different temperatures from 37 °C to 42 °C for 24 h in a regular cell culture incubator. Micronucleus frequency as a marker of genomic damage was elevated in a temperature-dependent and statistically significant manner. Apoptosis occurred at temperatures of 39 °C or higher. Cell proliferation was unaffected up to 40 °C and decreased at 41 °C and 42 °C. Expression of the heat shock protein Hsp70 was elevated, particularly at temperatures of 40 °C and higher. These findings are in agreement with several in vivo studies and some in vitro studies looking at single, specific temperatures, but a systematically investigated temperature-dependent increase of genomic damage in human keratinocytes in vitro is demonstrated for the first time here.

  9. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances matrix assembly during chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S; Chen, Faye H

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention.

  10. CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN ENHANCES MATRIX ASSEMBLY DURING CHONDROGENESIS OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Faye H.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate-hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention. PMID:22095699

  11. Progranulin Inhibits Human T Lymphocyte Proliferation by Inducing the Formation of Regulatory T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Hwan Kwack

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effect of progranulin (PGRN on human T cell proliferation and its underlying mechanism. We show that PGRN inhibits the PHA-induced multiplication of T lymphocytes. It increases the number of iTregs when T lymphocytes are activated by PHA but does not do so in the absence of PHA. PGRN-mediated inhibition of T lymphocyte proliferation, as well as the induction of iTregs, was completely reversed by a TGF-β inhibitor or a Treg inhibitor. PGRN induced TGF-β secretion in the presence of PHA whereas it did not in the absence of PHA. Our findings indicate that PGRN suppresses T lymphocyte proliferation by enhancing the formation of iTregs from activated T lymphocytes in response to TGF-β.

  12. Inhibiting actin depolymerization enhances osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in human stromal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Shi, Kaikai; Frary, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton through actin dynamics is involved in a number of biological processes, but its role in human stromal (skeletal) stem cells (hMSCs) differentiation is poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that stabilizing actin filaments by inhibiting gene...... expression of the two main actin depolymerizing factors (ADFs): Cofilin 1 (CFL1) and Destrin (DSTN) in hMSCs, enhanced cell viability and differentiation into osteoblastic cells (OB) in vitro, as well as heterotopic bone formation in vivo. Similarly, treating hMSC with Phalloidin, which is known to stabilize...... polymerized actin filaments, increased hMSCs viability and OB differentiation. Conversely, Cytocholasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, reduced cell viability and inhibited OB differentiation of hMSC. At a molecular level, preventing Cofilin phosphorylation through inhibition of LIM domain kinase 1...

  13. Micronucleus formation in cultured human keratinocytes following exposure to mitomycin C and cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, F N; Haring, R M; Overkamp, M J; Weterings, P J

    1991-02-01

    A method is described to investigate the induction of micronuclei in cultured human keratinocytes after short-term exposure to known clastogenic agents. The cytokinesis-block method was applied to facilitate the scoring of micronucleated cells. Mitomycin C, a direct-acting compound, caused a 5-20-fold increase in micronuclei over the controls at the highest concentration tested (1 microgram/ml). Cyclophosphamide, an agent requiring metabolic activation, did not induce the formation of micronuclei in cultured keratinocytes. However, after pretreatment of the keratinocyte cultures with Aroclor 1254 for 72 h, exposure to cyclophosphamide resulted in a 3-fold increase in micronucleus frequency over the controls. No cytogenetic effect of Aroclor 1254 was observed in control experiments.

  14. A coverslip-based technique for evaluating Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N Walker

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, to form biofilms is increasingly being viewed as an important contributor to chronic infections. In vitro methods for analyzing S. aureus biofilm formation have focused on bacterial attachment and accumulation on abiotic surfaces, such as in microtiter plate and flow cell assays. Microtiter plates provide a rapid measure of relative biomass levels, while flow cells have limited experimental throughput but are superior for confocal microscopy biofilm visualization. Although these assays have proven effective at identifying mechanisms involved in cell attachment and biofilm accumulation, the significance of these assays in vivo remains unclear. Studies have shown that when medical devices are implanted they are coated with host factors, such as matrix proteins, that facilitate S. aureus attachment and biofilm formation. To address the challenge of integrating existing biofilm assay features with a biotic surface, we have established an in vitro biofilm technique utilizing UV-sterilized coverslips coated with human plasma. The substratum more closely resembles the in vivo state and provides a platform for S. aureus to establish a robust biofilm. Importantly, these coverslips are amenable to confocal microscopy imaging to provide a visual reference of the biofilm growth stage, effectively merging the benefits of the microtiter and flow cell assays. We confirmed the approach using clinical S. aureus isolates and mutants with known biofilm phenotypes. Altogether, this new biofilm assay can be used to assess the function of S. aureus virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and for monitoring the efficacy of biofilm treatment modalities.

  15. Leucine supplementation attenuates macrophage foam-cell formation: Studies in humans, mice, and cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajeda-Iglesias, Claudia; Rom, Oren; Hamoud, Shadi; Volkova, Nina; Hayek, Tony; Abu-Saleh, Niroz; Aviram, Michael

    2018-02-05

    Whereas atherogenicity of dietary lipids has been largely studied, relatively little is known about the possible contribution of dietary amino acids to macrophage foam-cell formation, a hallmark of early atherogenesis. Recently, we showed that leucine has antiatherogenic properties in the macrophage model system. In this study, an in-depth investigation of the role of leucine in macrophage lipid metabolism was conducted by supplementing humans, mice, or cultured macrophages with leucine. Macrophage incubation with serum obtained from healthy adults supplemented with leucine (5 g/d, 3 weeks) significantly decreased cellular cholesterol mass by inhibiting the rate of cholesterol biosynthesis and increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophages. Similarly, leucine supplementation to C57BL/6 mice (8 weeks) resulted in decreased cholesterol content in their harvested peritoneal macrophages (MPM) in relation with reduced cholesterol biosynthesis rate. Studies in J774A.1 murine macrophages revealed that leucine dose-dependently decreased cellular cholesterol and triglyceride mass. Macrophages treated with leucine (0.2 mM) showed attenuated uptake of very low-density lipoproteins and triglyceride biosynthesis rate, with a concurrent down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1, a key enzyme catalyzing triglyceride biosynthesis in macrophages. Similar effects were observed when macrophages were treated with α-ketoisocaproate, a key leucine metabolite. Finally, both in vivo and in vitro leucine supplementation significantly improved macrophage mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. The above studies, conducted in human, mice, and cultured macrophages, highlight a protective role for leucine attenuating macrophage foam-cell formation by mechanisms related to the metabolism of cholesterol, triglycerides, and energy production. © 2018 BioFactors, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Effect of Genistein on vasculogenic mimicry formation by human uveal melanoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Haijuan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vasculogenic mimicry (VM was increasingly recognized as a form of aggressive melanoma acquiring blood supply. Genistein had attracted much attention as a potential anticancer agent. Therefore, we examined the effect of Genistein on VM in human uveal melanoma cells. Methods VM structure was detected by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS staining for uveal melanoma C918 cells cultured on the three-dimensional type I collagen gels after exposed to Genistein. We used reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and Western Blot analysis to examine the effect of Genistein on vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin mRNA and protein expression. The nude mice models of human uveal melanoma C918 cells were established to assess the number of VM using immunohistochemical and PAS double-staining. Results Genistein inhibited the survival of C918 cells in vitro. The ectopic model study showed that VM in tumor tissue sections were significantly reduced by Genistein in vivo. In vitro, the VM structure was found in control, 25 and 50 μM Genistein-treatment groups but not in 100 and 200 μM. RT-PCR and Western Blot showed that 100 and 200 μM concentration of Genistein could significantly decrease VE-cadherin mRNA and protein expression of C918 cells compared with control (P 0.05. Conclusion Genistein inhibits VM formation of uveal melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro. One possible underlying molecular mechanism by which Genistein could inhibit VM formation of uveal melanoma is related to down-regulation of VE-cadherin.

  17. Free Radicals Formation of Irradiated Lyophilized Can-Cellous Human and Bovine Bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Basril; Sudiro, Sutjipto; Hilmy, Nazly

    2000-01-01

    Radiation sterilization of lyophilized human and bovine bone as allograft and xenograft have been produced and used in orthopaedic practice in Indonesia routinely. It is well known from radio biologic studies that one of the most pronounce effects of ionizing radiation on biologic species produced the free radicals that influence the physico-chemical as well as the mechanical properties of irradiated bone. The aim of our study is to investigate the free radicals formation of irradiated lyophilized cancellous triple A bone (Autolyzed Antigen-Extracted Allograft) produced by Batan Research Tissue Bank in Jakarta. The cancellous triple A were prepared according to AATB (American Association of Tissue Bank) method. Gamma Irradiations was done at doses of 10, 20 and 30 kGy with a dose rate of 7,5 kGy/h at room temperature (30 o C± 2 o C). Measurements of free radicals was done at 24 o C ±1 o C within 30 minutes after irradiational and measurement were continued up to 9 months of storage using a JES-REIX ESR Spectrophotometer (JEOL) with Mn exp. ++ standard. Parameters measured, were the effects of mechanical grinding, water immersion and irradiation dose on free radicals formation in the bone. Results show that the signal area of ESR spectra from irradiated bovine bone of 30 kGy was higher than those of human bone I.e. 1,4 x 10 exp. 7 dan 6,4 x 10 exp. 6 Au (arbitrary unit)/g samples respectively. The signal of ESR spectra increased linearly with increasing dose in the range of 10-30 kGy and it will reduce about 30% caused by water immersion. The ESR signal reduced sharply after 2 days and gradually decreased up to 14 days and then became constant up to 9 months of storage at room temperature. A certain method of crushing can produce free radicals. Key Words: free radical, irradiation, allograft, xenograft, mechanical-grinding

  18. A biplanar X-ray approach for studying the 3D dynamics of human track formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatala, Kevin G; Perry, David A; Gatesy, Stephen M

    2018-05-09

    Recent discoveries have made hominin tracks an increasingly prevalent component of the human fossil record, and these data have the capacity to inform long-standing debates regarding the biomechanics of hominin locomotion. However, there is currently no consensus on how to decipher biomechanical variables from hominin tracks. These debates can be linked to our generally limited understanding of the complex interactions between anatomy, motion, and substrate that give rise to track morphology. These interactions are difficult to study because direct visualization of the track formation process is impeded by foot and substrate opacity. To address these obstacles, we developed biplanar X-ray and computer animation methods, derived from X-ray Reconstruction of Moving Morphology (XROMM), to analyze the 3D dynamics of three human subjects' feet as they walked across four substrates (three deformable muds and rigid composite panel). By imaging and reconstructing 3D positions of external markers, we quantified the 3D dynamics at the foot-substrate interface. Foot shape, specifically heel and medial longitudinal arch deformation, was significantly affected by substrate rigidity. In deformable muds, we found that depths measured across tracks did not directly reflect the motions of the corresponding regions of the foot, and that track outlines were not perfectly representative of foot size. These results highlight the complex, dynamic nature of track formation, and the experimental methods presented here offer a promising avenue for developing and refining methods for accurately inferring foot anatomy and gait biomechanics from fossil hominin tracks. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acrylamide: inhibition of formation in processed food and mitigation of toxicity in cells, animals, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel

    2015-06-01

    Potentially toxic acrylamide is largely derived from the heat-inducing reactions between the amino group of the amino acid asparagine and carbonyl groups of glucose and fructose in plant-derived foods including cereals, coffees, almonds, olives, potatoes, and sweet potatoes. This review surveys and consolidates the following dietary aspects of acrylamide: distribution in food, exposure and consumption by diverse populations, reduction of the content in different food categories, and mitigation of adverse in vivo effects. Methods to reduce acrylamide levels include selecting commercial food with a low acrylamide content, selecting cereal and potato varieties with low levels of asparagine and reducing sugars, selecting processing conditions that minimize acrylamide formation, adding food-compatible compounds and plant extracts to food formulations before processing that inhibit acrylamide formation during processing of cereal products, coffees, teas, olives, almonds, and potato products, and reducing multiorgan toxicity (antifertility, carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, teratogenicity). The herein described observations and recommendations are of scientific interest for food chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology, but also have the potential to benefit nutrition, food safety, and human health.

  20. Small GTPases are involved in sprout formation in human granulosa lutein cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Maximilian B; Daube, Stefanie; Keck, Christoph; Sator, Michael; Pietrowski, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    The corpus luteum (CL), develops from the ruptured follicle after gonadotropin stimulation. Based on intracellular reorganization of the cytoskeleton an human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) dependent sprouting and migration of luteinizing granulosa cells (LGCs) and endothelial cells is observed. Rho-GTPases are shown to be key regulators of cytoskeletal restructuring. In the present study we analyzed the role of Rho-GTPases in the sprouting activity of LGCs. We used the Rho-GTPase-inhibitors Toxin A and -B and the Cdc42-activator Bradykinin in a LGC-spheroid sprouting assay to determine the effect of these modulators in LGCs. Toxin A and Toxin B reduces sprout formation in LGC spheroids. However, the reduction is less than in hCG treated cells. The usage of Bradykinin demonstrates both, a reduction of sprouts in untreated spheroids and an increase of sprouting in previous hCG treated spheroids. The presented results let us suggest that small Rho-GTPases may regulate the sprouting activity of LGCs after stimulation by hCG and that this mechanism may play a role in CL formation.

  1. Synthetic niches for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells bypassing embryoid body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yarong; Fox, Victoria; Lei, Yuning; Hu, Biliang; Joo, Kye-Il; Wang, Pin

    2014-07-01

    The unique self-renewal and pluripotency features of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offer the potential for unlimited development of novel cell therapies. Currently, hESCs are cultured and differentiated using methods, such as monolayer culture and embryoid body (EB) formation. As such, achieving efficient differentiation into higher order structures remains a challenge, as well as maintaining cell viability during differentiation into homogeneous cell populations. Here, we describe the application of highly porous polymer scaffolds as synthetic stem cell niches. Bypassing the EB formation step, these scaffolds are capable of three-dimensional culture of undifferentiated hESCs and subsequent directed differentiation into three primary germ layers. H9 hESCs were successfully maintained and proliferated in biodegradable polymer scaffolds based on poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The results showed that cells within PLGA scaffolds retained characteristics of undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells. Moreover, the scaffolds allowed differentiation towards the lineage of interest by the addition of growth factors to the culture system. The in vivo transplantation study revealed that the scaffolds could provide a microenvironment that enabled hESCs to interact with their surroundings, thereby promoting cell differentiation. Therefore, this approach, which provides a unique culture/differentiation system for hESCs, will find its utility in various stem cell-based tissue-engineering applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The human hippocampal formation mediates short-term memory of colour-location associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Carsten; Braun, Mischa; Ostendorf, Florian; Lehmann, Thomas-Nicolas; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Kopp, Ute; Ploner, Christoph J

    2008-01-31

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) has long been considered essential for declarative long-term memory, whereas the fronto-parietal cortex is generally seen as the anatomical substrate of short-term memory. This traditional dichotomy is questioned by recent studies suggesting a possible role of the MTL for short-term memory. In addition, there is no consensus on a possible specialization of MTL sub-regions for memory of associative information. Here, we investigated short-term memory for single features and feature associations in three humans with post-surgical lesions affecting the right hippocampal formation and in 10 healthy controls. We used three delayed-match-to-sample tasks with two delays (900/5000 ms) and three set sizes (2/4/6 items). Subjects were instructed to remember either colours, locations or colour-location associations. In colour-only and location-only conditions, performance of patients did not differ from controls. By contrast, a significant group difference was found in the association condition at 5000 ms delay. This difference was largely independent of set size, thus suggesting that it cannot be explained by the increased complexity of the association condition. These findings show that the hippocampal formation plays a significant role for short-term memory of simple visuo-spatial associations, and suggest a specialization of MTL sub-regions for associative memory.

  3. Metabolism of 5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid by the human platelet. Formation of novel thromboxane analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazy, M

    1991-12-15

    Radiolabeled cis-(+-)-5,6-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (5(6)-EpETrE) was incubated with a suspension of isolated human platelets in order to study its metabolic fate. The epoxide slowly disappeared from the suspension and was completely metabolized within 30 min. After extraction and analysis by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography, seven metabolites were found. Addition of either indomethacin (0.01 mM, cyclooxygenase inhibitor) or BW755C (0.1 mM, cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor) to the incubations blocked the formation of four and six metabolites, respectively, 1,2-Epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (inhibitor of microsomal epoxide hydrolase) failed to inhibit the formation of 5,6-dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (5,6-DiHETrE), a hydrolysis product of the precursor 5(6)-EpETrE. The metabolites were characterized by UV spectroscopy, negative ion chemical ionization liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and, in one instance, coelution with synthetic standard. Three primary platelet metabolites were structurally determined to be 5,6-epoxy-12-hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid, 5,6-epoxy-12-hydroxyheptadecadienoic acid, and a unique bicyclic metabolite, 5-hydroxy-6,9-epoxy-thromboxane B1, which originated from intramolecular hydrolysis of 5,6-epoxythromboxane-B1. This thromboxane analog was partially separated into stereoisomers and coeluted with the racemic synthetic standard in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Three other metabolites were characterized as 5,6,12-trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid, 5,6,12-trihydroxyheptadecadienoic acid, and 5,6-dihydroxythromboxane-B1, and resulted from the hydrolysis of the corresponding epoxides rather than from the metabolism of 5,6-DiHETrE. The latter was not metabolized by platelet cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase. The biosynthesis of two cyclooxygenase metabolites indicated the formation of unstable 5,6-epoxythromboxane-A1 as an intermediate

  4. The Contribution of the Human Body in Young Children's Explanations About Shadow Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakleioti, Evagelia; Pantidos, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    This paper begins with the view that the generation of meaning is a multimodal process. Props, drawings, graphs, gestures, as well as speech and written text are all mediators through which students construct new knowledge. Each semiotic context makes a unique contribution to the conceptualization of scientific entities. The human body, in particular, can function as a factor in both representation and explanation, serving as a link between verbal discourse and setting. Considering this perspective, a body-based activity was designed for kindergarten children, involving the concept of a shadow. The 3-D arrangement of the light from the light source, the human body (the obstacle), and the resulting shadow plays a central role. Using their own bodies as obstacles to the light, the children were able to explore the direction of the light and to change the relative positions of the light source and the obstacle. They formed hypotheses and were able to test them by moving on the stage. This body-centered activity explicitly incorporates the rectilinear movement of light into the process of shadow formation, while also providing learning through direct experience. Positive effects on learning were achieved for the group of children who participated in the activity, while the video analysis showed that many of the children were able to use their bodies to transfer to a different setting the embodied knowledge they acquired. This, according to researchers in the field of science education, is a powerful indication of conceptual change.

  5. Novelty-Sensitive Dopaminergic Neurons in the Human Substantia Nigra Predict Success of Declarative Memory Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Jan; Mamelak, Adam N; Birch, Kurtis; Mosher, Clayton P; Tagliati, Michele; Rutishauser, Ueli

    2018-04-12

    The encoding of information into long-term declarative memory is facilitated by dopamine. This process depends on hippocampal novelty signals, but it remains unknown how midbrain dopaminergic neurons are modulated by declarative-memory-based information. We recorded individual substantia nigra (SN) neurons and cortical field potentials in human patients performing a recognition memory task. We found that 25% of SN neurons were modulated by stimulus novelty. Extracellular waveform shape and anatomical location indicated that these memory-selective neurons were putatively dopaminergic. The responses of memory-selective neurons appeared 527 ms after stimulus onset, changed after a single trial, and were indicative of recognition accuracy. SN neurons phase locked to frontal cortical theta-frequency oscillations, and the extent of this coordination predicted successful memory formation. These data reveal that dopaminergic neurons in the human SN are modulated by memory signals and demonstrate a progression of information flow in the hippocampal-basal ganglia-frontal cortex loop for memory encoding. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. ROCK inhibitor is not required for embryoid body formation from singularized human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettinato, Giuseppe; Vanden Berg-Foels, Wendy S; Zhang, Ning; Wen, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    We report a technology to form human embryoid bodies (hEBs) from singularized human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) without the use of the p160 rho-associated coiled-coil kinase inhibitor (ROCKi) or centrifugation (spin). hEB formation was tested under four conditions: +ROCKi/+spin, +ROCKi/-spin, -ROCKi/+spin, and -ROCKi/-spin. Cell suspensions of BG01V/hOG and H9 hESC lines were pipetted into non-adherent hydrogel substrates containing defined microwell arrays. hEBs of consistent size and spherical geometry can be formed in each of the four conditions, including the -ROCKi/-spin condition. The hEBs formed under the -ROCKi/-spin condition differentiated to develop the three embryonic germ layers and tissues derived from each of the germ layers. This simplified hEB production technique offers homogeneity in hEB size and shape to support synchronous differentiation, elimination of the ROCKi xeno-factor and rate-limiting centrifugation treatment, and low-cost scalability, which will directly support automated, large-scale production of hEBs and hESC-derived cells needed for clinical, research, or therapeutic applications.

  7. Formation of Main Elements of the System Motivation of Human Capital of Construction Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malykhina Oksana M.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on a necessity to develop system motivation of human capital of construction enterprises. The author gives her own vision of this process on the basis of the system situational approach. The article identifies main requirements, which are made stronger with the necessity of establishment of the system motivation. It generalises the aggregate of components of internal and external environments, which form the structure, requirements to functioning and directions of managerial impact on the genesis of this process, which would facilitate achievement of long-term goals of construction enterprises on the basis of the innovation model of development. Efficiency of functioning of the system motivation of human capital of construction enterprises would depend on accounting in the process of its formation and development of such basic properties as: target orientation, synergetic integrity, availability of the internal organisational structure, ability to restore and resistance to influence of external environment factors, flexibility and dynamism and ecologo-socio-economic efficiency.

  8. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  9. Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunus, Abdul S.; Jackson, Trent P.; Crisafi, Katherine; Burimski, Irina; Kilgore, Nicole R.; Zoumplis, Dorian; Allaway, Graham P.; Wild, Carl T.; Salzwedel, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of

  10. In vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue formation with porous poly-L-lactide matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Wen; Okada, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Fumito; Okita, Naoya; Inami, Kaoru; Nishiura, Aki; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue (HPdLLT) by three-dimensional culturing of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLFs) in a porous poly-L-lactide (PLLA) matrix modified hydrophilically with ammonia solution. After ammonia modification, the surface roughness and culture-medium-soaking-up ability of the PLLA matrix increased, whereas the contact angle of water drops decreased. The thickness, porosity, and pore size of the PLLA matrix were 400 ± 50 μm, 83.3%, and 75–150 μm, respectively. HPdLFs (1 × 10 5 cells) were seeded on the modified PLLA matrix and centrifuged to facilitate seeding into its interior and cultured for 14 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, proliferation assay, picrosirius-red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for type-1 collagen (COL1), periodontal ligament associated protein-1 (PLAP-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA were conducted on days 1, 3, 7, and 14. HPdLFs were observed entirely from the surface to the rear side of the matrix. Cell proliferation analysis, SEM observation, and picrosirius-red staining showed both progressive growth of 3D-cultured HPdLFs and extracellular matrix maturation by the secretion of COL1 and type 3 collagen (COL3) from days 1 to 14. Expressions of COL1, PLAP-1, and FGF-2 mRNA suggested the formation of cellular components and supplementation of extracellular components. Expressions of ALP, COL1, and PLAP-1 mRNA suggested the osteogenic potential of the HPdLLT. The results indicated in vitro HPdLLT formation, and it could be used in future periodontal ligament tissue engineering to achieve optimal periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • First report on ammonia treated PLLA matrix for in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue generation. • Good combination of matrix thickness, pore size, and porosity. • Biodegradable PLLA is also possible to be used in vivo

  11. In vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue formation with porous poly-L-lactide matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Wen [Graduate School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Okada, Masahiro [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Sakamoto, Fumito; Okita, Naoya [Graduate School of Dentistry, Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Inami, Kaoru; Nishiura, Aki [Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiya, E-mail: yoshiya@cc.osaka-dent.ac.jp [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan); Matsumoto, Naoyuki [Department of Orthodontics, Osaka Dental University, 8-1 Kuzuha-hanazono-cho, Hirakata-shi, Osaka-fu 573-1121 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to establish an in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue (HPdLLT) by three-dimensional culturing of human periodontal ligament fibroblasts (HPdLFs) in a porous poly-L-lactide (PLLA) matrix modified hydrophilically with ammonia solution. After ammonia modification, the surface roughness and culture-medium-soaking-up ability of the PLLA matrix increased, whereas the contact angle of water drops decreased. The thickness, porosity, and pore size of the PLLA matrix were 400 ± 50 μm, 83.3%, and 75–150 μm, respectively. HPdLFs (1 × 10{sup 5} cells) were seeded on the modified PLLA matrix and centrifuged to facilitate seeding into its interior and cultured for 14 days. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation, proliferation assay, picrosirius-red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for type-1 collagen (COL1), periodontal ligament associated protein-1 (PLAP-1), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA were conducted on days 1, 3, 7, and 14. HPdLFs were observed entirely from the surface to the rear side of the matrix. Cell proliferation analysis, SEM observation, and picrosirius-red staining showed both progressive growth of 3D-cultured HPdLFs and extracellular matrix maturation by the secretion of COL1 and type 3 collagen (COL3) from days 1 to 14. Expressions of COL1, PLAP-1, and FGF-2 mRNA suggested the formation of cellular components and supplementation of extracellular components. Expressions of ALP, COL1, and PLAP-1 mRNA suggested the osteogenic potential of the HPdLLT. The results indicated in vitro HPdLLT formation, and it could be used in future periodontal ligament tissue engineering to achieve optimal periodontal regeneration. - Highlights: • First report on ammonia treated PLLA matrix for in vitro human periodontal ligament-like tissue generation. • Good combination of matrix thickness, pore size, and porosity. • Biodegradable PLLA is also possible to be used in vivo.

  12. Neuromuscular junction formation between human stem-cell-derived motoneurons and rat skeletal muscle in a defined system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiufang; Das, Mainak; Rumsey, John; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Stancescu, Maria; Hickman, James

    2010-12-01

    To date, the coculture of motoneurons (MNs) and skeletal muscle in a defined in vitro system has only been described in one study and that was between rat MNs and rat skeletal muscle. No in vitro studies have demonstrated human MN to rat muscle synapse formation, although numerous studies have attempted to implant human stem cells into rat models to determine if they could be of therapeutic use in disease or spinal injury models, although with little evidence of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation. In this report, MNs differentiated from human spinal cord stem cells, together with rat skeletal myotubes, were used to build a coculture system to demonstrate that NMJ formation between human MNs and rat skeletal muscles is possible. The culture was characterized by morphology, immunocytochemistry, and electrophysiology, while NMJ formation was demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and videography. This defined system provides a highly controlled reproducible model for studying the formation, regulation, maintenance, and repair of NMJs. The in vitro coculture system developed here will be an important model system to study NMJ development, the physiological and functional mechanism of synaptic transmission, and NMJ- or synapse-related disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as for drug screening and therapy design.

  13. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-α-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 μM) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-α and 5 μM sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction

  14. Impaired representation of geometric relationships in humans with damage to the hippocampal formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Finke

    Full Text Available The pivotal role of the hippocampus for spatial memory is well-established. However, while neurophysiological and imaging studies suggest a specialization of the hippocampus for viewpoint-independent or allocentric memory, results from human lesion studies have been less conclusive. It is currently unclear whether disproportionate impairment in allocentric memory tasks reflects impairment of cognitive functions that are not sufficiently supported by regions outside the medial temporal lobe or whether the deficits observed in some studies are due to experimental factors. Here, we have investigated whether hippocampal contributions to spatial memory depend on the spatial references that are available in a certain behavioral context. Patients with medial temporal lobe lesions affecting systematically the right hippocampal formation performed a series of three oculomotor tasks that required memory of a spatial cue either in retinal coordinates or relative to a single environmental reference across a delay of 5000 ms. Stimulus displays varied the availability of spatial references and contained no complex visuo-spatial associations. Patients showed a selective impairment in a condition that critically depended on memory of the geometric relationship between spatial cue and environmental reference. We infer that regions of the medial temporal lobe, most likely the hippocampal formation, contribute to behavior in conditions that exceed the potential of viewpoint-dependent or egocentric representations. Apparently, this already applies to short-term memory of simple geometric relationships and does not necessarily depend on task difficulty or integration of landmarks into more complex representations. Deficient memory of basic geometric relationships may represent a core deficit that contributes to impaired performance in allocentric spatial memory tasks.

  15. Impaired representation of geometric relationships in humans with damage to the hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, Carsten; Ostendorf, Florian; Braun, Mischa; Ploner, Christoph J

    2011-01-01

    The pivotal role of the hippocampus for spatial memory is well-established. However, while neurophysiological and imaging studies suggest a specialization of the hippocampus for viewpoint-independent or allocentric memory, results from human lesion studies have been less conclusive. It is currently unclear whether disproportionate impairment in allocentric memory tasks reflects impairment of cognitive functions that are not sufficiently supported by regions outside the medial temporal lobe or whether the deficits observed in some studies are due to experimental factors. Here, we have investigated whether hippocampal contributions to spatial memory depend on the spatial references that are available in a certain behavioral context. Patients with medial temporal lobe lesions affecting systematically the right hippocampal formation performed a series of three oculomotor tasks that required memory of a spatial cue either in retinal coordinates or relative to a single environmental reference across a delay of 5000 ms. Stimulus displays varied the availability of spatial references and contained no complex visuo-spatial associations. Patients showed a selective impairment in a condition that critically depended on memory of the geometric relationship between spatial cue and environmental reference. We infer that regions of the medial temporal lobe, most likely the hippocampal formation, contribute to behavior in conditions that exceed the potential of viewpoint-dependent or egocentric representations. Apparently, this already applies to short-term memory of simple geometric relationships and does not necessarily depend on task difficulty or integration of landmarks into more complex representations. Deficient memory of basic geometric relationships may represent a core deficit that contributes to impaired performance in allocentric spatial memory tasks.

  16. CDK1 inhibition facilitates formation of syncytiotrophoblasts and expression of human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    KAUST Repository

    Ullah, Rahim

    2018-05-17

    Aims The human placental syncytiotrophoblast (STB) cells play essential roles in embryo implantation and nutrient exchange between the mother and the fetus. STBs are polyploid which are formed by fusion of diploid cytotrophoblast (CTB) cells. Abnormality in STBs formation can result in pregnancy-related disorders. While a number of genes have been associated with CTB fusion the initial events that trigger cell fusion are not well understood. Primary objective of this study was to enhance our understanding about the molecular mechanism of placental cell fusion. Methods FACS and microscopic analysis was used to optimize Forskolin-induced fusion of BeWo cells (surrogate of CTBs) and subsequently, changes in the expression of different cell cycle regulator genes were analyzed through Western blotting and qPCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the first trimester placental tissue sections to validate the results in the context of placental tissue. Effect of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1) inhibitor, RO3306, on BeWo cell fusion was studied by microscopy and FACS, and by monitoring the expression of human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) by Western blotting and qPCR. Results The data showed that the placental cell fusion was associated with down regulation of CDK1 and its associated cyclin B, and significant decrease in DNA replication. Moreover, inhibition of CDK1 by an exogenous inhibitor induced placental cell fusion and expression of hCG. Conclusion Here, we report that the placental cell fusion can be induced by inhibiting CDK1. This study has a high therapeutic significance to manage pregnancy related abnormalities.

  17. Evaluation of the radiological consequences of a human intrusion in a granite formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejon-Goula, M.J.; Cernes, A.

    1989-07-01

    The methodology used in France for the evaluation of the radiological consequences associated to a nuclear waste repository in a deep geological formation is the deterministic one. This means that, in addition to the calculations in connection with the ''normal'' scenario, a limited number of ''altered'' scenarios, representing the different families of plausible scenarios and corresponding to the most important consequences resulting from there families, have to be taken into account. Among them, the human intrusion scenario is an important one. In a study performed inside the CEC PAGIS project and also for a french expert group (Goguel group) which carried out a methodologic work for the national site selection procedure, results concerning the quantification of the radiological consequences of a human intrusion have been obtained without attempting at the evaluation of its probability. The intrusion time ranged from 1 000 to 100 000 years and different contamination scenarios were taken into account. It was assumed that the intrusion led to the creation of a 100 cubic meters edge cubic cavity in the immediate vicinity to the repository. Using the description of the Auriat site realized for PAGIS, the calculation was performed in three steps: - calculation of the evolution of the repository until the intrusion time, - computation of the supposed instantaneous new flow distribution after the intrusion, - computation of the dose rate, using the mean volumic activity in the cavity walls and the outgoing flow rate. Three exposure scenarios were considered: - a worker in the mine exposed to by external irradiation and contaminated by inhalation of radioactive materials, -an animal drinking in the vicinity during the mining operation, - gardening after the closure of the mine. With the exception of the worker scenario (the dose rate may reach 10 -2 Sv/year, which is comparable with the normal exposure in a granite mine), the other dose rates were found to be quite low

  18. Assessment and characterization of biofilm formation among human isolates of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genteluci, Gabrielle Limeira; Silva, Ligia Guedes; Souza, Maria Clara; Glatthardt, Thaís; de Mattos, Marcos Corrêa; Ejzemberg, Regina; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Ferreira-Carvalho, Bernadete Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    The capacity to form biofilm is considered a protective mechanism that allows the bacteria to survive and proliferate in hostile environments, facilitating the maintenance of the infectious process. Recently, biofilm has become a topic of interest in the study of the human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS). Although GAS has not been associated with infection on medical implants, the presence of microcolonies embedded in an extracellular matrix on infected tissues has been reported. Despite the similarity between GAS and Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDSE), there are no studies in the literature describing the production of biofilm by SDSE. In this work, we assessed and characterized biofilm development among SDSE human isolates of group C. The in vitro data showed that 59.3% of the 118 isolates tested were able to form acid-induced biofilm on glass, and 28% formed it on polystyrene surfaces. More importantly, biofilm was also formed in a foreign body model in mice. The biofilm structure was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Long fibrillar-like structures were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the expression of a pilus associated gene of SDSE was increased for in vitro sessile cells compared with planktonics, and when sessile cells were collected from biofilms formed in the animal model compared with that of in vitro model. Results obtained from the immunofluorescence microscopy indicated the biofilm was immunogenic. Our data also suggested a role for proteins, exopolysaccharide and extracellular DNA in the formation and accumulation of biofilm by SDSE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Hepatic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in miniaturized format suitable for high-throughput screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Carpentier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of protocols to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs including embryonic (ESC and induced pluripotent (iPSC stem cells into functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs creates new opportunities to study liver metabolism, genetic diseases and infection of hepatotropic viruses (hepatitis B and C viruses in the context of specific genetic background. While supporting efficient differentiation to HLCs, the published protocols are limited in terms of differentiation into fully mature hepatocytes and in a smaller-well format. This limitation handicaps the application of these cells to high-throughput assays. Here we describe a protocol allowing efficient and consistent hepatic differentiation of hPSCs in 384-well plates into functional hepatocyte-like cells, which remain differentiated for more than 3 weeks. This protocol affords the unique opportunity to miniaturize the hPSC-based differentiation technology and facilitates screening for molecules in modulating liver differentiation, metabolism, genetic network, and response to infection or other external stimuli.

  20. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. ► tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. ► tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA Met (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA Met was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  1. Aggregate formation and suspension culture of human pluripotent stem cells and differentiated progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookway, Tracy A; Butts, Jessica C; Lee, Emily; Tang, Hengli; McDevitt, Todd C

    2016-05-15

    Culture of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) as in vitro multicellular aggregates has been increasingly used as a method to model early embryonic development. Three-dimensional assemblies of hPSCs facilitate interactions between cells and their microenvironment to promote morphogenesis, analogous to the multicellular organization that accompanies embryogenesis. In this paper, we describe a method for reproducibly generating and maintaining populations of homogeneous three-dimensional hPSC aggregates using forced aggregation and rotary orbital suspension culture. We propose solutions to several challenges associated with the consistent formation and extended culture of cell spheroids generated from hPSCs and their differentiated progeny. Further, we provide examples to demonstrate how aggregation can be used as a tool to select specific subpopulations of cells to create homotypic spheroids, or as a means to introduce multiple cell types to create heterotypic tissue constructs. Finally, we demonstrate that the aggregation and rotary suspension method can be used to support culture and maintenance of hPSC-derived cell populations representing each of the three germ layers, underscoring the utility of this platform for culturing many different cell types. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Induction of bone formation by smart biphasic hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate biomimetic matrices in the non-human primate Papio ursinus

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ripamonti, U

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies in the non-human primate Chacma baboon Papio ursinus were set to investigate the induction of bone formation by biphasic hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) biomimetic matrices. HA/β-TCP biomimetic matrices in a pre...

  3. Teratoma Formation by Human Embryonic Stem Cells is site-dependent and enhanced by the presence of Matrigel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokhorova, Tatyana A; Harkness, Linda M; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2008-01-01

    When implanted into immunodeficient mice, human embryonic stem cells (hESC) give rise to teratoma, tumour-like formations containing tissues belonging to all three germ layers. The ability to form teratoma is a sine qua non characteristic of pluripotent stem cells. However, limited data...

  4. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics Associated with Biofilm Formation by Human Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates of Different Pathotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Juliane; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Weinreich, Jörg; Ali, Aamir; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter

    2017-12-15

    Bacterial biofilm formation is a widespread phenomenon and a complex process requiring a set of genes facilitating the initial adhesion, maturation, and production of the extracellular polymeric matrix and subsequent dispersal of bacteria. Most studies on Escherichia coli biofilm formation have investigated nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strains. Due to the extensive focus on laboratory strains in most studies, there is poor information regarding biofilm formation by pathogenic E. coli isolates. In this study, we genotypically and phenotypically characterized 187 human clinical E. coli isolates representing various pathotypes (e.g., uropathogenic, enteropathogenic, and enteroaggregative E. coli ). We investigated the presence of biofilm-associated genes ("genotype") and phenotypically analyzed the isolates for motility and curli and cellulose production ("phenotype"). We developed a new screening method to examine the in vitro biofilm formation ability. In summary, we found a high prevalence of biofilm-associated genes. However, we could not detect a biofilm-associated gene or specific phenotype correlating with the biofilm formation ability. In contrast, we did identify an association of increased biofilm formation with a specific E. coli pathotype. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) was found to exhibit the highest capacity for biofilm formation. Using our image-based technology for the screening of biofilm formation, we demonstrated the characteristic biofilm formation pattern of EAEC, consisting of thick bacterial aggregates. In summary, our results highlight the fact that biofilm-promoting factors shown to be critical for biofilm formation in nonpathogenic strains do not reflect their impact in clinical isolates and that the ability of biofilm formation is a defined characteristic of EAEC. IMPORTANCE Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and consist of sessile bacterial cells surrounded by a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. They cause chronic and device

  5. Micronucleus formation compared to the survival rate of human melanoma cells after X-ray and neutron irradiation and hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Beuningen, D.; Streffer, C.; Bertholdt, G.

    1981-09-01

    After neutron and X-ray irradiation and combined X-ray irradiation and hyperthermia (3 hours, 42/sup 0/C), the survival rate of human melanoma cells was measured by means of the colony formation test and compared to the formation of micronuclei. Neutrons had a stronger effect on the formation of micronuclei than the combination of X-rays and hyperthermia. X-rays had the lowest effect. The dose effect curve showed a break at that dose level at which a reduction of cells was observed in the cultures. A good relation between survival rate and formation of micronuclei was found for the X-ray irradiation, but not for the neutron irradiation and the combined treatment. These observations are discussed. At least for X-rays, the micronucleus test has turned out to be a good screening method for the radiosensitivity of a biologic system.

  6. Formation of adjectives referring to human physical traits in the speech of the Svrljig area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić-Grujić Ana R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our analysis focuses on all the adjectives which refer to human physical traits in the speech of the villages in the Svrljig area. This derivational analysis included more than 300 derivative adjectives which, from a synchronic point of view, belong to the category of derived words. The analysis included derivatives which have been formed through prefixation and suffixation, as well as derivatives which occurred as the result of compound-suffix derivation. Special attention was paid to suffixation as the basic and most frequently available means of adjective formation. Suffixes are represented in combination with the base they are bound to, with an indication of their productivity and meaning in derivational terms. A study of the material indicates that adjective derivation by means of suffixation is made possible with the use of 20 suffixes and suffix derivatives, 10 of which have one confirmation each. The greatest productivity has been found for the noun base and suffix -av (52 which a total number of recorded derivative adjectives is 200. The prefix-suffix derivation process is the least frequent, and thus only 12 adjectives were derived in this way. Contrary to the mainstream opinion that complex words are not characteristic of our diasystem, the derivation process involving adjectives referring to humans based on physical traits shows great productivity in the compound-suffix derivation process. More than 90 complex words were derived from the binding the suffix -av (4, -as / -es (54 and the zero suffix (37 to complex bases. Another difference compared to the literary language is reflected in the occurrence of various forms of one suffix, which came about as the consequence of vowel changes (-as / -es : -ast. It is also not infrequent that during derivation, various forms of bases are used, or that a nonproductive basis in one system is productive in another. So for example it has been confirmed that in the speech of the Svrljig area the

  7. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Ryu [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Mizuno, Rie [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Watanabe, Kazunori, E-mail: watanabe@ric.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Ijiri, Kenichi [Radioisotope Center, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  8. Carbonyl Reduction of NNK by Recombinant Human Lung Enzymes. Identification of HSD17β12 as the Reductase important in (R)-NNAL formation in Human Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Joseph H; Luo, Shaman; Watson, Christy J W; Lazarus, Philip

    2018-05-17

    4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is the most abundant and carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamine in tobacco and tobacco smoke. The major metabolic pathway for NNK is carbonyl reduction to form the (R) and (S) enantiomers of 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL) which, like NNK, is a potent lung carcinogen. The goal of the present study was to characterize NNAL enantiomer formation in human lung and identify the enzymes responsible for this activity. While (S)-NNAL was the major enantiomer of NNAL formed in incubations with NNK in lung cytosolic fractions, (R)-NNAL comprised ~60 and ~95% of the total NNAL formed in lung whole cell lysates and microsomes, respectively. In studies examining the role of individual recombinant reductase enzymes in lung NNAL enantiomer formation, AKR1C1, AKR1C2, AKR1C3, AKR1C4 and CBR1 all exhibited (S)-NNAL formation activity. To identify the microsomal enzymes responsible for (R)-NNAL formation, 28 microsomal reductase enzymes were screened for expression by real-time PCR in normal human lung. HSD17β6, HSD17β12, KDSR, NSDHL, RDH10, RDH11 and SDR16C5 were all expressed at levels >HSD11β1, the only previously reported microsomal reductase enzyme with NNK-reducing activity, with HSD17β12 the most highly expressed. Of these lung-expressing enzymes, only HSD17β12 exhibited activity against NNK, forming primarily (>95%) (R)-NNAL, a pattern consistent with that observed in lung microsomes. siRNA knockdown of HSD17β12 resulted in significant decreases in (R)-NNAL formation activity in HEK293 cells. These data suggest that both cytosolic and microsomal enzymes are active against NNK and that HSD17β12 is the major active microsomal reductase that contributes to (R)-NNAL formation in human lung.

  9. The role of the University in the context of Inclusive Education Policy: reflections about human resources formation and knowledge production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Glat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present text aims to discuss and present, briefly action lines about the role of University in the promotion of psicossocial and educational development of people with handicap and other special needs. Taking the framework of specialized literature, it brings different questions dealing with human resources formation, specially, teacher formation, and the production of knowledge in the area of Special Education, obtained through research and extension projects, done, preferentially, in partnership with the educational agents that work in the field. It also analyses how these actions may influence the implementation of policies regarding school, labor, and social inclusion of people with handicap and other developmental disorders.

  10. Telomere disruption results in non-random formation of de novo dicentric chromosomes involving acrocentric human chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaitlin M Stimpson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome rearrangement often produces chromosomes with two centromeres (dicentrics that are inherently unstable because of bridge formation and breakage during cell division. However, mammalian dicentrics, and particularly those in humans, can be quite stable, usually because one centromere is functionally silenced. Molecular mechanisms of centromere inactivation are poorly understood since there are few systems to experimentally create dicentric human chromosomes. Here, we describe a human cell culture model that enriches for de novo dicentrics. We demonstrate that transient disruption of human telomere structure non-randomly produces dicentric fusions involving acrocentric chromosomes. The induced dicentrics vary in structure near fusion breakpoints and like naturally-occurring dicentrics, exhibit various inter-centromeric distances. Many functional dicentrics persist for months after formation. Even those with distantly spaced centromeres remain functionally dicentric for 20 cell generations. Other dicentrics within the population reflect centromere inactivation. In some cases, centromere inactivation occurs by an apparently epigenetic mechanism. In other dicentrics, the size of the alpha-satellite DNA array associated with CENP-A is reduced compared to the same array before dicentric formation. Extra-chromosomal fragments that contained CENP-A often appear in the same cells as dicentrics. Some of these fragments are derived from the same alpha-satellite DNA array as inactivated centromeres. Our results indicate that dicentric human chromosomes undergo alternative fates after formation. Many retain two active centromeres and are stable through multiple cell divisions. Others undergo centromere inactivation. This event occurs within a broad temporal window and can involve deletion of chromatin that marks the locus as a site for CENP-A maintenance/replenishment.

  11. 3D tissue formation : the kinetics of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera Sierra, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    The main thesis in this book proposes that physical phenomena underlies the formation of three-dimensional (3D) tissue. In this thesis, tissue regeneration with mesenchymal stem cells was studied through the law of conservation of mass. MSCs proliferation and 3D tissue formation were explored from

  12. Multidimensional human capital formation in a developing country: Health, cognition and locus of control in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Kira M

    2017-11-01

    Economic success depends on multiple human capital stocks whose production is interrelated and occurs over many life stages. Yet, much empirical work fails to account for human capital's multidimensional nature and limits its focus to specific childhood stages. Using longitudinal data from the Philippines, I estimate a model of multidimensional human capital formation from birth through adulthood where health, cognitive, and noncognitive dimensions are jointly produced. I examine during which developmental stages parental investment is most influential and address the endogeneity of investment using a policy function where investment depends on child characteristics, exogenous conditions at birth and local prices. Findings imply that not only will early human capital disparities persist into adulthood without early remediation but also that cognitive gains yielded from early remediation will be lost without complementary investment in adolescence. Findings further suggest that interventions will be undervalued if their multidimensional effects are not accounted for. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sulfite-induced protein radical formation in LPS aerosol-challenged mice: Implications for sulfite sensitivity in human lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to (bisulfite (HSO3– and sulfite (SO32– has been shown to induce a wide range of adverse reactions in sensitive individuals. Studies have shown that peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of (bisulfite leads to formation of several reactive free radicals, such as sulfur trioxide anion (.SO3–, peroxymonosulfate (–O3SOO., and especially the sulfate (SO4. – anion radicals. One such peroxidase in neutrophils is myeloperoxidase (MPO, which has been shown to form protein radicals. Although formation of (bisulfite-derived protein radicals is documented in isolated neutrophils, its involvement and role in in vivo inflammatory processes, has not been demonstrated. Therefore, we aimed to investigate (bisulfite-derived protein radical formation and its mechanism in LPS aerosol-challenged mice, a model of non-atopic asthma. Using immuno-spin trapping to detect protein radical formation, we show that, in the presence of (bisulfite, neutrophils present in bronchoalveolar lavage and in the lung parenchyma exhibit, MPO-catalyzed oxidation of MPO to a protein radical. The absence of radical formation in LPS-challenged MPO- or NADPH oxidase-knockout mice indicates that sulfite-derived radical formation is dependent on both MPO and NADPH oxidase activity. In addition to its oxidation by the MPO-catalyzed pathway, (bisulfite is efficiently detoxified to sulfate by the sulfite oxidase (SOX pathway, which forms sulfate in a two-electron oxidation reaction. Since SOX activity in rodents is much higher than in humans, to better model sulfite toxicity in humans, we induced SOX deficiency in mice by feeding them a low molybdenum diet with tungstate. We found that mice treated with the SOX deficiency diet prior to exposure to (bisulfite had much higher protein radical formation than mice with normal SOX activity. Altogether, these results demonstrate the role of MPO and NADPH oxidase in (bisulfite-derived protein radical formation and show the involvement of

  14. External Genital Development, Urethra Formation, and Hypospadias Induction in Guinea Pig: A Double Zipper Model for Human Urethral Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanshan; Shi, Mingxin; Zhu, Dongqing; Mathews, Ranjiv; Zheng, Zhengui

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether the guinea pig phallus would be an appropriate model of human penile development, we characterized the embryology and sexual differentiation of guinea pig external genitalia and attended to induce hypospadias in males and tubular urethra formation in females pharmacologically. The external genitalia of guinea pig were collected from genital swelling initiation to newborn stages, and scanning electronic microscopy and histology were performed to visualize the morphology and structure. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the androgen receptor localization. Bicalutamide and methyltestosterone were given to pregnant dams to reveal the role and timing of androgen in guinea pig penile masculinization. Canalization and dorsal-to-ventral movement of the urethral canal develops the urethral groove in both sexes, and then the males perform distal-opening-proximal-closing to form tubular urethra. More nuclear-localized androgen receptor is found in proximal genital tubercles of males than in females at (E) 29. Antiandrogen treatment at E26-E30 can cause hypospadias, and methyltestosterone administration at E27-E31 can induce tubular urethra formation in females. Fetal development of the guinea pig phallus is homologous to that of humans. Although guinea pig has structures similar to mouse, the urethral groove and the tubular urethra formation are more similar to humans. Antiandrogen treatment causes hypospadias in males and additional androgen induces tubular urethra formation in females. Thus, guinea pig is an appropriate model for further study of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in distal-opening-proximal-closing in tubular urethra formation and the evaluation of the pathophysiological processes of hypospadias. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Glycation of human cortical and cancellous bone captures differences in the formation of Maillard reaction products between glucose and ribose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna E Sroga

    Full Text Available To better understand some aspects of bone matrix glycation, we used an in vitro glycation approach. Within two weeks, our glycation procedures led to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs at the levels that corresponded to approx. 25-30 years of the natural in vivo glycation. Cortical and cancellous bones from human tibias were glycated in vitro using either glucose (glucosylation or ribose (ribosylation. Both glucosylation and ribosylation led to the formation of higher levels of AGEs and pentosidine (PEN in cancellous than cortical bone dissected from all tested donors (young, middle-age and elderly men and women. More efficient glycation of bone matrix proteins in cancellous bone most likely depended on the higher porosity of this tissue, which facilitated better accessibility of the sugars to the matrix proteins. Notably, glycation of cortical bone from older donors led to much higher AGEs levels as compared to young donors. Such efficient in vitro glycation of older cortical bone could result from aging-related increase in porosity caused by the loss of mineral content. In addition, more pronounced glycation in vivo would be driven by elevated oxidation processes. Interestingly, the levels of PEN formation differed pronouncedly between glucosylation and ribosylation. Ribosylation generated very high levels of PEN (approx. 6- vs. 2.5-fold higher PEN level than in glucosylated samples. Kinetic studies of AGEs and PEN formation in human cortical and cancellous bone matrix confirmed higher accumulation of fluorescent crosslinks for ribosylation. Our results suggest that in vitro glycation of bone using glucose leads to the formation of lower levels of AGEs including PEN, whereas ribosylation appears to support a pathway toward PEN formation. Our studies may help to understand differences in the progression of bone pathologies related to protein glycation by different sugars, and raise awareness for excessive sugar

  16. Regulation of hemoglobin AIc formation in human erythrocytes in vitro. Effects of physiologic factors other than glucose.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R J; Koenig, R J; Binnerts, A; Soeldner, J S; Aoki, T T

    1982-01-01

    The formation of hemoglobin AIc was studied in intact human erythrocytes in vitro. Satisfactory methods were developed for maintaining erythrocytes under physiologic conditions for greater than 8 d with less than 10% hemolysis. Hemoglobin AIc levels were determined chromatographically on erythrocyte hemolysates after removal of reversible components by incubation for 6 h at 37 degree C. Hemoglobin AIc concentration was found to increase linearly with time during 8 d of incubation. The rate of...

  17. Beyond the functional matrix hypothesis: a network null model of human skull growth for the formation of bone articulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve-Altava, Borja; Rasskin-Gutman, Diego

    2014-09-01

    Craniofacial sutures and synchondroses form the boundaries among bones in the human skull, providing functional, developmental and evolutionary information. Bone articulations in the skull arise due to interactions between genetic regulatory mechanisms and epigenetic factors such as functional matrices (soft tissues and cranial cavities), which mediate bone growth. These matrices are largely acknowledged for their influence on shaping the bones of the skull; however, it is not fully understood to what extent functional matrices mediate the formation of bone articulations. Aiming to identify whether or not functional matrices are key developmental factors guiding the formation of bone articulations, we have built a network null model of the skull that simulates unconstrained bone growth. This null model predicts bone articulations that arise due to a process of bone growth that is uniform in rate, direction and timing. By comparing predicted articulations with the actual bone articulations of the human skull, we have identified which boundaries specifically need the presence of functional matrices for their formation. We show that functional matrices are necessary to connect facial bones, whereas an unconstrained bone growth is sufficient to connect non-facial bones. This finding challenges the role of the brain in the formation of boundaries between bones in the braincase without neglecting its effect on skull shape. Ultimately, our null model suggests where to look for modified developmental mechanisms promoting changes in bone growth patterns that could affect the development and evolution of the head skeleton. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  18. Students' Illustrations of the Human Nervous System as a Formative Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Sisika Priyani Nelum; Montplaisir, Lisa Marie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore students' knowledge and learning of the human nervous system (HNS) in an introductory undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course. Classroom observations, demographic data, a preinstructional unit test with drawings, and a postinstructional unit test with drawings were used to identify students'…

  19. Biosynthesis of heme in immature erythroid cells. The regulatory step for heme formation in the human erythron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, L.C.; Cox, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Heme formation in reticulocytes from rabbits and rodents is subject to end product negative feedback regulation: intracellular free heme has been shown to control acquisition of transferrin iron for heme synthesis. To identify the site of control of heme biosynthesis in the human erythron, immature erythroid cells were obtained from peripheral blood and aspirated bone marrow. After incubation with human 59Fe transferrin, 2-[14C]glycine, or 4-[14C]delta-aminolevulinate, isotopic incorporation into extracted heme was determined. Addition of cycloheximide to increase endogenous free heme, reduced incorporation of labeled glycine and iron but not delta-aminolevulinate into cell heme. Incorporation of glycine and iron was also sensitive to inhibition by exogenous hematin (Ki, 30 and 45 microM, respectively) i.e. at concentrations in the range which affect cell-free protein synthesis in reticulocyte lysates. Hematin treatment rapidly diminished incorporation of intracellular 59Fe into heme by human erythroid cells but assimilation of 4-[14C]delta-aminolevulinate into heme was insensitive to inhibition by hematin (Ki greater than 100 microM). In human reticulocytes (unlike those from rabbits), addition of ferric salicylaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazone, to increase the pre-heme iron pool independently of the transferrin cycle, failed to promote heme synthesis or modify feedback inhibition induced by hematin. In human erythroid cells (but not rabbit reticulocytes) pre-incubation with unlabeled delta-aminolevulinate or protoporphyrin IX greatly stimulated utilization of cell 59Fe for heme synthesis and also attenuated end product inhibition. In human erythroid cells heme biosynthesis is thus primarily regulated by feedback inhibition at one or more steps which lead to delta-aminolevulinate formation

  20. Ectopic bone formation in nude rats using human osteoblasts seeded poly(3)hydroxybutyrate embroidery and hydroxyapatite-collagen tapes constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Ronald; Hagedorn, Manolo Gunnar; Gelinsky, Michael; Werner, Carsten; Turhani, Dritan; Späth, Heike; Gedrange, Tomas; Lauer, Günter

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ectopic bone formation using tissue engineered cell-seeded constructs with two different scaffolds and primary human maxillary osteoblasts in nude rats over an implantation period of up to 96 days. Collagen I-coated Poly(3)hydroxybutyrate (PHB) embroidery and hydroxyapatite (HAP) collagen tapes were seeded with primary human maxillary osteoblasts (hOB) and implanted into athymic rnu/run rats. A total of 72 implants were placed into the back muscles of 18 rats. 24, 48 and 96 days after implantation, histological and histomorphometric analyses were made. The osteoblastic character of the cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR for osteocalcin. Histological analysis demonstrated that all cell-seeded constructs induced ectopic bone formation after 24, 48 and 96 days of implantation. There was more mineralized tissue in PHB constructs than in HAP-collagen tapes (at day 24; p embroidery or HAP-collagen tapes can induce ectopic bone formation. However, the amount of bone formed decreased with increasing length of implantation.

  1. Pathways of hepatic glycogen formation in humans following ingestion of a glucose load in the fed state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Schumann, W.C.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The relative contributions of the direct and the indirect pathways to hepatic glycogen formation following a glucose load given to humans four hours after a substantial breakfast have been examined. Glucose loads labeled with [6-( 14 )C]glucose were given to six healthy volunteers along with diflunisal (1 g) or acetaminophen (1.5 g), drugs excreted in urine as glucuronides. Distribution of 14 C in the glucose unit of the glucuronide was taken as a measure of the extent to which glucose was deposited directly in liver glycogen (ie, glucose----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen) rather than indirectly (ie, glucose----C3-compound----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen). The maximum contribution to glycogen formation by the direct pathway was estimated to be 77% +/- 4%, which is somewhat higher than previous estimates in humans fasted overnight (65% +/- 1%, P less than 0.05). Thus, the indirect pathway of liver glycogen formation following a glucose load is operative in both the overnight fasted and the fed state, although its contribution may be somewhat less in the fed state

  2. Rap1 integrates tissue polarity, lumen formation, and tumorigenicpotential in human breast epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Masahiko; Nelson, Celeste M.; Myers, Connie A.; Bissell,Mina J.

    2006-09-29

    Maintenance of apico-basal polarity in normal breast epithelial acini requires a balance between cell proliferation, cell death, and proper cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix signaling. Aberrations in any of these processes can disrupt tissue architecture and initiate tumor formation. Here we show that the small GTPase Rap1 is a crucial element in organizing acinar structure and inducing lumen formation. Rap1 activity in malignant HMT-3522 T4-2 cells is appreciably higher than in S1 cells, their non-malignant counterparts. Expression of dominant-negative Rap1 resulted in phenotypic reversion of T4-2 cells, led to formation of acinar structures with correct apico-basal polarity, and dramatically reduced tumor incidence despite the persistence of genomic abnormalities. The resulting acini contained prominent central lumina not observed when other reverting agents were used. Conversely, expression of dominant-active Rap1 in T4-2 cells inhibited phenotypic reversion and led to increased invasiveness and tumorigenicity. Thus, Rap1 acts as a central regulator of breast architecture, with normal levels of activation instructing apical polarity during acinar morphogenesis, and increased activation inducing tumor formation and progression to malignancy.

  3. Formation and Stabilization of Vertical Hierarchies among Adolescents: Towards a Quantitative Ethology of Dominance among Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John Levi

    2009-01-01

    Social psychological investigations of hierarchy formation have been almost entirely confined to the case of task-oriented groups and hence have produced theories that turn on the existence of such a task. But other forms of vertical hierarchy may emerge in non-task groups. One form, orderings of dominance, has been studied among animals using…

  4. Activation of Midbrain Structures by Associative Novelty and the Formation of Explicit Memory in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Bjorn H.; Sellner, Daniela B.; Lauer, Corinna-J.; Habib, Reza; Frey, Julietta U.; Guderian, Sebastian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Duzel, Emrah

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a close functional relationship between memory formation in the hippocampus and dopaminergic neuromodulation originating in the ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra of the midbrain. Here we report midbrain activation in two functional MRI studies of visual memory in healthy young adults. In the first study,…

  5. Human Motivation in the Digital Commons: Reflections on Robbie McClintock's Conception of Formative Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marzio, Derryl; Ignaffo, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Background & Purpose: According to McClintock, persons and groups exercise formative justice as a strategy of selecting the behaviors, powers, and potentials that ought to receive educational attention to achieve their maximization. We argue that the question of what motivates individuals and collectives to utilize certain capacities to…

  6. FORMATION OF HEMOGLOBIN AND ALBUMIN ADDUCTS OF BENZENE OXIDE IN MOUSE, RAT, AND HUMAN BLOOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known about the formation and disposition of benzene oxide (BO), the initial metabolite arising from oxidation of benzene by cytochrome P450. In this study, reactions of BO with hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) were investigated in blood from B6C3F1 mice, F344 rats, ...

  7. CDK1 inhibition facilitates formation of syncytiotrophoblasts and expression of human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    KAUST Repository

    Ullah, Rahim; Dar, Saira; Ahmad, Tanvir; de Renty, Christelle; Usman, Mohammad; DePamphilis, Melvin L.; Faisal, Amir; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Ullah, Zakir

    2018-01-01

    The human placental syncytiotrophoblast (STB) cells play essential roles in embryo implantation and nutrient exchange between the mother and the fetus. STBs are polyploid which are formed by fusion of diploid cytotrophoblast (CTB) cells

  8. Syllabic discrimination in premature human infants prior to complete formation of cortical layers

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudzadeh, Mahdi; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Fournier, Marc; Kongolo, Guy; Goudjil, Sabrina; Dubois, Jessica; Grebe, Reinhard; Wallois, Fabrice

    2013-01-01

    The ontogeny of linguistic functions in the human brain remains elusive. Although some auditory capacities are described before term, whether and how such immature cortical circuits might process speech are unknown. Here we used functional optical imaging to evaluate the cerebral responses to syllables at the earliest age at which cortical responses to external stimuli can be recorded in humans (28- to 32-wk gestational age). At this age, the cortical organization in layers is not completed. ...

  9. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    the alternative pathway. Blockade of the CR2 ligand-binding site with the monoclonal antibody FE8 resulted in 56 +/- 13% and 71 +/- 9% inhibition of the C3-fragment and MAC deposition, respectively, whereas the monoclonal antibody HB135, directed against an irrelevant CR2 epitope, had no effect. Blockade......Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... processes on CR2, indicate that MAC formation is a consequence of alternative pathway activation....

  10. Definitive Endoderm Formation from Plucked Human Hair-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells and SK Channel Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anett Illing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells present an extraordinary powerful tool to investigate embryonic development in humans. Essentially, they provide a unique platform for dissecting the distinct mechanisms underlying pluripotency and subsequent lineage commitment. Modest information currently exists about the expression and the role of ion channels during human embryogenesis, organ development, and cell fate determination. Of note, small and intermediate conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels have been reported to modify stem cell behaviour and differentiation. These channels are broadly expressed throughout human tissues and are involved in various cellular processes, such as the after-hyperpolarization in excitable cells, and also in differentiation processes. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs generated from plucked human hair keratinocytes have been exploited in vitro to recapitulate endoderm formation and, concomitantly, used to map the expression of the SK channel (SKCa subtypes over time. Thus, we report the successful generation of definitive endoderm from hiPSCs of ectodermal origin using a highly reproducible and robust differentiation system. Furthermore, we provide the first evidence that SKCas subtypes are dynamically regulated in the transition from a pluripotent stem cell to a more lineage restricted, endodermal progeny.

  11. Unwinding fibril formation of medin, the peptide of the most common form of human amyloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Annika; Soederberg, Linda; Westermark, Gunilla T.; Sletten, Knut; Engstroem, Ulla; Tjernberg, Lars O.; Naeslund, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2007-01-01

    Medin amyloid affects the medial layer of the thoracic aorta of most people above 50 years of age. The consequences of this amyloid are not completely known but the deposits may contribute to diseases such as thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection or to the general diminished elasticity of blood vessels seen in elderly people. We show that the 50-amino acid residue peptide medin forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. With the use of Congo red staining, Thioflavin T fluorescence, electron microscopy, and a solid-phase binding assay on different synthetic peptides, we identified the last 18-19 amino acid residues to constitute the amyloid-promoting region of medin. We also demonstrate that the two C-terminal phenylalanines, previously suggested to be of importance for amyloid formation, are not required for medin amyloid formation

  12. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage......), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another......). The phenotype of patients correlated well with the extent of deletion or duplication of chromosome 21 sequences. These data demonstrate three mechanisms of r(21) formation and show that the phenotype of r(21) patients varies with the extent of chromosome 21 monosomy or trisomy....

  13. Activation of midbrain structures by associative novelty and the formation of explicit memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Björn H; Sellner, Daniela B; Lauer, Corinna-J; Habib, Reza; Frey, Julietta U; Guderian, Sebastian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Düzel, Emrah

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a close functional relationship between memory formation in the hippocampus and dopaminergic neuromodulation originating in the ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra of the midbrain. Here we report midbrain activation in two functional MRI studies of visual memory in healthy young adults. In the first study, participants distinguished between familiar and novel configurations of pairs of items which had been studied together by either learning the location or the identity of the items. In the second study, participants studied words by either rating the words' pleasantness or counting syllables. The ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra showed increased activation by associative novelty (first study) and subsequent free recall performance (second study). In both studies, this activation accompanied hippocampal activation, but was unaffected by the study task. Thus midbrain regions seem to participate selectively in hippocampus-dependent processes of associative novelty and explicit memory formation, but appear to be unaffected by other task-relevant aspects.

  14. Spontaneous lung metastasis formation of human Merkel cell carcinoma cell lines transplanted into scid mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knips, Jill; Czech-Sioli, Manja; Spohn, Michael; Heiland, Max; Moll, Ingrid; Grundhoff, Adam; Schumacher, Udo; Fischer, Nicole

    2017-07-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive skin cancer entity that frequently leads to rapid death due to its high propensity to metastasize. The etiology of most MCC cases is linked to Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), a virus which is monoclonally integrated in up to 95% of tumors. While there are presently no animal models to study the role of authentic MCPyV infection on transformation, tumorigenesis or metastasis formation, xenograft mouse models employing engrafted MCC-derived cell lines (MCCL) represent a promising approach to study certain aspects of MCC pathogenesis. Here, the two MCPyV-positive MCC cell lines WaGa and MKL-1 were subcutaneously engrafted in scid mice. Engraftment of both MCC cell lines resulted in the appearance of circulating tumor cells and metastasis formation, with WaGa-engrafted mice showing a significantly shorter survival time as well as increased numbers of spontaneous lung metastases compared to MKL-1 mice. Interestingly, explanted tumors compared to parental cell lines exhibit an upregulation of MCPyV sT-Antigen expression in all tumors, with WaGa tumors showing significantly higher sT-Antigen expression than MKL-1 tumors. RNA-Seq analysis of explanted tumors and parental cell lines furthermore revealed that in the more aggressive WaGa tumors, genes involved in inflammatory response, growth factor activity and Wnt signalling pathway are significantly upregulated, suggesting that sT-Antigen is the driver of the observed differences in metastasis formation. © 2017 UICC.

  15. In vitro radiosensitivity of human fresh T-lymphocytes by colony formation assay using PHA and recombinant Interleukin-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsugawa, Kaori; Nakamura, Nori; Hakoda, Masayuki; Akiyama, Mitoshi.

    1988-05-01

    In vitro culture conditions for colony formation of human fresh peripheral T-cells using phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and recombinant Interleukin-2 are defined. Peripheral lymphocytes, from six individuals, were exposed to X or gamma rays in vitro, and dose-survival curves were obtained. The results showed typical sigmoid curves similar to those observed when other mammalian cells are exposed to radiation. The D 10 (dose required to kill 90 % of the cells) was found to be 3.0 to 3.5 Gy. (author)

  16. Polymorphic Human Sulfotransferase 2A1 Mediates the Formation of 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3-3-O-Sulfate, a Major Circulating Vitamin D Metabolite in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Timothy; Wang, Zhican; Chapron, Brian D; Suzuki, Mizuki; Claw, Katrina G; Gao, Chunying; Foti, Robert S; Prasad, Bhagwat; Chapron, Alenka; Calamia, Justina; Chaudhry, Amarjit; Schuetz, Erin G; Horst, Ronald L; Mao, Qingcheng; de Boer, Ian H; Thornton, Timothy A; Thummel, Kenneth E

    2018-04-01

    Metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 (25OHD 3 ) plays a central role in regulating the biologic effects of vitamin D in the body. Although cytochrome P450-dependent hydroxylation of 25OHD 3 has been extensively investigated, limited information is available on the conjugation of 25OHD 3 In this study, we report that 25OHD 3 is selectively conjugated to 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate by human sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1) and that the liver is a primary site of metabolite formation. At a low (50 nM) concentration of 25OHD 3 , 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate was the most abundant metabolite, with an intrinsic clearance approximately 8-fold higher than the next most efficient metabolic route. In addition, 25OHD 3 sulfonation was not inducible by the potent human pregnane X receptor agonist, rifampicin. The 25OHD 3 sulfonation rates in a bank of 258 different human liver cytosols were highly variable but correlated with the rates of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfonation. Further analysis revealed a significant association between a common single nucleotide variant within intron 1 of SULT2A1 (rs296361; minor allele frequency = 15% in whites) and liver cytosolic SULT2A1 content as well as 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate formation rate, suggesting that variation in the SULT2A1 gene contributes importantly to interindividual differences in vitamin D homeostasis. Finally, 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate exhibited high affinity for the vitamin D binding protein and was detectable in human plasma and bile but not in urine samples. Thus, circulating concentrations of 25OHD 3 -3- O -sulfate appear to be protected from rapid renal elimination, raising the possibility that the sulfate metabolite may serve as a reservoir of 25OHD 3 in vivo, and contribute indirectly to the biologic effects of vitamin D. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Wavelength dependence of pyrimidine dimer formation in DNA of human skin irradiated in situ with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, S.E.; Hacham, H.; Gange, R.W.; Maytum, D.J.; Sutherland, J.C.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    The UV components of sunlight are believed to be a major cause of human skin caner, and DNA is though to be the principal molecular target. Alterations of the intensity and wavelength distribution of solar UV radiation reaching the surface of the earth, for example by depletion of stratospheric ozone, will change the effectiveness of solar radiation in damaging DNA in human skin. Evaluation of the magnitude of such effects requires knowledge of the altered sunlight spectrum and of the action spectrum for damaging DNA in human skin. The authors have determined an action spectrum for the frequency of pyrimidine dimer formation induced in the DNA of human skin per unit dose of UV incident on the skin surface. The peak of this action spectrum is near 300 nm and decreases rapidly at both longer and shorter wavelengths. The decrease in the action spectrum for wavelengths <300 nm is attributed to the absorption of the upper layers of the skin. Convolution of the dimer action spectrum with the solar spectra corresponding to a solar angle of 40 degree under current levels of stratospheric ozone and those for 50% ozone depletion, indicate about a 2.5-fold increase in dimer formation. If the action spectrum for DNA damage that results in skin cancer resembles that for dimer induction in skin, these results suggest that a 50% decrease in stratospheric ozone would increase the incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers among white males in Seattle, Washington, by 7.5- to 8-fold, to a higher incidence than is presently seen in the corresponding population of Albuquerque, New Mexico

  18. Formation of hydroxyl radicals in the human lens is related to the severity of nuclear cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garner, B; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Truscott, R J

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have identified specific hydroxylated amino acid oxidation products which strongly suggest the presence of hydroxyl radical (HO.)-damaged proteins in human cataractous lenses. In the present study, the ability of early stage (type II) and advanced (type IV) nuclear cataractous lens...

  19. Challenges to Popular and Human Rights Education: The Formation of Producer, Citizen, and Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sime, Luis

    1994-01-01

    Contends that popular, or a form of alternative, education stands in the background of most efforts in human rights education in Latin America. Maintains that education must educate people as producers, citizens, and individuals. Discusses challenges to this task in light of liberation theology and the Peruvian experience. (CFR)

  20. Dose-dependent micronuclei formation in normal human fibroblasts exposed to proton radiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Litvinchuk, Alexandra; Vachelová, Jana; Michaelidesová, Anna; Wagner, Richard; Davídková, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2015), s. 327-334 ISSN 0301-634X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : human fibroblasts * proton radiation * micronuclei assay * biodosimetry Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.923, year: 2015

  1. The role of human capital formation in the transition to modern economic growth, 1300-1900

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pleijt, A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375805621

    2016-01-01

    Economic models of the Industrial Revolution increasingly emphasize the key role of human capital in promoting economic growth, and empirical studies have shown that education is a strong predictor of per capita GDP. Contrary to the theory, however, economic historians have described the role of

  2. The Contribution of the Human Body in Young Children's Explanations about Shadow Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakleioti, Evagelia; Pantidos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    This paper begins with the view that the generation of meaning is a multimodal process. Props, drawings, graphs, gestures, as well as speech and written text are all mediators through which students construct new knowledge. Each semiotic context makes a unique contribution to the conceptualization of scientific entities. The human body, in…

  3. In vitro adduct formation of phosgene with albumin and hemoglobin in human blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Hulst, A.G.; Fidder, A.; Gurp, R.A. van; Jong, L.P.A. de; Benschop, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    The development of procedures for retrospective detection and quantitation of exposure to phosgene, based on adducts to hemoglobin and albumin, is described. Upon incubation of human blood with [14C]phosgene (0-750 μM), a significant part of radioactivity (0-13%) became associated with globin and

  4. Pathways Regulating Spheroid Formation of Human Follicular Thyroid Cancer Cells under Simulated Microgravity Conditions: A Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Riwaldt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity induces three-dimensional (3D growth in numerous cell types. Despite substantial efforts to clarify the underlying mechanisms for spheroid formation, the precise molecular pathways are still not known. The principal aim of this paper is to compare static 1g-control cells with spheroid forming (MCS and spheroid non-forming (AD thyroid cancer cells cultured in the same flask under simulated microgravity conditions. We investigated the morphology and gene expression patterns in human follicular thyroid cancer cells (UCLA RO82-W-1 cell line after a 24 h-exposure on the Random Positioning Machine (RPM and focused on 3D growth signaling processes. After 24 h, spheroid formation was observed in RPM-cultures together with alterations in the F-actin cytoskeleton. qPCR indicated more changes in gene expression in MCS than in AD cells. Of the 24 genes analyzed VEGFA, VEGFD, MSN, and MMP3 were upregulated in MCS compared to 1g-controls, whereas ACTB, ACTA2, KRT8, TUBB, EZR, RDX, PRKCA, CAV1, MMP9, PAI1, CTGF, MCP1 were downregulated. A pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes code for proteins, which promote 3D growth (angiogenesis and prevent excessive accumulation of extracellular proteins, while genes coding for structural proteins are downregulated. Pathways regulating the strength/rigidity of cytoskeletal proteins, the amount of extracellular proteins, and 3D growth may be involved in MCS formation.

  5. Oxidative damage of U937 human leukemic cells caused by hydroxyl radical results in singlet oxygen formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rác

    Full Text Available The exposure of human cells to oxidative stress leads to the oxidation of biomolecules such as lipids, proteins and nuclei acids. In this study, the oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA was studied after the addition of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent to cell suspension containing human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line U937. EPR spin-trapping data showed that the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cell suspension formed hydroxyl radical via Fenton reaction mediated by endogenous metals. The malondialdehyde HPLC analysis showed no lipid peroxidation after the addition of hydrogen peroxide, whereas the Fenton reagent caused significant lipid peroxidation. The formation of protein carbonyls monitored by dot blot immunoassay and the DNA fragmentation measured by comet assay occurred after the addition of both hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent. Oxidative damage of biomolecules leads to the formation of singlet oxygen as conformed by EPR spin-trapping spectroscopy and the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It is proposed here that singlet oxygen is formed by the decomposition of high-energy intermediates such as dioxetane or tetroxide formed by oxidative damage of biomolecules.

  6. CR2-mediated activation of the complement alternative pathway results in formation of membrane attack complexes on human B lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Marquart, H V; Prodinger, W M

    2001-01-01

    of the CR1 binding site with the monoclonal antibody 3D9 also resulted in a minor reduction in MAC deposition, while FE8 and 3D9, in combination, markedly reduced deposition of both C3 fragments (91 +/- 5%) and C9 (95 +/- 3%). The kinetics of C3-fragment and MAC deposition, as well as the dependence of both......Normal human B lymphocytes activate the alternative pathway of complement via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), that binds hydrolysed C3 (iC3) and thereby promotes the formation of a membrane-bound C3 convertase. We have investigated whether this might lead to the generation of a C5...... convertase and consequent formation of membrane attack complexes (MAC). Deposition of C3 fragments and MAC was assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes in the presence of 30% autologous serum containing 4.4 mM MgCl2/20 mM EGTA, which abrogates the classical pathway of complement without affecting...

  7. A numerical analysis of the Born approximation for image formation modeling of differential interference contrast microscopy for human embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sigal; Feigin, Micha; Greenspan, Hayit; Sochen, Nir

    2008-03-01

    The differential interference contrast (DIC) microscope is commonly used for the visualization of live biological specimens. It enables the view of the transparent specimens while preserving their viability, being a non-invasive modality. Fertility clinics often use the DIC microscope for evaluation of human embryos quality. Towards quantification and reconstruction of the visualized specimens, an image formation model for DIC imaging is sought and the interaction of light waves with biological matter is examined. In many image formation models the light-matter interaction is expressed via the first Born approximation. The validity region of this approximation is defined in a theoretical bound which limits its use to very small specimens with low dielectric contrast. In this work the Born approximation is investigated via the Helmholtz equation, which describes the interaction between the specimen and light. A solution on the lens field is derived using the Gaussian Legendre quadrature formulation. This numerical scheme is considered both accurate and efficient and has shortened significantly the computation time as compared to integration methods that required a great amount of sampling for satisfying the Whittaker - Shannon sampling theorem. By comparing the numerical results with the theoretical values it is shown that the theoretical bound is not directly relevant to microscopic imaging and is far too limiting. The numerical exhaustive experiments show that the Born approximation is inappropriate for modeling the visualization of thick human embryos.

  8. Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Taku; Yano, Fumiko; Mori, Daisuke; Kawata, Manabu; Hoshi, Kazuto; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Masaki, Hideki; Otsu, Makoto; Eto, Koji; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Chung, Ung-il; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report in vitro chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

  9. Human oxidation-specific antibodies reduce foam cell formation and atherosclerosis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsimikas, Sotirios; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Hartvigsen, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    We sought to assess the in vivo importance of scavenger receptor (SR)-mediated uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) in atherogenesis and to test the efficacy of human antibody IK17-Fab or IK17 single-chain Fv fragment (IK17-scFv), which lacks immunologic properties of intact antibod...... antibodies other than the ability to inhibit uptake of OxLDL by macrophages, to inhibit atherosclerosis....

  10. Formation of tissue factor activity following incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein with plasma lipoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, T.; Kisiel, W.

    1990-01-01

    Incubation of recombinant human tissue factor apoprotein (Apo-TF) with human plasma decreased the recalcified clotting time of this plasma in a time-and dose-dependent manner suggesting relipidation of the Apo-TF by plasma lipoproteins. Incubation of Apo-TF with purified preparations of human very low density, low density and high density lipoproteins resulted in tissue factor activity in a clotting assay. The order of effectiveness was VLDL greater than LDL much greater than HDL. Tissue factor activity generated by incubation of a fixed amount of Apo-TF with plasma lipoproteins was lipoprotein concentration-dependent and saturable. The association of Apo-TF with lipoprotein particles was supported by gel filtration studies in which 125 I-Apo-TF coeluted with the plasma lipoprotein in the void volume of a Superose 6 column in the presence and absence of calcium ions. In addition, void-volume Apo-TF-lipoprotein fractions exhibited tissue factor activity. These results suggest that the factor VIII-bypassing activity of bovine Apo-TF observed in a canine hemophilic model may be due, in part, to its association with plasma lipoproteins and expression of functional tissue factor activity

  11. Recombinant Human Endostatin Suppresses Mouse Osteoclast Formation by Inhibiting the NF-κB and MAPKs Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Non eChen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia and progressive joint destruction. As reported previously, recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin is associated with inhibition of joint bone destruction present in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis; however, the effect of rhEndostatin on bone destruction is not known. This study was designed to assess the inhibitory effect and mechanisms of rhEndostatin on formation and function of osteoclasts in vitro, and to gain insight into the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of bone destruction. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from BALB/c mice were stimulated with receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL and macrophage colony-stimulating factor to establish osteoclast formation. Osteoclast formation was determined by TRAP staining. Cell viability of BMMs affected by rhEndostatin was determined using a MTT assay. Bone resorption was examined with a bone resorption pits assay. The expression of osteoclast-specific markers was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. The related signaling pathways were examined using a Luciferase reporter assay and western blot analysis. Indeed, rhEndostatin showed a significant reduction in the number of osteoclast-like cells and early-stage bone resorption. Moreover, molecular analysis demonstrated that rhEndostatin attenuated RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IκBα and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Furthermore, rhEndostatin significantly inhibited the activation of RANKL-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, such as ERK1/2, JNK, and p38. Hence, we demonstrated for the first time that preventing the formation and function of osteoclasts is an important anti-bone destruction mechanism of rhEndostatin, which might be useful in the prevention and treatment of bone destruction in RA.

  12. Repetition suppression and repetition enhancement underlie auditory memory-trace formation in the human brain: an MEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recasens, Marc; Leung, Sumie; Grimm, Sabine; Nowak, Rafal; Escera, Carles

    2015-03-01

    The formation of echoic memory traces has traditionally been inferred from the enhanced responses to its deviations. The mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditory event-related potential (ERP) elicited between 100 and 250ms after sound deviation is an indirect index of regularity encoding that reflects a memory-based comparison process. Recently, repetition positivity (RP) has been described as a candidate ERP correlate of direct memory trace formation. RP consists of repetition suppression and enhancement effects occurring in different auditory components between 50 and 250ms after sound onset. However, the neuronal generators engaged in the encoding of repeated stimulus features have received little interest. This study intends to investigate the neuronal sources underlying the formation and strengthening of new memory traces by employing a roving-standard paradigm, where trains of different frequencies and different lengths are presented randomly. Source generators of repetition enhanced (RE) and suppressed (RS) activity were modeled using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in healthy subjects. Our results show that, in line with RP findings, N1m (~95-150ms) activity is suppressed with stimulus repetition. In addition, we observed the emergence of a sustained field (~230-270ms) that showed RE. Source analysis revealed neuronal generators of RS and RE located in both auditory and non-auditory areas, like the medial parietal cortex and frontal areas. The different timing and location of neural generators involved in RS and RE points to the existence of functionally separated mechanisms devoted to acoustic memory-trace formation in different auditory processing stages of the human brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Specific Human and Candida Cellular Interactions Lead to Controlled or Persistent Infection Outcomes during Granuloma-Like Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misme-Aucouturier, Barbara; Albassier, Marjorie; Alvarez-Rueda, Nidia; Le Pape, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    A delayed type of multicellular process could be crucial during chronic candidiasis in determining the course of infection. This reaction, consisting of organized immune cells surrounding the pathogen, initiates an inflammatory response to avoid fungal dissemination. The goal of the present study was to examine, at an in vitro cellular scale, Candida and human immune cell interaction dynamics during a long-term period. By challenging human peripheral blood immune cells from 10 healthy donors with 32 Candida albicans and non-albicans (C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, C. dubliniensis, C. lusitaniae, C. krusei, and C. kefyr) clinical isolates, we showed that Candida spp. induced the formation of granuloma-like structures within 6 days after challenge, but their sizes and the respective fungal burdens differed according to the Candida species. These two parameters are positively correlated. Phenotypic characteristics, such as hypha formation and higher axenic growth rate, seem to contribute to yeast persistence within granuloma-like structures. We showed an interindividual variability of the human response against Candida spp. Higher proportions of neutrophils and elevated CD4 + /CD8 + T cell ratios during the first days after challenge were correlated with early production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and associated with controlled infection. In contrast, the persistence of Candida could result from upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and a poor anti-inflammatory negative feedback (IL-10). Importantly, regulatory subsets of NK cells and CD4 lo CD8 hi doubly positive (DP) lymphocytes at late stage infiltrate granuloma-like structures and could correlate with the IL-10 and TNF-α production. These data offer a base frame to explain cellular events that guide infection control or fungal persistence. Copyright © 2016 Misme-Aucouturier et al.

  14. Ribosomal RNA Genes Contribute to the Formation of Pseudogenes and Junk DNA in the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robicheau, Brent M; Susko, Edward; Harrigan, Amye M; Snyder, Marlene

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 35% of the human genome can be identified as sequence devoid of a selected-effect function, and not derived from transposable elements or repeated sequences. We provide evidence supporting a known origin for a fraction of this sequence. We show that: 1) highly degraded, but near full length, ribosomal DNA (rDNA) units, including both 45S and Intergenic Spacer (IGS), can be found at multiple sites in the human genome on chromosomes without rDNA arrays, 2) that these rDNA sequences have a propensity for being centromere proximal, and 3) that sequence at all human functional rDNA array ends is divergent from canonical rDNA to the point that it is pseudogenic. We also show that small sequence strings of rDNA (from 45S + IGS) can be found distributed throughout the genome and are identifiable as an "rDNA-like signal", representing 0.26% of the q-arm of HSA21 and ∼2% of the total sequence of other regions tested. The size of sequence strings found in the rDNA-like signal intergrade into the size of sequence strings that make up the full-length degrading rDNA units found scattered throughout the genome. We conclude that the displaced and degrading rDNA sequences are likely of a similar origin but represent different stages in their evolution towards random sequence. Collectively, our data suggests that over vast evolutionary time, rDNA arrays contribute to the production of junk DNA. The concept that the production of rDNA pseudogenes is a by-product of concerted evolution represents a previously under-appreciated process; we demonstrate here its importance. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Human telomeric G-quadruplex formation and highly selective fluorescence detection of toxic strontium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Konggang; Zhao, Chuanqi; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-03-01

    Strontium ions play important roles in biological systems. The inhalation of strontium can cause severe respiratory difficulties, anaphylactic reaction and extreme tachycardia. Strontium can replace calcium in organisms, inhibit normal calcium absorption and induce strontium "rickets" in childhood. Thus, the development of sensitive and selective methods for the determination of trace amounts of Sr(2+) in aqueous media is of considerable importance for environmental and human health protection. A number of methodologies, such as X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry, inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and instrumental thermal neutron activation analysis, have been reported. However, these methods are somewhat complex, costly, time consuming and, especially, need special instruments. Thus, the design of convenient and inexpensive approaches for the sensitive and selective detection of Sr(2+) with rapid, easy manipulation is in ever-increasing demand. To the best of our knowledge, using DNA conformational change to detect Sr(2+) has not yet been reported. Herein we utilized thiazole orange (TO) as a signal reporter to devise a simple Sr(2+) detection assay based on Sr(2+) induced human telomeric DNA conformational change in the presence of SWNTs. The limit of detection is 10 nM Sr(2+) (0.87 μg L(-1)), far below 4 mg L(-1), the U.S. Federal threshold in drinking water defined by the U.S. EPA.

  16. Does the foveal shape influence the image formation in human eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Katharina; Zimmerling, Beatrice; Scheibe, Patrick; Rauscher, Franziska G.; Reichenbach, Andreas; Francke, Mike; Brunner, Robert

    2017-10-01

    In human eyes, the maximum visual acuity correlates locally with the fovea, a shallow depression in the retina. Previous examinations have been reduced to simple geometrical fovea models derived from postmortem preparations and considering only a few superficial ray propagation aspects. In the current study, an extended and realistic analysis of ray-optical simulations for a comprehensive anatomical realistic eye model for the anterior part and realistic aspherical human foveal topographical profiles deduced from in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) are presented, and the refractive index step at the transition from vitreous to retinal tissue is taken into account. The optical effect of a commonly shaped (averaged) and an extraordinarily shaped foveal pit were both compared to the analysis of an assumed pure spherical boundary layer. The influence of the aperture size, wavelength, and incident angle on the spot size and shape, as well as the axial focal and lateral centroid position is investigated, and a lateral displacement of about 2 μm and an axial shift of the best focal position of less than 4 μm are found. These findings indicate only small optical effects that are laterally in the range of inter-receptor distances and axially less than the photoreceptor outer segment dimension.

  17. Recapitulation of physiological spatiotemporal signals promotes in vitro formation of phenotypically stable human articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Bernhard, Jonathan; Robinson, Samuel; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, X. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Standard isotropic culture fails to recapitulate the spatiotemporal gradients present during native development. Cartilage grown from human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) is poorly organized and unstable in vivo. We report that human cartilage with physiologic organization and in vivo stability can be grown in vitro from self-assembling hMSCs by implementing spatiotemporal regulation during induction. Self-assembling hMSCs formed cartilage discs in Transwell inserts following isotropic chondrogenic induction with transforming growth factor β to set up a dual-compartment culture. Following a switch in the basal compartment to a hypertrophic regimen with thyroxine, the cartilage discs underwent progressive deep-zone hypertrophy and mineralization. Concurrent chondrogenic induction in the apical compartment enabled the maintenance of functional and hyaline cartilage. Cartilage homeostasis, chondrocyte maturation, and terminal differentiation markers were all up-regulated versus isotropic control groups. We assessed the in vivo stability of the cartilage formed under different induction regimens. Cartilage formed under spatiotemporal regulation in vitro resisted endochondral ossification, retained the expression of cartilage markers, and remained organized following s.c. implantation in immunocompromised mice. In contrast, the isotropic control groups underwent endochondral ossification. Cartilage formed from hMSCs remained stable and organized in vivo. Spatiotemporal regulation during induction in vitro recapitulated some aspects of native cartilage development, and potentiated the maturation of self-assembling hMSCs into stable and organized cartilage resembling the native articular cartilage. PMID:28228529

  18. Morphologic study of the effect of iron on pseudocyst formation in Trichomonas vaginalis and its interaction with human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Lopes, Geovane; Saboia-Vahia, Leonardo; Margotti, Eliane Trindade; Fernandes, Nilma de Souza; Castro, Cássia Luana de Faria; Oliveira, Francisco Odencio; Peixoto, Juliana Figueiredo; Britto, Constança; Silva, Fernando Costa E; Cuervo, Patricia; Jesus, José Batista de

    2017-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aetiological agent of human trichomoniasis, which is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases in humans. Iron is an important element for the survival of this parasite and the colonisation of the host urogenital tract. In this study, we investigated the effects of iron on parasite proliferation in the dynamics of pseudocyst formation and morphologically characterised iron depletion-induced pseudocysts. We performed structural and ultrastructural analyses using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was observed that iron depletion (i) interrupts the proliferation of T. vaginalis, (ii) induces morphological changes in typical multiplicative trophozoites to spherical non-proliferative, non-motile pseudocysts, and (iii) induces the arrest of cell division at different stages of the cell cycle; (iv) iron is the fundamental element for the maintenance of typical trophozoite morphology; (v) pseudocysts induced by iron depletion are viable and reversible forms; and, finally, (vi) we demonstrated that pseudocysts induced by iron depletion are able to interact with human epithelial cells maintaining their spherical forms. Together, these data suggest that pseudocysts could be induced as a response to iron nutritional stress and could have a potential role in the transmission and infection of T. vaginalis.

  19. Formation and hematopoietic differentiation of human embryoid bodies by suspension and hanging drop cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdan, Chantal; Hong, Seok Ho; Bhatia, Mickie

    2007-10-01

    The in vitro aggregation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into clusters termed embryoid bodies (EBs) allows for the spontaneous differentiation of cells representing endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm lineages. This stochastic process results however, in the generation of low numbers of differentiated cells, and can be enhanced to some extent by the addition of exogenous growth factors or overexpression of regulatory genes. In the authors' laboratory, the use of hematopoietic cytokines in combination with the mesoderm inducer bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) was able to generate up to 90% of CD45(+) hematopoietic cells with colony-forming unit (CFU) activity. This unit describes two protocols that have been successfully applied in the authors' laboratory for the generation of EBs in (1) suspension and (2) hanging drop (HD) cultures from enzymatically digested clumps of undifferentiated hESC colonies.

  20. Formation of a protection film on the human skin by microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lademann, J; Schanzer, S; Richter, H; Knorr, F; Sterry, W; Patzelt, A; Antoniou, C

    2008-01-01

    Laser scanning microscopy and tape stripping, in combination with optical methods, were used to analyze the distribution and penetration of a barrier cream into the horny layer (stratum corneum) of the human skin under in vivo conditions. The barrier cream contained microparticles of 10 – 100 μm loaded with antioxidant substances. The cream was designed for protection of the skin surface against the destructive action of free radicals, produced by systemically applied chemotherapeutic agents reaching the skin surface via the sweat. Both methods were able to demonstrate that the barrier cream was distributed homogeneously on the skin surface forming a protection film. A penetration into deeper parts of the stratum corneum (SC) was not observed

  1. Webquest and Comics in the Formation of Human Resources in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruxo, Harriet Bárbara; Prado, Cláudia; Almeida, Denise Maria de; Tobase, Lucia; Grossi, Manoela Gomes; Vaz, Débora Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Objective To describe the process of constructing and implementation of Webquest as pedagogical strategy as guiding the study about the pedagogical concepts using Comic. Method The first stage of the study was outlined applied research of technological production. The second stage was characterized as research exploratory, descriptive documentary for the analysis of Comic. in the teaching diploma in Nursing of EEUSP in 2013. Results The proposed Webquest was implemented, resulting in 18 Comic. All Pedagogical Concepts studied were addressed; used the software indicated and the power point, the plots developed in different scenarios and most Comic contemplated mandatory items. Conclusion The use of different technological resources provide learning, by mobilizing multiple potentialities, abilities and interests of students, favoring the construction of collective and collaborative learning, strengthening important and necessary features in training that will influence the human resource profile in tune with the aspirations of the labor market.

  2. Formation of the accumulative human metabolite and human-specific glutathione conjugate of diclofenac in TK-NOG chimeric mice with humanized livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi; Nozawa, Kohei; Nakamura, Shota; Chijiwa, Hiroyuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-ichiro; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Ohnishi, Yasuyuki; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Shin-ichi

    2015-03-01

    3'-Hydroxy-4'-methoxydiclofenac (VI) is a human-specific metabolite known to accumulate in the plasma of patients after repeated administration of diclofenac sodium. Diclofenac also produces glutathione-conjugated metabolites, some of which are human-specific. In the present study, we investigated whether these metabolites could be generated in humanized chimeric mice produced from TK-NOG mice. After a single oral administration of diclofenac to humanized mice, the unchanged drug in plasma peaked at 0.25 hour and then declined with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.4 hours. 4'-Hydroxydiclofenac (II) and 3'-hydroxydiclofenac also peaked at 0.25 hour and were undetectable within 24 hours. However, VI peaked at 8 hours and declined with a t1/2 of 13 hours. When diclofenac was given once per day, peak and trough levels of VI reached plateau within 3 days. Studies with administration of II suggested VI was generated via II as an intermediate. Among six reported glutathione-conjugated metabolites of diclofenac, M1 (5-hydroxy-4-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac) to M6 (2'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac), we found three dichlorinated conjugates [M1, M2 (4'-hydroxy-3'-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac), and M3 (5-hydroxy-6-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac)], and a single monochlorinated conjugate [M4 (2'-hydroxy-3'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac) or M5 (4'-hydroxy-2'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac)], in the bile of humanized chimeric mice. M4 and M5 are positional isomers and have been previously reported as human-specific in vitro metabolites likely generated via arene oxide and quinone imine-type intermediates, respectively. The biliary monochlorinated metabolite exhibited the same mass spectrum as those of M4 and M5, and we discuss whether this conjugate corresponded to M4 or M5. Overall, humanized TK-NOG chimeric mice were considered to be a functional tool for the study of drug metabolism of diclofenac in humans. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental

  3. De novo centriole formation in human cells is error-prone and does not require SAS-6 self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Won-Jing; Acehan, Devrim; Kao, Chien-Han; Jane, Wann-Neng; Uryu, Kunihiro; Tsou, Meng-Fu Bryan

    2015-11-26

    Vertebrate centrioles normally propagate through duplication, but in the absence of preexisting centrioles, de novo synthesis can occur. Consistently, centriole formation is thought to strictly rely on self-assembly, involving self-oligomerization of the centriolar protein SAS-6. Here, through reconstitution of de novo synthesis in human cells, we surprisingly found that normal looking centrioles capable of duplication and ciliation can arise in the absence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. Moreover, whereas canonically duplicated centrioles always form correctly, de novo centrioles are prone to structural errors, even in the presence of SAS-6 self-oligomerization. These results indicate that centriole biogenesis does not strictly depend on SAS-6 self-assembly, and may require preexisting centrioles to ensure structural accuracy, fundamentally deviating from the current paradigm.

  4. Hypoxia compounds exercise-induced free radical formation in humans; partitioning contributions from the cerebral and femoral circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Rasmussen, Peter; Evans, Kevin A

    2018-01-01

    This study examined to what extent the human cerebral and femoral circulation contribute to free radical formation during basal and exercise-induced responses to hypoxia. Healthy participants (5♂, 5♀) were randomly assigned single-blinded to normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (10% O2) trials...... hypoxia (P free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation subsequent to inadequate antioxidant defense. This was pronounced during exercise across the femoral circulation in proportion to the increase in local O2 uptake (r = -0.397 to -0.459, P = 0.037 to 0...... with measurements taken at rest and 30min after cycling at 70% of maximal power output in hypoxia and equivalent relative and absolute intensities in normoxia. Blood was sampled from the brachial artery (a), internal jugular and femoral veins (v) for non-enzymatic antioxidants (HPLC), ascorbate radical (A...

  5. Type III methyltransferase M.NgoAX from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 regulates biofilm formation and human cell invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eKwiatek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the etiological factor of the sexually transmitted gonorrhea disease that may lead, under specific conditions, to systemic infections. The gonococcal genome encodes many Restriction Modification (RM systems, which main biological role is to defend the pathogen from potentially harmful foreign DNA. However, RM systems seem also to be involved in several other functions. In this study, we examined the effect of inactivation the N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 ngo0545 gene encoding M.NgoAX methyltransferase on the global gene expression, biofilm formation, interactions with human epithelial host cells and overall bacterial growth. Expression microarrays showed at least a two-fold deregulation of a total of 121 genes in the NgoAX knock-out mutant compared to the wt strain under standard grow conditions. As determined by the assay with crystal violet, the NgoAX knock-out strain formed a slightly larger biofilm biomass per cell than the wt strain (OD570/600 = 13.8  2.24 and 9.35  2.06, respectively. SCLM observations showed that the biofilm formed by the gonococcal ngo0545 gene mutant is more relaxed and dispersed than the one formed by the wt strain. Thickness of the biofilm formed by both strains was 48.3 (14.9 µm for the mutant and 28.6 (4.0 µm for the wt. This more relaxed feature of the biofilm in respect to adhesion and bacterial interactions seems advantageous for pathogenesis of the NgoAX-deficient gonococci at the stage of human epithelial cell invasion. Indeed, the overall adhesion of mutant bacterial cells to human cells was lower than adhesion of the wt gonococci (adhesion index = 0.672 ( 0.2 and 2.15 ( 1.53, respectively; yet, a higher number of mutant than wt bacteria were found inside the Hec-1-B epithelial cells (invasion index = 3.38 ( 0.93  105 for mutant and 4.67 ( 3.09  104 for the wt strain. These results indicate that NgoAX-deficient cells have lower ability to attach to human cells

  6. Recombinant human IGF-1 produced by transgenic plant cell suspension culture enhances new bone formation in calvarial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Sher Bahadur; Bhattarai, Govinda; Kook, Sung-Ho; Shin, Yun-Ji; Kwon, Tae-Ho; Lee, Seung-Youp; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2017-10-01

    Transgenic plant cell suspension culture systems have been utilized extensively as convenient and efficient expression systems for the production of recombinant human growth factors. We produced insulin-like growth factor-1 using a plant suspension culture system (p-IGF-1) and explored its effect on new bone formation in calvarial defects. We also compared the bone regenerating potential of p-IGF-1 with commercial IGF-1 derived from Escherichia coli (e-IGF-1). Male C57BL/6 mice underwent calvarial defect surgery, and the defects were loaded with absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) only (ACS group) or ACS impregnated with 13μg of p-IGF-1 (p-IGF-1 group) or e-IGF-1 (e-IGF-1 group). The sham group did not receive any treatment with ACS or IGFs after surgery. Live μCT and histological analyses showed critical-sized bone defects in the sham group, whereas greater bone formation was observed in the p-IGF-1 and e-IGF-1 groups than the ACS group both 5 and 10weeks after surgery. Bone mineral density, bone volume, and bone surface values were also higher in the IGF groups than in the ACS group. Local delivery of p-IGF-1 or e-IGF-1 more greatly enhanced the expression of osteoblast-specific markers, but inhibited osteoclast formation, in newly formed bone compared with ACS control group. Specifically, p-IGF-1 treatment induced higher expression of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and osteopontin in the defect site than did e-IGF-1. Furthermore, treatment with p-IGF-1, but not e-IGF-1, increased mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells, with the attendant upregulation of osteogenic marker genes. Collectively, our findings suggest the potential of p-IGF-1 in promoting the processes required for bone regeneration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Formation of harmful compounds in biotransformation of lilial by microorganisms isolated from human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Afshari, Shima; Esmaeili, Davood

    2015-01-01

    The biotransformation of lilial results in an acid that is used in the dairy industry, in perfumery, as an intermediate in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, and as a food additive for enhancing taste. This study investigates the biotransformation of lilial by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, two bacterial species isolated from human skin. Both species of Staphylococcus were isolated in samples taken from the skin of individuals living in a rural area of Iran. The pH of the culture medium was optimized, and after culturing the microorganisms, the bacteria were added to a flask containing a nutrient broth and incubated for several hours. The flasks of bacteria were combined with lilial, and various biochemical tests and diagnostics were performed, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The S. aureus produced isobutyric acid (2-methylpropanoic acid) after 72 h (71% of the total products yielded during biotransformation), whereas the S. epidermidis produced terpenoid alcoholic media after 24 h (90% of total products obtained). The results obtained indicate that biotransformation of lilial by S. aureus is more desirable than by S. epidermidis due to the highly efficient production of a single product. Bourgeonal and liliol were two toxic compounds produced during biotransformation, which indicates that the use of lilial in cosmetics can be harmful to the skin.

  8. A human in vitro model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy muscle formation and contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesmith, Alexander P; Wagner, Matthew A; Pasqualini, Francesco S; O'Connor, Blakely B; Pincus, Mark J; August, Paul R; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-10-10

    Tongue weakness, like all weakness in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), occurs as a result of contraction-induced muscle damage and deficient muscular repair. Although membrane fragility is known to potentiate injury in DMD, whether muscle stem cells are implicated in deficient muscular repair remains unclear. We hypothesized that DMD myoblasts are less sensitive to cues in the extracellular matrix designed to potentiate structure-function relationships of healthy muscle. To test this hypothesis, we drew inspiration from the tongue and engineered contractile human muscle tissues on thin films. On this platform, DMD myoblasts formed fewer and smaller myotubes and exhibited impaired polarization of the cell nucleus and contractile cytoskeleton when compared with healthy cells. These structural aberrations were reflected in their functional behavior, as engineered tongues from DMD myoblasts failed to achieve the same contractile strength as healthy tongue structures. These data suggest that dystrophic muscle may fail to organize with respect to extracellular cues necessary to potentiate adaptive growth and remodeling. © 2016 Nesmith et al.

  9. Protoporphyrin IX formation and photobleaching in different layers of normal human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Idorn, Luise W; Philipsen, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    human skin was tape-stripped and incubated with 20% methylaminolevulinate (MAL) or 20% hexylaminolevulinate (HAL) for 3 h. Fluorescence microscopy quantified PpIX accumulation in epidermis, superficial, mid and deep dermis, down to 2 mm. PpIX photobleaching by light-emitting diode (LED, 632 nm, 18......Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used for various skin disorders, and selective targeting of specific skin structures is desirable. The objective was to assess accumulation of PpIX fluorescence and photobleaching within skin layers using different photosensitizers and light sources. Normal...... and 37 J/cm(2)), intense pulsed light (IPL, 500-650 nm, 36 and 72 J/cm(2)) and long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL, 595 nm, 7.5 and 15 J/cm(2)) was measured using fluorescence photography and microscopy. We found higher PpIX fluorescence intensities in epidermis and superficial dermis in HAL-incubated skin than...

  10. Ectopic Hard Tissue Formation by Odonto/Osteogenically In Vitro Differentiated Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghye; Song, Je Seon; Jeon, Mijeong; Shin, Dong Min; Kim, Seong-Oh; Lee, Jae Ho

    2015-07-01

    There have been many attempts to use the pulp tissue from human deciduous teeth for dentin or bone regeneration. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of deciduous teeth pulp stem cells (DTSCs) on their in vivo hard tissue-forming potential. DTSCs were isolated from extracted deciduous teeth using the outgrowth method. These cells were exposed to odonto/osteogenic stimuli for 4 and 8 days (Day 4 and Day 8 groups, respectively), while cells in the control group were cultured in normal medium. The in vitro differentiated DTSCs and the control DTSCs were transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice with macroporous biphasic calcium phosphate and sacrificed at 8 weeks post-implantation. The effect of odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation was evaluated using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The in vivo effect was evaluated by qualitative RT-PCR, assessment of ALP activity, histologic analysis, and immunohistochemical staining. The amount of hard tissue was greater in Day 4 group than Day 8 group (p = 0.014). However, Day 8 group generated lamellar bone-like structure, which was immunonegative to anti-human dentin sialoprotein with significantly low expression level of DSPP compared with the control group (p = 0.008). This study demonstrates that odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs enhances the formation of bone-like tissue, instead of dentin-like tissue, when transplanted subcutaneously using MBCP as a carrier. The odonto/osteogenic in vitro differentiation of DTSCs may be an effective modification that enhances in vivo bone formation by DTSCs.

  11. Delayed cell death, giant cell formation and chromosome instability induced by X-irradiation in human embryo cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, K.; Kodama, Seiji; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Masami

    1999-01-01

    We studied X-ray-induced delayed cell death, delayed giant cell formation and delayed chromosome aberrations in normal human embryo cells to explore the relationship between initial radiation damage and delayed effect appeared at 14 to 55 population doubling numbers (PDNs) after X-irradiation. The delayed effect was induced in the progeny of X-ray survivors in a dose-dependent manner and recovered with increasing PDNs after X-irradiation. Delayed plating for 24 h post-irradiation reduced both acute and delayed lethal damage, suggesting that potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) can be effective for relieving the delayed cell death. The chromosome analysis revealed that most of the dicentrics (more than 90%) observed in the progeny of X-ray survivors were not accompanied with fragments, in contrast with those observed in the first mitosis after X-irradiation. The present results indicate that the potentiality of genetic instability is determined during the repair process of initial radiation damage and suggest that the mechanism for formation of delayed chromosome aberrations by radiation might be different from that of direct radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. (author)

  12. Dependence of the bystander effect for micronucleus formation on dose of heavy-ion radiation in normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Aoki-Nakano, Mizuho; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Wada, Seiichi; Kakizaki, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation-induced bystander effects are well recognised, but its dependence on dose or linear energy transfer (LET) is still a matter of debate. To test this, 49 sites in confluent cultures of AG01522D normal human fibroblasts were targeted with microbeams of carbon (103 keV μm -1 ), neon (375 keV μm -1 ) and argon ions (1260 keV μm -1 ) and evaluated for the bystander-induced formation of micronucleus that is a kind of a chromosome aberration. Targeted exposure to neon and argon ions significantly increased the micronucleus frequency in bystander cells to the similar extent irrespective of the particle numbers per site of 1- 6. In contrast, the bystander micronucleus frequency increased with increasing the number of carbon-ion particles in a range between 1 and 3 particles per site and was similar in a range between 3 and 8 particles per site. These results suggest that the bystander effect of heavy ions for micronucleus formation depends on dose. (authors)

  13. The formation of human auricular cartilage from microtic tissue: An in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Mohamad Fikeri bin; See, Goh Bee; Hui, Chua Kien; Abdullah, Asma bt; Saim, Lokman bin; Saim, Aminuddin bin; Idrus, Ruszymah bt Haji

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to isolate, culture-expand and characterize the chondrocytes isolated from microtic cartilage and evaluate its potential as a cell source for ear cartilage reconstruction. Specific attention was to construct the auricular cartilage tissue by using fibrin as scaffold. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. Cell culture experiment with the use of microtic chondrocytes. After ear reconstructive surgery at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, chondrocytes were isolated from microtic cartilage. Chondrocytes isolated from the tissue were cultured expanded until passage 4 (P4). Upon confluency at P4, chondrocytes were harvested and tissue engineered constructs were made with human plasma polymerized to fibrin. Constructs formed later is implanted at the dorsal part of nude mice for 8 weeks, followed by post-implantation evaluation with histology staining (Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and Safranin O), immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for chondrogenic associated genes expression level. Under gross assessment, the construct after 8 weeks of implantation showed similar physical characteristics that of cartilage. Histological staining showed abundant lacunae cells embedded in extracellular matrix similar to that of native cartilage. Safranin O staining showed positive staining which indicates the presence of proteoglycan-rich matrix. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed the strong positive staining for collagen type II, the specific collagen type in the cartilage. Gene expression quantification showed no significant differences in the expression of chondrogenic gene used which is collagen type I, collagen type II, aggrecan core protein (ACP), elastin and sox9 genes when compared to construct formed from normal auricular tissue. Chondrocytes isolated from microtia cartilage has the potential to be used as an alternative cell source for external ear reconstruction in future clinical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  14. Hepatic glycogen in humans. II. Gluconeogenetic formation after oral and intravenous glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziuk, J.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of glycogen that is formed by gluconeogenetic pathways during glucose loading was quantitated in human subjects. Oral glucose loading was compared with its intravenous administration. Overnight-fasted subjects received a constant infusion or [3- 3 H]glucose and a marker for gluconeogenesis, [U- 14 C]lactate or sodium [ 14 C]bicarbonate [ 14 C]bicarbonate. An unlabeled glucose load was then administered. Postabsorptively, or after glucose infusion was terminated, a third tracer ([6- 3 H]glucose) infusion was initiated along with a three-step glucagon infusion. Without correcting for background stimulation of [ 14 C]glucose production or for dilution of 14 C with citric acid cycle carbon in the oxaloacetate pool, the amount of glycogen mobilized by the glucagon infusion that was produced by gluconeogenesis during oral glucose loading was 2.9 +/- 0.7 g calculated from [U- 14 C]-lactate incorporation and 7.4 +/- 1.3 g calculated using [ 14 C]bicarbonate as a gluconeogenetic marker. During intravenous glucose administration the latter measurement also yielded 7.2 +/- 1.1 g. When the two corrections above are applied, the respective quantities became 5.3 +/- 1.7 g for [U- 14 C]lactate as tracer and 14.7 +/- 4.3 and 13.9 +/- 3.6 g for oral and intravenous glucose with [ 14 C]bicarbonate as tracer (P less than 0.05, vs. [ 14 C]-lactate as tracer). When [2- 14 C]acetate was infused, the same amount of label was incorporated into mobilized glycogen regardless of which route of glucose administration was used. Comparison with previous data also suggests that 14 CO 2 is a potentially useful marker for the gluconeogenetic process in vivo

  15. Biobankonomics: developing a sustainable business model approach for the formation of a human tissue biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Jimmie; Rogers, Joyce; Carolin, Todd; Compton, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The preservation of high-quality biospecimens and associated data for research purposes is being performed in variety of academic, government, and industrial settings. Often these are multimillion dollar operations, yet despite these sizable investments, the economics of biobanking initiatives is not well understood. Fundamental business principles must be applied to the development and operation of such resources to ensure their long-term sustainability and maximize their impact. The true costs of developing and maintaining operations, which may have a variety of funding sources, must be better understood. Among the issues that must be considered when building a biobank economic model are: understanding the market need for the particular type of biobank under consideration and understanding and efficiently managing the biobank's "value chain," which includes costs for case collection, tissue processing, storage management, sample distribution, and infrastructure and administration. By using these value chain factors, a Total Life Cycle Cost of Ownership (TLCO) model may be developed to estimate all costs arising from owning, operating, and maintaining a large centralized biobank. The TLCO approach allows for a better delineation of a biobank's variable and fixed costs, data that will be needed to implement any cost recovery program. This article represents an overview of the efforts made recently by the National Cancer Institute's Office of Biorepositories and Biospecimen Research as part of its effort to develop an appropriate cost model and cost recovery program for the cancer HUman Biobank (caHUB) initiative. All of these economic factors are discussed in terms of maximizing caHUB's potential for long-term sustainability but have broad applicability to the wide range of biobanking initiatives that currently exist.

  16. Human disc cells in monolayer vs 3D culture: cell shape, division and matrix formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between cell shape, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM production, important aspects of cell behavior, is examined in a little-studied cell type, the human annulus cell from the intervertebral disc, during monolayer vs three-dimensional (3D culture. Results Three experimental studies showed that cells respond specifically to culture microenvironments by changes in cell shape, mitosis and ECM production: 1 Cell passages showed extensive immunohistochemical evidence of Type I and II collagens only in 3D culture. Chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were abundant in both monolayer and 3D cultures. 2 Cells showed significantly greater proliferation in monolayer in the presence of platelet-derived growth factor compared to cells in 3D. 3 Cells on Matrigel™-coated monolayer substrates became rounded and formed nodular colonies, a finding absent during monolayer growth. Conclusions The cell's in vivo interactions with the ECM can regulate shape, gene expression and other cell functions. The shape of the annulus cell changes markedly during life: the young, healthy disc contains spindle shaped cells and abundant collagen. With aging and degeneration, many cells assume a strikingly different appearance, become rounded and are surrounded by unusual accumulations of ECM products. In vitro manipulation of disc cells provides an experimental window for testing how disc cells from given individuals respond when they are grown in environments which direct cells to have either spindle- or rounded-shapes. In vitro assessment of the response of such cells to platelet-derived growth factor and to Matrigel™ showed a continued influence of cell shape even in the presence of a growth factor stimulus. These findings contribute new information to the important issue of the influence of cell shape on cell behavior.

  17. Priming 3D cultures of human mesenchymal stromal cells toward cartilage formation via developmental pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centola, Matteo; Tonnarelli, Beatrice; Schären, Stefan; Glaser, Nicolas; Barbero, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    The field of regenerative medicine has increasingly recognized the importance to be inspired by developmental processes to identify signaling pathways crucial for 3D organogenesis and tissue regeneration. Here, we aimed at recapitulating the first events occurring during limb development (ie, cell condensation and expansion of an undifferentiated mesenchymal cell population) to prime 3D cultures of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hBM-MSC) toward the chondrogenic route. Based on embryonic development studies, we hypothesized that Wnt3a and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) induce hBM-MSC to proliferate in 3D culture as an undifferentiated pool of progenitors (defined by clonogenic capacity and expression of typical markers), retaining chondrogenic potential upon induction by suitable morphogens. hBM-MSC were responsive to Wnt signaling in 3D pellet culture, as assessed by significant upregulation of main target genes and increase of unphosphorylated β-catenin levels. Wnt3a was able to induce a five-fold increase in the number of proliferating hBM-MSC (6.4% vs. 1.3% in the vehicle condition), although total DNA content of the 3D construct was decreasing over time. Preconditioning with Wnt3a improved transforming growth factor-β1 mediated chondrogenesis (30% more glycosaminoglycans/cell in average). In contrast to developmental and 2D MSC culture models, FGF2 antagonized the Wnt-mediated effects. Interestingly, the CD146⁺ subpopulation was found to be more responsive to Wnt3a. The presented data indicate a possible strategy to prime 3D cultures of hBM-MSC by invoking a "developmental engineering" approach. The study also identifies some opportunities and challenges to cross-fertilize skeletal development models and 3D hBM-MSC culture systems.

  18. Cyclobutane-type pyrimidine photodimer formation and induction of ornithine decarboxylase in human skin fibroblasts after UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niggli, H.J.; Roethlisberger, R.

    1988-01-01

    Cyclobutane-type pyrimidine photodimers as well as the induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) may serve as biochemical markers of the mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet light (UV). For this reason, it is important to compare the formation of pyrimidine dimers with the induction of ODC in human skin fibroblasts after irradiation with UVC (200-290 nm) and UVB (290-320 nm). In our studies we determined cytosine-thymine (C-T) as well as thymine-thymine dimer yields (T-T) by high-pressure liquid chromatography in cultures of neonatal normal human foreskin-derived fibroblasts after irradiation with UVC and UVB light. It was found that the yield of dimerization and the ratio of T-T/C-T decreased from the UVC to the UVB region. Time-course studies of ODC-induction in the same cells indicated that the maximal activity after UVB irradiation was retarded compared to UVC exposure. For the UV-induced ODC-levels, however, no significant difference in maximal induction could be measured after UVC and UVB irradiation at fluences where comparable yields of thymine dimerization are produced. Similar ODC-maxima were obtained with strains from children, while cells from adults showed significantly less pronounced ODC induction, indicating that ODC-response decreases with age and may therefore be used as a marker of aging

  19. 3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) induced micronucleus formation and DNA damage in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Evelyn; Kassie, Fekadu; Gminski, Richard; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2004-01-15

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), identified in diesel exhaust and in airborne particulate matter, is a potent mutagen in Salmonella, induces micronuclei formation in mice and in human cells and DNA adducts in rats. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic potency of 3-NBA in human HepG2 cells using the micronucleus (MN) assay and the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). 3-NBA caused a genotoxic effect at concentrations > or =12 nM in both assays. In the micronucleus assay, we found 98.7+/-10.3 MN/1000 BNC at a concentration of 100 nM 3-NBA in comparison to 27.3+/-0.6 MN/1000 BNC with the negative control. At the same concentration, the DNA-migration (SCGE) showed an Olive tail moment (OTM) of 2.7+/-0.45 and %DNA in the tail of 8.28+/-0.76; OTM and %DNA in the tail of cells treated with the negative control were 0.73+/-0.08 and 2.81+/-0.30, respectively. The results are discussed under consideration of former studies.

  20. GABA and Topiramate Inhibit the Formation of Human Macrophage-Derived Foam Cells by Modulating Cholesterol-Metabolism-Associated Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter, acts on GABA receptors to play an important role in the modulation of macrophage functions. The present study examined the effects of GABA and a GABA receptor agonist on modulating cholesterol-metabolism-associated molecules in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs. Methods: ORO stain, HPLC, qRT-PCR, Western blot and EMSA were carried out using HMDMs exposed to ox-LDL with or without GABAergic agents as the experimental model. Results: GABA and topiramate reduced the percentage of cholesterol ester in lipid-laden HMDMs by down-regulating SR-A, CD36 and LOX-1 expression and up-regulating ABCA1, ABCG1 and SR-BI expression in lipid-laden HMDMs. The production of TNF-a was decreased in GABA-and topiramate-treated lipid-laden HMDMs, and levels of interleukin (IL-6 did not change. The activation of two signaling pathways, p38MAPK and NF-γB, was repressed by GABA and topiramate in lipid-laden HMDMs. Conclusion: GABA and topiramate inhibit the formation of human macrophage-derived foam cells and may be a possibility for macrophage targeted therapy of atherosclerotic lesions.

  1. Basil extract inhibits the sulfotransferase mediated formation of DNA adducts of the procarcinogen 1′-hydroxyestragole by rat and human liver S9 homogenates and in HepG2 human hepatoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Delatour, T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a basil extract on the sulfation and concomitant DNA adduct formation of the proximate carcinogen 1′-hydroxyestragole were studied using rat and human liver S9 homogenates and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Basil was chosen since it contains the procarcinogen estragole that can

  2. Basil extract inhibits the sulfotransferase mediated formation of DNA adducts of the procarcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole by rat and human liver S9 homogenates and in HepG2 human hepatoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Delatour, T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a basil extract on the sulfation and concomitant DNA adduct formation of the proximate carcinogen 1¿-hydroxyestragole were studied using rat and human liver S9 homogenates and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Basil was chosen since it contains the procarcinogen estragole that can

  3. Pharmacological and physiological assessment of serotonin formation and degradation in isolated preparations from mouse and human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergs, Ulrich; Jung, Franziska; Buchwalow, Igor B; Hofmann, Britt; Simm, Andreas; Treede, Hendrik; Neumann, Joachim

    2017-12-01

    Using transgenic (TG) mice that overexpress the human serotonin (5-HT) 4a receptor specifically in cardiomyocytes, we wanted to know whether 5-HT can be formed and degraded in the mammalian heart and whether this can likewise lead to inotropic and chronotropic effects in this TG model. We noted that the 5-HT precursor 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HTP) can exert inotropic and chronotropic effects in cardiac preparations from TG mice but not from wild-type (WT) mice; similar results were found in human atrial preparations as well as in intact TG animals using echocardiography. Moreover, by immunohistochemistry we could detect 5-HT metabolizing enzymes and 5-HT transporters in mouse hearts as well as in human atria. Hence, in the presence of an inhibitor of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase, the positive inotropic effects of 5-HTP were absent in TG and isolated human atrial preparations, and, moreover, inhibitors of enzymes involved in 5-HT degradation enhanced the efficacy of 5-HT in TG atria. A releaser of neurotransmitters increased inotropy in the isolated TG atrium, and this effect could be blocked by a 5-HT 4a receptor antagonist. Fluoxetine, an inhibitor of 5-HT uptake, elevated the potency of 5-HT to increase contractility in the TG atrium. In addition, inhibitors of organic cation and monoamine transporters apparently reduced the positive inotropic potency of 5-HT in the TG atrium. Hence, we tentatively conclude that a local production and degradation of 5-HT in the mammalian heart and more specifically in mammalian myocytes probably occurs. Conceivably, this formation of 5-HT and possibly impaired degradation may be clinically relevant in cases of unexplained tachycardia and other arrhythmias. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present work suggests that inotropically active serotonin (5-HT) can be formed in the mouse and human heart and probably by cardiomyocytes themselves. Moreover, active degradation of 5-HT seems to occur in the mammalian heart. These findings may again

  4. Tissue-engineered bone formation using human bone marrow stromal cells and novel β-tricalcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangpeng; Zhao Li; Cui Lei; Liu Wei; Cao Yilin

    2007-01-01

    In this study we investigated not only the cellular proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) on the novel β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds in vitro but also bone formation by ectopic implantation in athymic mice in vivo. The interconnected porous β-TCP scaffolds with pores of 300-500 μm in size were prepared by the polymeric sponge method. β-TCP scaffolds with the dimension of 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm were combined with hBMSCs, and incubated with (+) or without (-) osteogenic medium in vitro. Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on the scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) content measurement. SEM observation showed that hBMSCs attached well on the scaffolds and proliferated rapidly. No significant difference in the MTT assay could be detected between the two groups, but the ALP activity and OCN content of scaffolds (+) were much higher than those of the scaffolds (-) (p < 0.05). These results indicated that the novel porous β-TCP scaffolds can support the proliferation and subsequent osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro. After being cultured in vitro for 14 days, the scaffolds (+) and (-) were implanted into subcutaneous sites of athymic mice. In β-TCP scaffolds (+), woven bone formed after 4 weeks of implantation and osteogenesis progressed with time. Furthermore, tissue-engineered bone could be found at 8 weeks, and remodeled lamellar bone was also observed at 12 weeks. However, no bone formation could be found in β-TCP scaffolds (-) at each time point checked. The above findings illustrate that the novel porous β-TCP scaffolds developed in this work have prominent osteoconductive activity and the potential for applications in bone tissue engineering

  5. Tissue-engineered bone formation using human bone marrow stromal cells and novel {beta}-tricalcium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Guangpeng [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Zhao Li [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Cui Lei [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Liu Wei [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China); Cao Yilin [National Tissue Engineering Research and Development Center, Shanghai 200235 (China)

    2007-06-01

    In this study we investigated not only the cellular proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) on the novel {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) scaffolds in vitro but also bone formation by ectopic implantation in athymic mice in vivo. The interconnected porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds with pores of 300-500 {mu}m in size were prepared by the polymeric sponge method. {beta}-TCP scaffolds with the dimension of 3 mm x 3 mm x 3 mm were combined with hBMSCs, and incubated with (+) or without (-) osteogenic medium in vitro. Cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on the scaffolds were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation, MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) content measurement. SEM observation showed that hBMSCs attached well on the scaffolds and proliferated rapidly. No significant difference in the MTT assay could be detected between the two groups, but the ALP activity and OCN content of scaffolds (+) were much higher than those of the scaffolds (-) (p < 0.05). These results indicated that the novel porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds can support the proliferation and subsequent osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro. After being cultured in vitro for 14 days, the scaffolds (+) and (-) were implanted into subcutaneous sites of athymic mice. In {beta}-TCP scaffolds (+), woven bone formed after 4 weeks of implantation and osteogenesis progressed with time. Furthermore, tissue-engineered bone could be found at 8 weeks, and remodeled lamellar bone was also observed at 12 weeks. However, no bone formation could be found in {beta}-TCP scaffolds (-) at each time point checked. The above findings illustrate that the novel porous {beta}-TCP scaffolds developed in this work have prominent osteoconductive activity and the potential for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  6. An Amino Acid of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Nucleoprotein Is Critical for Template Function and Cytoplasmic Inclusion Body Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengwei; Chen, Longyun; Zhang, Guangyuan; Yan, Qin; Yang, Xiaodan; Ding, Binbin; Tang, Qiaopeng; Sun, Shengjun; Hu, Zhulong

    2013-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P) interaction of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses is essential for viral replication; this includes N0-P (N0, free of RNA) interaction and the interaction of N-RNA with P. The precise site(s) within N that mediates the N-P interaction and the detailed regulating mechanism, however, are less clear. Using a human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) minigenome assay, we found that an N mutant (NL478A) did not support reporter gene expression. Using in vivo and in vitro coimmunoprecipitation, we found that NL478A maintains the ability to form NL478A0-P, to self-assemble, and to form NL478A-RNA but that NL478A-RNA does not interact with P. Using an immunofluorescence assay, we found that N-P interaction provides the minimal requirement for the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, which contain viral RNA, N, P, and polymerase in HPIV3-infected cells. NL478A was unable to form inclusion bodies when coexpressed with P, but the presence of N rescued the ability of NL478A to form inclusion bodies and the transcriptional function of NL478A, thereby suggesting that hetero-oligomers formed by N and NL478A are functional and competent to form inclusion bodies. Furthermore, we found that NL478A is also defective in virus growth. To our knowledge, we are the first to use a paramyxovirus to identify a precise amino acid within N that is critical for N-RNA and P interaction but not for N0-P interaction for the formation of inclusion bodies, which appear to be bona fide sites of RNA synthesis. PMID:24027324

  7. Hepatic glycogen in humans. I. Direct formation after oral and intravenous glucose or after a 24-h fast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziuk, J.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of hepatic glycogen by the direct pathway is assessed in humans after a 12-h fast and oral loading (100 g) or intravenous infusion (90 g) and after a 24-h fast and the same oral glucose load. The methodology used is based on the double tracer method. [3- 3 H]glucose is infused at a constant rate for the determination of the metabolic clearance of glucose. [1- 14 C]glucose is administered with the glucose load. One hour after absorption or the intravenous glucose infusion is terminated, a glucagon infusion is initiated to mobilize the glycogen labeled with [1- 14 C]glucose and formed during the absorptive period. At this time a third tracer, [6- 3 H]glucose, is administered to measure glucose clearance. It was found that after the 12-h fast and oral glucose loading 7.2 +/- 1.1 g of hepatic glycogen appears to be formed directly from glucose compared with 8.4 +/- 1.0 g after the same load and a 24-h fast and 8.5 +/- 0.4 g after a 12-h fast and an equivalent intravenous glucose infusion. When the amount of label ([ 14 C]glucose) mobilized that was not corrected for metabolic recycling was calculated, the data suggested that the amount of glycogen formed by gluconeogenic pathways was probably at least equal to that formed by direct uptake. It was also approximately 60% greater after a 24-h fast. It can be concluded that the amount of hepatic glycogen formed directly from glucose during glucose loading is not significantly altered by the route of entry or the extension of the fasting period to 24 h. The data suggest, however, that gluconeogenetic formation of glycogen increases with fasting

  8. Statistical analysis of polarization-inhomogeneous Fourier spectra of laser radiation scattered by human skin in the tasks of differentiation of benign and malignant formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, Alexander G.; Dubolazov, Alexander V.; Ushenko, Vladimir A.; Novakovskaya, Olga Y.

    2016-07-01

    The optical model of formation of polarization structure of laser radiation scattered by polycrystalline networks of human skin in Fourier plane was elaborated. The results of investigation of the values of statistical (statistical moments of the 1st to 4th order) parameters of polarization-inhomogeneous images of skin surface in Fourier plane were presented. The diagnostic criteria of pathological process in human skin and its severity degree differentiation were determined.

  9. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-01-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n b ) and apparent association constant (K app ) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n b = 23.7 and log K app = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe 2+ sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided

  10. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n{sub b}) and apparent association constant (K{sub app}) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n{sub b} = 23.7 and log K{sub app} = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe{sup 2+} sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided.

  11. HIF-2α Expression Regulates Sprout Formation into 3D Fibrin Matrices in Prolonged Hypoxia in Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Tessa D; Duyndam, Monique C A; Weijers, Ester M; van Hinsbergh, Victor M W; Koolwijk, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    During short-term hypoxia, Hypoxia Inducible Factors (particular their subunits HIF-1α and HIF-2α) regulate the expression of many genes including the potent angiogenesis stimulator VEGF. However, in some pathological conditions chronic hypoxia occurs and is accompanied by reduced angiogenesis. We investigated the effect of prolonged hypoxia on the proliferation and sprouting ability of human microvascular endothelial cells and the involvement of the HIFs and Dll4/Notch signaling. Human microvascular endothelial cells (hMVECs), cultured at 20% oxygen for 14 days and seeded on top of 3D fibrin matrices, formed sprouts when stimulated with VEGF-A/TNFα. In contrast, hMVECs precultured at 1% oxygen for 14 days were viable and proliferative, but did not form sprouts into fibrin upon VEGF-A/TNFα stimulation at 1% oxygen. Silencing of HIF-2α with si-RNA partially restored the inhibition of endothelial sprouting, whereas HIF-1α or HIF-3α by si-RNA had no effect. No involvement of Dll4/Notch pathway in the inhibitory effect on endothelial sprouting by prolonged hypoxia was found. In addition, hypoxia decreased the production of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), needed for migration and invasion, without a significant effect on its inhibitor PAI-1. This was independent of HIF-2α, as si-HIF-2α did not counteract uPA reduction. Prolonged culturing of hMVECs at 1% oxygen inhibited endothelial sprouting into fibrin. Two independent mechanisms contribute. Silencing of HIF-2α with si-RNA partially restored the inhibition of endothelial sprouting pointing to a HIF-2α-dependent mechanism. In addition, reduction of uPA contributed to reduced endothelial tube formation in a fibrin matrix during prolonged hypoxia.

  12. Preliminary observations on polar body extrusion and pronuclear formation in human oocytes using time-lapse video cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, D; Flaherty, S P; Barry, M F; Matthews, C D

    1997-03-01

    In this study, we have used time-lapse video cinematography to study fertilization in 50 human oocytes that had undergone intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Time-lapse recording commenced shortly after ICSI and proceeded for 17-20 h. Oocytes were cultured in an environmental chamber which was maintained under standard culture conditions. Overall, 38 oocytes (76%) were fertilized normally, and the fertilization rate and embryo quality were not significantly different from 487 sibling oocytes cultured in a conventional incubator. Normal fertilization followed a defined course of events, although the timing of these events varied markedly between oocytes. In 35 of the 38 fertilized oocytes (92%), there were circular waves of granulation within the ooplasm which had a periodicity of 20-53 min. The sperm head decondensed during this granulation phase. The second polar body was then extruded, and this was followed by the central formation of the male pronucleus. The female pronucleus formed in the cytoplasm adjacent to the second polar body at the same time as, or slightly after, the male pronucleus, and was subsequently drawn towards the male pronucleus until the two abutted. Both pronuclei then increased in size, the nucleoli moved around within the pronuclei and some nucleoli coalesced. During pronuclear growth, the organelles contracted from the cortex towards the centre of the oocyte, leaving a clear cortical zone. The oocyte decreased in diameter from 112 to 106 microm (P cinematography is an excellent tool for studying fertilization and early embryo development, and have demonstrated that human fertilization comprises numerous complex dynamic events.

  13. Cognitive environment simulation: An artificial intelligence system for human performance assessment: Modeling human intention formation: [Technical report, May 1986-June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.D.; Roth, E.M.; Pople, H. Jr.

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the results of Phase II of a three phase research program to develop and validate improved methods to model the cognitive behavior of nuclear power plant (NPP) personnel. In Phase II a dynamic simulation capability for modeling how people form intentions to act in NPP emergency situations was developed based on techniques from artificial intelligence. This modeling tool, Cognitive Environment Simulation or CES, simulates the cognitive processes that determine situation assessment and intention formation. It can be used to investigate analytically what situations and factors lead to intention failures, what actions follow from intention failures (e.g., errors of omission, errors of commission, common mode errors), the ability to recover from errors or additional machine failures, and the effects of changes in the NPP person-machine system. The Cognitive Reliability Assessment Technique (or CREATE) was also developed in Phase II to specify how CES can be used to enhance the measurement of the human contribution to risk in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) studies. 43 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab

  14. Cyst-Like Osteolytic Formations in Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 (rhBMP-2) Augmented Sheep Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsin Chuan; Lee, Soonchul; Ting, Kang; Shen, Jia; Wang, Chenchao; Nguyen, Alan; Berthiaume, Emily A; Zara, Janette N; Turner, A Simon; Seim, Howard B; Kwak, Jin Hee; Zhang, Xinli; Soo, Chia

    2017-07-01

    Multiple case reports using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) have reported complications. However, the local adverse effects of rhBMP-2 application are not well documented. In this report we show that, in addition to promoting lumbar spinal fusion through potent osteogenic effects, rhBMP-2 augmentation promotes local cyst-like osteolytic formations in sheep trabecular bones that have undergone anterior lumbar interbody fusion. Three months after operation, conventional computed tomography showed that the trabecular bones of the rhBMP-2 application groups could fuse, whereas no fusion was observed in the control group. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the core implant area's bone volume fraction and bone mineral density increased proportionately with rhBMP-2 dose. Multiple cyst-like bone voids were observed in peri-implant areas when using rhBMP-2 applications, and these sites showed significant bone mineral density decreases in relation to the unaffected regions. Biomechanically, these areas decreased in strength by 32% in comparison with noncystic areas. Histologically, rhBMP-2-affected void sites had an increased amount of fatty marrow, thinner trabecular bones, and significantly more adiponectin- and cathepsin K-positive cells. Despite promoting successful fusion, rhBMP-2 use in clinical applications may result in local adverse structural alterations and compromised biomechanical changes to the bone. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. On the formation of lipid droplets in human adipocytes: the organization of the perilipin-vimentin cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Heid

    Full Text Available We report on the heterogeneity and diversity of lipid droplets (LDs in early stages of adipogenesis by elucidating the cell and molecular biology of amphiphilic and cytoskeletal proteins regulating and stabilizing the generation of LDs in human adipose cells. A plethora of distinct and differently sized LDs was detected by a brief application of adipocyte differentiation medium and additional short treatment with oleic acid. Using these cells and highly specific antibodies for LD-binding proteins of the perilipin (PLIN family, we could distinguish between endogenously derived LDs (endogenous LDs positive for perilipin from exogenously induced LDs (exogenous LDs positive for adipophilin, TIP47 and S3-12. Having optimized these stimulation conditions, we used early adipogenic differentiation stages to investigate small-sized LDs and concentrated on LD-protein associations with the intermediate-sized filament (IF vimentin. This IF protein was described earlier to surround lipid globules, showing spherical, cage-like structures. Consequently - by biochemical methods, by immunofluorescence microscopy and by electron- and immunoelectron microscopy - various stages of emerging lipid globules were revealed with perilipin as linking protein between LDs and vimentin. For this LD-PLIN-Vimentin connection, a model is now proposed, suggesting an interaction of proteins via opposed charged amino acid domains respectively. In addition, multiple sheaths of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cisternae surrounding concentrically nascent LDs are shown. Based on our comprehensive localization studies we present and discuss a novel pathway for the LD formation.

  16. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein-iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (nb) and apparent association constant (Kapp) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at nb=23.7 and log Kapp=4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe(2+) sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. © 2013.

  17. Effects of cryopreservation on excretory function, cellular adhesion molecules and vessel lumen formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guoping; Lai, Binbin; Hong, Huaxing; Lin, Peng; Chen, Weifu; Zhu, Zhong; Chen, Haixiao

    2017-07-01

    Cryopreservation is widely used in regenerative medicine for tissue preservation. In the present study, the effects of cryopreservation on excretory function, cellular adhesion molecules and vessel lumen formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were investigated. After 0, 4, 8, 12 or 24 weeks of cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen, the HUVECs were thawed. The excretory functions markers (endothelin‑1, prostaglandin E1, von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide) of HUVECs were measured by ELISA assay. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in HUVECs was analyzed using flow cytometry. An angiogenesis assay was used to determine the angiogeneic capabilities of the thawed HUVECs. The results demonstrated that cryopreserved/thawed and recultivated HUVECs were unsuitable for tissue‑engineered microvascular construction. Specifically, the excretory function of the cells was significantly decreased in the post‑cryopreserved HUVECs at 24 weeks. In addition, the level of ICAM‑1 in HUVECs was significantly upregulated from the fourth week of cryopreservation. Furthermore, the tube‑like structure‑forming potential was weakened with increasing cryopreservation duration, and the numbers of lumen and the length of the pipeline were decreased in the thawed HUVECs, in a time‑dependent manner. In conclusion, the results of the present study revealed that prolonged cryopreservation may lead to HUVEC dysfunction and did not create stable cell lines for tissue‑engineered microvascular construction.

  18. The formation of human resources in radiation protection: the Lato Sensu Specialization Program of the IRD/IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razuck, Fernando Barcellos; Silva, Aucyone Augusto da

    2017-01-01

    The Lato Sensu Postgraduate Course in Radiological Protection and Security of Radioactive Sources, offered by the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) in partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), was designed to meet the needs of professionals with higher education at university level in various fields, such as physics, chemistry, health and earth sciences or engineering, and who are working in the field of radiation protection and radiation source safety in their countries. The course, created in 2011, provides the basic tools necessary for those who will become instructors in their area, forming qualified experts so that will act as multipliers of the knowledge of the area. The course has a workload of 472 hours and is divided into 17 modules, with theoretical parts and practical training (such as demonstrations, laboratory exercises, case studies, technical visits, simulation exercises and workshops). Some theoretical topics and exercises are developed online using the virtual classroom of the course. This paper aims to present a panoramic view of these 5 years of the course, leaving as a record their memory and discussing new perspectives for the formation of human resources in the area of radiological protection. (author)

  19. The formation of human resources in radiation protection: the Lato Sensu Specialization Program of the IRD/IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razuck, Fernando Barcellos; Silva, Aucyone Augusto da, E-mail: fernandor@ird.gov.br, E-mail: aucyone@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Lato Sensu Postgraduate Course in Radiological Protection and Security of Radioactive Sources, offered by the Institute of Radioprotection and Dosimetry (IRD) in partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), was designed to meet the needs of professionals with higher education at university level in various fields, such as physics, chemistry, health and earth sciences or engineering, and who are working in the field of radiation protection and radiation source safety in their countries. The course, created in 2011, provides the basic tools necessary for those who will become instructors in their area, forming qualified experts so that will act as multipliers of the knowledge of the area. The course has a workload of 472 hours and is divided into 17 modules, with theoretical parts and practical training (such as demonstrations, laboratory exercises, case studies, technical visits, simulation exercises and workshops). Some theoretical topics and exercises are developed online using the virtual classroom of the course. This paper aims to present a panoramic view of these 5 years of the course, leaving as a record their memory and discussing new perspectives for the formation of human resources in the area of radiological protection. (author)

  20. Protection by quercetin and quercetin-rich fruit juice against induction of oxidative DNA damage and formation of BPDE-DNA adducts in human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, L.C.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Boots, A.W.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids are claimed to protect against cardiovascular disease, certain forms of cancer and ageing, possibly by preventing initial DNA damage. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of the flavonoid quercetin against the formation of oxidative DNA damage and bulky DNA adducts in human

  1. Evaluation of Interindividual Human Variation in Bioactivation and DNA Adduct Formation of Estragole in Liver Predicted by Physiologically Based Kinetic/Dynamic and Monte Carlo Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, Ans; Paini, Alicia; Spenkelink, Bert; Scholz, Gabriele; Schilter, Benoit; Bladeren, Van Peter J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Estragole is a known hepatocarcinogen in rodents at high doses following metabolic conversion to the DNA-reactive metabolite 1′-sulfooxyestragole. The aim of the present study was to model possible levels of DNA adduct formation in (individual) humans upon exposure to estragole. This was done by

  2. A Story of Large Land Owners and Math Skills: Inequality and Human Capital Formation in the Long-Run Development, 1820-2000

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baten, J.; Juif, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    We create a new dataset to test the influence of land inequality on long-run human capital formation in a global cross-country study and assess the importance of land inequality relative to income inequality. Our results show that early land inequality has a detrimental influence on math and science

  3. Human Capital Formation and Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries. OECD Development Centre Working Paper No. 211 (Formerly Technical Paper No. 211)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Koji

    2003-01-01

    This paper synthesises the existing literature on human capital formation and foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing countries. The aim is to take a bird's eye view of the complex linkages between the activities of multinational enterprises (MNEs) and policies of host developing countries. In doing so, general trends, best practices and…

  4. Urokinase receptor expression on human microvascular endothelial cells is increased by hypoxia: Implications for capillary-like tube formation in a fibrin matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, M.E.; Koolwijk, P.; Vecht, B. van der; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia stimulates angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels. This study evaluates the direct effect of hypoxia (1% oxygen) on the angiogenic response of human microvascular endothelial cells (hMVECs) seeded on top of a 3-dimensional fibrin matrix, hMVECs stimulated with fibroblast growth

  5. The ferric yersiniabactin uptake receptor FyuA is required for efficient biofilm formation by urinary tract infectious Escherichia coli in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ferrieres, Lionel; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infection in patients with indwelling urinary catheters, and bacterial biofilm formation is a major problem in this type of infection. Escherichia coli is responsible for the large majority of UTIs. Free iron is strictly limited in the human urinary...... of the most upregulated genes in biofilm; it was upregulated 63-fold in the E coli UTI strain VR50. FyuA was found to be highly important for biofilm formation in iron-poor environments such as human urine. Mutants in fyuA show aberrant biofilm formation and the cells become filamentous; a VR50fyuA mutant...... of iron greatly influences UTI strains' ability to form biofilm....

  6. Anti-inflammatory compound resveratrol suppresses homocysteine formation in stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroecksnadel, Katharina; Winkler, Christiana; Wirleitner, Barbara; Schennach, Harald; Weiss, Günter; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    Inflammation, immune activation and oxidative stress play a major role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders. In addition to markers of inflammation, moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and there is a link between the activation of immunocompetent cells and the enhanced formation of homocysteine in vitro. Likewise, anti-inflammatory drugs and nutrients rich in antioxidant vitamins are able to reduce cardiovascular risk and to slow down the atherogenic process. Resveratrol, a phenolic antioxidant synthesized in grapes and vegetables and present in wine, has also been supposed to be beneficial for the prevention of cardiovascular events. Apart from its strong antioxidant properties, resveratrol has also been demonstrated to act as an anti-inflammatory agent. In this study the influence of resveratrol on the production of homocysteine by stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated. Results were compared to earlier described effects of the anti-inflammatory compounds aspirin and salicylic acid and of the lipid-lowering drug atorvastatin. Stimulation of PBMCs with the mitogens concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin induced significantly higher homocysteine accumulation in supernatants compared with unstimulated cells. Treatment with 10-100 muM resveratrol suppressed homocysteine formation in a dose-dependent manner. Resveratrol did not influence the release of homocysteine from resting PBMCs. The data suggest that resveratrol may prevent homocysteine accumulation in the blood by suppressing immune activation cascades and the proliferation of mitogen-driven T-cells. The effect of resveratrol to down-regulate the release of homo-cysteine was comparable to the decline of neopterin concentrations in the same experiments. The suppressive effect of resveratrol was very similar to results obtained earlier with aspirin, salicylic acid and atorvastatin; however, it appeared that doses

  7. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cementsformation of apatite nano-spherulites; (2) the alpha-TCP doped cement aged for 28 days displayed the highest bioactivity and cell proliferation; (3) the deleterious effect of bismuth on cell

  8. Overexpression of human GATA-1 and GATA-2 interferes with spine formation and produces depressive behavior in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyeon Choi

    Full Text Available Functional consequences to which vertebrate GATA transcription factors contribute in the adult brain remain largely an open question. The present study examines how human GATA-1 and GATA-2 (hGATA-1 and hGATA-2 are linked to neuronal differentiation and depressive behaviors in rats. We investigated the effects of adeno-associated viral expression of hGATA-1 and hGATA-2 (AAV-hGATA1 and AAV-hGATA2 in the dentate gyrus (DG of the dorsal hippocampus on dendrite branching and spine number. We also examined the influence of AAV-hGATA1 and AAV-hGATA2 infusions into the dorsal hippocampus on rodent behavior in models of depression. Viral expression of hGATA-1 and hGATA-2 cDNA in rat hippocampal neurons impaired dendritic outgrowth and spine formation. Moreover, viral-mediated expression of hGATA-1 and hGATA-2 in the dorsal hippocampus caused depressive-like deficits in the forced swim test and learned helplessness models of depression, and decreased the expression of several synapse-related genes as well as spine number in hippocampal neurons. Conversely, shRNA knockdown of GATA-2 increased synapse-related gene expression, spine number, and dendrite branching. The results demonstrate that hGATA-1 and hGATA-2 expression in hippocampus is sufficient to cause depressive like behaviors that are associated with reduction in spine synapse density and expression of synapse-related genes.

  9. Phospholipase D is involved in the formation of Golgi associated clathrin coated vesicles in human parotid duct cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Brito de Souza

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D (PLD has been implicated in many cellular functions, such as vesicle trafficking, exocytosis, differentiation, and proliferation. The aim of this study was to characterize the role of PLD in HSY cells, a human cell line originating from the intercalated duct of the parotid gland. As the function and intracellular localization of PLD varies according to cell type, initially, the intracellular localization of PLD1 and PLD2 was determined. By immunofluorescence, PLD1 and PLD2 both showed a punctate cytoplasmic distribution with extensive co-localization with TGN-46. PLD1 was also found in the nucleus, while PLD2 was associated with the plasma membrane. Treatment of cells with the primary alcohol 1-butanol inhibits the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcoline by PLD thereby suppressing phosphatidic acid (PA production. In untreated HSY cells, there was only a slight co-localization of PLD with the clathrin coated vesicles. When HSY cells were incubated with 1-butanol the total number of clathrin coated vesicles increased, especially in the juxtanuclear region and the co-localization of PLD with the clathrin coated vesicles was augmented. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the number of Golgi-associated coated vesicles was greater. Treatment with 1-butanol also affected the Golgi apparatus, increasing the volume of the Golgi saccules. The decrease in PA levels after treatment with 1-butanol likewise resulted in an accumulation of enlarged lysosomes in the perinuclear region. Therefore, in HSY cells PLD appears to be involved in the formation of Golgi associated clathrin coated vesicles as well as in the structural maintenance of the Golgi apparatus.

  10. Formation and repair of physically and chemically induced DNA damage in human cells. Final report, September 1, 1976-November 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerutti, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    The major topic was the study of the formation and repair of DNA damage by energy related physical and chemical agents in cultured human cells. Two pathways of damage production were distinguished: (1) indirect action, i.e., attack of DNA by active oxygen species which are formed by the reaction of the primary agent with a non-DNA target; and (2) direct action, i.e., reaction of the primary agent or a chemical derivative of the primary agent with DNA usually resulting in the formation of a covalent adduct. Near-ultraviolet light and ionizing radiation were studied as agents which operate at least in part via indirect action and benzo(a)pyrene as chemical carcinogen operating mostly by direct action. The formation of monomeric thymine damage of the 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine type by γ-rays and ultraviolet light was investigated. Indirect action of near-ultraviolet light is also responsible for the induction of DNA single strand breaks. Their formation and repair following exposure to 313 nm light was studied in skin fibroblasts from patients with the hereditary disease Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Excision repair of γ-ray induced 5,6-dihydroxy-dihydrothymine type lesions was studied in fibroblasts from Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) patients. The formation and repair of covalent purine adducts was studied in actively metabolizing rodent and human cells following treatment with the procarcinogen benzo(a)pyrene and with the ultimate metabolite benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide I

  11. SU-F-J-174: A Series of Computational Human Phantoms in DICOM-RT Format for Normal Tissue Dose Reconstruction in Epidemiological Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyakuryal, A; Moroz, B; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J; Lee, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risk in radiotherapy patients often require individualized dose estimates of normal tissues. Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D radiological images or not even available. Generic patient CT images are often used in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) to reconstruct normal tissue doses. The objective of the current work was to develop a series of reference size computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format for direct use in dose reconstruction in TPS. Methods: Contours of 93 organs and tissues were extracted from a series of pediatric and adult hybrid computational human phantoms (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old, and adult males and females) using Rhinoceros software. A MATLAB script was created to convert the contours into the DICOM-RT structure format. The simulated CT images with the resolution of 1×1×3 mm3 were also generated from the binary phantom format and coupled with the DICOM-structure files. Accurate volumes of the organs were drawn in the format using precise delineation of the contours in converted format. Due to complex geometry of organs, higher resolution (1×1×1 mm3) was found to be more efficient in the conversion of newborn and 1-year-old phantoms. Results: Contour sets were efficiently converted into DICOM-RT structures in relatively short time (about 30 minutes for each phantom). A good agreement was observed in the volumes between the original phantoms and the converted contours for large organs (NRMSD<1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD<7.7%). Conclusion: A comprehensive series of computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format was created to support epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in radiotherapy patients. We confirmed the DICOM-RT phantoms were successfully imported into the TPS programs of major vendors.

  12. SU-F-J-174: A Series of Computational Human Phantoms in DICOM-RT Format for Normal Tissue Dose Reconstruction in Epidemiological Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyakuryal, A; Moroz, B [National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C; Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Epidemiological studies of second cancer risk in radiotherapy patients often require individualized dose estimates of normal tissues. Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D radiological images or not even available. Generic patient CT images are often used in commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) to reconstruct normal tissue doses. The objective of the current work was to develop a series of reference size computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format for direct use in dose reconstruction in TPS. Methods: Contours of 93 organs and tissues were extracted from a series of pediatric and adult hybrid computational human phantoms (newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-year-old, and adult males and females) using Rhinoceros software. A MATLAB script was created to convert the contours into the DICOM-RT structure format. The simulated CT images with the resolution of 1×1×3 mm3 were also generated from the binary phantom format and coupled with the DICOM-structure files. Accurate volumes of the organs were drawn in the format using precise delineation of the contours in converted format. Due to complex geometry of organs, higher resolution (1×1×1 mm3) was found to be more efficient in the conversion of newborn and 1-year-old phantoms. Results: Contour sets were efficiently converted into DICOM-RT structures in relatively short time (about 30 minutes for each phantom). A good agreement was observed in the volumes between the original phantoms and the converted contours for large organs (NRMSD<1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD<7.7%). Conclusion: A comprehensive series of computational human phantoms in DICOM-RT format was created to support epidemiological studies of second cancer risks in radiotherapy patients. We confirmed the DICOM-RT phantoms were successfully imported into the TPS programs of major vendors.

  13. Human stem cell osteoblastogenesis mediated by novel glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors induces bone formation and a unique bone turnover biomarker profile in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, Peter S.; O'Shea, Patrick J.; Fagura, Malbinder; Pilling, James E.; Sanganee, Hitesh; Wada, Hiroki; Courtney, Paul F.; Kavanagh, Stefan; Hall, Peter A.; Escott, K. Jane

    2013-01-01

    Wnt activation by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) causes bone anabolism in rodents making GSK-3 a potential therapeutic target for osteoporotic and osteolytic metastatic bone disease. To understand the wnt pathway related to human disease translation, the ability of 3 potent inhibitors of GSK-3 (AZD2858, AR79, AZ13282107) to 1) drive osteoblast differentiation and mineralisation using human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSC) in vitro; and 2) stimulate rat bone formation in vivo was investigated. Bone anabolism/resorption was determined using clinically relevant serum biomarkers as indicators of bone turnover and bone formation assessed in femurs by histopathology and pQCT/μCT imaging. GSK-3 inhibitors caused β-catenin stabilisation in human and rat mesenchymal stem cells, stimulated hADSC commitment towards osteoblasts and osteogenic mineralisation in vitro. AZD2858 produced time-dependent changes in serum bone turnover biomarkers and increased bone mass over 28 days exposure in rats. After 7 days, AZD2858, AR79 or AZ13282107 exposure increased the bone formation biomarker P1NP, and reduced the resorption biomarker TRAcP-5b, indicating increased bone anabolism and reduced resorption in rats. This biomarker profile was differentiated from anabolic agent PTH 1–34 or the anti-resorptive Alendronate-induced changes. Increased bone formation in cortical and cancellous bone as assessed by femur histopathology supported biomarker changes. 14 day AR79 treatment increased bone mineral density and trabecular thickness, and decreased trabecular number and connectivity assessed by pQCT/μCT. GSK-3 inhibition caused hADSC osteoblastogenesis and mineralisation in vitro. Increased femur bone mass associated with changes in bone turnover biomarkers confirmed in vivo bone formation and indicated uncoupling of bone formation and resorption. - Highlights: • Wnt modulation with 3 novel GSK-3 inhibitors alters bone growth. • Human stem cell osteoblastogenesis and

  14. Human stem cell osteoblastogenesis mediated by novel glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors induces bone formation and a unique bone turnover biomarker profile in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, Peter S., E-mail: Peter.Gilmour@astrazeneca.com [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); O' Shea, Patrick J.; Fagura, Malbinder [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Pilling, James E. [Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Sanganee, Hitesh [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Wada, Hiroki [R and I IMed, AstraZeneca R and D, Molndal (Sweden); Courtney, Paul F. [DMPK, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Kavanagh, Stefan; Hall, Peter A. [Safety Assessment, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom); Escott, K. Jane [New Opportunities Innovative Medicines group, AstraZeneca R and D, Alderley Park, Cheshire SK10 4TF (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Wnt activation by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) causes bone anabolism in rodents making GSK-3 a potential therapeutic target for osteoporotic and osteolytic metastatic bone disease. To understand the wnt pathway related to human disease translation, the ability of 3 potent inhibitors of GSK-3 (AZD2858, AR79, AZ13282107) to 1) drive osteoblast differentiation and mineralisation using human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSC) in vitro; and 2) stimulate rat bone formation in vivo was investigated. Bone anabolism/resorption was determined using clinically relevant serum biomarkers as indicators of bone turnover and bone formation assessed in femurs by histopathology and pQCT/μCT imaging. GSK-3 inhibitors caused β-catenin stabilisation in human and rat mesenchymal stem cells, stimulated hADSC commitment towards osteoblasts and osteogenic mineralisation in vitro. AZD2858 produced time-dependent changes in serum bone turnover biomarkers and increased bone mass over 28 days exposure in rats. After 7 days, AZD2858, AR79 or AZ13282107 exposure increased the bone formation biomarker P1NP, and reduced the resorption biomarker TRAcP-5b, indicating increased bone anabolism and reduced resorption in rats. This biomarker profile was differentiated from anabolic agent PTH{sub 1–34} or the anti-resorptive Alendronate-induced changes. Increased bone formation in cortical and cancellous bone as assessed by femur histopathology supported biomarker changes. 14 day AR79 treatment increased bone mineral density and trabecular thickness, and decreased trabecular number and connectivity assessed by pQCT/μCT. GSK-3 inhibition caused hADSC osteoblastogenesis and mineralisation in vitro. Increased femur bone mass associated with changes in bone turnover biomarkers confirmed in vivo bone formation and indicated uncoupling of bone formation and resorption. - Highlights: • Wnt modulation with 3 novel GSK-3 inhibitors alters bone growth. • Human stem cell osteoblastogenesis

  15. Determining How Tertiary Education and Human Capital Formation Influenced Economic Expansion in Israel, Japan, and Norway from 2000-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkbrenner, Erin Lee

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have calculated the relationship between human capital development and economic output by various means of econometric modeling and by use of numerous indicators under the context of an assortment of human capital theory. This study was conducted to identify new interpretations of the expansion of human capital in the form of tertiary…

  16. Molecular cloning of the human gene SUVCC3 associated with the formation of DNA-protein crosslinks following exposure to solar UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenstein, B.S.; Vaslet, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    DRP 153 cells, which are hypersensitive to solar UV and deficient in the formation of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) following irradiation, were transfected with human DNA and a secondary transformant obtained in which a normal DPC response and solar UV sensitivity reestablished. DNA from this secondary transformant was used to construct a genomic DNA library from which a recombinant phage was isolated containing the human gene capable of restoring a normal DPC response and solar UV sensitivity to DRP 153. This gene has been designated SUVCC3 to denote solar UV cross-complementing gene number 3. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Thymidine kinase deficient human cells have increased UV sensitivity in their capacity to support herpes simplex virus but normal UV sensitivity for colony formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainbow, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    A thymidine kinase deficient (tk - ) and two thymidine kinase proficient (tk + ) human cell lines were compared for UV sensitivity using colony-forming ability as well as their capacity to support the plaque formation of herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1).The tk - line (143 cells) was a derivative of one of the tk + lines (R970-5), whereas the other tk + line (AC4 cells) was a derivative of the 143 cells obtained by transfection with purified sheared HSV-2 DNA encoding the viral tk gene. 143, R970-5 and AC4 cells showed a similar UV sensitivity for colony-forming ability. In contrast, the capacity to support HSV-1 plaque formation immediately (within 1 h) afte UV-irradiation was reduced to a greater extent in the 143 cells compared to the R970-5 and AC4 cells. Capacity curves for plaque formation of the HSV-1: KOS wild-type (tk + ) strain were similar to those for the HSV-1: PTK3B mutant (tk - ) strain were similar to those for the HSV-1: PTK3B mutant (tk - ) strain in the 3 cell strains, indicating that the viral tk gene does not influence the ability of HSV-1 to form plaques in UV-irradiated compared to unirradiated human cells. Cellular capacity for HSV-1 plaque formation was found to recover in both tk - and tk + cells for cultures infected 24 h after UV-irradiation. These results suggest that repair of UV-damaged DNA takes place to a similar extent in both tk - and tk + human cells, but the kinetics of repair are initially slower in tk - compared to tk + human cells. (author). 33 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  18. Evaluation of the human relevance of the constitutive androstane receptor-mediated mode of action for rat hepatocellular tumor formation by the synthetic pyrethroid momfluorothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Yu; Kushida, Masahiko; Kikumoto, Hiroko; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Higuchi, Hashihiro; Kawamura, Satoshi; Cohen, Samuel M; Lake, Brian G; Yamada, Tomoya

    2017-01-01

    High dietary levels of the non-genotoxic synthetic pyrethroid momfluorothrin increased the incidence of hepatocellular tumors in male and female Wistar rats. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated that the mode of action (MOA) for momfluorothrin-induced hepatocellular tumors is constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)-mediated. In the present study, to evaluate the potential human carcinogenic risk of momfluorothrin, the effects of momfluorothrin (1-1,000 µM) and a major metabolite Z-CMCA (5-1,000 µM) on hepatocyte replicative DNA synthesis and CYP2B mRNA expression were examined in cultured rat and human hepatocyte preparations. The effect of sodium phenobarbital (NaPB), a prototypic rodent hepatocarcinogen with a CAR-mediated MOA, was also investigated. Human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF) produced a concentration-dependent increase in replicative DNA synthesis in rat and human hepatocytes. However, while NaPB and momfluorothrin increased replicative DNA synthesis in rat hepatocytes, NaPB, momfluorothrin and Z-CMCA did not increase replicative DNA synthesis in human hepatocytes. NaPB, momfluorothrin and Z-CMCA increased CYP2B1/2 mRNA levels in rat hepatocytes. NaPB and momfluorothrin also increased CYP2B6 mRNA levels in human hepatocytes. Overall, while momfluorothrin and NaPB activated CAR in cultured human hepatocytes, neither chemical increased replicative DNA synthesis. Furthermore, to confirm whether the findings observed in vitro were also observed in vivo, a humanized chimeric mouse study was conducted. Replicative DNA synthesis was not increased in human hepatocytes of chimeric mice treated with momfluorothrin or its close structural analogue metofluthrin. As human hepatocytes are refractory to the mitogenic effects of momfluorothrin, in contrast to rat hepatocytes, the data support the hypothesis that the MOA for momfluorothrin-induced rat liver tumor formation is not relevant for humans.

  19. Lipid droplets formation in human endothelial cells in response to polyunsaturated fatty acids and 1-methyl-nicotinamide (MNA); confocal Raman imaging and fluorescence microscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzner, Katarzyna; Chlopicki, Stefan; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2016-04-01

    In this work the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in human endothelial cells culture in response to the uptake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) was studied. Additionally, an effect of 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA) on the process of LDs formation was investigated. LDs have been previously described structurally and to some degree biochemically, however neither the precise function of LDs nor the factors responsible for LD induction have been clarified. Lipid droplets, sometimes referred in the literature as lipid bodies are organelles known to regulate neutrophil, eosinophil, or tumor cell functions but their presence and function in the endothelium is largely unexplored. 3D linear Raman spectroscopy was used to study LDs formation in vitro in a single endothelial cell. The method provides information about distribution and size of LDs as well as their composition. The incubation of endothelial cells with various PUFAs resulted in formation of LDs. As a complementary method for LDs identification a fluorescence microscopy was applied. Fluorescence measurements confirmed the Raman results suggesting endothelial cells uptake of PUFAs and subsequent LDs formation in the cytoplasm of the endothelium. Furthermore, MNA seem to potentiate intracellular uptake of PUFAs to the endothelium that may bear physiological and pharmacological significance. Confocal Raman imaging of HAoEC cell with LDs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Hydroxyl Radical Formation from HULIS and Fe(II) Interactions: Fulvic Acid-Fe(II) Complexes in Simulated and Human Lung Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, D.

    2017-12-01

    Inhalation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has long been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, the causative agents and underlying mechanisms for these health effects have yet to be identified. One hypothesis is that PM2.5 deposited in the alveoli produce an excess of highly reactive radicals, leading to oxidative stress. The OH radical may be the most physiologically damaging, capable of oxidizing of lipids, proteins and DNA. Due to the variability and uncertainty in PM2.5 composition, the components that contribute to OH formation are not well understood. Soluble Fe is a component of PM2.5that produces OH under physiological conditions. Humic-like substances are water soluble organics found in biomass burning and tobacco smoke. Humic-like substances are capable of binding to Fe and enhancing OH formation, but this chemistry is not well understood. In this work, we use soil derived fulvic acid as a surrogate for Humic-like substances and investigate its effect on OH formation from Fe(II) under conditions relevant to the lungs. We use a fluorescent OH trapping probe, chemical kinetics and thermodynamic modeling to investigate OH formation from fulvic acid and Fe(II) dissolved in simulated and human lung fluids. In simulated lung fluid, we find that fulvic acid binds to Fe(II) and enhances the rate of key reactions that form OH. When fulvic acid is added to human lung fluids containing Fe(II), an enhancement of OH formation is observed. In human lung fluid, fulvic acid and metal binding proteins compete for Fe binding. These metal binding proteins are typically not found in simulated lung fluids. Results show that fulvic acid strongly binds Fe(II) and catalyzes key reactions that form OH in both simulated and human lung fluids. These results may help explain the role of Humic-like substances and Fe in oxidative stress and adverse health outcomes. Furthermore, we suggest that future studies employ simulated lung fluids containing metal binding proteins

  1. Differentiation and sarcomere formation in skeletal myocytes directly prepared from human induced pluripotent stem cells using a sphere-based culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwlawat, Saowanee; Lynch, Eileen; Glaser, Jennifer; Smit-Oistad, Ivy; Jeffrey, Jeremy; Van Dyke, Jonathan M; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    Human induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising resource for propagation of myogenic progenitors. Our group recently reported a unique protocol for the derivation of myogenic progenitors directly (without genetic modification) from human pluripotent cells using free-floating spherical culture. Here we expand our previous efforts and attempt to determine how differentiation duration, culture surface coatings, and nutrient supplements in the medium influence progenitor differentiation and formation of skeletal myotubes containing sarcomeric structures. A long differentiation period (over 6 weeks) promoted the differentiation of iPSC-derived myogenic progenitors and subsequent myotube formation. These iPSC-derived myotubes contained representative sarcomeric structures, consisting of organized myosin and actin filaments, and could spontaneously contract. We also found that a bioengineering approach using three-dimensional (3D) artificial muscle constructs could facilitate the formation of elongated myotubes. Lastly, we determined how culture surface coating matrices and different supplements would influence terminal differentiation. While both Matrigel and laminin coatings showed comparable effects on muscle differentiation, B27 serum-free supplement in the differentiation medium significantly enhanced myogenesis compared to horse serum. Our findings support the possibility to create an in vitro model of contractile sarcomeric myofibrils for disease modeling and drug screening to study neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. SU-E-J-93: Development of Pre-Contoured Human Model Library in DICOM-RT Format for the Epidemiological Study of the Radiotherapy Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C; Lee, C; Pelletier, C; Jung, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D beams-eye-view from the conventional simulator. To analyze the outcomes of such treatments for radiation late effects, 3D computational human models are often used in commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, several underlying difficulties such as time-consuming manual delineation procedures of a large number of structures in the model have always limited its applications. Primary objective of this work was to develop a human model library for the epidemiological study by converting 3D-surface model organs to DICOM-RT format (DICOM-RT structure) using an in-house built software. We converted the ICRP reference human models to DICOM-RT models, which can be readily adopted for various dose calculations. Methods: MATLAB based code were utilized to convert the contour drawings extracted in text-format from the 3D graphic-tool, Rhinoceros into DICOM-RT structure format for 50 different organs of each model using a 16GB dual-core processor. The conversion periods were measured for each DICOM-RT models, and the reconstructed structure volumes were validated against the original 3D-surface models in the TPS. Ten reference hybrid whole-body models (8-pediatric and 2-adults) were automatically processed to create DICOM-RT computational human model library. Results: Mean contour conversion period was found to be 580 (N=2) and 394.5 (N=8) seconds for 50 organs in the adult and pediatric models respectively. A good agreement for large organs (NRMSD <1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD <7.7%) was also observed between the original volumes and corresponding DICOM-RT structure volumes of the organs. Conclusion: The ICRP reference human models were converted into DICOM-RT format to support the epidemiological study using a large cohort of conventional radiotherapy patients. Due to its DICOM-compatibility, the library may be implemented to many other different

  3. SU-E-J-93: Development of Pre-Contoured Human Model Library in DICOM-RT Format for the Epidemiological Study of the Radiotherapy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Jung, J [East Carolina Univ, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Prior to 3D conformal radiation therapy planning, patient anatomy information was mostly limited to 2D beams-eye-view from the conventional simulator. To analyze the outcomes of such treatments for radiation late effects, 3D computational human models are often used in commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs). However, several underlying difficulties such as time-consuming manual delineation procedures of a large number of structures in the model have always limited its applications. Primary objective of this work was to develop a human model library for the epidemiological study by converting 3D-surface model organs to DICOM-RT format (DICOM-RT structure) using an in-house built software. We converted the ICRP reference human models to DICOM-RT models, which can be readily adopted for various dose calculations. Methods: MATLAB based code were utilized to convert the contour drawings extracted in text-format from the 3D graphic-tool, Rhinoceros into DICOM-RT structure format for 50 different organs of each model using a 16GB dual-core processor. The conversion periods were measured for each DICOM-RT models, and the reconstructed structure volumes were validated against the original 3D-surface models in the TPS. Ten reference hybrid whole-body models (8-pediatric and 2-adults) were automatically processed to create DICOM-RT computational human model library. Results: Mean contour conversion period was found to be 580 (N=2) and 394.5 (N=8) seconds for 50 organs in the adult and pediatric models respectively. A good agreement for large organs (NRMSD <1.0%) and small organs (NRMSD <7.7%) was also observed between the original volumes and corresponding DICOM-RT structure volumes of the organs. Conclusion: The ICRP reference human models were converted into DICOM-RT format to support the epidemiological study using a large cohort of conventional radiotherapy patients. Due to its DICOM-compatibility, the library may be implemented to many other different

  4. Extracellular matrix components and culture regimen selectively regulate cartilage formation by self-assembling human mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Johnathan; Wei, Yiyong; Zhou, Bin; Burapachaisri, Aonnicha; Guo, Edward; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-12-09

    Cartilage formation from self-assembling mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro recapitulate important cellular events during mesenchymal condensation that precedes native cartilage development. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) components and culture regimen on cartilage formation by self-assembling human MSCs in vitro and in vivo. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs (hMSCs) were seeded and compacted in 6.5-mm-diameter transwell inserts with coated (type I, type II collagen) or uncoated (vehicle) membranes, at different densities (0.5 × 10 6 , 1.0 × 10 6 , 1.5 × 10 6 per insert). Pellets were formed by aggregating hMSCs (0.25 × 10 6 ) in round-bottomed wells. All tissues were cultured for up to 6 weeks for in vitro analyses. Discs (cultured for 6, 8 or 10 weeks) and pellets (cultured for 10 weeks) were implanted subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice to evaluate the cartilage stability in vivo. Type I and type II collagen coatings enabled cartilage disc formation from self-assembling hMSCs. Without ECM coating, hMSCs formed dome-shaped tissues resembling the pellets. Type I collagen, expressed in the prechondrogenic mesenchyme, improved early chondrogenesis versus type II collagen. High seeding density improved cartilage tissue properties but resulted in a lower yield of disc formation. Discs and pellets exhibited compositional and organizational differences in vitro and in vivo. Prolonged chondrogenic induction of the discs in vitro expedited endochondral ossification in vivo. The outcomes of cartilage tissues formed from self-assembling MSCs in vitro and in vivo can be modulated by the control of culture parameters. These insights could motivate new directions for engineering cartilage and bone via a cartilage template from self-assembling MSCs.

  5. RNAi mediated acute depletion of Retinoblastoma protein (pRb promotes aneuploidy in human primary cells via micronuclei formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovino Flora

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in chromosome number or structure as well as supernumerary centrosomes and multipolar mitoses are commonly observed in human tumors. Thus, centrosome amplification and mitotic checkpoint dysfunctions are believed possible causes of chromosomal instability. The Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB participates in the regulation of synchrony between DNA synthesis and centrosome duplication and it is involved in transcription regulation of some mitotic genes. Primary human fibroblasts were transfected transiently with short interfering RNA (siRNA specific for human pRb to investigate the effects of pRb acute loss on chromosomal stability. Results Acutely pRb-depleted fibroblasts showed altered expression of genes necessary for cell cycle progression, centrosome homeostasis, kinetochore and mitotic checkpoint proteins. Despite altered expression of genes involved in the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC the checkpoint seemed to function properly in pRb-depleted fibroblasts. In particular AURORA-A and PLK1 overexpression suggested that these two genes might have a role in the observed genomic instability. However, when they were post-transcriptionally silenced in pRb-depleted fibroblasts we did not observe reduction in the number of aneuploid cells. This finding suggests that overexpression of these two genes did not contribute to genomic instability triggered by RB acute loss although it affected cell proliferation. Acutely pRb-depleted human fibroblasts showed the presence of micronuclei containing whole chromosomes besides the presence of supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Conclusion Here we show for the first time that RB acute loss triggers centrosome amplification and aneuploidy in human primary fibroblasts. Altogether, our results suggest that pRb-depleted primary human fibroblasts possess an intact spindle checkpoint and that micronuclei, likely caused by mis-attached kinetochores that in turn trigger

  6. Mitochondrial protein adducts formation and mitochondrial dysfunction during N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Du, Kuo; Dorko, Kenneth [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M. [Department of Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Ding, Wen-Xing [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    3′-Hydroxyacetanilide or N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally regarded as a non-hepatotoxic analog of acetaminophen (APAP). Previous studies demonstrated the absence of toxicity after AMAP in mice, hamsters, primary mouse hepatocytes and several cell lines. In contrast, experiments with liver slices suggested that it may be toxic to human hepatocytes; however, the mechanism of toxicity is unclear. To explore this, we treated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with AMAP or APAP for up to 48 h and measured several parameters to assess metabolism and injury. Although less toxic than APAP, AMAP dose-dependently triggered cell death in PHH as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Similar to APAP, AMAP also significantly depleted glutathione (GSH) in PHH and caused mitochondrial damage as indicated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) release and the JC-1 assay. However, unlike APAP, AMAP treatment did not cause relevant c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol or phospho-JNK translocation to mitochondria. To compare, AMAP toxicity was assessed in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). No cytotoxicity was observed as indicated by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase release and no PI staining. Furthermore, there was no GSH depletion or mitochondrial dysfunction after AMAP treatment in PMH. Immunoblotting for arylated proteins suggested that AMAP treatment caused extensive mitochondrial protein adduct formation in PHH but not in PMH. In conclusion, AMAP is hepatotoxic in PHH and the mechanism involves the formation of mitochondrial protein adducts and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • AMAP induces cell death in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). • AMAP does not cause cell death in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). • AMAP leads to mitochondria dysfunction in PHH but not PMH. • Protein adduct formation and dysfunction in mitochondria correlate with toxicity.

  7. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondrial protein adducts formation and mitochondrial dysfunction during N-acetyl-m-aminophenol (AMAP)-induced hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yuchao; McGill, Mitchell R.; Du, Kuo; Dorko, Kenneth; Kumer, Sean C.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Ding, Wen-Xing; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    3′-Hydroxyacetanilide or N-acetyl-meta-aminophenol (AMAP) is generally regarded as a non-hepatotoxic analog of acetaminophen (APAP). Previous studies demonstrated the absence of toxicity after AMAP in mice, hamsters, primary mouse hepatocytes and several cell lines. In contrast, experiments with liver slices suggested that it may be toxic to human hepatocytes; however, the mechanism of toxicity is unclear. To explore this, we treated primary human hepatocytes (PHH) with AMAP or APAP for up to 48 h and measured several parameters to assess metabolism and injury. Although less toxic than APAP, AMAP dose-dependently triggered cell death in PHH as indicated by alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Similar to APAP, AMAP also significantly depleted glutathione (GSH) in PHH and caused mitochondrial damage as indicated by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) release and the JC-1 assay. However, unlike APAP, AMAP treatment did not cause relevant c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cytosol or phospho-JNK translocation to mitochondria. To compare, AMAP toxicity was assessed in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). No cytotoxicity was observed as indicated by the lack of lactate dehydrogenase release and no PI staining. Furthermore, there was no GSH depletion or mitochondrial dysfunction after AMAP treatment in PMH. Immunoblotting for arylated proteins suggested that AMAP treatment caused extensive mitochondrial protein adduct formation in PHH but not in PMH. In conclusion, AMAP is hepatotoxic in PHH and the mechanism involves the formation of mitochondrial protein adducts and mitochondrial dysfunction. - Highlights: • AMAP induces cell death in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). • AMAP does not cause cell death in primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH). • AMAP leads to mitochondria dysfunction in PHH but not PMH. • Protein adduct formation and dysfunction in mitochondria correlate with toxicity.

  9. Pharmacological Inhibition of Protein Kinase G1 Enhances Bone Formation by Human Skeletal Stem Cells Through Activation of RhoA-Akt Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Siersbaek, Majken S; Chen, Li

    2015-01-01

    for several malignant and nonmalignant conditions. We screened a library of kinase inhibitors to identify small molecules that enhance bone formation by human skeletal (stromal or mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC). We identified H-8 (known to inhibit protein kinases A, C, and G) as a potent enhancer of ex vivo......Development of novel approaches to enhance bone regeneration is needed for efficient treatment of bone defects. Protein kinases play a key role in regulation of intracellular signal transduction pathways, and pharmacological targeting of protein kinases has led to development of novel treatments...

  10. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Young Woo [Cell Therapy and Tissue Engineering Center, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin [Biomedical Research Institute, Lifeliver Co., Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won Jin [Dr. Park' s Aesthetic Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong In, E-mail: oncochem@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Soo, E-mail: khsmd@unitel.co.kr [Department of Hematology-Oncology, Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. {yields} hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  11. Effective myotube formation in human adipose tissue-derived stem cells expressing dystrophin and myosin heavy chain by cellular fusion with mouse C2C12 myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Young Woo; Lee, Jong Eun; Yang, Mal Sook; Jang, In Keun; Kim, Hyo Eun; Lee, Doo Hoon; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Won Jin; Kong, Jee Hyun; Shim, Kwang Yong; Lee, Jong In; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → hASCs were differentiated into skeletal muscle cells by treatment with 5-azacytidine, FGF-2, and the supernatant of cultured hASCs. → Dystrophin and MyHC were expressed in late differentiation step by treatment with the supernatant of cultured hASCs. → hASCs expressing dystrophin and MyHC contributed to myotube formation during co-culture with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. -- Abstract: Stem cell therapy for muscular dystrophies requires stem cells that are able to participate in the formation of new muscle fibers. However, the differentiation steps that are the most critical for this process are not clear. We investigated the myogenic phases of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) step by step and the capability of myotube formation according to the differentiation phase by cellular fusion with mouse myoblast C2C12 cells. In hASCs treated with 5-azacytidine and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) for 1 day, the early differentiation step to express MyoD and myogenin was induced by FGF-2 treatment for 6 days. Dystrophin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression was induced by hASC conditioned medium in the late differentiation step. Myotubes were observed only in hASCs undergoing the late differentiation step by cellular fusion with C2C12 cells. In contrast, hASCs that were normal or in the early stage were not involved in myotube formation. Our results indicate that stem cells expressing dystrophin and MyHC are more suitable for myotube formation by co-culture with myoblasts than normal or early differentiated stem cells expressing MyoD and myogenin.

  12. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function.

  13. Task-Related Edge Density (TED-A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Lohmann

    Full Text Available The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach "Task-related Edge Density" (TED. TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function.

  14. Task-Related Edge Density (TED)—A New Method for Revealing Dynamic Network Formation in fMRI Data of the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Gabriele; Stelzer, Johannes; Zuber, Verena; Buschmann, Tilo; Margulies, Daniel; Bartels, Andreas; Scheffler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The formation of transient networks in response to external stimuli or as a reflection of internal cognitive processes is a hallmark of human brain function. However, its identification in fMRI data of the human brain is notoriously difficult. Here we propose a new method of fMRI data analysis that tackles this problem by considering large-scale, task-related synchronisation networks. Networks consist of nodes and edges connecting them, where nodes correspond to voxels in fMRI data, and the weight of an edge is determined via task-related changes in dynamic synchronisation between their respective times series. Based on these definitions, we developed a new data analysis algorithm that identifies edges that show differing levels of synchrony between two distinct task conditions and that occur in dense packs with similar characteristics. Hence, we call this approach “Task-related Edge Density” (TED). TED proved to be a very strong marker for dynamic network formation that easily lends itself to statistical analysis using large scale statistical inference. A major advantage of TED compared to other methods is that it does not depend on any specific hemodynamic response model, and it also does not require a presegmentation of the data for dimensionality reduction as it can handle large networks consisting of tens of thousands of voxels. We applied TED to fMRI data of a fingertapping and an emotion processing task provided by the Human Connectome Project. TED revealed network-based involvement of a large number of brain areas that evaded detection using traditional GLM-based analysis. We show that our proposed method provides an entirely new window into the immense complexity of human brain function. PMID:27341204

  15. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce oxidative stress and DNA-adduct formation but not DNA-breakage in human lung cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schins Roel PF

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Titanium dioxide (TiO2, also known as titanium (IV oxide or anatase, is the naturally occurring oxide of titanium. It is also one of the most commercially used form. To date, no parameter has been set for the average ambient air concentration of TiO2 nanoparticles (NP by any regulatory agency. Previously conducted studies had established these nanoparticles to be mainly non-cyto- and -genotoxic, although they had been found to generate free radicals both acellularly (specially through photocatalytic activity and intracellularly. The present study determines the role of TiO2-NP (anatase, ∅ in vitro. For comparison, iron containing nanoparticles (hematite, Fe2O3, ∅ 2-NP did not induce DNA-breakage measured by the Comet-assay in both cell types. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was measured acellularly (without any photocatalytic activity as well as intracellularly for both types of particles, however, the iron-containing NP needed special reducing conditions before pronounced radical generation. A high level of DNA adduct formation (8-OHdG was observed in IMR-90 cells exposed to TiO2-NP, but not in cells exposed to hematite NP. Our study demonstrates different modes of action for TiO2- and Fe2O3-NP. Whereas TiO2-NP were able to generate elevated amounts of free radicals, which induced indirect genotoxicity mainly by DNA-adduct formation, Fe2O3-NP were clastogenic (induction of DNA-breakage and required reducing conditions for radical formation.

  16. The Postischemic Environment Differentially Impacts Teratoma or Tumor Formation After Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Progenitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seminatore, CH.; Polentes, J.; Ellman, D.; Kozubenko, Nataliya; Itier, V.; Tine, S.; Tritschler, L.; Brenot, M.; Guidou, E.; Blondeau, J.; Lhuillier, M.; Bugi, A.; Aubry, L.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Perrier, A. L.; Finsen, B.; Onteniente, B.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2010), s. 153-159 ISSN 0039-2499 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : brain transplantation * human embryonic stem cells * neural differentiation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.756, year: 2010

  17. METABOLISM AND DNA ADDUCT FORMATION OF 2-ACETYLAMINOFLUORENE BY BLADDER EXPLANTS FROM HUMAN, DOG, MONKEY, HAMSTER AND RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is concluded that bladder explants of the human, dog, monkey, hamster, and rat metabolize AAF mainly to ring-hydroxylated products, but also form small amounts of the proximate carcinogenic metabolite N-hydroxy-AAF. Neither the overall binding of AAF to bladder DNA, nor the fo...

  18. Walking paths to and from a goal differ: on the role of bearing angle in the formation of human locomotion paths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sreenivasa

    Full Text Available The path that humans take while walking to a goal is the result of a cognitive process modulated by the perception of the environment and physiological constraints. The path shape and timing implicitly embeds aspects of the architecture behind this process. Here, locomotion paths were investigated during a simple task of walking to and from a goal, by looking at the evolution of the position of the human on a horizontal (x,y plane. We found that the path while walking to a goal was not the same as that while returning from it. Forward-return paths were systematically separated by 0.5-1.9m, or about 5% of the goal distance. We show that this path separation occurs as a consequence of anticipating the desired body orientation at the goal while keeping the target in view. The magnitude of this separation was strongly influenced by the bearing angle (difference between body orientation and angle to goal and the final orientation imposed at the goal. This phenomenon highlights the impact of a trade-off between a directional perceptual apparatus-eyes in the head on the shoulders-and and physiological limitations, in the formation of human locomotion paths. Our results give an insight into the influence of environmental and perceptual variables on human locomotion and provide a basis for further mathematical study of these mechanisms.

  19. OVERWEIGHT/OBESITY AND HUMAN CAPITAL FORMATION FROM INFANCY TO ADOLESCENCE: EVIDENCE FROM TWO LARGE US COHORTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasko, Jason E

    2015-03-01

    Body mass index (BMI) levels in US children and adolescents have increased over the past several decades. The negative health effects of this trend are well-documented. Recent work has evaluated the potential effects on skills formation. Studies are mixed on whether there is an association between high BMI and skills outcomes, and those that estimate causal effects find none. This paper offers estimates on the causal effect of BMI-defined overweight and obesity on skills formation using two large cohorts of contemporary US children followed from infancy to 5 years and from kindergarten (6 years) to the eighth grade (14 years). Significant negative associations were observed in the random effects models for males in early life with respect to a mental skills assessment, for females during the pre-school years for reading and maths assessments, for both males and females during the schooling years for reading assessments and for females during the schooling years for maths assessments. Fixed effects models yielded a significant negative association only with respect to the latter. The implication of these findings is that any improvement in skills outcomes that may accompany reductions in obesity prevalence may depend on whether interventions are general to overall health productivity or whether they are specific to dietary and exercise behaviours.

  20. Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute leads to sufficient bone tissue formation already after 3 months: histological and histomorphometrical analysis 3 and 6 months following human sinus cavity augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanaati, Shahram; Barbeck, Mike; Willershausen, Ines; Thimm, Benjamin; Stuebinger, Stefan; Korzinskas, Tadas; Obreja, Karina; Landes, Constantin; Kirkpatrick, Charles J; Sader, Robert A

    2013-12-01

    In this study the de novo bone formation capacity of a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite bone substitute was assessed 3 and 6 months after its insertion into the human sinus cavity. Sinus cavity augmentation was performed in a total of 14 patients (n = 7 implantation after 3 months; n = 7 implantation after 6 months) with severely atrophic maxillary bone. The specimens obtained after 3 and 6 months were analyzed histologically and histomorphometrically with special focus on bone metabolism within the residual bone and the augmented region. This study revealed that bone tissue formation started from the bone-biomaterial-interface and was directed into the most cranial parts of the augmented region. There was no statistically significant difference in new bone formation after 3 and 6 months (24.89 ± 10.22% vs 31.29 ± 2.29%), respectively. Within the limits of the present study and according to previously published data, implant insertion in regions augmented with this bone substitute material could be considered already after 3 months. Further clinical studies with bone substitute materials are necessary to validate these findings. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. FGF signaling via MAPK is required early and improves Activin A-induced definitive endoderm formation from human embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Lina, E-mail: linasui@vub.ac.be [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Mfopou, Josue K. [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Geens, Mieke; Sermon, Karen [Department of Embryology and Genetics, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Bouwens, Luc [Cell Differentiation Unit, Diabetes Research Center, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep study the FGF signaling role during DE specification in the context of hESCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DE differentiation from hESCs has an early dependence on FGF signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A serum-free DE protocol is developed based on the findings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DE cells showed potential to differentiate into pancreatic progenitor cells. -- Abstract: Considering their unlimited proliferation and pluripotency properties, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) constitute a promising resource applicable for cell replacement therapy. To facilitate this clinical translation, it is critical to study and understand the early stage of hESCs differentiation wherein germ layers are defined. In this study, we examined the role of FGF signaling in Activin A-induced definitive endoderm (DE) differentiation in the absence of supplemented animal serum. We found that activated FGF/MAPK signaling is required at the early time point of Activin A-induced DE formation. In addition, FGF activation increased the number of DE cells compared to Activin A alone. These DE cells could further differentiate into PDX1 and NKX6.1 positive pancreatic progenitors in vitro. We conclude that Activin A combined with FGF/MAPK signaling efficiently induce DE cells in the absence of serum. These findings improve our understanding of human endoderm formation, and constitute a step forward in the generation of clinical grade hESCs progenies for cell therapy.

  2. FGF signaling via MAPK is required early and improves Activin A-induced definitive endoderm formation from human embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui, Lina; Mfopou, Josué K.; Geens, Mieke; Sermon, Karen; Bouwens, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Deep study the FGF signaling role during DE specification in the context of hESCs. ► DE differentiation from hESCs has an early dependence on FGF signaling. ► A serum-free DE protocol is developed based on the findings. ► The DE cells showed potential to differentiate into pancreatic progenitor cells. -- Abstract: Considering their unlimited proliferation and pluripotency properties, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) constitute a promising resource applicable for cell replacement therapy. To facilitate this clinical translation, it is critical to study and understand the early stage of hESCs differentiation wherein germ layers are defined. In this study, we examined the role of FGF signaling in Activin A-induced definitive endoderm (DE) differentiation in the absence of supplemented animal serum. We found that activated FGF/MAPK signaling is required at the early time point of Activin A-induced DE formation. In addition, FGF activation increased the number of DE cells compared to Activin A alone. These DE cells could further differentiate into PDX1 and NKX6.1 positive pancreatic progenitors in vitro. We conclude that Activin A combined with FGF/MAPK signaling efficiently induce DE cells in the absence of serum. These findings improve our understanding of human endoderm formation, and constitute a step forward in the generation of clinical grade hESCs progenies for cell therapy.

  3. Introduction of the human proα1(I) collagen gene into proα1(I)-deficient Mov-13 mouse cells leads to formation of functional mouse-human hybrid type I collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnieke, A.; Dziadek, M.; Bateman, J.; Mascara, T.; Harbers, K.; Gelinas, R.; Jaenisch, R.

    1987-01-01

    The Mov-13 mouse strain carries a retroviral insertion in the proα1(I) collagen gene that prevents transcription of the gene. Cell lines derived from homozygous embryos do not express type I collagen although normal amounts of proα2 mRNA are synthesized. The authors have introduced genomic clones of either the human or mouse proα1(I) collagen gene into homozygous cell lines to assess whether the human or mouse proα1(I) chains can associate with the endogenous mouse proα2(I) chain to form stable type I collagen. The human gene under control of the simian virus 40 promoter was efficiently transcribed in the transfected cells. Protein analyses revealed that stable heterotrimers consisting of two human α1 chains and one mouse α2 chain were formed and that type I collagen was secreted by the transfected cells at normal rates. However, the electrophoretic migration of both α1(I) and α2(I) chains in the human-mouse hybrid molecules were retarded, compared to the α(I) chains in control mouse cells. Inhibition of the posttranslational hydroxylation of lysine and proline resulted in comigration of human and mouse α1 and α2 chains, suggesting that increased posttranslational modification caused the altered electrophoretic migration in the human-mouse hybrid molecules. Amino acid sequence differences between the mouse and human α chains may interfere with the normal rate of helix formation and increase the degree of posttranslational modifications similar to those observed in patients with lethal perinatal osteogenesis imperfecta. The Mov-13 mouse system should allow the authors to study the effect specific mutations introduced in transfected proα1(I) genes have on the synthesis, assembly, and function of collagen I

  4. The transcriptional regulatory network of Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 and its interaction with metabolic routes contributing to human body odor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzantny, Helena; Schröder, Jasmin; Strotmeier, Jasmin; Fredrich, Eugenie; Brune, Iris; Tauch, Andreas

    2012-06-15

    Lipophilic corynebacteria are involved in the generation of volatile odorous products in the process of human body odor formation by degrading skin lipids and specific odor precursors. Therefore, these bacteria represent appropriate model systems for the cosmetic industry to examine axillary malodor formation on the molecular level. To understand the transcriptional control of metabolic pathways involved in this process, the transcriptional regulatory network of the lipophilic axilla isolate Corynebacterium jeikeium K411 was reconstructed from the complete genome sequence. This bioinformatic approach detected a gene-regulatory repertoire of 83 candidate proteins, including 56 DNA-binding transcriptional regulators, nine two-component systems, nine sigma factors, and nine regulators with diverse physiological functions. Furthermore, a cross-genome comparison among selected corynebacterial species of the taxonomic cluster 3 revealed a common gene-regulatory repertoire of 44 transcriptional regulators, including the MarR-like regulator Jk0257, which is exclusively encoded in the genomes of this taxonomical subline. The current network reconstruction comprises 48 transcriptional regulators and 674 gene-regulatory interactions that were assigned to five interconnected functional modules. Most genes involved in lipid degradation are under the combined control of the global cAMP-sensing transcriptional regulator GlxR and the LuxR-family regulator RamA, probably reflecting the essential role of lipid degradation in C. jeikeium. This study provides the first genome-scale in silico analysis of the transcriptional regulation of metabolism in a lipophilic bacterium involved in the formation of human body odor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  6. Hypoxia causes IL-8 secretion, Charcot Leyden crystal formation, and suppression of corticosteroid-induced apoptosis in human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, L M; Cowburn, A S; Farahi, N; Deighton, J; Farrow, S N; Fiddler, C A; Juss, J K; Condliffe, A M; Chilvers, E R

    2017-06-01

    Inflamed environments are typically hypercellular, rich in pro-inflammatory cytokines, and profoundly hypoxic. While the effects of hypoxia on neutrophil longevity and function have been widely studied, little is known about the consequences of this stimulus on eosinophils. We sought to investigate the effects of hypoxia on several key aspects of eosinophil biology, namely secretion, survival, and their sensitivity to glucocorticosteroids (GCS), agents that normally induce eosinophil apoptosis. Eosinophils derived from patients with asthma/atopy or healthy controls were incubated under normoxia and hypoxia, with or without glucocorticoids. Activation was measured by flow cytometry, ELISA of cultured supernatants, and F-actin staining; apoptosis and efferocytosis by morphology and flow cytometry; and GCS efficacy by apoptosis assays and qPCR. Hypoxic incubation (3 kPa) caused (i) stabilization of HIF-2α and up-regulation of hypoxia-regulated genes including BNIP3 (BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3) and GLUT1 (glucose transporter 1); (ii) secretion of pre-formed IL-8, and Charcot Leyden crystal (CLC) formation, which was most evident in eosinophils derived from atopic and asthmatic donors; (iii) enhanced F-actin formation; (iv) marked prolongation of eosinophil lifespan (via a NF-κB and Class I PI3-kinase-dependent mechanism); and (v) complete abrogation of the normal pro-apoptotic effect of dexamethasone and fluticasone furoate. This latter effect was evident despite preservation of GCS-mediated gene transactivation under hypoxia. These data indicate that hypoxia promotes an eosinophil pro-inflammatory phenotype by enhancing eosinophil secretory function, delaying constitutive apoptosis, and importantly, antagonizing the normal pro-apoptotic effect of GCS. As eosinophils typically accumulate at sites that are relatively hypoxic, particularly during periods of inflammation, these findings may have important implications to understanding the

  7. The Impact of Media, Phylogenetic Classification, and E. coli Pathotypes on Biofilm Formation in Extraintestinal and Commensal E. coli From Humans and Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Daniel W; Klimavicz, James S; Cavender, Tia; Wannemuehler, Yvonne; Barbieri, Nicolle L; Nolan, Lisa K; Logue, Catherine M

    2018-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) include avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and are responsible for significant animal and human morbidity and mortality. This study sought to investigate if biofilm formation by ExPEC likely contributes to these losses since biofilms are associated with recurrent urinary tract infections, antibiotic resistance, and bacterial exchange of genetic material. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine differences in biofilm formation among a collection of ExPEC and to ascertain if there is a relationship between their ability to produce biofilms and their assignment to phylogenetic groups in three media types - M63, diluted TSB, and BHI. Our results suggest that ExPEC produce relatively different levels of biofilm formation in the media tested as APEC (70.4%, p = 0.0064) and NMEC (84.4%, p = 0.0093) isolates were poor biofilm formers in minimal medium M63 while UPEC isolates produced significantly higher ODs under nutrient-limited conditions with 25% of strains producing strong biofilms in diluted TSB ( p = 0.0204). Additionally, E. coli phylogenetic assignment using Clermont's original and revised typing scheme demonstrated significant differences among the phylogenetic groups in the different media. When the original phylogenetic group isolates previously typed as group D were phylogenetically typed under the revised scheme and examined, they showed substantial variation in their ability to form biofilms, which may explain the significant values of revised phylogenetic groups E and F in M63 ( p = 0.0291, p = 0.0024). Our data indicates that biofilm formation is correlated with phylogenetic classification and subpathotype or commensal grouping of E. coli strains.

  8. The Impact of Media, Phylogenetic Classification, and E. coli Pathotypes on Biofilm Formation in Extraintestinal and Commensal E. coli From Humans and Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W. Nielsen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC include avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC, and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC and are responsible for significant animal and human morbidity and mortality. This study sought to investigate if biofilm formation by ExPEC likely contributes to these losses since biofilms are associated with recurrent urinary tract infections, antibiotic resistance, and bacterial exchange of genetic material. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine differences in biofilm formation among a collection of ExPEC and to ascertain if there is a relationship between their ability to produce biofilms and their assignment to phylogenetic groups in three media types – M63, diluted TSB, and BHI. Our results suggest that ExPEC produce relatively different levels of biofilm formation in the media tested as APEC (70.4%, p = 0.0064 and NMEC (84.4%, p = 0.0093 isolates were poor biofilm formers in minimal medium M63 while UPEC isolates produced significantly higher ODs under nutrient-limited conditions with 25% of strains producing strong biofilms in diluted TSB (p = 0.0204. Additionally, E. coli phylogenetic assignment using Clermont’s original and revised typing scheme demonstrated significant differences among the phylogenetic groups in the different media. When the original phylogenetic group isolates previously typed as group D were phylogenetically typed under the revised scheme and examined, they showed substantial variation in their ability to form biofilms, which may explain the significant values of revised phylogenetic groups E and F in M63 (p = 0.0291, p = 0.0024. Our data indicates that biofilm formation is correlated with phylogenetic classification and subpathotype or commensal grouping of E. coli strains.

  9. The effects of topically applied glycolic acid and salicylic acid on ultraviolet radiation-induced erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhauser, Andrija; Wei, Rong-Rong; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Coelho, Sergio G; Kaidbey, Kays; Barton, Curtis; Takahashi, Kaoruko; Beer, Janusz Z; Miller, Sharon A; Hearing, Vincent J

    2009-07-01

    alpha-Hydroxy acids (alphaHAs) are reported to reduce signs of aging in the skin and are widely used cosmetic ingredients. Several studies suggest that alphaHA can increase the sensitivity of skin to ultraviolet radiation. More recently, beta-hydroxy acids (betaHAs), or combinations of alphaHA and betaHA have also been incorporated into antiaging skin care products. Concerns have also arisen about increased sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation following use of skin care products containing beta-HA. To determine whether topical treatment with glycolic acid, a representative alphaHA, or with salicylic acid, a betaHA, modifies the short-term effects of solar simulated radiation (SSR) in human skin. Fourteen subjects participated in this study. Three of the four test sites on the mid-back of each subject were treated daily Monday-Friday, for a total of 3.5 weeks, with glycolic acid (10%), salicylic acid (2%), or vehicle (control). The fourth site received no treatment. After the last treatment, each site was exposed to SSR, and shave biopsies from all four sites were obtained. The endpoints evaluated in this study were erythema (assessed visually and instrumentally), DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Treatment with glycolic acid resulted in increased sensitivity of human skin to SSR, measured as an increase in erythema, DNA damage and sunburn cell formation. Salicylic acid did not produce significant changes in any of these biomarkers. Short-term topical application of glycolic acid in a cosmetic formulation increased the sensitivity of human skin to SSR, while a comparable treatment with salicylic acid did not.

  10. Formation of reactive aldehydes (MDA, HHE, HNE) during the digestion of cod liver oil: comparison of human and porcine in vitro digestion models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullberg, Cecilia; Larsson, Karin; Carlsson, Nils-Gunnar; Comi, Irene; Scheers, Nathalie; Vegarud, Gerd; Undeland, Ingrid

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we investigated lipid oxidation of cod liver oil during gastrointestinal (GI) digestion using two types of in vitro digestion models. In the first type of model, we used human GI juices, while we used digestive enzymes and bile from porcine origin in the second type of model. Human and porcine models were matched with respect to factors important for lipolysis, using a standardized digestion protocol. The digests were analysed for reactive oxidation products: malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE), and 4-hydroxy-trans-2-hexenal (HHE) by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (LC/APCI-MS), and for free fatty acids (FFA) obtained during the digestion by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The formation of the oxidation products MDA, HHE, and HNE was low during the gastric digestion, however, it increased during the duodenal digestion. The formation of the oxidation products reached higher levels when digestive juices of human origin were used (60 μM of MDA, 0.96 μM of HHE, and 1.6 μM of HNE) compared to when using enzymes and bile of porcine origin (9.8, and 0.36 μM of MDA; 0.16, and 0.026 μM of HHE; 0.23, and 0.005 μM of HNE, respectively, in porcine models I and II). In all models, FFA release was only detected during the intestinal step, and reached up to 31% of total fatty acids (FA). The findings in this work may be of importance when designing oxidation oriented lipid digestion studies.

  11. Anizotropy characteristics of the left ventricle false chordae tendineae as one of varieties of myoendocardial formations of the human heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrylyak, M. S.; Malyk, Yu. Yu.; Tsyhykalo, O. V.; Semeniuk, T. O.; Penteleichuk, N. P.; Burkovets, D. N.; Yermolenko, S. B.

    2018-01-01

    The morphological and anizotropy characteristics of the left ventricle false chordae tendineae of human heart in the aspect of their anisotropic properties using spectroscopic-polarization methods was studied. There are given the results of statistical correlation structure of the spectral dependence of the two-dimensional Mueller matrix elements and phase shifts of histological sections of different morphological structure and physiological state. The relationship between the distribution of orientations of the optical axes birefringent miozyn fibrils with a set of statistical moments that characterize the distributions of Mueller matrix elements in different spectral ranges and half-width corresponding autocorrelation functions are established.

  12. Inconsistent formation and nonfunction of insulin-positive cells from pancreatic endoderm derived from human embryonic stem cells in athymic nude rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveyenko, Aleksey V; Georgia, Senta; Bhushan, Anil; Butler, Peter C

    2010-11-01

    Embryonic stem cell therapy has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to restore β-cell mass and function in T1DM. Recently, a group from Novocell (now ViaCyte) reported successful development of glucose-responsive islet-like structures after implantation of pancreatic endoderm (PE) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into immune-deficient mice. Our objective was to determine whether implantation of hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm from Novocell into athymic nude rats results in development of viable glucose-responsive pancreatic endocrine tissue. Athymic nude rats were implanted with PE derived from hESC either via implantation into the epididymal fat pads or by subcutaneous implantation into TheraCyte encapsulation devices for 20 wk. Blood glucose, weight, and human insulin/C-peptide secretion were monitored by weekly blood draws. Graft β-cell function was assessed by a glucose tolerance test, and graft morphology was assessed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. At 20 wk postimplantation, epididymal fat-implanted PE progressed to develop islet-like structures in 50% of implants, with a mean β-cell fractional area of 0.8 ± 0.3%. Human C-peptide and insulin were detectable, but at very low levels (C-peptide = 50 ± 26 pmol/l and insulin = 15 ± 7 pmol/l); however, there was no increase in human C-peptide/insulin levels after glucose challenge. There was no development of viable pancreatic tissue or meaningful secretory function when human PE was implanted in the TheraCyte encapsulation devices. These data confirm that islet-like structures develop from hESC differentiated to PE by the protocol developed by NovoCell. However, the extent of endocrine cell formation and secretory function is not yet sufficient to be clinically relevant.

  13. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  14. Capsid protein VP4 of human rhinovirus induces membrane permeability by the formation of a size-selective multimeric pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Panjwani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-enveloped viruses must deliver their viral genome across a cell membrane without the advantage of membrane fusion. The mechanisms used to achieve this remain poorly understood. Human rhinovirus, a frequent cause of the common cold, is a non-enveloped virus of the picornavirus family, which includes other significant pathogens such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus. During picornavirus cell entry, the small myristoylated capsid protein VP4 is released from the virus, interacts with the cell membrane and is implicated in the delivery of the viral RNA genome into the cytoplasm to initiate replication. In this study, we have produced recombinant C-terminal histidine-tagged human rhinovirus VP4 and shown it can induce membrane permeability in liposome model membranes. Dextran size-exclusion studies, chemical crosslinking and electron microscopy demonstrated that VP4 forms a multimeric membrane pore, with a channel size consistent with transfer of the single-stranded RNA genome. The membrane permeability induced by recombinant VP4 was influenced by pH and was comparable to permeability induced by infectious virions. These findings present a molecular mechanism for the involvement of VP4 in cell entry and provide a model system which will facilitate exploration of VP4 as a novel antiviral target for the picornavirus family.

  15. Contribution of the 7β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Ruminococcus gnavus N53 to ursodeoxycholic acid formation in the human colon[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ja-Young; Arai, Hisashi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Fukiya, Satoru; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Bile acid composition in the colon is determined by bile acid flow in the intestines, the population of bile acid-converting bacteria, and the properties of the responsible bacterial enzymes. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is regarded as a chemopreventive beneficial bile acid due to its low hydrophobicity. However, it is a minor constituent of human bile acids. Here, we characterized an UDCA-producing bacterium, N53, isolated from human feces. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified this isolate as Ruminococcus gnavus, a novel UDCA-producer. The forward reaction that produces UDCA from 7-oxo-lithocholic acid was observed to have a growth-dependent conversion rate of 90–100% after culture in GAM broth containing 1 mM 7-oxo-lithocholic acid, while the reverse reaction was undetectable. The gene encoding 7β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7β-HSDH), which facilitates the UDCA-producing reaction, was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Characterization of the purified 7β-HSDH revealed that the kcat/Km value was about 55-fold higher for the forward reaction than for the reverse reaction, indicating that the enzyme favors the UDCA-producing reaction. As R. gnavus is a common, core bacterium of the human gut microbiota, these results suggest that this bacterium plays a pivotal role in UDCA formation in the colon. PMID:23729502

  16. Contribution of the 7β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Ruminococcus gnavus N53 to ursodeoxycholic acid formation in the human colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ja-Young; Arai, Hisashi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Fukiya, Satoru; Wada, Masaru; Yokota, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Bile acid composition in the colon is determined by bile acid flow in the intestines, the population of bile acid-converting bacteria, and the properties of the responsible bacterial enzymes. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is regarded as a chemopreventive beneficial bile acid due to its low hydrophobicity. However, it is a minor constituent of human bile acids. Here, we characterized an UDCA-producing bacterium, N53, isolated from human feces. 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified this isolate as Ruminococcus gnavus, a novel UDCA-producer. The forward reaction that produces UDCA from 7-oxo-lithocholic acid was observed to have a growth-dependent conversion rate of 90-100% after culture in GAM broth containing 1 mM 7-oxo-lithocholic acid, while the reverse reaction was undetectable. The gene encoding 7β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (7β-HSDH), which facilitates the UDCA-producing reaction, was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Characterization of the purified 7β-HSDH revealed that the kcat/Km value was about 55-fold higher for the forward reaction than for the reverse reaction, indicating that the enzyme favors the UDCA-producing reaction. As R. gnavus is a common, core bacterium of the human gut microbiota, these results suggest that this bacterium plays a pivotal role in UDCA formation in the colon.

  17. TGF-beta1 inhibits Cx43 expression and formation of functional syncytia in cultured smooth muscle cells from human detrusor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Jochen; Heinrich, Marco; Schwalenberg, Thilo; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe

    2009-02-01

    Human detrusor smooth muscle cells (hBSMCs) are coupled by connexin 43 (Cx43)-positive gap junctions to form functional syncytia. Gap junctional communication likely is necessary for synchronised detrusor contractions and is supposed to be altered in voiding disturbances. Other authors have shown that the pleiotropic cytokine TGF-beta1 upregulates Cx43 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells. In this study, we examined the TGF-beta1 effects on Cx43 expression in cultured hBSMCs. hBSMC cultures, established from patients undergoing cystectomy, were treated with recombinant human TGF-beta1. Cx43 expression was then examined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunocytochemistry. Dye-injection experiments were used to study the size of functional syncytia. Dye-coupling experiments revealed stable formation of functional syncytia in passaged cell cultures (P1-P4). Stimulation with TGF-beta1 led to significant reduction of Cx43 immunoreactivity and coupling. Cx43 protein expression was significantly downregulated and Cx43 mRNA was only 30% of the control level. Interestingly, low phosphorylation species of Cx43 were particularly affected. Our experiments demonstrated a significant down regulation of connexin 43 by TGF-beta1 in cultured hBSMCs. These findings support the view that TGF-beta1 is involved in the pathophysiology of urinary bladder dysfunction.

  18. The relationship between level of processing and hippocampal-cortical functional connectivity during episodic memory formation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Björn H; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Wimber, Maria; Fenker, Daniela B; Zierhut, Kathrin C; Seidenbecher, Constanze I; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Walter, Henrik; Düzel, Emrah; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2013-02-01

    New episodic memory traces represent a record of the ongoing neocortical processing engaged during memory formation (encoding). Thus, during encoding, deep (semantic) processing typically establishes more distinctive and retrievable memory traces than does shallow (perceptual) processing, as assessed by later episodic memory tests. By contrast, the hippocampus appears to play a processing-independent role in encoding, because hippocampal lesions impair encoding regardless of level of processing. Here, we clarified the neural relationship between processing and encoding by examining hippocampal-cortical connectivity during deep and shallow encoding. Participants studied words during functional magnetic resonance imaging and freely recalled these words after distraction. Deep study processing led to better recall than shallow study processing. For both levels of processing, successful encoding elicited activations of bilateral hippocampus and left prefrontal cortex, and increased functional connectivity between left hippocampus and bilateral medial prefrontal, cingulate and extrastriate cortices. Successful encoding during deep processing was additionally associated with increased functional connectivity between left hippocampus and bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and right temporoparietal junction. In the shallow encoding condition, on the other hand, pronounced functional connectivity increases were observed between the right hippocampus and the frontoparietal attention network activated during shallow study processing. Our results further specify how the hippocampus coordinates recording of ongoing neocortical activity into long-term memory, and begin to provide a neural explanation for the typical advantage of deep over shallow study processing for later episodic memory. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Association between in vivo bone formation and ex vivo migratory capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K.; Zaher, Walid; Larsen, Kenneth Hauberg

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a clinical need for developing systemic transplantation protocols for use of human skeletal stem cells (also known bone marrow stromal stem cells) (hBMSC) in tissue regeneration. In systemic transplantation studies, only a limited number of hBMSC home to injured tissues...... populations derived from telomerized hBMSC (hBMSC-TERT) with variable ability to form heterotopic bone when implanted subcutaneously in immune deficient mice. In vitro transwell migration assay was used and the in vivo homing ability of transplanted hBMSC to bone fractures in mice was visualized...... suggesting that only a subpopulation of hBMSC possesses "homing" capacity. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that a subpopulation of hBMSC defined by ability to form heterotopic bone in vivo, is capable of homing to injured bone. METHODS: We tested ex vivo and in vivo homing capacity of a number of clonal cell...

  20. Human recombinant cementum attachment protein (hrPTPLa/CAP) promotes hydroxyapatite crystal formation in vitro and bone healing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Gonzalo; Arenas, Jesús; Romo, Enrique; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Alvarez, Marco; Narayanan, A Sampath; Velázquez, Ulises; Mercado, Gabriela; Arzate, Higinio

    2014-12-01

    Cementum extracellular matrix is similar to other mineralized tissues; however, this unique tissue contains molecules only present in cementum. A cDNA of these molecules, cementum attachment protein (hrPTPLa/CAP) was cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. This molecule is an alternative splicing of protein tyrosine phosphatase-like A (PTPLa). In this study, we wanted to determine the structural and functional characteristics of this protein. Our results indicate that hrPTPLa/CAP contains a 43.2% α-helix, 8.9% β-sheet, 2% β-turn and 45.9% random coil secondary structure. Dynamic light scattering shows that this molecule has a size distribution of 4.8 nm and aggregates as an estimated mass of 137 kDa species. AFM characterization and FE-SEM studies indicate that this protein self-assembles into nanospheres with sizes ranging from 7.0 to 27 nm in diameter. Functional studies demonstrate that hrPTPLa/CAP promotes hydroxyapatite crystal nucleation: EDS analysis revealed that hrPTPLa/CAP-induced crystals had a 1.59 ± 0.06 Ca/P ratio. Further confirmation with MicroRaman spectrometry and TEM confirm the presence of hydroxyapatite. In vivo studies using critical-size defects in rat cranium showed that hrPTPLa/CAP promoted 73% ± 2.19% and 87% ± 1.97% new bone formation at 4 and 8 weeks respectively. Although originally identified in cementum, PTPLa/CAP is very effective at inducing bone repair and healing and therefore this novel molecule has a great potential to be used for mineralized tissue bioengineering and tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of Knoop and Vickers surface microhardness and transverse microradiography for the study of early caries lesion formation in human and bovine enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F; Lynch, R J M

    2014-07-01

    The aims of the present laboratory study were twofold: a) to investigate the suitability of Knoop and Vickers surface microhardness (SMH) in comparison to transverse microradiography (TMR) to investigate early enamel caries lesion formation; b) to compare the kinetics of caries lesion initiation and progression between human and bovine enamel. Specimens (90×bovine and 90×human enamel) were divided into six groups (demineralization times of 8/16/24/32/40/48h) of 15 per enamel type and demineralized using a partially saturated lactic acid solution. SMH was measured before and after demineralization and changes in indentation length (ΔIL) calculated. Lesions were characterized using TMR. Data were analyzed (two-way ANOVA) and Pearson correlation coefficients calculated. ΔIL increased with increasing demineralization times but plateaued after 40h, whereas lesion depth (L) and integrated mineral loss (ΔZ) increased almost linearly throughout. No differences between Knoop and Vickers SMH in their ability to measure enamel demineralization were observed as both correlated strongly. Overall, ΔIL correlated strongly with ΔZ and L but only moderately with the degree of surface zone mineralization, whereas ΔZ and L correlated strongly. Bovine demineralized faster than human enamel (all techniques). Lesions in bovine formed faster than in human enamel, although the resulting lesions were almost indistinguishable in their mineral distribution characteristics. Early caries lesion demineralization can be sufficiently studied by SMH, but its limitations on the assessment of the mineral status of more demineralized lesions must be considered. Ideally, complementary techniques to assess changes in both physical and chemical lesion characteristics would be employed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface modification of nano-silica on the ligament advanced reinforcement system for accelerated bone formation: primary human osteoblasts testing in vitro and animal testing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Jia; Sun, Jiashu; Li, Yuzhuo; Huang, Deyong; Long, Yun-Ze; Zheng, Wenfu; Chen, Shiyi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-05-07

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ∼21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction.

  3. Optimized formation of detergent micelles of beta-carotene and retinal production using recombinant human beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Hee; Kim, Yeong-Su; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2008-01-01

    The formation of beta-carotene detergent micelles and their conversion into retinal by recombinant human beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase was optimized under aqueous conditions. Toluene was the most hydrophobic among the organic solvents tested; thus, it was used to dissolve beta-carotene, which is a hydrophobic compound. Tween 80 was selected as the detergent because it supported the highest level of retinal production among all of the detergents tested. The maximum production of retinal was achieved in detergent micelles containing 200 mg/L of beta-carotene and 2.4% (w/v) Tween 80. Under these conditions, the recombinant enzyme produced 97 mg/L of retinal after 16 h with a conversion yield of 48.5% (w/w). The amount of retinal produced, which is the highest ever reported, is a result of the ability of our system to dissolve large amounts of beta-carotene.

  4. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, J.C.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.A.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. (Wyeth); (MBL)

    2008-06-03

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca{sup 2+} and two Cu{sup 2+} ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Factor VIII: Implications for the Formation of the Factor IXa-Factor VIIIa Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi Ki Ngo,J.; Huang, M.; Roth, D.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2008-01-01

    Factor VIII is a procofactor that plays a critical role in blood coagulation, and is missing or defective in hemophilia A. We determined the X-ray crystal structure of B domain-deleted human factor VIII. This protein is composed of five globular domains and contains one Ca(2+) and two Cu(2+) ions. The three homologous A domains form a triangular heterotrimer where the A1 and A3 domains serve as the base and interact with the C2 and C1 domains, respectively. The structurally homologous C1 and C2 domains reveal membrane binding features. Based on biochemical studies, a model of the factor IXa-factor VIIIa complex was constructed by in silico docking. Factor IXa wraps across the side of factor VIII, and an extended interface spans the factor VIII heavy and light chains. This model provides insight into the activation of factor VIII and the interaction of factor VIIIa with factor IXa on the membrane surface.

  6. The Impact of Environmental Design on Doffing Personal Protective Equipment in a Healthcare Environment: A Formative Human Factors Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihey, Tracey A; Gelmi, Stefano; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Hall, Trevor N T

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the impact of environmental design on doffing personal protective equipment in a simulated healthcare environment. METHODS A mixed-methods approach was used that included human-factors usability testing and qualitative questionnaire responses. A patient room and connecting anteroom were constructed for testing purposes. This experimental doffing area was designed to overcome the environmental failures identified in a previous study and was not constructed based on any generalizable hospital standard. RESULTS In total, 72 healthcare workers from Ontario, Canada, took part in the study and tested the simulated doffing area. The following environmental design changes were tested and were deemed effective: increasing prominence of color-coded zones; securing disinfectant wipes and hand sanitizer; outlining disposal bins locations; providing mirrors to detect possible contamination; providing hand rails to assist with doffing; and restricting the space to doff. Further experimentation and iterative design are required with regard to several important features: positioning the disposal bins for safety, decreasing the risk of contamination and user accessibility; optimal positioning of mirrors for safety; communication within the team; and positioning the secondary team member for optimal awareness. Additional design suggestions also emerged during this study, and they require future investigation. CONCLUSIONS This study highlights the importance of the environment on doffing personal protective equipment in a healthcare setting. Iterative testing and modification of the design of the environment (doffing area) are important to enhancing healthcare worker safety. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:712-717.

  7. Region-specific chromatin decondensation and micronucleus formation induced by 5-azacytidine in human TIG-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, T; Yamamoto, K; Miura, K F; Sofuni, T

    2004-01-01

    A human diploid lung fibroblast cell strain, TIG-7, has a heteromorphic chromosome 15 with an extra short arm carrying a homogeneously staining region (15p+hsr). We demonstrated previously that the 15p+hsr consists of an inactive and G+C-rich rDNA cluster characterized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and various chromosome banding techniques. Thus, it was suggested that the region could contain highly methylated DNA. To observe methylation status on the target region directly under the microscope, we used a demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-azaC), to induce decondensation of the chromatin containing methylated DNA. At 24 h after treatment with 0.5 microM 5-azaC, marked decondensation of the 15p+hsr was observed in almost all of the metaphases. Furthermore, we observed micronuclei, which were equivalent to the rDNA of the 15p+hsr demonstrated by FISH in the same preparation. In contrast, the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC) preferentially induced 15p+hsr-negative micronuclei. These findings indicated that chromatin decondensation and subsequent DNA strand breakage induced by the demethylating effect of 5-azaC led specifically to 15p+hsr-positive micronuclei. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Antioxidants inhibit SAA formation and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in a human cell model of alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreafico, Adriano; Millucci, Lia; Ghezzi, Lorenzo; Geminiani, Michela; Braconi, Daniela; Amato, Loredana; Chellini, Federico; Frediani, Bruno; Moretti, Elena; Collodel, Giulia; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2013-09-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an ultra-rare autosomal recessive disease that currently lacks an appropriate therapy. Recently we provided experimental evidence that AKU is a secondary serum amyloid A (SAA)-based amyloidosis. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the use of antioxidants to inhibit SAA amyloid and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in AKU. We adopted a human chondrocytic cell AKU model to evaluate the anti-amyloid capacity of a set of antioxidants that had previously been shown to counteract ochronosis in a serum AKU model. Amyloid presence was evaluated by Congo red staining. Homogentisic acid-induced SAA production and pro-inflammatory cytokine release (overexpressed in AKU patients) were evaluated by ELISA and multiplex systems, respectively. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by means of a fluorescence-based assay. Our AKU model allowed us to prove the efficacy of ascorbic acid combined with N-acetylcysteine, taurine, phytic acid and lipoic acid in significantly inhibiting SAA production, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and membrane lipid peroxidation. All the tested antioxidant compounds were able to reduce the production of amyloid and may be the basis for establishing new therapies for AKU amyloidosis.

  9. Radiosensitivity of CD4 and CD8 positive human T lymphocytes by an in vitro colony formation assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nori; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Akiyama, Mitoshi.

    1989-12-01

    The recent development of an in vitro lymphocyte colony assay provides a new opportunity to examine possible variations in human radiosensitivity using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) in place of the hitherto used skin fibroblast assay. Our recent study showed that most of the colonies consisted of lymphocytes bearing CD4 or CD8 antigens. Since the fraction of CD4 + and CD8 + cells in PBL differs among individuals, it was suspected that individual radiosensitivity might be biased by the different subset frequencies if the dose-survival curves of the CD4 + and CD8 + cells differed. In the present study, CD4 + lymphocytes (helper/inducer T cells) and CD8 + lymphocytes (suppressor/cytotoxic T cells) were isolated from PBL and their dose-survival curves were determined. The results showed that the D 10 (the dose required to reduce the surviving fraction to 10 %) was quite similar for these two types of cells (3.13 ± 0.10 Gy [mean ±SD] for CD4 + , 3.34 ± 0.50 Gy for CD8 + and 3.07 ± 0.05 Gy for the unsorted cells), supporting the use of a whole PBL population for screening of individuals with altered radiosensitivity. (author)

  10. Kinetics of the formation of a G2 block from tritiated thymidine in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, A.; Bagwell, C.B.; Irvin, G.L.; Jensen, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Flow cytometry (FCM) was used to monitor the radiation effects promoted by incorporated tritiated thymidine ( 3 H-TdR) on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes stained with propidium iodide (PI). Lymphocyte microcultures were continuously labeled or pulse-labeled for various periods of time with different 3 H-TdR concentrations. Two types of DNA histogram analyses were performed on unperturbed and 3 H]TdR perturbed lymphocytes. The data analyses consisted of statistical analyses between averaged groups of histograms (nonparametric analysis) and cell cycle analyses (parametric analysis) to determine the percentages of cells in G0 + G1, S and G2 + M. The results showed that (a) 3 H-TdR when added to proliferating lymphocytes under certain conditions (both short-term continuous and pulse-labeling) caused a highly significant increase in the proportion of tetraploid (4C) cells by FCM, (b) the increase in the proportion of 4C cells represented a block in G2 and (c) the relative increase in the percentage of 4C cells was proportional to 3 H-TdR incorporation which was proportional to labeling time and concentration. Therefore, it was concluded that short labeling times be used to minimize adverse radiation effects when 3 H-TdR is used to assay substances affecting lymphocyte proliferation or in the estimation of cell cycle time

  11. Fate of Chloromethanes in the Atmospheric Environment: Implications for Human Health, Ozone Formation and Depletion, and Global Warming Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien

    2017-09-21

    Among the halogenated hydrocarbons, chloromethanes (i.e., methyl chloride, CH₃Cl; methylene chloride, CH₂Cl₂; chloroform, CHCl₃; and carbon tetrachloride, CCl₄) play a vital role due to their extensive uses as solvents and chemical intermediates. This article aims to review their main chemical/physical properties and commercial/industrial uses, as well as the environment and health hazards posed by them and their toxic decomposition products. The environmental properties (including atmospheric lifetime, radiative efficiency, ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, photochemical ozone creation potential, and surface mixing ratio) of these chlorinated methanes are also reviewed. In addition, this paper further discusses their atmospheric fates and human health implications because they are apt to reside in the lower atmosphere when released into the environment. According to the atmospheric degradation mechanism, their toxic degradation products in the troposphere include hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon monoxide (CO), chlorine (Cl₂), formyl chloride (HCOCl), carbonyl chloride (COCl₂), and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). Among them, COCl₂ (also called phosgene) is a powerful irritating gas, which is easily hydrolyzed or thermally decomposed to form hydrogen chloride.

  12. Fate of Chloromethanes in the Atmospheric Environment: Implications for Human Health, Ozone Formation and Depletion, and Global Warming Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien

    2017-01-01

    Among the halogenated hydrocarbons, chloromethanes (i.e., methyl chloride, CH3Cl; methylene chloride, CH2Cl2; chloroform, CHCl3; and carbon tetrachloride, CCl4) play a vital role due to their extensive uses as solvents and chemical intermediates. This article aims to review their main chemical/physical properties and commercial/industrial uses, as well as the environment and health hazards posed by them and their toxic decomposition products. The environmental properties (including atmospheric lifetime, radiative efficiency, ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, photochemical ozone creation potential, and surface mixing ratio) of these chlorinated methanes are also reviewed. In addition, this paper further discusses their atmospheric fates and human health implications because they are apt to reside in the lower atmosphere when released into the environment. According to the atmospheric degradation mechanism, their toxic degradation products in the troposphere include hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon monoxide (CO), chlorine (Cl2), formyl chloride (HCOCl), carbonyl chloride (COCl2), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Among them, COCl2 (also called phosgene) is a powerful irritating gas, which is easily hydrolyzed or thermally decomposed to form hydrogen chloride. PMID:29051455

  13. A new approach for generating bispecific antibodies based on a common light chain format and the stable architecture of human immunoglobulin G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardis, Camilla; Hendriks, Linda J A; Poirier, Emilie; Arvinte, Tudor; Gros, Piet; Bakker, Alexander B H; de Kruif, John

    2017-09-01

    Bispecific antibodies combine two different antigen-binding sites in a single molecule, enabling more specific targeting, novel mechanisms of action, and higher clinical efficacies. Although they have the potential to outperform conventional monoclonal antibodies, many bispecific antibodies have issues regarding production, stability, and pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we describe a new approach for generating bispecific antibodies using a common light chain format and exploiting the stable architecture of human immunoglobulin G 1 We used iterative experimental validation and computational modeling to identify multiple Fc variant pairs that drive efficient heterodimerization of the antibody heavy chains. Accelerated stability studies enabled selection of one Fc variant pair dubbed "DEKK" consisting of substitutions L351D and L368E in one heavy chain combined with L351K and T366K in the other. Solving the crystal structure of the DEKK Fc region at a resolution of 2.3 Å enabled detailed analysis of the interactions inducing CH3 interface heterodimerization. Local shifts in the IgG backbone accommodate the introduction of lysine side chains that form stabilizing salt-bridge interactions with substituted and native residues in the opposite chain. Overall, the CH3 domain adapted to these shifts at the interface, yielding a stable Fc conformation very similar to that in wild-type IgG. Using the DEKK format, we generated the bispecific antibody MCLA-128, targeting human EGF receptors 2 and 3. MCLA-128 could be readily produced and purified at industrial scale with a standard mammalian cell culture platform and a routine purification protocol. Long-term accelerated stability assays confirmed that MCLA-128 is highly stable and has excellent biophysical characteristics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Effect of Cell Sheet Manipulation Techniques on the Expression of Collagen Type II and Stress Fiber Formation in Human Chondrocyte Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongin, Sopita; Waikakul, Saranatra; Chotiyarnwong, Pojchong; Siriwatwechakul, Wanwipa; Viravaidya-Pasuwat, Kwanchanok

    2018-03-01

    Cell sheet technology is applied to human articular chondrocytes to construct a tissue-like structure as an alternative treatment for cartilage defect. The effect of a gelatin manipulator, as a cell sheet transfer system, on the quality of the chondrocyte sheets was investigated. The changes of important chondrogenic markers and stress fibers, resulting from the cell sheet manipulation, were also studied. The chondrocyte cell sheets were constructed with patient-derived chondrocytes using a temperature-responsive polymer and a gelatin manipulator as a transfer carrier. The properties of the cell sheets, including sizes, expression levels of collagen type II and I, and the localization of the stress fibers, were assessed and compared with those of the cell sheets harvested without the gelatin manipulator. Using the gelatin manipulator, the original size of the chondrocyte cell sheets was retained with abundant stress fibers, but with a decrease in the expression of collagen type II. Without the gelatin manipulator, although the cell shrinkage occurred, the cell sheet with suppressed stress fiber formation showed significantly higher levels of collagen type II. These results support our observations that stress fiber formation in chondrocyte cell sheets affected the production of chondrogenic markers. These densely packed tissue-like structures possessed a good chondrogenic activity, indicating their potential for use in autologous chondrocyte implantation to treat cartilage defects.

  15. Recognition of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells is mediated by dectin-2 and results in formation of extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loures, Flávio V; Röhm, Marc; Lee, Chrono K; Santos, Evelyn; Wang, Jennifer P; Specht, Charles A; Calich, Vera L G; Urban, Constantin F; Levitz, Stuart M

    2015-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) were initially considered as critical for innate immunity to viruses. However, our group has shown that pDCs bind to and inhibit the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae and that depletion of pDCs renders mice hypersusceptible to experimental aspergillosis. In this study, we examined pDC receptors contributing to hyphal recognition and downstream events in pDCs stimulated by A. fumigatus hyphae. Our data show that Dectin-2, but not Dectin-1, participates in A. fumigatus hyphal recognition, TNF-α and IFN-α release, and antifungal activity. Moreover, Dectin-2 acts in cooperation with the FcRγ chain to trigger signaling responses. In addition, using confocal and electron microscopy we demonstrated that the interaction between pDCs and A. fumigatus induced the formation of pDC extracellular traps (pETs) containing DNA and citrullinated histone H3. These structures closely resembled those of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). The microarray analysis of the pDC transcriptome upon A. fumigatus infection also demonstrated up-regulated expression of genes associated with apoptosis as well as type I interferon-induced genes. Thus, human pDCs directly recognize A. fumigatus hyphae via Dectin-2; this interaction results in cytokine release and antifungal activity. Moreover, hyphal stimulation of pDCs triggers a distinct pattern of pDC gene expression and leads to pET formation.

  16. Recognition of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae by human plasmacytoid dendritic cells is mediated by dectin-2 and results in formation of extracellular traps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio V Loures

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs were initially considered as critical for innate immunity to viruses. However, our group has shown that pDCs bind to and inhibit the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae and that depletion of pDCs renders mice hypersusceptible to experimental aspergillosis. In this study, we examined pDC receptors contributing to hyphal recognition and downstream events in pDCs stimulated by A. fumigatus hyphae. Our data show that Dectin-2, but not Dectin-1, participates in A. fumigatus hyphal recognition, TNF-α and IFN-α release, and antifungal activity. Moreover, Dectin-2 acts in cooperation with the FcRγ chain to trigger signaling responses. In addition, using confocal and electron microscopy we demonstrated that the interaction between pDCs and A. fumigatus induced the formation of pDC extracellular traps (pETs containing DNA and citrullinated histone H3. These structures closely resembled those of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. The microarray analysis of the pDC transcriptome upon A. fumigatus infection also demonstrated up-regulated expression of genes associated with apoptosis as well as type I interferon-induced genes. Thus, human pDCs directly recognize A. fumigatus hyphae via Dectin-2; this interaction results in cytokine release and antifungal activity. Moreover, hyphal stimulation of pDCs triggers a distinct pattern of pDC gene expression and leads to pET formation.

  17. The effect of cationically-modified phosphorylcholine polymers on human osteoblasts in vitro and their effect on bone formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Jonathan M; Habib, Mariam; Ma, Bingkui; Brooks, Roger A; Best, Serena M; Lewis, Andrew L; Rushton, Neil; Bonfield, William

    2017-08-17

    The effect of introducing cationic charge into phosphorylcholine (PC)-based polymers has been investigated in this study with a view to using these materials as coatings to improve bone formation and osseointegration at the bone-implant interface. PC-based polymers, which have been used in a variety of medical devices to improve biocompatibility, are associated with low protein adsorption resulting in reduced complement activation, inflammatory response and cell adhesion. However, in some applications, such as orthopaedics, good integration between the implant and bone is needed to allow the distribution of loading stresses and a bioactive response is required. It has previously been shown that the incorporation of cationic charge into PC-based polymers may increase protein adsorption that stimulates subsequent cell adhesion. In this paper, the effect of cationic charge in PC-based polymers on human osteoblasts (HObs) in vitro and the effect of these polymers on bone formation in the rat tibia was assessed. Increasing PC positive surface charge increased HOb cell adhesion and stimulated increased cell differentiation and the production of calcium phosphate deposits. However, when implanted in bone these materials were at best biotolerant, stimulating the production of fibrous tissue and areas of loosely associated matrix (LAM) around the implant. Their development, as formulated in this study, as bone interfacing implant coatings is therefore not warranted.

  18. Mechanisms of virus immune evasion lead to development from chronic inflammation to cancer formation associated with human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senba, Masachika; Mori, Naoki

    2012-10-02

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has developed strategies to escape eradication by innate and adaptive immunity. Immune response evasion has been considered an important aspect of HPV persistence, which is the main contributing factor leading to HPV-related cancers. HPV-induced cancers expressing viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are potentially recognized by the immune system. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are patrolled by natural killer cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, respectively. This system of recognition is a main target for the strategies of immune evasion deployed by viruses. The viral immune evasion proteins constitute useful tools to block defined stages of the MHC class I presentation pathway, and in this way HPV avoids the host immune response. The long latency period from initial infection to persistence signifies that HPV evolves mechanisms to escape the immune response. It has now been established that there are oncogenic mechanisms by which E7 binds to and degrades tumor suppressor Rb, while E6 binds to and inactivates tumor suppressor p53. Therefore, interaction of p53 and pRb proteins can give rise to an increased immortalization and genomic instability. Overexpression of NF-κB in cervical and penile cancers suggests that NF-κB activation is a key modulator in driving chronic inflammation to cancer. HPV oncogene-mediated suppression of NF-κB activity contributes to HPV escape from the immune system. This review focuses on the diverse mechanisms of the virus immune evasion with HPV that leads to chronic inflammation and cancer.

  19. Antibody formation in pregnant women with maternal-neonatal human platelet antigen mismatch from a hospital in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Hua Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT is a clinical syndrome that resembles hemolytic disease of the newborn, affecting the platelets only. The thrombocytopenia results from the maternal alloantibodies reacting with specific human platelet antigens (HPAs on the fetal platelets. Forty-four maternal plasma samples were screened for platelet alloantibodies using qualitative solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA commercial kit (LIFECODES Pakplus, Hologic Gen-Probe GTI Diagnostics, Waukesha, WI, USA, and both the maternal and the corresponding cord blood samples were genotyped (LIFECODES ThromboType, Hologic Gen-Probe GTI Diagnostics, Waukesha, WI, USA. HPA genotyping results correlated with the genetic frequencies in the Taiwan population. A total of 34 newborns (77.3% had partial HPA genotyping mismatches with the corresponding mothers. The most common partial mismatches between mothers and neonates in HPA genotypes were 13 (29.5% in both HPA-3b and HPA-15a, followed by 12 (27.3% in HPA-15b, and 8 (18.2% in HPA-3a. The frequencies of homozygotic mother with heterozygotic neonate were 15.9% in both HPA-3a and HPA-15b, 9.1% in HPA-15a, 6.8% in HPA-3b, and 2.3% in both HPA-2a and HPA-6a. In this study, maternal HPA antibodies were found in five samples, whereas HLA class I antibodies were found in seven maternal plasma samples from the antibody screen. The results from this study have demonstrated that HPA mismatch is not the main cause for the production of HPA alloantibodies.

  20. Determination of atenolol in human plasma using ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted in situ solvent formation microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeb, Mohsen; Farahani, Hadi; Papan, Mohammad Kazem

    2016-06-01

    An efficient analytical method called ionic-liquid-based ultrasound-assisted in situ solvent formation microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography was developed for the determination of atenolol in human plasma. A hydrophobic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate) was formed by the addition of a hydrophilic ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate) to a sample solution containing an ion-pairing agent during microextraction. The analyte was extracted into the ionic liquid phase while the microextraction solvent was dispersed throughout the sample by utilizing ultrasound. The sample was then centrifuged, and the extracting phase retracted into the microsyringe and injected to liquid chromatography. After optimization, the calibration curve showed linearity in the range of 2-750 ng/mL with the regression coefficient corresponding to 0.998. The limits of detection (S/N = 3) and quantification (S/N = 10) were 0.5 and 2 ng/mL, respectively. A reasonable relative recovery range of 90-96.7% and satisfactory intra-assay (4.8-5.1%, n = 6) and interassay (5.0-5.6%, n = 9) precision along with a substantial sample clean-up demonstrated good performance of the procedure. It was applied for the determination of atenolol in human plasma after oral administration and some pharmacokinetic data were obtained. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. 3D-fibroblast tissues constructed by a cell-coat technology enhance tight-junction formation of human colon epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsusaki, Michiya; Hikimoto, Daichi; Nishiguchi, Akihiro; Kadowaki, Koji; Ohura, Kayoko; Imai, Teruko; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2015-02-13

    Caco-2, human colon carcinoma cell line, has been widely used as a model system for intestinal epithelial permeability because Caco-2 cells express tight-junctions, microvilli, and a number of enzymes and transporters characteristic of enterocytes. However, the functional differentiation and polarization of Caco-2 cells to express sufficient tight-junctions (a barrier) usually takes over 21 days in culture. This may be due to the cell culture environment, for example inflammation induced by plastic petri dishes. Three-dimensional (3D) sufficient cell microenvironments similar to in vivo natural conditions (proteins and cells), will promote rapid differentiation and higher functional expression of tight junctions. Herein we report for the first time an enhancement in tight-junction formation by 3D-cultures of Caco-2 cells on monolayered (1L) and eight layered (8L) normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). Trans epithelial electric resistance (TEER) of Caco-2 cells was enhanced in the 3D-cultures, especially 8L-NHDF tissues, depending on culture times and only 10 days was enough to reach the same TEER value of Caco-2 monolayers after a 21 day incubation. Relative mRNA expression of tight-junction proteins of Caco-2 cells on 3D-cultures showed higher values than those in monolayer structures. Transporter gene expression patterns of Caco-2 cells on 3D-constructs were almost the same as those of Caco-2 monolayers, suggesting that there was no effect of 3D-cultures on transporter protein expression. The expression correlation between carboxylesterase 1 and 2 in 3D-cultures represented similar trends with human small intestines. The results of this study clearly represent a valuable application of 3D-Caco-2 tissues for pharmaceutical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Translocation and gross deletion breakpoints in human inherited disease and cancer II: Potential involvement of repetitive sequence elements in secondary structure formation between DNA ends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuzhanova, Nadia; Abeysinghe, Shaun S; Krawczak, Michael; Cooper, David N

    2003-09-01

    Translocations and gross deletions are responsible for a significant proportion of both cancer and inherited disease. Although such gene rearrangements are nonuniformly distributed in the human genome, the underlying mutational mechanisms remain unclear. We have studied the potential involvement of various types of repetitive sequence elements in the formation of secondary structure intermediates between the single-stranded DNA ends that recombine during rearrangements. Complexity analysis was used to assess the potential of these ends to form secondary structures, the maximum decrease in complexity consequent to a gross rearrangement being used as an indicator of the type of repeat and the specific DNA ends involved. A total of 175 pairs of deletion/translocation breakpoint junction sequences available from the Gross Rearrangement Breakpoint Database [GRaBD; www.uwcm.ac.uk/uwcm/mg/grabd/grabd.html] were analyzed. Potential secondary structure was noted between the 5' flanking sequence of the first breakpoint and the 3' flanking sequence of the second breakpoint in 49% of rearrangements and between the 5' flanking sequence of the second breakpoint and the 3' flanking sequence of the first breakpoint in 36% of rearrangements. Inverted repeats, inversions of inverted repeats, and symmetric elements were found in association with gross rearrangements at approximately the same frequency. However, inverted repeats and inversions of inverted repeats accounted for the vast majority (83%) of deletions plus small insertions, symmetric elements for one-half of all antigen receptor-mediated translocations, while direct repeats appear only to be involved in mediating simple deletions. These findings extend our understanding of illegitimate recombination by highlighting the importance of secondary structure formation between single-stranded DNA ends at breakpoint junctions. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Divergent effects of 17-β-estradiol on human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell function diminishes TNF-α-induced neointima formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nintasen, Rungrat; Riches, Kirsten; Mughal, Romana S.; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Chaisri, Urai; Maneerat, Yaowapa; Turner, Neil A.; Porter, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► TNF-α augments neointimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein. ► TNF-α induces detrimental effects on endothelial and smooth muscle cell function. ► Estradiol exerts modulatory effects on TNF-induced vascular cell functions. ► The modulatory effects of estradiol are discriminatory and cell-type specific. -- Abstract: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a condition characterized by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). TNF-α can induce vascular endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) dysfunction, central events in development of neointimal lesions. The reduced incidence of CHD in young women is believed to be due to the protective effects of estradiol (E2). We therefore investigated the effects of TNF-α on human neointima formation and SMC/EC functions and any modulatory effects of E2. Saphenous vein (SV) segments were cultured in the presence of TNF-α (10 ng/ml), E2 (2.5 nM) or both in combination. Neointimal thickening was augmented by incubation with TNF-α, an effect that was abolished by co-culture with E2. TNF-α increased SV–SMC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner that was optimal at 10 ng/ml (1.5-fold increase), and abolished by E2 at all concentrations studied (1–50 nM). Surprisingly, E2 itself at low concentrations (1 and 5 nM) stimulated SV–SMC proliferation to a level comparable to that of TNF-α alone. SV–EC migration was significantly impaired by TNF-α (42% of control), and co-culture with E2 partially restored the ability of SV–EC to migrate and repair the wound. In contrast, TNF-α increased SV–SMC migration by 1.7-fold, an effect that was completely reversed by co-incubation with E2. Finally, TNF-α potently induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in both SV–EC and SV–SMC. However there was no modulation by E2 in either cell-type. In conclusion, TNF-α induced SV neointima formation, increased SMC proliferation and migration, impaired

  4. Podoplanin increases the migration of human fibroblasts and affects the endothelial cell network formation: A possible role for cancer-associated fibroblasts in breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslaw Suchanski

    Full Text Available In our previous studies we showed that in breast cancer podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts correlated positively with tumor size, grade of malignancy, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and poor patients' outcome. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess if podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts can affect malignancy-associated properties of breast cancer cells. Human fibroblastic cell lines (MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst overexpressing podoplanin and control fibroblasts were co-cultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells and the impact of podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts on migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells were studied in vitro. Migratory and invasive properties of breast cancer cells were not affected by the presence of podoplanin on the surface of fibroblasts. However, ectopic expression of podoplanin highly increases the migration of MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst fibroblasts. The present study also revealed for the first time, that podoplanin expression affects the formation of pseudo tubes by endothelial cells. When human HSkMEC cells were co-cultured with podoplanin-rich fibroblasts the endothelial cell capillary-like network was characterized by significantly lower numbers of nodes and meshes than in co-cultures of endothelial cells with podoplanin-negative fibroblasts. The question remains as to how our experimental data can be correlated with previous clinical data showing an association between the presence of podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we propose that expression of podoplanin by fibroblasts facilitates their movement into the tumor stroma, which creates a favorable microenvironment for tumor progression by increasing the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts, which produce numerous factors affecting proliferation, survival and invasion of cancer cells. In accordance with this, the present study revealed for the first

  5. Podoplanin increases the migration of human fibroblasts and affects the endothelial cell network formation: A possible role for cancer-associated fibroblasts in breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanski, Jaroslaw; Tejchman, Anna; Zacharski, Maciej; Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Nowinska, Katarzyna; Rys, Janusz; Dziegiel, Piotr; Kieda, Claudine; Ugorski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies we showed that in breast cancer podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts correlated positively with tumor size, grade of malignancy, lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular invasion and poor patients' outcome. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess if podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts can affect malignancy-associated properties of breast cancer cells. Human fibroblastic cell lines (MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst) overexpressing podoplanin and control fibroblasts were co-cultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 cells and the impact of podoplanin expressed by fibroblasts on migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells were studied in vitro. Migratory and invasive properties of breast cancer cells were not affected by the presence of podoplanin on the surface of fibroblasts. However, ectopic expression of podoplanin highly increases the migration of MSU1.1 and Hs 578Bst fibroblasts. The present study also revealed for the first time, that podoplanin expression affects the formation of pseudo tubes by endothelial cells. When human HSkMEC cells were co-cultured with podoplanin-rich fibroblasts the endothelial cell capillary-like network was characterized by significantly lower numbers of nodes and meshes than in co-cultures of endothelial cells with podoplanin-negative fibroblasts. The question remains as to how our experimental data can be correlated with previous clinical data showing an association between the presence of podoplanin-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we propose that expression of podoplanin by fibroblasts facilitates their movement into the tumor stroma, which creates a favorable microenvironment for tumor progression by increasing the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts, which produce numerous factors affecting proliferation, survival and invasion of cancer cells. In accordance with this, the present study revealed for the first time, that such

  6. Merlin, the product of NF2 gene, is associated with aromatase expression and estrogen formation in human liver tissues and liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocciadiferro, Letizia; Miceli, Vitale; Granata, Orazia M; Carruba, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    The product of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) gene, also known as Merlin/neurofibromin 2, homeostatically regulates liver stem cells by controlling abundance and signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), with a mechanism independent of the Hippo pathway. We have reported that locally elevated estrogen formation, driven by abnormally high expression and function of aromatase, may be implicated in development and progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through activation of a rapid signaling pathway mediated by amphiregulin (AREG) and EGFR. We have recently presented a model by which the aromatase-estrogen-amphiregulin-EGFR axis is activated in response to tissue injury and/or inflammatory disease, with its alteration eventually leading to development of major human tumors (liver, breast, prostate) and other chronic diseases (diabetes, obesity, Alzheimer's and heart disease). In this study, we investigated NF2 expression in liver cancer cells and tissues in relation to aromatase expression/function, estrogen receptor (ER) status and amphiregulin. Our data indicate that NF2 expression is associated with aromatase and AREG expression, being elevated in HCC tissues and HepG2 cells, intermediate in cirrhotic tissues and Huh7 cells, and lower in nontumoral liver and HA22T cells. In addition, NF2 expression is inversely related to wild type hERα66 and proportional to the expression of the membrane-associated hERα36 splice variant, as measured by exon-specific RT-PCR analysis, both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, incubation with estradiol induced a significant decrease of NF2 expression in both HA22T and Huh7 cells (over 54% and 22%, respectively), while no change could be observed in HepG2 cells, this effect being inversely related to aromatase expression and activity in HCC cell lines. Based on the above combined evidence, we hypothesize that NF2 behaves as a protein sensing tissue damage and aromatase-driven local estrogen formation

  7. Divergent effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol on human vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell function diminishes TNF-{alpha}-induced neointima formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nintasen, Rungrat [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Center (MCRC), University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Department of Tropical Pathology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University (Thailand); Riches, Kirsten; Mughal, Romana S. [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Center (MCRC), University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Chaisri, Urai; Maneerat, Yaowapa [Department of Tropical Pathology, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University (Thailand); Turner, Neil A. [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Center (MCRC), University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Porter, Karen E., E-mail: medkep@leeds.ac.uk [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Leeds Institute of Genetics, Health and Therapeutics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Multidisciplinary Cardiovascular Research Center (MCRC), University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} augments neointimal hyperplasia in human saphenous vein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces detrimental effects on endothelial and smooth muscle cell function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol exerts modulatory effects on TNF-induced vascular cell functions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The modulatory effects of estradiol are discriminatory and cell-type specific. -- Abstract: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a condition characterized by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). TNF-{alpha} can induce vascular endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) dysfunction, central events in development of neointimal lesions. The reduced incidence of CHD in young women is believed to be due to the protective effects of estradiol (E2). We therefore investigated the effects of TNF-{alpha} on human neointima formation and SMC/EC functions and any modulatory effects of E2. Saphenous vein (SV) segments were cultured in the presence of TNF-{alpha} (10 ng/ml), E2 (2.5 nM) or both in combination. Neointimal thickening was augmented by incubation with TNF-{alpha}, an effect that was abolished by co-culture with E2. TNF-{alpha} increased SV-SMC proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner that was optimal at 10 ng/ml (1.5-fold increase), and abolished by E2 at all concentrations studied (1-50 nM). Surprisingly, E2 itself at low concentrations (1 and 5 nM) stimulated SV-SMC proliferation to a level comparable to that of TNF-{alpha} alone. SV-EC migration was significantly impaired by TNF-{alpha} (42% of control), and co-culture with E2 partially restored the ability of SV-EC to migrate and repair the wound. In contrast, TNF-{alpha} increased SV-SMC migration by 1.7-fold, an effect that was completely reversed by co-incubation with E2. Finally, TNF-{alpha} potently induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in both SV-EC and SV-SMC. However there

  8. Interleukin-9 receptor α chain mRNA formation in CD8+ T cells producing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 substance(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.M.; Tsuchie, H.; Detorio, M.A.; Shirono, H.; Hara, C.; Nishimoto, A.; Saji, A.; Koga, J.; Takata, N.; Maniar, J.K.; Saple, D.G.; Taniguchi, K.; Kageyama, S.; Ichimura, H.; Kurimura, T.

    1998-01-01

    A search for gene(s) associated with anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-l) activity of CD8 + T cells was attempted using molecular cloning and the relation between the anti-HIV activity of CD8 + T cells and the interleukin-9 receptor a chain (IL-9R-α) mRNA expression from the cDNA clones obtained was examined. The anti-HIV-l activity of CD8 + T cell culture supernatants was assessed by measuring the level of HIV-l replication in a CD4 + T cell line transfected with an infectious HIV-l DNA clone. IL-9R-a mRNA was assayed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 5 cases showing high level of anti-HIV-l activity (more than 80% suppression of HIV-l replication), the mRNA was detected in 4 cases. Of 10 cases showing low level of anti-HIV-l activity (less than 80% suppression of HIV-l replication), the mRNA was detected in one case. Soluble recombinant human IL-9 receptor (rhIL-9sR) did not suppress HIV-l replication at a concentration of 1 μg/ml. These data suggest that the IL-9R-a mRNA formation in CD8 + T cells may correlate with and play some role in the anti-HIV-l activity of CD8+ T cells from HIV-l-infected individuals. Key words: CD8+ T cells; anti-HIV-l activity; cytokines; interleukin-9 receptor (authors)

  9. Ortho- and meta-tyrosine formation from phenylalanine in human saliva as a marker of hydroxyl radical generation during betel quid chewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, U J; Nair, J; Friesen, M D; Bartsch, H; Ohshima, H

    1995-05-01

    The habit of betel quid chewing, common in South-East Asia and the South Pacific islands, is causally associated with an increased risk of oral cancer. Reactive oxygen species formed from polyphenolic betel quid ingredients and lime at alkaline pH have been implicated as the agents responsible for DNA and tissue damage. To determine whether hydroxyl radical (HO.) is generated in the human oral cavity during chewing of betel quid, the formation of o- and m-tyrosine from L-phenylalanine was measured. Both o- and m-tyrosine were formed in vitro in the presence of extracts of areca nut and/or catechu, transition metal ions such as Cu2+ and Fe2+ and lime or sodium carbonate (alkaline pH). Omission of any of these ingredients from the reaction mixture significantly reduced the yield of tyrosines. Hydroxyl radical scavengers such as ethanol, D-mannitol and dimethylsulfoxide inhibited the phenylalanine oxidation in a dose-dependent fashion. Five volunteers chewed betel quid consisting of betel leaf, areca nut, catechu and slaked lime (without tobacco). Their saliva, collected after chewing betel quid, contained high concentrations of p-tyrosine, but no appreciable amounts of o- or m-tyrosine. Saliva samples from the same subjects after chewing betel quid to which 20 mg phenylalanine had been added contained o- and m-tyrosine at concentrations ranging from 1010 to 3000 nM and from 1110 to 3140 nM respectively. These levels were significantly higher (P betel quid, which ranged from 14 to 70 nM for o-tyrosine and from 10 to 35 nM for m-tyrosine. These studies clearly demonstrate that the HO. radical is formed in the human oral cavity during betel quid chewing and is probably implicated in the genetic damage that has been observed in oral epithelial cells of chewers.

  10. Human capital formation from occupations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Pleijt, Alexandra M.; Weisdorf, Jacob L.

    2017-01-01

    -quality workmen’ deemed necessary by Mokyr and others to facilitate the Industrial Revolution, including machine erectors and operators. But we also find remarkable growth in the share of unskilled workers, rising from 20 % in the late sixteenth century to nearly 40 % in the early nineteenth century, caused...... mainly by falling shares of semi-skilled, blue-collar workers. Close inspection of the occupational structures within the main sectors of production suggests that deskilling occurred in agriculture and industry alike, prompted by land concentration in agriculture and workshop-to-factory changes...... in industry....

  11. Yellow fever virus envelope protein expressed in insect cells is capable of syncytium formation in lepidopteran cells and could be used for immunodetection of YFV in human sera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagata Tatsuya

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yellow fever is an haemorrhagic disease caused by a virus that belongs to the genus Flavivirus (Flaviviridae family and is transmitted by mosquitoes. Among the viral proteins, the envelope protein (E is the most studied one, due to its high antigenic potencial. Baculovirus are one of the most popular and efficient eukaryotic expression system. In this study a recombinant baculovirus (vSynYFE containing the envelope gene (env of the 17D vaccine strain of yellow fever virus was constructed and the recombinant protein antigenicity was tested. Results Insect cells infected with vSynYFE showed syncytium formation, which is a cytopathic effect characteristic of flavivirus infection and expressed a polypeptide of around 54 kDa, which corresponds to the expected size of the recombinant E protein. Furthermore, the recombinant E protein expression was also confirmed by fluorescence microscopy of vSynYFE-infected insect cells. Total vSynYFE-infected insect extracts used as antigens detected the presence of antibodies for yellow fever virus in human sera derived from yellow fever-infected patients in an immunoassay and did not cross react with sera from dengue virus-infected patients. Conclusions The E protein expressed by the recombinant baculovirus in insect cells is antigenically similar to the wild protein and it may be useful for different medical applications, from improved diagnosis of the disease to source of antigens for the development of a subunit vaccine.

  12. Sensitive and selective spectrophotometric assay of piroxicam in pure form, capsule and human blood serum samples via ion-pair complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2014-09-01

    A simple, accurate and highly sensitive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the rapid determination of piroxicam (PX) in pure and pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method involves formation of stable yellow colored ion-pair complexes of the amino derivative (basic nitrogen) of PX with three sulphonphthalein acid dyes namely; bromocresol green (BCG), bromothymol blue (BTB), bromophenol blue (BPB) in acidic medium. The colored species exhibited absorption maxima at 438, 429 and 432 nm with molar absorptivity values of 9.400 × 103, 1.218 × 103 and 1.02 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1 for PX-BCG, PX-BTB and PX-BPB complexes, respectively. The effect of optimum conditions via acidity, reagent concentration, time and solvent were studied. The reactions were extremely rapid at room temperature and the absorbance values remained constant for 48 h. Beer’s law was obeyed with a good correlation coefficient in the concentration ranges 1-100 μg mL-1 for BCG, BTB complexes and 1-95 μg mL-1 for BPB complex. The composition ratio of the ion-pair complexes were found to be 1:1 in all cases as established by Job’s method. No interference was observed from common additives and excipients which may be present in the pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of PX in capsule and human blood serum samples with good accuracy and precision.

  13. Cellular senescence of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) is associated with an altered MMP-7/HB-EGF signaling and increased formation of elastin-like structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Catharina; Hass, Ralf

    2009-10-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) and a complex interplay of cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix (ECM) interactions provide important platforms to determine cellular senescence and a potentially tumorigenic transformation of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC). An enhanced formation of extracellular filaments, consisting of elastin-like structures, in senescent post-selection HMEC populations was paralleled by a significantly increased expression of its precursor protein tropoelastin and matched with a markedly elevated activity of the cross-linking enzyme family of lysyl oxidases (LOX). RNAi experiments revealed both the ECM metalloproteinase MMP-7 and the growth factor HB-EGF as potential effectors of an increased tropoelastin expression. Moreover, co-localization of MMP-7 and HB-EGF as well as a concomittant downstream signaling via Fra-1 indicated a possible association between the reduced MMP-7 enzyme activity and an impaired HB-EGF processing, resulting in an enhanced tropoelastin synthesis during senescence of HMEC. In agreement with previous work, these findings suggested an important influence of the extracellular proteinase MMP-7 on the aging process of HMEC, affecting both extracellular remodeling as well as intracellular signaling pathways.

  14. Juventude, espaços de formação e modos de vida / Youth, place of human formation and ways of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celecina de Maria Veras Sales

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Os jovens rurais têm diferentes inserções na sociedade. Considerando essas diversidades, pretende-se conhecer seus espaços de formação (escola, família, movimentos sociais, apreendendo as singularidades, as variações e as multiplicidades de suas práticas. Como os jovens na escola, nos cursos de formação, na família, no cotidiano, estão criando e recriando modos de vida? Como os jovens rurais constituem seus espaços de formação e sociabilidade, como exercitam corpo e o pensamento e como canalizam desejos, sonhos e ações afirmativas?Rural youth have different insertions in society. Considering these differences, we intend to know their place of human formation (school, family, social movements learning the singularities, variations and multiplicity of practices of these youths. How young people are creating and recreating lifestyles at school, training courses and in family? As rural youth are building their areas of training and sociability and how they exercise body and mind, how they can channel desires, dreams and affirmative action.

  15. Formation of covalent complexes between human O sup 6 -alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase and BCNU-treated defined length synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent, T.P.; Remack, J.S. (St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (USA))

    1988-07-25

    Repair of chloroethylnitrosourea (CENU)-induced precursors of DNA interstrand cross-links by O{sup 6}-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (GAT or GATase) appears to be a factor in tumor resistance to therapy with this class of antineoplastic drugs. Since human GAT is highly specific for O{sup 6}-guanine, yet the probably cross-link structure is N{prime}-Guanine N{sup 3}cytosine ethane, rearrangement of the initial O{sup 6}-guanine adduct via O{sup 6},N{sup 1}ethanoguanine has been proposed. The authors suggested that GAT reaction with this intermediate would produce DNA covalently linked to protein through an ethane link from N{sup 1}-guanine to the alkylacceptor site on GAT. In preliminary studies they demonstrated a covalent complex between GAT and carmustine (BCNU)-treated DNA by a precipitation assay method. They have now developed a method for isolating the reaction product of BCNU-treated synthetic 14-mer ({sup 32}P)-labeled oligodeoxynucleotide and GAT using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This approach can be used to characterize the adducts induced by CENUs that lead to complex formation with GAT.

  16. Development of ADA Against Recombinant Human Interferon Beta in Immune Tolerant Mice Requires Rapid Recruitment of CD4(+) T Cells, Induces Formation of Germinal Centers but Lacks Susceptibility for (Most) Adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijanka, Grzegorz; Sauerborn, Melody; Boon, Louis; Schellekens, Huub; Brinks, Vera

    Immunological processes leading to formation of antidrug antibodies (Abs) against recombinant human proteins remain poorly understood. Animal and clinical studies revealed that immunogenicity shares both T-cell-dependent (requirement of CD4(+) T cells, isotype switching) and T-cell-independent

  17. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  18. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke Hansen

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes...... in the presence of 30% autologous serum. Blocking the CR2 ligand-binding site with monoclonal antibody (mAb) FE8 resulted in significant reduction (37.9+/-11.9%) in C3-fragment deposition, whereas MAC formation was only marginally affected (12.1+/-22.2% reduction). Blocking the CR1 binding-site resulted...

  19. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.; Di Cintio, A.; Dvorkin, I.

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  20. [Experimental research on the effects of different activators on the formation of platelet-rich gel and the release of bioactive substances in human platelet-rich plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Zhang, W; Cheng, B

    2017-01-20

    Objective: To explore the effects of calcium gluconate and thrombin on the formation of platelet-rich gel (PRG) and the release of bioactive substances in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the clinical significance. Methods: Six healthy blood donors who met the inclusion criteria were recruited in our unit from May to August in 2016. Platelet samples of each donor were collected for preparation of PRP. (1) PRP in the volume of 10 mL was collected from each donor and divided into thrombin activation group (TA, added with 0.5 mL thrombin solution in dose of 100 U/mL) and calcium gluconate activation group (CGA, added with 0.5 mL calcium gluconate solution in dose of 100 g/L) according to the random number table, with 5 mL PRP in each group. Then the PRP of the two groups was activated in water bath at 37 ℃ for 1 h. The formation time of PRG was recorded, and the formation situation of PRG was observed within 1 hour of activation. After being activated for 1 h, one part of PRG was collected to observe the distribution of fibrous protein with HE staining, and another part of PRG was collected to observe platelet ultrastructure under transmission electron microscope (TEM). After being activated for 1 h, the supernatant was collected to determine the content of transforming growth factor β(1, )platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB), vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor, and insulin-like growth factorⅠby enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. (2) Another 10 mL PRP from each donor was collected and grouped as above, and the platelet suspension was obtained after two times of centrifugation and resuspension with phosphate buffered saline, respectively. And then they were treated with corresponding activator for 1 h as that in experiment (1). Nanoparticle tracking analyzer was used to detect the concentrations of microvesicles with different diameters and total microvesicles derived from platelet. Data

  1. The Helicobacter pylori L-form: formation and isolation in the human bile cultures in vitro and in the gallbladders of patients with biliary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan N; Ding, Wen J; Pan, Yao Z; Tang, Ke L; Wang, Tao; She, Xiao L; Wang, He

    2015-04-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is considered the important causative agent causing biliary diseases, but the H. pylori can be isolated from very few gallbladder specimens with diseases. We studied the formation of H. pylori L-forms in bile in vitro and isolated the H. pylori L-forms from gallbladder of patients with biliary diseases. We inoculated the H. pylori into the human bile to induce the L-form in vitro. The gallbladder specimens were collected from patients with biliary diseases to isolate the bacterial L-forms by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the H. pylori L-forms in the L-form isolates were identified by the gene assay for the H. pylori-specific genes 16S rRNA and UreA. The H. Pylori cannot be isolated from the bile-induced cultures, but the H. pylori L-form can be isolated from the H. pylori-negative bile-induced cultures. The L-form isolates of bile-induced cultures showed a positive reaction of the H. pylori-specific genes by PCR, and the coincidence ratio of the nucleotide sequences between the L-forms and the H. pylori is 99%. The isolation rate of bacteria L-form is 93.2% in the gallbladder specimens with bacteria-negative isolation culture by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the positive rate of the H. pylori-specific genes in the L-form isolates is 7.1% in the bacterial L-form-positive isolation cultures by the PCR. H. pylori can be rapidly induced into the L-form in the human bile; the L-form, as the latent bacteria, can live in the host gallbladder for a long times, and they made the host became a latent carrier of the H. pylori L-form. The H. pylori L-form can be isolated by the nonhigh osmotic isolation technique, and the variant can be identified by the gene assay for the H. pylori-specific genes 16S rRNA and reA. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Expression and assembly of largest foreign protein in chloroplasts: oral delivery of human FVIII made in lettuce chloroplasts robustly suppresses inhibitor formation in haemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Sherman, Alexandra; Chang, Wan-Jung; Kamesh, Aditya; Biswas, Moanaro; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2017-11-06

    Inhibitor formation is a serious complication of factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder haemophilia A and occurs in 20%-30% of patients. No prophylactic tolerance protocol currently exists. Although we reported oral tolerance induction using FVIII domains expressed in tobacco chloroplasts, significant challenges in clinical advancement include expression of the full-length CTB-FVIII sequence to cover the entire patient population, regardless of individual CD4 + T-cell epitope responses. Codon optimization of FVIII heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) increased expression 15- to 42-fold higher than the native human genes. Homoplasmic lettuce lines expressed CTB fusion proteins of FVIII-HC (99.3 kDa), LC (91.8 kDa), C2 (31 kDa) or single chain (SC, 178.2 kDa) up to 3622, 263, 3321 and 852 μg/g in lyophilized plant cells, when grown in a cGMP hydroponic facility (Fraunhofer). CTB-FVIII-SC is the largest foreign protein expressed in chloroplasts; despite a large pentamer size (891 kDa), assembly, folding and disulphide bonds were maintained upon lyophilization and long-term storage as revealed by GM1-ganglioside receptor binding assays. Repeated oral gavages (twice/week for 2 months) of CTB-FVIII-HC/CTB-FVIII-LC reduced inhibitor titres ~10-fold (average 44 BU/mL to 4.7 BU/mL) in haemophilia A mice. Most importantly, increase in the frequency of circulating LAP-expressing CD4 + CD25 + FoxP3 + Treg in tolerized mice could be used as an important cellular biomarker in human clinical trials for plant-based oral tolerance induction. In conclusion, this study reports the first clinical candidate for oral tolerance induction that is urgently needed to protect haemophilia A patients receiving FVIII injections. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Multilayered Films Produced by Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Chitosan and Alginate as a Potential Platform for the Formation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cell aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Hatami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The construction of multilayered films with tunable properties could offer new routes to produce biomaterials as a platform for 3D cell cultivation. In this study, multilayered films produced with five bilayers of chitosan and alginate (CHT/ALG were built using water-soluble modified mesyl and tosyl–CHT via layer-by-layer (LbL self-assembly. NMR results demonstrated the presences of mesyl (2.83 ppm and tosyl groups (2.39, 7.37 and 7.70 ppm in the chemical structure of modified chitosans. The buildup of multilayered films was monitored by quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM-D and film thickness was estimated using the Voigt-based viscoelastic model. QCM-D results demonstrated that CHT/ALG films constructed using mesyl or tosyl modifications (mCHT/ALG were significantly thinner in comparison to the CHT/ALG films constructed with unmodified chitosan (p < 0.05. Adhesion analysis demonstrated that human adipose stem cells (hASCs did not adhere to the mCHT/ALG multilayered films and formed aggregates with sizes between ca. 100–200 µm. In vitro studies on cell metabolic activity and live/dead staining suggested that mCHT/ALG multilayered films are nontoxic toward hACSs. Multilayered films produced via LbL assembly of ALG and off-the-shelf, water-soluble modified chitosans could be used as a scaffold for the 3D aggregates formation of hASCs in vitro.

  4. Kinetics of the formation of chromosome aberrations in x-irradiated human lymphocytes: Analysis by premature chromosome condensation with delayed fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greinert, R.; Detzler, E.; Volkmer, B.

    1995-01-01

    Human lymphocytes irradiated with graded doses of up to 5 Gy of 150 kV X rays were fused with mitotic CHO cells after delay times ranging from 0 to 14 h after irradiation. The yields of dicentrics seen under PCC conditions, using C-banding for centromere detection, and of excess acentric fragments observed in the PCC experiment were determined by image analysis. At 4 Gy the time course of the yield of dicentrics shows an early plateau for delay times up to 2 h, then an S-shaped rise and a final plateau which is reached after a delay time of about 8 to 10 h. Whereas the dose-yield curve measured at zero delay time is strictly linear, the shape of the curve obtained for 8 h delay time is linear-quadratic. The linear yield component, αD is formed entirely in the fast process manifested in the early plateau, while component βD 2 is developed slowly in the subsequent hours. Analysis of the kinetics of the rise of the S-shaped curve for yield as a function of time leads to the postulate of an open-quotes intermediate productclose quotes of pairwise DNA lesion interaction, still fragile when subjected to the stress of PCC, but gradually processed into a stable dicentric chromosome. It is concluded that the observed difference in the kinetics of the α and β components explains a number of earlier results, especially the disappearance of the β component at high LET, and opens possibilities for chemical and physical modification of the β component during the extended formation process after irradiation observed here. 22 refs., 4 figs

  5. Kinetics of the formation of chromosome aberrations in X-irradiated human lymphocytes: analysis by premature chromosome condensation with delayed fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, R; Detzler, E; Volkmer, B; Harder, D

    1995-11-01

    Human lymphocytes irradiated with graded doses of up to 5 Gy of 150 kV X rays were fused with mitotic CHO cells after delay times ranging from 0 to 14 h after irradiation. The yields of dicentrics seen under PCC conditions, using C-banding for centromere detection, and of excess acentric fragments observed in the PCC experiment were determined by image analysis. At 4 Gy the time course of the yield of dicentrics shows an early plateau for delay times up to 2 h, then an S-shaped rise and a final plateau which is reached after a delay time of about 8 to 10 h. Whereas the dose-yield curve measured at zero delay time is strictly linear, the shape of the curve obtained for 8 h delay time is linear-quadratic. The linear yield component, alpha D, is formed entirely in the fast process manifested in the early plateau, while component beta D2 is developed slowly in the subsequent hours. Analysis of the kinetics of the rise of the S-shaped curve for yield as a function of time leads to the postulate of an "intermediate product" of pairwise DNA lesion interaction, still fragile when subjected to the stress of PCC, but gradually processed into a stable dicentric chromosome. It is concluded that the observed difference in the kinetics of the alpha and beta components explains a number of earlier results, especially the disappearance of the beta component at high LET, and opens possibilities for chemical and physical modification of the beta component during the extended formation process after irradiation observed here.

  6. Down regulation of ITGA4 and ITGA5 genes after formation of 3D spherules by human Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi-Pour, Zohreh; Ashrafi, Mohammad Reza; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh

    2018-06-01

    Human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJSCs) are multipotent stem cells that could be aggregated into 3D spherules. ITGA4 and ITGA5 genes encode α4 and α5 subunits of integrins, respectively. In this study, we analyzed expression levels of ITGA4 and ITGA5 gene mRNAs in undifferentiated and 3D spherules forming hWJSCs in order to determine their expression pattern for possible future treatment of cancer cells in a co-culture fashion. For the purpose of obtaining hWJSCs, umbilical cords were collected from patients with caesarian section at full term delivery. The cells were then characterized according to cell surface markers using flow cytometry. Furthermore pluripotency of the obtained cells was verified. Subsequently the cells were aggregated in 3D spherules using hanging drop cultures. Expression levels of ITGA4 and ITGA5 gene mRNAs were determined by RT-PCR and Real time PCR, both in the initial undifferentiated cells and those aggregated in the spherules. The obtained hWJSCs demonstrated pluripotency, differentiating to adipogenic and osteogenic cells. They also expressed mesenchymal stem cell surface markers. Following the aggregation of these cells and formation of 3D spherules, mRNA expression levels of both genes were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) compared with the initial undifferentiated state. The results of this study demonstrated that aggregation of hWJSCs into spherules alters their expression of ITGA4 and ITGA5. The implications of such an alteration would require further research.

  7. RECOMBINANT HUMAN MAST-CELL GROWTH-FACTOR SUPPORTS ERYTHROID COLONY FORMATION IN POLYCYTHEMIA-VERA IN THE PRESENCE AND ABSENCE OF ERYTHROPOIETIN AND SERUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULLER, EW; DEWOLF, JTM; HENDRIKS, DW; ESSELINK, MT; HALIE, MR; VELLENGA, E

    The effect of mast cell growth factor (MGF) was studied on erythropoietin (Epo)-dependent and Epo-independent (''spontaneous'') erythroid colony formation in patients with polycythemia vera (PV). MGF stimulated both Epo-dependent and Epo-independent erythroid colony formation from PV peripheral

  8. The pro-fibrotic properties of transforming growth factor on human fibroblasts are counteracted by caffeic acid by inhibiting myofibroblast formation and collagen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mia, Masum M.; Bank, Ruud A.

    Fibrosis is a chronic disorder affecting many organs. A universal process in fibrosis is the formation of myofibroblasts and the subsequent collagen deposition by these cells. Transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF beta 1) plays a major role in the formation of myofibroblasts, e.g. by activating

  9. Importance of the content and localization of tyrosine residues for thyroxine formation within the N-terminal part of human thyroglobulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartog, M. T.; Sijmons, C. C.; Bakker, O.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; de Vijlder, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    Thyroxine (T4) is formed by coupling of iodinated tyrosine residues within thyroglobulin (TG). In mature TG, some iodinated tyrosine residues are involved preferentially in T4 formation. In order to investigate the specific role of various tyrosine residues in T4 formation, N-terminal TG fragments

  10. Apoptotic action of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activation in human non small-cell lung cancer is mediated via proline oxidase-induced reactive oxygen species formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Young; Ahn, Jin Hee; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2007-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma ligands have been shown to inhibit human lung cancers by inducing apoptosis and differentiation. In the present study, we elucidated the apoptotic mechanism of PPARgamma activation in human lung cancers by using a novel PPARgamma agonist, 1-(trans-methylimino-N-oxy)-6-(2-morpholinoethoxy)-3-phenyl-(1H-indene-2-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (KR-62980), and rosiglitazone. PPARgamma activation selectively inhibited cell viability of non-small-cell lung cancer with little effect on small-cell lung cancer and normal lung cells. The cell death induced by PPARgamma activation presented apoptotic features of oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation in A549 human non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was accompanied by increased expression of proline oxidase (POX), a redox enzyme expressed in mitochondria, upon incubation with the agonists. POX RNA interference treatment blocked PPARgamma-induced ROS formation and cytotoxicity, suggesting that POX plays a functional role in apoptosis through ROS formation. The apoptotic effects by the agonists were antagonized by bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPARgamma antagonist, and by knockdown of PPARgamma expression, indicating the involvement of PPARgamma in these actions. The results of the present study suggest that PPARgamma activation induces apoptotic cell death in non-small-cell lung carcinoma mainly through ROS formation via POX induction.

  11. Formative (measurement)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassott, G.; Henseler, Jörg; Cooper, C.; Lee, N.; Farrell, A.

    2015-01-01

    When using measurement models with multiple indicators, researchers need to decide about the epistemic relationship between the latent variable and its indicators. In this article, we describe the nature, the estimation, the characteristics, and the validity assessment of formative measurement

  12. Formation of RNA Granule-Derived Capsid Assembly Intermediates Appears To Be Conserved between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and the Nonprimate Lentivirus Feline Immunodeficiency Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Jonathan C; Westergreen, Nick; Barajas, Brook C; Ressler, Dylan T B; Phuong, Daryl J; Swain, John V; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Lingappa, Jaisri R

    2018-05-01

    During immature capsid assembly in cells, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag co-opts a host RNA granule, forming a pathway of intracellular assembly intermediates containing host components, including two cellular facilitators of assembly, ABCE1 and DDX6. A similar assembly pathway has been observed for other primate lentiviruses. Here we asked whether feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus, also forms RNA granule-derived capsid assembly intermediates. First, we showed that the released FIV immature capsid and a large FIV Gag-containing intracellular complex are unstable during analysis, unlike for HIV-1. We identified harvest conditions, including in situ cross-linking, that overcame this problem, revealing a series of FIV Gag-containing complexes corresponding in size to HIV-1 assembly intermediates. Previously, we showed that assembly-defective HIV-1 Gag mutants are arrested at specific assembly intermediates; here we identified four assembly-defective FIV Gag mutants, including three not previously studied, and demonstrated that they appear to be arrested at the same intermediate as the cognate HIV-1 mutants. Further evidence that these FIV Gag-containing complexes correspond to assembly intermediates came from coimmunoprecipitations demonstrating that endogenous ABCE1 and the RNA granule protein DDX6 are associated with FIV Gag, as shown previously for HIV-1 Gag, but are not associated with a ribosomal protein, at steady state. Additionally, we showed that FIV Gag associates with another RNA granule protein, DCP2. Finally, we validated the FIV Gag-ABCE1 and FIV Gag-DCP2 interactions with proximity ligation assays demonstrating colocalization in situ Together, these data support a model in which primate and nonprimate lentiviruses form intracellular capsid assembly intermediates derived from nontranslating host RNA granules. IMPORTANCE Like HIV-1 Gag, FIV Gag assembles into immature capsids; however, it is not known whether

  13. Evidence for Ongoing Modeling-Based Bone Formation in Human Femoral Head Trabeculae via Forming Minimodeling Structures: A Study in Patients with Fractures and Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hiroshige; Kondo, Naoki; Shimakura, Taketoshi; Fujisawa, Junichi; Kijima, Yasufumi; Kanai, Tomotake; Poole, Kenneth E S; Yamamoto, Noriaki; Takahashi, Hideaki E; Endo, Naoto

    2018-01-01

    Bone modeling is a biological process of bone formation that adapts bone size and shape to mechanical loads, especially during childhood and adolescence. Bone modeling in cortical bone can be easily detected using sequential radiographic images, while its assessment in trabecular bone is challenging. Here, we performed histomorphometric analysis in 21 bone specimens from biopsies collected during hip arthroplasty, and we proposed the criteria for histologically identifying an active modeling-based bone formation, which we call a "forming minimodeling structure" (FMiS). Evidence of FMiSs was found in 9 of 20 specimens (45%). In histomorphometric analysis, bone volume was significant higher in specimens displaying FMiSs compared with the specimens without these structures (BV/TV, 31.7 ± 10.2 vs. 23.1 ± 3.9%; p  modeling-based bone formation on trabecular bone surfaces occurs even during adulthood. As FMiSs can represent histological evidence of modeling-based bone formation, understanding of this physiology in relation to bone homeostasis is crucial.

  14. Human placentation from nidation to 5 weeks of gestation. Part I: What do we know about formative placental development following implantation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, J L; Carter, Anthony Michael; Chamley, L W

    2012-01-01

    limited for ethical reasons. In this review we discuss our current knowledge of early placental formation from the time of implantation at 3 weeks of gestation to approximately 5-6 weeks of gestation, encompassing both the significant anatomical findings derived from the unique specimens obtained...

  15. The role of international institutions in the formation of international bioethical law: UNESCO and the United Nations General Assembly attempt to govern human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppuswamy, Chamundeeswari

    2007-01-01

    This article analyses the international governance of human reproductive cloning. Noting that bioethics is a new field of engagement for international lawyers, it recounts some of the institutional developments in bioethical law making. The role of UNESCO and the United Nations General Assembly is scrutinized and the author discusses the relative merits of the institutions' governance of human reproductive cloning. The author suggests that some international institutions and mechanisms are better suited than others for bioethical law making. The 2005 General Assembly resolution on human cloning is analysed in this context.

  16. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  17. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  18. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof...... is important, since it helps constraining chemical evolution models at high redshift. A new project studying how the population of galaxies hosting GRBs relate to other galaxy population is outlined in the conclusion of this thesis. The core of this project will be to quantify how the stellar mass function...

  19. Comet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  20. Direct and indirect reputation formation in nonhuman great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus) and human children (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Esther; Keupp, Stefanie; Hare, Brian; Vaish, Amrisha; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Humans make decisions about when and with whom to cooperate based on their reputations. People either learn about others by direct interaction or by observing third-party interactions or gossip. An important question is whether other animal species, especially our closest living relatives, the nonhuman great apes, also form reputations of others. In Study 1, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, and 2.5-year-old human children experienced a nice experimenter who tried to give food/toys to the subject and a mean experimenter who interrupted the food/toy giving. In studies 2 and 3, nonhuman great apes and human children could only passively observe a similar interaction, in which a nice experimenter and a mean experimenter interacted with a third party. Orangutans and 2.5-year-old human children preferred to approach the nice experimenter rather than the mean one after having directly experienced their respective behaviors. Orangutans, chimpanzees, and 2.5-year-old human children also took into account experimenter actions toward third parties in forming reputations. These studies show that the human ability to form direct and indirect reputation judgment is already present in young children and shared with at least some of the other great apes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  1. The formation of human resources in the area of imaging diagnosed and therapeutic of the Universidad de Costa Rica and its contribution to the services of radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine: period 1969 - 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez Avila, Maria Catalina

    2009-01-01

    The formation of human resources in the area of imaging diagnosed and therapeutic at the Universidad de Costa Rica, was carried out during the last 38 years and has been necessary to realize an assessment of that trajectory and value the impact it has had, the race today, in radiodiagnostic services, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine. The present work was carried out in order of providing to the Escuela de Tecnologias en Salud, the Universidad de Costa Rica, radiology services, radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and all those involved and interested in the area, a documented and rigorous analysis regarding the trajectory and characterization of the different stages of historical development of human resources training in imaging diagnosed and therapeutic. Also, suffered changes in the curriculum are considered in accordance with historical events and service needs. The analysis of each curriculum was performed and used for training of technicians and graduates in nuclear medicine and ionizing radiation, as well as the curriculum for the training of bachelors and degrees in imaging diagnosed and therapeutics, as part of the curriculum evolution in the formation of human resources. The strengths, deficiencies and challenge in each curriculum were presented, determining in this way how the changes made to the curriculum meet the needs and demands of radiology services, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. (author) [es

  2. Formation of an adduct by clenbuterol, a beta-adrenoceptor agonist drug, and serum albumin in human saliva at the acidic pH of the stomach: evidence for an aryl radical-based process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietraforte, D; Brambilla, G; Camerini, S; Scorza, G; Peri, L; Loizzo, A; Crescenzi, M; Minetti, M

    2008-07-15

    Clenbuterol (CLB) is an antiasthmatic drug used also illegally as a lean muscle mass enhancer in both humans and animals. CLB and amine-related drugs in general are nitrosatable, thus raising concerns regarding possible genotoxic/carcinogenic activity. Oral administration of CLB raises the issue of its possible transformation by salivary nitrite at the acidic pH of gastric juice. In acidic human saliva CLB was rapidly transformed to the CLB arenediazonium ion. This suggests a reaction of CLB with salivary nitrite, as confirmed in aerobic HNO(2) solution by a drastic decrease in nitric oxide, nitrite, and nitrate. In human saliva, both glutathione and ascorbic acid were able to inhibit CLB arenediazonium formation and to react with preformed CLB arenediazonium. The effect of ascorbic acid is particularly pertinent because this vitamin is actively concentrated within the gastric juice. EPR spin trapping experiments showed that preformed CLB arenediazonium ion was reduced to the aryl radical by ascorbic acid, glutathione, and serum albumin, the major protein of saliva. As demonstrated by anti-CLB antibodies and MS, the CLB-albumin interaction leads to the formation of a covalent drug-protein adduct, with a preference for Tyr-rich regions. This study highlights the possible hazards associated with the use/abuse of this drug.

  3. One-electron oxidation of diclofenac by human cytochrome P450s as a potential bioactivation mechanism for formation of 2'-(glutathion-S-yl)-deschloro-diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Jan Simon; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M

    2014-01-25

    Reactive metabolites have been suggested to play a role in the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity observed with diclofenac (DF). By structural identification of the GSH conjugates formed after P450-catalyzed bioactivation of DF, it was shown that three types of reactive intermediates were formed: p-benzoquinone imines, o-imine methide and arene-oxide. Recently, detection of 2'-(glutathion-S-yl)-deschloro-diclofenac (DDF-SG), resulting from chlorine substitution, suggested the existence of a fourth type of P450-dependent reactive intermediate whose inactivation by GSH is completely dependent on presence of glutathione S-transferase. In this study, fourteen recombinant cytochrome P450s and three flavin-containing monooxygenases were tested for their ability to produce oxidative DF metabolites and their corresponding GSH conjugates. Concerning the hydroxymetabolites and their GSH conjugates, results were consistent with previous studies. Unexpectedly, all tested recombinant P450s were able to form DDF-SG to almost similar extent. DDF-SG formation was found to be partially independent of NADPH and even occurred by heat-inactivated P450. However, product formation was fully dependent on both GSH and glutathione-S-transferase P1-1. DDF-SG formation was also observed in reactions with horseradish peroxidase in absence of hydrogen peroxide. Because DDF-SG was not formed by free iron, it appears that DF can be bioactivated by iron in hemeproteins. This was confirmed by DDF-SG formation by other hemeproteins such as hemoglobin. As a mechanism, we propose that DF is subject to heme-dependent one-electron oxidation. The resulting nitrogen radical cation, which might activate the chlorines of DF, then undergoes a GST-catalyzed nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction in which the chlorine atom of the DF moiety is replaced by GSH. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The format of things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørnø, Rasmus Leth

    this conception is identified as “the Format of Things.” The format is embedded in our everyday thinking. In relation to design,it is found in the name taken by the design community, that is human-computer interaction (HCI), and it is mirrored in the desktop metaphor, wherein information is conceived...... available. It consists of philosophical considerations on matters of relevance for the design of interfaces. It takes the position that the graphical user interfaces of computers (the Desktop Metaphor or Windows, Icons, Menus, Pointers [‘WIMP’]) that ordinarily come to mind for most people are cognates......The development of novel interfaces is one of the most important current design challenges for the intellectual, cultural and cognitive evolution of human imagination and knowledge work. Unfortunately, the thinking surrounding this design challenge is heavily mired in conceptions that harbor...

  5. Investigating the adduct formation of organic mercury species with carbonic anhydrase and hemoglobin from human red blood cell hemolysate by means of LC/ESI-TOF-MS and LC/ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeback, Jens; Schwarzer, Miriam; Wehe, Christoph A; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of mercury species with human erythrocytes is studied to investigate possible high molecular binding partners for mercury species. Human blood hemolysate was spiked with methylmercury and investigated by means of liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to electrospray ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (ESI-ToF-MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Beside adduct formation of mercury species with hemoglobin, the main compound of the erythrocytes, mercury binding to the enzyme carbonic anhydrase was revealed. Due to an enzymatic digest of the protein-mercury adduct, the binding site at the free thiol group of the protein was identified. These results indicate that carbonic anhydrase might play a role in mercury toxicity.

  6. A study of the formation and branching pattern of brachial plexus and its variations in adult human cadavers of north Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal V Pattanshetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: The brachial plexus is highly variable, in its formation and branching pattern thus, knowledge of its anatomical patterns, may be insufficient for the surgeon operating on or around these nerves or for the regional anesthesiologist working in this area. Therefore, the present study was an attempt to study further about variations of brachial plexus encountered during routine dissection classes. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive study was carried out by dissection of 60 upper limbs of 30 cadavers, in the age group of 18 to 85 years, obtained during a study period of 2 years from the Department of Anatomy. The plexus was studied in its entire course commencing from the formation in cervical region, course through root of the neck and axilla, up to the main terminal branches of the upper extremity. During the dissection, variations of brachial plexus pertaining to its formation from the roots, trunks, divisions and cords and the branching pattern were observed and data was collected. Results: Out of the 60 cadaveric upper limbs studied for the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus, 2 limbs (3.33% were pre-fixed plexuses. Fusion of adjacent trunks was detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. Variations in branches of lateral cord were detected in 8 limbs (13.33%. Among Posterior cord variations 2-thoracodorsal nerves were detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. All the other branches from brachial plexus had been found to have no anatomical variations. Conclusion: In the present study, an attempt has been made to know the possible variations of the brachial plexus. Though the variations mentioned may not alter the normal functioning of the limb of the individual, but knowledge of the variations is of prime importance to be kept in mind, during anaesthetic and surgical procedures.

  7. Interaction with the 5D3 monoclonal antibody is regulated by intramolecular rearrangements but not by covalent dimer formation of the human ABCG2 multidrug transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Laczkó, Rozália; Hegedűs, Csilla

    2008-01-01

    D3 monoclonal antibody shows a function-dependent reactivity to an extracellular epitope of the ABCG2 transporter. In the current experiments we have further characterized the 5D3-ABCG2 interaction. The effect of chemical cross-linking and the modulation of extracellular S-S bridges...... on the transporter function and 5D3 reactivity of ABCG2 were investigated in depth. We found that several protein cross-linkers greatly increased 5D3 labeling in ABCG2 expressing HEK cells; however, there was no correlation between covalent dimer formation, the inhibition of transport activity, and the increase in 5...

  8. Disruption of the ECM33 Gene in Candida albicans Prevents Biofilm Formation, Engineered Human Oral Mucosa Tissue Damage and Gingival Cell Necrosis/Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Rouabhia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we demonstrated that ΔCaecm33 double mutant showed reduced biofilm formation and causes less damage to gingival mucosa tissues. This was confirmed by the reduced level of necrotic cells and Bax/Bcl2 gene expression as apoptotic markers. In contrast, parental and Caecm33 mutant strains decreased basement membrane protein production (laminin 5 and type IV collagen. We thus propose that ECM33 gene/protein represents a novel target for the prevention and treatment of infections caused by Candida.

  9. Development of a dual luciferase activity and fluorescamine protein assay adapted to a 384 micro-well plate format: Reducing variability in human luciferase transactivation cell lines aimed at endocrine active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jennifer; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2018-01-01

    There is a need to adapt cell bioassays to 384-well and 1536-well formats instead of the traditional 96-well format as high-throughput screening (HTS) demands increase. However, the sensitivity and performance of the bioassay must be re-verified in these higher micro-well plates, and verification of cell health must also be HT (high-throughput). We have adapted two commonly used human breast luciferase transactivation cell bioassays, the recently re-named estrogen agonist/antagonist screening VM7Luc4E2 cell bioassay (previously designated BG1Luc4E2) and the androgen/glucocorticoid screening MDA-kb2 cell bioassay, to 384-well formats for HTS of endocrine-active substances (EASs). This cost-saving adaptation includes a fast, accurate, and easy measurement of protein amount in each well via the fluorescamine assay with which to normalize luciferase activity of cell lysates without requiring any transfer of the cell lysates. Here we demonstrate that by accounting for protein amount in the cell lysates, antagonistic agents can easily be distinguished from cytotoxic agents in the MDA-kb2 and VM7Luc4E2 cell bioassays. Additionally, we demonstrate via the fluorescamine assay improved interpretation of luciferase activity in wells along the edge of the plate (the so-called “edge effect”), thereby increasing usable wells to the entire plate, not just interior wells.

  10. AAV vector encoding human VEGF165-transduced pectineus muscular flaps increase the formation of new tissue through induction of angiogenesis in an in vivo chamber for tissue engineering: A technique to enhance tissue and vessels in microsurgically engineered tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moimas, Silvia; Manasseri, Benedetto; Cuccia, Giuseppe; Stagno d'Alcontres, Francesco; Geuna, Stefano; Pattarini, Lucia; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Colonna, Michele R

    2015-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, new approaches are required for the creation of tissue substitutes, and the interplay between different research areas, such as tissue engineering, microsurgery and gene therapy, is mandatory. In this article, we report a modification of a published model of tissue engineering, based on an arterio-venous loop enveloped in a cross-linked collagen-glycosaminoglycan template, which acts as an isolated chamber for angiogenesis and new tissue formation. In order to foster tissue formation within the chamber, which entails on the development of new vessels, we wondered whether we might combine tissue engineering with a gene therapy approach. Based on the well-described tropism of adeno-associated viral vectors for post-mitotic tissues, a muscular flap was harvested from the pectineus muscle, inserted into the chamber and transduced by either AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 or AAV vector expressing the reporter gene β-galactosidase, as a control. Histological analysis of the specimens showed that muscle transduction by AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 resulted in enhanced tissue formation, with a significant increase in the number of arterioles within the chamber in comparison with the previously published model. Pectineus muscular flap, transduced by adeno-associated viral vectors, acted as a source of the proangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor, thus inducing a consistent enhancement of vessel growth into the newly formed tissue within the chamber. In conclusion, our present findings combine three different research fields such as microsurgery, tissue engineering and gene therapy, suggesting and showing the feasibility of a mixed approach for regenerative medicine.

  11. The environmental carcinogen 3-nitrobenzanthrone and its main metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone enhance formation of reactive oxygen intermediates in human A549 lung epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, Tanja; Seidel, Albrecht; Borlak, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    The environmental contaminant 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is highly mutagenic and a suspected human carcinogen. We aimed to evaluate whether 3-NBA is able to deregulate critical steps in cell cycle control and apoptosis in human lung epithelial A549 cells. Increased intracellular Ca 2+ and caspase activities were detected upon 3-NBA exposure. As shown by cell cycle analysis, an increased number of S-phase cells was observed after 24 h of treatment with 3-NBA. Furthermore, 3-NBA was shown to inhibit cell proliferation when added to subconfluent cell cultures. The main metabolite of 3-NBA, 3-ABA, induced statistically significant increases in tail moment as judged by alkaline comet assay. The potential of 3-NBA and 3-ABA to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated by flow cytometry using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The enzyme inhibitors allopurinol, dicumarol, resveratrol and SKF525A were used to assess the impact of metabolic conversion on 3-NBA-mediated ROS production. Resveratrol decreased dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence by 50%, suggesting a role for CYP1A1 in 3-NBA-mediated ROS production. Mitochondrial ROS production was significantly attenuated (20% reduction) by addition of rotenone (complex I inhibition) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA, complex II inhibition). Taken together, the results of the present study provide evidence for a genotoxic potential of 3-ABA in human epithelial lung cells. Moreover, both compounds lead to increased intracellular ROS and create an environment favorable to DNA damage and the promotion of cancer

  12. More surprises in the global greenhouse: Human health impacts from recent toxic marine aerosol formations, due to centennial alterations of world-wide coastal food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J J; Lenes, J M; Weisberg, R H; Zheng, L; Hu, C; Fanning, K A; Snyder, R; Smith, J

    2017-03-15

    Reductions of zooplankton biomasses and grazing pressures were observed during overfishing-induced trophic cascades and concurrent oil spills at global scales. Recent phytoplankton increments followed, once Fe-, P-, and N-nutrient limitations of commensal diazotrophs and dinoflagellates were also eliminated by respective human desertification, deforestation, and eutrophication during climate changes. Si-limitation of diatoms instead ensued during these last anthropogenic perturbations of agricultural effluents and sewage loadings. Consequently, ~15% of total world-wide annual asthma trigger responses, i.e. amounting to ~45 million adjacent humans during 2004, resulted from brevetoxin and palytoxin poisons in aerosol forms of western boundary current origins. They were denoted by greater global harmful algal bloom [HAB] abundances and breathing attacks among sea-side children during prior decadal surveys of asthma prevalence, compiled here in ten paired shelf ecosystems of western and eutrophied boundary currents. Since 1965, such inferred onshore fluxes of aerosolized DOC poisons of HABs may have served as additional wind-borne organic carriers of toxic marine MeHg, phthalate, and DDT/DDE vectors, traced by radio-iodine isotopes to potentially elicit carcinomas. During these exchanges, as much as 40% of mercury poisonings may instead have been effected by inhalation of collateral HAB-carried marine neurotoxic aerosols of MeHg, not just from eating marine fish. Health impacts in some areas were additional asthma and pneumonia episodes, as well as endocrine disruptions among the same adjacent humans, with known large local rates of thyroid cancers, physician-diagnosed pulmonary problems, and ubiquitous high indices of mercury in hair, pesticides in breast milk, and phthalates in urine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, Morris

    2018-04-01

    Modern observational techniques are still not powerful enough to directly view planet formation, and so it is necessary to rely on theory. However, observations do give two important clues to the formation process. The first is that the most primitive form of material in interstellar space exists as a dilute gas. Some of this gas is unstable against gravitational collapse, and begins to contract. Because the angular momentum of the gas is not zero, it contracts along the spin axis, but remains extended in the plane perpendicular to that axis, so that a disk is formed. Viscous processes in the disk carry most of the mass into the center where a star eventually forms. In the process, almost as a by-product, a planetary system is formed as well. The second clue is the time required. Young stars are indeed observed to have gas disks, composed mostly of hydrogen and helium, surrounding them, and observations tell us that these disks dissipate after about 5 to 10 million years. If planets like Jupiter and Saturn, which are very rich in hydrogen and helium, are to form in such a disk, they must accrete their gas within 5 million years of the time of the formation of the disk. Any formation scenario one proposes must produce Jupiter in that time, although the terrestrial planets, which don't contain significant amounts of hydrogen and helium, could have taken longer to build. Modern estimates for the formation time of the Earth are of the order of 100 million years. To date there are two main candidate theories for producing Jupiter-like planets. The core accretion (CA) scenario supposes that any solid materials in the disk slowly coagulate into protoplanetary cores with progressively larger masses. If the core remains small enough it won't have a strong enough gravitational force to attract gas from the surrounding disk, and the result will be a terrestrial planet. If the core grows large enough (of the order of ten Earth masses), and the disk has not yet dissipated, then

  14. Effect of ingested human antibodies induced by RTS, S/AS01 malaria vaccination in children on Plasmodium falciparum oocyst formation and sporogony in mosquitoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Jongert, Erik; Deng, Bingbing

    2014-01-01

    falciparum CS protein, but the ability of serum from vaccinated individuals to inhibit sporogony in mosquitoes has not been evaluated. METHODS: Previously a double-blind, randomized trial of RTS,S/AS01 vaccine, as compared with rabies vaccine, in five- to 17-month old children in Tanzania was conducted....... In this study, polyclonal human antibodies were purified from the pools of sera taken one month after the third vaccination. IgGs were purified from four pools of sera from 25 RTS,S/AS01 vaccinated children each, and two pools of sera from 25 children vaccinated with rabies vaccine each. The ability...

  15. Sediment sequence and site formation processes at the Arbreda Cave, NE Iberian Peninsula, and implications on human occupation and climate change during the Last Glacial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kehl

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Arbreda Cave provides a detailed archaeological record of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic and is a key site for studying human occupation and cultural transitions in NE Iberia. Recently, studies of lake archives and archaeological sites presented new evidence on climate changes in NE Iberia correlating with Heinrich events. It, therefore, needs to be determined whether climate signals can be identified in the cave sequence of Arbreda, and if so, whether these signals can be correlated with stratigraphic indicators suggesting the continuity or discontinuity of human occupation. We conducted a high-resolution sedimentological and geochemical study, including micromorphological investigations, to shed light on stratigraphy, processes of sediment accumulation and post-depositional alteration in the cave. Seven major sediment units were distinguished which partly correlate with archaeological levels. The lower part of the sequence including Mousterian levels J and K consists of fluvial deposits truncated by a sharp erosional disconformity between Mousterian levels J and I. Strong enrichment with phosphorus and strontium reflect zoogenic inputs. The transition from Mousterian to Archaic Aurignacian in levels I and H, respectively, is reflected by more gradual changes in colour, grain size and geochemical composition. However, a peak in potentially wind-blown particles (40–125 μm in diameter reflects higher aeolian input, and banded microstructure suggests reworking of sediments at the interface. Both properties correlate with low density of finds suggesting low intensity of human occupation related to a dry spell. More arid conditions than during the Holocene are indicated for the Gravettian to Solutrean levels. These findings are in agreement with previous palaeoclimatic interpretations as based on palaeontological proxies. The detailed multi-proxy analyses of the sequence adds to our understanding on sediment accumulation and alteration in

  16. Inconsistent formation and nonfunction of insulin-positive cells from pancreatic endoderm derived from human embryonic stem cells in athymic nude rats

    OpenAIRE

    Matveyenko, Aleksey V.; Georgia, Senta; Bhushan, Anil; Butler, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell therapy has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to restore β-cell mass and function in T1DM. Recently, a group from Novocell (now ViaCyte) reported successful development of glucose-responsive islet-like structures after implantation of pancreatic endoderm (PE) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into immune-deficient mice. Our objective was to determine whether implantation of hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm from Novocell into athymic nude rats results in ...

  17. Roles of C-Terminal Region of Yeast and Human Rad52 in Rad51-Nucleoprotein Filament Formation and ssDNA Annealing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh V Khade

    Full Text Available Yeast Rad52 (yRad52 has two important functions at homologous DNA recombination (HR; annealing complementary single-strand DNA (ssDNA molecules and recruiting Rad51 recombinase onto ssDNA (recombination mediator activity. Its human homolog (hRAD52 has a lesser role in HR, and apparently lacks mediator activity. Here we show that yRad52 can load human Rad51 (hRAD51 onto ssDNA complexed with yeast RPA in vitro. This is biochemically equivalent to mediator activity because it depends on the C-terminal Rad51-binding region of yRad52 and on functional Rad52-RPA interaction. It has been reported that the N-terminal two thirds of both yRad52 and hRAD52 is essential for binding to and annealing ssDNA. Although a second DNA binding region has been found in the C-terminal region of yRad52, its role in ssDNA annealing is not clear. In this paper, we also show that the C-terminal region of yRad52, but not of hRAD52, is involved in ssDNA annealing. This suggests that the second DNA binding site is required for the efficient ssDNA annealing by yRad52. We propose an updated model of Rad52-mediated ssDNA annealing.

  18. Hormone-dependent bacterial growth, persistence and biofilm formation--a pilot study investigating human follicular fluid collected during IVF cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise S Pelzer

    Full Text Available Human follicular fluid, considered sterile, is aspirated as part of an in vitro fertilization (IVF cycle. However, it is easily contaminated by the trans-vaginal collection route and little information exists in its potential to support the growth of microorganisms. The objectives of this study were to determine whether human follicular fluid can support bacterial growth over time, whether the steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone (present at high levels within follicular fluid contribute to the in vitro growth of bacterial species, and whether species isolated from follicular fluid form biofilms. We found that bacteria in follicular fluid could persist for at least 28 weeks in vitro and that the steroid hormones stimulated the growth of some bacterial species, specifically Lactobacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp. Streptococcus spp. and E. coli. Several species, Lactobacillus spp., Propionibacterium spp., and Streptococcus spp., formed biofilms when incubated in native follicular fluids in vitro (18/24, 75%. We conclude that bacteria aspirated along with follicular fluid during IVF cycles demonstrate a persistent pattern of growth. This discovery is important since it can offer a new avenue for investigation in infertile couples.

  19. Humanidades Médicas,una contribución a la formación de recursos humanos en Salud Humanidades Médicas, a contribution to human resources formation within the Health Care sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alfredo Díaz Cruz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available El artículo aborda aspectos significativos de las Ciencias Sociales y Humanísticas que perfeccionan la práctica profesional en la Salud y expone algunos de los desafíos, iniciativas y progresos de la publicación científica latinoamericana; específicamente los de la revista Humanidades Médicas. Más adelante se describen el impacto científico y social de una estrategia organizativa para contribuir a la formación integral de recursos humanos en el sector de la Salud a través de la revista, los resultados esperados y las principales acciones dentro del proceso editorial y aquellas que aumentarán el impacto de la revista como producto editorial.This article deals with key aspects of the Social Sciences and Humanities that improve the professional practice in Health Care, and presents some of the challenges, projects, and advances of Latin American scientific publication, especially those of the journal Humanidades Médicas. Later on, it describes the scientific and social impact of an organizational strategy to contribute to the integrated formation of human resources in the Health Care sector through the journal. The strategys prospective results and main tasks within the editorial process and those to increase the journals impact as an editorial product are taken into account, as well.

  20. Inhibition of signaling between human CXCR4 and zebrafish ligands by the small molecule IT1t impairs the formation of triple-negative breast cancer early metastases in a zebrafish xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tulotta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a highly aggressive and recurrent type of breast carcinoma that is associated with poor patient prognosis. Because of the limited efficacy of current treatments, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. The CXCR4-CXCL12 chemokine signaling axis guides cell migration in physiological and pathological processes, including breast cancer metastasis. Although targeted therapies to inhibit the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis are under clinical experimentation, still no effective therapeutic approaches have been established to block CXCR4 in TNBC. To unravel the role of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis in the formation of TNBC early metastases, we used the zebrafish xenograft model. Importantly, we demonstrate that cross-communication between the zebrafish and human ligands and receptors takes place and human tumor cells expressing CXCR4 initiate early metastatic events by sensing zebrafish cognate ligands at the metastatic site. Taking advantage of the conserved intercommunication between human tumor cells and the zebrafish host, we blocked TNBC early metastatic events by chemical and genetic inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. We used IT1t, a potent CXCR4 antagonist, and show for the first time its promising anti-tumor effects. In conclusion, we confirm the validity of the zebrafish as a xenotransplantation model and propose a pharmacological approach to target CXCR4 in TNBC.

  1. The Distribution of Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Predicted by a Generalized Time-Dependent Model of Radiation-Induced Formation of Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem L.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    New experimental data show how chromosomal aberrations for low- and high-LET radiation are dependent on DSB repair deficiencies in wild-type, AT and NBS cells. We simulated the development of chromosomal aberrations in these cells lines in a stochastic track-structure-dependent model, in which different cells have different kinetics of DSB repair. We updated a previously formulated model of chromosomal aberrations, which was based on a stochastic Monte Carlo approach, to consider the time-dependence of DSB rejoining. The previous version of the model had an assumption that all DSBs would rejoin, and therefore we called it a time-independent model. The chromosomal-aberrations model takes into account the DNA and track structure for low- and high-LET radiations, and provides an explanation and prediction of the statistics of rare and more complex aberrations. We compared the program-simulated kinetics of DSB rejoining to the experimentally-derived bimodal exponential curves of the DSB kinetics. We scored the formation of translocations, dicentrics, acentric and centric rings, deletions, and inversions. The fraction of DSBs participating in aberrations was studied in relation to the rejoining time. Comparisons of simulated dose dependence for simple aberrations to the experimental dose-dependence for HF19, AT and NBS cells will be made.

  2. 3D analysis of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation in monkeys vaccinated with the first peptide inducing sterilizing immunity against human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A Patarroyo

    Full Text Available T-cell receptor gene rearrangements were studied in Aotus monkeys developing high antibody titers and sterilizing immunity against the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite upon vaccination with the modified synthetic peptide 24112, which was identified in the Merozoite Surface Protein 2 (MSP-2 and is known to bind to HLA-DRbeta1*0403 molecules with high capacity. Spectratyping analysis showed a preferential usage of Vbeta12 and Vbeta6 TCR gene families in 67% of HLA-DRbeta1*0403-like genotyped monkeys. Docking of peptide 24112 into the HLA-DRbeta1*0401-HA peptide-HA1.7TCR complex containing the VDJ rearrangements identified in fully protected monkeys showed a different structural signature compared to nonprotected monkeys. These striking results show the exquisite specificity of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation needed for inducing sterilizing immunity and provide important hints for a logical and rational methodology to develop multiepitopic, minimal subunit-based synthetic vaccines against infectious diseases, among them malaria.

  3. Biofilm formation and cellulose expression by Bordetella avium 197N, the causative agent of bordetellosis in birds and an opportunistic respiratory pathogen in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Kimberley; Folorunso, Ayorinde O; Deeni, Yusuf Y; Foster, Dona; Gorbatiuk, Oksana; Hapca, Simona M; Immoor, Corinna; Koza, Anna; Mohammed, Ibrahim U; Moshynets, Olena; Rogalsky, Sergii; Zawadzki, Kamil; Spiers, Andrew J

    2017-06-01

    Although bacterial cellulose synthase (bcs) operons are widespread within the Proteobacteria phylum, subunits required for the partial-acetylation of the polymer appear to be restricted to a few γ-group soil, plant-associated and phytopathogenic pseudomonads, including Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and several Pseudomonas syringae pathovars. However, a bcs operon with acetylation subunits has also been annotated in the unrelated β-group respiratory pathogen, Bordetella avium 197N. Our comparison of subunit protein sequences and GC content analyses confirms the close similarity between the B. avium 197N and pseudomonad operons and suggests that, in both cases, the cellulose synthase and acetylation subunits were acquired as a single unit. Using static liquid microcosms, we can confirm that B. avium 197N expresses low levels of cellulose in air-liquid interface biofilms and that biofilm strength and attachment levels could be increased by elevating c-di-GMP levels like the pseudomonads, but cellulose was not required for biofilm formation itself. The finding that B. avium 197N is capable of producing cellulose from a highly-conserved, but relatively uncommon bcs operon raises the question of what functional role this modified polymer plays during the infection of the upper respiratory tract or survival between hosts, and what environmental signals control its production. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. All rights reserved.

  4. Host genetics in granuloma formation: human-like lung pathology in mice with reciprocal genetic susceptibility to M. tuberculosis and M. avium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Kondratieva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of lung granulomata is a hallmark of infections caused by virulent mycobacteria, reflecting both protective host response that restricts infection spreading and inflammatory pathology. The role of host genetics in granuloma formation is not well defined. Earlier we have shown that mice of the I/St strain are extremely susceptible to Mycobacterium tuberculosis but resistant to M. avium infection, whereas B6 mice show a reversed pattern of susceptibility. Here, by directly comparing: (i characteristics of susceptibility to two infections in vivo; (ii architecture of lung granulomata assessed by immune staining; and (iii expression of genes encoding regulatory factors of neutrophil influx in the lung tissue, we demonstrate that genetic susceptibility of the host largely determines the pattern of lung pathology. Necrotizing granuloma surrounded by hypoxic zones, as well as a massive neutrophil influx, develop in the lungs of M. avium-infected B6 mice and in the lungs of M. tuberculosis-infected I/St mice, but not in the lungs of corresponding genetically resistant counterparts. The mirror-type lung tissue responses to two virulent mycobacteria indicate that the level of genetic susceptibility of the host to a given mycobacterial species largely determines characteristics of pathology, and directly demonstrate the importance of host genetics in pathogenesis.

  5. Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longair, Malcolm S

    2008-01-01

    This second edition of Galaxy Formation is an up-to-date text on astrophysical cosmology, expounding the structure of the classical cosmological models from a contemporary viewpoint. This forms the background to a detailed study of the origin of structure and galaxies in the Universe. The derivations of many of the most important results are derived by simple physical arguments which illuminate the results of more advanced treatments. A very wide range of observational data is brought to bear upon these problems, including the most recent results from WMAP, the Hubble Space Telescope, galaxy surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, studies of Type 1a supernovae, and many other observations.

  6. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribbin, J.

    1979-01-01

    The current debate on the origin and evolution of galaxies is reviewed and evidence to support the so-called 'isothermal' and 'adiabatic' fluctuation models considered. It is shown that new theories have to explain the formation of both spiral and elliptical galaxies and the reason for their differences. It is stated that of the most recent models the best indicates that rotating spiral galaxies are formed naturally when gas concentrates in the centre of a great halo and forms stars while ellipticals are explained by later interactions between spiral galaxies and merging, which can cancel out the rotation while producing an elliptical galaxy in which the stars, coming from two original galaxies, follow very elliptical, anisotropic orbits. (UK)

  7. Habit formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle S; Graybiel, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network.

  8. Habit formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  9. More surprises in the global greenhouse: Human health impacts from recent toxic marine aerosol formations, due to centennial alterations of world-wide coastal food webs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, J.J.; Lenes, J.M.; Weisberg, R.H.; Zheng, L.; Hu, C.; Fanning, K.A.; Snyder, R.; Smith, J.

    2017-01-01

    Reductions of zooplankton biomasses and grazing pressures were observed during overfishing-induced trophic cascades and concurrent oil spills at global scales. Recent phytoplankton increments followed, once Fe-, P-, and N-nutrient limitations of commensal diazotrophs and dinoflagellates were also eliminated by respective human desertification, deforestation, and eutrophication during climate changes. Si-limitation of diatoms instead ensued during these last anthropogenic perturbations of agricultural effluents and sewage loadings. Consequently, ~ 15% of total world-wide annual asthma trigger responses, i.e. amounting to ~ 45 million adjacent humans during 2004, resulted from brevetoxin and palytoxin poisons in aerosol forms of western boundary current origins. They were denoted by greater global harmful algal bloom [HAB] abundances and breathing attacks among sea-side children during prior decadal surveys of asthma prevalence, compiled here in ten paired shelf ecosystems of western and eutrophied boundary currents. Since 1965, such inferred onshore fluxes of aerosolized DOC poisons of HABs may have served as additional wind-borne organic carriers of toxic marine MeHg, phthalate, and DDT/DDE vectors, traced by radio-iodine isotopes to potentially elicit carcinomas. During these exchanges, as much as 40% of mercury poisonings may instead have been effected by inhalation of collateral HAB-carried marine neurotoxic aerosols of MeHg, not just from eating marine fish. Health impacts in some areas were additional asthma and pneumonia episodes, as well as endocrine disruptions among the same adjacent humans, with known large local rates of thyroid cancers, physician-diagnosed pulmonary problems, and ubiquitous high indices of mercury in hair, pesticides in breast milk, and phthalates in urine. - Highlights: • Oil spills, heavy metals, and overfishing decimated zooplankton grazers • Desert expansions and eutrophication concurrently fueled diazotrophs to set free

  10. The effect of particle agglomeration on the formation of a surface-connected compartment induced by hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human monocyte-derived macrophages☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Karin H.; Motskin, Michael; Philpott, Alistair J.; Routh, Alexander F.; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Duer, Melinda J.; Skepper, Jeremy N.

    2014-01-01

    Agglomeration dramatically affects many aspects of nanoparticle–cell interactions. Here we show that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles formed large agglomerates in biological medium resulting in extensive particle uptake and dose-dependent cytotoxicity in human macrophages. Particle citration and/or the addition of the dispersant Darvan 7 dramatically reduced mean agglomerate sizes, the amount of particle uptake and concomitantly cytotoxicity. More surprisingly, agglomeration governed the mode of particle uptake. Agglomerates were sequestered within an extensive, interconnected membrane labyrinth open to the extracellular space. In spite of not being truly intracellular, imaging studies suggest particle degradation occurred within this surface-connected compartment (SCC). Agglomerate dispersion prevented the SCC from forming, but did not completely inhibit nanoparticle uptake by other mechanisms. The results of this study could be relevant to understanding particle–cell interactions during developmental mineral deposition, in ectopic calcification in disease, and during application of hydroxyapatite nanoparticle vectors in biomedicine. PMID:24183166

  11. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  12. Sustained induction of cytochrome P4501A1 in human hepatoma cells by co-exposure to benzo[a]pyrene and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole underlies the synergistic effects on DNA adduct formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gábelová, Alena, E-mail: alena.gabelova@savba.sk [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Poláková, Veronika [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Prochazka, Gabriela [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Kretová, Miroslava; Poloncová, Katarína; Regendová, Eva; Luciaková, Katarína [Cancer Research Institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 7, 833 91 Bratislava (Slovakia); Segerbäck, Dan [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    To gain a deeper insight into the potential interactions between individual aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture, several benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and 7H-dibenzo[c,g]carbazole (DBC) binary mixtures were studied. The biological activity of the binary mixtures was investigated in the HepG2 and WB-F344 liver cell lines and the Chinese hamster V79 cell line that stably expresses the human cytochrome P4501A1 (hCYP1A1). In the V79 cells, binary mixtures, in contrast to individual carcinogens, caused a significant decrease in the levels of micronuclei, DNA adducts and gene mutations, but not in cell survival. Similarly, a lower frequency of micronuclei and levels of DNA adducts were found in rat liver WB-F344 cells treated with a binary mixture, regardless of the exposure time. The observed antagonism between B[a]P and DBC may be due to an inhibition of Cyp1a1 expression because cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC showed a decrease in Cyp1a1 mRNA levels. In human liver HepG2 cells exposed to binary mixtures for 2 h, a reduction in micronuclei frequency was also found. However, after a 24 h treatment, synergism between B[a]P and DBC was determined based on DNA adduct formation. Accordingly, the up-regulation of CYP1A1 expression was detected in HepG2 cells exposed to B[a]P:DBC. Our results show significant differences in the response of human and rat cells to B[a]P:DBC mixtures and stress the need to use multiple experimental systems when evaluating the potential risk of environmental pollutants. Our data also indicate that an increased expression of CYP1A1 results in a synergistic effect of B[a]P and DBC in human cells. As humans are exposed to a plethora of noxious chemicals, our results have important implications for human carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • B[a]P:DBC mixtures were less genotoxic in V79MZh1A1 cells than B[a]P and DBC alone. • An antagonism between B[a]P and DBC was determined in rat liver WB-F344 cells. • The inhibition of CYP1a1 expression by B[a]P:DBC mixture

  13. Liarozole inhibits transforming growth factor-β3–mediated extracellular matrix formation in human three-dimensional leiomyoma cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Gary; Malik, Minnie; Britten, Joy; Gilden, Melissa; Segars, James; Catherino, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of liarozole on transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) expression, TGF-β3 controlled profibrotic cytokines, and extracellular matrix formation in a three-dimensional (3D) leiomyoma model system. Design Molecular and immunohistochemical analysis in a cell line evaluated in a three-dimensional culture. Setting Laboratory study. Patient(s) None. Intervention(s) Treatment of leiomyoma and myometrial cells with liarozole and TGF-β3 in a three-dimensional culture system. Main Outcome Measure(s) Quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting to assess fold gene and protein expression of TGF-β3 and TGF-β3 regulated fibrotic cytokines: collagen 1A1 (COL1A1), fibronectin, and versican before and after treatment with liarozole, and confirmatory immunohistochemical stains of treated three-dimensional cultures. Result(s) Both TGF-β3 gene and protein expression were elevated in leiomyoma cells compared with myometrium in two-dimensional and 3D cultures. Treatment with liarozole decreased TGF-β3 gene and protein expression. Extracellular matrix components versican, COL1A1, and fibronectin were also decreased by liarozole treatment in 3D cultures. Treatment of 3D cultures with TGF-β3 increased gene expression and protein production of COL1A1, fibronectin, and versican. Conclusion(s) Liarozole decreased TGF-β3 and TGF-β3–mediated extracellular matrix expression in a 3D uterine leiomyoma culture system. PMID:24825427

  14. Dicentric chromosomes and γ-H2AX foci formation in lymphocytes of human blood samples exposed to a CT scanner: A direct comparison of dose response relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golfier, S.; Jost, G.; Pietsch, H.; Lengsfeld, P.; Eckardt-Schupp, F.; Schmid, E.; Voth, M.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments using the induction of dicentric chromosomes (dicentrics) as well as the γ-H2AX foci formation in lymphocytes of blood samples from a healthy donor were performed to directly evaluate the radiation sensitivity of both biological endpoints. For computed tomography scans at dose levels from 0.025 to 1 Gy, a linear-quadratic dose - response relationship for dicentrics and a linear dose - response relationship for γ-H2AX foci were obtained. The coefficients of the dose - response relationship for dicentrics are α = (3.76 ± 0.29) x 10 -2 Gy -1 and β = (5.54 ± 0.45) x 10 -2 Gy -2 , the linear coefficient for γ-H2AX foci is (7.38 ± 0.11) Gy -1 . The findings indicate that scoring of dicentrics as well as microscopic analysis of γ-H2AX foci are sensitive methods to quantify a radiation-induced biological damage at low doses. However, since γ-H2AX foci can be partially repaired within a few hours, biological damages present for days or even months, which constitute the clinically relevant endpoints, can only be quantified reliably by scoring of chromosome aberrations. Thus currently the quantification of dicentrics or reciprocal translocations remains the recommended method for estimating the effect of exposures to low dose levels of radiation ('biological dosimetry'). However, owing to the high radiation sensitivity of the γ-H2AX foci assay observed in the present study, further investigations on the effectiveness of low-linear energy transfer radiation qualities in producing γ-H2AX foci in lymphocytes from healthy donors should be performed. (authors)

  15. Boeravinone B, A Novel Dual Inhibitor of NorA Bacterial Efflux Pump of Staphylococcus aureus and Human P-Glycoprotein, Reduces the Biofilm Formation and Intracellular Invasion of Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Samsher; Kalia, Nitin P; Joshi, Prashant; Kumar, Ajay; Sharma, Parduman R; Kumar, Ashok; Bharate, Sandip B; Khan, Inshad A

    2017-01-01

    This study elucidated the role of boeravinone B, a NorA multidrug efflux pump inhibitor, in biofilm inhibition. The effects of boeravinone B plus ciprofloxacin, a NorA substrate, were evaluated in NorA-overexpressing, wild-type, and knocked-out Staphylococcus aureus (SA-1199B, SA-1199, and SA-K1758, respectively). The mechanism of action was confirmed using the ethidium bromide accumulation and efflux assay. The role of boeravinone B as a human P -glycoprotein ( P -gp) inhibitor was examined in the LS-180 (colon cancer) cell line. Moreover, its role in the inhibition of biofilm formation and intracellular invasion of S. aureus in macrophages was studied. Boeravinone B reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin against S. aureus and its methicillin-resistant strains; the effect was stronger in SA-1199B. Furthermore, time-kill kinetics revealed that boeravinone B plus ciprofloxacin, at subinhibitory concentration (0.25 × MIC), is as equipotent as that at the MIC level. This combination also had a reduced mutation prevention concentration. Boeravinone B reduced the efflux of ethidium bromide and increased the accumulation, thus strengthening the role as a NorA inhibitor. Biofilm formation was reduced by four-eightfold of the minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin, effectively preventing bacterial entry into macrophages. Boeravinone B effectively inhibited P -gp with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of 64.85 μM. The study concluded that boeravinone B not only inhibits the NorA-mediated efflux of fluoroquinolones but also considerably inhibits the biofilm formation of S. aureus. Its P -gp inhibition activity demonstrates its potential as a bioavailability and bioefficacy enhancer.

  16. How Bioethics is Complementing Human Rights in Realizing Health Access for Clinical Trial Participants: The Case of Formative PrEP Access in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jerome

    2015-06-11

    Following the demise of apartheid, human rights in South Africa are now constitutionally enshrined.The right to health in South Africa's Constitution has been credited with transforming the lives of millions of people by triggering programmatic reforms in HIV treatment and the prevention of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV.However, a constitutionally enshrined right to health offers no guarantee that clinical trial participants will enjoy post-trial access to beneficial interventions. Using access to HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in South Africa as an example, this paper argues that adherence to bioethics norms could realize the right to health for trial participants following the end of a clinical trial. Copyright 2015 Singh. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

  17. Vinclozolin, a widely used fungizide, enhanced BaP-induced micronucleus formation in human derived hepatoma cells by increasing CYP1A1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Jiang; Lu, Wen-qing; Roos, Peter H; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2005-10-15

    Vinclozolin, a widely used fungicide, can be identified as a residue in numerous vegetable and fruit samples. To get insight in its genetic toxicity, we investigated the genotoxic effect of vinclozolin in the human derived hepatoma cell line HepG2 using the micronucleus (MN) assay. Additionally, to evaluate the co- or anti-mutagenic potency of vinclozolin, we treated HepG2 cells with different concentrations of vinclozolin for 24 h. Subsequently, the cells were exposed to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) for 1h. Exposure of HepG2 cells to 50-400 microM vinclozolin alone did not cause any induction of micronuclei. However, a pronounced co-mutagenic effect was observed. MN frequencies caused by BaP increased by 30.6%, 52.8% and 65.3% after pretreatment of the cell cultures with 50, 100 and 200 microM vinclozolin, respectively. The highest concentration (400 microM) of vinclozolin tested caused cytotoxicity. Therefore, micronuclei were not considered for that concentration. To clarify the mechanism of cogenotoxicity, we assayed cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), which plays a pivotal role in activation of BaP. Cells exposed to vinclozolin led to significant increase of CYP1A1 expression in Western blot. The result suggested that induction of CYP1A1 by vinclozolin account for its enhancing effect on genotoxicity caused by BaP.

  18. Bisphenol A accelerates toxic amyloid formation of human islet amyloid polypeptide: a possible link between bisphenol A exposure and type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Gong

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a chemical compound widely used in manufacturing plastic products. Recent epidemiological studies suggest BPA exposure is positively associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, however the mechanisms underlying this link remain unclear. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP is a hormone synthesized and secreted by the pancreatic β-cells. Misfolding of hIAPP into toxic oligomers and mature fibrils can disrupt cell membrane and lead to β-cell death, which is regarded as one of the causative factors of T2DM. To test whether there are any connections between BPA exposure and hIAPP misfolding, we investigated the effects of BPA on hIAPP aggregation using thioflavin-T based fluorescence, transmission electronic microscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, size-exclusion chromatography, fluorescence-dye leakage assay in an artificial micelle system and the generation of reactive oxygen species in INS-1 cells. We demonstrated that BPA not only dose-dependently promotes the aggregation of hIAPP and enhances the membrane disruption effects of hIAPP, but also promotes the extent of hIAPP aggregation related oxidative stress. Taken together, our results suggest that BPA exposure increased T2DM risk may involve the exacerbated toxic aggregation of hIAPP.

  19. 3D Culture for Self-Formation of the Cerebellum from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Through Induction of the Isthmic Organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muguruma, Keiko

    2017-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) possess self-organizing abilities in 3D culture. This property has been demonstrated in recent studies, including the generation of various neuroectodermal and endodermal tissues. For example, PSCs are able to differentiate into specific type of neural tissues, such as the neocortex and the optic cup, in response to local positional information brought about by signals during embryogenesis. In contrast, the generation of cerebellar tissue from PSCs requires a secondary induction by a signaling center, called the isthmic organizer, which first appears in the cell aggregate in 3D culture. Such developmental complexity of cerebellum has hampered establishment of effective differentiation culture system from PSCs, thus far.We recently reported that cerebellar neurons are generated from human PSCs (hPSCs). In this chapter, we describe an efficient protocol for differentiation of 3D cerebellar neuroepithelium from hPSCs. We also describe the protocols for further differentiation into specific neurons in the cerebellar cortex, such as Purkinje cells and the granule cells.

  20. Two-way regulation between cells and aligned collagen fibrils: local 3D matrix formation and accelerated neural differentiation of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Zhu, Bofan; Strakova, Zuzana; Wang, Rong

    2014-08-08

    It has been well established that an aligned matrix provides structural and signaling cues to guide cell polarization and cell fate decision. However, the modulation role of cells in matrix remodeling and the feedforward effect on stem cell differentiation have not been studied extensively. In this study, we report on the concerted changes of human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) and the highly ordered collagen fibril matrix in response to cell-matrix interaction. With high-resolution imaging, we found the hdpPSCs interacted with the matrix by deforming the cell shape, harvesting the nearby collagen fibrils, and reorganizing the fibrils around the cell body to transform a 2D matrix to a localized 3D matrix. Such a unique 3D matrix prompted high expression of β-1 integrin around the cell body that mediates and facilitates the stem cell differentiation toward neural cells. The study offers insights into the coordinated, dynamic changes at the cell-matrix interface and elucidates cell modulation of its matrix to establish structural and biochemical cues for effective cell growth and differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural differences between the avian and human H7N9 hemagglutinin proteins are attributable to modifications in salt bridge formation: a computational study with implications in viral evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueno, Marni E; Imai, Kenichi; Tamura, Muneaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) is a homotrimeric glycoprotein composed of a fibrous globular stem supporting a globular head containing three sialic acid binding sites responsible for infection. The H7N9 strain has consistently infected an avian host, however, the novel 2013 strain is now capable of infecting a human host which would imply that the HA in both strains structurally differ. A better understanding of the structural differences between the avian and human H7N9 strains may shed light into viral evolution and transmissibility. In this study, we elucidated the structural differences between the avian and human H7N9 strains. Throughout the study, we generated HA homology models, verified the quality of each model, superimposed HA homology models to determine structural differences, and, likewise, elucidated the probable cause for these structural differences. We detected two different types of structural differences between the novel H7N9 human and representative avian strains, wherein, one type (Pattern-1) showed three non-overlapping regions while the other type (Pattern-2) showed only one non-overlapping region. In addition, we found that superimposed HA homology models exhibiting Pattern-1 contain three non-overlapping regions designated as: Region-1 (S1571-A1601); Region-3 (R2621-S2651); and Region-4 (S2701-D2811), whereas, superimposed HA homology models showing Pattern-2 only contain one non-overlapping region designated as Region-2 (S1371-S1451). We attributed the two patterns we observed to either the presence of salt bridges involving the E1141 residue or absence of the R1411:D771 salt bridge. Interestingly, comparison between the human H7N7 and H7N9 HA homology models showed high structural similarity. We propose that the putative absence of the R1411:D771 salt bridge coupled with the putative presence of the E1141:R2621 and E1141:K2641 salt bridges found in the 2013 H7N9 HA homology model is associated to human-type receptor binding. This

  2. Structural differences between the avian and human H7N9 hemagglutinin proteins are attributable to modifications in salt bridge formation: a computational study with implications in viral evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni E Cueno

    Full Text Available Influenza A hemagglutinin (HA is a homotrimeric glycoprotein composed of a fibrous globular stem supporting a globular head containing three sialic acid binding sites responsible for infection. The H7N9 strain has consistently infected an avian host, however, the novel 2013 strain is now capable of infecting a human host which would imply that the HA in both strains structurally differ. A better understanding of the structural differences between the avian and human H7N9 strains may shed light into viral evolution and transmissibility. In this study, we elucidated the structural differences between the avian and human H7N9 strains. Throughout the study, we generated HA homology models, verified the quality of each model, superimposed HA homology models to determine structural differences, and, likewise, elucidated the probable cause for these structural differences. We detected two different types of structural differences between the novel H7N9 human and representative avian strains, wherein, one type (Pattern-1 showed three non-overlapping regions while the other type (Pattern-2 showed only one non-overlapping region. In addition, we found that superimposed HA homology models exhibiting Pattern-1 contain three non-overlapping regions designated as: Region-1 (S1571-A1601; Region-3 (R2621-S2651; and Region-4 (S2701-D2811, whereas, superimposed HA homology models showing Pattern-2 only contain one non-overlapping region designated as Region-2 (S1371-S1451. We attributed the two patterns we observed to either the presence of salt bridges involving the E1141 residue or absence of the R1411:D771 salt bridge. Interestingly, comparison between the human H7N7 and H7N9 HA homology models showed high structural similarity. We propose that the putative absence of the R1411:D771 salt bridge coupled with the putative presence of the E1141:R2621 and E1141:K2641 salt bridges found in the 2013 H7N9 HA homology model is associated to human-type receptor binding

  3. Lack of WDR36 leads to preimplantation embryonic lethality in mice and delays the formation of small subunit ribosomal RNA in human cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallenberger, Martin; Meinel, Dominik M; Kroeber, Markus; Wegner, Michael; Milkereit, Philipp; Bösl, Michael R; Tamm, Ernst R

    2011-02-01

    Mutations in WD repeat domain 36 gene (WDR36) play a causative role in some forms of primary open-angle glaucoma, a leading cause of blindness worldwide. WDR36 is characterized by the presence of multiple WD40 repeats and shows homology to Utp21, an essential protein component of the yeast small subunit (SSU) processome required for maturation of 18S rRNA. To clarify the functional role of WDR36 in the mammalian organism, we generated and investigated mutant mice with a targeted deletion of Wdr36. In parallel experiments, we used RNA interference to deplete WDR36 mRNA in mouse embryos and cultured human trabecular meshwork (HTM-N) cells. Deletion of Wdr36 in the mouse caused preimplantation embryonic lethality, and essentially similar effects were observed when WDR36 mRNA was depleted in mouse embryos by RNA interference. Depletion of WDR36 mRNA in HTM-N cells caused apoptotic cell death and upregulation of mRNA for BAX, TP53 and CDKN1A. By immunocytochemistry, staining for WDR36 was observed in the nucleolus of cells, which co-localized with that of nucleolar proteins such as nucleophosmin and PWP2. In addition, recombinant and epitope-tagged WDR36 localized to the nucleolus of HTM-N cells. By northern blot analysis, a substantial decrease in 21S rRNA, the precursor of 18S rRNA, was observed following knockdown of WDR36. In addition, metabolic-labeling experiments consistently showed a delay of 18S rRNA maturation in WDR36-depleted cells. Our results provide evidence that WDR36 is an essential protein in mammalian cells which is involved in the nucleolar processing of SSU 18S rRNA.

  4. High Uric Acid Activates the ROS-AMPK Pathway, Impairs CD68 Expression and Inhibits OxLDL-Induced Foam-Cell Formation in a Human Monocytic Cell Line, THP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohuan Luo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hyperuricemia is part of the metabolic-syndrome cluster of abdominal obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Monocytes/macrophages are critical in the development of metabolic syndrome, including gout, obesity and atherosclerosis. However, how high uric acid (HUA exposure affects monocyte/macrophage function remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of HUA exposure in monocytes/macrophages and its impact on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL-induced foam-cell formation in a human monocytic cell line, THP-1. Methods: We primed THP-1 cells with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA for differentiation, then exposed cells to HUA and detected the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and analyzed the level of phospho-AMPKα. THP-1 cells were pre-incubated with Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger, or HUA before PMA, to assess CD68 expression and phospho-AMPKα level. PMA-primed THP-1 cells were pre-treated with oxLDL before Compound C and HUA treatment. Western blot analysis was used to examine the levels of phospho-AMPKα, CD68, ABCG1, ABCA1, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and NF-κB (p65. Flow cytometry was used to assess ROS production and CD68 expression in live cells. Oil-red O staining was used to observe oxLDL uptake in cells. Results: HUA treatment increased ROS production in PMA-primed THP-1 cells; NAC blocked HUA-induced oxidative stress. HUA treatment time-dependently increased phospho-AMPKα level in PMA-primed THP-1 cells. The HUA-induced oxidative stress increased phospho-AMPKα levels, which was blocked by NAC. HUA treatment impaired CD68 expression during cell differentiation by activating the AMPK pathway, which was reversed by Compound C treatment. Finally, HUA treatment inhibited oxLDL uptake in the formation of foam cells in THP-1 cells, which was blocked by Compound C treatment. HUA treatment

  5. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayah, Zaid H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ghebeh, Hazem [Stem Cell & Tissue Re-Engineering, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Alhaider, Abdulqader A. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Camel Biomedical Research Unit, College of Pharmacy and Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); El-Kadi, Ayman O.S. [Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Korashy, Hesham M., E-mail: hkorashy@ksu.edu.sa [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-04-15

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand-independent mechanism

  6. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maayah, Zaid H.; Ghebeh, Hazem; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.; Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad; Korashy, Hesham M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand-independent mechanism

  7. Suppression of the formation of polyamines and macromolecules by dl-α-difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) in phytohaemagglutinin-activated human lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jänne, Juhani; Hovi, Tapani; Hölttä, Erkki

    1979-01-01

    1. The activation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by phytohaemagglutinin in vitro was accompanied by striking increases in the concentrations of the natural polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine. 2. The enhanced accumulation of polyamines could be almost totally abolished by dl-α-difluoromethylornithine, a newly discovered irreversible inhibitor of l-ornithine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.17), or by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) {1,1′-[(methylethanediylidene)dinitrilo]diguanidine}, an inhibitor of S-adenosyl-l-methionine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50). The inhibition of polyamine accumulation was associated with a marked suppression of DNA synthesis, which was partially or totally reversed by low concentrations of exogenous putrescine, spermidine, spermine and cadaverine and by higher concentrations of 1,3-diaminopropane. 3. In contrast with some earlier studies, we found that methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), at concentrations that were sufficient to prevent polyamine accumulation, also caused a clear inhibition of protein synthesis in the activated lymphocytes. Similar results were obtained with difluoromethylornithine. The decrease in protein synthesis caused by both compounds preceded the impairment of DNA synthesis. The inhibition of protein synthesis by difluoromethylornithine was fully reversed by exogenous putrescine, spermidine and spermine, and that caused by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) by spermidine and spermine. In further support of the idea that the inhibition of protein synthesis by these compounds was related to the polyamine depletion, we found that difluoromethylornithine caused a dose-dependent decrease in the incorporation of [14C]leucine into lymphocyte proteins which closely correlated with the decreased concentrations of cellular spermidine. 4. Difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) also elicited a variable depression in the incorporation of [3H]uridine and [14C]adenine into total RNA. The

  8. Suppression of the formation of polyamines and macromolecules by DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) in phytohaemagglutinin-activated human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölttä, E; Jänne, J; Hovi, T

    1979-01-15

    1. The activation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by phytohaemagglutinin in vitro was accompanied by striking increases in the concentrations of the natural polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine. 2. The enhanced accumulation of polyamines could be almost totally abolished by dl-alpha-difluoromethylornithine, a newly discovered irreversible inhibitor of l-ornithine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.17), or by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) {1,1'-[(methylethanediylidene)dinitrilo]diguanidine}, an inhibitor of S-adenosyl-l-methionine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.50). The inhibition of polyamine accumulation was associated with a marked suppression of DNA synthesis, which was partially or totally reversed by low concentrations of exogenous putrescine, spermidine, spermine and cadaverine and by higher concentrations of 1,3-diaminopropane. 3. In contrast with some earlier studies, we found that methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), at concentrations that were sufficient to prevent polyamine accumulation, also caused a clear inhibition of protein synthesis in the activated lymphocytes. Similar results were obtained with difluoromethylornithine. The decrease in protein synthesis caused by both compounds preceded the impairment of DNA synthesis. The inhibition of protein synthesis by difluoromethylornithine was fully reversed by exogenous putrescine, spermidine and spermine, and that caused by methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) by spermidine and spermine. In further support of the idea that the inhibition of protein synthesis by these compounds was related to the polyamine depletion, we found that difluoromethylornithine caused a dose-dependent decrease in the incorporation of [(14)C]leucine into lymphocyte proteins which closely correlated with the decreased concentrations of cellular spermidine. 4. Difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) also elicited a variable depression in the incorporation of [(3)H]uridine and [(14)C]adenine into total RNA

  9. Sexualidade humana na formação do enfermeiro Sexualidad humana en la formación del enfermero Human sexuality in nurses' formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elucir Gir

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Aplicou-se um questionário aos alunos do curso de graduação em Enfermagem, com o objetivo de se verificar as noções que estes sujeitos apresentam acerca da temática sexualidade, no término do curso de graduação, bem como identificar alguns temas da sexualidade vivenciados por ocasião de suas atividades acadêmicas. Os resultados mostraram que os alunos apresentam, em sua maioria, noções fluídas e limitadas, sem embasamento norteador sobre sexualidade humana, além de empregarem os termos "sexo" e "sexualidade" como sinônimos. Os alunos referem ter necessidade de adquirir conhecimento sobre sexualidade. Apresenta-se, ainda, a classificação do embasamento recebido, as disciplinas do curso de graduação que viabilizaram discussões e as situações-tema enfrentadas ou abordadas nas atividades acadêmicas.Se aplicó un cuestionario a los alumnos del curso de pre-grado en enfermería, en el término del mismo, con el objetivo de verificar las acciones que estos sujetos presentan acerca de la temática de sexualidad, y también identificar algunos temas de la sexualidad vividos en sus actividades académicas. Los resultados demostraron que los alumnos presentan, en su mayoría, nociones fluidas y limitadas, sin una base de orientación sobre la sexualidad humana, además de usar el término "sexo" y "sexualidad" como sinónimos. Los alumnos refieren necesidad en adquirir conocimientos sobre sexualidad. Se presenta, además, la clasificación del conocimiento previo recibido, las asignaturas del curso de pre-grado que permitieron discusiones y las situaciones-tema enfrentadas y/o abordadas en las actividades académicas.A questionnaire was applied to undergraduate nursing students in order to verify the ideas on the sexuality theme they had absorbed from the notions they received in their nursing undergraduate program. Results showed that most of these students have slightly, limited and unbased notions concerning human sexuality. They

  10. Distinct mechanisms of axonal globule formation in mice expressing human wild type α-synuclein or dementia with Lewy bodies-linked P123H ß-synuclein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekigawa Akio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axonopathy is critical in the early pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB. Axonal swellings such as globules and spheroids are a distinct feature of axonopathy and our recent study showed that transgenic (tg mice expressing DLB-linked P123H β-synuclein (P123H βS were characterized by P123H βS-immunoreactive axonal swellings (P123H βS-globules. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to evaluate α-synuclein (αS-immunoreactive axonal swellings (αS-globules in the brains of tg mice expressing human wild-type αS and to compare them with the globules in P123H βS tg mice. Results In αS tg mice, αS-globules were formed in an age-dependent manner in various brain regions, including the thalamus and basal ganglia. These globules were composed of autophagosome-like membranous structures and were reminiscent of P123H βS-globules in P123H βS tg mice. In the αS-globules, frequent clustering and deformation of mitochondria were observed. These changes were associated with oxidative stress, based on staining of nitrated αS and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE. In accord with the absence of mitochondria in the P123H βS-globules, staining of nitrated αS and 4-HNE in these globules was weaker than that for αS-globules. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2, the PARK8 of familial PD, was detected exclusively in αS-globules, suggesting a specific role of this molecule in these globules. Conclusions Lysosomal pathology was similarly observed for both αS- and P123H βS-globules, while oxidative stress was associated with the αS-globules, and to a lesser extent with the P123H βS-globules. Other pathologies, such as mitochondrial alteration and LRRK2 accumulation, were exclusively detected for αS-globules. Collectively, both αS- and P123H βS-globules were formed through similar but distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Our findings suggest that synuclein

  11. Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) stimulates cAMP formation in human mononuclear cells and inhibits angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Gc protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) have been studied in cancer and other conditions where angiogenesis is deregulated. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that the mitogenic response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to GcMAF was associated with 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) formation. The effect was dose dependent, and maximal stimulation was achieved using 0.1 ng/ml. Heparin inhibited the stimulatory effect of GcMAF on PBMCs. In addition, we demonstrate that GcMAF (1 ng/ml) inhibited prostaglandin E(1)- and human breast cancer cell-stimulated angiogenesis in chick embryo chorionallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Finally, we tested different GcMAF preparations on CAM, and the assay proved to be a reliable, reproducible and inexpensive method to determine the relative potencies of different preparations and their stability; we observed that storage at room temperature for 15 days decreased GcMAF potency by about 50%. These data could prove useful for upcoming clinical trials on GcMAF.

  12. In-vitro formation of the blood-testis barrier during long-term organotypic culture of human prepubertal tissue: comparison with a large cohort of pre/peripubertal boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Michele, F; Poels, J; Giudice, M G; De Smedt, F; Ambroise, J; Vermeulen, M; Gruson, D; Wyns, C

    2018-03-12

    How does the formation of the blood-testis barrier (BTB), as reflected by the expression of connexin 43 and claudin 11 proteins during the pubertal transition period, take place in vitro compared to samples from a large cohort of pre/peripubertal boys? The BTB connexin 43 and claudin 11 expression patterns appeared to be partially achieved in organotypic culture when compared to that in samples from 71 pre/peripubertal patients. Although alterations in the protein expression patterns of the BTB, whose main components are connexin 43 and claudin 11, are known to be associated with impaired spermatogenesis in mice and adult men, there is a lack of knowledge on its formation in pre-peripubertal human tissue both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, despite Sertoli cell (SC) maturation during long-term organotypic culture of immature testicular tissue (ITT), initiation of spermatogenesis has not yet been achieved. Histological sections from 71 pre-peripubertal patients were evaluated for the formation of the BTB acting as in-vivo controls according to age, SC maturation, clinical signs of puberty and germ cell differentiation. Testicular tissue fragments retrieved from three prepubertal boys were cultured in a long term organotypic system to analyze the BTB formation and expression pattern in correlation with SC maturation. Testicular histological sections from 71 patients aged 0-16 years who underwent a biopsy between 2005 and 2014 to preserve their fertility before gonadotoxic treatment were examined. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results for connexin 43 and claudin 11 as BTB markers, using a semi-quantitative score for their expression, and for Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), as SC maturation marker, were analyzed. Germ cell differentiation was evaluated on Hematoxylin-Eosin sections. Tanner stages at the time of biopsy were recorded from medical files. A longitudinal analysis of connexin 43, claudin 11 and AMH expressions on immunohistological sections of organotypic

  13. Medusae Fossae Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  14. Induction and disappearance of γH2AX foci and formation of micronuclei after exposure of human lymphocytes to ⁶⁰Co γ-rays and p(66)+ Be(40) neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersickel, Veerle; Beukes, Philip; Van Bockstaele, Bram; Depuydt, Julie; Vral, Anne; Slabbert, Jacobus

    2014-02-01

    To investigate both the formation of micronuclei (MN) and the induction and subsequent loss of phosphorylated histone H2AX foci (γH2AX foci) after in vitro exposure of human lymphocytes to either (60)Co γ-rays or p(66)+ Be(40) neutrons. MN dose response (DR) curves were obtained by exposing isolated lymphocytes of 10 different donors to doses ranging from 0-4 Gy γ-rays or 0-2 Gy neutrons. Also, γH2AX foci DR curves were obtained following exposure to doses ranging from 0-0.5 Gy of either γ-rays or neutrons. Foci kinetics for lymphocytes for a single donor exposed to 0.5 Gy γ-rays or neutrons were studied up to 24 hours post-irradiation. Micronuclei yields following neutron exposure were consistently higher compared to that from (60)Co γ-rays. All MN yields were over-dispersed compared to a Poisson distribution. Over-dispersion was higher after neutron irradiation for all doses > 0.1 Gy. Up to 4 hours post-irradiation lower yields of neutron-induced γH2AX foci were observed. Between 4 and 24 hours the numbers of foci from neutrons were consistently higher than that from γ-rays. The half-live of foci disappearance is only marginally longer for neutrons compared to that from γ-rays. Foci formations were more likely to be over-dispersed for neutron irradiations. Although neutrons are more effective to induce MN, the absolute number of induced γH2AX foci are less at first compared to γ-rays. With time neutron-induced foci are more persistent. These findings are helpful for using γH2AX foci in biodosimetry and to understand the repair of neutron-induced cellular damage.

  15. Residue Phe112 of the Human-Type Corrinoid Adenosyltransferase (PduO) Enzyme of Lactobacillus reuteri Is Critical to the Formation of the Four-Coordinate Co(II) Corrinoid Substrate and to the Activity of the Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mera, Paola E.; St. Maurice, Martin; Rayment, Ivan; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; UW

    2009-06-08

    ATP:Corrinoid adenosyltransferases (ACAs) catalyze the transfer of the adenosyl moiety from ATP to cob(I)alamin via a four-coordinate cob(II)alamin intermediate. At present, it is unknown how ACAs promote the formation of the four-coordinate corrinoid species needed for activity. The published high-resolution crystal structure of the ACA from Lactobacillus reuteri (LrPduO) in complex with ATP and cob(II)alamin shows that the environment around the alpha face of the corrin ring consists of bulky hydrophobic residues. To understand how these residues promote the generation of the four-coordinate cob(II)alamin, variants of the human-type ACA enzyme from L. reuteri (LrPduO) were kinetically and structurally characterized. These studies revealed that residue Phe112 is critical in the displacement of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB) from its coordination bond with the Co ion of the ring, resulting in the formation of the four-coordinate species. An F112A substitution resulted in a 80% drop in the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. The explanation for this loss of activity was obtained from the crystal structure of the mutant protein, which showed cob(II)alamin bound in the active site with DMB coordinated to the cobalt ion. The crystal structure of an LrPduO(F112H) variant showed a DMB-off/His-on interaction between the corrinoid and the enzyme, whose catalytic efficiency was 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of the wild-type protein. The analysis of the kinetic parameters of LrPduO(F112H) suggests that the F112H substitution negatively impacts product release. Substitutions of other hydrophobic residues in the Cbl binding pocket did not result in significant defects in catalytic efficiency in vitro; however, none of the variant enzymes analyzed in this work supported AdoCbl biosynthesis in vivo.

  16. Interactive effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and retinoids on proliferation and differentiation in cultured human keratinocytes: quantification of cross-linked envelope formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkers, J.A.M.; Hassing, I.; Spenkelink, B.; Brouwer, A.; Blaauboer, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    Dioxins are potent inducers of chloracne in humans. This skin aberration can be interpreted as an altered differentiation pattern of acinar sebaceous base cells and a change in the rate of terminal differentiation of the keratinocytes. We measured this rate induced by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in primary cultures of human keratinocytes. As parameters for differentiation, we quantified the 35 S-methionine incorporation into cross-linked envelopes (revealing the total CLE biomass), as well as the number of microscopically visible CLEs. It was shown that TCDD is a very potent inducer of both CLE biomass and number with a half-maximal effect concentration (EC 50 ) of 1.4 nM. CLE biomass was maximally increased 10-fold and the number of cells in culture producing a CLE was increased from 15% in control cultures to maximally 75% of the cells in TCDD-treated cultures. Both effects were Ca 2+ -dependent and increased with elevated cell density, being optimal in post-confluent cultures. Retinoic acid dose-dependently decreased the effect of 10 -8 M TCDD, 10 -6 M having a nearly complete antagonistic action. This interaction of retinoic acid with TCDD-induced differentiation was non-competitive. Retinol was equally potent as an antagonist of the TCDD-induced elevation of CLE formation as compared with retinoic acid. Retinyl palmitate and etretinate were not very effective as TCDD antagonists. Supplementation of hydrocortisone suppressed the TCDD-induced keratinocyte differentiation. It was concluded that CLE biomass quantification provides a reliable and sensitive parameter for keratinocyte differentiation. In this in vitro system it is shown that TCDD strongly induces a switch from proliferation to terminal differentiation and that this effect can be antagonized effectively by retinoic acid and retinol. (orig.)

  17. KINETICS AND MECHANISM OF PRUSSIAN BLUE FORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    the 137Cs from radioactive waste solutions [7] and from humans and animals exposed to nuclear accidents [8]. PB and ... ferrocyanide ion resulting in formation of PB is used as a qualitative test for ferric ion. Although. Prussian ..... zeolites [21].

  18. Value Formation of Basic Anthropological Connectivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Preben

    2009-01-01

    and their political value formations. In this regard, the interdisciplinary contribution of Psychology is to explore how humans as active participants can and will participate in handling such value tasks. The article presents a general, theoretical, political-psychological model, which unites precisely these two......Abstract. Human beings live and thrive in surroundings based on the human condition of certain basic anthropological connectivities. Amongst the vital political life tasks can be mentioned the ones of establishing, maintaining and critically/conformably developing these basic conditions...... aspects: The political value formations of the basic anthropological conditions in human life, and the capability and will to participate in solving the subsequent value tasks....

  19. TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 stimulation induces chondrogenesis in expanded human articular chondrocytes and marrow-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan K; Huey, Daniel J; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2015-03-01

    Replacement of degenerated cartilage with cell-based cartilage products may offer a long-term solution to halt arthritis' degenerative progression. Chondrocytes are frequently used in cell-based FDA-approved cartilage products; yet human marrow-derived stromal cells (hMSCs) show significant translational potential, reducing donor site morbidity and maintaining their undifferentiated phenotype with expansion. This study sought to investigate the effects of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), growth/differentiation factor 5 (GDF-5), and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) during postexpansion chondrogenesis in human articular chondrocytes (hACs) and to compare chondrogenesis in passaged hACs with that of passaged hMSCs. Through serial expansion, chondrocytes dedifferentiated, decreasing expression of chondrogenic genes while increasing expression of fibroblastic genes. However, following expansion, 10 ng/mL TGF-β1, 100 ng/mL GDF-5, or 100 ng/mL BMP-2 supplementation during three-dimensional aggregate culture each upregulated one or more markers of chondrogenic gene expression in both hACs and hMSCs. Additionally, in both cell types, the combination of TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 induced the greatest upregulation of chondrogenic genes, that is, Col2A1, Col2A1/Col1A1 ratio, SOX9, and ACAN, and synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix, that is, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and ratio of collagen II/I. Finally, TGF-β1, GDF-5, and BMP-2 stimulation yielded mechanically robust cartilage rich in collagen II and GAGs in both cell types, following 4 weeks maturation. This study illustrates notable success in using the self-assembling method to generate robust, scaffold-free neocartilage constructs using expanded hACs and hMSCs. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Instituto de Farmacia y Alimentos, 15 años en la formación de recursos humanos Pharmacy and Food Institute, 15 years of participation in the formation of human resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio Martínez Sánchez

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El Instituto de Farmacia y Alimentos (IFAL, de la Universidad de La Habana, fue fundado en 1991, para dar continuidad al trabajo desarrollado por la antigua Facultad de Farmacia y Alimentos. El IFAL asegura la formación constante de los recursos humanos necesarios para la Industria Farmacéutica y Alimentaria y los centros del Polo Científico. El sistema de enseñanza comprende los cursos de pregrado y posgrado, diplomados, maestrías, doctorados y actividades de extensión universitaria . El IFAL organiza eventos nacionales e internacionales, mantine un elevado desempeño en la investigación científica y estrechos vínculos de cooperación con instituciones nacionales y extranjeras. Tras 15 años de fundado, cuenta con un claustro cada vez más preparado y una fuerte actividad docente- investigativa.The Institute of Pharmacy and Food of Havana University was founded in 1991 to continue the work done by the former Faculty of Pharmacy and Food. This Institute assures the permanent formation of the necessary human resources for the pharmaceutical and food industries and for the scientific complex centers. The educational system comprises undergraduate and postgraduate courses, diploma´s cosurses, master´s courses, PH D studies, and other university extracurricular activities. It organizes national and international events, keeps high level of performance in scientific research as well as close cooperation links with domestic and foreign institutions. After 15 years of foundation, its faculty is ever increasingly prepared and its teaching-research activity is remarkable.

  1. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. (Department of Biochemistry, Albany Medical College, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  2. Utilization of circular dichroism and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to understand the formation and conversion of G-quadruplex DNA at the human c-myb proto-oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hengqing; Yang, Pengfei; Hai, Jinhui; Li, Huihui

    2018-10-05

    G-quadruplex DNAs are involved in a number of key biological processes, including gene expression, transcription, and apoptosis. The c-myb oncogene contains a number of GGA repeats in its promoter which forms G-quadruplex, thus it could be used as a target in cancer therapeutics. Several in-vitro studies have used Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy or electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to demonstrate formation and stability of G-quadruplex DNA structure in the promoter region of human c-myb oncogene. The factors affecting the c-myb G-quadruplex structures were investigated, such as cations (i.e. K + , NH 4 + and Na + ) and co-solutes (methanol and polyethylene glycol). The results indicated that the presence of cations and co-solutes could change the G-quadruplex structural population and promote its thermodynamic stabilization as indicated by CD melting curves. It indicated that the co-solutes preferentially stabilize the c-myb G-quadruplex structure containing both homo- and hetero-stacking. In addition, protopine was demonstrated as a binder of c-myb G-quadruplex as screened from a library of natural alkaloids using ESI-MS method. CD spectra showed that it could selectively stabilize the c-myb G-quadruplex structure compared to other six G-quadruplexes from tumor-related G-rich sequences and the duplex DNAs (both long and short-chain ones). The binding of protopine could induce the change in the G-quadruplex structural populations. Therefore, protopine with its high binding specificity could be considered as a precursor for the design of drugs to target and regulate c-myb oncogene transcription. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Rates of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is illustrated that a theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies depends on an understanding of star formation, and especially of the factors influencing the rate of star formation. Some of the theoretical problems of star formation in galaxies, some approaches that have been considered in models of galaxy evolution, and some possible observational tests that may help to clarify which processes or models are most relevant are reviewed. The material is presented under the following headings: power-law models for star formation, star formation processes (conditions required, ways of achieving these conditions), observational indications and tests, and measures of star formation rates in galaxies. 49 references

  4. Why adult formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Justinek

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The article argues that the primary aim of adult formation is comprehensive personality development which is supposed to ensure quality existence in modern world. The article also suggests that formarion is a permanent process. Justinek puts special emphasis on adult formation methodology and defines fundamental formation styles which encourage independent action in individuals. Justinek differentiates between formation and education. methods and concludes that formation methods are related to the emotional sphere of personality, and education methods mostly to the rational. Justinek believes that formation of adults is based primarily on appropriate formation methodology.

  5. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Crable

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production.

  6. A empregabilidade nos Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais: implicações e limites a formação humana/The empregabilidade in the National Curricular Parameters: implications and limits the formation human being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Accioly Lemos Moreira

    2007-12-01

    empregabilidade contained in the National Curricular Parameters (1998/1999, in the Transversal Subjects (1998 and in the National Curricular Lines of direction of Average Ensino (1999. The analysis of this problematic one, on the basis of the beddings of the ontológico-marxiana perspective, allowed to evidence that the formation in the perspective of the empregabilidade is articulated with the categories of the citizenship and the consumer. The empregabilidade fulfills to the paper of adequacy of the individuals to a market of work each unstabler time and in structural crisis, having the field of the citizenship and the consuming market as natural places in the disputes and conquests of the social citizens. The boarding defended for the National Curricular Parameters presents the sociability of insuperável and untouchable the capital as something, fitting only to transform the conscience of the men, enabling them to the enfretamento of the challenges of a world tecnologicamente developed and economically mundializado. It criticizes it carried through for our analysis, guideline in the explicitação of the implications and limits of this proposal for the formation human being, understanding that the proposal of analyzed documents keeps the effect of the mentally ill work on the worker, legitimizing and naturalizing the inherent desumanização to the social relations of the capitalist sociability. How much to the collective life, the National Curricular Parameters and the Transversal Subjects suggest the citizenship and the consuming market. We understand that this collective life has an abstract and empty existence of direction, therefore restricts it the space of the politics and the market, controlled and necessary to the reproduction of this system. E finally, we try to demonstrate the possibilities of an educative activity that has glimpsed a formation for beyond the capital.

  7. FORMATION CONSTANTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEY WORDS: Metal complexes, Schiff base ligand, Formation constant, DFT calculation ... best values for the formation constants of the proposed equilibrium model by .... to its positive charge distribution and the ligand deformation geometry.

  8. Theory of aurora formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira.

    1975-04-01

    A new theory of aurora formation is presented based on Alfven wave-electron interaction. The theory explains consistently 1) the electron acceleration process, 2) the formation of auroral layers and 3) the long wave formation in the longitudinal direction. (auth.)

  9. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  10. The application of multiple biophysical cues to engineer functional neocartilage for treatment of osteoarthritis. Part II: signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mariea A; Waldman, Stephen D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-02-01

    The unique mechanoelectrochemical environment of cartilage has motivated researchers to investigate the effect of multiple biophysical cues, including mechanical, magnetic, and electrical stimulation, on chondrocyte biology. It is well established that biophysical stimuli promote chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and maturation within "biological windows" of defined dose parameters, including mode, frequency, magnitude, and duration of stimuli (see companion review Part I: Cellular Response). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways activated in response to multiple biophysical stimuli remain to be elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms of biophysical signal transduction will deepen knowledge of tissue organogenesis, remodeling, and regeneration and aiding in the treatment of pathologies such as osteoarthritis. Further, this knowledge will provide the tissue engineer with a potent toolset to manipulate and control cell fate and subsequently develop functional replacement cartilage. The aim of this article is to review chondrocyte signal transduction pathways in response to mechanical, magnetic, and electrical cues. Signal transduction does not occur along a single pathway; rather a number of parallel pathways appear to be activated, with calcium signaling apparently common to all three types of stimuli, though there are different modes of activation. Current tissue engineering strategies, such as the development of "smart" functionalized biomaterials that enable the delivery of growth factors or integration of conjugated nanoparticles, may further benefit from targeting known signal transduction pathways in combination with external biophysical cues.

  11. Stages of ores formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Deposit formation (especially endogenous) is the complicated, multi-stage and long process. Establishment of deposit formation succession, age-specific correlations of minerals and aggregates have a high importance at solving genetic questions. Studying of minerals correlations and mineral aggregates, succession of their crystallization and other observations let restore the history of deposit formation, pick up in it different on duration and physical and chemical conditions stages

  12. Planet formation in Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Thebault, Ph.; Haghighipour, N.

    2014-01-01

    Spurred by the discovery of numerous exoplanets in multiple systems, binaries have become in recent years one of the main topics in planet formation research. Numerous studies have investigated to what extent the presence of a stellar companion can affect the planet formation process. Such studies have implications that can reach beyond the sole context of binaries, as they allow to test certain aspects of the planet formation scenario by submitting them to extreme environments. We review her...

  13. Data format translation routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base

  14. ENDF/B format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1986-09-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B. This format, originally designed for the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File, is recommended for international use. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-NCS-50496 (ENDF 102) should be consulted. An Appendix to the present document gives a summary of the format differences between ENDF/B-4 and ENDF/B-5. (author)

  15. Exploring Opponent Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Rasmussen, Majken; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    of how the opponent format and relationships impact a game are almost absent in current research. Thus, this paper aims to elucidate how the perception of a competition differs, depending on the opponent format, by presenting a game mechanic framework. The paper furthermore presents an interactive...... football-training platform, as well as games designed to explore the different opponent formats. The games are qualitatively evaluated to illuminate the qualities of and distinctions between different types of opponent formats, proposed by the framework terminology....

  16. Macrophage specific overexpression of the human macrophage scavenger receptor in transgenic mice, using a 180-kb yeast artificial chromosome, leads to enhanced foam cell formation of isolated peritoneal macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winther, M. P.; van Dijk, K. W.; van Vlijmen, B. J.; Gijbels, M. J.; Heus, J. J.; Wijers, E. R.; van den Bos, A. C.; Breuer, M.; Frants, R. R.; Havekes, L. M.; Hofker, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    Macrophage scavenger receptors class A (MSR) are thought to play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins by macrophages in the vessel wall leading to foam cell formation. To investigate the in vivo role of the MSR in this process, a transgenic

  17. ENDF/B Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B, the evaluated neutron nuclear data library of the US National Nuclear Data Center. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-50274 (ENDF-102) should be consulted. (author)

  18. Formation of multiple networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnani, Matteo; Rossi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    we introduce the first network formation model for multiple networks. Network formation models are among the most popular tools in traditional network studies, because of both their practical and theoretical impact. However, existing models are not sufficient to describe the generation of multiple...

  19. From Sermon Formation to Preacher Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaarden, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    today is less about exercising the authority of an office and more about embodying authenticity. I argue that traditional homiletic education can benefit from implementing a learner-centered approach to teaching moving from sermon formation towards preacher formation, in order to develop and train...... preachers. This involves a learning strategy to ministry where theological skills, pastoral competences, and own personality are interwoven. Teaching here means facilitating a room of learning where teacher’s power and control is reduced, allowing the preacher to reflect upon own practice without being...... judged, evaluated, or critiqued. In this paper, I explain how a learner-centered approach to education works in practice and show how pastors experience the teaching method and the congregations’ positive response to their improvements. I shall present the results of a focus-group interview with pastors...

  20. Development of emergency response training program based on human factors; Developpement d'un programme de formation pour la reaction aux situations d'urgences base sur les facteurs humains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakata, Y. [Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    A training program has been developed at Osaka Gas Co., Ltd. to improve personal response to emergency situations by enabling plant shift chiefs to understand the unique human behavioral patterns that appear during emergencies. The program provides comprehensive and systematic training consisting of lectures and seminars based on a Human Factor Handbook, simulation training, and feedback training. The program can also be applied to all areas of the process industry. (author)

  1. Usage Record Format Recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsen, J.K.; Muller-Pfeerkorn, R

    2013-01-01

    For resources to be shared, sites must be able to exchange basic accounting and usage data in a common format. This document describes a common format which enables the exchange of basic accounting and usage data from different resources. This record format is intended to facilitate the sharing of usage information, particularly in the area of the accounting of jobs, computing, memory, storage and cloud usage but with a structure that allows an easy extension to other resources. This document describes the Usage Record components both in natural language form and annotated XML. This document does not address how these records should be used, nor does it attempt to dictate the format in which the accounting records are stored. Instead, it denes a common exchange format. Furthermore, nothing is said regarding the communication mechanisms employed to exchange the records, i.e. transport layer, framing, authentication, integrity, etc.

  2. Converting Taxonomic Descriptions to New Digital Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Cui

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.--The majority of taxonomic descriptions is currently in print format. The majority of digital descriptions are in formats such as DOC, HTML, or PDF and for human readers. These formats do not convey rich semantics in taxonomic descriptions for computer-aided process. Newer digital formats such as XML and RDF accommodate semantic annotations that allow computers to process the rich semantics on human's behalf, thus open up opportunities for a wide range of innovative usages of taxonomic descriptions, such as searching in more precise and flexible ways, integrating with gnomic and geographic information, generating taxonomic keys automatically, and text data mining and information visualization etc. This paper discusses the challenges in automated conversion of multiple collections of descriptions to XML format and reports an automated system, MARTT. MARTT is a machine-learning system that makes use of training examples to tag new descriptions into XML format. A number of utilities are implemented as solutions to the challenges. The utilities are used to reduce the effort for training example preparation, to facilitate the creation of a comprehensive schema, and to predict system performance on a new collection of descriptions. The system has been tested with several plant and alga taxonomic publications including Flora of China and Flora of North America.

  3. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannou, Anastasios D; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell-induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable.

  4. Tropospheric ozone. Formation, properties, effects. Expert opinion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elstner, E.F.

    1996-01-01

    The formation and dispersion of tropospheric ozone are discussed only marginally in this expert opinion; the key interest is in the effects of ground level ozone on plants, animals, and humans. The expert opinion is based on an analysis of the available scientific publications. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Effect of a Particulate and a Putty-Like Tricalcium Phosphate-Based Bone-grafting Material on Bone Formation, Volume Stability and Osteogenic Marker Expression after Bilateral Sinus Floor Augmentation in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Knabe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effect of a hyaluronic acid (HyAc containing tricalcium phosphate putty scaffold material (TCP-P and of a particulate tricalcium phosphate (TCP-G graft on bone formation, volume stability and osteogenic marker expression in biopsies sampled 6 months after bilateral sinus floor augmentation (SFA in 7 patients applying a split-mouth design. 10% autogenous bone chips were added to the grafting material during surgery. The grain size of the TCP granules was 700 to 1400 µm for TCP-G and 125 to 250 µm and 500 to 700 µm (ratio 1:1 for TCP-P. Biopsies were processed for immunohistochemical analysis of resin-embedded sections. Sections were stained for collagen type I (Col I, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, osteocalcin (OC and bone sialoprotein (BSP. Furthermore, the bone area and biomaterial area fraction were determined histomorphometrically. Cone-beam CT data recorded after SFA and 6 months later were used for calculating the graft volume at these two time points. TCP-P displayed more advantageous surgical handling properties and a significantly greater bone area fraction and smaller biomaterial area fraction. This was accompanied by significantly greater expression of Col I and BSP and in osteoblasts and osteoid and a less pronounced reduction in grafting volume with TCP-P. SFA using both types of materials resulted in formation of sufficient bone volume for facilitating stable dental implant placement with all dental implants having been in function without any complications for 6 years. Since TCP-P displayed superior surgical handling properties and greater bone formation than TCP-G, without the HyAc hydrogel matrix having any adverse effect on bone formation or graft volume stability, TCP-P can be regarded as excellent grafting material for SFA in a clinical setting. The greater bone formation observed with TCP-P may be related to the difference in grain size of the TCP granules and/or the addition of the HyAc.

  6. Earth formation porosity log

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining the porosity of earth formations in the vicinity of a cased well borehole is described, comprising the steps of: irradiating the earth formations in the vicinity of the cased well borehole with fast neutrons from a source of fast neutrons passed into the borehole; and generating a signal representative of the fast neutron population present in the well borehole at a location in the borehole, the signal is functionally related to the porosity of the earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole

  7. Manuel UNIMARC format bibliographique

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This manual is the French translation of the second edition of UNIMARC Manual: bibliographic format published in English in 1994 and completed by 5 updates published from 1996 to 2005. This 5th French edition is composite. It reproduces identically a part of the 4th edition published in 2002 and, for the fields of the format modified in the Update 5, it offers a new more structured presentation. This is a handbook dedicated to French-speaking users of the UNIMARC format for bibliographic descriptions.

  8. Reconsidering formative measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Roy D; Breivik, Einar; Wilcox, James B

    2007-06-01

    The relationship between observable responses and the latent constructs they are purported to measure has received considerable attention recently, with particular focus on what has become known as formative measurement. This alternative to reflective measurement in the area of theory-testing research is examined in the context of the potential for interpretational confounding and a construct's ability to function as a point variable within a larger model. Although these issues have been addressed in the traditional reflective measurement context, the authors suggest that they are particularly relevant in evaluating formative measurement models. On the basis of this analysis, the authors conclude that formative measurement is not an equally attractive alternative to reflective measurement and that whenever possible, in developing new measures or choosing among alternative existing measures, researchers should opt for reflective measurement. In addition, the authors provide guidelines for researchers dealing with existing formative measures. Copyright 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Isothermal Martensite Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo

    Isothermal (i.e. time dependent) martensite formation in steel was first observed in the 40ies of the XXth century and is still treated as an anomaly in the description of martensite formation which is considered as a-thermal (i.e. independent of time). Recently, the clarification of the mechanism...... of lattice strains provided fundamental information on the state of stress in the material and clarified the role of the strain energy on martensite formation. Electron backscatter diffraction revealed that the microstructure of the material and the morphology of martensite were independent on the cooling...... leading to isothermal kinetics acquired new practical relevance because of the identification of isothermal martensite formation as the most likely process responsible for enhanced performances of sub-zero Celsius treated high carbon steel products. In the present work, different iron based alloys...

  10. Cosmology and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Implications of the massive halos and ''missing mass'' for galaxy formation are addressed; it is suggested that this mass consists of ''Population III'' stars that formed before the galaxies did. 19 references

  11. Fracturing formations in wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daroza, R A

    1964-05-15

    This well stimulation method comprises introducing through the well bore a low-penetrating, dilatant fluid, and subjecting the fluid to sufficient pressure to produce fractures in the formation. The fluid is permitted to remain in contact with the formation so as to become diluted by the formation fluids, and thereby lose its properties of dilatancy. Also, a penetrating fluid, containing a propping agent suspended therein, in introduced into contact with the fractures at a pressure substantially reduced with respect to that pressure which would have been required, prior to the fracturing operation performed using the low-penetrating dilatant fluid. The propping agent is deposited within the fractures, and thereafter, fluid production is resumed from the fractured formation. (2 claims)

  12. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  13. Dioxin formation from waste incineration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibamoto, Takayuki; Yasuhara, Akio; Katami, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    There has been great concern about dioxins-polychlorinated dibenzo dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-causing contamination in the environment because the adverse effects of these chemicals on human health have been known for many years. Possible dioxin-contamination has received much attention recently not only by environmental scientists but also by the public, because dioxins are known to be formed during the combustion of industrial and domestic wastes and to escape into the environment via exhaust gases from incinerators. Consequently, there is a pressing need to investigate the formation mechanisms or reaction pathways of these chlorinated chemicals to be able to devise ways to reduce their environmental contamination. A well-controlled small-scale incinerator was used for the experiments in the core references of this review. These articles report the investigation of dioxin formation from the combustion of various waste-simulated samples, including different kinds of paper, various kinds of wood, fallen leaves, food samples, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyvinylidene chloride, polyethylene tetraphthalate (PET), and various kinds of plastic products. These samples were also incinerated with inorganic chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CuCI2, MgCl2, MnCl2, FeCl2, CoCl2, fly ash, and seawater) or organic chlorides (PVC, chlordane, and pentachlorophenol) to investigate the role of chlorine content and/or the presence of different metals in dioxin formation. Some samples, such as newspapers, were burned after they were impregnated with NaCl or PVC, as well as being cocombusted with chlorides. The roles of incineration conditions, including chamber temperatures, O2 concentrations, and CO concentrations, in dioxin formation were also investigated. Dioxins (PCDDs, PCDFs, and coplanar-PCBs) formed in the exhaust gases from a controlled small-scale incinerator, where experimental waste

  14. PCF File Format.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoreson, Gregory G [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    PCF files are binary files designed to contain gamma spectra and neutron count rates from radiation sensors. It is the native format for the GAmma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) package [1]. It can contain multiple spectra and information about each spectrum such as energy calibration. This document outlines the format of the file that would allow one to write a computer program to parse and write such files.

  15. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  16. The forensics of fulgurite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Pasek, Virginia D.

    2018-04-01

    Natural disasters such as forest fires can result in extensive and costly property damage. These events may be the result of a human error or system failure triggered by electrical discharge, and in such circumstances may form a fulgurite. Understanding fulgurites and their formation may be critical in determining the cause of the fire or other, shock-related event. Here we identify several distinguishing features of fulgurites formed in association with downed power lines, including the presence of melted conductors, transformation of quartz to cristobalite, and morphological differences including increased glass percentage and smaller internal voids. These features are consequences of how heat is transferred to and through a target rock material as it melts and forms a fulgurite, and are predicted from both first principles of diffusive heat transfer, and empirically-derived reaction kinetics for mineral transformations.

  17. Blistering and bubble formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.

    1976-01-01

    Blister formation in metals has been observed during bombardment with inert-gas ions in the energy range between 1 and 2000 keV at doses of about 10 17 to 10 19 cm -2 . The changes in surface topography and the erosion yields were mainly studied in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Additionally the release of the implanted gas during blister formation was observed. Recently measurements on single crystals were performed determining simultaneously the implantation profile, the total amount of trapped ions, the depth distribution of the induced lattice damage and the thickness of the covers of the blisters. In several stages of the formation process of blisters the implanted layer was observed in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) showing the formation of gas bubbles. Using the results of all these measurements in this review an attempt is made to develop a model of blister formation combining the effects of hydrostatic pressure in the gas bubbles and lateral stress due to volume swelling. (author)

  18. Vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Eckhard; Axnick, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    The vascular system developed early in evolution. It is required in large multicellular organisms for the transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products to and from tissues. The vascular system is composed of hollow tubes, which have a high level of complexity in vertebrates. Vasculogenesis describes the de novo formation of blood vessels, e.g., aorta formation in vertebrate embryogenesis. In contrast, angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels from preexisting ones, e.g., sprouting of intersomitic blood vessels from the aorta. Importantly, the lumen of all blood vessels in vertebrates is lined and formed by endothelial cells. In both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, lumen formation takes place in a cord of endothelial cells. It involves a complex molecular mechanism composed of endothelial cell repulsion at the cell-cell contacts within the endothelial cell cords, junctional rearrangement, and endothelial cell shape change. As the vascular system also participates in the course of many diseases, such as cancer, stroke, and myocardial infarction, it is important to understand and make use of the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel formation to better understand and manipulate the pathomechanisms involved.

  19. AAV vector encoding human VEGF165–transduced pectineus muscular flaps increase the formation of new tissue through induction of angiogenesis in an in vivo chamber for tissue engineering: A technique to enhance tissue and vessels in microsurgically engineered tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Moimas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In regenerative medicine, new approaches are required for the creation of tissue substitutes, and the interplay between different research areas, such as tissue engineering, microsurgery and gene therapy, is mandatory. In this article, we report a modification of a published model of tissue engineering, based on an arterio-venous loop enveloped in a cross-linked collagen–glycosaminoglycan template, which acts as an isolated chamber for angiogenesis and new tissue formation. In order to foster tissue formation within the chamber, which entails on the development of new vessels, we wondered whether we might combine tissue engineering with a gene therapy approach. Based on the well-described tropism of adeno-associated viral vectors for post-mitotic tissues, a muscular flap was harvested from the pectineus muscle, inserted into the chamber and transduced by either AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 or AAV vector expressing the reporter gene β-galactosidase, as a control. Histological analysis of the specimens showed that muscle transduction by AAV vector encoding human VEGF165 resulted in enhanced tissue formation, with a significant increase in the number of arterioles within the chamber in comparison with the previously published model. Pectineus muscular flap, transduced by adeno-associated viral vectors, acted as a source of the proangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor, thus inducing a consistent enhancement of vessel growth into the newly formed tissue within the chamber. In conclusion, our present findings combine three different research fields such as microsurgery, tissue engineering and gene therapy, suggesting and showing the feasibility of a mixed approach for regenerative medicine.

  20. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  1. Tritiated ammonia formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    When nitrogen was selected as the glovebox atmosphere for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a concern was raised as to the possibility of tritiated ammonia formation in the gloveboxes. Experimental data were produced to study the tritiated ammonia formation rate in a tritium and nitrogen mixture. A rate equation that closely simulates the experimental data was developed. This rate equation can be used to calculate the formation of tritiated ammonia from different concentrations of tritium and nitrogen. The reaction of T 2 and N 2 to form NT 3 is a slow process, particularly when the tritium concentration is low. The reaction requires weeks or months to reach radiochemical equilibrium dependent on the concentrations of the reactants. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Galaxy formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Houjun; White, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of galaxy formation lies at the interface between astronomy, particle physics, and cosmology. Covering diverse topics from these disciplines, all of which are needed to understand how galaxies form and evolve, this book is ideal for researchers entering the field. Individual chapters explore the evolution of the Universe as a whole and its particle and radiation content; linear and nonlinear growth of cosmic structure; processes affecting the gaseous and dark matter components of galaxies and their stellar populations; the formation of spiral and elliptical galaxies; central supermassive black holes and the activity associated with them; galaxy interactions; and the intergalactic medium. Emphasizing both observational and theoretical aspects, this book provides a coherent introduction for astronomers, cosmologists, and astroparticle physicists to the broad range of science underlying the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  3. Observsational Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruobing; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Fung, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    Planets form in gaseous protoplanetary disks surrounding newborn stars. As such, the most direct way to learn how they form from observations, is to directly watch them forming in disks. In the past, this was very difficult due to a lack of observational capabilities; as such, planet formation was largely a subject of pure theoretical astrophysics. Now, thanks to a fleet of new instruments with unprecedented resolving power that have come online recently, we have just started to unveil features in resolve images of protoplanetary disks, such as gaps and spiral arms, that are most likely associated with embedded (unseen) planets. By comparing observations with theoretical models of planet-disk interactions, the masses and orbits of these still forming planets may be constrained. Such planets may help us to directly test various planet formation models. This marks the onset of a new field — observational planet formation. I will introduce the current status of this field.

  4. Forces in strategy formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensen, Elmer Fly; Sanchez, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This chapter proposes that organizational strategy formation should be characterized theoretically as a process that is subject to several interacting forces, rather than represented by separate discrete decisionmodels or theoretic perspectives, as is commonly done in the strategic management...... literature. Based on an extensive review of relevant theory and empirical work in strategic decision-making, organizational change theory, cognitive and social psychology, and strategy processes, seven kinds of ''forces'' - rational, imposed, teleological, learning, political, heuristic, and social...... - are identified as interacting in and having significant influence on the strategy formation process. It is further argued that by applying a holistic ''forces-view'' of the significant and interacting influences on strategy formation, we can better understand the dynamics and challenges in managing the process...

  5. Suppressing the formation of lipid raft-associated Rac1/PI3K/Akt signaling complexes by curcumin inhibits SDF-1α-induced invasion of human esophageal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Liang; Lu, Yao-Cheng; Chen, Hung-Yi; Lee, Chuan-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2014-05-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) is a ligand for C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), which contributes to the metastasis of cancer cells by promoting cell migration. Here, we show that the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis can significantly increase invasion of esophageal carcinoma (EC) cells. We accomplished this by examining the effects of CXCR4 knockdown as well as treatment with a CXCR4-neutralizing antibody and the CXCR4-specific inhibitor AMD3100. Curcumin suppressed SDF-1α-induced cell invasion and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) promoter activity, cell surface localization of CXCR4 at lipid rafts, and lipid raft-associated ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85α/Akt signaling. Curcumin inhibited SDF-1α-induced cell invasion by suppressing the Rac1-PI3K signaling complex at lipid rafts but did not abrogate lipid raft formation. We further demonstrate that the attenuation of lipid raft-associated Rac1 activity by curcumin was critical for the inhibition of SDF-1α-induced PI3K/Akt/NF-κB activation, cell surface localization of CXCR4 at lipid rafts, MMP-2 promoter activity, and cell invasion. Collectively, our results indicate that curcumin inhibits SDF-1α-induced EC cell invasion by suppressing the formation of the lipid raft-associated Rac1-PI3K-Akt signaling complex, the localization of CXCR4 with lipid rafts at the cell surface, and MMP-2 promoter activity, likely through the inhibition of Rac1 activity. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Planetesimals and Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John

    The first step in the standard model for planet formation is the growth of gravitationally bound bodies called ``planetesimals'' from dust grains in a protoplanetary disk. Currently, we do not know how planetesimals form, how long they take to form, or what their sizes and mechanical properties are. The goal of this proposal is to assess how these uncertainties affect subsequent stages of planetary growth and the kind of planetary systems that form. The work will address three particular questions: (i) Can the properties of small body populations in the modern Solar System constrain the properties of planetesimals? (ii) How do the properties of planetesimals affect the formation of giant planets? (iii) How does the presence of a water ice condensation front (the ``snow line'') in a disk affect planetesimal formation and the later stages of planetary growth? These questions will be examined with computer simulations of planet formation using new computer codes to be developed as part of the proposal. The first question will be addressed using a statistical model for planetesimal coagulation and fragmentation. This code will be merged with the proposer's Mercury N-body integrator code to model the dynamics of large protoplanets in order to address the second question. Finally, a self- consistent model of disk evolution and the radial transport of water ice and vapour will be added to examine the third question. A theoretical understanding of how planets form is one of the key goals of NASA and the Origins of Solar Systems programme. Researchers have carried out many studies designed to address this goal, but the questions of how planetesimals form and how their properties affect planet formation have received relatively little attention. The proposed work will help address these unsolved questions, and place other research in context by assessing the importance of planetesimal origins and properties for planet formation.

  7. Superclusters and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einasto, J.; Joeveer, M.; Saar, E.

    1979-01-01

    The spatial distribution of Galaxies and Galaxy congestions in the southern galactic hemisphere is studied. The rich galaxy congestions, containing many elliptic Galaxies and radiogalaxies, are linked with each other by chains of scanty congestions with moderate content of elliptic Galaxies and radiogalaxies. The flat formation, linking the density pikes and the intermediate chains, can reasonably be called supercongestion. In the central region of supercongestions there is a thin layer of Galaxies consisting of only spiral Galaxies. The neighbouring supercongestions touch each other, while the intersupercongestion space contains no Galaxy congestions and almost no Galaxies. It is shown that such a structure was, apparently, formed before the formation of Galaxies

  8. Formation of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalay, A.S.

    1984-12-01

    The present theories of galaxy formation are reviewed. The relation between peculiar velocities and the correlation function of galaxies points to the possibility that galaxies do not form uniformly everywhere. Scale invariant properties of the cluster-cluster correlations are discussed. Comparing the correlation functions in a dimensionless way, galaxies appear to be stronger clustered, in contrast with the comparison of the dimensional amplitudes of the correlation functions. Theoretical implications of several observations as Lyman-α clouds, correlations of faint galaxies are discussed. None of the present theories of galaxy formation can account for all facts in a natural way. 29 references

  9. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  10. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    a Redlich-Kister type of expression with temperature-independent parameters and the data for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate with temperature-dependent parameters. The viscosities have furthermore been compared to values predicted by means of the GC......Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated using...

  11. Barrier cell sheath formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.

    1980-04-01

    The solution for electrostatic potential within a simply modeled tandem mirror thermal barrier is seen to exhibit a sheath at each edge of the cell. The formation of the sheath requires ion collisionality and the analysis assmes that the collisional trapping rate into the barrier is considerably slower than the barrier pump rate

  12. Formation of topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachaspati, T.

    1991-01-01

    We consider the formation of point and line topological defects (monopoles and strings) from a general point of view by allowing the probability of formation of a defect to vary. To investigate the statistical properties of the defects at formation we give qualitative arguments that are independent of any particular model in which such defects occur. These arguments are substantiated by numerical results in the case of strings and for monopoles in two dimensions. We find that the network of strings at formation undergoes a transition at a certain critical density below which there are no infinite strings and the closed-string (loop) distribution is exponentially suppressed at large lengths. The results are contrasted with the results of statistical arguments applied to a box of strings in dynamical equilibrium. We argue that if point defects were to form with smaller probability, the distance between monopoles and antimonopoles would decrease while the monopole-to-monopole distance would increase. We find that monopoles are always paired with antimonopoles but the pairing becomes clean only when the number density of defects is small. A similar reasoning would also apply to other defects

  13. The formation of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The presently fashionable ideas for galaxy formation are reviewed briefly, and it is concluded that the standard isothermal heirarchy fits the available data best. A simple infall picture is presented which explains many of the observed properties of disk galaxies. (orig.)

  14. Reconsidering Formative Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Roy D.; Breivik, Einar; Wilcox, James B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between observable responses and the latent constructs they are purported to measure has received considerable attention recently, with particular focus on what has become known as formative measurement. This alternative to reflective measurement in the area of theory-testing research is examined in the context of the potential…

  15. Chlorination and chloramines formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Lim Fang; Mohd Pauzi Abdullah; Sadia Ata; Abbas Abdullah; Basar IShak; Khairul Nidzham

    2008-01-01

    Chlorination is the most important method of disinfection in Malaysia which aims at ensuring an acceptable and safe drinking water quality. The dosing of chlorine to surface water containing ammonia and nitrogen compounds may form chloramines in the treated water. During this reaction, inorganic and organic chloramines are formed. The recommended maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for chloramines in drinking water is 3000 μg/L. The production of monochloramine, dichloramine and trichloramine is highly dependent upon pH, contact time and the chlorine to ammonia molar ratio. The purpose of this study is to examine the formation of chloramines that occur upon the chlorination during the treatment process. Chloramines were determined using the N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD) colorimetric method. The influences of ammonia, pH and chlorine dosage on the chloramines formation were also studied. This paper presents a modeling approach based on regression analysis which is designed to estimate the formation of chloramines. The correlation between the concentration of chloramines and the ammonia, pH and chlorine dosage was examined. In all cases, the quantity of chloramines formed depended linearly upon the amount of chlorine dosage. On the basis of this study it reveals that the concentration of chloramines is a function of chlorine dosage and the ammonia