WorldWideScience

Sample records for human musculoskeletal system

  1. A REVIEW ON LOWER APPENDICULAR MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM OF HUMAN BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akhtaruzzaman

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation engineering plays an important role in designing various autonomous robots to provide better therapeutic exercise to disabled patients. Hence it is necessary to study human musculoskeletal system and also needs to be presented in scientific manner in order to describe and analyze the biomechanics of human body motion. This review focuses on lower appendicular musculoskeletal structure of human body to represent joints and links architectures; to identify muscle attachments and functions; and to illustrate muscle groups which are responsible for a particular joint movement. Firstly, human lower skeletal structure, linking systems, joint mechanisms, and their functions are described with a conceptual representation of joint architecture of human skeleton. This section also represents joints and limbs by comparing with mechanical systems. Characteristics of ligaments and their functions to construct skeletal joints are also discussed briefly in this part. Secondly, the study focuses on muscular system of human lower limbs where muscle structure, functions, roles in moving endoskeleton structure, and supporting mechanisms are presented ellaborately. Thirdly, muscle groups are tabulated based on functions that provide mobility to different joints of lower limbs. Finally, for a particular movement action of lower extremity, muscles are also grouped and tabulated to have a better understanding on functions of individual muscle. Basically the study presents an overview of the structure of human lower limbs by characterizing and classifying skeletal and muscular systems.KEYWORDS:   Musculoskeletal system; Human lower limbs; Muscle groups; Joint motion; Biomechatronics; Rehabilitation.

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging of the musculoskeletal system in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, A.; Reiser, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the principles of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and recent results in DWI of the musculoskeletal system. The potential of DWI in the diagnosis of pathology of the musculoskeletal system is discussed. DWI is a relatively new MR imaging technique that has already been established in neuroradiology, especially in the early detection of brain ischemia. The random motion of water protons on a molecular basis can be measured with DWI. To date DWI of the abdomen and of the musculoskeletal system has only been employed in scientific studies, but first results indicate that it may also be beneficial in these fields. Different diffusion characteristics have been found in normal tissues such as muscle, fat and bone marrow. Also, pathologic entities such as neoplasms, post-therapeutic soft tissue changes and inflammatory processes can be differentiated. Normal muscle shows significantly higher diffusion values than subcutaneous fat and bone marrow, due to a higher mobility of water protons within muscle. Soft tissue tumors exhibit a significantly lower diffusion value compared with post-therapeutic soft tissue changes and inflammatory processes. Necrotic tumor tissue can be distinguished from viable tumor due to significantly higher diffusion of water protons within necrotic tissue. (orig.)

  3. A Mechanical Musculo-Skeletal System for a Human-Shaped Robot Arm

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    Koichi Koganezawa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mechanical system with a similar configuration to a human musculo-skeletal system for use in anthropomorphic robots or as artificial limbs for disabled persons. First, a mechanical module called ANLES (Actuator with Non-Linear Elasticity System is introduced. There are two types of ANLES: the linear-type ANLES and rotary-type ANLES. They can be used as a voluntary muscle in a wide-range of musculo-skeletal structures in which at least double actuators work in an antagonistic setup via some elastic elements. Next, an application of the two types of ANLES to a two-degree-of-freedom (DOF manipulator that has a similar configuration to the human elbow joint is shown. The experimental results of the joint stiffness and joint angle control elucidate that the developed mechanism effectively regulates joint stiffness in the same way as a musculo-skeletal system.

  4. Musculoskeletal MRI: dedicated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masciocchi, C.; Barile, A.; Satragno, L.

    2000-01-01

    The ''dedicated'' MRI units have characteristics of high diagnostic accuracy and lower installation and management costs as compared with whole-body systems. The dedicated MRI units are easy to install. The low weight allows their installation also under unfavorable circumstances. In a dedicated system cost-effectiveness and ease of installation must be accompanied by the capability of providing high-quality images. In our experience, the high number of examinations performed, the most part of which provided with the surgical controls, allowed an accurate evaluation of the diagnostic potentialities of the dedicated magnet. We were not able to perform the examinations in only 3 % of cases due to the physical shape of the patient and the clinical condition of the patient which may hinder the correct positioning of the limb. The overlapping of the diagnostic accuracy of the E-scan and Artoscan units in the study of the lower limbs, compared with whole-body units and surgery, prompted us to exploit the potentialities of the E-Scan in the study of the shoulder. We had a good correlation between E-Scan, whole-body units, and surgical findings, which confirmed the high diagnostic accuracy of the dedicated system. In conclusion, in our experience carried out in the musculoskeletal system, the dedicated magnets showed promising results. Their diagnostic reliability and utility was comparable to that obtained from conventional units operating at higher magnetic fields. (orig.)

  5. Computed tomography of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, W.W.; Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 10 chapters. The chapter titles are: Soft Tissue Masses; Primary Bone Tumors; The Role of CT in the Therapeutic Management of Soft Tissue Sarcomas; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Inflammation; Assessment of Musculoskeletal Trauma; The Foot and Ankle; The Shoulder; Measurement of Bone Mineral for Early Detection of Osteoporosis; MRI of the Musculoskeletal System; and Advances in CT Imaging of Musculoskeletal Pathology

  6. A general-purpose framework to simulate musculoskeletal system of human body: using a motion tracking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Hossein; Rostami, Mostafa; Gudarzi, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Computation of muscle force patterns that produce specified movements of muscle-actuated dynamic models is an important and challenging problem. This problem is an undetermined one, and then a proper optimization is required to calculate muscle forces. The purpose of this paper is to develop a general model for calculating all muscle activation and force patterns in an arbitrary human body movement. For this aim, the equations of a multibody system forward dynamics, which is considered for skeletal system of the human body model, is derived using Lagrange-Euler formulation. Next, muscle contraction dynamics is added to this model and forward dynamics of an arbitrary musculoskeletal system is obtained. For optimization purpose, the obtained model is used in computed muscle control algorithm, and a closed-loop system for tracking desired motions is derived. Finally, a popular sport exercise, biceps curl, is simulated by using this algorithm and the validity of the obtained results is evaluated via EMG signals.

  7. Knowledge-based personalized search engine for the Web-based Human Musculoskeletal System Resources (HMSR) in biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Tien Tuan; Hoang, Tuan Nha; Ta, Xuan Hien; Tho, Marie Christine Ho Ba

    2013-02-01

    Human musculoskeletal system resources of the human body are valuable for the learning and medical purposes. Internet-based information from conventional search engines such as Google or Yahoo cannot response to the need of useful, accurate, reliable and good-quality human musculoskeletal resources related to medical processes, pathological knowledge and practical expertise. In this present work, an advanced knowledge-based personalized search engine was developed. Our search engine was based on a client-server multi-layer multi-agent architecture and the principle of semantic web services to acquire dynamically accurate and reliable HMSR information by a semantic processing and visualization approach. A security-enhanced mechanism was applied to protect the medical information. A multi-agent crawler was implemented to develop a content-based database of HMSR information. A new semantic-based PageRank score with related mathematical formulas were also defined and implemented. As the results, semantic web service descriptions were presented in OWL, WSDL and OWL-S formats. Operational scenarios with related web-based interfaces for personal computers and mobile devices were presented and analyzed. Functional comparison between our knowledge-based search engine, a conventional search engine and a semantic search engine showed the originality and the robustness of our knowledge-based personalized search engine. In fact, our knowledge-based personalized search engine allows different users such as orthopedic patient and experts or healthcare system managers or medical students to access remotely into useful, accurate, reliable and good-quality HMSR information for their learning and medical purposes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human Posture and Movement Prediction based on Musculoskeletal Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farahani, Saeed Davoudabadi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This thesis explores an optimization-based formulation, so-called inverse-inverse dynamics, for the prediction of human posture and motion dynamics performing various tasks. It is explained how this technique enables us to predict natural kinematic and kinetic patterns for human posture...... and motion using AnyBody Modeling System (AMS). AMS uses inverse dynamics to analyze musculoskeletal systems and is, therefore, limited by its dependency on input kinematics. We propose to alleviate this dependency by assuming that voluntary postures and movement strategies in humans are guided by a desire...... expenditure, joint forces and other physiological properties derived from the detailed musculoskeletal analysis. Several attempts have been made to uncover the principles underlying motion control strategies in the literature. In case of some movements, like human squat jumping, there is almost no doubt...

  9. Structure, function, and control of the human musculoskeletal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Murphy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a complex organism, the gross mechanical properties of which are enabled by an interconnected musculoskeletal network controlled by the nervous system. The nature of musculoskeletal interconnection facilitates stability, voluntary movement, and robustness to injury. However, a fundamental understanding of this network and its control by neural systems has remained elusive. Here we address this gap in knowledge by utilizing medical databases and mathematical modeling to reveal the organizational structure, predicted function, and neural control of the musculoskeletal system. We constructed a highly simplified whole-body musculoskeletal network in which single muscles connect to multiple bones via both origin and insertion points. We demonstrated that, using this simplified model, a muscle's role in this network could offer a theoretical prediction of the susceptibility of surrounding components to secondary injury. Finally, we illustrated that sets of muscles cluster into network communities that mimic the organization of control modules in primary motor cortex. This novel formalism for describing interactions between the muscular and skeletal systems serves as a foundation to develop and test therapeutic responses to injury, inspiring future advances in clinical treatments.

  10. Musculoskeletal System Symptoms in Goiter

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    Sevim Akin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with thyroid dysfunction. Methods: One hundred and twenty-three patients (100 female, 23 male who visited the nuclear medicine department for thyroid gland scintigraphy were included in our study. According to thyroid hormone levels, patients were allocated into five categories: hyperthyroidism, subclinical hyperthyroidism, euthyroid, subclinical hypothyroidism, and hypothyroidism. Before neurological and musculoskeletal examinations, a standardized symptom questionnaire was completed including questions about sensory symptoms, muscle weakness, restricted joint mobility, musculoskeletal pain. Neurological examination, range of motion of joints, effusion or swelling of joints was assessed. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis was done by the clinical and radiological characteristics. The diagnosis of FMS was made according to criteria of American College of Rheumatology. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, a T-score ≤ -2.5 was classified as osteoporosis, whereas a T-score between -2.5 and -1.0 was classified as osteopenia. Thyroid status was determined by serum TSH levels. Results: Eighty-one percent of the patients were female (100 and 19% were male (23. Mean age of female patients was 49.99±15.27 years (range 20-87 and mean age of male patients was 61.8±12.33 years (range 34-88. When divided according to thyroid status, 21.1% (n=26 had hyperthyroidism, 21.1% (n=26 had subclinical hyperthyroidism, 49.6% (n=61 were euthyroid, 4.9% (n=6 had subclinical hypothyroidism and 3.3% (n=4 were hypothyroid. None of 59% of patients had any musculoskeletal diagnosis. Osteoporosis was the most common problem, affecting 23.7% of patients Conclusion: The presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in patients with goiter should be considered and investigated. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 261-269

  11. Closed-loop EMG-informed model-based analysis of human musculoskeletal mechanics on rough terrains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varotto, C.; Sawacha, Z.; Gizzi, L; Farina, D.; Sartori, M.

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at estimating the musculoskeletal forces acting in the human lower extremity during locomotion on rough terrains. We employ computational models of the human neuro-musculoskeletal system that are informed by multi-modal movement data including foot-ground reaction forces, 3D marker

  12. Human Body Mechanics of Pushing and Pulling: Analyzing the Factors of Task-related Strain on the Musculoskeletal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argubi-Wollesen, Andreas; Wollesen, Bettina; Leitner, Martin; Mattes, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to name and describe the important factors of musculoskeletal strain originating from pushing and pulling tasks such as cart handling that are commonly found in industrial contexts. A literature database search was performed using the research platform Web of Science. For a study to be included in this review differences in measured or calculated strain had to be investigated with regard to: (1) cart weight/ load; (2) handle position and design; (3) exerted forces; (4) handling task (push and pull); or (5) task experience. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria and proved to be of adequate methodological quality by the standards of the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research. External load or cart weight proved to be the most influential factor of strain. The ideal handle positions ranged from hip to shoulder height and were dependent on the strain factor that was focused on as well as the handling task. Furthermore, task experience and subsequently handling technique were also key to reducing strain. Workplace settings that regularly involve pushing and pulling should be checked for potential improvements with regards to lower weight of the loaded handling device, handle design, and good practice guidelines to further reduce musculoskeletal disease prevalence.

  13. Motion control of musculoskeletal systems with redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjoo; Durand, Dominique M

    2008-12-01

    Motion control of musculoskeletal systems for functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a challenging problem due to the inherent complexity of the systems. These include being highly nonlinear, strongly coupled, time-varying, time-delayed, and redundant. The redundancy in particular makes it difficult to find an inverse model of the system for control purposes. We have developed a control system for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) redundant musculoskeletal systems with little prior information. The proposed method separates the steady-state properties from the dynamic properties. The dynamic control uses a steady-state inverse model and is implemented with both a PID controller for disturbance rejection and an artificial neural network (ANN) feedforward controller for fast trajectory tracking. A mechanism to control the sum of the muscle excitation levels is also included. To test the performance of the proposed control system, a two degree of freedom ankle-subtalar joint model with eight muscles was used. The simulation results show that separation of steady-state and dynamic control allow small output tracking errors for different reference trajectories such as pseudo-step, sinusoidal and filtered random signals. The proposed control method also demonstrated robustness against system parameter and controller parameter variations. A possible application of this control algorithm is FES control using multiple contact cuff electrodes where mathematical modeling is not feasible and the redundancy makes the control of dynamic movement difficult.

  14. Purinergic signalling in the musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Arnett, Timothy R; Orriss, Isabel R

    2013-12-01

    It is now widely recognised that extracellular nucleotides, signalling via purinergic receptors, participate in numerous biological processes in most tissues. It has become evident that extracellular nucleotides have significant regulatory effects in the musculoskeletal system. In early development, ATP released from motor nerves along with acetylcholine acts as a cotransmitter in neuromuscular transmission; in mature animals, ATP functions as a neuromodulator. Purinergic receptors expressed by skeletal muscle and satellite cells play important pathophysiological roles in their development or repair. In many cell types, expression of purinergic receptors is often dependent on differentiation. For example, sequential expression of P2X5, P2Y1 and P2X2 receptors occurs during muscle regeneration in the mdx model of muscular dystrophy. In bone and cartilage cells, the functional effects of purinergic signalling appear to be largely negative. ATP stimulates the formation and activation of osteoclasts, the bone-destroying cells. Another role appears to be as a potent local inhibitor of mineralisation. In osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, ATP acts via P2 receptors to limit bone mineralisation by inhibiting alkaline phosphatase expression and activity. Extracellular ATP additionally exerts significant effects on mineralisation via its hydrolysis product, pyrophosphate. Evidence now suggests that purinergic signalling is potentially important in several bone and joint disorders including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and cancers. Strategies for future musculoskeletal therapies might involve modulation of purinergic receptor function or of the ecto-nucleotidases responsible for ATP breakdown or ATP transport inhibitors.

  15. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System

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    Elke Wintermeyer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D’s central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported.

  16. Diabetes Mellitus and the Musculoskeletal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monu, Johnny V.J.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease with systemic manifestations. Occurrence is increasing worldwide from 153m to 347m from 1980 to 2011. Traditionally there are two main types: Insulin dependent or juvenile diabetes and non-insulin dependent or Maturity onset or insulin resistant diabetes. Gestational diabetes the second type of diabetes is increasingly seen in young patients and it evolves into insulin dependence. Obesity is causally related to type II diabetes. Diabetes Mellitus affects appendicular and peripheral structures more commonly – ankle and feet. Diabetes in the MSK System effects manifested as congenital problems, Peripheral neuropathy, Peripheral vasculopathy Infections and Connective tissue changes. The disease target Structures like Cardio-vascular system, Central nervous system (brain, eyes) and peripheral nerves, Reticulo-endothelial system, Kidneys and Musculoskeletal system. Osteomyelitis fractures including fragmentation of bones and disorganization of joints – neuropathic changes. Diabetic Myopathy occurs predominantly in long-standing, poorly controlled type 1 diabetics often have other vascular or end organ complications. Etiology related to microvascular disease leads to muscle ischemia and infarction eventual muscle atrophy

  17. Dynamic MR imaging of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, A.S.; Hylton, H.; Hentz, V.R.; Schattner, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on dynamic MR imaging which is an MR technique that allows imaging of the musculoskeletal system in motion. Current methods for observing the articulation of muscles and joints are limited to acquisition of stationary images at different spatial orientations. These images are then replayed from computer memory to simulate motion. Unlike stationary acquisition, dynamic MR imaging allows the volume of interest to be subjected to motion and dynamic stress, which is important for detecting stress-induced pathology. To demonstrate the utility of dynamic MR imaging, a system for imaging a moving wrist has been developed. The system consists of apparatus capable of providing simultaneous radialulnar deviation and flexion-extension, and hardware for system control and acquisition gating. The apparatus is mounted on the patient bed and is transferable to a variety of standard clinical MR imaging systems. Images were obtained during motion, and the ability of dynamic MR imaging to accurately image the moving wrist with very little motion artifact was demonstrated

  18. Magnetic resonance of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berquist, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides a review of the principles and techniques of musculoskeletal MRI and its broad range of diagnostic applications. Opening chapters of the book summarize the principles of musculoskeletal MRI, explaining how these principles can be applied to provide optimal tissue contrast and characterization. Step-by-step guidelines are then offered on patient selection, positioning, and coil techniques, with full consideration of how coils, number of averages, matrix size, repetition time, and other factors affect image quality. Patient throughput and the most commonly used pulse sequences are also discussed. The book features coverage of the use of MRI in evaluation of specific diseases: bone and soft tissue tumors;infections;musculoskeletal trauma;spinal disorders;and miscellaneous conditions. The authors' comparisons of MRI with computed tomography, ultrasound, isotopes, and other techniques will assist the physician in determining which clinical problems are best evaluated by MRI. Where MRI is the optimal technique, the text outlines the examination procedure, indicates which sequences provide the most information, and describes the pathologic findings that can be observed in MRI scans

  19. Musculoskeletal system pathology in aids patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabala, R.; Oleaga, L.; Garcia Bolado, A.; Grande, D.; Gorrino, O.; Lecumberri, I.

    2003-01-01

    We studied 22 AIDS patients who presented musculoskeletal system pathology. The affected area underwent simple X-ray and MR. The MR study was performed using a 1 Tesla magnet. T1 and T2 weighted echo spin sequences, as well as sequences of short T1 inversion recovery (STIR). In nine cases, intravenous gadolinium was used at a dose of 0.2cc/kg. The study plane was selected depending on the location of the lesion and surface coils were used when appropriate. In those patients showing pathology which was removed from the appendicular skeleton, the principal magnet was used as both transmitter and receiver. In one case, an On-Tine Tomography (CT) was also carried out. The evaluated ata were: a) localization; b) bony erosion; c) soft-tissue mass; d) articular effusion; e) cartilaginous changes; f) and T2 signals, and g) gadolinium enhancement. A diagnosis was made on the basis of biopsy or clinical culture, and evolution. Spinal cord alterations were the most frequent, being found in 13 cases. Twelve were caused by spondylodiscitis, 10 by tuberculosis, one by staphylococcal infection and one by candidiasis. In all cases, there appeared disk damage, as well as bone marrow signal alterations in the affected area and disks soft-tissue. In the mine cases in which gadolinium was used, the disk, vertebral plates and cases in which gadolinium was used, the disk, vertebral plates and soft-tissue mass heterogeneously enhanced, demonstrating an abscess with ring enhancement, and a central necrotic area in one case. In one patient, a spinal cord alteration due to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was observed. In six cases,there was observed and infectious arthritis two in coxofemoral joints, three in knees and one in a glenohumeral joint. Isolated germs were staphylococcal in three cases one being Mycobacterium tuberculosis, another being M. kansasii and the third identified as. Candida. In all cases, there was observed joint effusion, synovial thickening, joint cartilage damage and bony

  20. Biomechanical Constraints Underlying Motor Primitives Derived from the Musculoskeletal Anatomy of the Human Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Valeriya; Hardesty, Russell L; Boots, Mathew T; Yakovenko, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    Neural control of movement can only be realized though the interaction between the mechanical properties of the limb and the environment. Thus, a fundamental question is whether anatomy has evolved to simplify neural control by shaping these interactions in a beneficial way. This inductive data-driven study analyzed the patterns of muscle actions across multiple joints using the musculoskeletal model of the human upper limb. This model was used to calculate muscle lengths across the full range of motion of the arm and examined the correlations between these values between all pairs of muscles. Musculoskeletal coupling was quantified using hierarchical clustering analysis. Muscle lengths between multiple pairs of muscles across multiple postures were highly correlated. These correlations broadly formed two proximal and distal groups, where proximal muscles of the arm were correlated with each other and distal muscles of the arm and hand were correlated with each other, but not between groups. Using hierarchical clustering, between 11 and 14 reliable muscle groups were identified. This shows that musculoskeletal anatomy does indeed shape the mechanical interactions by grouping muscles into functional clusters that generally match the functional repertoire of the human arm. Together, these results support the idea that the structure of the musculoskeletal system is tuned to solve movement complexity problem by reducing the dimensionality of available solutions.

  1. Vitamin D Related Musculoskeletal System Findings

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    Banu Sarıfakıoğlu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The effect of vitamin D on bone metabolism has been well known for a long time. Recently, various hormonal and immunity related effects has have been obtained. Additionally, the deficiency of vitamin D is thought to be related with various pain syndromes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the main musculoskeletal symptoms of patients with vitamin D deficiency admitting to physical medicine and rehabilitation clinics. Materials and Methods: The data were retrospectively investigated in patients with myalgia, arthralgia, regional pain, widespread body pain (WBP and in whom vitamin D levels were measured. Patients over 50 years old and with known osteoporosis/osteomalacia diagnosis, endocrinological pathology, and inflammatory rheumatological disease were excluded. Results: The data of 571 patients were investigated and totally 214 of them were included in the study. There were 178 females (83.2%, 36 males (16.8%. The mean age of the patients was 39.19±9.58 years. Of the patients, 100 (46.7% were in severe deficiency, 68 (31.8% were in deficiency, 46 (21.5% were in insufficient group. The symptoms were regional pain in 65 (30.3%, WBP in 63 (29.4%, arthralgia in 49 (23%, and myalgia in 37 (17.3% patients. Conclusion: Vitamin D deficiency may be encountered as musculoskeletal problems. In the presence of persistent joint-muscle pain, regional pain and fibromiyalgia, vitamin D deficiency should be kept in mind.

  2. Collagen synthesis in human musculoskeletal tissues and skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babraj, J A; Cuthbertson, D J R; Smith, K

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a direct method for the measurement of human musculoskeletal collagen synthesis on the basis of the incorporation of stable isotope-labeled proline or leucine into protein and have used it to measure the rate of synthesis of collagen in tendon, ligament, muscle, and skin....... In postabsorptive, healthy young men (28 +/- 6 yr) synthetic rates for tendon, ligament, muscle, and skin collagen were 0.046 +/- 0.005, 0.040 +/- 0.006, 0.016 +/- 0.002, and 0.037 +/- 0.003%/h, respectively (means +/- SD). In postabsorptive, healthy elderly men (70 +/- 6 yr) the rate of skeletal muscle collagen...... synthesis is greater than in the young (0.023 +/- 0.002%/h, P collagen are similar to those of mixed skeletal muscle protein in the postabsorptive state, whereas the rate for muscle collagen synthesis is much lower in both young and elderly men...

  3. Application of computer-assisted imaging technology in human musculoskeletal joint research

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    Xudong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted imaging analysis technology has been widely used in the musculoskeletal joint biomechanics research in recent years. Imaging techniques can accurately reconstruct the anatomic features of the target joint and reproduce its in vivo motion characters. The data has greatly improved our understanding of normal joint function, joint injury mechanism, and surgical treatment, and can provide foundations for using reverse-engineering methods to develop biomimetic artificial joints. In this paper, we systematically reviewed the investigation of in vivo kinematics of the human knee, shoulder, lumber spine, and ankle using advanced imaging technologies, especially those using a dual fluoroscopic imaging system (DFIS. We also briefly discuss future development of imaging analysis technology in musculoskeletal joint research.

  4. Virtual interactive musculoskeletal system (VIMS in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Hiroaki

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System. Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  5. Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System (VIMS) in orthopaedic research, education and clinical patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Edmund Y S; Armiger, Robert S; Yoshida, Hiroaki; Lim, Jonathan; Haraguchi, Naoki

    2007-03-08

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the "Virtual Human" reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of these unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system, model library and database will impact on orthopaedic education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal joint system reconstruction, trauma management, and rehabilitation.

  6. Musculoskeletal sporotrichosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A.C.; Destouet, J.M.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-06-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic, indolent, fungal infection that rarely involves the musculoskeletal system. The etiologic agent, Sporothrix schenckii, is ubiquitous in nature and has been isolated from soil, timber, decaying vegetation, and a variety of foliage. The organism gains entrance to the body through trauma to the skin or, in rare instances, by inhalation. The vast majority of infections in humans is characterized by nodular or ulcerated lesions of the cutaneous tissues and adjacent lymphatics. Osteoarticular involvement may occur either by contiguous spread from a cutaneous focus, through direct inoculation of tissue by the organism, or by hematogenous dissemination. The rarity of musculoskeletal sporotrichosis often causes a delay in diagnosis which leads to inappropriate therapy and permanent deformity in some patients. Three cases which show a spectrum of bone and joint involvement are presented.

  7. Musculoskeletal sporotrichosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, A.C.; Destouet, J.M.; Murphy, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a chronic, indolent, fungal infection that rarely involves the musculoskeletal system. The etiologic agent, Sporothrix schenckii, is ubiquitous in nature and has been isolated from soil, timber, decaying vegetation, and a variety of foliage. The organism gains entrance to the body through trauma to the skin or, in rare instances, by inhalation. The vast majority of infections in humans is characterized by nodular or ulcerated lesions of the cutaneous tissues and adjacent lymphatics. Osteoarticular involvement may occur either by contiguous spread from a cutaneous focus, through direct inoculation of tissue by the organism, or by hematogenous dissemination. The rarity of musculoskeletal sporotrichosis often causes a delay in diagnosis which leads to inappropriate therapy and permanent deformity in some patients. Three cases which show a spectrum of bone and joint involvement are presented. (orig.)

  8. Radiologically detectable musculoskeletal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, M. M.; Manjon, P.; Diaz de Bustamante, T.; Galindo, M.; Buj, M. J.; Cabezudo, J.

    2000-01-01

    We show a wide spectrum of musculoskeletal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that can be detected by radiological examination. We determined the indications of different imaging techniques in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease. We reviewed the clinical and radiological histories of 37 patients diagnosed as having SLE on the basis of serological and musculoskeletal criteria. We assessed the personal data of each patient, the association of the disease with autoimmune processes, serology, treatment and radiological findings using plain X ray, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). Of the 37 cases reviewed, only ten presented changes in one or more of the imaging studies performed. the most common radiological finding was symmetric poly arthritis located at different sites. Other signs included avascular necrosis (late and early), inflammation and tendon and/or ligament rupture, nonerosive deforming arthropathies , soft tissue calcifications and arthritis (staphylococcal and tuberculous). A direct correlation was established between the anticardiolipin antibody titer, steroid doses and avascular necrosis. In SLE, radiologically detectable osteoarticular lesions are uncommon. Symmetric polyarthritis is the earliest lesion and that occurring most frequently. Other signs do not appear as often, with the exception of osteonecrosis, which usually occurs late. It developed early and was unusually aggressive in two youths with elevated anticardiolipin antibody titers and substantial systemic involvement in our series. The contributions of ultrasound and MR in the assessment of musculoskeletal involvement in SLE are especially relevant in the study of inflammations and tendon rupture and in the management of avascular necrosis, respectively. (Author) 17 refs

  9. Assessment of musculoskeletal system in women with jumping mechanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannis Dionyssiotis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Yannis Dionyssiotis1,2, Antonios Galanos1, Georgios Michas1, Georgios Trovas1, Georgios P Lyritis11Laboratory for Research of the Musculoskeletal System, University of Athens, KAT Hospital, Kifissia, Greece; 2Rehabilitation Department, Rhodes General Hospital, Rhodes, GreeceAbstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate and add reference data about the musculoskeletal system in women. The mechanography system of the Leonardo™ platform (Novotec, Germany was used to measure parameters of movement (velocity, force, power in 176 healthy Greek women aged 20–79 years, separated according to age decade in six groups: group 1 (n = 12, 20–29 years; group 2 (n = 14, 30–39 years; group 3 (n = 33, 40–49 years; group 4 (n = 59, 50–59 years including 21 postmenopausal; group 5 (n = 31, 60–69 years including 12 postmenopausal; and group 6 (n = 27, 70–79 years all postmenopausal. This system measures forces applied to the plate over time, calculates through acceleration the vertical velocity of center of gravity and using force and velocity it calculates power of vertical movements. All women performed a counter-movement jump (brief squat before the jump with freely moving arms. Weight was recorded on the platform before the jump and height was measured with a wall-mounted ruler. Body weight and body mass index were gradually increased; on the contrary height and all movement parameters except force (velocity, power were statistically decreased during aging and after menopause.Keywords: biomechanics, ground reaction force, power, women, menopause

  10. Evaluation of mechanical load in the musculoskeletal system : development of experimental and modeling methodologies for the study of the effect of exercise in human models

    OpenAIRE

    João, Filipa Oliveira da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Doutoramento em Motricidade Humana, na especialidade de Biomecânica A major concern of Biomechanics research is the evaluation of the mechanical load and power that the human body develops and endorses when performing high to moderate sport activities. With the purpose of increasing performance and reducing the risk of injury, substantial advances were accomplished to pursuit this goal, either on the laboratory techniques as well as modelling and simulation. Traditionally, the main focus w...

  11. Radiologic manifestations in the musculoskeletal system of miscellaneous endocrine disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, F S

    1991-01-01

    The manifestations of endocrine derangements in the musculoskeletal system in infancy and childhood are disturbances in growth and maturation and in adulthood are disturbances in maintenance and metabolism. Hypercortisolism during skeletal immaturity suppresses growth. In the adult, hypercortisolism leads to osteoporosis, osteonecrosis, and muscle wasting. Deficiency of growth hormone during skeletal development results in short stature. An excess of growth hormone in a skeletally immature individual results in gigantism, an excess in a skeletally mature individual results in acromegaly. Patients with gigantism have extreme height with normal body proportions. Musculoskeletal manifestations of acromegaly include soft-tissue thickening, vertebral body enlargement, characteristic hand and foot changes, and enthesal bony proliferation. Hyperthyroidism causes catabolism of protein and loss of connective tissue, which manifest as muscle wasting. Deficient levels of thyroid hormone cause defects in growth and development. Severe growth retardation from congenital hypothyroidism is rare because neonatal screening recognizes the disorder and leads to early treatment. The skeletal manifestation of hypergonadism in children is precocious growth and early skeletal maturation. Although the initial precocious growth spurt results in a tall child, early closure of the growth plates results in a short adult. Hypogonadism in the prepubertal child results in delayed adolescence and delayed skeletal maturation. Diabetes mellitus in childhood results in decreased growth, a phenomenon presumed to be secondary to nutritional abnormalities. Generalized osteoporosis and short stature are common. In the adult, generalized osteoporosis may accompany insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus if obesity is absent. Calcification of interdigital arteries of the foot is common in diabetics and uncommon in other conditions. Additional skeletal manifestations relate to complications of diabetes such as

  12. DIAGNOSTICS OF DISORDERS AND DISEASES OF MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM IN SCHOOLCHILDREN: APPROACHES, TERMINOLOGY, CLASSIFICATION

    OpenAIRE

    N.B. Mirskaya; A.N. Kolomenskaya

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an information system for physicians working in general education institutes, which is named «Detection, correction and prophylaxis of musculoskeletal system disorders in students of general education institutes». This system was created for the purpose of improving diagnostics of initial stages of musculoskeletal system in schoolchildren, detecting of risk factors, and for the provision of timely prophylaxis during school education. The system was based on classificati...

  13. Diagnostic imaging of sport related musculoskeletal system injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa; Schivartche, Vivian

    1998-01-01

    The authors review the literature about musculoskeletal injuries related to sports, emphasizing the main findings with different imaging methods. They also present the specific characteristics of each method. (author)

  14. DIAGNOSTICS OF DISORDERS AND DISEASES OF MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM IN SCHOOLCHILDREN: APPROACHES, TERMINOLOGY, CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Mirskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an information system for physicians working in general education institutes, which is named «Detection, correction and prophylaxis of musculoskeletal system disorders in students of general education institutes». This system was created for the purpose of improving diagnostics of initial stages of musculoskeletal system in schoolchildren, detecting of risk factors, and for the provision of timely prophylaxis during school education. The system was based on classification of functional disorders and initial stages of diseases of musculoskeletal system in schoolchildren, developed by authors of present article, and methods of medical examination and organization of this work.Key words: schoolchildren, musculoskeletal system, diagnostics, classification, prophylaxis.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(3:10-13

  15. Atlas of anatomic cross sections. Musculoskeletal system; Atlas der Schnittbildanatomie. Muskuloskelettales System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Torsten B.; Reif, Emil [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Dillingen/Saar (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The book is focussed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the musculoskeletal system with high resolution and detailed precision of all relevant structures. The book is based on the practical experience of 25 years work with MRI. The contributions cover the following systems: whole body, temporomandibular joint, spinal column, upper extremities, and lower extremities.

  16. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF AUTOMATED REHABILITATION SYSTEM WITH BIOLOGICAL FEEDBACK FOR REHABILITATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill A. Kalyashin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the efficiency and safety of rehabilitation of musculoskeletal system, the model and the algorithm for patient interaction with automated rehabilitation system with biological feedback was developed, based on registration and management of the second functional parameter, which prevents risks of overwork while intensive exercises.

  17. Differential diagnostics of the musculoskeletal system in sports medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehrer, S.

    2010-01-01

    The positive effects of sports on the cardiovascular and musculoskeleal systems are widely accepted. Nevertheless, sports also can cause injury and overuse leading to sport-specific problems, which are often a challenge in diagnosing and treatment. The history of the sport-related injury is crucial for further differential diagnosis. Careful inspection, palpation and functional testing can reveal the possible pathology and lead to an effective strategy in the diagnostic assessment using radiographic tools such as sonography, X-ray and MR imaging (MRI). In muscle and tendon injuries sonography can provide ready to use information concerning muscle tears and tendon ruptures or degenerative lesions. Plain X-rays give a good overview on joint conditions regarding the bone and sometimes have to be completed by focused enlargement of the critical structure, especially in stress fractures and small bone lesions. MRT is the gold standard in the evaluation of interarticular and extra-articular sport-related pathologies, however, an exact clinical diagnosis allows a more effective investigation protocol. Profound knowledge of possible sport-specific injury and overuse patterns is necessary to detect lesions of the musculoskeletal system in active athletes and to use the fitting radiographic strategy for confirmation. The exact diagnosis is the prerequisite for initiating the appropriate treatment and a fast sports medical rehabilitation process. (orig.) [de

  18. Design and validation of a general purpose robotic testing system for musculoskeletal applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Lawrence D; Colbrunn, Robb W; Lee, Dong-Gil; van den Bogert, Antonie J; Davis, Brian L

    2010-02-01

    specimen interactions with the robot (with and without muscle forces) to duplicate physiological loading of the joints through iterative pseudo-fuzzy logic and real-time hybrid control are described. Results from the tests of the musculoskeletal simulator have demonstrated that the speed and accuracy of the components, the synchronization timing, the force and position control methods, and the system software can adequately replicate the biomechanics of human motion required to conduct meaningful cadaveric joint investigations.

  19. Novel Musculoskeletal Loading System for Small Exercise Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Meghan; Newby, Nate; Trinh, Tinh; Hanson, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Long duration spaceflight places astronauts at increased risk for muscle strain and bone fracture upon return to a 1-g or partial gravity environment. Functionally limiting decrements in musculoskeletal health are likely during Mars proving-ground and Earth-independent missions given extended transit times and the vehicle limitations for exercise devices (low-mass, small volume, little to no power). This is particularly alarming for exploration missions because astronauts will be required to perform novel and physically demanding tasks (i.e. vehicle egress, exploration, and habitat building activities) on unfamiliar terrain. Accordingly, NASA's exploration roadmap identifies the need for development of small exercise equipment that can prevent musculoskeletal atrophy and has the ability to assess musculoskeletal health at multiple time points during long-duration missions.

  20. Addressing Neuroplastic Changes in Distributed Areas of the Nervous System Associated With Chronic Musculoskeletal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, René; Higgins, Johanne; Bourbonnais, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Present interventions utilized in musculoskeletal rehabilitation are guided, in large part, by a biomedical model where peripheral structural injury is believed to be the sole driver of the disorder. There are, however, neurophysiological changes across different areas of the peripheral and central nervous systems, including peripheral receptors, dorsal horn of the spinal cord, brain stem, sensorimotor cortical areas, and the mesolimbic and prefrontal areas associated with chronic musculoskeletal disorders, including chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, and tendon injuries. These neurophysiological changes appear not only to be a consequence of peripheral structural injury but also to play a part in the pathophysiology of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Neurophysiological changes are consistent with a biopsychosocial formulation reflecting the underlying mechanisms associated with sensory and motor findings, psychological traits, and perceptual changes associated with chronic musculoskeletal conditions. These changes, therefore, have important implications in the clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, and treatment of chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Musculoskeletal rehabilitation professionals have at their disposal tools to address these neuroplastic changes, including top-down cognitive-based interventions (eg, education, cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness meditation, motor imagery) and bottom-up physical interventions (eg, motor learning, peripheral sensory stimulation, manual therapy) that induce neuroplastic changes across distributed areas of the nervous system and affect outcomes in patients with chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Furthermore, novel approaches such as the use of transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be utilized to help renormalize neurological function. Comprehensive treatment addressing peripheral structural injury as well as neurophysiological changes occurring across

  1. Value of computerized tomography in the diagnosis of bone and musculoskeletal system tumors of the pelvis and extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, R.; Langer, M.

    1983-01-01

    49 cases of tumors of the musculoskeletal system of the pelvis and the extremities have been investigated by computerized tomography. The CT was performed only after conventional radiologic methods. The results are discussed and compared with those described in the literature. The advantages and disadvantages of CT of musculoskeletal disorders are discussed. We consider the CT to be of value in disorders of the musculoskeletal system, specially, if operative- or radiotherapy is planned. (orig.) [de

  2. Mechanical Stimulation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Functional Tissue Engineering of the Musculoskeletal System via Cyclic Hydrostatic Pressure, Simulated Microgravity, and Cyclic Tensile Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordberg, Rachel C; Bodle, Josie C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2018-01-01

    It is critical that human adipose stem cell (hASC) tissue-engineering therapies possess appropriate mechanical properties in order to restore function of the load bearing tissues of the musculoskeletal system. In an effort to elucidate the hASC response to mechanical stimulation and develop mechanically robust tissue engineered constructs, recent research has utilized a variety of mechanical loading paradigms including cyclic tensile strain, cyclic hydrostatic pressure, and mechanical unloading in simulated microgravity. This chapter describes methods for applying these mechanical stimuli to hASC to direct differentiation for functional tissue engineering of the musculoskeletal system.

  3. Paediatric obesity, physical activity and the musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, S P; Anner, J; Hills, A P

    2009-09-01

    The current epidemic of paediatric obesity is consistent with a myriad of health-related comorbid conditions. Despite the higher prevalence of orthopaedic conditions in overweight children, a paucity of published research has considered the influence of these conditions on the ability to undertake physical activity. As physical activity participation is directly related to improvements in physical fitness, skeletal health and metabolic conditions, higher levels of physical activity are encouraged, and exercise is commonly prescribed in the treatment and management of childhood obesity. However, research has not correlated orthopaedic conditions, including the increased joint pain and discomfort that is commonly reported by overweight children, with decreases in physical activity. Research has confirmed that overweight children typically display a slower, more tentative walking pattern with increased forces to the hip, knee and ankle during 'normal' gait. This research, combined with anthropometric data indicating a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal malalignment in overweight children, suggests that such individuals are poorly equipped to undertake certain forms of physical activity. Concomitant increases in obesity and decreases in physical activity level strongly support the need to better understand the musculoskeletal factors associated with the performance of motor tasks by overweight and obese children.

  4. Computed tomography findings of paracoccidiodomycosis in musculoskeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Junior, Francisco Valtenor Araujo; Savarese, Leonor Garbin; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Martinez, Roberto; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique, E-mail: fvaltenor@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina

    2015-01-15

    Objective: to evaluate musculoskeletal involvement in paracoccidioidomycosis at computed tomography. Materials and methods: development of a retrospective study based on a review of radiologic and pathologic reports in the institution database. Patients with histopathologically confirmed musculoskeletal paracoccidioidomycosis and submitted to computed tomography were included in the present study. The imaging findings were consensually described by two radiologists. In order to avoid bias in the analysis, one patient with uncountable bone lesions was excluded from the study. Results: a total of seven patients were included in the present study. A total of 18 bone lesions were counted. The study group consisted of 7 patients. A total number of 18 bone lesions were counted. Osteoarticular lesions were the first manifestation of the disease in four patients (57.14%). Bone lesions were multiple in 42.85% of patients. Appendicular and axial skeleton were affected in 85.71% and 42.85% of cases, respectively. Bone involvement was characterized by well-demarcated osteolytic lesions. Marginal osteosclerosis was identified in 72.22% of the lesions, while lamellar periosteal reaction and soft tissue component were present in 5.55% of them. One patient showed multiple small lesions with bone sequestra. Conclusion: paracoccidioidomycosis can be included in the differential diagnosis of either single or multiple osteolytic lesions in young patients even in the absence of a previous diagnosis of pulmonary or visceral paracoccidioidomycosis. (author)

  5. Femoral morphology and femoropelvic musculoskeletal anatomy of humans and great apes: a comparative virtopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Naoki; Ponce de León, Marcia S; Nishimura, Takeshi; Zollikofer, Christoph P E

    2011-09-01

    The proximal femoral morphology of fossil hominins is routinely interpreted in terms of muscular topography and associated locomotor modes. However, the detailed correspondence between hard and soft tissue structures in the proximal femoral region of extant great apes is relatively unknown, because dissection protocols typically do not comprise in-depth osteological descriptions. Here, we use computed tomography and virtopsy (virtual dissection) for non-invasive examination of the femoropelvic musculoskeletal anatomy in Pan troglodytes, P. paniscus, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, and Homo sapiens. Specifically, we analyze the topographic relationship between muscle attachment sites and surface structures of the proximal femoral shaft such as the lateral spiral pilaster. Our results show that the origin of the vastus lateralis muscle is anterior to the insertion of gluteus maximus in all examined great ape specimens and humans. In gorillas and orangutans, the insertion of gluteus maximus is on the inferior (anterolateral) side of the lateral spiral pilaster. In chimpanzees, however, the maximus insertion is on its superior (posteromedial) side, similar to the situation in modern humans. These findings support the hypothesis that chimpanzees and humans exhibit a shared-derived musculoskeletal topography of the proximal femoral region, irrespective of their different locomotor modes, whereas gorillas and orangutans represent the primitive condition. Caution is thus warranted when inferring locomotor behavior from the surface topography of the proximal femur of fossil hominins, as the morphology of this region may contain a strong phyletic signal that tends to blur locomotor adaptation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Imaging of systemic lupus erythematosus. Part II: Gastrointestinal, renal, and musculoskeletal manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, Y.P.; Naidoo, P.; Ngian, G.-S.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease that has a relapsing and remitting course. It has a wide range of presentations with various organ manifestations. In this review, we have compiled the radiological findings of gastrointestinal, renal, and musculoskeletal manifestations of SLE.

  7. A musculoskeletal model of human locomotion driven by a low dimensional set of impulsive excitation primitives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Massimo; Gizzi, Leonardo; Lloyd, David G; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Human locomotion has been described as being generated by an impulsive (burst-like) excitation of groups of musculotendon units, with timing dependent on the biomechanical goal of the task. Despite this view being supported by many experimental observations on specific locomotion tasks, it is still unknown if the same impulsive controller (i.e., a low-dimensional set of time-delayed excitastion primitives) can be used as input drive for large musculoskeletal models across different human locomotion tasks. For this purpose, we extracted, with non-negative matrix factorization, five non-negative factors from a large sample of muscle electromyograms in two healthy subjects during four motor tasks. These included walking, running, sidestepping, and crossover cutting maneuvers. The extracted non-negative factors were then averaged and parameterized to obtain task-generic Gaussian-shaped impulsive excitation curves or primitives. These were used to drive a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the human lower extremity. Results showed that the same set of five impulsive excitation primitives could be used to predict the dynamics of 34 musculotendon units and the resulting hip, knee and ankle joint moments (i.e., NRMSE = 0.18 ± 0.08, and R (2) = 0.73 ± 0.22 across all tasks and subjects) without substantial loss of accuracy with respect to using experimental electromyograms (i.e., NRMSE = 0.16 ± 0.07, and R (2) = 0.78 ± 0.18 across all tasks and subjects). Results support the hypothesis that biomechanically different motor tasks might share similar neuromuscular control strategies. This might have implications in neurorehabilitation technologies such as human-machine interfaces for the torque-driven, proportional control of powered prostheses and orthoses. In this, device control commands (i.e., predicted joint torque) could be derived without direct experimental data but relying on simple parameterized Gaussian-shaped curves, thus decreasing the input drive

  8. Virtual Reality Anatomy: Is It Comparable with Traditional Methods in the Teaching of Human Forearm Musculoskeletal Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codd, Anthony M.; Choudhury, Bipasha

    2011-01-01

    The use of cadavers to teach anatomy is well established, but limitations with this approach have led to the introduction of alternative teaching methods. One such method is the use of three-dimensional virtual reality computer models. An interactive, three-dimensional computer model of human forearm anterior compartment musculoskeletal anatomy…

  9. INFLUENCE OF WORKING CONDITIONS ON THE OCCURRENCE AND PREVALENCE OF DISEASES MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM OF THE WORKERS OF LLC "TOLYATTI TRANSFORMER"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Semina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of working conditions upon the occurrence and (or prevalence of the musculoskeletal system diseases according to the results of the periodical medical examinations of Co. ltd. “TOGLIATTY TRANSFORMATOR” workers is analyzed. The direct influence of work conditions upon the occurrence and (or prevalence of the musculoskeletal system diseases in view of the prevalence of the foregoing diseases among different professions and working processes factors irrespective of age, sex and seniority is shown. Exciting causes of musculoskeletal system diseases are not only overwork due to hard manual labor, but also prolonged stay in a forced position.

  10. Seeing through Musculoskeletal Tissues: Improving In Situ Imaging of Bone and the Lacunar Canalicular System through Optical Clearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Ian M.; Miola, Joseph P.; David, Michael A.; Smith, Melanie K.; Price, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In situ, cells of the musculoskeletal system reside within complex and often interconnected 3-D environments. Key to better understanding how 3-D tissue and cellular environments regulate musculoskeletal physiology, homeostasis, and health is the use of robust methodologies for directly visualizing cell-cell and cell-matrix architecture in situ. However, the use of standard optical imaging techniques is often of limited utility in deep imaging of intact musculoskeletal tissues due to the highly scattering nature of biological tissues. Drawing inspiration from recent developments in the deep-tissue imaging field, we describe the application of immersion based optical clearing techniques, which utilize the principle of refractive index (RI) matching between the clearing/mounting media and tissue under observation, to improve the deep, in situ imaging of musculoskeletal tissues. To date, few optical clearing techniques have been applied specifically to musculoskeletal tissues, and a systematic comparison of the clearing ability of optical clearing agents in musculoskeletal tissues has yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study we tested the ability of eight different aqueous and non-aqueous clearing agents, with RIs ranging from 1.45 to 1.56, to optically clear murine knee joints and cortical bone. We demonstrated and quantified the ability of these optical clearing agents to clear musculoskeletal tissues and improve both macro- and micro-scale imaging of musculoskeletal tissue across several imaging modalities (stereomicroscopy, spectroscopy, and one-, and two-photon confocal microscopy) and investigational techniques (dynamic bone labeling and en bloc tissue staining). Based upon these findings we believe that optical clearing, in combination with advanced imaging techniques, has the potential to complement classical musculoskeletal analysis techniques; opening the door for improved in situ investigation and quantification of musculoskeletal tissues. PMID:26930293

  11. Seeing through Musculoskeletal Tissues: Improving In Situ Imaging of Bone and the Lacunar Canalicular System through Optical Clearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Berke

    Full Text Available In situ, cells of the musculoskeletal system reside within complex and often interconnected 3-D environments. Key to better understanding how 3-D tissue and cellular environments regulate musculoskeletal physiology, homeostasis, and health is the use of robust methodologies for directly visualizing cell-cell and cell-matrix architecture in situ. However, the use of standard optical imaging techniques is often of limited utility in deep imaging of intact musculoskeletal tissues due to the highly scattering nature of biological tissues. Drawing inspiration from recent developments in the deep-tissue imaging field, we describe the application of immersion based optical clearing techniques, which utilize the principle of refractive index (RI matching between the clearing/mounting media and tissue under observation, to improve the deep, in situ imaging of musculoskeletal tissues. To date, few optical clearing techniques have been applied specifically to musculoskeletal tissues, and a systematic comparison of the clearing ability of optical clearing agents in musculoskeletal tissues has yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study we tested the ability of eight different aqueous and non-aqueous clearing agents, with RIs ranging from 1.45 to 1.56, to optically clear murine knee joints and cortical bone. We demonstrated and quantified the ability of these optical clearing agents to clear musculoskeletal tissues and improve both macro- and micro-scale imaging of musculoskeletal tissue across several imaging modalities (stereomicroscopy, spectroscopy, and one-, and two-photon confocal microscopy and investigational techniques (dynamic bone labeling and en bloc tissue staining. Based upon these findings we believe that optical clearing, in combination with advanced imaging techniques, has the potential to complement classical musculoskeletal analysis techniques; opening the door for improved in situ investigation and quantification of musculoskeletal

  12. Human osteoblast cells: isolation, characterization, and growth on polymers for musculoskeletal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Amin, Saadiq F; Botchwey, Edward; Tuli, Richard; Kofron, Michelle D; Mesfin, Addisu; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Tuan, Rocky S; Laurencin, Cato T

    2006-03-01

    We performed a detailed examination of the isolation, characterization, and growth of human osteoblast cells derived from trabecular bone. We further examined the morphology, phenotypic gene expression, mineralization,and growth of these human osteoblasts on polyester polymers used for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid [PLAGA (85:15, 50:50, 75:25)], and poly-lactic acid (L-PLA, D,L-PLA) were examined. The osteoblastic expression of key phenotypic markers osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, collagen, and bone sialoprotein at 4 and 8 weeks was examined. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that trabecular-derived osteoblasts were positive for all markers evaluated with higher levels expressed over long-term culture. These cells also revealed mineralization and maturation as evidenced by energy dispersive X-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Growth studies on PLAGA at 50:50,75:25, and 85:15 ratios and PLA in the L and DL isoforms revealed that human osteoblasts actively grew, with significantly higher cell numbers attached to scaffolds composed of PLAGA 50:50 in the short term and PLAGA 85:15 in the long term compared with PLA (p < 0.05). We believe human cell adhesion among these polymeric materials may be dependent on differences in cellular integrin expression and extracellular matrix protein elaboration. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Learned parametrized dynamic movement primitives with shared synergies for controlling robotic and musculoskeletal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmar eRückert

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A salient feature of human motor skill learning is the ability to exploitsimilarities across related tasks.In biological motor control, it has been hypothesized that muscle synergies,coherent activations of groups of muscles, allow for exploiting shared knowledge.Recent studies have shown that a rich set of complex motor skills can be generated bya combination of a small number of muscle synergies.In robotics, dynamic movement primitives are commonlyused for motor skill learning. This machine learning approach implements a stable attractor systemthat facilitates learning and it can be used in high-dimensional continuous spaces. However, it does not allow for reusing shared knowledge, i.e. for each task an individual set of parameters has to be learned.We propose a novel movement primitive representationthat employs parametrized basis functions, which combines the benefits of muscle synergiesand dynamic movement primitives. For each task asuperposition of synergies modulates a stable attractor system.This approach leads to a compact representation of multiple motor skills andat the same time enables efficient learning in high-dimensional continuous systems.The movement representation supports discrete and rhythmic movements andin particular includes the dynamic movement primitive approach as a special case.We demonstrate the feasibility of the movement representation in three multi-task learning simulated scenarios.First, the characteristics of the proposed representation are illustrated in a point-mass task.Second, in complex humanoid walking experiments,multiple walking patterns with different step heights are learned robustly and efficiently.Finally, in a multi-directional reaching task simulated with a musculoskeletal modelof the human arm, we show how the proposed movement primitives can be used tolearn appropriate muscle excitation patterns and to generalize effectively to new reaching skills.

  14. Analytical review of modern herbal medicines used in musculoskeletal system diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Анна Ігорівна Крюкова; Інна Миколаївна Владимирова

    2015-01-01

    Effective and safe treatment of the musculoskeletal system diseases is one of the main branches of medicine in general and rheumatology in particular. The relevance of this problem is caused mainly by the high incidence in the population, and temporary and permanent work disability status development in patients. The duration of rheumatologic diseases necessitates the optimal regimen selection, providing effective treatment and helping to prevent potential side effects associated with long-te...

  15. The Biphasic Effect of Vitamin D on the Musculoskeletal and Cardiovascular System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Zittermann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This narrative review summarizes beneficial and harmful vitamin D effects on the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular system. Special attention is paid to the dose-response relationship of vitamin D with clinical outcomes. In infants and adults, the risk of musculoskeletal diseases is highest at circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD concentrations below 25 nmol/L and is low if 40–60 nmol/L are achieved. However, evidence is also accumulating that in elderly people the risk of falls and fractures increases again at circulating 25OHD levels > 100 nmol/L. Cohort studies report a progressive increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD events at 25OHD levels  100 nmol/L, but the threshold may be influenced by the level of physical activity. In conclusion, dose-response relationships indicate deleterious effects on the musculoskeletal system and probably on the cardiovascular system at circulating 25OHD levels 100 nmol/L. Future studies should focus on populations with 25OHD levels  100 nmol/L.

  16. Percutaneous CT-guided biopsy of the musculoskeletal system: Results of 2027 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, Eugenio; Rossi, Giuseppe; Bartalena, Tommaso; Ciminari, Rosanna; Alberghini, Marco; Ruggieri, Pietro; Errani, Costantino; Angelini, Andrea; Calabro, Teresa; Abati, Caterina Novella; Balladelli, Alba; Tranfaglia, Cristina; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.; Vanel, Daniel; Mercuri, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Biopsy of the musculoskeletal system is useful in the management of bone lesions particularly in oncology but they are often challenging procedures with a significant risk of complications. Computed tomography (CT)-guided needle biopsies may decrease these risks but doubts still exist about their diagnostic accuracy. This retrospective analysis of the experience of a single institution with percutaneous CT-guided biopsy of musculoskeletal lesions evaluates the results of these biopsies for bone lesions either in the appendicular skeleton or in the spine, and defines indications. Materials and methods: We reviewed the results of 2027 core needle biopsies performed over the past 18 years at the authors' institution. The results obtained are subject of this paper. Results: In 1567 cases the correct diagnosis was made with the first CT-guided needle biopsy (77.3% accuracy rate), in 408 cases the sample was not diagnostic and in 52 inadequate. Within 30 days these 408 patients underwent another biopsy, which was diagnostic in 340 cases with a final diagnostic accuracy of 94%. Highest accuracy rates were obtained in primary and secondary malignant lesions. Most false negative results were found in cervical lesions and in benign, pseudotumoral, flogistic, and systemic pathologies. There were 22 complications (18 transient paresis, 3 haematomas, 1 retroperitoneal haematoma) which had no influence on the treatment strategy, nor on patient outcome. Conclusion: This technique is reliable and safe and should be considered nowadays the gold standard for biopsies of the musculoskeletal system.

  17. Molecular Genetic and Gene Therapy Studies of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Center during the past 12 months. Both lectures were designed to educate and tutor Army project investigators in viral gene transfer technology. One...sponge char- Y, Sakamoto K, et al. Effects of recombinant human acteristics and protein pI on in vivo rhBMP pharma - bone morphogenetic protein-2 on

  18. Use of Ultrasound Elastography in the Assessment of the Musculoskeletal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paluch, Łukasz; Nawrocka-Laskus, Ewa; Wieczorek, Janusz; Mruk, Bartosz; Frel, Małgorzata; Walecki, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    This article presents possible applications of ultrasound elastography in musculoskeletal imaging based on the available literature, as well as the possibility of extending indications for the use of elastography in the future. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) is a new method that shows structural changes in tissues following application of physical stress. Elastography techniques have been widely used to assess muscles and tendons in vitro since the early parts of the twentieth century. Only recently with the advent of new technology and creation of highly specialized ultrasound devices, has elastography gained widespread use in numerous applications. The authors performed a search of the Medline/PubMed databases for original research and reviewed publications on the application of ultrasound elastography for musculoskeletal imaging. All publications demonstrate possible uses of ultrasound elastography in examinations of the musculoskeletal system. The most widely studied areas include the muscles, tendons and rheumatic diseases. There are also reports on the employment in vessel imaging. The main limitation of elastography as a technique is above all the variability of applied pressure during imaging, which is operator-dependent. It would therefore be reasonable to provide clear guidelines on the technique applied, as well as clear indications for performing the test. It is important to develop methods for creating artifact-free, closed-loop, compression-decompression cycles. The main advantages include cost-effectiveness, short duration of the study, non-invasive nature of the procedure, as well as a potentially broader clinical availability. There are no clear guidelines with regard to indications as well as examination techniques. Ultrasound elastography is a new and still poorly researched method. We conclude, however, that it can be widely used in the examinations of musculoskeletal system. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct large, multi-center studies to

  19. Analytical review of modern herbal medicines used in musculoskeletal system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Ігорівна Крюкова

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective and safe treatment of the musculoskeletal system diseases is one of the main branches of medicine in general and rheumatology in particular. The relevance of this problem is caused mainly by the high incidence in the population, and temporary and permanent work disability status development in patients. The duration of rheumatologic diseases necessitates the optimal regimen selection, providing effective treatment and helping to prevent potential side effects associated with long-term use of remedies.Aim of research. The aim of our research was to perform an analytical review of modern herbal products registered in Ukraine and used for musculoskeletal system treatment. The drug analysis was made according to next parameters: producing country, manufacturer, dosage form, and the origin of remedies (natural or synthetic.Methods. Conventional analytical studies of electronic and paper sources were used for realization of the given problem.Results. As a result of the analytical review of modern herbal remedies registered in Ukraine and used for musculoskeletal system treatment, it was found that 20 trade names of drugs, more than 90% of which are homeopathic, are displayed on the pharmaceutical market. Concerning dosage forms, pills (38,5 %, injection solutions and oral drops (23,1 % and 11,5 %, respectively gain the biggest market share.Conclusion. It was found that imported drugs are widely available (80 % on the analyzed market segment, while local remedies gain rather minor market share (about 20 %.Among medicines of this group presented on Ukrainian market, imported homeopathic remedies gain the biggest share. Phytotheurapeutic drugs gain minor market share and have limited composition of natural active ingredients represented by the extracts of Harpagophytum procumbens, Apium graveolens, Salix alba, and Zingiber officinale

  20. Whole-body imaging of the musculoskeletal system: the value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Gerwin P.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea [University Hospitals Munich/Grosshadern, LMU, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    In clinical practice various modalities are used for whole-body imaging of the musculoskeletal system, including radiography, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). Multislice CT is far more sensitive than radiographs in the assessment of trabecular and cortical bone destruction and allows for evaluation of fracture risk. The introduction of combined PET-CT scanners has markedly increased diagnostic accuracy for the detection of skeletal metastases compared with PET alone. The unique soft-tissue contrast of MRI enables for precise assessment of bone marrow infiltration and adjacent soft tissue structures so that alterations within the bone marrow may be detected before osseous destruction becomes apparent in CT or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or PET scan. Improvements in hard- and software, including parallel image acquisition acceleration, have made high resolution whole-body MRI clinically feasible. Whole-body MRI has successfully been applied for bone marrow screening of metastasis and systemic primary bone malignancies, like multiple myeloma. Furthermore, it has recently been proposed for the assessment of systemic bone diseases predisposing for malignancy (e.g., multiple cartilaginous exostoses) and muscle disease (e.g., muscle dystrophy). The following article gives an overview on state-of-the-art whole-body imaging of the musculoskeletal system and highlights present and potential future applications, especially in the field of whole-body MRI. (orig.)

  1. Determination of pain in musculoskeletal system reported by office workers and the pain risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Sevim; Celik, Kadir; Dirimese, Elif; Taşdemir, Nurten; Arik, Tarik; Büyükkara, İbrahim

    2018-01-01

    This research was conducted as a cross-sectional descriptive study aimed at determining the existence of pain in the musculoskeletal system among office workers and the reasons for it. The sample consisted of 528 office workers. Collection of data was achieved using a questionnaire prepared by the researchers in line with information from the literature. The male and female office workers most frequently complained of pain in the lower back (55.1%), neck (52.5%) and back (53%). It was seen that out of the variables relating to the work environment, those which had the most significant effect on muscular-skeletal system pain were sitting at the desk for a long time without a break, working sitting on a chair that supported only the lumbar area and the arms, having the computer mouse at a distance from the keyboard, having the head inclined at 45° when working, working holding both forearms above the level of the desk, not taking exercise in daily life, and having a moderate or extremely stressful workplace (p office workers not to suffer musculoskeletal system pain, it is very important that the working environment should be ergonomically arranged and that various measures should be taken to ensure healthy life behavior. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2018;31(1):91-111. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  2. Mobilization of endothelial precursor cells: systemic vascular response to musculoskeletal trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, A J

    2012-02-03

    Postnatal vasculogenesis, the process by which vascular committed bone marrow stem cells or endothelial precursor cells (EPC) migrate, differentiate, and incorporate into the nacent endothelium contributing to physiological and pathological neovascularization, has stimulated much interest. Its contribution to tumor nonvascularization, wound healing, and revascularization associated with skeletal and cardiac muscles ischaemia is established. We evaluated the mobilization of EPCs in response to musculoskeletal trauma. Blood from patients (n = 15) following AO type 42a1 closed diaphyseal tibial fractures was analyzed for CD34 and AC133 cell surface marker expression. Immunomagnetically enriched CD34+ mononuclear cell (MNC(CD34+)) populations were cultured and examined for phenotypic and functional vascular endothelial differentiation. Circulating MNC(CD34+) levels increased sevenfold by day 3 postinjury. Circulating MNC(AC133+) increased 2.5-fold. Enriched MNC(CD34+) populations from day 3 samples in culture exhibited cell cluster formation with sprouting spindles. These cells bound UEA-1 and incorporated fluorescent DiI-Ac-LDL intracellularily. Our findings suggest a systemic provascular response is initiated in response to musculoskeletal trauma. Its therapeutic manipulation may have implications for the potential enhancement of fracture healing.

  3. Prevention of musculoskeletal disorders within management systems: A scoping review of practices, approaches, and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Amin; Neumann, W Patrick; Imbeau, Daniel; Bigelow, Philip; Pagell, Mark; Wells, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and summarize the current research evidence on approaches to preventing musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) within Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems (OHSMS). Databases in business, engineering, and health and safety were searched and 718 potentially relevant publications were identified and examined for their relevance. Twenty-one papers met the selection criteria and were subjected to thematic analysis. There was very little literature describing the integration of MSD risk assessment and prevention into management systems. This lack of information may isolate MSD prevention, leading to difficulties in preventing these disorders at an organizational level. The findings of this review argue for further research to integrate MSD prevention into management systems and to evaluate the effectiveness of the approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. [Musculoskeletal biopsies in an open 0.5-T-MR system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzsch, M; Scholz, R; Moche, M; Thomas, M; Tannapfel, A; von Salis-Soglio, G

    2005-01-01

    MR-guided interventions have been successful in different medical disciplines. The aim of this paper is to report our results with the application of MR-guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions using an open 0.5-T-MR scanner and further to discuss these results on the basis of the available literature. Between 1998 and 2003 30 patients (average age 44.1 years) underwent a total of 31 biopsies. The interventions were performed in an open 0.5-T MRI system using an active optical localization system as well as a navigation system. For the motion tracking we used T (1)-weighted real-time sequences with 0.25 pictures per second. For the sampling MR-compatible instruments were used that were specially developed for this purpose. The data of this retrospective investigation are based on the evaluation of the patient documents and the radiological findings. On the basis of the histological findings the technical success rate and the histological overall accuracy were determined. In 81 % of the biopsies the histological diagnosis was correct. In cases of suspected inflammation the histological accuracy was smaller (70 %). No differences were observed between skeletal and soft-tissue lesions. The technical success rate amounted to 77.5 %. No procedural or anesthesiological complications occurred. The mean operating time amounted to 65 min including the time for motion tracking. In cases of suspected lesions of the musculoskeletal system, the MR-guided biopsy represents a promising and safe procedure to get a histological diagnosis. In cases of sufficient size of the lesion sampling of a representative probe is possible. On account of the outstanding performance in soft-part contrasting, the sensitive structures surrounding the lesion can be saved. Substantial disadvantages of the procedure are the high costs for personal and material and the long operating time.

  5. CT of the musculoskeletal system: What is left is the days of MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, A.T.H.; Marshall, T.J.; Bearcroft, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a central role in the modern imaging of musculoskeletal disorders, due to its ability to produce multiplanar images and characterise soft tissues accurately. However, computed tomography (CT) still has an important role to play, not merely as an alternative to MRI, but as being the preferred imaging investigation in some situations. This article briefly reviews the history of CT technology, the technical factors involved and a number of current applications, as well as looking at future areas where CT may be employed. The advent of ever-increasing numbers of rows of detectors has opened up more possible uses for CT technology. However, diagnostic images may be obtained from CT systems with four rows of detectors or more, and their ability to produce near isotropic voxels and therefore multiplanar reformats. (orig.)

  6. Vocabulary of signs and symptoms of the Musculoskeletal System, Vol. II: Medical imaging signs. Terminology bulletin No. 212

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lussier, A; Beauregard, G; Dionne, S

    1992-01-01

    This vocabulary is the second of four on the musculoskeletal system. It is compiled from recommended works and deals mainly with radiological aspects. It also includes fractures and diseases, imaging techniques, roentgenographic positions, angles, lines, and indexes. About 500 concepts are listed in English and French with each entry including the main entry term, synonym(s), textual support, and notes.

  7. Effect of push handle height on net moments and forces on the musculoskeletal system during standardized wheelchair pushing tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Woude, L H; Van Koningsbruggen, C M; Kroes, A L; Kingma, I

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to analyze the external forces and biomechanical loading on the musculoskeletal system during wheelchair pushing, in relation to different push handle heights. In addition, recommendations for wheelchair pushing in accordance with push handle height are made. Eight

  8. Assessment of functional capacity of the musculoskeletal system in the context of work, daily living, and sport: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, Haije; Gouttebarge, Vincent; Kuijer, P. Paul F. M.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to survey methods to assess the functional capacity of the musculoskeletal system within the context of work, daily activities, and sport. The following key words and synonyms were used: functional physical assessment, healthy/disabled subjects, and instruments.

  9. Disinfection of human musculoskeletal allografts in tissue banking: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, J; Germain, M; Winters, M; Fraser, S; Duong, A; Garibaldi, A; Simunovic, N; Alsop, D; Dao, D; Bessemer, R; Ayeni, O R

    2016-12-01

    Musculoskeletal allografts are typically disinfected using antibiotics, irradiation or chemical methods but protocols vary significantly between tissue banks. It is likely that different disinfection protocols will not have the same level of microorganism kill; they may also have varying effects on the structural integrity of the tissue, which could lead to significant differences in terms of clinical outcome in recipients. Ideally, a disinfection protocol should achieve the greatest bioburden reduction with the lowest possible impact on tissue integrity. A systematic review of three databases found 68 laboratory and clinical studies that analyzed the microbial bioburden or contamination rates of musculoskeletal allografts. The use of peracetic acid-ethanol or ionizing radiation was found to be most effective for disinfection of tissues. The use of irradiation is the most frequently published method for the terminal sterilization of musculoskeletal allografts; it is widely used and its efficacy is well documented in the literature. However, effective disinfection results were still observed using the BioCleanse™ Tissue Sterilization process, pulsatile lavage with antibiotics, ethylene oxide, and chlorhexidine. The variety of effective methods to reduce contamination rate or bioburden, in conjunction with limited high quality evidence provides little support for the recommendation of a single bioburden reduction method.

  10. Percutaneous CT-guided interventional procedures in musculoskeletal system (our experience)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, Loukas E-mail: loutharad@yahoo.com; Mylona, Sophia; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos

    2004-06-01

    Percutaneous interventional procedures include a broad spectrum of minimal invasive techniques, which are a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool. In this study we present our experience in CT-guided percutaneous musculoskeletal biopsies, drainages of musculoskeletal abscesses, facet and sacroiliac joint injection and radiofrequency thermal ablation of painful metastases or osteoid osteomas.

  11. Effect of an emergency department-based electronic system for musculoskeletal consultation on facilitating care for common injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Simon C; Pantle, Hardin A; Bessman, Edward S; Lifchez, Scott D

    2015-05-01

    Access to musculoskeletal consultation in the emergency department (ED) is a nationwide problem. In addition, consultation from a subspecialist may be delayed or may not be available, which can slow down the ED flow and reduce patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to review the 1-year results of a change in the authors' institutional practice to reduce subspecialty consultation for select musculoskeletal problems while still ensuring adequate patient follow-up in orthopedic or plastic surgery clinics for patients not seen by these services in the ED. The authors hypothesized that select injuries could be safely managed in the ED by using an electronic system to ensure appropriate follow-up care. Using Kaizen methodology, a multidisciplinary group (including ED staff, orthopedics, plastic surgery, pediatrics, nursing, radiology, therapy, and administration) met to improve care for select musculoskeletal injuries. A system was agreed on in which ED providers managed select musculoskeletal injuries without subspecialist consultation. Follow-up was organized using an electronic system, which facilitated communication between the ED staff and the secretarial staff of the subspecialist departments. Over a 1-year period, 150 patients were treated using this system. Charts and radiographs were reviewed for missed injuries. Radiographic review revealed 2 missed injuries. One patient had additional back pain and a lumbar spine fracture was found during the subspecialist follow-up visit; it was treated nonoperatively. Another patient appeared to have scapholunate widening on the injury radiograph that was not appreciated in the ED. Of the 150 patients, 51 were seen in follow-up by a subspecialist at the authors' institution. An electronic system to organize follow-up with a subspecialist allowed the ED providers to deliver safe and effective care for simple musculoskeletal injuries. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Forces in the Shoulder Joint : On validation of musculoskeletal shoulder models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asadi Nikooyan, A.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed information about muscle forces in the human musculoskeletal system are highly demanded for several applications. Unfortunately, the measurement of muscle forces in-vivo is hardly possible. To date, musculoskeletal models are best alternative for the direct measurement of these forces. A

  13. Occupational musculoskeletal and mental health: Significance of rationalization and opportunities to create sustainable production systems - A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgaard, R H; Winkel, J

    2011-01-01

    This literature review aims to identify occupational musculoskeletal and mental health effects of production system rationalization as well as organizational-level measures that may improve health outcome ("modifiers" in this review). A short review of the effect of ergonomic interventions is included as background and rationalization is discussed as a theoretical concept. Indicator variables for occupational musculoskeletal and mental health and related risk factors are presented. Variables with a generalized format were allowed in the literature searches (e.g., job satisfaction and absenteeism were accepted as risk factor and health indicator, respectively), suitable for the research fields of work sociology, organization science, human resource management (HRM) and economics research. One hundred and sixty-two studies of rationalization effects on health and risk factors and 72 organization-level modifier results were accepted into the final database. Entries were sorted by rationalization strategy and work life sector, and trends in outcome (positive, mixed, no effect, or negative effect on health and risk factors) were determined. Rationalizations have a dominant negative effect on health and risk factors (57% negative, 19% positive); the most negative effects were found for downsizing and restructuring rationalizations in general (71 studies negative, 13 positive) and for the health care sector in particular (36 studies negative, 2 positive). The rationalization strategy High Performance Work System (HPWS) was associated with the highest fraction positive outcome studies (6 of 10 studies). Other rationalization strategies (lean practices, parallel vs. serial production and mechanization level) reported intermediate results, in part dependent on work life sector, but also on the year when studies were carried out. Worker participation, resonant management style, information, support, group autonomy and procedural justice were modifiers with favourable

  14. [The effect of different types of sports and athletes' age on the pathological changes of the musculoskeletal system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkasov, E E; Puzin, S N; Litvinenko, A S; Kurshev, V V; Bezuglov, E N

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the most common musculoskeletal diseases, depending on the type of sports and athletes' age. The results of examination of 976 athletes aged from 16 to 42 years (average age - 28,9±2,3) with musculoskeletal diseases were analyzed. Medical diagnostic procedures included clinical, laboratory, instrumental (radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound) investigations and functional testing (goniometry, manual muscle testing). Majority of patients were diagnosed to have diseases of the knee (17.9%) and ankle joints (11.3%), the heel bone (12.9%), Achilles tendon (10.2%), post-traumatic musculoskeletal diseases (16.2%), degenerative-dystrophic diseases of the spine (12.8%). In the young age group (16 to 20 years) post-traumatic disorders were most common. In the middle-age group (21 to 30 years) along with post-traumatic disorders diseases of the knee frequently occurred. For athletes over 30 years old, along with diseases of the knee spinal diseases were found to occur 2-3 times more frequently in comparison with other age groups. Injuries which are more common for different types of sports were identified: acute traumas - competitive sports, diseases of the calcaneus - sports with running and jumping (athletics, volleyball, soccer), disease of ankle joints - sport with sharp change in movement direction (hockey, figure skating), disease of the knee - sports with high load of the knee joint (figure skating, gymnastics, volleyball, diseases of bones and joints of the upper extremity - tennis, disease of spine - weightlifting. pathological changes in the musculoskeletal system depend on the type of sports and the age of athletes. The combination of age and risk factors associated with type of sport increases the possibility of development of these diseases of the musculoskeletal system.

  15. Interaction of a physician and a specialist on physical rehabilitation at violations of activity of the musculoskeletal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii Hertsyk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the improvement of cooperation and the interaction of an attending physician and a specialist on physical rehabilitation at violations of activity of musculoskeletal system. Material & Methods: physical rehabilitation is considered as a difficult system with the hierarchically-ordered structure. The analysis of references and the system analysis are applied. Results: the modern approaches to coordination of centers of decision-making and the management in hierarchical systems are analyzed. The ways of the interlevel coordination in organizational systems are revealed. The need of coordination of activity of an attending physician and a specialist on physical rehabilitation is proved. The content and the direction of coordination signals for the system of physical rehabilitation at violations of activity of the musculoskeletal system are determined. Conclusions: the coordination of activity of an attending physician and a specialist on physical rehabilitation at violations of activity of the musculoskeletal system has to occur in certain ways: on purposes, on restrictions, in time, on input and output parameters.

  16. Application of multimedia-based exercise programmes focused on improvement of the schoolgirls' musculoskeletal system during breaks between classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendíková, Elena

    2017-11-01

    This pilot study presents theoretical basis related to the purpose and methodology of the presented research the aim of which is to point to the importance of multimedia-based physical activity (exercise programme) done during breaks between classes. The purpose of this programme is to prevent occurrence of functional disorders of the musculoskeletal system among schoolchildren. The experimental and control groups were composed of the female students of the third grade at one secondary school in the town of L. Mikuláš. We obtained the data by means of standardized methods used for assessment of the musculoskeletal system in medical and physical education practice. The obtained qualitative and quantitative data were processed by means of the chi-squared test and the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The results significantly (pmuscular system.

  17. Melanocortin-4 receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression in rat cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountjoy, Kathleen G; Jenny Wu, C-S; Dumont, Laurence M; Wild, J Martin

    2003-12-01

    We determined melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4-R) mRNA ontogeny in the rat using in situ hybridization and a rat MC4-R riboprobe and showed numerous peripheral sites of expression for MC4-R. The developing heart showed MC4-R mRNA expression as early as embryonic day (E) 14. In the lungs of E16-E20 fetuses, the cells surrounding developing bronchi expressed relatively strong in situ signal. Muscles associated with the respiratory system such as diaphragm and intercostal muscle expressed MC4-R mRNA as early as E14. Occipital and tongue muscles, in particular the genioglossus, showed diffuse signal at E15-E20. In the eye, a discrete signal was detected in an outer neuroblastic layer which may correspond to retina or extraocular muscle. Developing limb buds expressed relatively strong signal at E14, whereas skull bone and joint capsules of the paw of the forelimb showed signal at E18-E20. Using RT-PCR and ribonuclease protection assays, we determined that MC4-R mRNA is also expressed in adult rat heart, lung, kidney, and testis. The expression of the MC4-R in cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and integumentary systems supports functional roles for the MC4-R in addition to its roles in appetite, weight control, and regulation of linear growth.

  18. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teo, E.-L.H.; Strouse, P.J.; Chhem, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    With the development of high-resolution ultrasound transducers, the role of ultrasonography (US) in evaluating the musculoskeletal system has increased. It is now possible to obtain detailed images of bones and soft-tissue structures that were previously unattainable. The advantages of US, when compared with other imaging modalities, are many. It is less expensive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). It does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation, so US examinations can be repeated without harm to the patient. Furthermore, US is performed in real-time, making it possible to assess the musculoskeletal system dynamically, in multiple planes and with contralateral comparison. In experienced hands, US is a quick, noninvasive and cost-effective way to assess the musculoskeletal system in children. It is used to evaluate soft-tissue masses, joint swelling, infections, lesions involving the chest and abdominal walls, bones, muscles and clubfoot deformity and to locate any foreign bodies. (author)

  19. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R.; Steinbach, Lynne S.

    2004-01-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  20. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part I: Infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Rt. 140, 101 The City Drive ZC 5005, CA 92868-3298, Orange (United States); Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R. [College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The musculoskeletal system can be affected by a variety of abnormalities in association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Although not as common as complications involving other organ systems, such as the pulmonary and the central nervous systems, HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders are sometimes the initial presentation of the viral illness. Knowledge of the existence and the characteristic appearance of the conditions affecting bone, joint, and muscle in HIV-infected patients is valuable to radiologists for diagnosis and to clinicians for detection and appropriate treatment. We reviewed recent literature to provide a comprehensive assessment of the HIV-associated musculoskeletal disorders, and present radiologic examples from our own collection. This article is divided into two parts. In the first part we review the infectious musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV illness and AIDS, including cellulitis, abscesses, pyomyositis, septic bursitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and bacillary angiomatosis. We also present a comprehensive spectrum of mycobacterial infections, consisting of tuberculous spondylitis and spondylodiskitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and tenosynovitis, as well as infections caused by atypical mycobacteria. Part II of this review will concentrate on non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions, including rheumatic disorders and neoplasms. (orig.)

  1. Magnetic resonance findings in 32 tumors of the nerve sheaths of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galant, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.M.; Soler, R.; Saez, F.

    1996-01-01

    To define the MR features of nerve sheath tumors (NST) located in soft tissue and to evaluate the parameters that aid in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. We have studied retrospectively the clinical features and MR images corresponding to 32 NST of the musculoskeletal system detected in 22 patients. Among the 32 NST, there were 12 neurofibromas, 11 neurilemmonas, 8 malignant tumors and 1 neuropithelioma. All the patients presented palpable mass, with neurological symptoms as the most common accompanying sign. Pain was most frequent in the malignant lesions. Seven lesions were located in subcutis. MR revealed the relationship between tumor and nerve in 11 cases (7 neurilemmomas and 4 neurofibromas). Most of the neurilemmomas were round-shaped tumors that were extrinsic to the nerve, displacing it. The neurofibromas were usually oval or irregularly-shaped and expanded the nerve. NST were generally found to have well-defined margins. They were isointense or slightly hyperintense with respect to muscle in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2 images, with heterogeneous frequency. A target-like aspect was observed in 11 lesions, all benign. NST present a number of common features. The presence of pain, the site of the nerve upon which they depend and the target-like appearance are characteristics that help to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions. 19 refs

  2. Musculoskeletal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigirey, V

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about musculoskeletal injuries and the diagnosis of osseous tumors. The use of the radiology, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance contribute to detect the localization of the osseous lesions as well as the density (lytic, sclerotic, mixed) and the benign and malignant tumors.

  3. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Ei Jeong; Chun, Yi Kyeong [Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies are various and may be an isolated finding or may be found in conjunction with numerous associations, including genetic syndromes, Karyotype abnormals, central nervous system anomalies and other general musculoskeletal disorders. Early prenatal diagnosis of these focal musculoskeletal anomalies nor only affects prenatal care and postnatal outcome but also helps in approaching other numerous associated anomalies.

  4. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Ei Jeong; Chun, Yi Kyeong

    2002-01-01

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies are various and may be an isolated finding or may be found in conjunction with numerous associations, including genetic syndromes, Karyotype abnormals, central nervous system anomalies and other general musculoskeletal disorders. Early prenatal diagnosis of these focal musculoskeletal anomalies nor only affects prenatal care and postnatal outcome but also helps in approaching other numerous associated anomalies.

  5. Razvoj skeletno-mišičnega sistema in kože: Embryonic development of the musculoskeletal and integumentary system:

    OpenAIRE

    Legan, Mateja

    2005-01-01

    The author presents embryological development of the musculoskeletal system and the skin. Although they are basically both mesodermal in origin, the article emphasises the ectodermal origin of head bones, certain small smooth muscles and skin epidermis, with accent on the segmental origin of musculoskeletal regions. Development of the dermis and epidermal adnexes is clearly explained. For better understanding, some clinical correlates to developmental problems are shown as well. Avtorica p...

  6. Competence in the musculoskeletal system: assessing the progression of knowledge through an undergraduate medical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Subhashis; Roberts, Chris; Newble, David I; Snaith, Michael

    2004-12-01

    Professional bodies have expressed concerns that medical students lack appropriate knowledge in musculoskeletal medicine despite its high prevalence of use within the community. Changes in curriculum and teaching strategies may be contributing factors to this. There is little evidence to evaluate the degree to which these concerns are justified. To design and evaluate an assessment procedure that tests the progress of medical students in achieving a core level of knowledge in musculoskeletal medicine during the course. A stratified sample of 136 volunteer students from all 5 years of the medical course at Sheffield University. The progress test concept was adapted to provide a cross-sectional view of student knowledge gain during each year of the course. A test was devised which aimed to provide an assessment of competence set at the standard required of the newly qualified doctor in understanding basic and clinical sciences relevant to musculoskeletal medicine. The test was blueprinted against internal and external guidelines. It comprised 40 multiple-choice and extended matching questions administered by computer. Six musculoskeletal practitioners set the standard using a modified Angoff procedure. Test reliability was 0.6 (Cronbach's alpha). Mean scores of students increased from 41% in Year 1 to 84% by the final year. Data suggest that, from a baseline score in Year 1, there is a disparate experience of learning in Year 2 that evens out in Year 3, with knowledge progression becoming more consistent thereafter. All final year participants scored above the standard predicted by the Angoff procedure. This short computer-based test was a feasible method of estimating student knowledge acquisition in musculoskeletal medicine across the undergraduate curriculum. Tested students appear to have acquired a satisfactory knowledge base by the end of the course. Knowledge gain seemed relatively independent of specialty-specific clinical training. Proposals from specialty

  7. Differential diagnostics of the musculoskeletal system in sports medicine; Differenzialdiagnostische Untersuchung in der Sportmedizin des Bewegungsapparats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nehrer, S. [Donau-Universitaet Krems, Department fuer Klinische Medizin und Biotechnologie, Zentrum fuer Regenerative Medizin, Krems (Austria)

    2010-05-15

    The positive effects of sports on the cardiovascular and musculoskeleal systems are widely accepted. Nevertheless, sports also can cause injury and overuse leading to sport-specific problems, which are often a challenge in diagnosing and treatment. The history of the sport-related injury is crucial for further differential diagnosis. Careful inspection, palpation and functional testing can reveal the possible pathology and lead to an effective strategy in the diagnostic assessment using radiographic tools such as sonography, X-ray and MR imaging (MRI). In muscle and tendon injuries sonography can provide ready to use information concerning muscle tears and tendon ruptures or degenerative lesions. Plain X-rays give a good overview on joint conditions regarding the bone and sometimes have to be completed by focused enlargement of the critical structure, especially in stress fractures and small bone lesions. MRT is the gold standard in the evaluation of interarticular and extra-articular sport-related pathologies, however, an exact clinical diagnosis allows a more effective investigation protocol. Profound knowledge of possible sport-specific injury and overuse patterns is necessary to detect lesions of the musculoskeletal system in active athletes and to use the fitting radiographic strategy for confirmation. The exact diagnosis is the prerequisite for initiating the appropriate treatment and a fast sports medical rehabilitation process. (orig.) [German] Die positive Auswirkung von Sport auf das Herz-Kreislauf-System und den Bewegungsapparat ist weitgehend gesichert. Trotzdem kann es bei der Sportausuebung zu sportspezifischen Problemen kommen, die den Sportarzt bei der Abklaerung dieser Schmerzsyndrome oft vor grosse Herausforderungen stellen. Die Ursache von Sportschaeden und Verletzungen sind einerseits akute Traumata, andererseits aber auch Ueberlastungen oder Kombinationen von beiden. Die Erhebung einer Anamnese unter Beruecksichtigung sportspezifischer Aspekte

  8. Musculoskeletal system pathology in aids patients; Patologia del sistema musculosqueletico en pacientes con sida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabala, R.; Oleaga, L.; Garcia Bolado, A.; Grande, D.; Gorrino, O.; Lecumberri, I. [Hospital de Basurto. Bilbao (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    We studied 22 AIDS patients who presented musculoskeletal system pathology. The affected area underwent simple X-ray and MR. The MR study was performed using a 1 Tesla magnet. T1 and T2 weighted echo spin sequences, as well as sequences of short T1 inversion recovery (STIR). In nine cases, intravenous gadolinium was used at a dose of 0.2cc/kg. The study plane was selected depending on the location of the lesion and surface coils were used when appropriate. In those patients showing pathology which was removed from the appendicular skeleton, the principal magnet was used as both transmitter and receiver. In one case, an On-Tine Tomography (CT) was also carried out. The evaluated ata were: a) localization; b) bony erosion; c) soft-tissue mass; d) articular effusion; e) cartilaginous changes; f) and T2 signals, and g) gadolinium enhancement. A diagnosis was made on the basis of biopsy or clinical culture, and evolution. Spinal cord alterations were the most frequent, being found in 13 cases. Twelve were caused by spondylodiscitis, 10 by tuberculosis, one by staphylococcal infection and one by candidiasis. In all cases, there appeared disk damage, as well as bone marrow signal alterations in the affected area and disks soft-tissue. In the mine cases in which gadolinium was used, the disk, vertebral plates and cases in which gadolinium was used, the disk, vertebral plates and soft-tissue mass heterogeneously enhanced, demonstrating an abscess with ring enhancement, and a central necrotic area in one case. In one patient, a spinal cord alteration due to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was observed. In six cases,there was observed and infectious arthritis two in coxofemoral joints, three in knees and one in a glenohumeral joint. Isolated germs were staphylococcal in three cases one being Mycobacterium tuberculosis, another being M. kansasii and the third identified as. Candida. In all cases, there was observed joint effusion, synovial thickening, joint cartilage damage and

  9. Incidence of disability pensions among slaughterhouse workers in Denmark. With special regard to diagnosis of the musculo-skeletal system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N S; Jeune, B

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether slaughterhouse workers (SW) in Denmark have a higher incidence of disability than expected in comparison with the general population and the sub-group of the population that is gainfully employed, especially with regard to pensions awarded...... are calculated on the basis of age-specific incidence rates among all actively employed people. Problems of the study design and selection bias are discussed to facilitate the interpretation of results. A possible deleterious effect of meatpacking on the musculo-skeletal system calls for further investigation....

  10. Musculoskeletal dysfunction in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakim A. Larbi and Dmitry Ye. Suyetenkov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights the comparative statistics of musculoskeletal system deseases depending on a type of dental method. The practical recommendations on prevention of diseases of joints, ligaments and spine were done.

  11. Radiologically detectable musculoskeletal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus; Afectacion musculoesquelitca con expresion radiologica en el lupus eritematoso sistemico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, M. M.; Manjon, P.; Diaz de Bustamante, T.; Galindo, M.; Buj, M. J.; Cabezudo, J. [Hospital Doce de Octubre de Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We show a wide spectrum of musculoskeletal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that can be detected by radiological examination. We determined the indications of different imaging techniques in the diagnosis and follow-up of this disease. We reviewed the clinical and radiological histories of 37 patients diagnosed as having SLE on the basis of serological and musculoskeletal criteria. We assessed the personal data of each patient, the association of the disease with autoimmune processes, serology, treatment and radiological findings using plain X ray, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR). Of the 37 cases reviewed, only ten presented changes in one or more of the imaging studies performed. the most common radiological finding was symmetric poly arthritis located at different sites. Other signs included avascular necrosis (late and early), inflammation and tendon and/or ligament rupture, nonerosive deforming arthropathies , soft tissue calcifications and arthritis (staphylococcal and tuberculous). A direct correlation was established between the anticardiolipin antibody titer, steroid doses and avascular necrosis. In SLE, radiologically detectable osteoarticular lesions are uncommon. Symmetric polyarthritis is the earliest lesion and that occurring most frequently. Other signs do not appear as often, with the exception of osteonecrosis, which usually occurs late. It developed early and was unusually aggressive in two youths with elevated anticardiolipin antibody titers and substantial systemic involvement in our series. The contributions of ultrasound and MR in the assessment of musculoskeletal involvement in SLE are especially relevant in the study of inflammations and tendon rupture and in the management of avascular necrosis, respectively. (Author) 17 refs.

  12. Development of a profile scoring system for assessing the psychosocial situation of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikaido T

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Takuya Nikaido,1 Shingo Fukuma,2,3 Takafumi Wakita,4 Miho Sekiguchi,1 Shoji Yabuki,1 Yoshihiro Onishi,5 Shunichi Fukuhara,2,3 Shin-ichi Konno1 On behalf of the profile scoring system for multilateral assessment of social factors in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain study group 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, 2Department of Healthcare Epidemiology, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto, 3Center for Innovative Research for Communities and Clinical Excellence (CIRC2LE, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, 4Department of Sociology, Kansai University, Osaka, 5Institute for Health Outcomes and Process Evaluation Research (iHope International, Kyoto, Japan Abstract: Chronic pain is a manifestation of interactions among physical, psychological, and social conditions, but the latter two, that is, the nonphysical correlates of chronic pain, are only rarely measured. This study aimed to develop a profile scoring system for assessing the psychosocial situation of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. An expert panel chose social and psychological domains considered to be relevant to patients with chronic pain and wrote questions asking about each of those domains. The questionnaire was completed by 252 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Factor analysis was used to select questionnaire items for each domain. Associations and interactions of pain severity and each domain score with pain-related quality of life (PRQOL were examined using linear regression models. Five domains were chosen: work, family, sleep, mental health, and PRQOL. Then, a total of 17 questions were created for the work, family, and sleep domains. Using the likelihood-ratio test, we found significant interactions with PRQOL in four pairs: severity–family, severity–mental, family–sleep, and work–mental. The association between pain severity and PRQOL was

  13. Biological Stress Systems, Adverse Life Events, and the Improvement of Chronic Multisite Musculoskeletal Pain Across a 6-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generaal, Ellen; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Macfarlane, Gary J; Geenen, Rinie; Smit, Johannes H; de Geus, Eco J C N; Dekker, Joost; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2017-02-01

    Dysfunction of biological stress systems and adverse life events, independently and in interaction, have been hypothesized to predict chronic pain persistence. Conversely, these factors may hamper the improvement of chronic pain. Longitudinal evidence is currently lacking. We examined whether: 1) function of biological stress systems, 2) adverse life events, and 3) their combination predict the improvement of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. Subjects of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) with chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain at baseline (N = 665) were followed-up 2, 4, and 6 years later. The Chronic Pain Grade Questionnaire was used to determine improvement (not meeting the criteria) of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain at follow-up. Baseline assessment of biological stress systems included function of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (1-hour cortisol awakening response, evening level, and post dexamethasone level), the immune system (basal and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inflammatory markers), the autonomic nervous system (heart rate, pre-ejection period, SD of the normal-to-normal interval, and respiratory sinus arrhythmia). The number of adverse life events were assessed at baseline and 2-year follow-up using the List of Threatening Events Questionnaire. We showed that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, immune system, and autonomic nervous system functioning and adverse life events were not associated with the improvement of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain, either as a main effect or in interaction. This longitudinal study could not confirm that biological stress system dysfunction and adverse life events affect the course of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain. Biological stress systems and adverse life events are not associated with the improvement of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain over 6 years of follow-up. Other determinants should thus be considered in future research to identify in which

  14. Spring-like leg behaviour, musculoskeletal mechanics and control in maximum and submaximum height human hopping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how humans regulate their 'leg stiffness' in hopping, and to determine whether this regulation is intended to minimize energy expenditure. 'Leg stiffness' is the slope of the relationship between ground reaction force and displacement of the centre of mass

  15. Novel bio-synthetic hybrid materials and coculture systems for musculoskeletal tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeseung Janice

    Tissue Engineering is a truly exciting field of this age, trying to regenerate and repair impaired tissues. Unlike the old artificial implants, tissue engineering aims at making a long-term functional biological replacement. One strategy for such tissue engineering requires the following three components: cells, scaffolds, and soluble factors. Cells are cultured in a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold with medium containing various soluble factors. Once a tissue is developed in vitro, then it is implanted in vivo. The overall goal of this thesis was to develop novel bio-synthetic hybrid scaffolds and coculture system for musculoskeletal tissue engineering. The most abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components are collagen and glycosaminoglycan (GAG), which are the natural scaffold for chondrocytes. As two different peptides, collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) and hyaluronic acid binding peptide (HABPep) were previously shown to bind to collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) of GAG, respectively, it was hypothesized that immobilizing CMP and HABP on 3D scaffold would results in an interaction between ECM components and synthetic scaffolds via peptide-ECM bindings. CMP or HABPep-conjugated photopolymerizable poly(ethylene oxide) diacrylate (PEODA) hydrogels were synthesized and shown to retain encapsulated collagen or HA, respectively. This result supported that conjugated CMP and HABPep can interact with collagen and HA, respectively, and can serve as biological linkers in 3D synthetic hydrogels. When chondrocytes or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were seeded, cells in CMP-conjugated scaffolds produced significantly more amount of type II collagen and GAG, compared to those in control scaffolds. Moreover, MSCs cultured in CMP-conjugated scaffolds exhibited lower level of hypertrophic markers, cbfa-1 and type X collagen. These results demonstrated that enhanced interaction between collagen and scaffold via CMP improves chondrogenesis of chondrocytes and MSCs and

  16. Augmentation of musculoskeletal regeneration: role for pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevons, Lauren A; Houghton, Franchesca D; Tare, Rahul S

    2018-03-20

    The rise in the incidence of musculoskeletal diseases is attributed to an increasing ageing population. The debilitating effects of musculoskeletal diseases, coupled with a lack of effective therapies, contribute to huge financial strains on healthcare systems. The focus of regenerative medicine has shifted to pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), namely, human embryonic stem cells and human-induced PSCs, due to the limited success of adult stem cell-based interventions. PSCs constitute a valuable cell source for musculoskeletal regeneration due to their capacity for unlimited self-renewal, ability to differentiate into all cell lineages of the three germ layers and perceived immunoprivileged characteristics. This review summarizes methods for chondrogenic, osteogenic, myogenic and adipogenic differentiation of PSCs and their potential for therapeutic applications.

  17. Gradient-based optimization with B-splines on sparse grids for solving forward-dynamics simulations of three-dimensional, continuum-mechanical musculoskeletal system models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, J; Sprenger, M; Pflüger, D; Röhrle, O

    2018-05-01

    Investigating the interplay between muscular activity and motion is the basis to improve our understanding of healthy or diseased musculoskeletal systems. To be able to analyze the musculoskeletal systems, computational models are used. Albeit some severe modeling assumptions, almost all existing musculoskeletal system simulations appeal to multibody simulation frameworks. Although continuum-mechanical musculoskeletal system models can compensate for some of these limitations, they are essentially not considered because of their computational complexity and cost. The proposed framework is the first activation-driven musculoskeletal system model, in which the exerted skeletal muscle forces are computed using 3-dimensional, continuum-mechanical skeletal muscle models and in which muscle activations are determined based on a constraint optimization problem. Numerical feasibility is achieved by computing sparse grid surrogates with hierarchical B-splines, and adaptive sparse grid refinement further reduces the computational effort. The choice of B-splines allows the use of all existing gradient-based optimization techniques without further numerical approximation. This paper demonstrates that the resulting surrogates have low relative errors (less than 0.76%) and can be used within forward simulations that are subject to constraint optimization. To demonstrate this, we set up several different test scenarios in which an upper limb model consisting of the elbow joint, the biceps and triceps brachii, and an external load is subjected to different optimization criteria. Even though this novel method has only been demonstrated for a 2-muscle system, it can easily be extended to musculoskeletal systems with 3 or more muscles. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Common acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hip/lower back was the most prevalent anatomical site of chronic musculoskeletal injury. (p<0.001). The intrinsic ..... Musculoskeletal disorders among nursing personnel in Korea. Int J ... Marieb E. Human Anatomy and Physiology. 7th ed.

  19. Analysis of Surgical Site Infection after Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery: Risk Assessment Using a New Scoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nagano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI has not been extensively studied in musculoskeletal tumors (MST owing to the rarity of the disease. We analyzed incidence and risk factors of SSI in MST. SSI incidence was evaluated in consecutive 457 MST cases (benign, 310 cases and malignant, 147 cases treated at our institution. A detailed analysis of the clinical background of the patients, pre- and postoperative hematological data, and other factors that might be associated with SSI incidence was performed for malignant MST cases. SSI occurred in 0.32% and 12.2% of benign and malignant MST cases, respectively. The duration of the surgery (P=0.0002 and intraoperative blood loss (P=0.0005 was significantly more in the SSI group than in the non-SSI group. We established the musculoskeletal oncological surgery invasiveness (MOSI index by combining 4 risk factors (blood loss, operation duration, preoperative chemotherapy, and the use of artificial materials. The MOSI index (0–4 points score significantly correlated with the risk of SSI, as demonstrated by an SSI incidence of 38.5% in the group with a high score (3-4 points. The MOSI index score and laboratory data at 1 week after surgery could facilitate risk evaluation and prompt diagnosis of SSI.

  20. Functional analysis of the musculo-skeletal system of the gill apparatus in Heptranchias perlo (Chondrichthyes: Hexanchidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukova, Nadezhda V

    2017-08-01

    Musculo-skeletal morphology is an indispensable source for understanding functional adaptations. Analysis of morphology of the branchial apparatus of Hexanchiform sharks can provide insight into aspects of their respiration that are difficult to observe directly. In this study, I compare the structure of the musculo-skeletal system of the gill apparatus of Heptranchias perlo and Squalus acanthias in respect to their adaptation for one of two respiratory mechanisms known in sharks, namely, the active two-pump (oropharyngeal and parabranchial) ventilation and the ram-jet ventilation. In both species, the oropharyngeal pump possesses two sets of muscles, one for compression and the other for expansion. The parabranchial pump only has constrictors. Expansion of this pump occurs only due to passive elastic recoil of the extrabranchial cartilages. In Squalus acanthias the parabranchial chambers are large and equipped by powerful superficial constrictors. These muscles and the outer walls of the parabranchial chambers are much reduced in Heptranchias perlo, and thus it likely cannot use this pump. However, this reduction allows for vertical elongation of outer gill slits which, along with greater number of gill pouches, likely decreases branchial resistance and, at the same time, increases the gill surface area, and can be regarded as an adaptation for ram ventilation at lower speeds. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Development of a profile scoring system for assessing the psychosocial situation of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaido, Takuya; Fukuma, Shingo; Wakita, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Miho; Yabuki, Shoji; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Fukuhara, Shunichi; Konno, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pain is a manifestation of interactions among physical, psychological, and social conditions, but the latter two, that is, the nonphysical correlates of chronic pain, are only rarely measured. This study aimed to develop a profile scoring system for assessing the psychosocial situation of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. An expert panel chose social and psychological domains considered to be relevant to patients with chronic pain and wrote questions asking about each of those domains. The questionnaire was completed by 252 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Factor analysis was used to select questionnaire items for each domain. Associations and interactions of pain severity and each domain score with pain-related quality of life (PRQOL) were examined using linear regression models. Five domains were chosen: work, family, sleep, mental health, and PRQOL. Then, a total of 17 questions were created for the work, family, and sleep domains. Using the likelihood-ratio test, we found significant interactions with PRQOL in four pairs: severity–family, severity–mental, family–sleep, and work–mental. The association between pain severity and PRQOL was related to each patient’s social and psychological situation. These results suggest that interventions for patients with chronic pain may be personalized to account for each individual’s psychosocial situation. PMID:28814896

  2. Virtual reality and gaming systems to improve walking and mobility for people with musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Judith E

    2009-01-01

    Improving walking for individuals with musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions is an important aspect of rehabilitation. The capabilities of clinicians who address these rehabilitation issues could be augmented with innovations such as virtual reality gaming based technologies. The chapter provides an overview of virtual reality gaming based technologies currently being developed and tested to improve motor and cognitive elements required for ambulation and mobility in different patient populations. Included as well is a detailed description of a single VR system, consisting of the rationale for development and iterative refinement of the system based on clinical science. These concepts include: neural plasticity, part-task training, whole task training, task specific training, principles of exercise and motor learning, sensorimotor integration, and visual spatial processing.

  3. Combined feedforward and feedback control of a redundant, nonlinear, dynamic musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blana, Dimitra; Kirsch, Robert F; Chadwick, Edward K

    2009-05-01

    A functional electrical stimulation controller is presented that uses a combination of feedforward and feedback for arm control in high-level injury. The feedforward controller generates the muscle activations nominally required for desired movements, and the feedback controller corrects for errors caused by muscle fatigue and external disturbances. The feedforward controller is an artificial neural network (ANN) which approximates the inverse dynamics of the arm. The feedback loop includes a PID controller in series with a second ANN representing the nonlinear properties and biomechanical interactions of muscles and joints. The controller was designed and tested using a two-joint musculoskeletal model of the arm that includes four mono-articular and two bi-articular muscles. Its performance during goal-oriented movements of varying amplitudes and durations showed a tracking error of less than 4 degrees in ideal conditions, and less than 10 degrees even in the case of considerable fatigue and external disturbances.

  4. Smart and Controllable rAAV Gene Delivery Carriers in Progenitor Cells for Human Musculoskeletal Regenerative Medicine with a Focus on the Articular Cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Rico, Ana; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2017-01-01

    Cell therapy using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is a powerful tool for the treatment of various diseases and injuries. Still, important limitations including the large amounts of cells required for application in vivo and the age-related decline in lifespan, proliferation, and potency may hinder the use of MSCs in patients. In this regard, gene therapy may offer strong approaches to optimize the use of MSCs for regenerative medicine. Diverse nonviral and viral gene vehicles have been manipulated to genetically modify MSCs, among which the highly effective and relatively safe recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors that emerged as the preferred gene delivery system to treat human disorders. Yet, clinical adaptation of such gene vehicles may be limited by several hurdles, including the possibility of dissemination to nontarget sites and the presence of immune and toxic responses in the host organism that may impair their therapeutic actions. The use of smart biomaterials acting as interfaces to enhance the temporal and spatial presentation of therapeutic agents in the target place and/or acting as scaffolding for MSC growth is an innovative, valuable approach to overcome these shortcomings that else restrain the efficacy of such potent cell populations. Here, we provide an overview on the most recent tissue engineering approaches based on the use of biomaterials acting as vehicles for rAAV vectors to target MSCs directly in the recipient (in vivo strategy) or as supportive matrices for rAAV-modified MSCs for indirect cell reimplantation (ex vivo strategy) as means to activate the reparative processes in tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Modelamento Multicorpo do Sistema Musculoesquelético/Multibody modeling of the Musculoskeletal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Elias Tomazini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vários sistemas podem ser tratados com formalismos multicorpos: mecanismos de máquinas em geral, robôs industriais e manipuladores, estruturas espaciais, motores e, ainda, sistemas biomecânicos. A locomoção ou marcha humana e animal podem ser estudadas através de formalismos multicorpos.Nos últimos anos, diversos trabalhos relacionados à biomecânica, e utilizando formalismos multicorpos, têm sido apresentados. Muitos estudos in vitro e in vivo têm sido realizados, objetivando descrever o potencial de sobrecarga nas articulações do corpo humano e de modelos animais. O objetivo desta revisão foi apresentar estudos envolvendo o modelamento matemático aplicado à bioengenharia, biomecânica e engenharia biomédica. Conclui-se que o modelamento matemático é uma ferramenta muito útil, barata e não invasiva que vem contribuir nos estudos envolvendo o sistema multicorpo mecânico e complexo, que é o corpo humano. Several systems can be treated with multibody formalisms: mechanisms of general machinery, industrial robots and manipulators, space structures, engines, and also biomechanical systems. The locomotion or human gait can be studied using multibody formalisms. Several studies related to biomechanics, and using multibody formalisms, have been presented in recent years. Many studies in vitro and in vivo have been carried out, aiming to describe the potential overload in the joints of the human body and animal models. The aim of this review was to present studies involving mathematical modeling applied to bioengineering, biomechanics and biomedical engineering. We have concluded that mathematical modeling is a useful, inexpensive and noninvasive tool which comes to contribute in studies involving the mechanical and complex multibody system which is the human body.

  6. A Comparative Study of Coping Strategies and the Features of Interpersonal Relations and Life Orientations of People with Congenital and Acquired Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, E. V.; Tolkacheva, O. N.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of a comparative study of the features of the coping strategies, life orientations, and interpersonal relations of disabled people with acquired and congenital diseases of the musculoskeletal system. The authors discovered differences in interpersonal behavior in the area of control, and they revealed factors that…

  7. Disuse of the musculo-skeletal system in space and on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, M V; de Boer, M D

    2011-03-01

    Muscle mass and strength are well known to decline in response to actual and simulated microgravity exposure. However, despite the considerable knowledge gained on the physiological changes induced by spaceflight, the mechanisms of muscle atrophy and the effectiveness of in-flight countermeasures still need to be fully elucidated. The present review examines the effects and mechanisms of actual and simulated microgravity on single fibre and whole muscle structural and functional properties, protein metabolism, tendon mechanical properties, neural drive and reflex excitability. The effects of inflight countermeasures are also discussed in the light of recent advances in resistive loading techniques, in combined physical, pharmacological and nutritional interventions as well as in the development of artificial gravity systems. Emphasis has been given to the pioneering work of Pietro Enrico di Prampero in the development of artificial gravity systems and in the progress of knowledge on the limits of human muscular performance in space.

  8. Design and control of a pneumatic musculoskeletal biped robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xizhe; Liu, Yixiang; Liu, Xinyu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-04-29

    Pneumatic artificial muscles are quite promising actuators for humanoid robots owing to their similar characteristics with human muscles. Moreover, biologically inspired musculoskeletal systems are particularly important for humanoid robots to perform versatile dynamic tasks. This study aims to develop a pneumatic musculoskeletal biped robot, and its controller, to realize human-like walking. According to the simplified musculoskeletal structure of human lower limbs, each leg of the biped robot is driven by nine muscles, including three pairs of monoarticular muscles which are arranged in the flexor-extensor form, as well as three biarticular muscles which span two joints. To lower cost, high-speed on/off solenoid valves rather than proportional valves are used to control the muscles. The joint trajectory tracking controller based on PID control method is designed to achieve the desired motion. Considering the complex characteristics of pneumatic artificial muscles, the control model is obtained through parameter identification experiments. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the biped robot is able to walk with this control strategy. The proposed musculoskeletal structure and control strategy are effective for the biped robot to achieve human-like walking.

  9. Members of the human body prone to musculoskeletal damages: a comparison between the sector of transportation and footwears production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes de Lima, Jeane F; Colaço, Geraldo; da Silva, Ricardo; Masculo, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    This study present areas of the body more prone to develop diseases by musculoskeletal efforts, ie, RTD, in two companies of Paraiba, Brazil. To this end, was made a comparative analysis with respect to the type of work performed (standing, sitting) and the parts that suffer most discomfort after a day's work in a footwear industry and a bus transportation company. The quanti-qualitative research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with 227 employees in the period 2008 to 2009, having as methodological the tool diagram of painful areas of Corlett and Manenica. It was concluded that the areas most affected by musculoskeletal disorders are located in the neck (9,2%), backs (23,6%), shoulders (14,5%) and legs (11,3%), being usually caused by inappropriate postures, repetitive movements and work station no adequate the anthropometry of the users. Thus, we recommend the adoption of ergonomic measures that enable a healthy and safe environment for workers.

  10. The aging musculoskeletal system and obesity-related considerations with exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Heather K; Raiser, Sara N; Vincent, Kevin R

    2012-07-01

    Advancing age and adiposity contribute to musculoskeletal degenerative diseases and the development of sarcopenic obesity. The etiology of muscle loss is multifactorial, and includes inflammation, oxidative stress and hormonal changes, and is worsened by activity avoidance due to fear of pain. The risk for mobility disability and functional impairment rises with severity of obesity in the older adult. Performance measures of walking distance, walking speed, chair rise, stair climb, body transfers and ability to navigate obstacles on a course are adversely affected in this population, and this reflects decline in daily physical functioning. Exercise training is an ideal intervention to counteract the effects of aging and obesity. The 18 randomized controlled trials of exercise studies with or without diet components reviewed here indicate that 3-18 month programs that included aerobic and strengthening exercise (2-3 days per week) with caloric restriction (typically 750 kcal deficit/day), induced the greatest change in functional performance measures compared with exercise or diet alone. Importantly, resistance exercise attenuates muscle mass loss with the interventions. These interventions can also combat factors that invoke sarcopenia, including inflammation, oxidative stress and insulin resistance. Therefore, regular multimodal exercise coupled with diet appears to be very effective for counteracting sarocpenic obesity and improving mobility and function in the older, obese adult. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Work load and musculoskeletal complaints during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, J. A.; van Dijk, F. J.; Frings-Dresen, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Many pregnant women have musculoskeletal complaints, the onset and aggravation of which are thought to be associated with their activity or work postures. The purpose of this paper was to obtain more insight into the influence of pregnancy on the load of the musculoskeletal system at work to provide

  12. Human factors information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.; DiPalo, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plant safety is dependent upon human performance related to plant operations. To provide improvements in human performance, data collection and assessment play key roles. This paper reports on the Human factors Information System (HFIS) which is designed to meet the needs of the human factors specialists of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These specialists identify personnel errors and provide guidance designed to prevent such errors. HFIS is a simple and modular system designed for use on a personal computer. It is designed to contain four separate modules that provide information indicative of program or function effectiveness as well as safety-related human performance based on programmatic and performance data. These modules include the Human Factors Status module; the Regulatory Programs module; the Licensee Event Report module; and the Operator Requalification Performance module. Information form these modules can either be used separately or can be combined due to the integrated nature of the system. HFIS has the capability, therefore, to provide insights into those areas of human factors that can reduce the probability of events caused by personnel error at nuclear power plants and promote the health and safety of the public. This information system concept can be applied to other industries as well as the nuclear industry

  13. 'Magnetic Resonance Motion Imaging' for functional diagnosis of the musculo-skeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, K.M.

    2002-06-01

    Purpose: radiological studies of joint and spine function are an important part of the diagnosis and therapy management for musculo-skeletal diseases affecting range-of-motion. The objective of this study was to investigate the integration and developement of the clinical application of currently available MR-tomographic techniques, which can be summarized as 'Magnetic Resonance Motion Imaging (MRMI)'. Material and methods: five healthy volunteers (three women and two men; mean age 21.8?4.4) and ten patients (eight women and two men; mean age 31.4?12.6) took part in the study. A total of 21 examinations with real-time motion-MRI were performed on selected peripheric joints (seven patellofemoral joints, six femorotibial joints, one cervical spine, two wrists, three ankles and two temporomandibular joints) with a 1.0T unit (Philips Intera T10) using T1-weighted gradient-echo and opposed-phase imaging sequences. For the examination of the patellofemoral joint, the femorotibial joint, the wrist and the tmj a dedicated positioning-device was used. Results were correlated with static MR-Images. Results: the quickly parcticable sequence of the examinations was not straining for the patients. The quality of imaging was only insignificantly lower as compared with static gradient-echo sequences. No artifacts were seen which could influence the evaluation. The visualisation of motions was very good. The quantification of the maximum extent of dysfunctions could be judged better with a higher sensitivity in real-time-mode than in static images. Conclusion: from the results of this study a three-step-plan for the radiodiagnostic procedure in cases of functional disorders of selected joints and the spine can be deduced, which uses static MR-imaging as first step. In case of unsolved questions MRMI is done (step 2). To obtain measurements, static MR-Images at different points of the motion range(kinematic MR-Imaging) should be done (step 3). This plan of 'motion-MRI' is well

  14. A health system program to reduce work disability related to musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abásolo, Lydia; Blanco, Margarita; Bachiller, Javier; Candelas, Gloria; Collado, Paz; Lajas, Cristina; Revenga, Marcelino; Ricci, Patricia; Lázaro, Pablo; Aguilar, Maria Dolores; Vargas, Emilio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Hernández-García, César; Carmona, Loreto; Jover, Juan A

    2005-09-20

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a frequent cause of work disability, accounting for productivity losses in industrialized societies equivalent to 1.3% of the U.S. gross national product. To evaluate whether a population-based clinical program offered to patients with recent-onset work disability caused by MSDs is cost-effective. Randomized, controlled intervention study. The inclusion and follow-up periods each lasted 12 months. Three health districts in Madrid, Spain. All patients with MSD-related temporary work disability in 1998 and 1999. The control group received standard primary care management, with referral to specialized care if needed. The intervention group received a specific program, administered by rheumatologists, in which care was delivered during regular visits and included 3 main elements: education, protocol-based clinical management, and administrative duties. Efficacy variables were 1) days of temporary work disability and 2) number of patients with permanent work disability. All analyses were done on an intention-to-treat basis. 1,077 patients were included in the study, 7805 in the control group and 5272 in the intervention group, generating 16,297 episodes of MSD-related temporary work disability. These episodes were shorter in the intervention group than in the control group (mean, 26 days compared with 41 days; P < 0.001), and the groups had similar numbers of episodes per patient. Fewer patients received long-term disability compensation in the intervention group (n = 38 [0.7%]) than in the control group (n = 99 [1.3%]) (P < 0.005). Direct and indirect costs were lower in the intervention group than in the control group. To save 1 day of temporary work disability, 6.00 dollars had to be invested in the program. Each dollar invested generated a benefit of 11.00 dollars. The program's net benefit was in excess of 5 million dollars. The study was unblinded. Implementation of the program, offered to the general population, improves short

  15. Human Systems Design Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of designing more humanised computer systems. This problem can be formally described as the need for defining human design criteria, which — if used in the design process - will secure that the systems designed get the relevant qualities. That is not only...... the necessary functional qualities but also the needed human qualities. The author's main argument is, that the design process should be a dialectical synthesis of the two points of view: Man as a System Component, and System as Man's Environment. Based on a man's presentation of the state of the art a set...... of design criteria is suggested and their relevance discussed. The point is to focus on the operator rather than on the computer. The crucial question is not to program the computer to work on its own conditions, but to “program” the operator to function on human conditions....

  16. The use of macro-ergonomic work system designs to reduce musculoskeletal disorders and injury risk in training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnomo, H.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Training based on competency is a government effort to improve employee candidates’ job competence. The T echnical Implementation Unit of the Technopark Ganesha Sukowati Sragen is a training centre in the Sragen Regency. Ergonomic issues have still not received attention in some training programmes. The work system design is constructed to support the achievement of the agency’s vision and mission, using the macro-ergonomic analysis and design approach (MEAD. Research results show that the key variance is the installation of embroidery hoops, which is difficult and time-consuming. Integration of the work system with ergonomic designs is necessary to create a pleasant training environment and to improve job competence. The new designs include adjustable seats, embroidery hoops tables with a foot rest, improved lighting, facemasks, earplugs, and a drinking water facility. The workshop layout is designed to follow the work process. The trainees also participated in stretching exercises before training began. A t-test was conducted with the same research design and the same subject, and the results showed a reduction of up to 60.39 per cent in musculoskeletal disorders and a reduction of up to 22.2 per cent in the risk of injury.

  17. Human Performance Evaluation System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardwick, R.J. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Operating nuclear power plants requires high standards of performance, extensive training and responsive management. Despite our best efforts inappropriate human actions do occur, but they can be managed. An extensive review of License Event Reports (LERs) was conducted which indicated continual inadequacy in human performance and in evaluation of root causes. Of some 31,000 LERs, about 5,000 or 16% were directly attributable to inappropriate actions. A recent analysis of 87 Significant Event Reports (issued by INPO in 1983) identified inappropriate actions as being the most frequent root cause (44% of the total). A more recent analysis of SERs issued in 1983 and 1984 indicate that 52% of the root causes were attributed to human performance. The Human Performance Evaluation System (HPES) is a comprehensive, coordinated utility/industry system for evaluating and reporting human performance situtations. HPES is a result of the realization that current reporting system provide limited treatment of human performance and rarely provide adequate information about root causes of inappropriate actions by individuals. The HPES was implemented to identify and eliminate root causes of inappropriate actions

  18. Engineering Musculoskeletal Tissue Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Bayrak

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering aims to bring together biomaterials, cells, and signaling molecules within properly designed microenvironments in order to create viable treatment options for the lost or malfunctioning tissues. Design and production of scaffolds and cell-laden grafts that mimic the complex structural and functional features of tissues are among the most important elements of tissue engineering strategy. Although all tissues have their own complex structure, an even more complex case in terms of engineering a proper carrier material is encountered at the tissue interfaces, where two distinct tissues come together. The interfaces in the body can be examined in four categories; cartilage-bone and ligament-bone interfaces at the knee and the spine, tendon-bone interfaces at the shoulder and the feet, and muscle-tendon interface at the skeletal system. These interfaces are seen mainly at the soft-to-hard tissue transitions and they are especially susceptible to injury and tear due to the biomechanical inconsistency between these tissues where high strain fields are present. Therefore, engineering the musculoskeletal tissue interfaces remain a challenge. This review focuses on recent advancements in strategies for musculoskeletal interface engineering using different biomaterial-based platforms and surface modification techniques.

  19. In Vivo Neuromechanics : Decoding Causal Motor Neuron Behavior with Resulting Musculoskeletal Function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartori, Massimo; Yavuz, Utku; Farina, Dario

    2017-01-01

    Human motor function emerges from the interaction between the neuromuscular and the musculoskeletal systems. Despite the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying neural and mechanical functions, there is no relevant understanding of the neuro-mechanical interplay in the neuro-musculo-skeletal system.

  20. The value of energy spectral CT in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant soft tissue masses of the musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Shao, Xiaodong; Chen, Haisong

    2015-06-01

    To explore the value of energy spectral CT in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant tumor of the musculoskeletal system. Energy spectral CT scan was performed on 100 patients with soft tissue mass caused by musculoskeletal tumors found by MRI. Solid areas with homogenous density were chosen as region of interests (ROI), avoiding necrosis, hemorrhage and calcification region. Select the optimal keV on single energy images, and then the keV-CT curve was automatically generated. All 100 cases of tumors proved by histological examination were divided into four groups, 38 cases were in benign group, 10 cases in borderline group, 49 cases in malignant group, and 3 cases of lipoma (that were analyzed separately since its curve was arc shaped, significantly different from other curves). The formula used to calculate the slope of spectral curve was as follows: slope=(Hu40 keV-Hu80 keV)/40. As the slope was steep within the range of 40-80 keV based on preliminary observations, 40 keV and 80 keV were used as the reference points to calculate the slope value of the energy spectral curve. Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test was applied for statistical analysis, and Pbenign and malignant group, benign and borderline group were of statistical significance (Pbenign and malignant tumor of the musculoskeletal system. Arc shaped curve is a specific sign for tumors containing abundant fat. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, C.L.F. [Department of Radiology, North District Hospital, NTEC, Fanling, NT, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: c8681@yahoo.com; Griffith, J.F. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, NTEC, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented.

  2. Musculoskeletal infections: ultrasound appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, C.L.F.; Griffith, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Musculoskeletal infections are commonly encountered in clinical practice. This review will discuss the ultrasound appearances of a variety of musculoskeletal infections such as cellulitis, infective tenosynovitis, pyomyositis, soft-tissue abscesses, septic arthritis, acute and chronic osteomyelitis, and post-operative infection. The peculiar sonographic features of less common musculoskeletal infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, and rice body formation in atypical mycobacterial tenosynovitis, and bursitis will also be presented

  3. CT of AIDS-related musculoskeletal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magid, D.; Fishman, E.K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper characterizes musculoskeletal inflammatory diseases in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients and with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). CT, radiographic, and clinical data were reviewed in 10 patients, and patterns and features were compared with those in musculoskeletal infections occurring in non-AIDS patients. Infection was confirmed by means of biopsy or aspiration in eight cases and strongly suggested in the other two by blood cultures, cell counts, and other data

  4. Work load and musculoskeletal complaints during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, J A; van Dijk, F J; Frings-Dresen, M H

    1994-06-01

    Many pregnant women have musculoskeletal complaints, the onset and aggravation of which are thought to be associated with their activity or work postures. The purpose of this paper was to obtain more insight into the influence of pregnancy on the load of the musculoskeletal system at work to provide a better basis for preventing complaints. To this end, literature pertinent to a model called "work load of the musculoskeletal system" was reviewed. The model was developed to describe how work contributes to musculoskeletal complaints. It was found that pregnancy causes changes in a worker's characteristics. These changes can lead to changes in the work situation, activity pattern, and postural characteristics and possibly result in a change in work load. In addition, physical changes such as weight gain increase the work load in a given posture. The load-bearing capacity of the musculoskeletal system decreases due to pregnancy. The changes in load and the decrease in load-bearing capacity singly or simultaneously increase the risk of musculoskeletal complaints. The multifactorial cause of musculoskeletal complaints during pregnancy reveals various possibilities for prevention.

  5. Graphic-based musculoskeletal model for biomechanical analyses and animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Edmund Y S

    2003-04-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the 'Virtual Human' reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. This paper details the design, capabilities, and features of the VIMS development at Johns Hopkins University, an effort possible only through academic and commercial collaborations. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of this unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system will impact on medical education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal diseases, trauma, and rehabilitation.

  6. Bacteriology laboratories and musculoskeletal tissue banks in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varettas, Kerry

    2012-11-01

    In Australia, there are six Therapeutic Goods Administration-licensed clinical bacteriology laboratories providing bacterial and fungal bioburden testing of allograft musculoskeletal samples sent from 10 tissue banks. Musculoskeletal swab and/or tissue biopsy samples are collected at the time of allograft retrieval and sent to bacteriology laboratories for bioburden testing, in some cases requiring interstate transport. Bacteria and fungi may be present within the allograft at the time of retrieval or contaminated from an external source. The type of organism recovered will determine if the allograft is rejected for transplant, which may include all allografts from the same donor. Bacteriology staff also provides unpaid support of tissue banks through meeting involvement, consultations, licence-related activities, validations and research funded by their organisation and not part of any contractual agreement. Bacteriology laboratories and tissue banks must be compliant to the Code of Good Manufacturing Practice - Human Blood and Tissues and regulated by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. Clinical bacteriology laboratories also require mandatory accreditation to Standards Australia International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) 15189:2009 medical laboratories - particular requirements for quality and competence, and may also attain Standards Australia/New Zealand Standard ISO 9001:2000 quality management systems certification. Bacteriology laboratories and musculoskeletal tissue banks are integral partners in providing safe allograft musculoskeletal tissue for transplant. © 2012 The Author. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Occupational medical prophylaxis for the musculoskeletal system: A function-oriented system for physical examination of the locomotor system in occupational medicine (fokus(C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarze Sieglinde

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Occupational physicians are very often confronted with questions as to the fitness of the postural and locomotor systems, especially the spinal column. Occupational medical assessment and advice can be required by patients with acute symptoms, at routine check-ups, by persons who have problems doing certain jobs, and for expert medical reports as to the fitness of persons with chronic disorders or after operations. Therefore, for occupational medical purposes a physical examination must aim primarily to investigate functions and not structures or radiologic evidence. The physical examination should be structured systematically and according to regions of the body and, together with a specific (pain anamnesis should provide a basis for the medical assessment. This paper presents a function-oriented system for physical examination of the locomotor system, named fokus(C (Funktionsorientierte Koerperliche Untersuchungssystematik, also available on DVD. fokus(C has been developed with a view to its relevance for occupational medical practice and does not aim primarily to provide a precise diagnosis. Decisive for an occupational medical assessment of disorders of the musculoskeletal system is rather information about functional disorders and any impairment of performance or mobility which they can cause. The division of the physical examination into a rapid screening phase and a subsequent more intensive functional diagnostic phase has proved its practicability in many years of day-to-day use. Here, in contrast to the very extensive measures recommended for orthopaedic and manual diagnosis, for reasons of efficiency and usability of the system in routine occupational medical examinations the examination is structured according to the findings. So it is reduced to that which is most necessary and feasible.

  8. Musculoskeletal Modelling and the Physiome Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, Justin; Zhang, Ju; Shim, Vickie; Munro, Jacob T.; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor; Lloyd, David G.; Nickerson, David P.; Hunter, Peter; Pivonka, Peter

    2018-01-01

    This chapter presents developments as part of the International Union of Physiological Sciences (IUPS) Physiome Project. Models are multiscale, multispatial and multiphysics, hence, suitable numerical tools and platforms have been developed to address these challenges for the musculoskeletal system.

  9. Human Systems Roadmap Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Impact of Human Systems Community of Interest D O T M L P F $450M COI Budget Has Broad Impact in Several DOTMLPF Areas Decision Making Selection...and fit to a military career. • 26 personality dimensions such as optimism, excitement seeking, and non- delinquency • Applicant chooses from...Adaptive Collaborative Control Technologies ( IMPACT ) architecture designed • IMPACT “DoD Virtual Lab” established (Year 1) • 1 operator x 6 vehicles

  10. Musculoskeletal pain in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannini, Suely Nóbrega; Dória-Filho, Ulysses; Damiani, Durval; Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida

    2011-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of pain, musculoskeletal syndromes, orthopedic disorders and using computers and playing videogames among obese adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study that investigated 100 consecutive obese adolescents and 100 healthy-weight controls using a confidential, self-report questionnaire covering demographic data, sports participation, painful musculoskeletal system symptoms and using computers and playing videogames. The questionnaire's test-retest reliability was tested. Physical examination covered six musculoskeletal syndromes and seven orthopedic disorders. The kappa index for test-retest was 0.724. Pain and musculoskeletal syndromes were equally prevalent in both groups (44 vs. 56%, p = 0.09; 12 vs. 16%, p = 0.541; respectively). Notwithstanding, orthopedic disorders (98 vs. 76%, p = 0.0001), tight quadriceps (89 vs. 44%, p = 0.0001) and genu valgum (87 vs. 24%, p = 0.0001) were significantly more prevalent in obese adolescents than in controls. Median time spent using a computer the day before, on Saturdays and on Sundays were all lower among the obese subjects (30 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.0001; 1 vs. 60 minutes, p = 0.001; and 0 vs. 30 minutes, p = 0.02; respectively). Obese adolescents were less likely to play handheld videogames (2 vs. 11%, p = 0.003) and there was no difference in the two groups' use of full-sized videogames (p > 0.05). Comparing obese adolescents with pain to those free from pain revealed that pain was more frequent among females (59 vs. 39%, p = 0.048) and was associated with greater median time spent playing on Sundays [0 (0-720) vs. 0 (0-240) minutes, p = 0.028]. Obesity can cause osteoarticular system damage at the start of adolescence, particularly to the lower limbs. Programs developed specifically for obese female adolescents with musculoskeletal pain are needed.

  11. Exergy Analysis of the Musculoskeletal System Efficiency during Aerobic and Anaerobic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Marques Spanghero

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The first and second laws of thermodynamics were applied to the human body in order to evaluate the quality of the energy conversion during muscle activity. Such an implementation represents an important issue in the exergy analysis of the body, because there is a difficulty in the literature in evaluating the performed power in some activities. Hence, to have the performed work as an input in the exergy model, two types of exercises were evaluated: weight lifting and aerobic exercise on a stationary bicycle. To this aim, we performed a study of the aerobic and anaerobic reactions in the muscle cells, aiming at predicting the metabolic efficiency and muscle efficiency during exercises. Physiological data such as oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, skin and internal temperatures and performed power were measured. Results indicated that the exergy efficiency was around 4% in the weight lifting, whereas it could reach values as high as 30% for aerobic exercises. It has been shown that the stationary bicycle is a more adequate test for first correlations between exergy and performance indices.

  12. Twente spine model : A complete and coherent dataset for musculo-skeletal modeling of the thoracic and cervical regions of the human spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayoglu, Riza; Geeraedts, Leo; Groenen, Karlijn H.J.; Verdonschot, Nico; Koopman, Bart; Homminga, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    Musculo-skeletal modeling could play a key role in advancing our understanding of the healthy and pathological spine, but the credibility of such models are strictly dependent on the accuracy of the anatomical data incorporated. In this study, we present a complete and coherent musculo-skeletal

  13. Reprint of: Musculoskeletal system in the old age and the demand for healthy ageing biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Sebastiano; Martin, François-Pierre; Karagounis, Leonidas G; Horcajada, Marie Noelle; Moco, Sofia; Franceschi, Claudio; Kussmann, Martin; Offord, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Population ageing has emerged as a major demographic trend worldwide due to improved health and longevity. This global ageing phenomenon will have a major impact on health-care systems worldwide due to increased morbidity and greater needs for hospitalization/institutionalization. As the ageing population increases worldwide, there is an increasing awareness not only of increased longevity but also of the importance of "healthy ageing" and "quality of life". Yet, the age related chronic inflammation is believed to be pathogenic with regards to its contribution to frailty and degenerative disorders. In particular, the frailty syndrome is increasingly being considered as a key risk indicator of adverse health outcomes. In addition, elderly may be also prone to be resistant to anabolic stimuli which is likely a key factor in the loss of skeletal muscle mass with ageing. Vital to understand these key biological processes is the development of biological markers, through system biology approaches, aiding at strategies for tailored therapeutic and personalized nutritional program. Overall aim is to prevent or attenuate decline of key physiological functions required to live an active, independent life. This review focus on core indicators of health and functions in older adults, where nutrition and tailored personalized programs could exhibit preventive roles, and where the aid of metabolomics technologies are increasingly displaying potential in revealing key molecular mechanisms/targets linked to specific ageing and/or healthy ageing processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Musculoskeletal system in the old age and the demand for healthy ageing biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Sebastiano; Martin, François-Pierre; Karagounis, Leonidas G; Horcajada, Marie Noelle; Moco, Sofia; Franceschi, Claudio; Kussmann, Martin; Offord, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Population ageing has emerged as a major demographic trend worldwide due to improved health and longevity. This global ageing phenomenon will have a major impact on health-care systems worldwide due to increased morbidity and greater needs for hospitalization/institutionalization. As the ageing population increases worldwide, there is an increasing awareness not only of increased longevity but also of the importance of "healthy ageing" and "quality of life". Yet, the age related chronic inflammation is believed to be pathogenic with regards to its contribution to frailty and degenerative disorders. In particular, the frailty syndrome is increasingly being considered as a key risk indicator of adverse health outcomes. In addition, elderly may be also prone to be resistant to anabolic stimuli which is likely a key factor in the loss of skeletal muscle mass with ageing. Vital to understand these key biological processes is the development of biological markers, through system biology approaches, aiding at strategies for tailored therapeutic and personalized nutritional program. Overall aim is to prevent or attenuate decline of key physiological functions required to live an active, independent life. This review focus on core indicators of health and functions in older adults, where nutrition and tailored personalized programs could exhibit preventive roles, and where the aid of metabolomics technologies are increasingly displaying potential in revealing key molecular mechanisms/targets linked to specific ageing and/or healthy ageing processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An exceptional case of xanthomatous infiltration of the musculoskeletal and integumentary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jae W.; Ersahin, Devrim [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Much, Melissa A. [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Thomson, J.G. [Yale University School of Medicine, Section of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Smitaman, Edward [University of California, San Diego, Teleradiology and Education Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Tendinous and subcutaneous xanthomas are most commonly associated with primary hyperlipidemia. Xanthomatosis caused by cholesterol deposition can be a high risk marker for cardiovascular disease related to premature atherosclerosis; thus, early recognition of this diagnosis may reduce mortality and morbidity. Achilles tendon involvement is most common, followed by the extensor tendons of the hand and elbow. We present an exceptional case of tendinous and tuberous xanthomas, with intraoperative and histologic correlation, in a 34-year-old female manifesting with xanthomatous deposits of nearly all ankle tendons, plantar aponeurosis, extensor tendons of the hands, and various locations within the integumentum. To the authors' knowledge, only four studies to date have focused specifically on imaging findings of multifocal xanthomas. Thus, the radiographic and MR imaging descriptions of xanthomas in this report further add to the existing literature by helping to identify imaging characteristics of this multifocal systemic disease. The diagnosis of this condition should alert the physician to the presence of a dyslipidemia that can be treated with dietary modifications and/or drug therapy. (orig.)

  16. An exceptional case of xanthomatous infiltration of the musculoskeletal and integumentary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jae W.; Ersahin, Devrim; Much, Melissa A.; Thomson, J.G.; Smitaman, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Tendinous and subcutaneous xanthomas are most commonly associated with primary hyperlipidemia. Xanthomatosis caused by cholesterol deposition can be a high risk marker for cardiovascular disease related to premature atherosclerosis; thus, early recognition of this diagnosis may reduce mortality and morbidity. Achilles tendon involvement is most common, followed by the extensor tendons of the hand and elbow. We present an exceptional case of tendinous and tuberous xanthomas, with intraoperative and histologic correlation, in a 34-year-old female manifesting with xanthomatous deposits of nearly all ankle tendons, plantar aponeurosis, extensor tendons of the hands, and various locations within the integumentum. To the authors' knowledge, only four studies to date have focused specifically on imaging findings of multifocal xanthomas. Thus, the radiographic and MR imaging descriptions of xanthomas in this report further add to the existing literature by helping to identify imaging characteristics of this multifocal systemic disease. The diagnosis of this condition should alert the physician to the presence of a dyslipidemia that can be treated with dietary modifications and/or drug therapy. (orig.)

  17. [Personal experience in the use of magnetotherapy in diseases of the musculoskeletal system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadlonova, J; Korpas, J

    1999-12-01

    Therapeutic application of pulsatile electromagnetic field in disorders of motility is recently becoming more frequent. Despite this fact information about the effectiveness of this therapy in the literature are rare. The aim of this study was therefore the treatment of 576 patients who suffered from vertebral syndrome, gonarthritis and coxarthritis. For application of pulsatile electromagnetic field MTU 500H Therapy System was used. Pulsatile electromagnetic field had a frequency valve of 4.5 mT in all studied groups and magnetic induction valve 12.5-18.75 mT in the 1st group. In the 2nd group the intensity was 5.8-7.3 mT and in the 3rd group it was 7.6-11.4 mT. The time of inclination/declination in the 1st group was 20/60 ms, in the 2nd group 40/80 ms and in the 3rd group 40/90 ms. The electromagnetic field was applied during 10 days. In the 1st-3rd day during 20 minutes and in the 4th-10th day during 30 minutes. The therapy was repeated in every patient after 3 months with values of intensity higher by 50%. In the time of pulsatile electro-magnetotherapy the patients were without pharmacotherapy or other physiotherapy. The application of pulsatile electromagnetic field is a very effective therapy of vertebral syndrome, gonarthritis and coxarthritis. The results have shown that the therapy was more effective in patients suffering from gonarthrosis, than in patients with vertebral syndrome and least effective in patients with coxarthosis. Owing to regression of oedema and pain relieve the motility of patients improved. (Tab. 3, Ref. 19.)

  18. A dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging: Design, optimization, and initial performance characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on the design and initial imaging performance of a dedicated cone-beam CT (CBCT) system for musculoskeletal (MSK) extremities. The system complements conventional CT and MR and offers a variety of potential clinical and logistical advantages that are likely to be of benefit to diagnosis, treatment planning, and assessment of therapy response in MSK radiology, orthopaedic surgery, and rheumatology. Methods: The scanner design incorporated a host of clinical requirements (e.g., ability to scan the weight-bearing knee in a natural stance) and was guided by theoretical and experimental analysis of image quality and dose. Such criteria identified the following basic scanner components and system configuration: a flat-panel detector (FPD, Varian 3030+, 0.194 mm pixels); and a low-power, fixed anode x-ray source with 0.5 mm focal spot (SourceRay XRS-125-7K-P, 0.875 kW) mounted on a retractable C-arm allowing for two scanning orientations with the capability for side entry, viz. a standing configuration for imaging of weight-bearing lower extremities and a sitting configuration for imaging of tensioned upper extremity and unloaded lower extremity. Theoretical modeling employed cascaded systems analysis of modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) computed as a function of system geometry, kVp and filtration, dose, source power, etc. Physical experimentation utilized an imaging bench simulating the scanner geometry for verification of theoretical results and investigation of other factors, such as antiscatter grid selection and 3D image quality in phantom and cadaver, including qualitative comparison to conventional CT. Results: Theoretical modeling and benchtop experimentation confirmed the basic suitability of the FPD and x-ray source mentioned above. Clinical requirements combined with analysis of MTF and DQE yielded the following system geometry: a ∼55 cm source-to-detector distance; 1.3 magnification; a 20

  19. Radiology trainer. Musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, A.; Erlt-Wagner, B.

    2006-01-01

    This book enables students to simulate examinations. The Radiology Trainer series comprises the whole knowledge of radiology in the form of case studies for self-testing. It is based on the best-sorted German-language collection of radiological examinations of all organ regions. Step by step, radiological knowledge is trained in order to make diagnoses more efficient. The book series ensures optimal preparation for the final medical examinations and is also a valuable tool for practical training. (orig.)

  20. Chest pain in focal musculoskeletal disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2010-01-01

    overlapping conditions and syndromes of focal disorders, including Tietze syndrome, costochondritis, chest wall syndrome, muscle tenderness, slipping rib, cervical angina, and segmental dysfunction of the cervical and thoracic spine, have been reported to cause pain. For most of these syndromes, evidence......The musculoskeletal system is a recognized source of chest pain. However, despite the apparently benign origin, patients with musculoskeletal chest pain remain under-diagnosed, untreated, and potentially continuously disabled in terms of anxiety, depression, and activities of daily living. Several...... arises mainly from case stories and empiric knowledge. For segmental dysfunction, clinical features of musculoskeletal chest pain have been characterized in a few clinical trials. This article summarizes the most commonly encountered syndromes of focal musculoskeletal disorders in clinical practice....

  1. Radiological diagnostics of malignant tumors of the musculoskeletal system in childhood and adolescence; Radiologische Diagnostik maligner Tumoren des Muskuloskelettalsystems im Kindes- und Adoleszentenalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, S.F.; Krestan, C.R. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Klinische Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie und muskuloskelettale Radiologie, Wien (Austria); Hojreh, A.; Hoermann, M. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Klinische Abteilung fuer Allgemeine Radiologie und Kinderradiologie, Wien (Austria)

    2008-10-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma are the most common malignant tumors of the musculoskeletal system in childhood and adolescence representing about 10% of newly diagnosed cancers in children and adolescents. In the last two decades the prognosis of patients with such malignancies improved significantly. On the one hand because of the advances in chemotherapy and orthopedic surgery, on the other hand also because of the innovations in radiological diagnostics. The precise pre-therapeutical staging of tumors of the musculoskeletal system provides important prognostic information and has impact on the entire therapy management. During respectively after therapy, imaging is extremely important in the follow-up and in diagnosing a possible recurrent disease. Modern imaging diagnostics of musculoskeletal tumors basically consist of conventional X-ray, of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and of modalities of nuclear medicine such as szintigraphy, positron emission tomography (PET) and PET CT. (orig.) [German] Das Rhabdomyosarkom, das Osteosarkom und das Ewing-Sarkom sind die am haeufigsten auftretenden malignen Tumoren des Muskuloskelettalsystems im Kindes- und Adoleszentenalter. Diese Erkrankungen repraesentieren etwa 10% der bei Kindern und Jugendlichen neu diagnostizierten Tumoren. In den letzten beiden Jahrzehnten hat sich insgesamt die Prognose der Patienten mit solchen Malignomen deutlich gebessert. Einerseits aufgrund der Fortschritte in der Chemotherapie und orthopaedischen Tumorchirurgie, andererseits nicht zuletzt aufgrund der zahlreichen Innovationen der radiologischen Diagnostik. Das praezise praetherapeutische Staging von Tumoren des Muskuloskelettalsystems liefert wichtige prognostische Informationen und beeinflusst das gesamte Therapiemanagement. Waehrend bzw. nach erfolgter Therapie ist die Bildgebung ganz entscheidend im Follow-up und bei der Diagnostik einer moeglichen Rezidiverkrankung. Die moderne

  2. Design Approach of Biologically-Inspired Musculoskeletal Humanoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuto Nakanishi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize more natural and various motions like humans, humanlike musculoskeletal tendon-driven humanoids have been studied. Especially, it is very challenging to design musculoskeletal body structure which consists of complicated bones, redundant powerful and flexible muscles, and large number of distributed sensors. In addition, it is very challenging to reveal humanlike intelligence to manage these complicated musculoskeletal body structure. This paper sums up life-sized musculoskeletal humanoids Kenta, Kotaro, Kenzoh and Kenshiro which we have developed so far, and describes key technologies to develop and control these robots.

  3. The value of energy spectral CT in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant soft tissue masses of the musculoskeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xin [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Shao, Xiaodong [Department of Radiology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, Shandong (China); Chen, Haisong, E-mail: chsEJR@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Different types of tissues have different types of spectral curves. • We find that spectral curve is useful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant tumor of the musculoskeletal system. • Arc shaped curve is a specific sign for tumors containing abundant fat. - Abstract: Objective: To explore the value of energy spectral CT in the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant tumor of the musculoskeletal system. Methods: Energy spectral CT scan was performed on 100 patients with soft tissue mass caused by musculoskeletal tumors found by MRI. Solid areas with homogenous density were chosen as region of interests (ROI), avoiding necrosis, hemorrhage and calcification region. Select the optimal keV on single energy images, and then the keV–CT curve was automatically generated. All 100 cases of tumors proved by histological examination were divided into four groups, 38 cases were in benign group, 10 cases in borderline group, 49 cases in malignant group, and 3 cases of lipoma (that were analyzed separately since its curve was arc shaped, significantly different from other curves). The formula used to calculate the slope of spectral curve was as follows: slope = (Hu40 keV − Hu80 keV)/40. As the slope was steep within the range of 40–80 keV based on preliminary observations, 40 keV and 80 keV were used as the reference points to calculate the slope value of the energy spectral curve. Kruskal–Wallis rank sum test was applied for statistical analysis, and P < 0.05 was considered to indicate a statistically significant difference. Results: The spectral curve of benign group was gradually falling type with a mean slope of 0.75 ± 0.30, that of malignant group was sharply falling type with a mean slope of 1.64 ± 1.00, and that of borderline group was a falling type between the above two groups with a mean slope of 1.34 ± 0.45. The differences of slopes between benign and malignant group, benign and borderline group were of

  4. [Prevalence and medical and social importance of disorders and diseases of the musculoskeletal systems in children and adolescents (review of literature)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirskaia, N B; Kolomenskaia, A N; Siniakina, A D

    2015-01-01

    The urgency of the problem of the excess incidence of disorders and diseases of the musculoskeletal system (MSS) in contemporary children and adolescents is determined by its high medical and social significance. However, the poor quality of diagnosis of MSS disorders in children at the polyclinics level, especially at the initial stages, when timely commenced recreational and corrective-measures are most effective, do not allow to carry out remedial work timely, and this in turn is the cause of the high prevalence of violations of the MSS later With the aim of the improvement of the quality of diagnosis of early forms of musculoskeletal pathology in children and adolescents, as well as for the performance of the prevention during learning them in school there is developed an information system for health care workers "Identification, correction and prevention of disorders of the locomotor apparatus in students of educational institutions". The core of the system is formed by developed by authors a classification of functional disorders and initial forms of diseases of the MSS in students, as well as the organization of this work.

  5. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.maurer@i-med.ac.at

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasonography is one of the first line imaging modalities for the evaluation of musculoskeletal disorders in children. This article provides an overview of the most important pathologic entities in which ultrasonography significantly contributes to the diagnostic workup.

  6. Incidental findings in musculoskeletal radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuennemann, F.; Rehnitz, C.; Weber, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing numbers of conventional X-rays, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the inpatient, outpatient and scientific routine leads to an increasing number of incidental findings. The correct interpretation of these incidental findings with respect to the relevance and the evaluation concerning further work-up is an important task of radiologists. Description of common incidental findings in musculoskeletal imaging and their clinical classification. A PubMed literature search was performed using the following terms: incidental findings, population-based imaging, musculoskeletal imaging, non-ossifying fibroma, enchondroma, osteodystrophia deformans, chondrosarcoma, fibrous dysplasia, simple bone cyst, unicameral bone cyst, solitary bone cyst, aneurysmal bone cyst, vertebral hemangioma, bone island, osteopoikilosis, Tarlov cyst and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Incidental findings are observed in up to 40% of imaging procedures. In up to 6% these incidental findings involve the skeletal system. Common incidental findings are discussed and their clinical relevance is explained. (orig.) [de

  7. Platelet-rich plasma in orthopedic therapy: a comparative systematic review of clinical and experimental data in equine and human musculoskeletal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossi, Patrícia M; Moreira, Juliana J; Machado, Thaís S L; Baccarin, Raquel Y A

    2015-04-22

    This systematic review aimed to present and critically appraise the available information on the efficacy of platelet rich plasma (PRP) in equine and human orthopedic therapeutics and to verify the influence of study design and methodology on the assumption of PRP's efficacy. We searched Medline, PubMed, Embase, Bireme and Google Scholar without restrictions until July 2013. Randomized trials, human cohort clinical studies or case series with a control group on the use of PRP in tendons, ligaments or articular lesions were included. Equine clinical studies on the same topics were included independently of their design. Experimental studies relevant to the clarification of PRP's effects and mechanisms of action in tissues of interest, conducted in any animal species, were selected. This review included 123 studies. PRP's beneficial effects were observed in 46.7% of the clinical studies, while the absence of positive effects was observed in 43.3%. Among experimental studies, 73% yielded positive results, and 7.9% yielded negative results. The most frequent flaws in the clinical trials' designs were the lack of a true placebo group, poor product characterization, insufficient blinding, small sampling, short follow-up periods, and adoption of poor outcome measures. The methods employed for PRP preparation and administration and the selected outcome measures varied greatly. Poor study design was a common feature of equine clinical trials. From studies in which PRP had beneficial effects, 67.8% had an overall high risk of bias. From the studies in which PRP failed to exhibit beneficial effects, 67.8% had an overall low risk of bias. Most experimental studies revealed positive effects of PRP. Although the majority of equine clinical studies yielded positive results, the human clinical trials' results failed to corroborate these findings. In both species, beneficial results were more frequently observed in studies with a high risk of bias. The use of PRP in musculoskeletal

  8. Human System Risk Management for Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    2004 of evaluating the tolerance limits and safe operating bands called for in the Bioastronautics Strategy. Over the next several years, the concept of the "operating bands" were turned into Space Flight Human System Standards (SFHSS), developed by the technical resources of the SLSD at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). These standards were developed and reviewed at the SLSD and then presented to the OCHMO for acceptance. The first set of standards was published in 2007 as the NASA-STD-3001, Volume 1, Crew Health that elaborated standards for several physiological areas such as cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, radiation exposure and nutrition. Volume 2, Human Factors, Habitability and Human Health was published in 2011, along with development guidance in the Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH). Taken together, the SFHSS Volumes 1 and 2, and the HIDH replaced the NASA-STD-3000 with new standards and revisions of the older document. Three other changes were also taking place that facilitated the development of the human system risk management approach. In 2005, the life sciences research and development portfolio underwent a comprehensive review through the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) that resulted in the reformulation of the Bioastronautics Program into Human Research Program (HRP) that was focused on appropriate mitigation results for high priority human health risks. The baseline HRP budget was established in August 2005. In addition, the OCHMO formulated the Health and Medical Technical Authority (HMTA) in 2006 that established the position of the Chief Medical Officer (CMO) at the NASA JSC along with other key technical disciplines, and the OCHMO became the responsible office for the SFHSS as noted above. The final change was the establishment in 2008 of the Human System Risk Board (HSRB), chaired by the CMO with representation from the HRP, SLSD management and technical experts. The HSRB then began to review all human system risks

  9. Human-Systems Integration Processes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to baseline a Human-Systems Integration Processes (HSIP) document as a companion to the NASA-STD-3001 and Human Integration Design...

  10. Musculoskeletal diseases in forestry workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Slađana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common hazards in the forestry that may induce disorders of the musculoskeletal system are vibrations, unfavorable microclimatic conditions, noise, over-time working hours, work load and long-term repeated movements. The objective of this study was to analyze the prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases and its difference among workers engaged in various jobs in the forestry. Two groups of workers were selected: woodcutters operating with chain-saw (N=33 and other loggers (N=32. Selected workers were of the similar age and had similar total length of employment as well as the length of service in the forestry. Both groups of workers employed in the forestry had the high prevalence of musculoskeletal diseases (woodcutters 69.7% and other loggers 62.5%, respectively. Degenerative diseases of spinal column were very frequent, in dependently of the type of activity in the forestry. Non-significantly higher risk of carpal tunnel syndrome was found in woodcutters with chain-saw compared to workers having other jobs in the forestry (OR=3.09; 95%CI=0.64-19.72. The lateral epicondylitis was found only in woodcutters operating with chain-saw with the prevalence of 18.2%.

  11. Musculoskeletal Simulation Model Generation from MRI Data Sets and Motion Capture Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Jérôme; Sandholm, Anders; Chung, François; Thalmann, Daniel; Delingette, Hervé; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    Today computer models and computer simulations of the musculoskeletal system are widely used to study the mechanisms behind human gait and its disorders. The common way of creating musculoskeletal models is to use a generic musculoskeletal model based on data derived from anatomical and biomechanical studies of cadaverous specimens. To adapt this generic model to a specific subject, the usual approach is to scale it. This scaling has been reported to introduce several errors because it does not always account for subject-specific anatomical differences. As a result, a novel semi-automatic workflow is proposed that creates subject-specific musculoskeletal models from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets and motion capture data. Based on subject-specific medical data and a model-based automatic segmentation approach, an accurate modeling of the anatomy can be produced while avoiding the scaling operation. This anatomical model coupled with motion capture data, joint kinematics information, and muscle-tendon actuators is finally used to create a subject-specific musculoskeletal model.

  12. On the Emerging Role of the Taste Receptor Type 1 (T1R Family of Nutrient-Sensors in the Musculoskeletal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichiro Kokabu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The special sense of taste guides and guards food intake and is essential for body maintenance. Salty and sour tastes are sensed via ion channels or gated ion channels while G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs of the taste receptor type 1 (T1R family sense sweet and umami tastes and GPCRs of the taste receptor type 2 (T2R family sense bitter tastes. T1R and T2R receptors share similar downstream signaling pathways that result in the stimulation of phospholipase-C-β2. The T1R family includes three members that form heterodimeric complexes to recognize either amino acids or sweet molecules such as glucose. Although these functions were originally described in gustatory tissue, T1R family members are expressed in numerous non-gustatory tissues and are now viewed as nutrient sensors that play important roles in monitoring global glucose and amino acid status. Here, we highlight emerging evidence detailing the function of T1R family members in the musculoskeletal system and review these findings in the context of the musculoskeletal diseases sarcopenia and osteoporosis, which are major public health problems among the elderly that affect locomotion, activities of daily living, and quality of life. These studies raise the possibility that T1R family member function may be modulated for therapeutic benefit.

  13. Replacement of daily load attenuates but does not prevent changes to the musculoskeletal system during bed rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. Cavanagh, PhD DSc

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dose-response effects of exercise in reduced gravity on musculoskeletal health have not been well documented. It is not known whether or not individualized exercise prescriptions can be effective in preventing the substantial loss in bone mineral density and muscle function that have been observed in space flight and in bed rest. In this study, typical daily loads to the lower extremities were quantified in free-living subjects who were then randomly assigned to control or exercise groups. Subjects were confined to 6-degree head-down bed rest for 84 days. The exercise group performed individually prescribed 1 g loaded locomotor exercise to replace their free-living daily load. Eleven subjects (5 exercise, 6 control completed the protocol. Volumetric bone mineral density results from quantitative computed tomography demonstrated that control subjects lost significant amounts of bone in the intertrochanteric and total hip regions (p  0.0125. Pre-and post-bed rest muscle volumes were calculated from analysis of magnetic resonance imaging data. The exercise group retained a larger percentage of their total quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscle volume (−7.2% ± 5.9, −13.8% ± 6.1, respectively than their control counterparts (−23.3% ± 5.9, −33.0 ± 8.2, respectively; p  0.05. The decline in VO2max was 17% ± 18 in exercising subjects (p  0.05. In summary, the decline in a number of important measures of musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health was attenuated but not eliminated by a subject-specific program of locomotor exercise designed to replace daily load accumulated during free living. We conclude that single daily bouts of exposure to locomotor exercise can play a role in a countermeasures program during bed rest, and perhaps space flight, but are not sufficient in their own right to ensure musculoskeletal or cardiovascular health. Keywords: Space flight, Bed rest, Exercise, Biomechanics, Simulation, Gravity

  14. Imaging of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussel, L.; Marchand, B.; Blineau, N.; Picaud, G.; Emn, M.; Coulon, A.; Pagnon, P.; Rode, A.; Pin-Leveugle, J.; Berthezene, Y.; Pariset, C.; Boibieux, A.; Hermier, M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose and methods. To perform an illustrated and educational review of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Results. As the incidence of musculoskeletal tuberculosis still increases, a review appears justified. The following four main presentations are detailed and illustrated, by emphasizing the value of both CT and MR imaging: a) spine tuberculosis (∼ 50 %/) commonly involves two adjacent vertebral bodies with usual large paravertebral abscesses. The following lesions are highly suggestive of tuberculosis: solitary vertebral involvement, solitary epidural abscess with or without erosive spondylitis; b) osteo-arthritis: peripherally located erosions at synovial insertions with gradual narrowing of the joint space are highly suggestive; c) osteomyelitis: unusual, may involve any bones; d) tenosynovitis and bursitis. Conclusion. Imaging studies are essential for diagnosis and to assess the extent of musculo-skeletal tuberculosis. (author)

  15. Patterns of Musculoskeletal Diseases seen in Zambian Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are a common cause of long-term pain and physical disability affecting many people worldwide and have an enormous economic and social impact on the individual, society and national health systems. Although the burden of disease due to musculoskeletal disorders is said to be ...

  16. A study of the blood flow restriction pressure of a tourniquet system to facilitate development of a system that can prevent musculoskeletal complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiroyuki; Iwase, Hideaki; Kanda, Akio; Morohashi, Itaru; Kaneko, Kazuo; Maeda, Mutsuhiro; Kakinuma, Yuki; Takei, Yusuke; Amemiya, Shota; Mitsui, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-01

    After an emergency or disaster, subsequent trauma can cause severe bleeding and this can often prove fatal, so promptly stopping that bleeding is crucial to preventing avoidable trauma deaths. A tourniquet is often used to restrict blood flow to an extremity. In operation and hospital, the tourniquet systems currently in use are pneumatically actuated by an air compressor, so they must have a steady power supply. These devices have several drawbacks: they vibrate and are noisy since they are pneumatically actuated and they are far from portable since they are large and heavy. Presumably, the drawbacks of pneumatic tourniquets could be overcome by developing a small, lightweight, vibration-free, quiet, and battery-powered tourniquet system. The current study built a small, vibration-free electrohydrodynamic (EHD) pump and then used that pump to restrict blood flow to the leg of rats in an experiment. This study explored the optimal conditions for effective restriction of blood flow by assessing biochemical and musculoskeletal complications following the restriction of blood flow, and this study also examined whether or not an EHD pump could be used to actuate a tourniquet system. A tourniquet cuff (width 12 mm × length 150 mm, material: polyolefin) was placed on the thigh of Wistar rats and pressure was applied for 2 hours by a device that uses EHD phenomena to generate pressure (an EHD pump). Animals were divided into four groups based on how much compressive pressure was applied with a tourniquet: 40 kPa (300 mm Hg, n = 13), 30 kPa (225 mm Hg, n = 12), 20 kPa (150 mm Hg, n = 15), or 0 kPa (controls, n = 25). Tissue oxygen saturation (regional oxygen saturation, denoted here as rSO 2 ) was measured to assess the restriction of blood flow. To assess behavior once blood flow resumed, animal activity was monitored for third day and the amount of movement was counted with digital counters. Body weight was measured before and after the behavioral experiment, and

  17. On the question of periodization training content and Paralympic athletes with disorders of the musculoskeletal system in the light of the general theory of sports training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Derkach

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To determine theoretically similar trends and differences in the periods of sports training athletes and Paralympic athletes with similar qualifications, without disabilities. Material : analyzed more than 80 references. Results : at present insufficiently developed periodization sports training many years to prepare athletes with disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Also - at the stage of maximum realization of individual empowerment athletes. This applies to the immediate preparation for the main competition. In the first case, periodization can be carried out on the basis of the classical theory. Also on stage, maximizing the individual capabilities. Need to adapt this theory to career achievements of athletes. Also, you must consider the disease. Conclusions : The main factors set differences training tools Paralympic athletes and physically healthy: increased attention to the psychological preparation for the Paralympics, inclusive education and sports training individualization programs already in the first stage of their training.

  18. [Prognostic prediction of the functional capacity and effectiveness of functional improvement program of the musculoskeletal system among users of preventive care service under long-term care insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Toshimasa; Nakaya, Naoki; Tomata, Yasutake; Aida, Jun; Okubo, Ichiro; Ohara, Satoko; Obuchi, Shuichi; Sugiyama, Michiko; Yasumura, Seiji; Suzuki, Takao; Tsuji, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Functional Improvement Program of the Musculoskeletal System among users of Preventive Care Service under Long-Term Care Insurance. A total of 3,073 subjects were analyzed. We used the prediction formula to estimate the predicted value of the Kihon Checklist after one year, and calculated the measured value minus the predicted value. The subjects were divided into two groups according to the measured value minus predicted value tertiles: the lowest and middle tertile (good-to-fair measured value) and the highest tertile (poor measured value). We used a multiple logistic regression model to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of the good-to-fair measured values of the Kihon Checklist after one year, according to the Functional Improvement Program of the Musculoskeletal System. In potentially dependent elderly, the multivariate adjusted ORs (95% CI) of the good-to-fair measured values were 2.4 (1.3-4.4) for those who attended the program eight times or more in a month (vs those who attended it three times or less in a month), 1.3 (1.0-1.8) for those who engaged in strength training using machines (vs those who did not train), and 1.4 (1.0-1.9) for those who engaged in endurance training. In this study, among potentially dependent elderly, those who attended the program eight times or more in a month and those who engaged in strength training using machines or endurance training showed a significant improvement of their functional capacity.

  19. Modeling of Embedded Human Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ISAT study [7] for DARPA in 20051 concretized the notion of an embedded human, who is a necessary component of the system. The proposed work integrates...Technology, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 229–244, March 2008. [7] C. J. Tomlin and S. S. Sastry, “Embedded humans,” tech. rep., DARPA ISAT

  20. Musculoskeletal trauma services in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddumba, E K

    2008-10-01

    Approximately 2000 lives are lost in Uganda annually through road traffic accidents. In Kampala, they account for 39% of all injuries, primarily in males aged 16-44 years. They are a result of rapid motorization and urbanization in a country with a poor economy. Uganda's population is an estimated 28 million with a growth rate of 3.4% per year. Motorcycles and omnibuses, the main taxi vehicles, are the primary contributors to the accidents. Poor roads and drivers compound the situation. Twenty-three orthopaedic surgeons (one for every 1,300,000 people) provide specialist services that are available only at three regional hospitals and the National Referral Hospital in Kampala. The majority of musculoskeletal injuries are managed nonoperatively by 200 orthopaedic officers distributed at the district, regional and national referral hospitals. Because of the poor economy, 9% of the national budget is allocated to the health sector. Patients with musculoskeletal injuries in Uganda frequently fail to receive immediate care due to inadequate resources and most are treated by traditional bonesetters. Neglected injuries typically result in poor outcomes. Possible solutions include a public health approach for prevention of road traffic injuries, training of adequate human resources, and infrastructure development.

  1. Molecular versus particulate deposition markers for blood flow measurement in the musculo-skeletal system. 131Iodo-DesMethyl-Imipramine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tromborg, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    The aims of the experiments were to develop and validate a porcine isolated blood perfused myocutaneous flap and tibia model with preserved venous outflow. The stability of the models was tested and washout of microspheres and IDMI was measured. IDMI and microsphere based tissue blood flow measurements were compared after central intracardiac injection into the intact animal. Three experimental series were necessary to develop and validate the models. The organs were perfused with arterial blood by a pulsatile pump and submerged into a tissue bath. All outflow from the models were collected. One experiment was necessary to validate the rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. In three experiments an isolated tibia with preserved venous outflow was developed and validated. Normal flow rate/perfusion pressure relations were reproduced after periods of supra-normal and sub-normal perfusion pressure in the two models. A response to endothelially mediated vasodilation with bradykinin was demonstrated after nine hours of artificial perfusion in the tibia model. IDMI did not influence the local hemodynamics during infusion, whereas microspheres elicited a transitory increase in the perfusion pressure after local injection. IDMI and microsphere based blood flow measurements and recirculation were compared in the in-situ musculo-skeletal tissue corresponding to the two models after central injection of the markers. Recirculation of IDMI was greater (8(1)%) than that of microspheres (2(0)%) after 18 minutes. Microspheres tended to measure higher blood flow values than IDMI at high flow rates and vice versa at low flow values. The 131 Iodo-DesMethyl-Imipramine (IDMI) method is not generally applicable as a deposition marker for blood flow measurement in the musculo-skeletal system. (EHS)

  2. Costs by industry and diagnosis among musculoskeletal claims in a state workers compensation system: 1999-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Kari K; Davis, Kermit G; Cook, Chad; Kotowski, Susan E; Hamrick, Chris; Jewell, Gregory; Lockey, James

    2010-03-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a tremendous burden on industry in the United States. However, there is limited understanding of the unique issues relating to specific industry sectors, specifically the frequency and costs of different MSDs. Claim data from 1999 to 2004 from the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation were analyzed as a function of industry sector (NAICS industry-sector categories) and anatomical region (ICD-9 codes). Almost 50% of the claims were lumbar spine (26.9%) or hand/wrist (21.7%). The majority of claims were from manufacturing (25.1%) and service (32.8%) industries. The industries with the highest average costs per claim were transportation, warehouse, and utilities and construction. Across industries, the highest costs per claim were consistently for the lumbar spine, shoulder, and cervical spine body regions. This study provides insight into the severity (i.e., medical and indemnity costs) of MSDs across multiple industries, providing data for prioritizing of resources for research and interventions. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Human resources in innovation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, René Nesgaard

    2007-01-01

    Human resources in innovation systems: With focus on introduction of highly educated labour in small Danish firms This thesis has two purposes: (1) a ‘general' purpose to enhance our knowledge on the relationship between innovation, technological and organisational change, and human resources......, including knowledge and skills embodied in human resources, and (2) a more ‘specific' purpose to enhance our knowledge on introduction of highly educated labour, innovation, and upgrading changes in small Danish firms. Chapter 1 establishes the relevance of this research interest, and it also states...... stemming from human resources - such as insight, understanding, creativity, and action - are inherently important to all innovation processes. The chapter also suggests a tentative conceptual and analytical framework for studying human resources and their development within a system of innovation approach...

  4. In Vivo Neuromechanics: Decoding Causal Motor Neuron Behavior with Resulting Musculoskeletal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Massimo; Yavuz, Utku Ş; Farina, Dario

    2017-10-18

    Human motor function emerges from the interaction between the neuromuscular and the musculoskeletal systems. Despite the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying neural and mechanical functions, there is no relevant understanding of the neuro-mechanical interplay in the neuro-musculo-skeletal system. This currently represents the major challenge to the understanding of human movement. We address this challenge by proposing a paradigm for investigating spinal motor neuron contribution to skeletal joint mechanical function in the intact human in vivo. We employ multi-muscle spatial sampling and deconvolution of high-density fiber electrical activity to decode accurate α-motor neuron discharges across five lumbosacral segments in the human spinal cord. We use complete α-motor neuron discharge series to drive forward subject-specific models of the musculoskeletal system in open-loop with no corrective feedback. We perform validation tests where mechanical moments are estimated with no knowledge of reference data over unseen conditions. This enables accurate blinded estimation of ankle function purely from motor neuron information. Remarkably, this enables observing causal associations between spinal motor neuron activity and joint moment control. We provide a new class of neural data-driven musculoskeletal modeling formulations for bridging between movement neural and mechanical levels in vivo with implications for understanding motor physiology, pathology, and recovery.

  5. Psychosocial risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, S. van den

    2014-01-01

    It has been known for some time that risk factors in the workplace can have a negative effect on health. Ramazzini was one of the first scientists to identify occupational health hazards. He wrote about diseases of the musculoskeletal system caused by sudden and irregular movements and the adoption

  6. Learning musculoskeletal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilanova, Joan C. (eds.) [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona; Ribes, Ramon

    2010-07-01

    This introduction to musculoskeletal imaging is a further volume in the Learning Imaging series. Written in a user-friendly format, it takes into account that musculoskeletal radiology is a subspecialty which has widely expanded its scope and imaging capabilities with the advent of ultrasound, MRI, multidetector CT, and PET. The book is divided into ten sections covering: infection and arthritis, tumors, tendons and muscles, bone marrow, spine, shoulder, elbow, hand and wrist, hip and pelvis, knee, and ankle and foot. Each chapter is presented with an introduction and ten case studies with illustrations and comments from anatomical, physiopathological and radiological standpoints along with bibliographic recommendations. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in particular. (orig.)

  7. Learning musculoskeletal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilanova, Joan C.; Ribes, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    This introduction to musculoskeletal imaging is a further volume in the Learning Imaging series. Written in a user-friendly format, it takes into account that musculoskeletal radiology is a subspecialty which has widely expanded its scope and imaging capabilities with the advent of ultrasound, MRI, multidetector CT, and PET. The book is divided into ten sections covering: infection and arthritis, tumors, tendons and muscles, bone marrow, spine, shoulder, elbow, hand and wrist, hip and pelvis, knee, and ankle and foot. Each chapter is presented with an introduction and ten case studies with illustrations and comments from anatomical, physiopathological and radiological standpoints along with bibliographic recommendations. Learning Imaging is a unique case-based series for those in professional education in general and for physicians in particular. (orig.)

  8. Opioid system and human emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Tuominen, Lauri

    2017-04-10

    Emotions are states of vigilant readiness that guide human and animal behaviour during survival-salient situations. Categorical models of emotions posit neurally and physiologically distinct basic human emotions (anger, fear, disgust, happiness, sadness and surprise) that govern different survival functions. Opioid receptors are expressed abundantly in the mammalian emotion circuit, and the opioid system modulates a variety of functions related to arousal and motivation. Yet, its specific contribution to different basic emotions has remained poorly understood. Here, we review how the endogenous opioid system and particularly the μ receptor contribute to emotional processing in humans. Activation of the endogenous opioid system is consistently associated with both pleasant and unpleasant emotions. In general, exogenous opioid agonists facilitate approach-oriented emotions (anger, pleasure) and inhibit avoidance-oriented emotions (fear, sadness). Opioids also modulate social bonding and affiliative behaviour, and prolonged opioid abuse may render both social bonding and emotion recognition circuits dysfunctional. However, there is no clear evidence that the opioid system is able to affect the emotions associated with surprise and disgust. Taken together, the opioid systems contribute to a wide array of positive and negative emotions through their general ability to modulate the approach versus avoidance motivation associated with specific emotions. Because of the protective effects of opioid system-mediated prosociality and positive mood, the opioid system may constitute an important factor contributing to psychological and psychosomatic resilience. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Serological prevalence of human parvovirus B19 in diseases or disordersrelated to different human body systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktaş, Osman; Aydin, Hakan; Uslu, Hakan

    2016-02-17

    Human parvovirus B19 is a pathogen that affects different parts of the body. We planned this study because of the lack of data on B19 seroprevalence based on different body-system diseases. The prevalence of parvovirus B19 antibodies was investigated retrospectively in 1239 patients by review of medical records from 2009-2012, according to their diseases classified under general titles in compliance with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Parvovirus B19-specific antibodies were detected by quantitative enzyme immunoassays. The positivity rate was 27.8% for only IgG, 8.5% for only IgM, and 2.6% for both IgG and IgM. The highest positivity for IgG alone was found in musculoskeletal system and connective tissue diseases (55.9%), while the highest positivity for IgM was found in neoplasms (16.4%). The highest positivity for IgG was seen in rheumatoid arthritis (72.2%) and pregnancy (52.6%), and the highest positivity for total IgM was found in upper respiratory tract disease (21.0%) and hepatic failure (17.1%). Parvovirus B19 seroprevalence was relatively low in northeastern Anatolia compared to most serological studies conducted in other regions. We think that this study has provided the first wide-ranging information on the seroprevalence of B19 in diseases and disorders of the major human body systems.

  10. Ultrasound imaging of sports-related musculoskeletal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, J.G.; Holsbeek, M.T. van; Gauthier, T.P.; Cook, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    Sports-related injuries of the musculoskeletal system affect millions of individuals every year. Integrating high-frequency Tissue Harmonic Imaging ultrasound with MRI and CT gives the greatest opportunity for diagnosing specific injuries. (orig.)

  11. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part II: Non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R.; Steinbach, Lynne S.

    2004-01-01

    This section of a two-part series on musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS reviews the non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions. In the first part, the infectious conditions were reviewed. The non-infectious conditions include polymyositis, drug-induced myopathy, myositis ossificans, adhesive capsulitis, avascular necrosis, bone marrow abnormalities, and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Inflammatory and reactive arthropathies are more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals, and a separate section is dedicated to these conditions, including Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, HIV-associated arthritis, painful articular syndrome, and acute symmetric polyarthritis. Lastly, we include a discussion of HIV-related neoplastic processes that affect the musculoskeletal system, namely Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  12. Musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS. Part II: Non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States); Ter-Oganesyan, Ramon R. [College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Steinbach, Lynne S. [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, San Francisco (United States)

    2004-06-01

    This section of a two-part series on musculoskeletal disorders associated with HIV infection and AIDS reviews the non-infectious musculoskeletal conditions. In the first part, the infectious conditions were reviewed. The non-infectious conditions include polymyositis, drug-induced myopathy, myositis ossificans, adhesive capsulitis, avascular necrosis, bone marrow abnormalities, and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Inflammatory and reactive arthropathies are more prevalent in HIV-positive individuals, and a separate section is dedicated to these conditions, including Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, HIV-associated arthritis, painful articular syndrome, and acute symmetric polyarthritis. Lastly, we include a discussion of HIV-related neoplastic processes that affect the musculoskeletal system, namely Kaposi's sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (orig.)

  13. Identification of the unstable human postural control system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungjae eHwang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining upright bipedal posture requires a control system that continually adapts to changing environmental conditions, such as different support surfaces. Behavioral changes associated with different support surfaces, such as the predominance of an ankle or hip strategy, is considered to reflect a change in the control strategy. However, tracing such behavioral changes to a specific component in a closed loop control system is challenging. Here we used the joint input-output (JIO method of closed-loop system identification to identify the musculoskeletal and neural feedback components of the human postural control loop. The goal was to establish changes in the control loop corresponding to behavioral changes observed on different support surfaces. Subjects were simultaneously perturbed by two independent mechanical and two independent sensory perturbations while standing on a normal or short support surface. The results show a dramatic phase reversal between visual input and body kinematics due to the change in surface condition from trunk leads legs to legs lead trunk with increasing frequency of the visual perturbation. Through decomposition of the control loop, we found that behavioral change is not necessarily due to a change in control strategy, but in the case of different support surfaces, is linked to changes in properties of the plant. The JIO method is an important tool to identify the contribution of specific components within a closed loop control system to overall postural behavior and may be useful to devise better treatment of balance disorders.

  14. Biological stress systems, adverse life events and the onset of chronic multisite musculoskeletal pain : a six-year cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Generaal, E.; Vogelzangs, N.; Macfarlane, G.J.; Geenen, R.; de Geus, E.; Smit, J.H.; Penninx, B.W.; Dekker, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysregulated biological stress systems and adverse life events, both independently and in interaction, have been hypothesized to initiate chronic pain. Objectives We examine whether (i) function of biological stress systems, (ii) adverse life events, and (iii) their combination predict

  15. Design-validation of a hand exoskeleton using musculoskeletal modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Clint; Gosselin, Florian; Ben Mansour, Khalil; Devos, Pierre; Marin, Frederic

    2018-04-01

    Exoskeletons are progressively reaching homes and workplaces, allowing interaction with virtual environments, remote control of robots, or assisting human operators in carrying heavy loads. Their design is however still a challenge as these robots, being mechanically linked to the operators who wear them, have to meet ergonomic constraints besides usual robotic requirements in terms of workspace, speed, or efforts. They have in particular to fit the anthropometry and mobility of their users. This traditionally results in numerous prototypes which are progressively fitted to each individual person. In this paper, we propose instead to validate the design of a hand exoskeleton in a fully digital environment, without the need for a physical prototype. The purpose of this study is thus to examine whether finger kinematics are altered when using a given hand exoskeleton. Therefore, user specific musculoskeletal models were created and driven by a motion capture system to evaluate the fingers' joint kinematics when performing two industrial related tasks. The kinematic chain of the exoskeleton was added to the musculoskeletal models and its compliance with the hand movements was evaluated. Our results show that the proposed exoskeleton design does not influence fingers' joints angles, the coefficient of determination between the model with and without exoskeleton being consistently high (R 2 ¯=0.93) and the nRMSE consistently low (nRMSE¯ = 5.42°). These results are promising and this approach combining musculoskeletal and robotic modeling driven by motion capture data could be a key factor in the ergonomics validation of the design of orthotic devices and exoskeletons prior to manufacturing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J. (BNL); Fleger, S.; Barnes V. (NRC)

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  17. Musculoskeletal manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, M H A; Khamashta, M A; Merashli, M; Sabbouh, T; Hughes, G R V; Uthman, I

    2016-04-01

    The scope of clinical and laboratory manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has increased dramatically since its discovery in 1983, where any organ system can be involved. Musculoskeletal complications are consistently reported in APS patients, not only causing morbidity and mortality, but also affecting their quality of life. We reviewed all English papers on APS involvement in the musculoskeletal system using Google Scholar and Pubmed; all reports are summarized in a table in this review. The spectrum of manifestations includes arthralgia/arthritis, avascular necrosis of bone, bone marrow necrosis, complex regional pain syndrome type-1, muscle infarction, non-traumatic fractures, and osteoporosis. Some of these manifestations were reported in good quality studies, some of which showed an association between aPL-positivity and the occurrence of these manifestations, while others were merely described in case reports. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. A Human Body Analysis System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girondel Vincent

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a system for human body analysis (segmentation, tracking, face/hands localisation, posture recognition from a single view that is fast and completely automatic. The system first extracts low-level data and uses part of the data for high-level interpretation. It can detect and track several persons even if they merge or are completely occluded by another person from the camera's point of view. For the high-level interpretation step, static posture recognition is performed using a belief theory-based classifier. The belief theory is considered here as a new approach for performing posture recognition and classification using imprecise and/or conflicting data. Four different static postures are considered: standing, sitting, squatting, and lying. The aim of this paper is to give a global view and an evaluation of the performances of the entire system and to describe in detail each of its processing steps, whereas our previous publications focused on a single part of the system. The efficiency and the limits of the system have been highlighted on a database of more than fifty video sequences where a dozen different individuals appear. This system allows real-time processing and aims at monitoring elderly people in video surveillance applications or at the mixing of real and virtual worlds in ambient intelligence systems.

  19. The Belfast musculoskeletal ultrasound course.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Taggart, Allister J

    2009-09-01

    To conduct a training course in musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) for rheumatologists in Northern Ireland with the aim of equipping the participants with a basic knowledge of the theoretical and practical aspects of MSUS as they are applied to rheumatology.

  20. Musculoskeletal desmoid tumours: Diagnostic imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Daniel; Perera, Warren; Schlicht, Stephen; Choong, Peter; Slavin, John; Pianta, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the role medical imaging has on diagnosis of musculoskeletal desmoid tumours and to describe their radiological appearances on various imaging modalities. Imaging of histologically proven cases of desmoid tumours at St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne were obtained via picture archiving communication system (PACS) and then assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Suitable imagings were obtained from PACS. All imaging chosen was de-identified. Desmoid tumours can occur in many areas of the body. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of these tumours and magnetic resonance imaging has been the gold standard for imaging and is the most accurate in terms of assessing tumour margins and involvement of surrounding structure.

  1. A Trap Motion in Validating Muscle Activity Prediction from Musculoskeletal Model using EMG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wibawa, A. D.; Verdonschot, N.; Halbertsma, J.P.K.; Burgerhof, J.G.M.; Diercks, R.L.; Verkerke, G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal modeling nowadays is becoming the most common tool for studying and analyzing human motion. Besides its potential in predicting muscle activity and muscle force during active motion, musculoskeletal modeling can also calculate many important kinetic data that are difficult to measure

  2. Commentary: the importance of musculoskeletal medicine and anatomy in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Charles S; Ahn, Christine S

    2010-03-01

    Medical schools in the United States have continued to demonstrate deficiencies in musculoskeletal education. In response to the findings of numerous studies and to the objectives of the U.S. Bone and Joint Decade (an international collaborative movement sanctioned by the United Nations and the World Health Organization for the purpose of promoting awareness of musculoskeletal disease), several institutions, including Harvard Medical School, have reassessed the preclinical musculoskeletal curriculum at their respective medical schools. A cross-sectional survey at Harvard in 2004 found that students lacked clinical confidence in dealing with the musculoskeletal system. In addition, only one quarter of the graduating class of medical students passed a nationally validated exam in basic musculoskeletal competency. In 2005, 33 total hours of musculoskeletal medicine were added to the musculoskeletal blocks of the preclinical anatomy, pathophysiology, and physical examination courses. Alongside this movement toward more musculoskeletal education, there has been continued debate over the relevance and cost-effectiveness of cadaveric and surface anatomy labs. With the advent of advanced imaging technology, some argue that dissection anatomy is outdated and labor-intensive, whereas three-dimensional images are more accessible and time-effective for today's students. However, knowledge of anatomy is a critical foundation to learning musculoskeletal medicine. Thus, making room for more musculoskeletal curriculum time by cutting out cadaveric anatomy labs may ultimately be counterproductive.

  3. Human tissue in systems medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caie, Peter D; Schuur, Klaas; Oniscu, Anca; Mullen, Peter; Reynolds, Paul A; Harrison, David J

    2013-12-01

    Histopathology, the examination of an architecturally artefactual, two-dimensional and static image remains a potent tool allowing diagnosis and empirical expectation of prognosis. Considerable optimism exists that the advent of molecular genetic testing and other biomarker strategies will improve or even replace this ancient technology. A number of biomarkers already add considerable value for prediction of whether a treatment will work. In this short review we argue that a systems medicine approach to pathology will not seek to replace traditional pathology, but rather augment it. Systems approaches need to incorporate quantitative morphological, protein, mRNA and DNA data. A significant challenge for clinical implementation of systems pathology is how to optimize information available from tissue, which is frequently sub-optimal in quality and amount, and yet generate useful predictive models that work. The transition of histopathology to systems pathophysiology and the use of multiscale data sets usher in a new era in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction based on the analysis of human tissue. © 2013 The Authors. FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of FEBS.

  4. System Re-set: High LET Radiation or Transient Musculoskeletal Disuse Cause Lasting Changes in Oxidative Defense Pathways Within Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhilesh; Chatterjee, A.; Alwood, Joshua S.; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo A. C.

    2011-01-01

    Six months post-IR, there were no notable changes in skeletal expression of 84 principal genes in the p53 signaling pathway due to low dose IR (0.5Gy), HU, or both. In contrast, numerous genes relevant to oxidative stress were regulated by the treatments, typically in a direction indicative of increased oxidative stress and impaired defense. IR and HU independently reduced (between 0.46 to 0.88 fold) expression levels of Noxa1, Gpx3, Prdx2, Prdx3, and Zmynd17. Surprisingly, transient HU alone (sham-irradiated) decreased expression of several redox-related genes (Gpx1,Gstk1, Prdx1, Txnrd2), which were not affected significantly by IR alone. Irradiation increased (1.13 fold) expression of a gene responsible for production of superoxides by neutrophils (NCF2). Of interest, only combined treatment with HU and IR led to increased expression levels of Ercc2, (1.19 fold), a DNA excision repair enzyme. Differences in gene expression levels may reflect a change in gene expression on a per cell basis, a shift in the repertoire of specific cell types within the tissue, or both. Serum nitrite/nitrate levels were elevated to comparable levels (1.6-fold) due to IR, HU or both, indicative of elevated systemic nitrosyl stress. CONCLUSIONS The magnitude of changes in skeletal expression of oxidative stress-related genes six months after irradiation and/or transient unloading tended to be relatively modest (0.46-1.15 fold), whereas the p53 pathway was not affected. The finding that many different oxidative stress-related genes differed from controls at this late time point implicates a generalized impairment of oxidative defense within skeletal tissue, which coincides with both profound radiation damage to osteoprogenitors/stem cells in bone marrow and impaired remodeling of mineralized tissue.

  5. Taking responsibility for the early assessment and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Nadine E; Hartvigsen, Jan; Croft, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Musculoskeletal pain is common across all populations and costly in terms of impact on the individual and, more generally, on society. In most health-care systems, the first person to see the patient with a musculoskeletal problem such as back pain is the general practitioner, and acces......, and underpinning evidence, for reconsidering who should take responsibility for the early assessment and treatment of patients with musculoskeletal problems....

  6. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jung-Kyu; Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Choi, Jong-Sun

    2003-01-01

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies vary, and can manifest as part of a syndrome or be accompanied by numerous other conditions such as genetic disorders, karyotype abnormalities, central nervous system anomalies and other skeletal anomalies, lsolated focal musculoskeletal anomaly does, however, also occur; its early prenatal diagnosis is important in deciding prenatal care, and also helps in counseling parents about the postnatal effects of numerous possible associated anomalies. We have encountered 50 cases involving focal musculoskeletal anomalies, including total limb dysplasia [radial ray abnormality (n=3), mesomelic dysplasia (n=1)]; anomalies of the hand [polydactyly (n=8), syndactyly (n=3), ectrodactyly (n=1), clinodactyly (n=6), clenched hand (n=5)]; anomalies of the foot [clubfoot (n=10), rockerbottom foot (n=5), sandal gap deformity (n=1), curly toe (n=2)]; amniotic band syndrome (n=3); and anomalies of the focal spine [block vertebra (n=1), hemivertebra (n=1)]. Among these 50 cases, five [polydactyly (n=1), syndactyly (n=2) and curly toe (n=2) were confirmed by postnatal physical evaluation, two (focal spine anomalies) were diagnosed after postnatal radiologic examination, and the remaining 43 were proven at autopsy. For each condition, we describe the prenatal sonographic findings, and include a brief review

  7. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jung-Kyu; Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Choi, Jong-Sun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies vary, and can manifest as part of a syndrome or be accompanied by numerous other conditions such as genetic disorders, karyotype abnormalities, central nervous system anomalies and other skeletal anomalies, lsolated focal musculoskeletal anomaly does, however, also occur; its early prenatal diagnosis is important in deciding prenatal care, and also helps in counseling parents about the postnatal effects of numerous possible associated anomalies. We have encountered 50 cases involving focal musculoskeletal anomalies, including total limb dysplasia [radial ray abnormality (n=3), mesomelic dysplasia (n=1)]; anomalies of the hand [polydactyly (n=8), syndactyly (n=3), ectrodactyly (n=1), clinodactyly (n=6), clenched hand (n=5)]; anomalies of the foot [clubfoot (n=10), rockerbottom foot (n=5), sandal gap deformity (n=1), curly toe (n=2)]; amniotic band syndrome (n=3); and anomalies of the focal spine [block vertebra (n=1), hemivertebra (n=1)]. Among these 50 cases, five [polydactyly (n=1), syndactyly (n=2) and curly toe (n=2) were confirmed by postnatal physical evaluation, two (focal spine anomalies) were diagnosed after postnatal radiologic examination, and the remaining 43 were proven at autopsy. For each condition, we describe the prenatal sonographic findings, and include a brief review.

  8. A Dynamic Simulation of Musculoskeletal Function in the Mouse Hindlimb During Trotting Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Charles

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Mice are often used as animal models of various human neuromuscular diseases, and analysis of these models often requires detailed gait analysis. However, little is known of the dynamics of the mouse musculoskeletal system during locomotion. In this study, we used computer optimization procedures to create a simulation of trotting in a mouse, using a previously developed mouse hindlimb musculoskeletal model in conjunction with new experimental data, allowing muscle forces, activation patterns, and levels of mechanical work to be estimated. Analyzing musculotendon unit (MTU mechanical work throughout the stride allowed a deeper understanding of their respective functions, with the rectus femoris MTU dominating the generation of positive and negative mechanical work during the swing and stance phases. This analysis also tested previous functional inferences of the mouse hindlimb made from anatomical data alone, such as the existence of a proximo-distal gradient of muscle function, thought to reflect adaptations for energy-efficient locomotion. The results do not strongly support the presence of this gradient within the mouse musculoskeletal system, particularly given relatively high negative net work output from the ankle plantarflexor MTUs, although more detailed simulations could test this further. This modeling analysis lays a foundation for future studies of the control of vertebrate movement through the development of neuromechanical simulations.

  9. A Neural Network Based Diagnostic System for Classification of Industrial Carrying Jobs With Respect of Low and High Musculoskeletal Injury Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit Sharma; Ranjit Singh

    2012-01-01

    Even with many years of research efforts, Safety professionals and ergonomists have not yetbeen established the occupational exposure limits of different risk factors for development ofMusculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). One of the main problems in setting such guidelines is toaccurately assess the association between exposures and possible occupational disorders ordiseases and predict the outcome of any variable. The task of an industrial ergonomist iscomplicated because the potential risk fac...

  10. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is being performed. Thus, the ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  11. Human Factors Interface with Systems Engineering for NASA Human Spaceflights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the past and present successes of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (HHFB) at NASA Johnson Space Center s Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) in including the Human-As-A-System (HAAS) model in many NASA programs and what steps to be taken to integrate the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into NASA s Systems Engineering (SE) process. The HAAS model stresses systems are ultimately designed for the humans; the humans should therefore be considered as a system within the systems. Therefore, the model places strong emphasis on human factors engineering. Since 1987, the HHFB has been engaging with many major NASA programs with much success. The HHFB helped create the NASA Standard 3000 (a human factors engineering practice guide) and the Human Systems Integration Requirements document. These efforts resulted in the HAAS model being included in many NASA programs. As an example, the HAAS model has been successfully introduced into the programmatic and systems engineering structures of the International Space Station Program (ISSP). Success in the ISSP caused other NASA programs to recognize the importance of the HAAS concept. Also due to this success, the HHFB helped update NASA s Systems Engineering Handbook in December 2007 to include HAAS as a recommended practice. Nonetheless, the HAAS model has yet to become an integral part of the NASA SE process. Besides continuing in integrating HAAS into current and future NASA programs, the HHFB will investigate incorporating the Human-Centered Design Philosophy (HCDP) into the NASA SE Handbook. The HCDP goes further than the HAAS model by emphasizing a holistic and iterative human-centered systems design concept.

  12. Biomechanical Evaluation of an Electric Power-Assisted Bicycle by a Musculoskeletal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Shoichiro; Murakami, Musashi; Hase, Kazunori

    In this study, we construct an evaluation system for the muscular activity of the lower limbs when a human pedals an electric power-assisted bicycle. The evaluation system is composed of an electric power-assisted bicycle, a numerical simulator and a motion capture system. The electric power-assisted bicycle in this study has a pedal with an attached force sensor. The numerical simulator for pedaling motion is a musculoskeletal model of a human. The motion capture system measures the joint angles of the lower limb. We examine the influence of the electric power-assisted force on each muscle of the human trunk and legs. First, an experiment of pedaling motion is performed. Then, the musculoskeletal model is calculated by using the experimental data. We discuss the influence on each muscle by electric power-assist. It is found that the muscular activity is decreased by the electric power-assist bicycle, and the reduction of the muscular force required for pedaling motion was quantitatively shown for every muscle.

  13. Musculoskeletal Findings in Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bicer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease is a multisystem disease characterized by recurrent oral and genital ulcers, relapsing uveitis, mucocutaneous, articular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and vascular manifestations. Rheumatologic manifestations may also occur in Behcet's disease, and arthritis and arthralgia are the most common musculoskeletal findings followed by enthesopathy, avascular necrosis, myalgia, and myositis. Although the main pathology of Behcet's disease has been known to be the underlying vasculitis, the etiology and exact pathogenesis of the disease are still unclear. Musculoskeletal findings of Behcet's disease, the relationship between Behcet's disease and spondyloarthropathy disease complex, and the status of bone metabolism in patients with Behcet's disease were discussed in this paper.

  14. CT Guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions, radiological and pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadzihasanovic, B.; Milisic, L.; Zuban, J.; Mujic, E.; Jahic, E.; Gjikolli, B.; Hasanovic, B.; Lincender-Cvijetic, L.; Jaganjac, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The aim of the study is to overview our experiences in taking the CT guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions during the period of sixteen months, analysis of validity of samples taken and correlation with pathological findings. CT guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions were performed in 32 patients during the period of sixteen months (from December 2004 until March 2006). Age range was from 13 to 78 years. Majorities of the biopsies were performed with coaxial cutting needle system (14 G and 16 G) with introducers size 13 and 15 G. Bone biopsies were performed with Yamsidi needles in purpose of taking the bone cylinder. Majorities of the biopsies were performed under local anaesthesia except a thirteen years old child to whom CT guided biopsy of corpus Th 6 was performed under general anaesthesia. Two samples of tissues were sent in formalin solutions to Pathology Institute for pathological verification. In one case of musculoskeletal lesions CT guided biopsies didn't yield a representative tissue sample. We had high level of congruence between radiological and pathological findings; precise presented in the article. CT guided biopsies of musculoskeletal lesions are method of choice for pathologic verification of musculoskeletal lesions proving incomparable less risk compared to 'open' biopsy which requires operating theatre and general anaesthesia. Coaxial needle systems has shown as suitable for yielding representative tissue samples (two samples for each patient), and samples are also appropriate for immunohistochemical analysis

  15. Robust Real-Time Musculoskeletal Modeling Driven by Electromyograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandau, Guillaume; Farina, Dario; Sartori, Massimo

    2018-03-01

    Current clinical biomechanics involves lengthy data acquisition and time-consuming offline analyses with biomechanical models not operating in real-time for man-machine interfacing. We developed a method that enables online analysis of neuromusculoskeletal function in vivo in the intact human. We used electromyography (EMG)-driven musculoskeletal modeling to simulate all transformations from muscle excitation onset (EMGs) to mechanical moment production around multiple lower-limb degrees of freedom (DOFs). We developed a calibration algorithm that enables adjusting musculoskeletal model parameters specifically to an individual's anthropometry and force-generating capacity. We incorporated the modeling paradigm into a computationally efficient, generic framework that can be interfaced in real-time with any movement data collection system. The framework demonstrated the ability of computing forces in 13 lower-limb muscle-tendon units and resulting moments about three joint DOFs simultaneously in real-time. Remarkably, it was capable of extrapolating beyond calibration conditions, i.e., predicting accurate joint moments during six unseen tasks and one unseen DOF. The proposed framework can dramatically reduce evaluation latency in current clinical biomechanics and open up new avenues for establishing prompt and personalized treatments, as well as for establishing natural interfaces between patients and rehabilitation systems. The integration of EMG with numerical modeling will enable simulating realistic neuromuscular strategies in conditions including muscular/orthopedic deficit, which could not be robustly simulated via pure modeling formulations. This will enable translation to clinical settings and development of healthcare technologies including real-time bio-feedback of internal mechanical forces and direct patient-machine interfacing.

  16. [Musculoskeletal medicine--strategies towards a "good musculoskeletal consultation"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulfsons, Simon

    2011-03-01

    The burden of musculoskeletal disease and disability is huge. The direct costs of diagnosis and treatment are dwarfed by the indirect costs to society comprised of sick leave, early retirement, pension funds and disability allowances. Chronic musculoskeletal pain and dysfunction account for the most common cause for chronic pain and for up to 25% of all consultations to family practitioners in the developed world. It is therefore surprising to find that education and training in musculoskeletal medicine has been given short shrift by medical schools, specialist training programs for family practitioners and post graduate continuing medical education. This has been shown quite comprehensively by Mashov and Tabenkin in this edition of the journal. At the close of the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010, as declared by the WHO, it is timely to see what has been achieved in terms of the original goals for this decade. There has been a major effort for increasing awareness both in the health community and the general public towards managing chronic musculoskeletal pain. Much has been written, but far less performed in changing the priorities of medical schools and family practice programs towards teaching and training doctors to adequately recognize and treat patients suffering from chronic musculoskeletal problems. In Israel, it is estimated that the indirect costs through lost productivity amount to up to 1.15 billion shekels a year. Investing time and money in training programs for medical students and doctors, together with building an incentive program for primary care physicians to adequately treat this huge chronically disabled population is not only feasible, but can also make great inroads towards easing suffering while curtailing costs.

  17. Current status of musculoskeletal application of shear wave elastography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Guri Hospital, Hanyang University School of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Ultrasonography (US) is a very powerful diagnostic modality for the musculoskeletal system due to the ability to perform real-time dynamic high-resolution examinations with the Doppler technique. In addition to acquiring morphologic data, we can now obtain biomechanical information by quantifying the elasticity of the musculoskeletal structures with US elastography. The earlier diagnosis of degeneration and the ability to perform follow-up evaluations of healing and the effects of treatment are possible. US elastography enables a transition from US-based inspection to US-based palpation in order to diagnose the characteristics of tissue. Shear wave elastography is considered the most suitable type of US elastography for the musculoskeletal system. It is widely used for tendons, ligaments, and muscles. It is important to understand practice guidelines in order to enhance reproducibility. Incorporating viscoelasticity and overcoming inconsistencies among manufacturers are future tasks for improving the capabilities of US elastography.

  18. Current status of musculoskeletal application of shear wave elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JeongAh Ryu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonography (US is a very powerful diagnostic modality for the musculoskeletal system due to the ability to perform real-time dynamic high-resolution examinations with the Doppler technique. In addition to acquiring morphologic data, we can now obtain biomechanical information by quantifying the elasticity of the musculoskeletal structures with US elastography. The earlier diagnosis of degeneration and the ability to perform follow-up evaluations of healing and the effects of treatment are possible. US elastography enables a transition from US-based inspection to US-based palpation in order to diagnose the characteristics of tissue. Shear wave elastography is considered the most suitable type of US elastography for the musculoskeletal system. It is widely used for tendons, ligaments, and muscles. It is important to understand practice guidelines in order to enhance reproducibility. Incorporating viscoelasticity and overcoming inconsistencies among manufacturers are future tasks for improving the capabilities of US elastography.

  19. Current status of musculoskeletal application of shear wave elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Jeong, Woo Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a very powerful diagnostic modality for the musculoskeletal system due to the ability to perform real-time dynamic high-resolution examinations with the Doppler technique. In addition to acquiring morphologic data, we can now obtain biomechanical information by quantifying the elasticity of the musculoskeletal structures with US elastography. The earlier diagnosis of degeneration and the ability to perform follow-up evaluations of healing and the effects of treatment are possible. US elastography enables a transition from US-based inspection to US-based palpation in order to diagnose the characteristics of tissue. Shear wave elastography is considered the most suitable type of US elastography for the musculoskeletal system. It is widely used for tendons, ligaments, and muscles. It is important to understand practice guidelines in order to enhance reproducibility. Incorporating viscoelasticity and overcoming inconsistencies among manufacturers are future tasks for improving the capabilities of US elastography

  20. [The improvement of the abilities to maintain motor coordination and equilibrium in the students presenting with the functional disorders of the musculoskeletal system by introducing the elements of therapeutic physical training into the structure of academic schedule of physical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilevich, L V; Davlet'yarova, K V; Ovchinnikova, N A

    The problem of deterioration of the health status in the university students at present remains as topical as it was before being a major cause of impaired working capacity, disability and/or poor social adaptation of the large number of graduates. It has been proposed to introduce a class of therapeutic physical training (TPT) into the schedule of physical education for the students. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the formation of the skills needed to maintain motor coordination and equilibrium in the students presenting with the functional disorders of the musculoskeletal system (MSS) including scoliosis by the introduction of the elements of therapeutic physical training into their academic schedules. The main study group was comprised of 32 students (men) at the age of 18-19 years presenting with the disorders of the musculoskeletal system (type III scoliosis, osteochondropathy, and osteochondrosis). The students of this group received a curriculum aimed at improving their motor skills with the emphasis laid on the selected elements of therapeutic physical training. The control group was composed of 17 students without disorders of the musculoskeletal system who attended the physical education classes following the traditional program. The coordination abilities and balance skills were evaluated based on the analysis with the use of the Stabilan-1 stabilographic apparatus. In addition, the stability test and the Romberg test with open and closed eyes were performed. The results of the study give evidence that the introduction of the elements of therapeutic physical training into the structure of academic schedule of physical education for the students suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system has beneficial effect on the parameters of stability and the general ability to maintain the posture and balance. Specifically, in the beginning of the academic year, the students of the main study group presenting with

  1. Human Adaptive Mechatronics and Human-System Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Suzuki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Several topics in projects for mechatronics studies, which are 'Human Adaptive Mechatronics (HAM' and 'Human-System Modelling (HSM', are presented in this paper. The main research theme of the HAM project is a design strategy for a new intelligent mechatronics system, which enhances operators' skills during machine operation. Skill analyses and control system design have been addressed. In the HSM project, human modelling based on hierarchical classification of skills was studied, including the following five types of skills: social, planning, cognitive, motion and sensory-motor skills. This paper includes digests of these research topics and the outcomes concerning each type of skill. Relationships with other research activities, knowledge and information that will be helpful for readers who are trying to study assistive human-mechatronics systems are also mentioned.

  2. Pain relief after musculoskeletal trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmerhorst, G.T.T.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis showed that, in spite of seemingly similar nociception (pathophysiology), there are substantial cultural differences in experiencing and managing pain after surgery of musculoskeletal trauma. The United States and Canada are in the midst of a crisis of opioid use, misuse, overdose, and

  3. Assessment of musculoskeletal load in refuse collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew W. Jóźwiak

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this work was to assess the load on the musculoskeletal system and its effects in the collectors of solid refuse. The rationale behind this study was to formulate proposals how to reduce excessive musculoskeletal load in this group of workers. Material and Methods: The study group comprised 15 refuse collectors aged 25 to 50 years. Data about the workplace characteristics and subjective complaints of workers were collected by the free interview and questionnaire. During the survey the photorecording of the workpostures, the distance and velocity by GPS recorders, measurements of forces necessary to move containers, energy expenditure (lung ventilation method, workload estimation using the Firstbeat system and REBA method and stadiometry were done. Results: The distance walked daily by the collectors operating in terms of 2 to 3 in urban areas was about 15 km, and in rural areas about 18 km. The most frequent musculoskeletal complaints concerned the feet (60% subjects, knees, wrists and shoulders (over 40% subjects. After work-shift all examined workers had vertebral column shorter by 10 to 14 mm (11.4 mm mean. Conclusions: The results of our study show that the refuse collectors are subjected to a very high physical load because of the work organization and the way it is performed. To avoid adverse health effects and overload it is necessary to undertake ergonomic interventions, involving training of workers to improve the way of their job performance, active and passive leisure, technical control of the equipment and refuse containers, as well as the renegotiation of contracts with clients, especially those concerning non-standard containers. Med Pr 2013;64(4:507–519

  4. The Human-Robot Interaction Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Terrence; Kunz, Clayton; Hiatt, Laura M.; Bugajska, Magda

    2006-01-01

    In order for humans and robots to work effectively together, they need to be able to converse about abilities, goals and achievements. Thus, we are developing an interaction infrastructure called the "Human-Robot Interaction Operating System" (HRI/OS). The HRI/OS provides a structured software framework for building human-robot teams, supports a variety of user interfaces, enables humans and robots to engage in task-oriented dialogue, and facilitates integration of robots through an extensible API.

  5. Quantitative techniques for musculoskeletal MRI at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangerter, Neal K; Taylor, Meredith D; Tarbox, Grayson J; Palmer, Antony J; Park, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Whole-body 7 Tesla MRI scanners have been approved solely for research since they appeared on the market over 10 years ago, but may soon be approved for selected clinical neurological and musculoskeletal applications in both the EU and the United States. There has been considerable research work on musculoskeletal applications at 7 Tesla over the past decade, including techniques for ultra-high resolution morphological imaging, 3D T2 and T2* mapping, ultra-short TE applications, diffusion tensor imaging of cartilage, and several techniques for assessing proteoglycan content in cartilage. Most of this work has been done in the knee or other extremities, due to technical difficulties associated with scanning areas such as the hip and torso at 7 Tesla. In this manuscript, we first provide some technical context for 7 Tesla imaging, including challenges and potential advantages. We then review the major quantitative MRI techniques being applied to musculoskeletal applications on 7 Tesla whole-body systems.

  6. Stupid Tutoring Systems, Intelligent Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ryan S.

    2016-01-01

    The initial vision for intelligent tutoring systems involved powerful, multi-faceted systems that would leverage rich models of students and pedagogies to create complex learning interactions. But the intelligent tutoring systems used at scale today are much simpler. In this article, I present hypotheses on the factors underlying this development,…

  7. Advanced imaging of the musculoskeletal system: Standard, three-dimensional, and contrast-enhanced CT and MR imaging, and quantitative bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnick, D.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This course reviews the application of advanced imaging techniques to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders. The indications for and utility of standard CT in both the axial and the appendicular skeleton is explored. The combined use of CT with air and contrast arthrography at sites including the hip, knee, and shoulder is discussed. A summary of the proved and potential applications of MR imaging in osseous, articular, bone marrow, and soft-tissue disorders is provided. The utility of intraarticular contrast agents in enhancing the diagnostic capabilities of MR imaging for disorders of hyaline cartilage and and fibrocartilage is demonstrated. The advantages of multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional image reconstruction of cross-sectional imaging data are described in conjunction with the fundamental technological principles of these strategies. Accepted methods as well as investigative techniques for the diagnosis and follow-up of metabolic bone disease are contrasted with regard to relative indications, advantages, and limitations

  8. Feedbacks in human-landscape systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Anne

    2015-04-01

    As human interactions with Earth systems intensify in the "Anthropocene", understanding the complex relationships among human activity, landscape change, and societal responses to those changes is increasingly important. Interdisciplinary research centered on the theme of "feedbacks" in human-landscape systems serves as a promising focus for unraveling these interactions. Deciphering interacting human-landscape feedbacks extends our traditional approach of considering humans as unidirectional drivers of change. Enormous challenges exist, however, in quantifying impact-feedback loops in landscapes with significant human alterations. This paper illustrates an example of human-landscape interactions following a wildfire in Colorado (USA) that elicited feedback responses. After the 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire, concerns for heightened flood potential and debris flows associated with post-fire hydrologic changes prompted local landowners to construct tall fences at the base of a burned watershed. These actions changed the sediment transport regime and promoted further landscape change and human responses in a positive feedback cycle. The interactions ultimately increase flood and sediment hazards, rather than dampening the effects of fire. A simple agent-based model, capable of integrating social and hydro-geomorphological data, demonstrates how such interacting impacts and feedbacks could be simulated. Challenges for fully capturing human-landscape feedback interactions include the identification of diffuse and subtle feedbacks at a range of scales, the availability of data linking impact with response, the identification of multiple thresholds that trigger feedback mechanisms, and the varied metrics and data needed to represent both the physical and human systems. By collaborating with social scientists with expertise in the human causes of landscape change, as well as the human responses to those changes, geoscientists could more fully recognize and anticipate the coupled

  9. NASA Human System Risk Assessment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, D.; Romero, E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA utilizes an evidence based system to perform risk assessments for the human system for spaceflight missions. The center of this process is the multi-disciplinary Human System Risk Board (HSRB). The HSRB is chartered from the Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO) at NASA Headquarters. The HSRB reviews all human system risks via an established comprehensive risk and configuration management plan based on a project management approach. The HSRB facilitates the integration of human research (terrestrial and spaceflight), medical operations, occupational surveillance, systems engineering and many other disciplines in a comprehensive review of human system risks. The HSRB considers all factors that influence human risk. These factors include pre-mission considerations such as screening criteria, training, age, sex, and physiological condition. In mission factors such as available countermeasures, mission duration and location and post mission factors such as time to return to baseline (reconditioning), post mission health screening, and available treatments. All of the factors influence the total risk assessment for each human risk. The HSRB performed a comprehensive review of all potential inflight medical conditions and events and over the course of several reviews consolidated the number of human system risks to 30, where the greatest emphasis is placed for investing program dollars for risk mitigation. The HSRB considers all available evidence from human research and, medical operations and occupational surveillance in assessing the risks for appropriate mitigation and future work. All applicable DRMs (low earth orbit for 6 and 12 months, deep space for 30 days and 1 year, a lunar mission for 1 year, and a planetary mission for 3 years) are considered as human system risks are modified by the hazards associated with space flight such as microgravity, exposure to radiation, distance from the earth, isolation and a closed environment. Each risk has a summary

  10. Musculoskeletal imaging with a prototype photon-counting detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, M; Homolka, P; Chmeissani, M; Uffmann, M; Pretterklieber, M; Kainberger, F

    2012-01-01

    To test a digital imaging X-ray device based on the direct capture of X-ray photons with pixel detectors, which are coupled with photon-counting readout electronics. The chip consists of a matrix of 256 × 256 pixels with a pixel pitch of 55 μm. A monolithic image of 11.2 cm × 7 cm was obtained by the consecutive displacement approach. Images of embalmed anatomical specimens of eight human hands were obtained at four different dose levels (skin dose 2.4, 6, 12, 25 μGy) with the new detector, as well as with a flat-panel detector. The overall rating scores for the evaluated anatomical regions ranged from 5.23 at the lowest dose level, 6.32 at approximately 6 μGy, 6.70 at 12 μGy, to 6.99 at the highest dose level with the photon-counting system. The corresponding rating scores for the flat-panel detector were 3.84, 5.39, 6.64, and 7.34. When images obtained at the same dose were compared, the new system outperformed the conventional DR system at the two lowest dose levels. At the higher dose levels, there were no significant differences between the two systems. The photon-counting detector has great potential to obtain musculoskeletal images of excellent quality at very low dose levels.

  11. Musculoskeletal manifestations of bacterial endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Bevilaqua Rangel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The incidence of staphylococcal infection has been increasing during the last 20 years. OBJECTIVE: Report a case of staphylococcal endocarditis preceded by musculoskeletal manifestations, which is a rare form of clinical presentation. DESIGN: Case report. CASE REPORT: A 45-year-old-man, without addictions and without known previous cardiopathy, was diagnosed as having definitive acute bacterial endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. Its etiology was community-acquired, arising from a non-apparent primary focus. In addition, the musculoskeletal symptoms preceded the infective endocarditis (IE by about 1 month, which occurred together with other symptoms, e.g. mycotic aneurysms and petechiae. Later, the patient showed perforation of the mitral valve and moderate mitral insufficiency with clinical control.

  12. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palestr, Christopher J.; North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY; Love, Charito

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of 'complicating osteomyelitis' such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose. (author)

  13. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palestr, Christopher J. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; E-mail: palestro@lij.edu; Love, Charito [North Shore Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset and New Hyde Park, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

    2007-09-15

    Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of 'complicating osteomyelitis' such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose. (author)

  14. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özçakar Levent

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined.

  15. Radiology of musculoskeletal stress injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    With the new emphasis on physical fitness, musculoskeletal stress injuries are being seen with greater frequency in children and adults, and in locations that are not widely associated with stress injury. Some of the injuries continue to be mistaken for signs of more serious illnesses, such as infection and neoplasm, and this may lead to unnecessary investigative effort. This book covers both the classic stress injuries and the new manifestations

  16. Imaging in percutaneous musculoskeletal interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi, Afshin; Guth, Stephane; Guermazi, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This is one of the first books to deal specifically with imaging in percutaneous musculoskeletal interventions. The use of different imaging modalities during these procedures is well described. In the first chapter, the basic procedures and different guidance techniques are presented and discussed. The ensuing chapters describe in exhaustive detail the abilities and uses of imaging in guiding procedures ranging from biopsy and joint injection to management of pain and tumors. These procedures are extensively documented in adults as well as in the pediatric population. The third part of the book describes the different indications for vascular interventions in musculoskeletal lesions. The final chapter focuses on ultrasound-guided interventions, as they are more common and tend to be fashionable. The book is well illustrated with carefully chosen and technically excellent images. Each of the 18 chapters is written by an expert of international repute, making this book the most current and complete treatment of the subject available. It should be of great interest to interventional radiologists and also musculoskeletal and general radiologists. (orig.)

  17. Control system oriented human interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barale, P.; Jacobson, V.; Kilgore, R.; Rondeau, D.

    1976-11-01

    The on-line control system interface for magnet beam steering and focusing in the Bevalac is described. An Aydin model 5205B display generator was chosen. This display generator will allow the computer to completely rewrite a monitor screen in less than 50 ms and is also capable of controlling a color monitor

  18. Three-body segment musculoskeletal model of the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdmanová L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim is to create a computational three-body segment model of an upper limb of a human body for determination of muscle forces generated to keep a given loaded upper limb position. The model consists of three segments representing arm, forearm, hand and of all major muscles connected to the segments. Muscle origins and insertions determination corresponds to a real anatomy. Muscle behaviour is defined according to the Hill-type muscle model consisting of contractile and viscoelastic element. The upper limb is presented by a system of three rigid bars connected by rotational joints. The whole limb is fixed to the frame in the shoulder joint. A static balance problem is solved by principle of virtual work. The system of equation describing the musculoskeletal system is overdetermined because more muscles than necessary contribute to get the concrete upper limb position. Hence the mathematical problem is solved by an optimization method searching the least energetically-consuming solution. The upper limb computational model is verified by electromyography of the biceps brachii muscle.

  19. Human engineering in mobile radwaste systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D.; McMahon, J.; Motl, G.

    1988-01-01

    To a large degree, mobile radwaste systems are replacing installed plant systems at US nuclear plants due to regulatory obsolescence, high capital and maintenance costs, and increased radiation exposure. Well over half the power plants in the United States now use some sort of mobile system similar to those offered by LN Technologies Corporation. Human engineering is reflected in mobile radwaste system design due to concerns about safety, efficiency, and cost. The radwaste services business is so competitive that vendors must reflect human engineering in several areas of equipment design in order to compete. The paper discusses radiation exposure control, contamination control, compact components, maintainability, operation, and transportability

  20. A case for human systems neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J L

    2015-06-18

    Can the human brain itself serve as a model for a systems neuroscience approach to understanding the human brain? After all, how the brain is able to create the richness and complexity of human behavior is still largely mysterious. What better choice to study that complexity than to study it in humans? However, measurements of brain activity typically need to be made non-invasively which puts severe constraints on what can be learned about the internal workings of the brain. Our approach has been to use a combination of psychophysics in which we can use human behavioral flexibility to make quantitative measurements of behavior and link those through computational models to measurements of cortical activity through magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, we have tested various computational hypotheses about what neural mechanisms could account for behavioral enhancement with spatial attention (Pestilli et al., 2011). Resting both on quantitative measurements and considerations of what is known through animal models, we concluded that weighting of sensory signals by the magnitude of their response is a neural mechanism for efficient selection of sensory signals and consequent improvements in behavioral performance with attention. While animal models have many technical advantages over studying the brain in humans, we believe that human systems neuroscience should endeavor to validate, replicate and extend basic knowledge learned from animal model systems and thus form a bridge to understanding how the brain creates the complex and rich cognitive capacities of humans. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Musculoskeletal manifestations in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti P. Deshmukh; Asmita G. Akarte

    2017-01-01

    Background: Musculoskeletal complications of diabetes have been generally ignored and poorly treated as compared to other complications. Hence we carried out this study to find the prevalence of musculoskeletal manifestations in type II diabetes mellitus and its correlation with age, BMI, duration of diabetes, and control of diabetes. Methods: 100 consecutive patients of type II diabetes were studied. Duration of diabetes, control of diabetes, and any musculoskeletal complaints were noted....

  2. Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2015-01-01

    The NASA/SP-2015-3709, Human Systems Integration (HSI) Practitioner's Guide, also known as the "HSIPG," provides a tool for implementing HSI activities within the NASA systems engineering framework. The HSIPG is written to aid the HSI practitioner engaged in a program or project (P/P), and serves as a knowledge base to allow the practitioner to step into an HSI lead or team member role for NASA missions. Additionally, this HSIPG is written to address the role of HSI in the P/P management and systems engineering communities and aid their understanding of the value added by incorporating good HSI practices into their programs and projects. Through helping to build a community of knowledgeable HSI practitioners, this document also hopes to build advocacy across the Agency for establishing strong, consistent HSI policies and practices. Human Systems Integration (HSI) has been successfully adopted (and adapted) by several federal agencies-most notably the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-as a methodology for reducing system life cycle costs (LCCs). These cost savings manifest themselves due to reductions in required numbers of personnel, the practice of human-centered design, decreased reliance on specialized skills for operations, shortened training time, efficient logistics and maintenance, and fewer safety-related risks and mishaps due to unintended human/system interactions. The HSI process for NASA establishes how cost savings and mission success can be realized through systems engineering. Every program or project has unique attributes. This HSIPG is not intended to provide one-size-fits-all recommendations for HSI implementation. Rather, HSI processes should be tailored to the size, scope, and goals of individual situations. The instructions and processes identified here are best used as a starting point for implementing human-centered system concepts and designs across programs and projects of varying types, including

  3. Musculoskeletal Pain in Gynecologic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sonia R.; Hacker, Michele R.; McKinney, Jessica L.; Elkadry, Eman A.; Rosenblatt, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and symptoms in gynecologic surgeons. Design Prospective cross-sectional survey study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). Setting Virtual. All study participants were contacted and participated via electronic means. Participants Gynecologic surgeons. Interventions An anonymous, web-based survey was distributed to gynecologic surgeons via electronic newsletters and direct E-mail. Measurements and Main Results There were 495 respondents with complete data. When respondents were queried about their musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 12 months, they reported a high prevalence of lower back (75.6%) and neck (72.9%) pain and a slightly lower prevalence of shoulder (66.6%), upper back (61.6%), and wrist/hand (60.9%) pain. Many respondents believed that performing surgery caused or worsened the pain, ranging from 76.3% to 82.7% in these five anatomic regions. Women are at an approximately twofold risk of pain, with adjusted odds ratios (OR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1–3.2; p 5 .02) in the lower back region, OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.4–4.8; p 5 .002) in the upper back, and OR 2.9 (95% CI, 1.8–4.6; p 5 .001) in the wrist/hand region. Conclusion Musculoskeletal symptoms are highly prevalent among gynecologic surgeons. Female sex is associated with approximately twofold risk of reported pain in commonly assessed anatomic regions. Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology (2013) 20, 656-660 PMID:23796512

  4. Evidence of educational inadequacies in region-specific musculoskeletal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Charles S; Yeh, Albert C

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies suggest US medical schools are not effectively addressing musculoskeletal medicine in their curricula. We examined if there were specific areas of weakness by analyzing students' knowledge of and confidence in examining specific anatomic regions. A cross-sectional survey study of third- and fourth-year students at Harvard Medical School was conducted during the 2005 to 2006 academic year. One hundred sixty-two third-year students (88% response) and 87 fourth-year students (57% response) completed the Freedman and Bernstein cognitive mastery examination in musculoskeletal medicine and a survey eliciting their clinical confidence in examining the shoulder, elbow, hand, back, hip, knee, and foot on a one to five Likert scale. We specifically analyzed examination questions dealing with the upper extremity, lower extremity, back, and others, which included more systemic conditions such as arthritis, metabolic bone diseases, and cancer. Students failed to meet the established passing benchmark of 70% in all subgroups except for the others category. Confidence scores in performing a physical examination and in generating a differential diagnosis indicated students felt below adequate confidence (3.0 of 5) in five of the seven anatomic regions. Our study provides evidence that region-specific musculoskeletal medicine is a potential learning gap that may need to be addressed in the undergraduate musculoskeletal curriculum.

  5. Musculoskeletal pareidolia in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foye, Patrick; Abdelshahed, Dena; Patel, Shounuck

    2014-07-01

    Medical educators use a variety of strategies to help medical students and resident doctors understand and remember complex topics. One teaching tool is matching up radiographic appearances with unrelated, common, non-medical images, in order to help students easily recognise clinical patterns. However, even among medical educators who use this approach, many are not aware of the neuropsychiatric phenomenon they are using, known as pareidolia. We will describe pareidolia (a form of patternicity) and give two examples of its use in the clinical teaching of musculoskeletal imaging abnormalities: the winking owl and the Scottie dog. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Group & Intergroup Relations in Living Human Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    organizational diagnosis , the group is itself a living human system. A group may be underbounded, overbounded, or optimally bounded. The state of group...very im- portant to understand and to use in order to conduct organizational diagnosis " using group methods. 2 -43 (Alderfer, 1977b). The group...Boundary Relations and Organizational Diagnosis . In H. Meltzer and F.W. Wickert (eds.) Humanizing Organizational Behavior. Springfield, Illinois: Thomas

  7. The Effects of Uniquely-Processed Titanium on Biological Systems: Implications for Human Health and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Rowlands

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium is biocompatible and widely utilized in a variety of applications. Recently, titanium in pico-nanometer scale and soluble form (Aqua Titan has expanded its use to applied human health and performance. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence associated with specific physiological responses to Aqua Titan-treated materials. In vitro studies have shown that application of Aqua Titan can modify membrane potential and long-term potentiation in isolated hippocampal neurons, suggesting reduced pain memory as a possible mechanism for reported analgesia. Proximal contact with Aqua Titan-treated titanium increased gene expression, protein synthesis, cell growth and adhesion in normal cultured muscle and bone cells, suggesting application for Aqua Titan in clinical implant procedures and wound healing. Evidence for beneficial effects on neuromuscular control of muscle-tendon function and improvements in running economy in human athletes was seen when Aqua Titan-treated tape was applied to the human triceps surae following fatigue induced by prior strenuous exercise. Finally, behavioral responses and effects on the autonomic nervous system to environmental exposure suggest Aqua Titan may promote a mild relaxant, or stress-suppressive response. Together, data suggest exposure to Aqua Titan-treated materials modulates aspects of growth and function in neuronal and other musculoskeletal cells with possible benefits to musculotendinous recovery from exercise and to the systemic response to stress.

  8. CORRELATION BETWEEN HUMAN NEEDS SYSTEM - PERSONALITY - HUMAN MOTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela MINICA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the main attributes of an economic approach of needs and preferences, with detailed focus on the correlation between meta-needs and personality, by correlating the principle of hierarchy established by Maslow with the balance theory. Adopting an integrated system of human capital motivation, which takes into account the complex aspects involved in the knowledge society, represents a managerial requirement for any organisation.

  9. Relationship between Comorbid Health Problems and Musculoskeletal Disorders Resulting in Musculoskeletal Complaints and Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence among Employees in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Sun; Yi, Kwan Hyung

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and comorbid health problems, including depression/anxiety disorder, insomnia/sleep disorder, fatigue, and injury by accident, and to determine whether certain physical and psychological factors reduce comorbid health problems. In total, 29,711 employees were selected from respondents of the Third Korean Working Conditions Survey and categorized into two groups: Musculoskeletal Complaints or Musculoskeletal Sickness Absence. Four self-reported health indicators (overall fatigue, depression/anxiety, insomnia/sleep disorder, and injury by accident) were selected as outcomes, based on their high prevalence in Korea. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to determine the relationship between comorbid health problems, musculoskeletal complaints, and sickness absence. The prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints and musculoskeletal sickness absence due to muscular pain was 32.26% and 0.59%, respectively. Compared to the reference group, depression/anxiety disorder and overall fatigue were 5.2-6.1 times more prevalent in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group and insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were 7.6-11.0 times more prevalent in the Sickness Absence Group. When adjusted for individual and work-related physical factors, prevalence of all four comorbid health problems were slightly decreased in both groups. Increases in overall fatigue and depression/anxiety disorder were observed in the Musculoskeletal Complaints Group, while increases in insomnia/sleep disorder and injury by accident were observed in the Sickness Absence Group. For management of musculoskeletal complaints and sickness absence in the workplace, differences in health problems between employees with musculoskeletal complaints and those with sickness absence as well as the physical and psychological risk factors should be considered.

  10. Baggage handler seniority and musculoskeletal symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bern, Stine Hvid; Brauer, Charlotte; Møller, Karina Lauenborg

    2013-01-01

    Heavy lifting is associated with musculoskeletal disorders but it is unclear whether it is related to acute reversible effects or to chronic effects from cumulated exposure. The aim of this study was to examine whether musculoskeletal symptoms in Danish airport baggage handlers were associated wi...... with their seniority as baggage handler, indicating chronic effects from cumulated workload....

  11. Epidemiology and clinical profile of common musculoskeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiology and clinical profile of common musculoskeletal diseases in patients with diabetes mellitus at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. ... or worsening of MSD. Keywords: musculoskeletal complications; diabetic foot; foot care; trigger finger; Dupuytren's contracture; stiff frozen shoulder ...

  12. Selection related to musculoskeletal complaints among employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zwart, B. C.; Broersen, J. P.; van der Beek, A. J.; Frings-Dresen, M. H.; van Dijk, F. J.

    1997-01-01

    To (a) describe differences in the outcome of cross sectional and longitudinal analysis on musculoskeletal complaints relative to age and work demands, and (b) to assess the entrance and drop out selection on musculoskeletal complaints among groups of employees relative to age and work demands. A

  13. The prevalence and factors associated with musculoskeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a condition characterized by a predominance of haemoglobin S (hbss) in the red blood cells. Musculoskeletal involvement is one of the commonest clinical manifestations of SCA. There is limited information on the prevalence, patterns and factors associated with Musculoskeletal ...

  14. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kevin R.; Lawton, Craig R.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Longsine, Dennis E. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX); Forsythe, James Chris; Gauthier, John Henry; Le, Hai D.

    2008-10-01

    A Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project was initiated in 2005 to investigate Human Performance Modeling in a System of Systems analytic environment. SAND2006-6569 and SAND2006-7911 document interim results from this effort; this report documents the final results. The problem is difficult because of the number of humans involved in a System of Systems environment and the generally poorly defined nature of the tasks that each human must perform. A two-pronged strategy was followed: one prong was to develop human models using a probability-based method similar to that first developed for relatively well-understood probability based performance modeling; another prong was to investigate more state-of-art human cognition models. The probability-based modeling resulted in a comprehensive addition of human-modeling capability to the existing SoSAT computer program. The cognitive modeling resulted in an increased understanding of what is necessary to incorporate cognition-based models to a System of Systems analytic environment.

  15. Dissatisfaction with work as a risk factor of musculoskeletal complaints among foresters in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowski, Stanisław; Choina, Piotr; Florek-Łuszczki, Magdalena; Goździewska, Małgorzata; Jezior, Jagoda

    2017-12-23

    Researchers indicate an important relationship between the level of job satisfaction and the state of health of the employees. Some elements of work related with its character, organization, and interpersonal relationships may evoke strong stress, manifested by, among others, an increased musculoskeletal tension which, in turn, may lead to permanent dysfunction of this system. The objective of the study was analysis of the relationship between the level of job satisfaction and occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders among employees of the State Forests. The research material was collected using two instruments: the modified Nordic Questionnaire for assessment of musculoskeletal disorders, and a questionnaire concerning job satisfaction. The study was conducted in a group of 396 employees of the State Forests from 8 regions of Poland. The results of analysis confirmed a significant relationship between job satisfaction and the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. The lower the level of job satisfaction, the more frequent the experiencing of musculoskeletal disorders. Low level of job satisfaction is a risk factor for the occurrence of musculoskeletal disorders. Shaping of work conditions, which are the source of job satisfaction, should be considered as one of the main elements of prevention of musculoskeletal complaints.

  16. Imaging features of musculoskeletal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuyst, Dimitri De; Vanhoenacker, Filip; Bernaerts, Anja; Gielen, Jan; Schepper, Arthur M. de

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the imaging characteristics of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Skeletal tuberculosis represents one-third of all cases of tuberculosis occurring in extrapulmonary sites. Hematogenous spread from a distant focus elsewhere in the body is the cornerstone in the understanding of imaging features of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. The most common presentations are tuberculous spondylitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, and soft tissue involvement. The diagnostic value of the different imaging techniques, which include conventional radiography, CT, and MR imaging, are emphasized. Whereas conventional radiography is the mainstay in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis and osteomyelitis, MR imaging may detect associated bone marrow and soft tissue abnormalities. MR imaging is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for diagnosis, demonstration of the extent of the disease of tuberculous spondylitis, and soft tissue tuberculosis. Moreover, it may be very helpful in the differential diagnosis with pyogenic spondylodiscitis, as it may easily demonstrate anterior corner destruction, the relative preservation of the intervertebral disk, multilevel involvement with or without skip lesions, and a large soft tissue abscess, as these are all arguments in favor of a tuberculous spondylitis. On the other hand, CT is still superior in the demonstration of calcifications, which are found in chronic tuberculous abscesses. (orig.)

  17. Protein phosphorylation systems in postmortem human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walaas, S.I.; Perdahl-Wallace, E.; Winblad, B.; Greengard, P.

    1989-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation systems regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), or calcium in conjunction with calmodulin or phospholipid/diacylglycerol, have been studied by phosphorylation in vitro of particulate and soluble fractions from human postmortem brain samples. One-dimensional or two-dimensional gel electrophoretic protein separations were used for analysis. Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was found to be highly active in both particulate and soluble preparations throughout the human CNS, with groups of both widely distributed and region-specific substrates being observed in different brain nuclei. Dopamine-innervated parts of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex contained the phosphoproteins previously observed in rodent basal ganglia. In contrast, calcium/phospholipid-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation systems were less prominent in human postmortem brain than in rodent brain, and only a few widely distributed substrates for these protein kinases were found. Protein staining indicated that postmortem proteolysis, particularly of high-molecular-mass proteins, was prominent in deeply located, subcortical regions in the human brain. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use human postmortem brain samples, when obtained under carefully controlled conditions, for qualitative studies on brain protein phosphorylation. Such studies should be of value in studies on human neurological and/or psychiatric disorders

  18. Modeling and Simulating Virtual Anatomical Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madehkhaksar, Forough; Luo, Zhiping; Pronost, Nicolas; Egges, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    This chapter presents human musculoskeletal modeling and simulation as a challenging field that lies between biomechanics and computer animation. One of the main goals of computer animation research is to develop algorithms and systems that produce plausible motion. On the other hand, the main

  19. Virginia power's human performance evaluation system (HPES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the Human Performance Evaluation System (HPES) which was initially developed by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) using the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) as a guide. After a pilot program involving three utilities ended in 1983, the present day program was instituted. A methodology was developed, for specific application to nuclear power plant employees, to aid trained coordinators/evaluators in determining those factors that exert a negative influence on human behavior in the nuclear power plant environment. HPES is for anyone and everyone on site, from contractors to plant staff to plant management. No one is excluded from participation. Virginia Power's HPES program goal is to identify and correct the root causes of human performance problems. Evaluations are performed on reported real or perceived conditions that may have an adverse influence on members of the nuclear team. A report is provided to management identifying root cause and contributing factors along with recommended corrective actions

  20. Validation of human factor engineering integrated system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Apart from hundreds of thousands of human-machine interface resources, the control room of a nuclear power plant is a complex system integrated with many factors such as procedures, operators, environment, organization and management. In the design stage, these factors are considered by different organizations separately. However, whether above factors could corporate with each other well in operation and whether they have good human factors engineering (HFE) design to avoid human error, should be answered in validation of the HFE integrated system before delivery of the plant. This paper addresses the research and implementation of the ISV technology based on case study. After introduction of the background, process and methodology of ISV, the results of the test are discussed. At last, lessons learned from this research are summarized. (authors)

  1. How to Bootstrap a Human Communication System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Arbib, Michael; Garrod, Simon

    2013-01-01

    How might a human communication system be bootstrapped in the absence of conventional language? We argue that motivated signs play an important role (i.e., signs that are linked to meaning by structural resemblance or by natural association). An experimental study is then reported in which participants try to communicate a range of pre-specified…

  2. The Human Resources Management System: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriello, Vincent R.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a systematic and disciplined approach to planning for the development and implementation of an information system which will collect, store, maintain, and report human resources data. Discusses guidelines, priorities, training requirements, security, auditing, interface with payroll, and personnel reporting. (CT)

  3. Cooperative mobility systems: The human factor challenges.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Marieke; Kroon, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a vision on cooperative mobility systems from a human factors perspective. To create a common ground for future developments, it’s important to define the common research themes and knowledge gaps. This article presents what steps need to be taken in order to come to proper

  4. Visuals and Visualisation of Human Body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Sindhu; Ramadas, Jayashree

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the role of diagrams and text in middle school students' understanding and visualisation of human body systems. We develop a common framework based on structure and function to assess students' responses across diagram and verbal modes. Visualisation is defined in terms of understanding transformations on structure and relating…

  5. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among Norwegian female biathlon athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østerås H

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Håvard Østerås,1 Kirsti Krohn Garnæs,2 Liv Berit Augestad3 1Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Sør-Trøndelag University College, Trondheim, Norway; 2Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway; 3Department of Human Movement Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Abstract: The purpose was to examine musculoskeletal disorders in Norwegian female biathlon athletes (age ≥ 16, both juniors and seniors. The design was a retrospective cross-sectional study. In all, 148 athletes (79.1% responded; of these, 118 athletes were 16–21 years (juniors (77.6%, and 30 athletes were 22 years or older (seniors (20.3%, and mean age was 19.1. A validated questionnaire was used to collect the data. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 57.8%. The most affected parts were the knee (23.0% of the total injuries, calf (12.2%, ankle/foot (10.8%, lower back (10.8%, and thigh (10.1%. The disorders resulted in training/competition cessation for 73.5% of athletes, in alternative training for 87.8%. Fifty percent of the athletes had one or several musculoskeletal disorders. Most of the problems occurred preseason, and the duration of symptoms was often prolonged. Few differences between the juniors and seniors were found. This study showed the prevalence of musculoskeletal problems among female biathlon athletes. The results indicate that prevention of lower limb problems must be prioritized, especially during the preseason. Keywords: injuries, cross-country skiing, skating

  6. Sensorimotor learning configures the human mirror system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catmur, Caroline; Walsh, Vincent; Heyes, Cecilia

    2007-09-04

    Cells in the "mirror system" fire not only when an individual performs an action but also when one observes the same action performed by another agent [1-4]. The mirror system, found in premotor and parietal cortices of human and monkey brains, is thought to provide the foundation for social understanding and to enable the development of theory of mind and language [5-9]. However, it is unclear how mirror neurons acquire their mirror properties -- how they derive the information necessary to match observed with executed actions [10]. We address this by showing that it is possible to manipulate the selectivity of the human mirror system, and thereby make it operate as a countermirror system, by giving participants training to perform one action while observing another. Before this training, participants showed event-related muscle-specific responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation over motor cortex during observation of little- and index-finger movements [11-13]. After training, this normal mirror effect was reversed. These results indicate that the mirror properties of the mirror system are neither wholly innate [14] nor fixed once acquired; instead they develop through sensorimotor learning [15, 16]. Our findings indicate that the human mirror system is, to some extent, both a product and a process of social interaction.

  7. Extended sequence diagram for human system interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Jong Rok; Choi, Sun Woo; Ko, Hee Ran; Kim, Jong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a modeling language in the field of object oriented software engineering. The sequence diagram is a kind of interaction diagram that shows how processes operate with one another and in what order. It is a construct of a message sequence chart. It depicts the objects and classes involved in the scenario and the sequence of messages exchanged between the objects needed to carry out the functionality of the scenario. This paper proposes the Extended Sequence Diagram (ESD), which is capable of depicting human system interaction for nuclear power plants, as well as cognitive process of operators analysis. In the conventional sequence diagram, there is a limit to only identify the activities of human and systems interactions. The ESD is extended to describe operators' cognitive process in more detail. The ESD is expected to be used as a task analysis method for describing human system interaction. The ESD can also present key steps causing abnormal operations or failures and diverse human errors based on cognitive condition

  8. Musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merashli, M; Chowdhury, T A; Jawad, A S M

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are increasing significantly worldwide. Whilst vascular complications of diabetes are well recognized, and account for principle mortality and morbidity from the condition, musculoskeletal manifestations of diabetes are common and whilst not life threatening, are an important cause of morbidity, pain and disability. Joints affected by diabetes include peripheral joints and the axial skeleton. Charcot neuroarthropathy is an important cause of deformity and amputation associated with peripheral neuropathy. A number of fibrosing conditions of the hands and shoulder are recognized, including carpal tunnel syndrome, adhesive capsulitis, tenosynovitis and limited joint mobility. People with diabetes are more prone to gout and osteoporosis. Management of these conditions requires early recognition and close liaison between diabetes and rheumatology specialists. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Musculoskeletal imaging insight 2015: Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Kathryn J. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Mutiso, Kavulani [Aga Khan University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nairobi (Kenya); Sconfienza, Luca Maria [University of Milan, Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, Milan (Italy); IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Unit of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Monu, Johnny [University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Over the past 6 years the International Skeletal Society (ISS) outreach programs have become popular amongst the various radiology organizations in sub-Saharan Africa. So much so that that the ISS outreach is now routinely expected to participate in many of the international radiology conferences in that part of the world. The organizational planning for an outreach visit to Kenya took place over a 3-year period. Eventually a double-headed event; the seventh and eighth sub-Saharan outreach efforts were organized in Nairobi and in Mombasa, Kenya. The Nairobi outreach was an educational course on musculoskeletal imaging at the University of Nairobi and the Aga Khan University in Nairobi from 26 to 28 May 2015. The Mombasa outreach was organized in collaboration with the African Society of Radiology (ASR) at their annual meeting in Mombasa from 30 May to 2 June 2015. (orig.)

  10. Musculoskeletal imaging insight 2015: Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Kathryn J.; Mutiso, Kavulani; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Monu, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 6 years the International Skeletal Society (ISS) outreach programs have become popular amongst the various radiology organizations in sub-Saharan Africa. So much so that that the ISS outreach is now routinely expected to participate in many of the international radiology conferences in that part of the world. The organizational planning for an outreach visit to Kenya took place over a 3-year period. Eventually a double-headed event; the seventh and eighth sub-Saharan outreach efforts were organized in Nairobi and in Mombasa, Kenya. The Nairobi outreach was an educational course on musculoskeletal imaging at the University of Nairobi and the Aga Khan University in Nairobi from 26 to 28 May 2015. The Mombasa outreach was organized in collaboration with the African Society of Radiology (ASR) at their annual meeting in Mombasa from 30 May to 2 June 2015. (orig.)

  11. Musculoskeletal pain in Dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Batista e Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the frequency of musculoskeletal pain in dental students. Methods: A descriptive study of observational and cross-sectional approach in which was used an Ergonomics and Posture Questionnaire for Dentists adapted by the researchers, associated with the Cooler Quiz. The sample comprised 43 students who attended between the 6th, 8th and 10th academic periods. The data were submitted to descriptive analysis and expressed as percentages, means and standard deviations, also maximum and minimum. For the comparative analysis between the variables, we used the chi-square test, chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher exact test, when necessary, considering the significance level of 5%. Results: Among the students surveyed 20 (46.51% were men and 23 (53.5% women with a mean age of 23.14 ± 10.24 years, maximum of 35 years and minimum of 19. It was found that 40 (93.02% reported pain in some part of the body, 23 (53.5% in the upper limbs, 20 (46.5% in the lower limbs and 37 (86% in axial skeleton, with no difference between genders (p = 0.59. Pain intensity was classified as mild 10 (25%, moderate 21(52.5% and severe 7 (17.5%. In the assessment we evidenced the direct correlation between the hours of trainning and the intensity of pain. Conclusions: The results of the survey showed that the students assessed developed high frequency of musculoskeletal pain and that pain was associated with hours of daily training held during graduation at the dental clinic.

  12. Multiscale musculoskeletal modelling, data–model fusion and electromyography-informed modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Heidlauf, T.; Sartori, M.; Besier, T.; Röhrle, O.; Lloyd, D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes methods and technologies that advance the state of the art for modelling the musculoskeletal system across the spatial and temporal scales; and storing these using efficient ontologies and tools. We present population-based modelling as an efficient method to rapidly generate individual morphology from only a few measurements and to learn from the ever-increasing supply of imaging data available. We present multiscale methods for continuum muscle and bone models; and efficient mechanostatistical methods, both continuum and particle-based, to bridge the scales. Finally, we examine both the importance that muscles play in bone remodelling stimuli and the latest muscle force prediction methods that use electromyography-assisted modelling techniques to compute musculoskeletal forces that best reflect the underlying neuromuscular activity. Our proposal is that, in order to have a clinically relevant virtual physiological human, (i) bone and muscle mechanics must be considered together; (ii) models should be trained on population data to permit rapid generation and use underlying principal modes that describe both muscle patterns and morphology; and (iii) these tools need to be available in an open-source repository so that the scientific community may use, personalize and contribute to the database of models. PMID:27051510

  13. Musculoskeletal disorders in main battle tank personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Guldager, Bernadette; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders of personnel in the main battle tank (MBT) units in the Danish army with those of personnel in other types of army units, and to investigate associations between job function in the tank, military rank, and musculoskeletal problems......, and ankle. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There were only 4 women in the MBT group; as a consequence, female personnel were excluded from the study. The participation rate was 58.0% (n = 184) in the MBT group and 56.3% (n = 333) in the reference group. The pattern of musculoskeletal disorders among personnel...

  14. THE PREVALENCE OF MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH RISK FACTORS IN AUTO RICKSHAW DRIVERS - A SURVEY IN GUNTUR CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Shaik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Musculoskeletal disorders represent largest category of work related illness in India. Variety of internal and external factors leads to postural stress in vehicle drivers that affects the functioning of musculoskeletal system. Vibration, studied extensively among various risk factors causing musculoskeletal disorders. Hence, the current study focused on various risk factors. Objectives: To know the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and their association with possible risk factors in auto rickshaw drivers. Investigation Tools: Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMSQ, inch tape, vibrometer. Methodology: NMSQ has been used to document prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in 300 subjects. Vibrometer and inch tape were used to measure risk factors like driver’s seat vibration and work space envelope (shoulder to handle distance, lower cabin space. Associations with risk factors were analyzed by logistic regression. Results: Work experience and working hours per week showed a significant positive association with knee problems (p=0.009, p=0.006 respectively. Shoulder to handle distance on right side showed significant negative association with knee problems (p=0.013. Driver’s seat vibration showed strong significant positive association with low backache (p=0.000. No variable showed significant association with neck troubles. Working experience and lower cabin space are significantly associated with ankle problems (p=0.012, p=0.045 respectively.Age, work experience and shoulder to handle distance on left side showed significant positive association with general musculoskeletal troubles (p=0.029, p= 0.005, p=0.045 respectively. Conclusion: Lower back, knee, neck and ankle troubles are more prevalent in auto rickshaw drivers. Increasing age, work experience, maximum working hours per week, increased left shoulder to handle distance and greater driver’s seat vibrations are increasing the risk of musculoskeletal

  15. Human performance modeling for system of systems analytics :soldier fatigue.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E.; Miller, Dwight Peter

    2005-10-01

    The military has identified Human Performance Modeling (HPM) as a significant requirement and challenge of future systems modeling and analysis initiatives as can be seen in the Department of Defense's (DoD) Defense Modeling and Simulation Office's (DMSO) Master Plan (DoD 5000.59-P 1995). To this goal, the military is currently spending millions of dollars on programs devoted to HPM in various military contexts. Examples include the Human Performance Modeling Integration (HPMI) program within the Air Force Research Laboratory, which focuses on integrating HPMs with constructive models of systems (e.g. cockpit simulations) and the Navy's Human Performance Center (HPC) established in September 2003. Nearly all of these initiatives focus on the interface between humans and a single system. This is insufficient in the era of highly complex network centric SoS. This report presents research and development in the area of HPM in a system-of-systems (SoS). Specifically, this report addresses modeling soldier fatigue and the potential impacts soldier fatigue can have on SoS performance.

  16. Role of human factors in system safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, D. M.; Robert, C.; Graham, T.

    2008-01-01

    What happens when technology goes wrong? Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, numerous airplane crashes, and other notable and newsworthy as well as many more incidents that are not reported on the news, have all been attributed to human error. Millions of dollars in fines are levied against industry under the General Duty clause for ergonomic violations, all avoidable. These incidents and situations indicate a lack of consideration for the humans in the system during the design phase. As a consequence, all of these organizations had to retrofit, had to redesign and had to pay countless dollars for medical costs, Worker's Compensation, OSHA fines and in some instances had irrecoverable damage to their public image. Human Factors, otherwise known as Engineering Psychology or Ergonomics, found its origins in loss, loss of life, loss of confidence, loss of technology, loss of property. Without loss, there would be no need for human factors. No one really 'attends' to discomfort...nor are errors attended to that have little consequence. Often it is ultimately the compilation and cumulative effects of these smaller and often ignored occurrences that lead to the bigger and more tragic incidents that make the evening news. When an incident or accident occurs, they are frequently attributed to accomplished, credible, experienced people. In reality however, the crisis was inevitable when a series of events happen such that a human is caught in the whirlwind of accident sequence. The world as known is becoming smaller and more complex. Highly technical societies have been hard at work for several centuries rebuilding the world out of cold steel that is very far removed from ancient instincts and traditions and is becoming more remote to human users. The growth of technology is more than exponential, and is virtually beyond comprehension for many people. Humans, feeling comfortable with the familiar, fulfill their propensity to implement new

  17. First human systemic infection caused by Spiroplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilino, Ana; Masiá, Mar; López, Pilar; Galiana, Antonio J; Tovar, Juan; Andrés, María; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2015-02-01

    Spiroplasma species are organisms that normally colonize plants and insects. We describe the first case of human systemic infection caused by Spiroplasma bacteria in a patient with hypogammaglobulinemia undergoing treatment with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic agents. Spiroplasma turonicum was identified through molecular methods in several blood cultures. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline plus levofloxacin. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Sleep fragmentation exacerbates mechanical hypersensitivity and alters subsequent sleep-wake behavior in a mouse model of musculoskeletal sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Blair C; Opp, Mark R

    2014-03-01

    Sleep deprivation, or sleep disruption, enhances pain in human subjects. Chronic musculoskeletal pain is prevalent in our society, and constitutes a tremendous public health burden. Although preclinical models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain demonstrate effects on sleep, few studies focus on musculoskeletal pain. We reported elsewhere in this issue of SLEEP that musculoskeletal sensitization alters sleep of mice. In this study we hypothesize that sleep fragmentation during the development of musculoskeletal sensitization will exacerbate subsequent pain responses and alter sleep-wake behavior of mice. This is a preclinical study using C57BL/6J mice to determine the effect on behavioral outcomes of sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization. Musculoskeletal sensitization, a model of chronic muscle pain, was induced using two unilateral injections of acidified saline (pH 4.0) into the gastrocnemius muscle, spaced 5 days apart. Musculoskeletal sensitization manifests as mechanical hypersensitivity determined by von Frey filament testing at the hindpaws. Sleep fragmentation took place during the consecutive 12-h light periods of the 5 days between intramuscular injections. Electroencephalogram (EEG) and body temperature were recorded from some mice at baseline and for 3 weeks after musculoskeletal sensitization. Mechanical hypersensitivity was determined at preinjection baseline and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 after sensitization. Two additional experiments were conducted to determine the independent effects of sleep fragmentation or musculoskeletal sensitization on mechanical hypersensitivity. Five days of sleep fragmentation alone did not induce mechanical hypersensitivity, whereas sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization resulted in prolonged and exacerbated mechanical hypersensitivity. Sleep fragmentation combined with musculoskeletal sensitization had an effect on subsequent sleep of mice as demonstrated by increased

  19. Clinical applications of dynamic functional musculoskeletal ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petscavage-Thomas J

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jonelle Petscavage-Thomas Department of Radiology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: There is an increasing trend in medicine to utilize ultrasound for diagnosis of musculoskeletal pathology. Although magnetic resonance imaging provides excellent spatial resolution of musculoskeletal structures in multiple imaging planes and is generally the cross-sectional modality of choice, it does not provide dynamic functional assessment of muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Dynamic maneuvers with ultrasound provide functional data and have been shown to be accurate for diagnosis. Ultrasound is also less expensive, portable, and more readily available. This article will review the common snapping, impingement, and friction syndromes imaged with dynamic ultrasound. It will also discuss future areas of research, including musculoskeletal sonoelastography. Keywords: snapping, dynamic, ultrasound, functional, musculoskeletal

  20. Prevalence and factors contributing to musculoskeletal disorder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 9, No 5S (2017) > ... Method used in this study is standard Nordic questionnaire (SNQ) Malay version for 150 garage workers ... Keywords: vehicle maintenance; musculoskeletal disorder; ache, pain, discomfort; prevalence ...

  1. Algorithm of Functional Musculoskeletal Disorders Diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra P. Eroshenko

    2012-01-01

    The article scientifically justifies the algorithm of complex diagnostics of functional musculoskeletal disorders during resort treatment, aimed at the optimal application of modern methods of physical rehabilitation (correction programs formation), based on diagnostic methodologies findings

  2. Algorithm of Functional Musculoskeletal Disorders Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra P. Eroshenko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article scientifically justifies the algorithm of complex diagnostics of functional musculoskeletal disorders during resort treatment, aimed at the optimal application of modern methods of physical rehabilitation (correction programs formation, based on diagnostic methodologies findings

  3. injury to presentation delays among musculoskeletal trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Injuries are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world with road traffic ... Methods: All musculoskeletal injury patients presenting to Mulago Hospital were prospectively .... who fell or were injured in sports.

  4. Common running musculoskeletal injuries among recreational half ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    probing the prevalence and nature of running musculoskeletal injuries in the 12 months preceding ... or agony, and which prevented them from physical activity for ..... injuries to professional football players: Developing the UEFA model.

  5. Prevalence of Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorders Among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Vol 4, No 4 (2014) > ... Background: Work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the common occupational ... of the doctor, duration of practice, working hours per week, physical activity and working environment.

  6. Assessment of Functional and Musculoskeletal Problems, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jibril Mohammed

    services. The questionnaires were administered to 384 elderly consenting individuals (aged 60 years and above) ... musculoskeletal problems had good ADL performance capacity rating. ..... may be that many of them scored high on tasks that.

  7. Psychosocial stressors at work and musculoskeletal problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.L.D.; Bongers, P.M.; Smulders, P.G.W.; Kompier, M.A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Objectives - This paper examines the relationship between work stressors and the following health indicators: psychosomatic complaints, health behavior, and musculoskeletal problems. Methods - Secondary analyses were performed on data from the National Work and Living Condition Survey, which

  8. WORK RELATED MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS: A SURVEY OF PHYSIOTHERAPISTS IN TRICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Maheshwari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal system disorders are common among health care workers worldwide. They are common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs are defined as “regional impairments of the muscles, tendons, nerves and joints. Physiotherapy can lead to WRMSDs in physiotherapist because of the nature of their profession. Despite of having expert knowledge of musculoskeletal injuries and injury prevention strategies they still report a high incidence of work-related injuries during their professional practice due to their training and continuous professional development Methods: A total of 100 Physiotherapists which included 78 females and 22 males in the age group of 21 to 40 years were recruited in the study. The subjects were taken as per the inclusion and exclusion criteria from Tricity. Results: Pearson’s correlation and Chi square analysis was used to determine correlation and the association of prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms with personal characteristics, job risk factors and coping strategies. The data obtained from this study documents that majority of Physiotherapists have experienced WRMSDs at some time. The prevalence of WRMSDs among Physiotherapists in Tricity is high (91%. The most common risk factors identified in the present study were dealing with an excessive number of patients in one day; continuing to work while injured or hurt; lifting or transferring dependent patients and work scheduling. In present study, the low back and neck regions were the most commonly affected site among physiotherapists (72.5% each followed by upper back (28.6 %, shoulder (20.9%, wrist and hand (17.6%, knee (12.1%, ankle and foot (12.1% and hip (7.70% Conclusions: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are an important health risk within the physiotherapy profession. The prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among the Physiotherapists in Tricity is high that

  9. Human-Systems Integration (HSI) Methodology Development for NASA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Human-Systems Integration (HSI) refers to design activities associated with ensuring that manpower, personnel, training, human factors engineering, safety, health...

  10. Musculoskeletal Imaging Findings of Hematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Shannon M; Matcuk, George R; Patel, Dakshesh B; Skalski, Matthew; White, Eric A; Tomasian, Anderanik; Schein, Aaron J

    2017-01-01

    Hematologic malignancies comprise a set of prevalent yet clinically diverse diseases that can affect every organ system. Because blood components originate in bone marrow, it is no surprise that bone marrow is a common location for both primary and metastatic hematologic neoplasms. Findings of hematologic malignancy can be seen with most imaging modalities including radiography, computed tomography (CT), technetium 99m ( 99m Tc) methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scanning, fluorine 18 ( 18 F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Because of the diversity of imaging appearances and clinical behavior of this spectrum of disease, diagnosis can be challenging, and profound understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic changes and current treatment modalities can be daunting. The appearance of normal bone marrow at MR imaging and FDG PET/CT is also varied due to dynamic compositional changes with normal aging and in response to hematologic demand or treatment, which can lead to false-positive interpretation of imaging studies. In this article, the authors review the normal maturation and imaging appearance of bone marrow. Focusing on lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma, they present the spectrum of imaging findings of hematologic malignancy affecting the musculoskeletal system and the current imaging tools available to the radiologist. They discuss the imaging findings of posttreatment bone marrow and review commonly used staging systems and consensus recommendations for appropriate imaging for staging, management, and assessment of clinical remission. © RSNA, 2017.

  11. Improving musculoskeletal health: global issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Girish M; Brooks, Peter M

    2012-04-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders are among the leading reasons why patients consult a family or primary health practitioner, take time off work and become disabled. Many of the MSK disorders are more common in the elderly. Thus, as the proportion of the elderly increases all over the world, MSK disorders will make a greater contribution to the global burden of disease. Epidemiological studies have shown that the spectrum of MSK disorders in developing countries is similar to that seen in industrialised countries, but the burden of disease tends to be higher due to a delay in diagnosis or lack of access to adequate health-care facilities for effective treatment. Musculoskeletal pain is very common in the community while fibromyalgia is being recognised as part of a continuum of chronic widespread pain rather than a narrowly defined entity. This will allow research to improve our understanding of pain in a variety of diffuse pain syndromes. The availability of newer more effective therapies has resulted in efforts to initiate therapy at an earlier stage of diseases. The new criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and the diagnosis of axial and peripheral involvement in spondyloarthritis, permit an earlier diagnosis without having to wait for radiological changes. One of the major health challenges is the global shortage of health workers, and based on current training of health workers and traditional models of care for service delivery, the global situation is unlikely to change in the near future. Thus, new models of care and strategies to train community health-care workers and primary health-care practitioners to detect and initiate the management of patients with MSK disorders at an earlier stage are required. There is also a need for prevention strategies with campaigns to educate and raise awareness among the entire population. Lifestyle interventions such as maintaining an ideal body weight to prevent obesity, regular exercises, avoidance of smoking and alcohol

  12. Radionuclide imaging of musculoskeletal infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Palestro

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide imaging studies are routinely used to evaluate patients suspected of having musculoskeletal infection. Three-phase bone imaging is readily available, relatively inexpensive, and very accurate in the setting of otherwise normal bone. Labeled leukocyte imaging should be used in cases of "complicating osteomyelitis" such as prosthetic joint infection. This test also is useful in clinically unsuspected diabetic pedal osteomyelitis as well as in the neuropathic joint. It is often necessary, however, to perform complementary bone marrow imaging, to maximize the accuracy of labeled leukocyte imaging. In contrast to other regions in the skeleton, labeled leukocyte imaging is not useful for diagnosing spinal osteomyelitis. At the moment, gallium is the preferred radionuclide procedure for this condition and is a useful adjunct to magnetic resonance imaging. FDG-PET likely will play an important role in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infection, especially spinal osteomyelitis, and may replace gallium imaging for this purpose.Estudos através de imagens com o uso de radionuclídeos são rotineiramente usadas para avaliar pacientes suspeitos de terem infecção músculo-esquelética. A imagem óssea em tridimensional é facilmente avaliável, relativamente de baixo custo, e muito precisa na localização de alterações ósseas. Imagem com leucócito marcado poderia ser usada nos casos de "osteomielite com complicações" tais como infecção prostética articular. Esse teste também é útil na não suspeita clinica de osteomielite associada ao pé diabético tanto quanto nas junções neuropáticas. É sempre necessário, por outro lado, realizar imagem complementar da medula óssea para aumentar a precisão da imagem com leucócito marcado. Em contraste com outras regiões no esqueleto, imagem com leucócito marcado não é útil para diagnosticar osteomielite da coluna vertebral. Até agora, o gálio é o radionuclídeo preferido para

  13. Infant carrying methods: Correlates and associated musculoskeletal disorders among nursing mothers in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojukwu, Chidiebele Petronilla; Anyanwu, Godson Emeka; Anekwu, Emelie Morris; Chukwu, Sylvester Caesar; Fab-Agbo, Chukwubuikem

    2017-10-01

    Infant carrying is an integral part of the mothering occupation. Paucity of data exists on its correlates and associated musculoskeletal injuries. In this study, factors and musculoskeletal injuries associated with infant carrying were investigated in 227 nursing mothers, using a structured questionnaire. 77.1% utilised the back infant carrying methods (ICM). Maternal comfort was the major factor influencing participants' (37.4%) choices of ICMs. Infant's age (p = .000) and transportation means (p = .045) were significantly associated with ICMs. Low back pain (82.8%) and upper back pain (74.9%) were the most reported musculoskeletal discomforts associated with ICMs, especially among women who utilised back ICM. Back ICM is predominantly used by nursing mothers. Impact statement Infant carrying has been associated with increased energy cost and biomechanical changes. Currently, there is a paucity of data on infant carrying-related musculoskeletal injuries. In this study, investigating factors and musculoskeletal injuries associated with infant carrying, the results showed that back infant carrying method is predominantly used by nursing mothers. Age of the infant and mothers' means of transportation were determinant factors of infant carrying methods. Among the several reported infant carrying-related musculoskeletal disorders, low back and upper back pain were the most prevalent, especially among women who utilised the back infant carrying method. There is need for women's health specialists to introduce appropriate ergonomic training and interventions on infant carrying tasks in order to improve maternal musculoskeletal health during the childbearing years and beyond. Further experimental studies on the effects of various infant carrying methods on the musculoskeletal system are recommended.

  14. Integrating spaceflight human system risk research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Anton, Wilma; Havenhill, Maria; Shelhamer, Mark; Canga, Michael

    2017-10-01

    NASA is working to increase the likelihood of exploration mission success and to maintain crew health, both during exploration missions and long term after return to Earth. To manage the risks in achieving these goals, a system modelled after a Continuous Risk Management framework is in place. ;Human System Risks; (Risks) have been identified, and 32 are currently being actively addressed by NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). Research plans for each of HRP's Risks have been developed and are being executed. Inter-disciplinary ties between the research efforts supporting each Risk have been identified; however, efforts to identify and benefit from these connections have been mostly ad hoc. There is growing recognition that solutions developed to address the full set of Risks covering medical, physiological, behavioural, vehicle, and organizational aspects of exploration missions must be integrated across Risks and disciplines. This paper discusses how a framework of factors influencing human health and performance in space is being applied as the backbone for bringing together sometimes disparate information relevant to the individual Risks. The resulting interrelated information enables identification and visualization of connections between Risks and research efforts in a systematic and standardized manner. This paper also discusses the applications of the visualizations and insights into research planning, solicitation, and decision-making processes.

  15. Lateralization of the human mirror neuron system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa; Koski, Lisa; Zaidel, Eran; Mazziotta, John; Iacoboni, Marco

    2006-03-15

    A cortical network consisting of the inferior frontal, rostral inferior parietal, and posterior superior temporal cortices has been implicated in representing actions in the primate brain and is critical to imitation in humans. This neural circuitry may be an evolutionary precursor of neural systems associated with language. However, language is predominantly lateralized to the left hemisphere, whereas the degree of lateralization of the imitation circuitry in humans is unclear. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of imitation of finger movements with lateralized stimuli and responses. During imitation, activity in the inferior frontal and rostral inferior parietal cortex, although fairly bilateral, was stronger in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the visual stimulus and response hand. This ipsilateral pattern is at variance with the typical contralateral activity of primary visual and motor areas. Reliably increased signal in the right superior temporal sulcus (STS) was observed for both left-sided and right-sided imitation tasks, although subthreshold activity was also observed in the left STS. Overall, the data indicate that visual and motor components of the human mirror system are not left-lateralized. The left hemisphere superiority for language, then, must be have been favored by other types of language precursors, perhaps auditory or multimodal action representations.

  16. The interactive evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Garrod, Simon; Roberts, Leo; Swoboda, Nik

    2010-04-01

    This paper compares two explanations of the process by which human communication systems evolve: iterated learning and social collaboration. It then reports an experiment testing the social collaboration account. Participants engaged in a graphical communication task either as a member of a community, where they interacted with seven different partners drawn from the same pool, or as a member of an isolated pair, where they interacted with the same partner across the same number of games. Participants' horizontal, pair-wise interactions led "bottom up" to the creation of an effective and efficient shared sign system in the community condition. Furthermore, the community-evolved sign systems were as effective and efficient as the local sign systems developed by isolated pairs. Finally, and as predicted by a social collaboration account, and not by an iterated learning account, interaction was critical to the creation of shared sign systems, with different isolated pairs establishing different local sign systems and different communities establishing different global sign systems. Copyright © 2010 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  17. Human-centered design of the human-system interfaces of medical equipment: thyroid uptake system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Jonathan K.R.; Farias, Marcos S.; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti; Monteiro, Beany G.

    2013-01-01

    Technology plays an important role in modern medical centers, making healthcare increasingly complex, relying on complex technical equipment. This technical complexity is particularly noticeable in the nuclear medicine. Poorly design human-system interfaces can increase the risks for human error. The human-centered approach emphasizes the development of the equipment with a deep understanding of the users activities, current work practices, needs and abilities of the users. An important concept of human-centered design is that the ease-of-use of the equipment can be ensured only if users are actively incorporated in all phases of the life cycle of design process. Representative groups of users are exposed to the equipment at various stages in development, in a variety of testing, evaluation and interviewing situations. The users feedback obtained is then used to refine the design, with the result serving as input to the next interaction of design process. The limits of the approach are that the users cannot address any particular future needs without prior experience or knowledge about the equipment operation. The aim of this paper is to present a methodological framework that contributes to the design of the human-system interfaces, through an approach related to the users and their activities. A case study is described in which the methodological framework is being applied in development of new human-system interfaces of the thyroid uptake system. (author)

  18. Mini Treadmill for Musculoskeletal Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Because NASA's approach to space exploration calls for long-term extended missions, there is a pressing need to equip astronauts with effective exercise regimens that will maintain musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health. ZIN Technologies, Inc., has developed an innovative miniature treadmill for use in both zero-gravity and terrestrial environments. The treadmill offers excellent periodic impact exercise to stimulate cardiovascular activity and bone remodeling as well as resistive capability to encourage full-body muscle maintenance. A novel speed-control algorithm allows users to modulate treadmill speed by adjusting stride, and a new subject load device provides a more Earth-like gravity replacement load. This new and compact treadmill offers a unique approach to managing astronaut health while addressing the inherent and stringent challenges of space flight. The innovation also has the potential to offer numerous terrestrial applications, as a real-time daily load stimulus (DLS) measurement feature provides an effective mechanism to combat or manage osteoporosis, a major public health threat for 55 percent of Americans over the age of 50.

  19. How to bootstrap a human communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nicolas; Arbib, Michael; Garrod, Simon

    2013-01-01

    How might a human communication system be bootstrapped in the absence of conventional language? We argue that motivated signs play an important role (i.e., signs that are linked to meaning by structural resemblance or by natural association). An experimental study is then reported in which participants try to communicate a range of pre-specified items to a partner using repeated non-linguistic vocalization, repeated gesture, or repeated non-linguistic vocalization plus gesture (but without using their existing language system). Gesture proved more effective (measured by communication success) and more efficient (measured by the time taken to communicate) than non-linguistic vocalization across a range of item categories (emotion, object, and action). Combining gesture and vocalization did not improve performance beyond gesture alone. We experimentally demonstrate that gesture is a more effective means of bootstrapping a human communication system. We argue that gesture outperforms non-linguistic vocalization because it lends itself more naturally to the production of motivated signs. © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Motor control and the management of musculoskeletal dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Paulette M; Heneghan, Nicola R

    2006-08-01

    This paper aims to develop understanding of three important motor control issues--feedforward mechanisms, cortical plasticity and task-specificity and assess the implications for musculoskeletal practice. A model of control for the reach-to-grasp movement illustrates how the central nervous system integrates sensorimotor processes to control complex movements. Feedforward mechanisms, an essential element of motor control, are altered in neurologically intact patients with chronic neck pain and low back pain. In healthy subjects, cortical mapping studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation have demonstrated that neural pathways adapt according to what and how much is practised. Neuroplasticity has also been demonstrated in a number of musculoskeletal conditions, where cortical maps are altered compared to normal. Behavioural and neurophysiological studies indicate that environmental and task constraints such as the goal of the task and an object's shape and size, are determinants of the motor schema for reaching and other movements. Consideration of motor control issues as well as signs and symptoms, may facilitate management of musculoskeletal conditions and improve outcome. Practice of entire everyday tasks at an early stage and systematic variation of the task is recommended. Training should be directed with the aim of re-educating feedforward mechanisms where necessary and the amount of practice should be sufficient to cause changes in cortical activity.

  1. Biological stress systems, adverse life events and the onset of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain: a six-year cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Generaal, E.; Vogelzangs, N.; MacFarlane, G.J.; Geenen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/087017571; Smit, J.H.; de Geus, E.J.C.N.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Dekker, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Dysregulated biological stress systems and adverse life events, independently and in interaction, have been hypothesised to initiate chronic pain. We examine whether (1) function of biological stress systems, (2) adverse life events, and (3) their combination predict the onset of chronic

  2. Update on ultrasound elastography: Miscellanea. Prostate, testicle, musculo-skeletal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correas, J.M.; Drakonakis, E.; Isidori, A.M.; Hélénon, O.; Pozza, C.; Cantisani, V.; Di Leo, N.; Maghella, F.; Rubini, A.; Drudi, F.M.; D’ambrosio, F.

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays ultrasound elastosonography is an established technique, although with limited clinical application, used to assess tissue stiffness, which is a parameter that in most cases is associated with malignancy. However, although a consistent number of articles have been published about several applications of elastosonography, its use in certain human body districts is still not well defined. In this paper we write on the use of elastosonography in prostate, testicle and musculo-skeletal apparatus. We report and compare the work of several authors, different type of elastosonography (shear wave, strain elastography, etc.) and instrumental data obtained in the study of both benign and malignant lesions

  3. Update on ultrasound elastography: Miscellanea. Prostate, testicle, musculo-skeletal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correas, J.M. [Descartes University and Necker University Hospital, Department of Adult Radiology, Paris (France); Drakonakis, E. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom); Isidori, A.M. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); Hélénon, O. [Descartes University and Necker University Hospital, Department of Adult Radiology, Paris (France); Pozza, C. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); Cantisani, V., E-mail: vito.cantisani@uniroma1.it [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Di Leo, N.; Maghella, F.; Rubini, A.; Drudi, F.M.; D’ambrosio, F. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy)

    2013-11-01

    Nowadays ultrasound elastosonography is an established technique, although with limited clinical application, used to assess tissue stiffness, which is a parameter that in most cases is associated with malignancy. However, although a consistent number of articles have been published about several applications of elastosonography, its use in certain human body districts is still not well defined. In this paper we write on the use of elastosonography in prostate, testicle and musculo-skeletal apparatus. We report and compare the work of several authors, different type of elastosonography (shear wave, strain elastography, etc.) and instrumental data obtained in the study of both benign and malignant lesions.

  4. Biological stress systems, adverse life events and the improvement of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain across a 6-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Generaal, E.; Vogelzangs, N.; Macfarlane, G.J.; Geenen, R.; Smit, J.H.; de Geus, E.J.C.N.; Dekker, J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    Dysfunction of biological stress systems and adverse life events, independently and in interaction, have been hypothesized to predict chronic pain persistence. Conversely, these factors may hamper the improvement of chronic pain. Longitudinal evidence is currently lacking. We examined whether: 1)

  5. Biological Stress Systems, Adverse Life Events, and the Improvement of Chronic Multisite Musculoskeletal Pain Across a 6-Year Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Generaal, Ellen; Vogelzangs, Nicole; Macfarlane, Gary J; Geenen, Rinie; Smit, Johannes H; de Geus, Eco J C N; Dekker, Joost; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    Dysfunction of biological stress systems and adverse life events, independently and in interaction, have been hypothesized to predict chronic pain persistence. Conversely, these factors may hamper the improvement of chronic pain. Longitudinal evidence is currently lacking. We examined whether: 1)

  6. Guidance for Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.; Higgins, J.; Stephen Fleger; Valerie Barnes

    2010-09-27

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions, including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: Levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration.

  7. Responsibility for managing musculoskeletal disorders--a cross-sectional postal survey of attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Maria E H; Nordholm, Lena A

    2008-08-05

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a major burden on individuals, health systems and social care systems and rehabilitation efforts in these disorders are considerable. Self-care is often considered a cost effective treatment alternative owing to limited health care resources. But what are the expectations and attitudes in this question in the general population? The purpose of this study was to describe general attitudes to responsibility for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and to explore associations between attitudes and background variables. A cross-sectional, postal questionnaire survey was carried out with a random sample of a general adult Swedish population of 1770 persons. Sixty-one percent (n = 1082) responded to the questionnaire and was included for the description of general attitudes towards responsibility for the management of musculoskeletal disorders. For the further analyses of associations to background variables 683-693 individuals could be included. Attitudes were measured by the "Attitudes regarding Responsibility for Musculoskeletal disorders" (ARM) instrument, where responsibility is attributed on four dimensions; to myself, as being out of my hands, to employers or to (medical) professionals. Multiple logistic regression was used to explore associations between attitudes to musculoskeletal disorders and the background variables age, sex, education, physical activity, presence of musculoskeletal disorders, sick leave and whether the person had visited a care provider. A majority of participants had internal views, i.e. showed an attitude of taking personal responsibility for musculoskeletal disorders, and did not place responsibility for the management out of their own hands or to employers. However, attributing shared responsibility between self and medical professionals was also found. The main associations found between attitude towards responsibility for musculoskeletal disorders and investigated background variables were that

  8. Responsibility for managing musculoskeletal disorders – A cross-sectional postal survey of attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Maria EH

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal disorders are a major burden on individuals, health systems and social care systems and rehabilitation efforts in these disorders are considerable. Self-care is often considered a cost effective treatment alternative owing to limited health care resources. But what are the expectations and attitudes in this question in the general population? The purpose of this study was to describe general attitudes to responsibility for the management of musculoskeletal disorders and to explore associations between attitudes and background variables. Methods A cross-sectional, postal questionnaire survey was carried out with a random sample of a general adult Swedish population of 1770 persons. Sixty-one percent (n = 1082 responded to the questionnaire and was included for the description of general attitudes towards responsibility for the management of musculoskeletal disorders. For the further analyses of associations to background variables 683–693 individuals could be included. Attitudes were measured by the "Attitudes regarding Responsibility for Musculoskeletal disorders" (ARM instrument, where responsibility is attributed on four dimensions; to myself, as being out of my hands, to employers or to (medical professionals. Multiple logistic regression was used to explore associations between attitudes to musculoskeletal disorders and the background variables age, sex, education, physical activity, presence of musculoskeletal disorders, sick leave and whether the person had visited a care provider. Results A majority of participants had internal views, i.e. showed an attitude of taking personal responsibility for musculoskeletal disorders, and did not place responsibility for the management out of their own hands or to employers. However, attributing shared responsibility between self and medical professionals was also found. The main associations found between attitude towards responsibility for musculoskeletal

  9. Investigation of human system interface design in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yan; Zhang Yunbo; Wang Zhongqiu

    2012-01-01

    The paper introduces the importance of HFE in designing nuclear power plant, and introduces briefly the content and scope of HFE, discusses human system interface design of new built nuclear power plants. This paper also describes human system interface design of foreign nuclear power plant, and describes in detail human system interface design of domestic nuclear power plant. (authors)

  10. Temporal Role for MyD88 in a Model of Brucella-Induced Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Carolyn A; Mitchell, William J; Brown, Charles R; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2017-03-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacteria that cause the zoonotic disease brucellosis, one of the most common global zoonoses. Osteomyelitis, arthritis, and musculoskeletal inflammation are common focal complications of brucellosis in humans; however, wild-type (WT) mice infected systemically with conventional doses of Brucella do not develop these complications. Here we report C57BL/6 WT mice infected via the footpad with 10 3 to 10 6 CFU of Brucella spp. display neutrophil and monocyte infiltration of the joint space and surrounding musculoskeletal tissue. Joint inflammation is detectable as early as 1 day postinfection and peaks 1 to 2 weeks later, after which WT mice are able to slowly resolve inflammation. B and T cells were dispensable for the onset of swelling but required for resolution of joint inflammation and infection. At early time points, MyD88 -/- mice display decreased joint inflammation, swelling, and proinflammatory cytokine levels relative to WT mice. Subsequently, swelling of MyD88 -/- joints surpassed WT joint swelling, and resolution of joint inflammation was prolonged. Joint bacterial loads in MyD88 -/- mice were significantly greater than those in WT mice by day 3 postinfection and at all time points thereafter. In addition, MyD88 -/- joint inflammatory cytokine levels on day 3 and beyond were similar to WT levels. Collectively these data demonstrate MyD88 signaling mediates early inflammatory responses in the joint but also contributes to subsequent clearance of Brucella and resolution of inflammation. This work also establishes a mouse model for studying Brucella -induced arthritis, musculoskeletal complications, and systemic responses, which will lead to a better understanding of focal complications of brucellosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Unifying Human Centered Design and Systems Engineering for Human Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Guy A.; McGovernNarkevicius, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Despite the holistic approach of systems engineering (SE), systems still fail, and sometimes spectacularly. Requirements, solutions and the world constantly evolve and are very difficult to keep current. SE requires more flexibility and new approaches to SE have to be developed to include creativity as an integral part and where the functions of people and technology are appropriately allocated within our highly interconnected complex organizations. Instead of disregarding complexity because it is too difficult to handle, we should take advantage of it, discovering behavioral attractors and the emerging properties that it generates. Human-centered design (HCD) provides the creativity factor that SE lacks. It promotes modeling and simulation from the early stages of design and throughout the life cycle of a product. Unifying HCD and SE will shape appropriate human-systems integration (HSI) and produce successful systems.

  12. International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies: A model for international collaboration to promote orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Miclau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In October 2013, the International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies (ICORS; http://i-cors.org was founded with inaugural member organisations from the previous Combined Orthopaedic Research Society, which had sponsored combined meetings for more than 2 decades. The ICORS is dedicated to the stimulation of orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research in fields such as biomedical engineering, biology, chemistry, and veterinary and human clinical research. The ICORS seeks to facilitate communication with member organisations to enhance international research collaborations and to promote the development of new international orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research organisations. Through new categories of membership, the ICORS represents the broadest coalition of orthopaedic research organisations globally.

  13. Are Human and Natural Systems Decoupling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, P. R.; Ehrlich, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Typically, studies of coupled human and natural systems focus on reciprocating interactions and feedbacks between social systems and their biophysical environments. A major challenge today for CHANS scholars is to determine whether significant coupling remains or whether society is simply plunging ahead without reacting effectively to the deterioration of the environment. Thresholds for serious climate disruption are passing, toxification of Earth is proceeding apace and producing worrying symptoms, losses of vital biodiversity are at a 65 million-year high with serious consequences for ecosystem services, the epidemiological environment is deteriorating and a race is building to control water flows and extract the last high-quality resources, increasing the chances of ending civilization in an environment-wrecking nuclear war. The social system has attempted to respond to this perfect storm of problems. In the 1960s, building on much earlier work, scientists began assessing the consequences of an ever-growing human population and expanding consumption, overuse of pesticides, radioactive fallout, air and water pollution, and other environmental issues - and to recommend ameliorative steps. In the mid-1980s, biologists formed the discipline of conservation biology with the explicit purpose of stemming the hemorrhage of biodiversity. In the late 1980s, perhaps the single most important reaction to the worsening environmental situation was the development of the Montreal Protocol to preserve the vital stratospheric ozone layer. Around the same time, it dawned on the scientific community that climate disruption was going to be more immediate and dangerous than previously thought, but attempts by the world community to take mitigating steps have been pathetic. Action to deal with other dimensions of the environmental dilemma has been utterly inadequate. To see the growing disconnect, one only has to consider the attention paid in public discourse to the relatively

  14. Launch Pad Escape System Design (Human Spaceflight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Kelli

    2011-01-01

    A launch pad escape system for human spaceflight is one of those things that everyone hopes they will never need but is critical for every manned space program. Since men were first put into space in the early 1960s, the need for such an Emergency Escape System (EES) has become apparent. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has made use of various types of these EESs over the past 50 years. Early programs, like Mercury and Gemini, did not have an official launch pad escape system. Rather, they relied on a Launch Escape System (LES) of a separate solid rocket motor attached to the manned capsule that could pull the astronauts to safety in the event of an emergency. This could only occur after hatch closure at the launch pad or during the first stage of flight. A version of a LES, now called a Launch Abort System (LAS) is still used today for all manned capsule type launch vehicles. However, this system is very limited in that it can only be used after hatch closure and it is for flight crew only. In addition, the forces necessary for the LES/LAS to get the capsule away from a rocket during the first stage of flight are quite high and can cause injury to the crew. These shortcomings led to the development of a ground based EES for the flight crew and ground support personnel as well. This way, a much less dangerous mode of egress is available for any flight or ground personnel up to a few seconds before launch. The early EESs were fairly simple, gravity-powered systems to use when thing's go bad. And things can go bad very quickly and catastrophically when dealing with a flight vehicle fueled with millions of pounds of hazardous propellant. With this in mind, early EES designers saw such a passive/unpowered system as a must for last minute escapes. This and other design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at the safety design requirements had to be derived for an EES, and this section will take a look at

  15. Aquatic exercise & balneotherapy in musculoskeletal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Arianne P; Cardoso, Jefferson R; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2012-06-01

    This is a best-evidence synthesis providing an evidence-based summary on the effectiveness of aquatic exercises and balneotherapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. The most prevalent musculoskeletal conditions addressed in this review include: low back pain, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis. Over 30 years of research demonstrates that exercises in general, and specifically aquatic exercises, are beneficial for reducing pain and disability in many musculoskeletal conditions demonstrating small to moderate effect sizes ranging between 0.19 and 0.32. Balneotherapy might be beneficial, but the evidence is yet insufficient to make a definitive statement about its use. High-quality trials are needed on balneotherapy and aquatic exercises research especially in specific patient categories that might benefit most. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorder survey for pond workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maryani, A.; Partiwi, S. G.; Dewi, H. N. F.

    2018-04-01

    Mucsuloskeletal disorder will affect worker performance and become serious injury when ignored, so that workers cannot work normally. Therefore, an effective strategy plan is needed to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorder. A pond worker is profession with high risk of physical complain. Four main activities are ponds preparation, seed distribution, pond maintenance, and harvesting. The methods employed in this current musculoskeletal disorder survey are questionnaire and interview. The result from 73 questionnaires shown that most of pond workers were working for 7 days a week. Prevalence physical complain are on neck, shoulders, upper back, lower back, and knees. The level of perceived complaint is moderate pain. However, most of them do not contact therapists or physicians. Therefore it is necessary to improve the working methods to be able to reduce physical complains due to musculoskeletal disorder.

  17. Complementary and alternative treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazio, Simeon; Balen, Diana

    2011-12-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high and increasing worldwide. Patients usually use CAM in addition to conventional medicine, mainly to treat pain. In a large number of cases, people use CAM for chronic musculoskeletal pain as in osteoarthritis, back pain, neck pain, or fibromyalgia. Herewith, a review is presented of CAM efficacy in treating musculoskeletal pain for which, however, no scientific research has so far provided evidence solid enough. In some rare cases where adequate pain control cannot be achieved, CAM might be considered in rational and individual approach based on the first general rule in medicine "not to harm" and on the utility theory of each intervention, i.e. according to the presumed mechanism of painful stimulus and with close monitoring of the patient's response. Further high quality studies are warranted to elucidate the efficacy and side effects of CAM methods. Therefore, conventional medicine remains the main mode of treatment for patients with musculoskeletal painful conditions.

  18. Metagenomic Systems Biology of the Human Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ida

    The human microbiome is an integrated part of the human body, outnumbering the human cells by approximately a factor 10. These microorganisms are very important for human health, hence knowledge about this, ”our other genome”, has been growing rapidly in recent years. This is manly due to the adv...

  19. Physical Ergonomics and Musculoskeletal Disorders: What's hot? What's cool?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, A.J. van der; IJmker, S.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter discusses the physical ergonomics and musculoskeletal disorders and summarizes the Triennial International Ergonomics Association (IEA) World Congress 2006-IEA2006-highlights on physical ergonomics and work-related MusculoSkeletal Disorders (MSDs). Two general trends are observed.

  20. Chernobyl - system accident or human error?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stang, E.

    1996-01-01

    Did human error cause the Chernobyl disaster? The standard point of view is that operator error was the root cause of the disaster. This was also the view of the Soviet Accident Commission. The paper analyses the operator errors at Chernobyl in a system context. The reactor operators committed errors that depended upon a lot of other failures that made up a complex accident scenario. The analysis is based on Charles Perrow's analysis of technological disasters. Failure possibility is an inherent property of high-risk industrial installations. The Chernobyl accident consisted of a chain of events that were both extremely improbable and difficult to predict. It is not reasonable to put the blame for the disaster on the operators. (author)

  1. THE N.I. PIROGOV'S CONTRIBUTION TO THE SURGERY OF MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM (ON THE OCCASION OF THE 200-th ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Tikhilov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of the scientific heritage the authors presented the contribution of the great Russian surgeon N.I. Pirogov in the development of surgery of the locomotor system. Discussed in detail next lines of activity of N.I. Pirogov being of interest of trauma and orthopedic surgeons, in particular the: anatomical and physiological approach to studying the issues of surgery of extremities, development of scientific and organizational bases in the domestic military-field surgery, the Pirogov's ideas in the field of reconstructive surgery of the extremities, as well as its contribution to the reforming of surgical education in Russia and improvement of the domestic surgical instruments.

  2. MR imaging of appendicular musculoskeletal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kathol, M.H.; Montgomery, W.J.; Yuh, W.T.C.; El-Khoury, G.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty cases of musculoskeletal trauma to the extremities examined by MR imaging have been reviewed retrospectively. Examples of various injuries will be shown, including disruption of ligament and tendon, muscular tear and edema, hemorrhage (local or diffuse), vascular injury, bone marrow contusion, osteocartilaginous fracture, meniscal tear, and joint fluid. Many of these patients were collegiate athletes, and MR was valuable in establishing a rapid, accurate diagnosis influencing not only treatment but also return to competition. Negative examinations allowed resumption of competition with a high degree of confidence. The advantages and disadvantages of MR in musculo-skeletal trauma are discussed

  3. International spinal cord injury musculoskeletal basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Burns, A S; Curt, A

    2012-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Musculoskeletal Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets to facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic musculoskeletal findings in the SCI population.Setting:International....

  4. Coupled Human-Atmosphere-System Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Chabay, Ilan

    2014-05-01

    minimize atmospheric release, but rather only complies with either climate or air quality requirements. Nor do current narratives promote behavioral change for the overall reduction of emissions (e.g., you can drive your diesel SUV as long as it has a low fuel consumption). This divide and thinking has not only been manifested in policy and regulations and hence media coverage, but has also shaped the public's general perception of this issue. There is no public conceptual understanding regarding humanity's modification of the atmosphere through the continuously and simultaneously released substances by almost any kind of activity and resulting impacts. Here, we propose a conceptual framework that provides a new perspective on the coupled human-atmosphere-system. It makes tangible the inherent linkages between the socio-economic system, the atmospheric physico-chemical changes and impacts, and legal frameworks for sustainable transformations at all levels. To implement HAS-thinking in decision and policy making, both salient disciplinary and interdisciplinary research and comprehensive science-society interactions in the form of transdisciplinary research are necessary. Societal transformations for the sake of a healthy human-atmosphere relationship are highly context dependent and require discussions of normative and value-related issues, which can only be solved through co-designed solutions. We demonstrate the importance of HAS-thinking by examples of sustainable development in the Arctic and Himalayan countries.

  5. Chronic Musculoskeletal Disabilities following Snake Envenoming in Sri Lanka: A Population-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subashini Jayawardana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Snakebite is a major public health problem in agricultural communities in the tropics leading to acute local and systemic impairments with resultant disabilities. Snakebite related long-term musculoskeletal disabilities have been a neglected area of research. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study in an agricultural community to describe the chronic musculoskeletal disabilities of snake envenoming.A sample representative of residents of a single district in a region of high incidence of snake envenoming was recruited to identify ever snakebite victims. They were evaluated for chronic musculoskeletal disabilities that had developed immediately or within four weeks after the snakebite and persisted over three months. In-depth interviews, validated musculoskeletal functional assessment criteria and specialists' examinations were utilised. Among the 816 victims, 26 (3.2%, 95% confidence interval: 2.2-4.6% had musculoskeletal disabilities, persisting on average for 13.4 years (SD = 14.4. The disabilities were mostly in lower limbs (61.5% and ranged from swelling (34.6%, muscle wasting (46.1%, reduced motion (61.5%, reduced muscle power (50%, impaired balance (26.9%, chronic non-healing ulcers (3.85%, abnormal gait (3.85%, fixed deformities (19.2% to amputations (15.4%. Based on disability patterns, six snakebite-related musculoskeletal syndromes were recognised. The offending snakes causing disabilities were cobra (30.8%, Russell's viper (26.9% and hump-nosed viper (7.7%. Cobra bites manifested muscle wasting (87.5%, reduced muscle power (87.5%, joint stiffness (62.5% and deformities (37.5% while viper bites manifested impaired balance (42.8%, pain (71.4% and swelling (71.4%.Snakebite envenoming is associated with considerable long-term musculoskeletal disabilities. Facilities for specialized care and rehabilitation need to be established in high risk areas.

  6. Work-organisational and personal factors associated with upper body musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P-C; Rempel, D M; Harrison, R J; Chan, J; Ritz, B R

    2007-12-01

    To assess the contribution of work-organisational and personal factors to the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) among garment workers in Los Angeles. This is a cross-sectional study of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 520 sewing machine operators from 13 garment industry sewing shops. Detailed information on work-organisational factors, personal factors, and musculoskeletal symptoms were obtained in face-to-face interviews. The outcome of interest, upper body WMSD, was defined as a worker experiencing moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain. Unconditional logistic regression models were adopted to assess the association between both work-organisational factors and personal factors and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain. The prevalence of moderate or severe musculoskeletal pain in the neck/shoulder region was 24% and for distal upper extremity it was 16%. Elevated prevalence of upper body pain was associated with age less than 30 years, female gender, Hispanic ethnicity, being single, having a diagnosis of a MSD or a systemic illness, working more than 10 years as a sewing machine operator, using a single sewing machine, work in large shops, higher work-rest ratios, high physical exertion, high physical isometric loads, high job demand, and low job satisfaction. Work-organisational and personal factors were associated with increased prevalence of moderate or severe upper body musculoskeletal pain among garment workers. Owners of sewing companies may be able to reduce or prevent WMSDs among employees by adopting rotations between different types of workstations thus increasing task variety; by either shortening work periods or increasing rest periods to reduce the work-rest ratio; and by improving the work-organisation to control psychosocial stressors. The findings may guide prevention efforts in the garment sector and have important public health implications for this workforce of largely immigrant labourers.

  7. Epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries in a population of harness Standardbred racehorses in training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a substantial paucity of studies concerning musculoskeletal injuries in harness Standardbred racehorses. Specifically, little is known about the epidemiology of exercise-related musculoskeletal injuries. Most studies on this subject involve Thoroughbred racehorses, whose biomechanics and racing speed differ from Standardbred, making comparisons difficult. Here, a population of Standardbred racehorses trained at the same racecourse was studied over four years and a classification system for exercise-related musculoskeletal injuries was designed. The incidence rates of musculoskeletal injuries causing horses’ withdrawal from training for 15 days or longer were investigated. A mixed-effects Poisson regression model was used to estimate musculoskeletal injury rates and to describe significance of selected risk factors for exercise-related injuries in this population. Results A total of 356 trotter racehorses from 10 different stables contributed 8961 months at risk of musculoskeletal injuries. Four-hundred-and-twenty-nine injuries were reported and classified into 16 categories, based on their aetiology and anatomical localisation. The overall exercise-related injury rate was 4.79 per 100 horse months. When considering risk factors one by one in separate univariable analyses, we obtained the following results: rates did not differ significantly between genders and classes of age, whereas one driver seemed to cause fewer injuries than the others. Racing speed and racing intensity, as well as recent medical history, seemed to be significant risk factors (p fracture are lower in Standardbreds compared to Thoroughbreds, whereas the opposite is true for tendon and suspensory ligament injuries. In addition to identification of risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries among Standardbred racehorses, results suggest that racing intensity seems to be a protective predictor of risk and recent medical history could be used to identify horses at risk of

  8. Work related musculoskeletal disorders among farm workers: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders among farm workers: A case study of an agricultural college in Zimbabwe. ... hazards, therefore a need for intervention to protect them from musculoskeletal complaints. Improvement in farm work practices through ergonomic training might help reduce musculoskeletal complaints.

  9. Musculoskeletal injuries resulting from patient handling tasks among hospital workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeii, Lisa A; Lipscomb, Hester J; Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Dement, John M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate musculoskeletal injuries and disorders resulting from patient handling prior to the implementation of a "minimal manual lift" policy at a large tertiary care medical center. We sought to define the circumstances surrounding patient handling injuries and to identify potential preventive measures. Human resources data were used to define the cohort and their time at work. Workers' compensation records (1997-2003) were utilized to identify work-related musculoskeletal claims, while the workers' description of injury was used to identify those that resulted from patient handling. Adjusted rate ratios were generated using Poisson regression. One-third (n = 876) of all musculoskeletal injuries resulted from patient handling activities. Most (83%) of the injury burden was incurred by inpatient nurses, nurses' aides and radiology technicians, while injury rates were highest for nurses' aides (8.8/100 full-time equivalent, FTEs) and smaller workgroups including emergency medical technicians (10.3/100 FTEs), patient transporters (4.3/100 FTEs), operating room technicians (3.1/100 FTEs), and morgue technicians (2.2/100 FTEs). Forty percent of injuries due to lifting/transferring patients may have been prevented through the use of mechanical lift equipment, while 32% of injuries resulting from repositioning/turning patients, pulling patients up in bed, or catching falling patients may not have been prevented by the use of lift equipment. The use of mechanical lift equipment could significantly reduce the risk of some patient handling injuries but additional interventions need to be considered that address other patient handling tasks. Smaller high-risk workgroups should not be neglected in prevention efforts.

  10. Diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging for pediatric musculoskeletal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, John D.; Gonzalez, Leonardo; Hernandez, Andrea; Ruppert, Kai; Jaramillo, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a powerful tool that has recently been applied to evaluate several pediatric musculoskeletal disorders. DWI probes abnormalities of tissue structure by detecting microscopic changes in water mobility that develop when disease alters the organization of normal tissue. DWI provides tissue characterization at a cellular level beyond what is available with other imaging techniques, and can sometimes identify pathology before gross anatomic alterations manifest. These features of early detection and tissue characterization make DWI particularly appealing for probing diseases that affect the musculoskeletal system. This article focuses on the current and future applications of DWI in the musculoskeletal system, with particular attention paid to pediatric disorders. Although most of the applications are experimental, we have emphasized the current state of knowledge and the main research questions that need to be investigated. (orig.)

  11. Human reliability in complex systems: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embrey, D.E.

    1976-07-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the main conceptual background underlying the areas of human reliability and human error. The concept of error is examined and generalized to that of human reliability, and some of the practical and methodological difficulties of reconciling the different standpoints of the human factors specialist and the engineer discussed. Following a survey of general reviews available on human reliability, quantitative techniques for prediction of human reliability are considered. An in-depth critical analysis of the various quantitative methods is then presented, together with the data bank requirements for human reliability prediction. Reliability considerations in process control and nuclear plant, and also areas of design, maintenance, testing and emergency situations are discussed. The effects of stress on human reliability are analysed and methods of minimizing these effects discussed. Finally, a summary is presented and proposals for further research are set out. (author)

  12. Lessons learned from HRA and human-system modeling efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallbert, B.P.

    1993-01-01

    Human-System modeling is not unique to the field of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). Since human factors professionals first began their explorations of human activities, they have done so with the concept of open-quotes systemclose quotes in mind. Though the two - human and system - are distinct, they can be properly understood only in terms of each other: the system provides a context in which goals and objectives for work are defined, and the human plays either a pre-defined or ad hoc role in meeting these goals. In this sense, every intervention which attempts to evaluate or improve upon some system parameter requires that an understanding of human-system interactions be developed. It is too often the case, however, that somewhere between the inception of a system and its implementation, the human-system relationships are overlooked, misunderstood, or inadequately framed. This results in mismatches between demands versus capabilities of human operators, systems which are difficult to operate, and the obvious end product-human error. The lessons learned from human system modeling provide a valuable feedback mechanism to the process of HRA, and the technologies which employ this form of modeling

  13. Human Errors and Bridge Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Nowak, A. S.

    on basis of reliability profiles for bridges without human errors are extended to include bridges with human errors. The first rehabilitation distributions for bridges without and with human errors are combined into a joint first rehabilitation distribution. The methodology presented is illustrated...... for reinforced concrete bridges....

  14. Reorganization of the human central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalow, G; Zäch, G A

    2000-10-01

    The key strategies on which the discovery of the functional organization of the central nervous system (CNS) under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions have been based included (1) our measurements of phase and frequency coordination between the firings of alpha- and gamma-motoneurons and secondary muscle spindle afferents in the human spinal cord, (2) knowledge on CNS reorganization derived upon the improvement of the functions of the lesioned CNS in our patients in the short-term memory and the long-term memory (reorganization), and (3) the dynamic pattern approach for re-learning rhythmic coordinated behavior. The theory of self-organization and pattern formation in nonequilibrium systems is explicitly related to our measurements of the natural firing patterns of sets of identified single neurons in the human spinal premotor network and re-learned coordinated movements following spinal cord and brain lesions. Therapy induced cell proliferation, and maybe, neurogenesis seem to contribute to the host of structural changes during the process of re-learning of the lesioned CNS. So far, coordinated functions like movements could substantially be improved in every of the more than 100 patients with a CNS lesion by applying coordination dynamic therapy. As suggested by the data of our patients on re-learning, the human CNS seems to have a second integrative strategy for learning, re-learning, storing and recalling, which makes an essential contribution of the functional plasticity following a CNS lesion. A method has been developed by us for the simultaneous recording with wire electrodes of extracellular action potentials from single human afferent and efferent nerve fibres of undamaged sacral nerve roots. A classification scheme of the nerve fibres in the human peripheral nervous system (PNS) could be set up in which the individual classes of nerve fibres are characterized by group conduction velocities and group nerve fibre diameters. Natural impulse patterns

  15. Sex differences in consequences of musculoskeletal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnhoven, H. A H; de Vet, Henrica C W; Picavet, H. Susan J

    STUDY DESIGN. Cross-sectional population-based study. OBJECTIVE. To study sex differences in consequences of musculoskeletal pain (MP): limited functioning, work leave or disability, and healthcare use. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. MP is a major public health problem in developed countries due to

  16. Prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries among young squash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by young squash players in Malaysia. This study was conducted retrospectively by using. Standardized Nordic Questionnaire (NSQ) during SUKMA 2016 at Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia. The questionnaires were distributed to the ...

  17. Smoking expands expected lifetime with musculoskeletal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Juel, Knud

    2003-01-01

    By indirect estimation of mortality from smoking and life table methods we estimated expected lifetime without musculoskeletal diseases among never smokers, ex-smokers, and smokers. We found that although life expectancy of a heavy smoker is 7 years shorter than that of a never smoker, heavy...

  18. Work-related musculoskeletal disorders : prevention report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podniece, Z.; Heuvel, S. van den; Blatter, B.

    2008-01-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can interfere with activities at work and can lead to reduced productivity, sickness absence and chronic occupational disability. The aim of this report is to systematic evaluate the effectiveness of interventions at the workplace since 2002 and to

  19. Musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S M; Sumar, B; Dixon, K A

    2014-01-01

    This review seeks to provide a current overview of musculoskeletal pain in overweight and obese children. Databases searched were Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Medline, Proquest Health and Medical Complete, Scopus, Google Scholar, SPORTDiscuss and Trove for studies published between 1 January 2000 and 30 December 2012. We used a broad definition of children within a 3- to 18-year age range. The search strategy included the following terms: obesity, morbid obesity, overweight, pain, musculoskeletal pain, child, adolescent, chronic pain, back pain, lower back pain, knee pain, hip pain, foot pain and pelvic pain. Two authors independently assessed each record, and any disagreement was resolved by the third author. Data were analysed using a narrative thematic approach owing to the heterogeneity of reported outcome measures. Ninety-seven records were initially identified using a variety of terms associated with children, obesity and musculoskeletal pain. Ten studies were included for thematic analysis when predetermined inclusion criteria were applied. Bone deformity and dysfunction, pain reporting and the impact of children being overweight or obese on physical activity, exercise and quality of life were the three themes identified from the literature. Chronic pain, obesity and a reduction in physical functioning and activity may contribute to a cycle of weight gain that affects a child's quality of life. Future studies are required to examine the sequela of overweight and obese children experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24077005

  20. Musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) among agricultural workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basher, A; Nath, P; Siddique, Z S; Rahman, M H; Rubel, M A; Sayed, M S; Ahmad, S A; Mondol, G D; Bhuiyan, M R

    2015-01-01

    Farming is a large and main industry in Bangladesh. Large numbers of people are directly involved in farming and have very unique exposure compare to other sectors. Musculoskeletal problems among farmer population are not infrequent. This study was carried out among 200 farmers in one selected district. The study revealed that musculoskeletal problems were common among the farmers working in a traditional way. All the respondents were male. The age of all respondents lie between 20-60 years. Among them 22.5% farmers were illiterate, about 45.5% below Class V. About half (42%) of the respondents had reported pain in different parts of the body at least one or more times during working in land. And about two third (65.5%) of the farmers had history of joint pain and stiffness in last 12 month. Most of the farmers who suffered from musculoskeletal symptoms were 41-60 years. Specially who worked more then 20 years (82.6%) and average 6 hours per day (66.7%). The occurrence of musculoskeletal problems in various part of the body included Knee pain - 48.1%, Back pain (back ache) - 22.9%, Waist pain (low back ache) - 13.3%, Neck pain - 18.3% and shoulder pain - 10.7%. Length of work in year and daily average working hours were found significant association with musculoskeletal pain. It was found that musculoskeletal pain were more common among the farmers when they worked in squatting position (52%) and specially during weeding of plants (31%). Among them only 22% also engaged in other business. Most of the farmers complained dull aching pain (40.6%), only 2.3% noticed severe acute pain, but about 86% farmers' temporary stop their work for pain and 80% get relief after discontinue of work. About 75% respondents visited doctors for their pain which was statistically significant (p=0.001). It was found that the rates of musculoskeletal complaints are more among those individuals who worked relatively bad ergonomic condition, such as body position probably play an important

  1. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skeletal muscles are called striated (pronounced: STRY-ay-ted) because they are made up of fibers that ... blood through your body. When we smile and talk, muscles are helping us communicate, and when we ...

  2. Dynamic MR imaging in the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedlund, L.; Vogler, J.; Utz, J.A.; Herfkens, R.J.; Martinez, S.; Urbaniak, J.; Evans, A.

    1986-01-01

    Many joint disorders are related to movement, and lack of dynamic imaging has thus far been a limitation of MR imaging. A recently developed dynamic MR imaging technique utilizing a gradient refocused echo (TE = 12 msec, TR = 21 msec) coupled to a physiologic trigger allows dynamic images of the moving joint to be obtained. Controlled joint articulation is produced using an air-driven nonmagnetic device. Imaging of the wrist by this technique demonstrated the dynamic motion of the carpal rows. The method displays cartilage with more sensitivity than does conventional MR imaging; thus, ligamentous and triangular cartilage alignment could be evaluated during motion. In the wrist, potential applications include imaging of carpal instability syndromes, ligamentous interruption, and tears of the triangular cartilage

  3. Sports injury of the pediatric musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, Karen; Strouse, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Sports related injuries are common in children and adolescents, with a reported incidence of around one in ten children each year. Boys incur more and severer sports injuries than girls, and chance for injury is greater with contact or jumping sports. Sports injuries seen in children under 10-years of age are non-specific, including contusions, mild sprains, and extremity fractures, usually Salter fractures of the physes (growth plate) or plastic fractures. In the very young athlete, sports injury of the ligaments or muscle is rare as are spine or head injuries. With growth and adolescence, the intensity of sports involvement increases. Pre-pubertal children still have open physes that are prone to injury, both acute or due to stress from a repetitive activity. In addition to injury of the physes of the long bones, injuries to the physes of apophyses are common. Ligamentous injury is uncommon before physeal closure, but can occur. After the physes fuse, ligamentous injury is seen with patterns similar to adults. This review will include a description of sports related injuries seen in children and adolescents. We will concentrate on injuries that are specific for the growing skeleton, with a brief mention of those seen after fusion of the physes.

  4. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stabilize it while the bone heals. Muscular dystrophy . Muscular dystrophy is an inherited group of diseases that affect the muscles, causing them to weaken and break down over time. The most common form in childhood is called Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and it most often affects boys. ...

  5. NMR imaging of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naegele, M.; Lienemann, A.; Hahn, D.

    1988-01-01

    NMR imaging now allows in vivo imaging of soft tissue hitherto undetectable by non-invasive means. This opens up excellent perspectives with regard to the diagnosis and therapy of various diseases in the field of traumatology and oncology, of which examples are discussed in this paper. (orig.) [de

  6. TREATMENT FOR ACUTE/SUBACUTE MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN, BY USING AN ALGORITHM FOR STEPWISE CHOICE OF ANALGESIC DRUGS AND FOR MONITORING THEIR EFFICACY: PRELIMINARY DATA OF THE ANALGESIC TREATMENT USING SYSTEMIC ALGORITHM (ATUSA PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Gontarenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize treatment for musculoskeletal pain (MSP is a topical medical and social problem. A meeting of experts was held inMoscowin June 2015 to discuss the possibility of forming an interdisciplinary approach and elaborating a unified MSP treatment algorithm based on the com prehensive pathogenetically justified use of different classes of medicines. The Analgesic Treatment Using a Systemic Algorithm (ATUSA trial is a retrospective observational study of the effectiveness of this approach in clinical practice.Objective: to investigate the efficiency of combination treatment for MSP in real clinical practice.Patients and methods. A study group consisted of 3304 patients (women (54.3% and men (45.7%; mean age 48.9±14.6 years with osteoarthritis, nonspecific back pain, and rheumatic juxta-articular soft tissue pathology who had visited their doctors for acute/subacute MSP. Treatment was performed in accordance with the following algorithm: the first appointment was a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, such as aceclofenac, in case of contraindications, paracetamol and/or tramadol + a topical NSAID, in case of indications, muscle relaxants. The therapeutic efficiency was monitored every 7 days (a total of 4 visits; during each visit, therapy could be changed: switching to another NSAID, local administration of glucocorticoids (GC, as well as antidepressants or anticonvulsants. The dynamics of pain (a 0–10 pain intensity numeric rating scale, the number of patients in whom MSP had been resolved completely, as well as treatment satisfaction were taken into account to assess the results of treatment.Results. The first appointment in 97.5% of the patients was NSAIDs, mainly aceclofenac (93.7%, that was used in combination with a muscle relaxant in 67.7%. By Visit 4, there was a reduction in MSP from 6.9±1.5–2.2±1.3 scores. MSP was completely resolved in 77.0% of the patients. The vast majority (88.4% of the patients rated their

  7. Stosowanie zabiegów fizjoterapeutycznych u osób uprawiających balet po urazie sportowym oraz przeciążeniach narządu ruchu = The use of physical therapy in people practicing ballet trauma and sports overload the musculoskeletal system

    OpenAIRE

    Michalczak, Magdalena; Bojarczuk, Katarzyna; Smoleń, Agata

    2016-01-01

    Michalczak Magdalena, Bojarczuk Katarzyna, Smoleń Agata. Stosowanie zabiegów fizjoterapeutycznych u osób uprawiających balet po urazie sportowym oraz przeciążeniach narządu ruchu = The use of physical therapy in people practicing ballet trauma and sports overload the musculoskeletal system. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(7):640-651. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.60867 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3783 The j...

  8. nmsBuilder: Freeware to create subject-specific musculoskeletal models for OpenSim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Giordano; Crimi, Gianluigi; Vanella, Nicola; Schileo, Enrico; Taddei, Fulvia

    2017-12-01

    Musculoskeletal modeling and simulations of movement have been increasingly used in orthopedic and neurological scenarios, with increased attention to subject-specific applications. In general, musculoskeletal modeling applications have been facilitated by the development of dedicated software tools; however, subject-specific studies have been limited also by time-consuming modeling workflows and high skilled expertise required. In addition, no reference tools exist to standardize the process of musculoskeletal model creation and make it more efficient. Here we present a freely available software application, nmsBuilder 2.0, to create musculoskeletal models in the file format of OpenSim, a widely-used open-source platform for musculoskeletal modeling and simulation. nmsBuilder 2.0 is the result of a major refactoring of a previous implementation that moved a first step toward an efficient workflow for subject-specific model creation. nmsBuilder includes a graphical user interface that provides access to all functionalities, based on a framework for computer-aided medicine written in C++. The operations implemented can be used in a workflow to create OpenSim musculoskeletal models from 3D surfaces. A first step includes data processing to create supporting objects necessary to create models, e.g. surfaces, anatomical landmarks, reference systems; and a second step includes the creation of OpenSim objects, e.g. bodies, joints, muscles, and the corresponding model. We present a case study using nmsBuilder 2.0: the creation of an MRI-based musculoskeletal model of the lower limb. The model included four rigid bodies, five degrees of freedom and 43 musculotendon actuators, and was created from 3D surfaces of the segmented images of a healthy subject through the modeling workflow implemented in the software application. We have presented nmsBuilder 2.0 for the creation of musculoskeletal OpenSim models from image-based data, and made it freely available via nmsbuilder

  9. How to combine human resource management systems and human capital portfolios to achieve superior innovation performance

    OpenAIRE

    Rupietta, Christian; Backes-Gellner, Uschi

    2013-01-01

    Firms generate new knowledge that leads to innovations by recombining existing knowledge sources. A successful recombination depends on both the availability of a knowledge stock (human capital pool) that contains innovation-relevant knowledge and the regulation of the knowledge flow through the application of human resource management practices. However, while human resource theory expects complementarities between both the human capital pool and the human resource management system it does ...

  10. Safety Metrics for Human-Computer Controlled Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveson, Nancy G; Hatanaka, Iwao

    2000-01-01

    The rapid growth of computer technology and innovation has played a significant role in the rise of computer automation of human tasks in modem production systems across all industries. Although the rationale for automation has been to eliminate "human error" or to relieve humans from manual repetitive tasks, various computer-related hazards and accidents have emerged as a direct result of increased system complexity attributed to computer automation. The risk assessment techniques utilized for electromechanical systems are not suitable for today's software-intensive systems or complex human-computer controlled systems.This thesis will propose a new systemic model-based framework for analyzing risk in safety-critical systems where both computers and humans are controlling safety-critical functions. A new systems accident model will be developed based upon modem systems theory and human cognitive processes to better characterize system accidents, the role of human operators, and the influence of software in its direct control of significant system functions Better risk assessments will then be achievable through the application of this new framework to complex human-computer controlled systems.

  11. Treatment of chikungunya musculoskeletal disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldo, Lusiele; Wakimoto, Mayumi Duarte; Ferreira, Heloisa; Bressan, Clarisse; Calvet, Guilherme Amaral; Pinheiro, Geraldo Castelar; Siqueira, Andre Machado; Brasil, Patrícia

    2018-04-01

    Chikungunya virus is amongst the fastest expanding vector transmissible diseases in recent years and has been causing massive epidemics in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Despite human infection by this virus being first described in the 1950s, there is a lack of adequate therapeutic evaluations to guide evidence-based recommendations. The current guidelines rely heavily in specialists' opinion and experience instead of using higher rated evidence. Areas covered: A systematic review of the literature was performed- not restricted to clinical trials - reporting the therapeutic response against this infection with the intent to gather the best evidence of the treatment options against musculoskeletal disorders following chikungunya fever. The 15 studies included in the analysis were categorized considering the initiation of treatment during the acute, subacute and chronic phase. Expert commentary: This review demonstrates the complexity of chikungunya fever and difficulty of therapeutic management. This review found no current evidence-based treatment recommendations for the musculoskeletal disorders following chikungunya fever. To provide an optimal treatment that prevents perpetuation or progression of chikungunya infection to a potentially destructive and permanent condition without causing more harm is an aim that must be pursued by researchers and health professionals working with this disease.

  12. An ontology for human-like interaction systems

    OpenAIRE

    Albacete García, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    This report proposes and describes the development of a Ph.D. Thesis aimed at building an ontological knowledge model supporting Human-Like Interaction systems. The main function of such knowledge model in a human-like interaction system is to unify the representation of each concept, relating it to the appropriate terms, as well as to other concepts with which it shares semantic relations. When developing human-like interactive systems, the inclusion of an ontological module can be valuab...

  13. Central Hyperexcitability in Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain: A Conceptual Breakthrough with Multiple Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lidbeck

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations of dysfunctional pain processing in the central nervous system have contributed much knowledge about the development of chronic musculoskeletal pain. Many common chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes - including regional myofascial pain syndromes, whiplash pain syndromes, refractory work-related neck-shoulder pain, certain types of chronic low back pain, fibromyalgia and others - may essentially be explained by abnormalities in central pain modulation. The growing awareness of dysfunctional central pain modulation may be a conceptual breakthrough leading to a better understanding of common chronic pain disorders. A new paradigm will have multiple clinical implications, including re-evaluation of clinical practice routines and rehabilitation methods, and will focus on controversial issues of medicolegal concern. The concept of dysfunctional central pain processing will also necessitate a mechanism-based classification of pain for the selection of individual treatment and rehabilitation programs for subgroups of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain due to different pathophysiological mechanisms.

  14. Incidence and Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injury in Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Preston J.; Gerrie, Brayden J.; Varner, Kevin E.; McCulloch, Patrick C.; Lintner, David M.; Harris, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most published studies on injuries in the ballet dancer focus on the lower extremity. The rigors of this activity require special training and care. By understanding prevalence and injury pattern to the musculoskeletal system, targeted prevention and treatment for this population can be developed. Purpose To determine the incidence and prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries in ballet. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A systematic review registered with PROSPERO was performed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Level 1 through 4 evidence studies reporting incidence of musculoskeletal injuries in male and female ballet dancers were included, with the numbers and types of injuries extracted from each. Injury rates were recorded and calculated based on professional status, sex, and nature of injury. Incidence was defined as number of injuries sustained over a specific time. Prevalence was defined as proportion of subjects with an injury at a given point in time. Results The studies analyzed reported injury incidence or prevalence in more than 1365 amateur and 900 professional dancers. The mean age was 16.2 years among amateur and 27.0 years among professional dancers. The incidence of injury among amateur dancers was 0.99 and 1.09 injuries per 1000 dance hours in males and females, respectively; 75% of injuries were overuse, with similar rates among males and females. In professional dancers, the incidence of injury was 1.06 and 1.46 injuries per 1000 dance hours in males and females, respectively, and 64% of female injuries were overuse, compared with 50% in males (P ballet dancers is 0.97 and 1.24 injuries per 1000 dance hours, respectively. The majority are overuse in both amateur and professional dancers, with amateur ballet dancers showing a higher proportion of overuse injuries than professionals (P < .001). Male professional dancers show a higher proportion of

  15. The evidence base for chiropractic treatment of musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents: The emperor's new suit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Stochkendahl, Mette Jensen

    2010-01-01

    studies were included if they investigated the effect of manual therapy on musculoskeletal disorders in children and/or adolescents. The MEDLINE and MANTIS databases were searched, and studies published in English, Danish, Swedish or Norwegian were included.Only three studies were identified that in some...... way attempted to look at the effectiveness of manual therapy for children or adolescents with spinal problems, and none of these was a randomized controlled clinical trial. As for the rest of the musculoskeletal system, only one study of temporomandibular disorder was identified.With this review, we...... on adult musculoskeletal health. Thus, this is an important part of the chiropractors' scope of practice, and the objective of this review is to assess the evidence base for manual treatment of musculoskeletal disorders in children and adolescents.Randomized, quasi-randomized and non-randomized clinical...

  16. Generating optimal control simulations of musculoskeletal movement using OpenSim and MATLAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Leng-Feng; Umberger, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling, simulation and optimization are powerful tools that have seen increased use in biomechanics research. Dynamic optimizations can be categorized as either data-tracking or predictive problems. The data-tracking approach has been used extensively to address human movement problems of clinical relevance. The predictive approach also holds great promise, but has seen limited use in clinical applications. Enhanced software tools would facilitate the application of predictive musculoskeletal simulations to clinically-relevant research. The open-source software OpenSim provides tools for generating tracking simulations but not predictive simulations. However, OpenSim includes an extensive application programming interface that permits extending its capabilities with scripting languages such as MATLAB. In the work presented here, we combine the computational tools provided by MATLAB with the musculoskeletal modeling capabilities of OpenSim to create a framework for generating predictive simulations of musculoskeletal movement based on direct collocation optimal control techniques. In many cases, the direct collocation approach can be used to solve optimal control problems considerably faster than traditional shooting methods. Cyclical and discrete movement problems were solved using a simple 1 degree of freedom musculoskeletal model and a model of the human lower limb, respectively. The problems could be solved in reasonable amounts of time (several seconds to 1-2 hours) using the open-source IPOPT solver. The problems could also be solved using the fmincon solver that is included with MATLAB, but the computation times were excessively long for all but the smallest of problems. The performance advantage for IPOPT was derived primarily by exploiting sparsity in the constraints Jacobian. The framework presented here provides a powerful and flexible approach for generating optimal control simulations of musculoskeletal movement using OpenSim and MATLAB. This

  17. Playing-related musculoskeletal disorders in music students-associated musculoskeletal signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, A; Möller, H; Seidel, W; Rigotti, T

    2012-12-01

    Pain and overuse are common problems for musicians. Up to 80% of professional musicians suffer from playing-related musculoskeletal disorders (PRMD). The prevalence rate in music students is very high as well. Sufficient data on the underlying musculoskeletal dysfunctions however is scarce. Additionally, the self-assessment of health in musicians seems to differ compared to non-musicians, which might influence their attitudes concerning preventive strategies. Evaluation of frequency of PRMD in music students, investigation of signs and symptoms in music students compared to non-music controls, comparison of self-reported health and well-being between the two groups. Prospective, cross-sectional, case control, non-randomized. Other (University volunteers). Music students in comparison to a non-music control group. Musculoskeletal examination and questionnaire of 36 volunteers of a music university and 19 volunteer students of an university of education were analyzed. The total number of musculoskeletal dysfunctions and differences between the student groups were examined. The personal pain and health self-rating were compared between music and non-music students. Eighty one percent of musicians experienced PRMD. Musicians experienced 6.19 pain regions on average compared to 4.31 of non-musicians. Musicians experiencing PRMD reported significantly (PMusic students presented with nearly the double amount (8.39 versus 4.37) of musculoskeletal dysfunctions per person compared to the non-music control group. Nevertheless, musicians significantly (P<0.05) rated their health more positively than the controls. Musicians presented with more pain regions and a higher amount of musculoskeletal dysfunctions. Further studies evaluating the clinical relevance and their role in the development of PRMD are warranted. Screening of musicians for musculoskeletal dysfunction may identify those musicians at increased risk. Early treatment may prevent PRMD in musicians. Additional

  18. Human Nature and its Implications for the Legal System | Obioha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the implications the various conceptions of human nature hold for the legal system. No doubt, there are various and conflicting theories of human nature such that the concept of human nature seems to have remained elusive and pervasive. Some conceive man as nothing but matter pure and simple; ...

  19. Effectiveness of Three-Dimensional Digital Animation in Teaching Human Anatomy in an Authentic Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyek, Nady; Collet, Christian; Di Rienzo, Franck; De Almeida, Mickael; Guillot, Aymeric

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) digital animations were used to teach the human musculoskeletal system to first year kinesiology students. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of this method by comparing two groups from two different academic years during two of their official required anatomy examinations (trunk and upper limb…

  20. Evaluating Models of Human Performance: Safety-Critical Systems Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feary, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is part of panel discussion on Evaluating Models of Human Performance. The purpose of this panel is to discuss the increasing use of models in the world today and specifically focus on how to describe and evaluate models of human performance. My presentation will focus on discussions of generating distributions of performance, and the evaluation of different strategies for humans performing tasks with mixed initiative (Human-Automation) systems. I will also discuss issues with how to provide Human Performance modeling data to support decisions on acceptability and tradeoffs in the design of safety critical systems. I will conclude with challenges for the future.

  1. Human as the chief controller in the complex system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yeonsub

    2012-01-01

    Due to accuracy of measurement and improvement of control logic, human beings are freed from time consuming and repeated task. When there are situations where the control logic cannot calculate the next state of system, human beings interrupt the system and steer the system manually. The most scope of human factors is focused on this interruption, and economists are concern how to present information cognitively and reliably. Fukushima nuclear accident has considered the role of human beings again. Human beings are forced to do something without proper knowledge, procedure, and process information. Thus post Fukushima actions should include how for human beings to be trained and how to get real time information. Finally because safety culture can determine behaviors of human beings, the method to cultivate safety culture should be considered

  2. Classification system for reporting events involving human malfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Pedersen, O.M.; Mancini, G.

    1981-01-01

    The report describes a set of categories for reporting industrial incidents and events involving human malfunction. The classification system aims at ensuring information adequate for improvement of human work situations and man-machine interface systems and for attempts to quantify ''human error'' rates. The classification system has a multifacetted non-hierarchical structure and its compatibility with Ispra's ERDS classification is described. The collection of the information in general and for quantification purposes are discussed. 24 categories, 12 of which being human factors-oriented, are listed with their respective subcategories, and comments are given. Underlying models of human data process and their typical malfuntions and of a human decision sequence are described. The work reported is a joint contribution to the CSNI Group of Experts on Human Error Data and Assessment

  3. Human factors/ergonomics as a systems discipline? "The human use of human beings" revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollnagel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the possible future of Human factors/ergonomics (HFE) usually take the past for granted in the sense that the future of HFE is assumed to be more of the same. This paper argues that the nature of work in the early 2010s is so different from the nature of work when HFE was formulated 60-70 years ago that a critical reassessment of the basis for HFE is needed. If HFE should be a systems discipline, it should be a soft systems rather than a hard systems discipline. It is not enough for HFE to seek to improve performance and well-being through systems design, since any change to the work environment in principle alters the very basis for the change. Instead HFE should try to anticipate how the nature of work will change so that it can both foresee what work will be and propose what work should be. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Study and application of human reliability analysis for digital human-system interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Ming; Liu Yanzi; Zhang Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of human-orientated abilities and limitations could be used to digital human-system interface (HSI) design by human reliability analysis (HRA) technology. Further, control room system design could achieve the perfect match of man-machine-environment. This research was conducted to establish an integrated HRA method. This method identified HSI potential design flaws which may affect human performance and cause human error. Then a systematic approach was adopted to optimize HSI. It turns out that this method is practical and objective, and effectively improves the safety, reliability and economy of nuclear power plant. This method was applied to CRP1000 projects under construction successfully with great potential. (authors)

  5. Imaging of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turecki, Marcin B.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Holden, Dean A.; Hunter, Tim B.; Rogers, Lee F. [University of Arizona HSC, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Stubbs, Alana Y. [Southern Arizona VA Health Care System, Department of Radiology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Graham, Anna R. [University of Arizona HSC, Department of Pathology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Prompt and appropriate imaging work-up of the various musculoskeletal soft tissue infections aids early diagnosis and treatment and decreases the risk of complications resulting from misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. The signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections can be nonspecific, making it clinically difficult to distinguish between disease processes and the extent of disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of soft tissue infections. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, radiography and nuclear medicine studies are considered ancillary. This manuscript illustrates representative images of superficial and deep soft tissue infections such as infectious cellulitis, superficial and deep fasciitis, including the necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis/soft tissue abscess, septic bursitis and tenosynovitis on different imaging modalities, with emphasis on MRI. Typical histopathologic findings of soft tissue infections are also presented. The imaging approach described in the manuscript is based on relevant literature and authors' personal experience and everyday practice. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turecki, Marcin B.; Taljanovic, Mihra S.; Holden, Dean A.; Hunter, Tim B.; Rogers, Lee F.; Stubbs, Alana Y.; Graham, Anna R.

    2010-01-01

    Prompt and appropriate imaging work-up of the various musculoskeletal soft tissue infections aids early diagnosis and treatment and decreases the risk of complications resulting from misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis. The signs and symptoms of musculoskeletal soft tissue infections can be nonspecific, making it clinically difficult to distinguish between disease processes and the extent of disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of soft tissue infections. Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound, radiography and nuclear medicine studies are considered ancillary. This manuscript illustrates representative images of superficial and deep soft tissue infections such as infectious cellulitis, superficial and deep fasciitis, including the necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis/soft tissue abscess, septic bursitis and tenosynovitis on different imaging modalities, with emphasis on MRI. Typical histopathologic findings of soft tissue infections are also presented. The imaging approach described in the manuscript is based on relevant literature and authors' personal experience and everyday practice. (orig.)

  7. Musculoskeletal pain in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steve J; Henschke, Nicholas; Hestbaek, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have litt...... to understand these conditions at a time close to their initial onset may offer a better chance of developing effective prevention and treatment strategies.......Introduction Musculoskeletal (MSK) pain in children and adolescents is responsible for substantial personal impacts and societal costs, but it has not been intensively or systematically researched. This means our understanding of these conditions is limited, and healthcare professionals have little...... empirical evidence to underpin their clinical practice. In this article we summarise the state of the evidence concerning MSK pain in children and adolescents, and offer suggestions for future research. Results Rates of self-reported MSK pain in adolescents are similar to those in adult populations...

  8. Surgeons' musculoskeletal pain in minimally invasive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalager, Tina; Søgaard, Karen; Bech (Katrine Tholstrup Pedersen), Katrine Tholstrup

    in surgeons performing MIS is high and derives mainly from static postures. Positioning of monitor, adjustment of table height and instrument design also contribute substantially. Robotic assisted laparoscopy seems less physically demanding for the surgeon compared with conventional laparoscopy. However, some...... put the patients at a higher risk of complications, and on the longer term there is an increasing risk for the surgeon to develop chronic musculoskeletal pain that will disable him/her to perform his/her job. Therefore, surgeons’ musculoskeletal health is of vital importance and must be considered...... alongside patient safety. The present literature study supports the need for a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of an individually designed training program for surgeons performing MIS....

  9. High School Students' Understanding of the Human Body System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaraf, Orit Ben-Zvi; Dodick, Jeff; Tripto, Jaklin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 120 tenth-grade students from 8 schools were examined to determine the extent of their ability to perceive the human body as a system after completing the first stage in their biology curriculum--"The human body, emphasizing homeostasis". The students' systems thinking was analyzed according to the STH thinking model, which roughly…

  10. [Musculoskeletal disorders among university student computer users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorusso, A; Bruno, S; L'Abbate, N

    2009-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are a common problem among computer users. Many epidemiological studies have shown that ergonomic factors and aspects of work organization play an important role in the development of these disorders. We carried out a cross-sectional survey to estimate the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using personal computers and to investigate the features of occupational exposure and the prevalence of symptoms throughout the study course. Another objective was to assess the students' level of knowledge of computer ergonomics and the relevant health risks. A questionnaire was distributed to 183 students attending the lectures for second and fourth year courses of the Faculty of Architecture. Data concerning personal characteristics, ergonomic and organizational aspects of computer use, and the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and upper limbs were collected. Exposure to risk factors such as daily duration of computer use, time spent at the computer without breaks, duration of mouse use and poor workstation ergonomics was significantly higher among students of the fourth year course. Neck pain was the most commonly reported symptom (69%), followed by hand/wrist (53%), shoulder (49%) and arm (8%) pain. The prevalence of symptoms in the neck and hand/wrist area was signifcantly higher in the students of the fourth year course. In our survey we found high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students using computers for long time periods on a daily basis. Exposure to computer-related ergonomic and organizational risk factors, and the prevalence ofmusculoskeletal symptoms both seem to increase significantly throughout the study course. Furthermore, we found that the level of perception of computer-related health risks among the students was low. Our findings suggest the need for preventive intervention consisting of education in computer ergonomics.

  11. Musculoskeletal symptoms in pharmaceutical sales representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Katherine; Gyi, Diane; Haslam, Cheryl

    2010-03-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a leading cause of work-related ill health. Existing literature indicates that pharmaceutical sales representatives (PSRs) report a high prevalence of MSDs, possibly exacerbated by the nature of work (prolonged driving and manual handling). In addition, they experience difficulty in accessing occupational health services. To assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms and associated risk factors among PSRs in order to assist their occupational health management through raising risk awareness. A self-completed questionnaire distributed to 205 PSRs within a UK pharmaceutical company was used to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, psychosocial factors, work tasks undertaken and company car use. To assist understanding of work tasks and organizational factors, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a sample of 12 key personnel. The questionnaire response rate was 68%. PSRs reported high mileage and 100% reported working from the car in a typical day. Forty-seven per cent reported both manual handling for > or = 4 h/day and 'often' or 'sometimes' working from the car. Fifty-seven per cent reported low back symptoms in the last 12 months. Interview data revealed issues relating to car choice, storage in the boot and working from the car, which should be considered when developing priorities for preventive management of MSDs. Musculoskeletal symptoms appear to be a problem for PSRs, with risk factors reported as prolonged driving, sitting in the car, working from the car and manual handling. Interventions to facilitate their occupational health management should focus on raising awareness of the risks of prolonged driving and working from the car.

  12. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Susan Armijo-Olivo; David Magee

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maxima...

  13. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Their Associated Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    M Jahangiri; H Rahimi Fard; A.R Choobineh; S Mahmood Khani

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims :Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) is high among office workers. Long time seated posture, working with computer, repetitive movements and inappropriate environmental conditions may have causal effects in these disorders. High prevalence rate of MSDs makes ergonomics assessment and working conditions improvement necessary. Designing an assessment checklist and calculating ergonomics indices can be useful in this evaluation. This study was conducted with the ob...

  14. An entropy-assisted musculoskeletal shoulder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-04-01

    Optimization combined with a musculoskeletal shoulder model has been used to estimate mechanical loading of musculoskeletal elements around the shoulder. Traditionally, the objective function is to minimize the summation of the total activities of the muscles with forces, moments, and stability constraints. Such an objective function, however, tends to neglect the antagonist muscle co-contraction. In this study, an objective function including an entropy term is proposed to address muscle co-contractions. A musculoskeletal shoulder model is developed to apply the proposed objective function. To find the optimal weight for the entropy term, an experiment was conducted. In the experiment, participants generated various 3-D shoulder moments in six shoulder postures. The surface EMG of 8 shoulder muscles was measured and compared with the predicted muscle activities based on the proposed objective function using Bhattacharyya distance and concordance ratio under different weight of the entropy term. The results show that a small weight of the entropy term can improve the predictability of the model in terms of muscle activities. Such a result suggests that the concept of entropy could be helpful for further understanding the mechanism of muscle co-contractions as well as developing a shoulder biomechanical model with greater validity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Office Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valipour Noroozi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Musculoskeletal disorders are among common occupational diseases in the world, which have high prevalence not only among hard and hurtful jobs, but also in office works. Objectives The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs among office workers of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods This study carried out intermittently among 392 individuals of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences office workers by Nordic questionnaire from October 2013 to December 2013. Study population included office workers of different departments as well as central organization and library. We use descriptive statistic, t test and chi-square test for data analysis. Results The mean and standard deviation of participants’ age was 35.4 ± 6.7 years and their work experience was 9.7 ± 6.65 years, respectively. Most signs (51% were in back region, which forced 18.9% of individuals to withdraw from daily activities. Statistical analysis also showed 36.7% neck disorders in office workers, which demonstrated significant association with age and work experience (P < 0.001. Conclusions Significant association of work experience and age with musculoskeletal disorders shows that individual’s education and knowledge improvements with regard to ergonomics risk factors and correction of work postures are very important and ought to follow management and technical practices in the organization.

  16. Musculoskeletal injuries among Malaysian badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, A H; George, J; Ramlan, A A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern of musculoskeletal injuries sustained by Malaysian badminton players. This is a retrospective case notes review of all badminton players who attended the National Sports Institute (NSI) Clinic, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and were diagnosed with musculoskeletal injuries. In a two and a half year period, from January 2005 to June 2007, 469 musculoskeletal injuries were diagnosed among badminton players at the NSI Clinic. The mean age of the players who attended the clinic was 19.2 (range 13-52) years. Approximately 60 percent of the injuries occurred in players younger than 20 years of age. The majority of injuries (91.5 percent) were categorised as mild overuse injury and mostly involved the knee. The majority of the injuries sustained by badminton players in this study were due to overuse, primarily in the knee. The majority of the injuries were diagnosed in younger players and occurred during training/practice sessions. There was no difference in terms of incidence and types of injuries between the genders.

  17. Relationships between work-related factors and musculoskeletal health with current and future work ability among male workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschman, J S; Noor, A; Lundström, R; Nilsson, T; Sluiter, J K; Hagberg, M

    2017-08-01

    The purpose was to increase job-specific knowledge about individual and work-related factors and their relationship with current and future work ability (WA). We studied cross-sectional relationships between mental demands, physical exertion during work, grip strength, musculoskeletal pain in the upper extremities and WA and the relationships between these variables and WA 11 years later. We used a dataset of a prospective cohort study (1997-2008) among employees of an engineering plant (n = 157). The cohort was surveyed by means of tests and written questions on work demands, musculoskeletal health, WA score (WAS; 0-10), and mental and physical WA. Spearman correlation coefficients and logistic regression analysis were used. Among manual workers, we found weak correlations between grip strength and current and future physical WA. We did not find predictors for future poor WA among the manual workers. Among the office workers, we found that musculoskeletal pain was moderately and negatively related to current WAS and physical WA. More handgrip strength related to better future WAS and physical WA. Musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.67 p health and work ability depending on occupation. However, the present implies that predicting work ability in the far future based on health surveillance data is rather difficult. Testing the musculoskeletal system (grip strength) and asking workers' about their musculoskeletal health seems relevant when monitoring work ability.

  18. A target field design of open multi-purpose RF coil for musculoskeletal MR imaging at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Diange; Wang, Xiaoying; Huang, Kefu; Zhang, Jue

    2016-10-01

    Musculoskeletal MR imaging under multi-angle situations plays an increasingly important role in assessing joint and muscle tissues system. However, there are still limitations due to the closed structures of most conventional RF coils. In this study, a time-harmonic target-field method was employed to design open multi-purpose coil (OMC) for multi-angle musculoskeletal MR imaging. The phantom imaging results suggested that the proposed OMC could achieve homogeneously distributed magnetic field and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 239.04±0.83 in the region of interest (ROI). The maximum temperature in the heating hazard test was 16°C lower than the standard regulation, which indicated the security of the designed OMC. Furthermore, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed OMC for musculoskeletal MR imaging, especially for multi-angle imaging, a healthy volunteer was examined for MR imaging of elbow, ankle and knee using OMC. The in vivo imaging results showed that the proposed OMC is effective for MR imaging of musculoskeletal tissues at different body parts, with satisfied B1 field homogeneity and SNR. Moreover, the open structure of the OMC could provide a large joint movement region. The proposed open multi-purpose coil is feasible for musculoskeletal MR imaging, and potentially, it is more suitable for the evaluation of musculoskeletal tissues under multi-angle conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The Systems Engineering Process for Human Support Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Systems engineering is designing and optimizing systems. This paper reviews the systems engineering process and indicates how it can be applied in the development of advanced human support systems. Systems engineering develops the performance requirements, subsystem specifications, and detailed designs needed to construct a desired system. Systems design is difficult, requiring both art and science and balancing human and technical considerations. The essential systems engineering activity is trading off and compromising between competing objectives such as performance and cost, schedule and risk. Systems engineering is not a complete independent process. It usually supports a system development project. This review emphasizes the NASA project management process as described in NASA Procedural Requirement (NPR) 7120.5B. The process is a top down phased approach that includes the most fundamental activities of systems engineering - requirements definition, systems analysis, and design. NPR 7120.5B also requires projects to perform the engineering analyses needed to ensure that the system will operate correctly with regard to reliability, safety, risk, cost, and human factors. We review the system development project process, the standard systems engineering design methodology, and some of the specialized systems analysis techniques. We will discuss how they could apply to advanced human support systems development. The purpose of advanced systems development is not directly to supply human space flight hardware, but rather to provide superior candidate systems that will be selected for implementation by future missions. The most direct application of systems engineering is in guiding the development of prototype and flight experiment hardware. However, anticipatory systems engineering of possible future flight systems would be useful in identifying the most promising development projects.

  20. CRESST Human Performance Knowledge Mapping System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Gregory K; Michiuye, Joanne K; Brill, David G; Sinha, Ravi; Saadat, Farzad; de Vries, Linda F; Delacruz, Girlie C; Bewley, William L; Baker, Eva L

    2002-01-01

    .... While several tools exist that are available to construct knowledge maps, CRESST's knowledge mapping tool is one of the only systems designed specifically for assessment purposes, the only system...

  1. CRESST Human Performance Knowledge Mapping System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Gregory K; Michiuye, Joanne K; Brill, David G; Sinha, Ravi; Saadat, Farzad; de Vries, Linda F; Delacruz, Girlie C; Bewley, William L; Baker, Eva L

    2002-01-01

    .... This report presents a review of knowledge mapping scoring methods and current online mapping systems, and the overall design, functionality, scoring, usability testing, and authoring capabilities of the CRESST system...

  2. Classification system for reporting events involving human malfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Pedersen, O.M.; Mancini, G.; Carnino, A.; Griffon, M.; Gagnolet, P.

    1981-03-01

    The report describes a set of categories for reporting industrial incidents and events involving human malfunction. The classification system aims at ensuring information adequate for improvement of human work situations and man-machine interface systems and for attempts to quantify ''human error'' rates. The classification system has a multifacetted non-hierarchial structure and its compatibility with Ispra's ERDS classification is described. The collection of the information in general and for quantification purposes are discussed. 24 categories, 12 of which being human factors oriented, are listed with their respective subcategories, and comments are given. Underlying models of human data processes and their typical malfunctions and of a human decision sequence are described. (author)

  3. Classification system for reporting events involving human malfunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Pedersen, O.M.; Mancini, G.

    1981-01-01

    The report describes a set of categories for reporting indus-trial incidents and events involving human malfunction. The classification system aims at ensuring information adequate for improvement of human work situations and man-machine interface systems and for attempts to quantify "human error......" rates. The classification system has a multifacetted non-hierarchical struc-ture and its compatibility with Isprals ERDS classification is described. The collection of the information in general and for quantification purposes are discussed. 24 categories, 12 of which being human factors oriented......, are listed with their respective subcategories, and comments are given. Underlying models of human data processes and their typical malfunc-tions and of a human decision sequence are described....

  4. The effectiveness of a chair intervention in the workplace to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Niekerk Sjan-Mari

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolonged sitting has been associated with musculoskeletal dysfunction. For desk workers, workstation modifications frequently address the work surface and chair. Chairs which can prevent abnormal strain of the neuromuscular system may aid in preventing musculo-skeletal pain and discomfort. Anecdotally, adjustability of the seat height and the seat pan depth to match the anthropometrics of the user is the most commonly recommended intervention. Within the constraints of the current economic climate, employers demand evidence for the benefits attributed to an investment in altering workstations, however this evidence-base is currently unclear both in terms of the strength of the evidence and the nature of the chair features. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of chair interventions in reducing workplace musculoskeletal symptoms. Methods Pubmed, Cinahl, Pedro, ProQuest, SCOPUS and PhysioFocus were searched. ‘Ergonomic intervention’, ‘chair’, ‘musculoskeletal symptoms’, ‘ergonomics’, ‘seated work’ were used in all the databases. Articles were included if they investigated the influence of chair modifications as an intervention; participants were in predominantly seated occupations; employed a pre/post design (with or without control or randomising and if the outcome measure included neuro-musculoskeletal comfort and/or postural alignment. The risk of bias was assessed using a tool based on The Cochrane Handbook. Results Five studies were included in the review. The number of participants varied from 4 to 293 participants. Three of the five studies were Randomised Controlled Trials, one pre and post-test study was conducted and one single case, multiple baselines (ABAB study was done. Three studies were conducted in a garment factory, one in an office environment and one with university students. All five studies found a reduction in self-reported musculoskeletal pain

  5. Design of an advanced human-centered supervisory system for a nuclear fuel reprocessing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, B.; Lambert, M.; Martel, G.

    1999-01-01

    In the field of highly automated processes, our research concerns supervisory system design adapted to supervisory and default diagnosis by human operators. The interpretation of decisional human behaviour models shows that the tasks of human operators require different information, which has repercussions on the supervisory system design. We propose an advanced human-centred supervisory system (AHCSS) which is more adapted to human-beings, because it integrates new representation of the production system,(such as functional and behavioural aspects) with the use of advanced algorithms of detection and location. Based on an approach using these new concepts, and AHCSS was created for a nuclear fuel reprocessing system. (authors)

  6. MERIP - Design of Production Systems with focus on Human Ressources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Knudsen, Mads Kristian Lund

    1998-01-01

    ", "Employee-activated Production Development - MAPU", "Integrated Production Systems - IPS" and "Strategic Development of Staff - SUM". MERIP (Human resources in production) is a continuation of this type of projects, aiming at increasing the competitive power of the companies. However MERIP scientists want...... to involve the human resources in the production in new ways. Therefore the objective of the project is to develop methods for design of production systems, that use every possibility in human resources supported by the technology aiming at increasing the competitive power of the companies. The task force......The way in which the Industry has involved the human resources in production systems, has changed in last decades. Previously the human resources were mainly considered as means to link together the technical systems, while today they are key resources responsible for development, planning...

  7. Relational adaptivity - enacting human-centric systems design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve

    2016-01-01

    Human centered design approaches places the experiencing human at the center of concern, situated in relation to the dynamics of the environmental condition and the variables of the system of control and sensing. Taking the approach of enacted design methods to enforce the experience...... of the inhabitant as core in human-centered design solutions, the intelligence of the connected sensors is suggested to be developed as an actual learning and self-adjusting adaptive environment, where the adaptive system is part of a negotiation with users on the qualities of the environment. We will present...... a fully functional sketching environment for adaptive sensor-control systems, which enable integration of the complex situation of everyday activities and human well-being. The proposed sketching environment allows for the development of sensor systems related to lighting conditions and human occupancy...

  8. Musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging: Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Fisher, C.F.; Fulmer, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior contrast, resolution, and multiplanar imaging capability, allowing excellent definition of soft-tissue and bone marrow abnormalities. For these reasons, magnetic resonance imaging has become a major diagnostic imaging method for the evaluation of many musculoskeletal disorders. The applications of magnetic resonance imaging for musculoskeletal diagnosis are summarized and examples of common clinical situations are given. General guidelines are suggested for the musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging

  9. Prevalence and predictors of musculoskeletal pain among Danish fishermen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Østergaard, Helle; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    at sea, age, BMI and education were used as predictors for the overall musculoskeletal pain score (multiple linear regression) and for each single pain site (multinomial logistic regression). RESULTS: The prevalence of pain was high for all musculoskeletal locations. Overall, more than 80...... demanding and impacting their musculoskeletal pain. Potential explanation for this unexpected result like increased work pressure and reduced financial attractiveness in small scale commercial fishery needs to be confirmed in future research....

  10. Human Systems Integration in Practice: Constellation Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbado, Jennifer Rochlis

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Constellation program provided a unique testbed for Human Systems Integration (HSI) as a fundamental element of the Systems Engineering process. Constellation was the first major program to have HSI mandated by NASA's Human Rating document. Proper HSI is critical to the success of any project that relies on humans to function as operators, maintainers, or controllers of a system. HSI improves mission, system and human performance, significantly reduces lifecycle costs, lowers risk and minimizes re-design. Successful HSI begins with sufficient project schedule dedicated to the generation of human systems requirements, but is by no means solely a requirements management process. A top-down systems engineering process that recognizes throughout the organization, human factors as a technical discipline equal to traditional engineering disciplines with authority for the overall system. This partners with a bottoms-up mechanism for human-centered design and technical issue resolution. The Constellation Human Systems Integration Group (HSIG) was a part of the Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) organization within the program office, and existed alongside similar groups such as Flight Performance, Environments & Constraints, and Integrated Loads, Structures and Mechanisms. While the HSIG successfully managed, via influence leadership, a down-and-in Community of Practice to facilitate technical integration and issue resolution, it lacked parallel top-down authority to drive integrated design. This presentation will discuss how HSI was applied to Constellation, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers. This presentation will discuss how Human Systems Integration (HSI) was applied to NASA's Constellation program, the lessons learned and best practices it revealed, and recommendations to future NASA program and project managers on how to accomplish this critical function.

  11. Integrated human-machine intelligence in space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, Guy A.

    1992-01-01

    The integration of human and machine intelligence in space systems is outlined with respect to the contributions of artificial intelligence. The current state-of-the-art in intelligent assistant systems (IASs) is reviewed, and the requirements of some real-world applications of the technologies are discussed. A concept of integrated human-machine intelligence is examined in the contexts of: (1) interactive systems that tolerate human errors; (2) systems for the relief of workloads; and (3) interactive systems for solving problems in abnormal situations. Key issues in the development of IASs include the compatibility of the systems with astronauts in terms of inputs/outputs, processing, real-time AI, and knowledge-based system validation. Real-world applications are suggested such as the diagnosis, planning, and control of enginnered systems.

  12. Diagnostic errors in musculoskeletal ultrasound imaging and how to avoid them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Serafin-Król

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the major challenges related to the principles of the correct technique of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSK US. All the crucial aspects of correct MSK soft tissue diagnosis have been discussed, including equipment settings, use of recent image software innovations and ultrasound standoff pads, and correct transducer positioning. The importance of the fundamental principles of MSK US, facilitating good quality image and limiting the occurrence of artifacts, has been highlighted. The most common artifacts of the musculoskeletal system have been described, including those that diagnostically helpful, such as the presence of echo enhancement deep to a fluidfilled structure, or an acoustic shadow behind a calcification. The presence of acoustic shadow in the context of lesions of a different type has also been discussed. The common anisotropy-related artifacts, frequently leading to diagnosis of a pathological condition where none is present, have been elaborated on. The frequently encountered mirror reflection artifact has been described. Special attention has been paid to the means of either eliminating, or taking advantage of artifacts for the correct diagnosis of musculoskeletal lesions. The possibilities and technique of correct differentiation of hypoechoic or anechoic foci, commonly found in the pathological conditions of the musculoskeletal system, have been analysed. Non-typical ultrasound findings leading to misdiagnosis of given pathological conditions have been discussed.

  13. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    OpenAIRE

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deteri...

  14. An Interpreter's Interpretation: Sign Language Interpreters' View of Musculoskeletal Disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, William L

    2003-01-01

    Sign language interpreters are at increased risk for musculoskeletal disorders. This study used content analysis to obtain detailed information about these disorders from the interpreters' point of view...

  15. Scaling of musculoskeletal models from static and dynamic trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Morten Enemark; Andersen, Michael Skipper; de Zee, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Subject-specific scaling of cadaver-based musculoskeletal models is important for accurate musculoskeletal analysis within multiple areas such as ergonomics, orthopaedics and occupational health. We present two procedures to scale ‘generic’ musculoskeletal models to match segment lengths and joint...... three scaling methods to an inverse dynamics-based musculoskeletal model and compared predicted knee joint contact forces to those measured with an instrumented prosthesis during gait. Additionally, a Monte Carlo study was used to investigate the sensitivity of the knee joint contact force to random...

  16. human immunodeficiency virus and the nervous system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    pathogenicity, drug resistance and predisposition to ... tropical countries, antiretroviral therapy is not available ... induced peripheral nervous system disorders ... ataxia and intractable vomiting. ... eligibility for chemotherapy and survival after.

  17. An evaluation of musculoskeletal discomfort experience by radiographers performing mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, A.G.; May, J.

    1997-01-01

    work and the design of the mammography units, breast screening radiographers are often subjected to frequent bending and twisting, static working postures, forceful movements and repetitive work. These are factors which have all been related to muscular problems. It is possible that these factors may have a cumulative effect of wear and tear on the musculoskeletal system of radiographers thus possibly aggravating existing or past injuries and paving the way for new ones. It is important therefore that recommendations are proposed to further the ergonomic design of mammography units, the training, the working practices and conditions of the radiographers. Both causal and contributory factors present in the workplace, regardless of whether the original injury was caused in performing breast screening, general radiography or actually outside work should be addressed. Recommendations are made in order to reduce the adoption of poor and awkward postures while breast screening in the future and therefore reduce the amount of musculoskeletal discomfort experienced by radiographers. All changes to the workplace should be initially conducted on a trial basis and monitored to determine their success to ensure that they represent no additional problems

  18. Essential technologies for developing human and robot collaborative system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo

    1997-10-01

    In this study, we aim to develop a concept of new robot system, i.e., 'human and robot collaborative system', for the patrol of nuclear power plants. This paper deals with the two essential technologies developed for the system. One is the autonomous navigation program with human intervention function which is indispensable for human and robot collaboration. The other is the position estimation method by using gyroscope and TV image to make the estimation accuracy much higher for safe navigation. Feasibility of the position estimation method is evaluated by experiment and numerical simulation. (author)

  19. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  20. Patient safety - the role of human factors and systems engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E

    2010-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety.

  1. Patient Safety: The Role of Human Factors and Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Wood, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety is a global challenge that requires knowledge and skills in multiple areas, including human factors and systems engineering. In this chapter, numerous conceptual approaches and methods for analyzing, preventing and mitigating medical errors are described. Given the complexity of healthcare work systems and processes, we emphasize the need for increasing partnerships between the health sciences and human factors and systems engineering to improve patient safety. Those partnerships will be able to develop and implement the system redesigns that are necessary to improve healthcare work systems and processes for patient safety. PMID:20543237

  2. The Human Operator in Advanced Aerospace Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-15

    a very effective 6.1 program. The neuropsychological area is another area currently showing considerable promise. Research in this area should not...Things are not well in the world today in the most diLect and simple sense of the word. Hunger and death threaten the majority of men. That is why the...people from hunger and disease cannot contradict the source of active good, that which is most humane in man. I believe that mankind will find a rational

  3. The mutualistic relationship between information systems and the humanities

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeze, Jan H

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the nature of the relationship between the study fields of Information Systems and the humanities. Although literature on Humanities Computing states in principle that there is a bidirectional, beneficial symbiotic relationship, most studies and reflections investigate only the application of information technology in the humanities. This implies that the relation is commensalistic rather that multualistic. However, studies do exist that implement theoretical constructs bor...

  4. Information Systems and the Humanities: A Symbiotic Relationship?

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeze, JH

    2009-01-01

    The lecture explores the nature of the relationship between the study fields of Information Systems and the humanities. Although literature on Humanities Computing states in principle that there is a bi-directional, beneficial symbiotic relationship, most studies and reflections investigate only the application of information technology in the humanities. This suggests that the relation is commensalistic rather that mutualistic. However, studies do exist that implement theor...

  5. Model-Based approaches to Human-Automation Systems Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamieson, Greg A.; Andersson, Jonas; Bisantz, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Human-automation interaction in complex systems is common, yet design for this interaction is often conducted without explicit consideration of the role of the human operator. Fortunately, there are a number of modeling frameworks proposed for supporting this design activity. However...... (and reportedly one or two critics) can engage one another on several agreed questions about such frameworks. The goal is to aid non-aligned practitioners in choosing between alternative frameworks for their human-automation interaction design challenges....

  6. A Computational Model of Torque Generation: Neural, Contractile, Metabolic and Musculoskeletal Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Damien M.; Umberger, Brian R.; Kent-Braun, Jane A.

    2013-01-01

    The pathway of voluntary joint torque production includes motor neuron recruitment and rate-coding, sarcolemmal depolarization and calcium release by the sarcoplasmic reticulum, force generation by motor proteins within skeletal muscle, and force transmission by tendon across the joint. The direct source of energetic support for this process is ATP hydrolysis. It is possible to examine portions of this physiologic pathway using various in vivo and in vitro techniques, but an integrated view of the multiple processes that ultimately impact joint torque remains elusive. To address this gap, we present a comprehensive computational model of the combined neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems that includes novel components related to intracellular bioenergetics function. Components representing excitatory drive, muscle activation, force generation, metabolic perturbations, and torque production during voluntary human ankle dorsiflexion were constructed, using a combination of experimentally-derived data and literature values. Simulation results were validated by comparison with torque and metabolic data obtained in vivo. The model successfully predicted peak and submaximal voluntary and electrically-elicited torque output, and accurately simulated the metabolic perturbations associated with voluntary contractions. This novel, comprehensive model could be used to better understand impact of global effectors such as age and disease on various components of the neuromuscular system, and ultimately, voluntary torque output. PMID:23405245

  7. Medical and technology requirements for human solar system exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld; Harris, Leonard; Couch, Lana; Sulzman, Frank; Gaiser, Karen

    1989-01-01

    Measures that need to be taken to cope with the health problems posed by zero gravity and radiation in manned solar system exploration missions are discussed. The particular systems that will be used aboard Space Station Freedom are addressed, and relevant human factors problems are examined. The development of a controlled ecological life support system is addressed.

  8. Human Systems Integration Synthesis Model for Ship Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    33  b.   Diesel .......................................................................................35  c.  Gas Turbine ...acquire systems capable of maximizing the output of the Navy’s Human Capital. The term Human Capital is defined by Kaplan and Norton (2004, p. 13) as...Machine—engines: steam, diesel, gas turbine , or nuclear Prior to establishing a ship’s speed requirements, one must understand the forces that

  9. Human Dimensions of Coral Reef Social-Ecological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N. Kittinger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are among the most diverse ecosystems on the planet but are declining because of human activities. Despite general recognition of the human role in the plight of coral reefs, the vast majority of research focuses on the ecological rather than the human dimensions of reef ecosystems, limiting our understanding of social relationships with these environments as well as potential solutions for reef recovery. General frameworks for social-ecological systems (SESs have been advanced, but system-specific approaches are needed to develop a more nuanced view of human-environmental interactions for specific contexts and resource systems, and at specific scales. We synthesize existing concepts related to SESs and present a human dimensions framework that explores the linkages between social system structural traits, human activities, ecosystem services, and human well-being in coral reef SESs. Key features of the framework include social-ecological reciprocity, proximate and underlying dimensions, and the directionality of key relationships and feedback loops. Such frameworks are needed if human dimensions research is to be more fully integrated into studies of ecosystem change and the sustainability of linked SESs.

  10. Musculoskeletal injuries in break-dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Song, Kwang Soon; Min, Byung Woo; Lee, Sung Moon; Chang, Hyuk Won; Eum, Dae Seup

    2009-11-01

    Since no epidemiologic studies have been reported about musculoskeletal injuries in break-dancers, there are no data on the rates and patterns of musculoskeletal injuries in this population that clinicians can use to find ways to decrease injury rate. We believe that the incidence of injuries in break-dancers is higher than assumed and that injury rates and patterns differ between professional and amateur dancers. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Of a total of 42 study subjects, 23 were professional dancers and 19 were amateur dancers. Injury frequency, site and type, along with the presence of supervised training, the use of protective devices and warm-up exercises done were recorded. Of the 42 study subjects, excluding two amateur dancers, 40 (95.2%) had had musculoskeletal injuries at more than one site. The mean number of sites per dancer was 4.60. The frequency of injury depended on the site and was as follows: wrist (69.0%), finger (61.9%), knee (61.9%), shoulder (52.4%), lumbar spine (50.0%), elbow (42.9%), cervical spine (38.1%), ankle (38.1%), foot (28.6%) and hip (16.7%). Sprain, strain and tendinitis were the most common injuries, accounting for the most cases. Of the 42 dancers, 13 (31%) had had fractures or dislocations. Eight (19.1%) learned break-dancing under supervised instruction, 17 (40.5%) used protective devices and 28 (66.7%) performed warm-up exercises before dancing. There were significant differences in age, dance career length, amount of dance training, mean number of injury sites and the presence of supervised training between professionals and amateurs (Pnature of the activities that result in both unusual and common injuries in break-dancers and educate them about safety. Careful screening, instruction and supervised training of break-dancers will help to prevent injuries.

  11. Associations of office workers' objectively assessed occupational sitting, standing and stepping time with musculoskeletal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Pieter; Healy, Genevieve N; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Dunstan, David W; Owen, Neville; Moodie, Marj; LaMontagne, Anthony D; Eakin, Elizabeth A; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Straker, Leon M

    2018-04-22

    We examined the association of musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) with workplace sitting, standing and stepping time, as well as sitting and standing time accumulation (i.e. usual bout duration of these activities), measured objectively with the activPAL3 monitor. Using baseline data from the Stand Up Victoria trial (216 office workers, 14 workplaces), cross-sectional associations of occupational activities with self-reported MSS (low-back, upper and lower extremity symptoms in the last three months) were examined using probit regression, correcting for clustering and adjusting for confounders. Sitting bout duration was significantly (p < 0.05) associated, non-linearly, with MSS, such that those in the middle tertile displayed the highest prevalence of upper extremity symptoms. Other associations were non-significant but sometimes involved large differences in symptom prevalence (e.g. 38%) by activity. Though causation is unclear, these non-linear associations suggest that sitting and its alternatives (i.e. standing and stepping) interact with MSS and this should be considered when designing safe work systems. Practitioner summary: We studied associations of objectively assessed occupational activities with musculoskeletal symptoms in office workers. Workers who accumulated longer sitting bouts reported fewer upper extremity symptoms. Total activity duration was not significantly associated with musculoskeletal symptoms. We underline the importance of considering total volumes and patterns of activity time in musculoskeletal research.

  12. Assessment of musculoskeletal disorders in a manufacturing company using QEC and LUBAmethods and comparison of results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Afsartala

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims   Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs are the most important causes of workers disabilities, increasing compensations and reducing productivity in developed and developing countries. This study was aimed to determine prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and assessment of them by using QEC and LUBA methods and comparison of results in a manufacturing company in Iran.     Methods   This descriptive-analytical study was performed on 115 operators in 15 working stations by using QEC and LUBA methods. The prevalence of MSDs was obtained by using Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ. The data were analyzed by Spearman correlation coefficients.     Results   According to findings of NMQ, 81.4 percent of operators at least in one of nine parts of musculoskeletal system have pain since 12 months ago. Assessment with QEC and LUBA  revealed that 71.3 and 24.35 percent of operators respectively are in action level four.     Conclusion   According to the analysis, correlation between findings of NMQ and action levels in QEC is higher than LUBA action levels. Whereas LUBA just assess working postures, this method is not a suitable tool for evaluation of working stations that require repetitive carrying of loads, static posture and long time to do.  

  13. QC operator’s nonneutral posture against musculoskeletal disorder’s (MSDs) risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautsar, F.; Gustopo, D.; Achmadi, F.

    2018-04-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders refer to a gamut of inflammatory and degenerative disorders aggravated largely by the performance of work. It is the major cause of pain, disability, absenteeism and reduced productivity among workers worldwide. Although it is not fatal, MSDs have the potential to develop into serious injuries in the musculoskeletal system if ignored. QC operators work in nonneutral body posture. This cross-sectional study was condusted in order to investigate correlation between risk assessment results of QEC and body posture calculation of mannequin pro. Statistical analysis was condusted using SPSS version 16.0. Validity test, Reliability test and Regression analysis were conducted to compare the risk assessment output of applied method and nonneutral body posture simulation. All of QEC’s indicator classified as valid and reliable. The result of simple regression anlysis are back (0.3264.32), wrist/hand (4.86 >4.32) and neck (1.298 <4.32). Result of this study shows that there is an influence between nonneutral body posture of the QC operator during work with risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The potential risk of musculoskeletal disorders is in the shoulder/arm and wrist/hand of the QC operator, whereas the back and neck are not affected.

  14. Human Robotic Systems (HRS): Robonaut 2 Technologies Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the Robonaut 2 (R2) Technology Project Element within Human Robotic Systems (HRS) is to developed advanced technologies for infusion into the Robonaut 2...

  15. Unmanned systems to support the human exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Douglas W.

    2010-04-01

    Robots and other unmanned systems will play many critical roles in support of a human presence on Mars, including surveying candidate landing sites, locating ice and mineral resources, establishing power and other infrastructure, performing construction tasks, and transporting equipment and supplies. Many of these systems will require much more strength and power than exploration rovers. The presence of humans on Mars will permit proactive maintenance and repair, and allow teleoperation and operator intervention, supporting multiple dynamic levels of autonomy, so the critical challenges to the use of unmanned systems will occur before humans arrive on Mars. Nevertheless, installed communications and navigation infrastructure should be able to support structured and/or repetitive operations (such as excavation, drilling, or construction) within a "familiar" area with an acceptable level of remote operator intervention. This paper discusses some of the factors involved in developing and deploying unmanned systems to make humans' time on Mars safer and more productive, efficient, and enjoyable.

  16. Dynamics of human respiratory system mycoflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Biedunkiewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at determing the prevalence of individual species of fungi in the respiratory systems of women and men, analysis of the dynamics of the fungi in individual sections of the respiratory system as concerns their quantity and identification of phenology of the isolated fungi coupled with an attempt at identifying their possible preferences for appearing during specific seasons of thc year. During 10 years of studies (1989- 1998. 29 species of fungi belonging: Candida, Geolrichum, Saccharomyces, Saccharomycopsis, Schizosaccharomyces, Torulopsis, Trichosporon and Aspergillus were isolated from the ontocenoses of the respiratory systems of patients at the Independent Public Center for Pulmonology and Oncology in Olsztyn. Candida albicans was a clearly dominating fungus. Individual species appeared individually, in twos or threes in a single patient, they were isolated more frequently in the spring and autumn, less frequently during the winter and summer. The largest number of fungi species were isolated from sputum (29 species, bronchoscopic material (23 species and pharyngeal swabs (15 species. Sacchoromycopsis capsularis and Trichosporon beigelii should be treated as new for the respiratory system. Biodiversity of fungi, their numbers and continous fluctuations in frequency indicate that the respiratory system ontocenose offers the optimum conditions for growth and development of the majority of the majority of yeasts - like fungi.

  17. Incidental findings in musculoskeletal radiology; Zufallsbefunde in der muskuloskeletalen Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuennemann, F.; Rehnitz, C.; Weber, M.A. [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Increasing numbers of conventional X-rays, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the inpatient, outpatient and scientific routine leads to an increasing number of incidental findings. The correct interpretation of these incidental findings with respect to the relevance and the evaluation concerning further work-up is an important task of radiologists. Description of common incidental findings in musculoskeletal imaging and their clinical classification. A PubMed literature search was performed using the following terms: incidental findings, population-based imaging, musculoskeletal imaging, non-ossifying fibroma, enchondroma, osteodystrophia deformans, chondrosarcoma, fibrous dysplasia, simple bone cyst, unicameral bone cyst, solitary bone cyst, aneurysmal bone cyst, vertebral hemangioma, bone island, osteopoikilosis, Tarlov cyst and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Incidental findings are observed in up to 40% of imaging procedures. In up to 6% these incidental findings involve the skeletal system. Common incidental findings are discussed and their clinical relevance is explained. (orig.) [German] Mit steigender Menge an konventionellen Roentgen- sowie CT- und MRT-Bildern im stationaeren, ambulanten und wissenschaftlichen Alltag steigt unweigerlich auch die Zahl der Zufallsbefunde. Die korrekte Einordnung bzgl. deren Relevanz, ob eine weitere Abklaerung notwendig ist oder nicht, stellt eine wichtige Aufgabe des Radiologen dar. Vorstellung haeufiger Zufallsbefunde des muskuloskeletalen Systems und deren klinische Einordnung. Pubmed-Literaturrecherche zu den Stichworten ''incidental findings'', ''population-based imaging'', ''musculoskeletal imaging'', ''non-ossifying fibroma'', ''enchondroma'', ''osteodysthrophia deformans'', ''chondrosarcoma'', ''fibrous dysplasia'', &apos

  18. Reduction of metal artefacts in musculoskeletal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, Reto; Dietrich, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Joint replacement and other orthopaedic implants are utilized in many patients with musculoskeletal disorders. While these operations commonly show a good clinical result, a substantial number of patients need to undergo postoperative imaging during follow-up. The presence of orthopaedic implants induces severe metal artefacts at MRI and CT. We review several basic methods and advanced techniques for reducing metal artefacts at MRI and CT in order to enable a diagnostic examination in patients with metal implants. With the use of these techniques, MRI and CT are important and reliable modalities to examine patients with joint replacement and orthopaedic implants.

  19. Various musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic renal insufficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.Y.; Ong, K.O.

    2013-01-01

    Musculoskeletal manifestations in chronic renal insufficiency are caused by complex bone metabolism alterations, now described under the umbrella term of chronic kidney disease mineral- and bone-related disorder (CKD-MBD), as well as iatrogenic processes related to renal replacement treatment. Radiological imaging remains the mainstay of disease assessment. This review aims to illustrate the radiological features of CKD-MBD, such as secondary hyperparathyroidism, osteomalacia, adynamic bone disease, soft-tissue calcifications; as well as features associated with renal replacement therapy, such as aluminium toxicity, secondary amyloidosis, destructive spondyloarthropathy, haemodialysis-related erosive arthropathy, tendon rupture, osteonecrosis, and infection

  20. A disjointed effort: paediatric musculoskeletal examination.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, Irwin

    2012-07-01

    Musculoskeletal (MSK) symptoms are a frequent cause of emergency department attendance for children, and while most often indicative of benign or self-limiting disease, such symptoms can occasionally be the first presentation of serious illness such as leukaemia or juvenile idiopathic arthritis. MSK examination, however, is often not included as part of the routine paediatric examination. The authors aimed to evaluate how often and how thoroughly MSK examination was performed during admissions to the paediatric ward and to compare it with the examination of other symptoms in relation to the presenting complaint and eventual diagnosis.

  1. User Interface Aspects of a Human-Hand Simulation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beifang Yi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the user interface design for a human-hand simulation system, a virtual environment that produces ground truth data (life-like human hand gestures and animations and provides visualization support for experiments on computer vision-based hand pose estimation and tracking. The system allows users to save time in data generation and easily create any hand gestures. We have designed and implemented this user interface with the consideration of usability goals and software engineering issues.

  2. The accessory magnocellular neurosecretory system of the rostral human hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Busch, Johannes R.; Jacobsen, Christina

    2018-01-01

    magnocellular neurons were often located along the blood vessels and projections of some of these neurons penetrated the vascular endothelium. The accessory magnocellular cell bodies expressed either neurophysin I or neurophysin II immunoreactivity. Summarizing, the accessory magnocellular system in the human......The morphology and neurophysin expression of the magnocellular accessory neuroendocrine system located in the rostral human hypothalamus is investigated in a series of brains obtained at autopsy. The hypothalami were fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin, or after cryoprotection, frozen...

  3. The human histaminergic system in neuropsychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Ling; Bao, Ai-Min; Swaab, Dick F

    Histaminergic neurons are exclusively located in the hypothalamic tuberomamillary nucleus, from where they project to many brain areas. The histaminergic system is involved in basic physiological functions, such as the sleep-wake cycle, energy and endocrine homeostasis, sensory and motor functions,

  4. Human Systems Integration: Requirements and Functional Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, Barry; Gershzohn, Gary; Boltz, Laura; Wolf, Russ; Schultz, Mike

    2005-01-01

    This deliverable was intended as an input to the Access 5 Policy and Simulation Integrated Product Teams. This document contains high-level pilot functionality for operations in the National Airspace System above FL430. Based on the derived pilot functions the associated pilot information and control requirements are given.

  5. Requirements engineering for human activity systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erasmus, J

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available railway crossing system Measure of Effectiveness Min Max Priority Points Weight Rail-road safety, APAs 1 0 2 80 24 Investment cost, $k - RC 250k 150k 6 20 6 Sustainment cost, $k/20 years - RC 250k 100k 4 40 12 Investment cost, $k - RTA 20k 5k 9 1 0...

  6. Human-computer interaction and management information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Galletta, Dennis F

    2014-01-01

    ""Human-Computer Interaction and Management Information Systems: Applications"" offers state-of-the-art research by a distinguished set of authors who span the MIS and HCI fields. The original chapters provide authoritative commentaries and in-depth descriptions of research programs that will guide 21st century scholars, graduate students, and industry professionals. Human-Computer Interaction (or Human Factors) in MIS is concerned with the ways humans interact with information, technologies, and tasks, especially in business, managerial, organizational, and cultural contexts. It is distinctiv

  7. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  8. Assessment and Diagnosis of Musculoskeletal Shoulder Disorders over the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Steele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder disorders are common, debilitating, and represent a considerable burden on society. As primary contact practitioners, physiotherapists play a large role in the management and rehabilitation of people with these conditions. For those living outside of urban areas, however, access to physiotherapy can be limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of using a telerehabilitation system to collect physical examination findings and correctly identify disorders of the shoulder. Twenty-two participants with 28 shoulder disorders were recruited and underwent a face-to-face physical examination and a remote telerehabilitation examination. Examination findings and diagnoses from the two modes of assessment were used to determine validity and reliability of the new method. Diagnostic agreement and agreement on individual findings between the two methods were found to be consistent with the reliability of conventional assessment methods. This study provides important preliminary findings on the validity and reliability of musculoskeletal examinations conducted via telerehabilitation.

  9. Operator role definition and human-system integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knee, H.E.; Schryver, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses operator role definition and human-system integration from a perspective of systems engineering and allocation of functions. Current and traditional allocation of tasks/functions can no longer by applied to systems that are significantly more sophisticated and dynamic than current system designs. For such advanced and automated designs, explicit attention must be given to the role of the operator in order to facilitate efficient system performance. Furthermore, such systems will include intelligent automated systems which will support the cognitive activities of the operator. If such systems share responsibility and control with the human operator, these computer-based assistants/associates should be viewed as intelligent team members. As such, factors such as trust, intentions, and expectancies, among team members must be considered by the systems designer. Such design considerations are discussed in this paper. This paper also discusses the area of dynamic allocation of functions, and the need for models of the human operator in support of machine forecast of human performance. The Integrated Reactor Operator/System (INTEROPS) model is discussed as an example of a cognitive model capable of functioning beyond a rule-based behavioral structure

  10. Focusing on the human factor in future expert systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Technological advances in the area of artificial intelligence have produced expert systems that hold much promise for the design, operation, and maintenance of complex systems such as nuclear power plants. Such systems have been designed and implemented in a wide variety of task settings. In spite of the gains that have been made in the application of expert systems, there are still several difficult problems which have yet to be resolved. One of these problems is a frequently noted lack of user acceptance of newly fielded intelligent systems. This lack of acceptance can be attributed to a variety of factors, including unfamiliarity with computer technology, difficulty in adjusting to interface mechanisms, fear that the system was designed to replace the human operator, and a feeling that the human can perform the job better than the system. Some of the problems may be related to the fact that expert system design is essentially in it's infancy

  11. Prevalence of triathlon-related musculoskeletal pain among Kwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The subjects' training history and epidemiology of triathlon-related musculoskeletal pain were gathered employing the use of a self report musculoskeletal pain questionnaire, in addition to body mass, stature, Q-angles and navicular height measurements. Descriptive statistics which included the mode, mean, frequency, ...

  12. Video Analysis of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Nigerian and English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Video Analysis of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Nigerian and English Professional Soccer Leagues: A Comparative Study. ... The knee and the ankle were the most common injured parts. Most injuries were caused by tackling ... Keywords: Soccer Players, Nigerian Premier League, English Premier League. Musculoskeletal ...

  13. Musculoskeletal colour/power Doppler in sports medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M I; Boesen, M; Langberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    This review article discusses the aspects of sports medicine where musculoskeletal Doppler ultrasound has valuable contribution in diagnosis and/or treatment of some of the typical musculoskeletal sports injuries. Also, conditions where the Doppler ultrasound has no value are discussed. Some...

  14. Musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, S; Tribler, J; Snorgaard, O

    2012-01-01

    The aims were to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrate possible associated factors.......The aims were to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in patients with type 2 diabetes and demonstrate possible associated factors....

  15. Incidence of work-related musculoskeletal pain among dentists in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dentists commonly experience musculoskeletal pain during the course of their career. This study investigated the incidence and mechanism of work-related musculoskeletal pain among practising dentists in Kwa-Zulu Natal. A descriptive survey was conducted among 94 dentists, who voluntarily consented to participate in ...

  16. Does muscle strength predict future musculoskeletal disorders and sickness absence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, A; Sell, L; Hansen, J V

    2012-01-01

    High muscle strength is considered relevant for preventing musculoskeletal disorders and long-term sickness absence. However, prospective studies on the association between muscle strength and future musculoskeletal disorders and long-term sickness absence are few and show contrasting results....

  17. Tailor's chair and musculoskeletal disorders in Nigeria | Akanbi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is concluded that seat devices which are not ergonomically designed, impose various work postures on operators which may partly be responsible for their musculoskeletal disorders. Hence, the redesign of sitting devices with ergonomic characteristics is recommended. Keywords: Musculoskeletal disorders, sewing ...

  18. Work related musculoskeletal pain among teachers in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impact of musculoskeletal pain specifically within the teaching profession has not been given sufficient attention in the literature especially in Nigeria. This study determined the prevalence of work related musculoskeletal pain among public secondary school teachers in Ife-Central Local Government Area (LGA), Osun ...

  19. Interrelations of codes in human semiotic systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Somov, Georgij

    2016-01-01

    Codes can be viewed as mechanisms that enable relations of signs and their components, i.e., semiosis is actualized. The combinations of these relations produce new relations as new codes are building over other codes. Structures appear in the mechanisms of codes. Hence, codes can be described as transformations of structures from some material systems into others. Structures belong to different carriers, but exist in codes in their "pure" form. Building of codes over other codes fosters t...

  20. Human Characteristics and Measures in Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    cause) death ( Lazarus and Folkman , 1984). All living organisms respond to stress. The term stress (or stressor) is used in a variety of ways and can... Lazarus , R. S., and Folkman , S. (1984). Stress, Appraisal and Coping. New York: Springer. Leger, A, Aymeric, B., Audrezet, H., and Alba, P. (October...stress response system has been eloquent!: y ¥operationalized by Seyle (1937, 1975) using his general adaptation syfldrome (GAS), whiah is divided into

  1. Project and implementation of the human/system interface laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Paulo Victor R. de; Obadia, Isaac Jose; Vidal, Mario Cesar Rodriguez

    2002-01-01

    Analog instrumentation is being increasingly replaced by digital technology in new nuclear power plants, such as Angra III, as well as in existing operating plants, such as Angra I and II, for modernization and life-extension projects. In this new technological environment human factors issues aims to minimize failures in nuclear power plants operation due to human error. It is well known that 30% to 50% of the detected unforeseen problems involve human errors. Presently, human factors issues must be considered during the development of advanced human-system interfaces for the plant. IAEA has considered the importance of those issues and has published TECDOC's and Safety Series Issues on the matter. Thus, there is a need to develop methods and criteria to asses, compare, optimize and validate the human-system interface associated with totally new or hybrid control rooms. Also, the use of computer based operator aids is en evolving area. In order to assist on the development of methods and criteria and to evaluate the effects of the new design concepts and computerized support systems on operator performance, research simulators with advanced control rooms technology, such the IEN's Human System Interface Laboratory, will provide the necessary setting. (author)

  2. Stereoscopy and the Human Visual System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Martin S.; Read, Jenny C. A.; Allison, Robert S.; Watt, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    Stereoscopic displays have become important for many applications, including operation of remote devices, medical imaging, surgery, scientific visualization, and computer-assisted design. But the most significant and exciting development is the incorporation of stereo technology into entertainment: specifically, cinema, television, and video games. In these applications for stereo, three-dimensional (3D) imagery should create a faithful impression of the 3D structure of the scene being portrayed. In addition, the viewer should be comfortable and not leave the experience with eye fatigue or a headache. Finally, the presentation of the stereo images should not create temporal artifacts like flicker or motion judder. This paper reviews current research on stereo human vision and how it informs us about how best to create and present stereo 3D imagery. The paper is divided into four parts: (1) getting the geometry right, (2) depth cue interactions in stereo 3D media, (3) focusing and fixating on stereo images, and (4) how temporal presentation protocols affect flicker, motion artifacts, and depth distortion. PMID:23144596

  3. Human development and sustainability of energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This seminar on human development and sustainability was jointly organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) and Enerdata company. This document summarises the content of the different presentations and of the minutes of the discussions that took place at the end of each topic. The different themes discussed were: 1 - Political and methodological issues related to sustainability (sustainability concept in government policy, sustainability and back-casting: lessons from EST); 2 - towards a socially viable world: thematic discussions (demography and peoples' migration; time budget and life style change - equal sex access to instruction and labour - geopolitical regional and inter-regional universal cultural acceptability; welfare, poverty and social link and economics); 3 - building up an environmentally sustainable energy world, keeping resources for future generations and preventing geopolitical ruptures (CO{sub 2} emissions; nuclear issues; land-use, noise, and other industrial risks). The memorandum on sustainability issues in view of very long term energy studies is reprinted in the appendix. The transparencies of seven presentations are attached to this document. (J.S.)

  4. Privatisation of water systems: Crime against humanity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titus R. Mobie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article emphasises the importance of water resources, which are vital to the sustenance of life. Water is essential for various reasons: for drinking, for personal hygiene, for cooking, for watering crops, for cleaning our homes etc. One can therefore conclude that, without this vital resource, there is no life. It is for this reason that God, giver of life, gave water as a gift – free – both to humanity and to the rest of creation, so that we may all achieve fullness of life. This article challenges the fact that, because of the insistence of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund on the privatisation of water supplies where the poorest of the poor are unable to pay, these people are cut off from water supplies and are deprived of the right to the fullness of life. The author emphasises that there is no life without water, that water resources are a gift from the creator and should therefore be made accessible to all, rich and poor alike.

  5. Human development and sustainability of energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This seminar on human development and sustainability was jointly organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) and Enerdata company. This document summarises the content of the different presentations and of the minutes of the discussions that took place at the end of each topic. The different themes discussed were: 1 - Political and methodological issues related to sustainability (sustainability concept in government policy, sustainability and back-casting: lessons from EST); 2 - towards a socially viable world: thematic discussions (demography and peoples' migration; time budget and life style change - equal sex access to instruction and labour - geopolitical regional and inter-regional universal cultural acceptability; welfare, poverty and social link and economics); 3 - building up an environmentally sustainable energy world, keeping resources for future generations and preventing geopolitical ruptures (CO{sub 2} emissions; nuclear issues; land-use, noise, and other industrial risks). The memorandum on sustainability issues in view of very long term energy studies is reprinted in the appendix. The transparencies of seven presentations are attached to this document. (J.S.)

  6. System ergonomics as an approach to improve human reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubb, H.

    1988-01-01

    The application of system technics on ergonomical problems is called system ergonomics. This enables improvements of human reliability by design measures. The precondition for this is the knowledge of how information processing is performed by man and machine. By a separate consideration of sensory processing, cognitive processing, and motory processing it is possible to have a more exact idea of the system element 'man'. The system element 'machine' is well described by differential equations which allow an ergonomical assessment of the manouverability. The knowledge of information processing of man and machine enables a task analysis. This makes appear on one hand the human boundaries depending on the different properties of the task and on the other hand suitable ergonomical solution proposals which improve the reliability of the total system. It is a disadvantage, however, that the change of human reliability by such measures may not be quoted numerically at the moment. (orig.)

  7. NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubec, Keith; Connolly, Janis

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the history, and development of NASA-STD-3001, NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health, and the related Human Integration Design Handbook. Currently being developed from NASA-STD-3000, this project standard currently in review will be available in two volumes, (i.e., Volume 1 -- VCrew Health and Volume 2 -- Human Factors, Habitability, and Environmental Health) and the handbook will be both available as a pdf file and as a interactive website.

  8. Human machine interface for research reactor instrumentation and control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sabri Minhat; Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Hussin; Zareen Khan Abdul Jalil Khan; Nurfarhana Ayuni Joha

    2010-01-01

    Most present design of Human Machine Interface for Research Reactor Instrumentation and Control System is modular-based, comprise of several cabinets such as Reactor Protection System, Control Console, Information Console as well as Communication Console. The safety, engineering and human factor will be concerned for the design. Redundancy and separation of signal and power supply are the main factor for safety consideration. The design of Operator Interface absolutely takes consideration of human and environmental factors. Physical parameters, experiences, trainability and long-established habit patterns are very important for user interface, instead of the Aesthetic and Operator-Interface Geometry. Physical design for New Instrumentation and Control System of RTP are proposed base on the state-of- the-art Human Machine Interface design. (author)

  9. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen

    2012-03-20

    The sources of shockwave generation include electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric principles. Electrohydraulic shockwaves are high-energy acoustic waves generated under water explosion with high voltage electrode. Shockwave in urology (lithotripsy) is primarily used to disintegrate urolithiasis, whereas shockwave in orthopedics (orthotripsy) is not used to disintegrate tissues, rather to induce tissue repair and regeneration. The application of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been around for more than a decade and is primarily used in the treatment of sports related over-use tendinopathies such as proximal plantar fasciitis of the heel, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, calcific or non-calcific tendonitis of the shoulder and patellar tendinopathy etc. The success rate ranged from 65% to 91%, and the complications were low and negligible. ESWT is also utilized in the treatment of non-union of long bone fracture, avascular necrosis of femoral head, chronic diabetic and non-diabetic ulcers and ischemic heart disease. The vast majority of the published papers showed positive and beneficial effects. FDA (USA) first approved ESWT for the treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis in 2000 and lateral epicondylitis in 2002. ESWT is a novel non-invasive therapeutic modality without surgery or surgical risks, and the clinical application of ESWT steadily increases over the years. This article reviews the current status of ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders.

  10. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ching-Jen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The sources of shockwave generation include electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric principles. Electrohydraulic shockwaves are high-energy acoustic waves generated under water explosion with high voltage electrode. Shockwave in urology (lithotripsy is primarily used to disintegrate urolithiasis, whereas shockwave in orthopedics (orthotripsy is not used to disintegrate tissues, rather to induce tissue repair and regeneration. The application of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders has been around for more than a decade and is primarily used in the treatment of sports related over-use tendinopathies such as proximal plantar fasciitis of the heel, lateral epicondylitis of the elbow, calcific or non-calcific tendonitis of the shoulder and patellar tendinopathy etc. The success rate ranged from 65% to 91%, and the complications were low and negligible. ESWT is also utilized in the treatment of non-union of long bone fracture, avascular necrosis of femoral head, chronic diabetic and non-diabetic ulcers and ischemic heart disease. The vast majority of the published papers showed positive and beneficial effects. FDA (USA first approved ESWT for the treatment of proximal plantar fasciitis in 2000 and lateral epicondylitis in 2002. ESWT is a novel non-invasive therapeutic modality without surgery or surgical risks, and the clinical application of ESWT steadily increases over the years. This article reviews the current status of ESWT in musculoskeletal disorders.

  11. Prevention of the Musculoskeletal Complications of Hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Rodriguez-Merchan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia is an inherited disorder of clotting factor deficiencies resulting in musculoskeletal bleeding, including hemarthroses, leading to musculoskeletal complications. The articular problems of hemophiliac patients begin in infancy. These include: recurrent hemarthroses, chronic synovitis, flexion deformities, hypertrophy of the growth epiphyses, damage to the articular cartilage, and hemophilic arthropathy. The most commonly affected joints are the ankle, the knee, and the elbow. Hematologic prophylactic treatment from ages 2 to 18 years could avoid the development of hemophilic arthropathy if the concentration of the patient's deficient factor is prevented from falling below 1% of normal. Hemarthroses can be prevented by the administration of clotting factor concentrates (prophylaxis. However, high costs and the need for venous access devices in younger children continue to complicate recommendations for universal prophylaxis. Prevention of joint arthropathy needs to focus on prevention of hemarthroses through prophylaxis, identifying early joint disease through the optimal use of cost-effective imaging modalities and the validation of serological markers of joint arthropathy. Screening for effects on bone health and optimal management of pain to improve quality of life are, likewise, important issues. Major hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilic synovitis should be treated aggressively to prevent hemophilic arthropathy.

  12. An Overview of Recent Patents on Musculoskeletal Interface Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rohit T.; Browe, Daniel P.; Lowe, Christopher J.; Freeman, Joseph W.

    2018-01-01

    Interface tissue engineering involves the development of engineered grafts that promote integration between multiple tissue types. Musculoskeletal tissue interfaces are critical to the safe and efficient transmission of mechanical forces between multiple musculoskeletal tissues e.g. between ligament and bone tissue. However, these interfaces often do not physiologically regenerate upon injury, resulting in impaired tissue function. Therefore, interface tissue engineering approaches are considered to be particularly relevant for the structural restoration of musculoskeletal tissues interfaces. In this article we provide an overview of the various strategies used for engineering musculoskeletal tissue interfaces with a specific focus on the recent important patents that have been issued for inventions that were specifically designed for engineering musculoskeletal interfaces as well as those that show promise to be adapted for this purpose. PMID:26577344

  13. Subgroups of musculoskeletal pain patients and their psychobiological patterns – The LOGIN study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhardt Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain conditions of the musculoskeletal system are very common and have tremendous socioeconomic impact. Despite its high prevalence, musculoskeletal pain remains poorly understood and predominantly non-specifically and insufficiently treated. The group of chronic musculoskeletal pain patients is supposed to be heterogeneous, due to a multitude of mechanisms involved in chronic pain. Psychological variables, psychophysiological processes, and neuroendocrine alterations are expected to be involved. Thus far, studies on musculoskeletal pain have predominantly focused on the general aspects of pain processing, thus neglecting the heterogeneity of patients with musculoskeletal pain. Consequently, there is a need for studies that comprise a multitude of mechanisms that are potentially involved in the chronicity and spread of pain. This need might foster research and facilitate a better pathophysiological understanding of the condition, thereby promoting the development of specific mechanism-based treatments for chronic pain. Therefore, the objectives of this study are as follows: 1 identify and describe subgroups of patients with musculoskeletal pain with regard to clinical manifestations (including mental co-morbidity and 2 investigate whether distinct sensory profiles or 3 distinct plasma levels of pain-related parameters due to different underlying mechanisms can be distinguished in various subgroups of pain patients. Methods/Design We will examine a population-based chronic pain sample (n = 100, a clinical tertiary care sample (n = 100 and pain-free patients with depression or post-traumatic stress disorder and pain-free healthy controls (each n = 30, respectively. The samples will be pain localisation matched by sex and age to the population-based sample. Patients will undergo physical examination and thorough assessments of mental co-morbidity (including psychological trauma, perceptual and central sensitisation

  14. Subgroups of musculoskeletal pain patients and their psychobiological patterns - the LOGIN study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Andreas; Hartmann, Mechthild; Tesarz, Jonas; Janke, Susanne; Leisner, Sabine; Seidler, Günter; Eich, Wolfgang

    2012-08-03

    Pain conditions of the musculoskeletal system are very common and have tremendous socioeconomic impact. Despite its high prevalence, musculoskeletal pain remains poorly understood and predominantly non-specifically and insufficiently treated.The group of chronic musculoskeletal pain patients is supposed to be heterogeneous, due to a multitude of mechanisms involved in chronic pain. Psychological variables, psychophysiological processes, and neuroendocrine alterations are expected to be involved. Thus far, studies on musculoskeletal pain have predominantly focused on the general aspects of pain processing, thus neglecting the heterogeneity of patients with musculoskeletal pain. Consequently, there is a need for studies that comprise a multitude of mechanisms that are potentially involved in the chronicity and spread of pain. This need might foster research and facilitate a better pathophysiological understanding of the condition, thereby promoting the development of specific mechanism-based treatments for chronic pain. Therefore, the objectives of this study are as follows: 1) identify and describe subgroups of patients with musculoskeletal pain with regard to clinical manifestations (including mental co-morbidity) and 2) investigate whether distinct sensory profiles or 3) distinct plasma levels of pain-related parameters due to different underlying mechanisms can be distinguished in various subgroups of pain patients. We will examine a population-based chronic pain sample (n = 100), a clinical tertiary care sample (n = 100) and pain-free patients with depression or post-traumatic stress disorder and pain-free healthy controls (each n = 30, respectively). The samples will be pain localisation matched by sex and age to the population-based sample. Patients will undergo physical examination and thorough assessments of mental co-morbidity (including psychological trauma), perceptual and central sensitisation (quantitative sensory testing), descending

  15. The shaping of modern human immune systems by multiregional admixture with archaic humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi-Rached, Laurent; Jobin, Matthew J; Kulkarni, Subhash; McWhinnie, Alasdair; Dalva, Klara; Gragert, Loren; Babrzadeh, Farbod; Gharizadeh, Baback; Luo, Ma; Plummer, Francis A; Kimani, Joshua; Carrington, Mary; Middleton, Derek; Rajalingam, Raja; Beksac, Meral; Marsh, Steven G E; Maiers, Martin; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Tavoularis, Sofia; Little, Ann-Margaret; Green, Richard E; Norman, Paul J; Parham, Peter

    2011-10-07

    Whole genome comparisons identified introgression from archaic to modern humans. Our analysis of highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, vital immune system components subject to strong balancing selection, shows how modern humans acquired the HLA-B*73 allele in west Asia through admixture with archaic humans called Denisovans, a likely sister group to the Neandertals. Virtual genotyping of Denisovan and Neandertal genomes identified archaic HLA haplotypes carrying functionally distinctive alleles that have introgressed into modern Eurasian and Oceanian populations. These alleles, of which several encode unique or strong ligands for natural killer cell receptors, now represent more than half the HLA alleles of modern Eurasians and also appear to have been later introduced into Africans. Thus, adaptive introgression of archaic alleles has significantly shaped modern human immune systems.

  16. An evaluation of musculoskeletal discomfort experience by radiographers performing mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, A.G.; May, J

    1997-10-01

    work and the design of the mammography units, breast screening radiographers are often subjected to frequent bending and twisting, static working postures, forceful movements and repetitive work. These are factors which have all been related to muscular problems. It is possible that these factors may have a cumulative effect of wear and tear on the musculoskeletal system of radiographers thus possibly aggravating existing or past injuries and paving the way for new ones. It is important therefore that recommendations are proposed to further the ergonomic design of mammography units, the training, the working practices and conditions of the radiographers. Both causal and contributory factors present in the workplace, regardless of whether the original injury was caused in performing breast screening, general radiography or actually outside work should be addressed. (abstract truncated)

  17. Correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with musculoskeletal complaints among dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiory Dioptis Putriwijaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal complaints have been common for dentists since their body is unknowingly often in inappropriate positions when caring for patients. For example, they bend towards patients, suddenly move, and then rotate from one side to another. The repetitive movements are done in long term. High activities and sufficient recovery time can cause a buildup of lactic acid in their blood leading to obstruction of the energy intake from the aerobic system in their muscle cells, resulting in fatigue. As a result, such conditions trigger decreased muscle performances. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with the risk of musculoskeletal disorders among dentists at Public Health Centers in Surabaya. Method: This research was an analytical observational research using cross sectional approach. Sampling technique used in this research was cluster random sampling with nineteen samples. To evaluate the working positions of those samples, a rapid entire body assessment (REBA method was used. Meanwhile, to observe the musculoskeletal disorders of those samples, a Nordic body map was used. Data obtained then were analyzed using Pearson correlation test with a significance level (p<0.05. Result: Results of data analysis using the Pearson correlation test showed that the significance value obtained was 0.036. It indicates that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels with the musculoskeletal disorders in those dentists. The results of the Pearson correlation test also revealed that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels among those dentists with a significance value of 0.025. Conclusion: It may be concluded that the wrong body positions during working can increase lactic acid level in the body of dentists. The increased level of lactic acid then can affect their muscles, leading to the high risk of

  18. Humans vs Hardware: The Unique World of NASA Human System Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, W.; Havenhill, M.; Overton, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Understanding spaceflight risks to crew health and performance is a crucial aspect of preparing for exploration missions in the future. The research activities of the Human Research Program (HRP) provide substantial evidence to support most risk reduction work. The Human System Risk Board (HSRB), acting on behalf of the Office of Chief Health and Medical Officer (OCHMO), assesses these risks and assigns likelihood and consequence ratings to track progress. Unfortunately, many traditional approaches in risk assessment such as those used in the engineering aspects of spaceflight are difficult to apply to human system risks. This presentation discusses the unique aspects of risk assessment from the human system risk perspective and how these limitations are accommodated and addressed in order to ensure that reasonable inputs are provided to support the OCHMO's overall risk posture for manned exploration missions.

  19. Development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model of the elbow joint complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Roger V.; Hutchins, E. L.; Barr, Ronald E.; Abraham, Lawrence D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a musculoskeletal model that represents human elbow flexion-extension and forearm pronation-supination. The length, velocity, and moment arm for each of the eight musculotendon actuators were based on skeletal anatomy and position. Musculotendon parameters were determined for each actuator and verified by comparing analytical torque-angle curves with experimental joint torque data. The parameters and skeletal geometry were also utilized in the musculoskeletal model for the analysis of ballistic elbow joint complex movements. The key objective was to develop a computational model, guided by parameterized optimal control, to investigate the relationship among patterns of muscle excitation, individual muscle forces, and movement kinematics. The model was verified using experimental kinematic, torque, and electromyographic data from volunteer subjects performing ballistic elbow joint complex movements.

  20. A new method to evaluate human-robot system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, G.; Weisbin, C. R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the key issues in space exploration is that of deciding what space tasks are best done with humans, with robots, or a suitable combination of each. In general, human and robot skills are complementary. Humans provide as yet unmatched capabilities to perceive, think, and act when faced with anomalies and unforeseen events, but there can be huge potential risks to human safety in getting these benefits. Robots provide complementary skills in being able to work in extremely risky environments, but their ability to perceive, think, and act by themselves is currently not error-free, although these capabilities are continually improving with the emergence of new technologies. Substantial past experience validates these generally qualitative notions. However, there is a need for more rigorously systematic evaluation of human and robot roles, in order to optimize the design and performance of human-robot system architectures using well-defined performance evaluation metrics. This article summarizes a new analytical method to conduct such quantitative evaluations. While the article focuses on evaluating human-robot systems, the method is generally applicable to a much broader class of systems whose performance needs to be evaluated.

  1. Sybar, a human motion analysis system for rehabilition medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hautus, E.H.

    1997-01-01

    The Sybar project is a designer's Ph.D project that deals with the development of a motion-analysis system for rehabilitation medicine, at the VU Hospital in Amsterdam. Human motion can be analyzed by biomechanical measurement systems. There are a number of different methods to generate several

  2. HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN A TOURISM ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Dicheva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, based on personal observations and analyzed information, an attempt is made to be identified the main problems with personnel management in tourism organizations. It argues that this system needs a thorough reorganization is needed in which sustainable development of the system will be achieved improving its ability to motivate, evaluate and properly manage human resources.

  3. The mirror system in human and nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Guy A

    2014-04-01

    The description of the mirror neuron system provided by Cook et al. is incomplete for the macaque, and incorrect for humans. This is relevant to exaptation versus associative learning as the underlying mechanism generating mirror neurons, and to the sensorimotor learning as evidence for the authors' viewpoint. The proposed additional testing of the mirror system in rodents is unrealistic.

  4. Understanding human factors in cyber security as a dynamic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, H.J.; Vliet, A.J. van; Ven, J.G.S. van de; Jol, S.C.; Broekman, C.C.M.T.

    2018-01-01

    The perspective of human factors is largely missing from the wider cyber security dialogue and its scope is often limited. We propose a framework in which we consider cyber security as a state of a system. System change is brought on by an entity’s behavior. Interventions are ways of changing

  5. Simplified detection system for neuroreceptor studies in the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bice, A.N.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Frost, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive dual-detector system has been developed for measurement of positronemitting receptor-binding drugs in the human brain. This high efficiency coincidence counting system requires that only a few hundred microcuries of labeled drug be administered to the subject, thereby allowing for multiple studies without an excessive radiation dose. Measurement of the binding of [11C]carfentanil, a high affinity synthetic opiate, to opiate receptors in the presence and in the absence of a competitive opiate antagonist indicates the potential utility of this system for estimating different degrees of receptor occupation in the human brain

  6. Human as a component of a nuclear material safeguard system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, D.E.; Schechter, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    Many human vigilance experiments are summarized and principles are extracted which should be useful in designing and evaluating a nuclear material safeguard system. A human is a poor observer and is not a dependable part of any man-machine system when required to function as an observer. There are a few techniques which improve his performance by providing feedback. A conceptual model is presented which is helpful in design and evaluation of systems. There is some slight experimental support for the model. Finally, some techniques of time study and statistical control charting will be useful as a means of detecting nuclear diversion attempts

  7. Cultural selection drives the evolution of human communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamariz, Monica; Ellison, T Mark; Barr, Dale J; Fay, Nicolas

    2014-08-07

    Human communication systems evolve culturally, but the evolutionary mechanisms that drive this evolution are not well understood. Against a baseline that communication variants spread in a population following neutral evolutionary dynamics (also known as drift models), we tested the role of two cultural selection models: coordination- and content-biased. We constructed a parametrized mixed probabilistic model of the spread of communicative variants in four 8-person laboratory micro-societies engaged in a simple communication game. We found that selectionist models, working in combination, explain the majority of the empirical data. The best-fitting parameter setting includes an egocentric bias and a content bias, suggesting that participants retained their own previously used communicative variants unless they encountered a superior (content-biased) variant, in which case it was adopted. This novel pattern of results suggests that (i) a theory of the cultural evolution of human communication systems must integrate selectionist models and (ii) human communication systems are functionally adaptive complex systems.

  8. User's manual of a support system for human reliability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokobayashi, Masao; Tamura, Kazuo.

    1995-10-01

    Many kinds of human reliability analysis (HRA) methods have been developed. However, users are required to be skillful so as to use them, and also required complicated works such as drawing event tree (ET) and calculation of uncertainty bounds. Moreover, each method is not so complete that only one method of them is not enough to evaluate human reliability. Therefore, a personal computer (PC) based support system for HRA has been developed to execute HRA practically and efficiently. The system consists of two methods, namely, simple method and detailed one. The former uses ASEP that is a simplified THERP-technique, and combined method of OAT and HRA-ET/DeBDA is used for the latter. Users can select a suitable method for their purpose. Human error probability (HEP) data were collected and a database of them was built to use for the support system. This paper describes outline of the HRA methods, support functions and user's guide of the system. (author)

  9. Human Performance Considerations for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, R. Jay; Hobbs, Alan; Lyall, Beth; Rorie, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Successful integration of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) into civil airspace will not only require solutions to technical challenges, but will also require that the design and operation of RPAS take into account human limitations and capabilities. Human factors can affect overall system performance whenever the system relies on people to interact with another element of the system. Four types of broad interactions can be described. These are (1) interactions between people and hardware, such as controls and displays; (2) human use of procedures and documentation; (3) impact of the task environment, including lighting, noise and monotony; and lastly, (4) interactions between operational personnel, including communication and coordination. In addition to the human factors that have been identified for conventional aviation, RPAS operations introduce a set of unique human challenges. The purpose of document is to raise human factors issues for consideration by workgroups of the ICAO RPAS panel as they work to develop guidance material and additions to ICAO annexes. It is anticipated that the content of this document will be revised and updated as the work of the panel progresses.

  10. Delay effects in the human sensory system during balancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, Gabor

    2009-03-28

    Mechanical models of human self-balancing often use the Newtonian equations of inverted pendula. While these mathematical models are precise enough on the mechanical side, the ways humans balance themselves are still quite unexplored on the control side. Time delays in the sensory and motoric neural pathways give essential limitations to the stabilization of the human body as a multiple inverted pendulum. The sensory systems supporting each other provide the necessary signals for these control tasks; but the more complicated the system is, the larger delay is introduced. Human ageing as well as our actual physical and mental state affects the time delays in the neural system, and the mechanical structure of the human body also changes in a large range during our lives. The human balancing organ, the labyrinth, and the vision system essentially adapted to these relatively large time delays and parameter regions occurring during balancing. The analytical study of the simplified large-scale time-delayed models of balancing provides a Newtonian insight into the functioning of these organs that may also serve as a basis to support theories and hypotheses on balancing and vision.

  11. Cardiovascular and Musculoskeletal Assessment of Elite US Volleyball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher K; Dyar, Dan A; Vargas, Lisa A; Grossfeld, Paul D

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems of elite volleyball players, including aortic dimensions. Previous studies have shown that the upper limit of normal aortic sinus diameter for male and female athletes is 4 and 3.4 cm, respectively. Cross-sectional analysis. United States Olympic Volleyball Training Facility and Rady Children's Hospital San Diego. Seventy (37 male) members of the US national volleyball team. Athletes underwent evaluation that included medical and family histories, targeted physical examinations specifically focusing on abnormalities present in Marfan syndrome (MFS), and transthoracic echocardiograms. Cardiac chamber and great artery size, valve function, and coronary artery origins were assessed. Three male athletes (8%) had an aortic sinus diameter ≥4 cm, one of whom also had an ascending aorta >4 cm. Two female athletes (6%) had aortic sinus diameter ≥3.4 cm, and another had an ascending aorta of 3.4 cm. There were no other intracardiac or arterial abnormalities. Individual musculoskeletal characteristics of MFS were common among the athletes but not more frequent or numerous in those with aortic dilation. The prevalence of aortic root dilation in this population of athletes was higher than what has previously been reported in other similar populations. Further study is needed to determine whether these represent pathological changes or normal variations in tall athletes. This study adds to the existing knowledge base of athlete's heart, with specific attention to aortic dimensions in elite volleyball players. The data are relevant to similar athletes' medical care and to preparticipation cardiac screening in general.

  12. Human systems integration in remotely piloted aircraft operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvaryanas, Anthony P

    2006-12-01

    The role of humans in remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs) is qualitatively different from manned aviation, lessening the applicability of aerospace medicine human factors knowledge derived from traditional cockpits. Aerospace medicine practitioners should expect to be challenged in addressing RPA crewmember performance. Human systems integration (HSI) provides a model for explaining human performance as a function of the domains of: human factors engineering; personnel; training; manpower; environment, safety, and occupational health (ESOH); habitability; and survivability. RPA crewmember performance is being particularly impacted by issues involving the domains of human factors engineering, personnel, training, manpower, ESOH, and habitability. Specific HSI challenges include: 1) changes in large RPA operator selection and training; 2) human factors engineering deficiencies in current RPA ground control station design and their impact on human error including considerations pertaining to multi-aircraft control; and 3) the combined impact of manpower shortfalls, shiftwork-related fatigue, and degraded crewmember effectiveness. Limited experience and available research makes it difficult to qualitatively or quantitatively predict the collective impact of these issues on RPA crewmember performance. Attending to HSI will be critical for the success of current and future RPA crewmembers. Aerospace medicine practitioners working with RPA crewmembers should gain first-hand knowledge of their task environment while the larger aerospace medicine community needs to address the limited information available on RPA-related aerospace medicine human factors. In the meantime, aeromedical decisions will need to be made based on what is known about other aerospace occupations, realizing this knowledge may have only partial applicability.

  13. Impact of three genetic musculoskeletal diseases: a comparative synthesis of achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogba, Maman Joyce; Rauch, Frank; Douglas, Erin; Bedos, Christophe

    2014-10-25

    Achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and osteogenesis imperfecta are among the most frequent rare genetic disorders affecting the musculoskeletal system in children. Rare genetic disorders are severely disabling and can have substantial impacts on families, children, and on healthcare systems. This literature review aims to classify, summarize and compare these non-medical impacts of achondroplasia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and osteogenesis imperfecta.

  14. Vision Systems with the Human in the Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauckhage, Christian; Hanheide, Marc; Wrede, Sebastian; Käster, Thomas; Pfeiffer, Michael; Sagerer, Gerhard

    2005-12-01

    The emerging cognitive vision paradigm deals with vision systems that apply machine learning and automatic reasoning in order to learn from what they perceive. Cognitive vision systems can rate the relevance and consistency of newly acquired knowledge, they can adapt to their environment and thus will exhibit high robustness. This contribution presents vision systems that aim at flexibility and robustness. One is tailored for content-based image retrieval, the others are cognitive vision systems that constitute prototypes of visual active memories which evaluate, gather, and integrate contextual knowledge for visual analysis. All three systems are designed to interact with human users. After we will have discussed adaptive content-based image retrieval and object and action recognition in an office environment, the issue of assessing cognitive systems will be raised. Experiences from psychologically evaluated human-machine interactions will be reported and the promising potential of psychologically-based usability experiments will be stressed.

  15. Vision Systems with the Human in the Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauckhage Christian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The emerging cognitive vision paradigm deals with vision systems that apply machine learning and automatic reasoning in order to learn from what they perceive. Cognitive vision systems can rate the relevance and consistency of newly acquired knowledge, they can adapt to their environment and thus will exhibit high robustness. This contribution presents vision systems that aim at flexibility and robustness. One is tailored for content-based image retrieval, the others are cognitive vision systems that constitute prototypes of visual active memories which evaluate, gather, and integrate contextual knowledge for visual analysis. All three systems are designed to interact with human users. After we will have discussed adaptive content-based image retrieval and object and action recognition in an office environment, the issue of assessing cognitive systems will be raised. Experiences from psychologically evaluated human-machine interactions will be reported and the promising potential of psychologically-based usability experiments will be stressed.

  16. The behavioural immune system and the psychology of human sociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Mark

    2011-12-12

    Because immunological defence against pathogens is costly and merely reactive, human anti-pathogen defence is also characterized by proactive behavioural mechanisms that inhibit contact with pathogens in the first place. This behavioural immune system comprises psychological processes that infer infection risk from perceptual cues, and that respond to these perceptual cues through the activation of aversive emotions, cognitions and behavioural impulses. These processes are engaged flexibly, producing context-contingent variation in the nature and magnitude of aversive responses. These processes have important implications for human social cognition and social behaviour-including implications for social gregariousness, person perception, intergroup prejudice, mate preferences, sexual behaviour and conformity. Empirical evidence bearing on these many implications is reviewed and discussed. This review also identifies important directions for future research on the human behavioural immune system--including the need for enquiry into underlying mechanisms, additional behavioural consequences and implications for human health and well-being.

  17. Cybernics fusion of human, machine and information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Cybernics plays a significant role in coping with an aging society using state-of-the-art technologies from engineering, clinical medicine and humanities. This new interdisciplinary field studies technologies that enhance, strengthen, and support physical and cognitive functions of human beings, based on the fusion of human, machine, and information systems. The design of a seamless interface for interaction between the interior and exterior of the human body is described in this book from diverse aspects such as the physical, neurophysiological, and cognitive levels. It is the first book to cover the many aspects of cybernics, allowing readers to understand the life support robotics technology for the elderly, including remote, in-home, hospital, institutional, community medical welfare, and vital-sensing systems. Serving as a valuable resource, this volume will interest not only graduate students, scientists, and engineers but also newcomers to the field of cybernics.

  18. Human immune system mouse models of Ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Jessica R; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Heinz; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2017-08-01

    Human immune system (HIS) mice, immunodeficient mice engrafted with human cells (with or without donor-matched tissue), offer a unique opportunity to study pathogens that cause disease predominantly or exclusively in humans. Several HIS mouse models have recently been used to study Ebola virus (EBOV) infection and disease. The results of these studies are encouraging and support further development and use of these models in Ebola research. HIS mice provide a small animal model to study EBOV isolates, investigate early viral interactions with human immune cells, screen vaccines and therapeutics that modulate the immune system, and investigate sequelae in survivors. Here we review existing models, discuss their use in pathogenesis studies and therapeutic screening, and highlight considerations for study design and analysis. Finally, we point out caveats to current models, and recommend future efforts for modeling EBOV infection in HIS mice. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Ultrasound as a stimulus for musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is an inaudible form of acoustic sound wave at 20 kHz or above that is widely used in the medical field with applications including medical imaging and therapeutic stimulation. In therapeutic ultrasound, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS is the most widely used and studied form that generally uses acoustic waves at an intensity of 30 mW/cm2, with 200 ms pulses and 1.5 MHz. In orthopaedic applications, it is used as a biophysical stimulus for musculoskeletal tissue repair to enhance tissue regeneration. LIPUS has been shown to enhance fracture healing by shortening the time to heal and reestablishment of mechanical properties through enhancing different phases of the healing process, including the inflammatory phase, callus formation, and callus remodelling phase. Reports from in vitro studies reveal insights in the mechanism through which acoustic stimulations activate cell surface integrins that, in turn, activate various mechanical transduction pathways including FAK (focal adhesion kinase, ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, PI3K, and Akt. It is then followed by the production of cyclooxygenase 2 and prostaglandin E2 to stimulate further downstream angiogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic cytokines, explaining the different enhancements observed in animal and clinical studies. Furthermore, LIPUS has also been shown to have remarkable effects on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in musculoskeletal injuries and tissue regeneration. The recruitment of MSCs to injury sites by LIPUS requires the SDF-1 (stromal cell derived factor-1/CXCR-4 signalling axis. MSCs would then differentiate differently, and this is regulated by the presence of different cytokines, which determines their fates. Other musculoskeletal applications including bone–tendon junction healing, and distraction osteogenesis are also explored, and the results are promising. However, the use of LIPUS is controversial in treating osteoporosis, with negative

  20. The human mirror neuron system and embodied representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa; Ivry, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    Mirror neurons are defined as neurons in the monkey cortex which respond to goal oriented actions, whether the behavior is self-generated or produced by another. Here we briefly review this literature and consider evidence from behavioral, neuropsychological, and brain imaging studies for a similar mirror neuron system in humans. Furthermore, we review functions of this system related to action comprehension and motor imagery, as well as evidence for speculations on the system's ties with conceptual knowledge and language.

  1. NASA UAS Integration into the NAS Project: Human Systems Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work the Human Systems Integration (HSI) sub-project has done on detect and avoid (DAA) displays while working on the UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) Integration into the NAS project. The most recent simulation on DAA interoperability with Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) is discussed in the most detail. The relationship of the work to the larger UAS community and next steps are also detailed.

  2. Human IgG repertoire of malaria antigen-immunized human immune system (HIS) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Sahi, Vincent; Huang, Jing; Tsuji, Moriya

    2017-08-01

    Humanized mouse models present an important tool for preclinical evaluation of new vaccines and therapeutics. Here we show the human variable repertoire of antibody sequences cloned from a previously described human immune system (HIS) mouse model that possesses functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, namely HIS-CD4/B mice. We sequenced variable IgG genes from single memory B-cell and plasma-cell sorted from splenocytes or whole blood lymphocytes of HIS-CD4/B mice that were vaccinated with a human plasmodial antigen, a recombinant Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (rPfCSP). We demonstrate that rPfCSP immunization triggers a diverse B-cell IgG repertoire composed of various human VH family genes and distinct V(D)J recombinations that constitute diverse CDR3 sequences similar to humans, although low hypermutated sequences were generated. These results demonstrate the substantial genetic diversity of responding human B cells of HIS-CD4/B mice and their capacity to mount human IgG class-switched antibody response upon vaccination. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Meaningful Human Control over Autonomous Systems: A Philosophical Account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Santoni de Sio

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Debates on lethal autonomous weapon systems have proliferated in the past 5 years. Ethical concerns have been voiced about a possible raise in the number of wrongs and crimes in military operations and about the creation of a “responsibility gap” for harms caused by these systems. To address these concerns, the principle of “meaningful human control” has been introduced in the legal–political debate; according to this principle, humans not computers and their algorithms should ultimately remain in control of, and thus morally responsible for, relevant decisions about (lethal military operations. However, policy-makers and technical designers lack a detailed theory of what “meaningful human control” exactly means. In this paper, we lay the foundation of a philosophical account of meaningful human control, based on the concept of “guidance control” as elaborated in the philosophical debate on free will and moral responsibility. Following the ideals of “Responsible Innovation” and “Value-sensitive Design,” our account of meaningful human control is cast in the form of design requirements. We identify two general necessary conditions to be satisfied for an autonomous system to remain under meaningful human control: first, a “tracking” condition, according to which the system should be able to respond to both the relevant moral reasons of the humans designing and deploying the system and the relevant facts in the environment in which the system operates; second, a “tracing” condition, according to which the system should be designed in such a way as to grant the possibility to always trace back the outcome of its operations to at least one human along the chain of design and operation. As we think that meaningful human control can be one of the central notions in ethics of robotics and AI, in the last part of the paper, we start exploring the implications of our account for the design and use of non

  4. Sustainability Indicators for Coupled Human-Earth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motesharrei, S.; Rivas, J. R.; Kalnay, E.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last two centuries, the Human System went from having a small impact on the Earth System (including the Climate System) to becoming dominant, because both population and per capita consumption have grown extremely fast, especially since about 1950. We therefore argue that Human System Models must be included into Earth System Models through bidirectional couplings with feedbacks. In particular, population should be modeled endogenously, rather than exogenously as done currently in most Integrated Assessment Models. The growth of the Human System threatens to overwhelm the Carrying Capacity of the Earth System, and may be leading to catastrophic climate change and collapse. We propose a set of Ecological and Economic "Sustainability Indicators" that can employ large data-sets for developing and assessing effective mitigation and adaptation policies. Using the Human and Nature Dynamical Model (HANDY) and Coupled Human-Climate-Water Model (COWA), we carry out experiments with this set of Sustainability Indicators and show that they are applicable to various coupled systems including Population, Climate, Water, Energy, Agriculture, and Economy. Impact of nonrenewable resources and fossil fuels could also be understood using these indicators. We demonstrate interconnections of Ecological and Economic Indicators. Coupled systems often include feedbacks and can thus display counterintuitive dynamics. This makes it difficult for even experts to see coming catastrophes from just the raw data for different variables. Sustainability Indicators boil down the raw data into a set of simple numbers that cross their sustainability thresholds with a large time-lag before variables enter their catastrophic regimes. Therefore, we argue that Sustainability Indicators constitute a powerful but simple set of tools that could be directly used for making policies for sustainability.

  5. Status of human factors engineering system design in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ives, G.

    1990-01-01

    A review of the European status of human factors engineering has been carried out covering a wide scope of activities which includes psychology, cognitive science, ergonomics, design, training, procedure writing, operating, artificial intelligence and expert systems. There is an increasing awareness of the part that human factors play in major nuclear power plant accidents. The emphasis of attention in human factors is changing. In some areas there are encouraging signs of progress and development, but in other areas there is still scope for improvement

  6. Robot and Human Surface Operations on Solar System Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbin, C. R.; Easter, R.; Rodriguez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of robot and human surface operations on solar system bodies. The topics include: 1) Long Range Vision of Surface Scenarios; 2) Human and Robots Complement Each Other; 3) Respective Human and Robot Strengths; 4) Need More In-Depth Quantitative Analysis; 5) Projected Study Objectives; 6) Analysis Process Summary; 7) Mission Scenarios Decompose into Primitive Tasks; 7) Features of the Projected Analysis Approach; and 8) The "Getting There Effect" is a Major Consideration. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  7. Economics of human performance and systems total ownership cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onkham, Wilawan; Karwowski, Waldemar; Ahram, Tareq Z

    2012-01-01

    Financial costs of investing in people is associated with training, acquisition, recruiting, and resolving human errors have a significant impact on increased total ownership costs. These costs can also affect the exaggerate budgets and delayed schedules. The study of human performance economical assessment in the system acquisition process enhances the visibility of hidden cost drivers which support program management informed decisions. This paper presents the literature review of human total ownership cost (HTOC) and cost impacts on overall system performance. Economic value assessment models such as cost benefit analysis, risk-cost tradeoff analysis, expected value of utility function analysis (EV), growth readiness matrix, multi-attribute utility technique, and multi-regressions model were introduced to reflect the HTOC and human performance-technology tradeoffs in terms of the dollar value. The human total ownership regression model introduces to address the influencing human performance cost component measurement. Results from this study will increase understanding of relevant cost drivers in the system acquisition process over the long term.

  8. Modeling human gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases using microphysiological culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kira G; Bortner, James D; Falk, Gary W; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Jhala, Nirag; Yu, Jian; Martín, Martín G; Rustgi, Anil K; Lynch, John P

    2014-09-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses are a significant health burden for the US population, with 40 million office visits each year for gastrointestinal complaints and nearly 250,000 deaths. Acute and chronic inflammations are a common element of many gastrointestinal diseases. Inflammatory processes may be initiated by a chemical injury (acid reflux in the esophagus), an infectious agent (Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), autoimmune processes (graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation), or idiopathic (as in the case of inflammatory bowel diseases). Inflammation in these settings can contribute to acute complaints (pain, bleeding, obstruction, and diarrhea) as well as chronic sequelae including strictures and cancer. Research into the pathophysiology of these conditions has been limited by the availability of primary human tissues or appropriate animal models that attempt to physiologically model the human disease. With the many recent advances in tissue engineering and primary human cell culture systems, it is conceivable that these approaches can be adapted to develop novel human ex vivo systems that incorporate many human cell types to recapitulate in vivo growth and differentiation in inflammatory microphysiological environments. Such an advance in technology would improve our understanding of human disease progression and enhance our ability to test for disease prevention strategies and novel therapeutics. We will review current models for the inflammatory and immunological aspects of Barrett's esophagus, acute graft versus host disease, and inflammatory bowel disease and explore recent advances in culture methodologies that make these novel microphysiological research systems possible. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  9. Process for Selecting System Level Assessments for Human System Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, James; Park, John

    2006-01-01

    The integration of many life support systems necessary to construct a stable habitat is difficult. The correct identification of the appropriate technologies and corresponding interfaces is an exhaustive process. Once technologies are selected secondary issues such as mechanical and electrical interfaces must be addressed. The required analytical and testing work must be approached in a piecewise fashion to achieve timely results. A repeatable process has been developed to identify and prioritize system level assessments and testing needs. This Assessment Selection Process has been defined to assess cross cutting integration issues on topics at the system or component levels. Assessments are used to identify risks, encourage future actions to mitigate risks, or spur further studies.

  10. Teleconnections in complex human-Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, K. V.; Edmonds, J.

    2017-12-01

    Human systems and physical Earth systems are closely coupled and interact in complex ways that are sometimes surprising. This presentation discusses a few examples of system interactions. We consider the coupled energy-water-land-economy systems. We show how reductions in fossil fuel emissions are inversely coupled to land rents, food prices and deforestation. We discuss how water shortages in one part of the world is propagated to other distant parts of the world. We discuss the sensitivity of international trade patterns to energy and land systems technology and markets, and the potentially unanticipated results that can emerge.

  11. Musculoskeletal problems among string instrumentalists in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedayo T. Ajidahun

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musicians who play string instruments are affected more by musculoskeletal injuries when compared to other instrument playing groups. Musculoskeletal problems are commonly found in the upper extremities and trunk. Several risk factors such as gender, practice hours and instrument played are associated with the prevalence and distribution of musculoskeletal problems among string instrumentalists. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, distribution, severity and risk factors for musculoskeletal problems among string instrumentalists. Method: A cross-sectional study design using both online and paper-based questionnaires were used to collect data from string instrumentalists playing in both amateur and professional orchestras in South Africa. Results: A total of 114 string instrumentalists participated in the study, of which 86 (77% reported problems in one or more anatomic regions while 39 (35% were currently experiencing musculoskeletal problems that affected their performance. The trunk and both shoulders were the most commonly affected body regions. The majority of the participants reported the severity of the complaints as mild to moderate with aching, soreness, tingling and fatigue being the most commonly used descriptors of the symptoms of playing-related musculoskeletal problems. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the prevalence of musculoskeletal problems that affect performance is high among string instrumentalists in South Africa. An evaluation of associated risk factors with the aim of reducing injuries may be important in improving performance.

  12. The Impacts of System and Human Factors on Online Learning Systems Use and Learner Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled A.; Freeze, Ronald D.; Lane, Peggy L.; Wen, H. Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Success in an online learning environment is tied to both human and system factors. This study illuminates the unique contributions of human factors (comfort with online learning, self-management of learning, and perceived Web self-efficacy) to online learning system success, which is measured in terms of usage and satisfaction. The research model…

  13. Development of guidelines to review advanced human-system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACRs) will utilize advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than 10 yr ago, considerably prior to these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development, evaluation, and current status of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline

  14. Development of guidelines to review advanced human-system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACRS) will utilize advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operators overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well prior to these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development, evaluation, and current status of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline, hereafter referred to as the ''Guideline.''

  15. Development of an integrated system for estimating human error probabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auflick, J.L.; Hahn, H.A.; Morzinski, J.A.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project had as its main objective the development of a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA), knowledge-based expert system that would provide probabilistic estimates for potential human errors within various risk assessments, safety analysis reports, and hazard assessments. HRA identifies where human errors are most likely, estimates the error rate for individual tasks, and highlights the most beneficial areas for system improvements. This project accomplished three major tasks. First, several prominent HRA techniques and associated databases were collected and translated into an electronic format. Next, the project started a knowledge engineering phase where the expertise, i.e., the procedural rules and data, were extracted from those techniques and compiled into various modules. Finally, these modules, rules, and data were combined into a nearly complete HRA expert system.

  16. A design condition for incorporating human judgement into monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, K.; Klir, G.J.

    1999-01-01

    In safety monitoring, there exists an uncertainty situation in which the sensor cannot detect whether or not the monitored object is in danger. For the uncertainty zone identified by a non-homogeneous safety monitoring system that utilizes two types of sensors with different thresholds, operators or experts are expected to judge whether the real state is safe or dangerous on the basis of additional information from a detailed inspection or other related sensors output. However, the activities for inspection performed by relevant humans may require additional cost and introduce inspection errors. The present article proposes two types of an automatic monitoring system not involving any human inspection or a human-machine (H-M) cooperative monitoring system with inspection. In order to compare the systems, an approach based on the Dempster-Shafer theory is proposed as uncertainty analysis by this theory (it is simpler than by the traditional Bayesian approach). By comparing their expected losses as a result of failed dangerous failures or failed safe failures as well as the inspection errors, the condition is determined under which H-M cooperative systems incorporating human judgements are more effective than automatic monitoring systems

  17. MAJOR INJURIES MUSCULOSKELETALS IN YOUNG ATHLETES BASKETBALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Simão Rodrigues Filho

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growth of participation of youth in sports is accompanied by an increase in the number of musculoskeletal injuries, especially in contact sports. Basketball gained prominence among contact sports not only for its plastic and beauty of their games, but because it is a sport that demands much of its practitioners, and in the case of young athletes, this requirement can endanger children and adolescents are not properly monitored for health professionals sports. In this study we can see that the ankle is the most affected, followed by knee and fingers and wrists. The mechanisms of injury most frequently reported were sprains, after the bruises and fractures. Highlight for disturbances dorsolumbar, pointed out by many authors. The prevention programs and pre-competition oriented properly treated as paramount by all the authors investigated, in order to reduce the number of injuries in young athletes.

  18. Musculoskeletal Risk Factors in the Young Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskwa, C A; Nicholas, J A; Goldberg, B

    1989-11-01

    In brief: Many children and adolescents participate in sports that put them at risk for musculoskeletal injuries. Underlying physical conditions, or risk factors, may predispose them to particular types of sports injuries. Research shows that these risk factors fall into five categories: body type, flexibility, muscle strength, inadequate rehabilitation of a previous injury, and skeletal malalignment and anomalies. Some findings show, for example, that youthful football players who are also heavy have an increased rate of injury, sprains and strains are less common in flexible athletes, and patellar pain or subluxation may be related to a variety of malalignment factors. The authors recommend using a systematic, integrated approach to risk assessment of the athlete, both for detecting risk factors and determining their potential for con tribu ting to a sports injury.

  19. Musculoskeletal manifestations in sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Ravikanth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by substitution of glutamic acid by valine at the sixth position of the beta globin chain. The sequence of events leads to pain crisis. Ischemia of the tissues resulting from decreased blood flow is believed to occur in pain crisis. Repeated or prolonged sickling causes red cell death in the form of hemolytic anemia. The majority of hospital admissions are due to painful crisis. These patients are at increased risk for both osteomyelitis and infarction of the long bones. Magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be helpful in the diagnosis of early osteomyelitis and its differentiation from infarction in sickle cell disease patients with acute bone crisis. Others findings include dactylitis, medullary infarcts, diploic space widening, fish mouth vertebrae, and avascular necrosis. We present a case series on the various musculoskeletal manifestations of sickle cell disease.

  20. Histologic examination of the rat central nervous system after intrathecal administration of human beta-endorphin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hée, P.; Klinken, Leif; Ballegaard, Martin

    1992-01-01

    Neuropathology, analgesics - intrathecal, central nervous system, histology, human beta-endorphin, toxicity......Neuropathology, analgesics - intrathecal, central nervous system, histology, human beta-endorphin, toxicity...

  1. Digital tripwire: a small automated human detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Amber D.; Redd, Emmett; Younger, A. Steven

    2009-05-01

    A low cost, lightweight, easily deployable imaging sensor that can dependably discriminate threats from other activities within its field of view and, only then, alert the distant duty officer by transmitting a visual confirmation of the threat would provide a valuable asset to modern defense. At present, current solutions suffer from a multitude of deficiencies - size, cost, power endurance, but most notably, an inability to assess an image and conclude that it contains a threat. The human attention span cannot maintain critical surveillance over banks of displays constantly conveying such images from the field. DigitalTripwire is a small, self-contained, automated human-detection system capable of running for 1-5 days on two AA batteries. To achieve such long endurance, the DigitalTripwire system utilizes an FPGA designed with sleep functionality. The system uses robust vision algorithms, such as a partially unsupervised innovative backgroundmodeling algorithm, which employ several data reduction strategies to operate in real-time, and achieve high detection rates. When it detects human activity, either mounted or dismounted, it sends an alert including images to notify the command center. In this paper, we describe the hardware and software design of the DigitalTripwire system. In addition, we provide detection and false alarm rates across several challenging data sets demonstrating the performance of the vision algorithms in autonomously analyzing the video stream and classifying moving objects into four primary categories - dismounted human, vehicle, non-human, or unknown. Performance results across several challenging data sets are provided.

  2. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, David

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance) to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82). Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º) to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07). However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82) were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders. PMID:24422022

  3. Cervical Musculoskeletal Impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Armijo-Olivo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study of cervical muscles and their significance in the development and perpetuation of Temporomandibular Disorders has not been elucidated. Thus this project was designed to investigate the association between cervical musculoskeletal impairments and Temporomandibular Disorders. Material and Methods: A sample of 154 subjects participated in this study. All subjects underwent a series of physical tests and electromyographic assessment (i.e. head and neck posture, maximal cervical muscle strength, cervical flexor and extensor muscles endurance, and cervical flexor muscle performance to determine cervical musculoskeletal impairments. Results: A strong relationship between neck disability and jaw disability was found (r = 0.82. Craniocervical posture was statistically different between patients with myogenous Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD and healthy subjects. However, the difference was too small (3.3º to be considered clinically relevant. Maximal cervical flexor muscle strength was not statistically or clinically different between patients with TMD and healthy subjects. No statistically significant differences were found in electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid or the anterior scalene muscles in patients with TMD when compared to healthy subjects while executing the craniocervical flexion test (P = 0.07. However, clinically important effect sizes (0.42 - 0.82 were found. Subjects with TMD presented with reduced cervical flexor as well as extensor muscle endurance while performing the flexor and extensor muscle endurance tests when compared to healthy individuals. Conclusions: Subjects with Temporomandibular Disorders presented with impairments of the cervical flexors and extensors muscles. These results could help guide clinicians in the assessment and prescription of more effective interventions for individuals with Temporomandibular Disorders.

  4. In-111 WBC imaging in musculoskeletal sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.; Ouzounian, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy and utility of the In-111 labeled WBC imaging in a series of patients who were suspected of having musculoskeletal sepsis. The labeling of the WBCs was patterned after a method previously described, in which the WBCs are labeled with In-111 oxine in plasma. The WBCs from 100 ml of blood are separated and incubated with In-111 oxine complex, and then 500 μCi. of the labeled cells were reinjected into the patient. Images of the areas in question were obtained at 24 hrs. In some instances, 48 hour images were also obtained. Images were interpreted using consistent criteria. Forty imaging procedures were done on 39 patients. These included 39 total joint protheses, and 17 other images to evaluate possible osteomyelitis, septic arthritis or deep abscesses. Of these studies, 15 were positive, and 42 negative. The findings were then correlated with operative culture and pathology in 21, aspiration cultures and gram stains in 14, and with clinical findings in the remaining 21. This correlation showed 41 true negatives, 12 true positives, 1 false negative, and 2 false positives. The sensitivity was 92.9% and the specificity was 95.2%l. The false negative occurred in a patient on chronic suppressive antibiotic therapy for an infected total hip replacement. The false positive images occurred in a patient with active rheumatoid arthritis and in a patient imaged one month post operative placement of the prosthesis. These images were very useful in several septic patients who had many possible sites of infection. The authors conclude that In-III imaging is an accurate and useful non-invasive method of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis

  5. Musculoskeletal Injuries and Their Associated Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jahangiri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims :Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs is high among office workers. Long time seated posture, working with computer, repetitive movements and inappropriate environmental conditions may have causal effects in these disorders. High prevalence rate of MSDs makes ergonomics assessment and working conditions improvement necessary. Designing an assessment checklist and calculating ergonomics indices can be useful in this evaluation. This study was conducted with the objectives of determination of prevalence rate, ergonomics assessment of working conditions and determination of factors associated with MSDs among office workers. Methods:In this study 400 randomly selected office workers participated. Nordic musculoskeletal disorders questionnaire was applied to determine prevalence rate of MSDs. Working conditions were assessed by the designed ergonomics checklist and ergonomic risk factors were identified. Data were analyzed using statistical tests including t-test, Chi-square and test of proportion by SPSS software (Version 12.0. Results:The highest prevalence rates of MSDs were reported in lower back and neck regions (49% and 47%, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed that there were significant association between occurrence of MSDs and calculated ergonomics indices (P<0.05. The mean of ergonomics index among those suffered from MSDs were less than other healthy workers indicating inappropriate ergonomics conditions. Calculation of OR also revealed that ergonomics conditions was associated with MSDs occurrence among workers (P<0.05. Totally, 53.3% of the office workers studied had poor working conditions. Awkward working posture and inappropriate workstation design were recognized as the main risk factors in the office workplace.  Conclusion:Most ergonomics problems were originated from bad postures and inappropriate design of workstation. Any interventional program for working conditions improvement should

  6. Human factors/ergonomics as a systems discipline? "The human use of human beings" revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the possible future of Human factors/ergonomics (HFE) usually take the past for granted in the sense that the future of HFE is assumed to be more of the same. This paper argues that the nature of work in the early 2010s is so different from the nature of work when HFE was formulated...

  7. Human System Simulation in Support of Human Performance Technical Basis at NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; alan mecham; william phoenix; Magdy Tawfik; Jeffrey Joe

    2010-06-01

    This paper focuses on strategies and progress toward establishing the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Human Systems Simulator Laboratory at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a consortium of Idaho State Universities. The INL is one of the National Laboratories of the US Department of Energy. One of the first planned applications for the Human Systems Simulator Laboratory is implementation of a dynamic nuclear power plant simulation (NPP) where studies of operator workload, situation awareness, performance and preference will be carried out in simulated control rooms including nuclear power plant control rooms. Simulation offers a means by which to review operational concepts, improve design practices and provide a technical basis for licensing decisions. In preparation for the next generation power plant and current government and industry efforts in support of light water reactor sustainability, human operators will be attached to a suite of physiological measurement instruments and, in combination with traditional Human Factors Measurement techniques, carry out control room tasks in simulated advanced digital and hybrid analog/digital control rooms. The current focus of the Human Systems Simulator Laboratory is building core competence in quantitative and qualitative measurements of situation awareness and workload. Of particular interest is whether introduction of digital systems including automated procedures has the potential to reduce workload and enhance safety while improving situation awareness or whether workload is merely shifted and situation awareness is modified in yet to be determined ways. Data analysis is carried out by engineers and scientists and includes measures of the physical and neurological correlates of human performance. The current approach supports a user-centered design philosophy (see ISO 13407 “Human Centered Design Process for Interactive Systems, 1999) wherein the context for task performance along with the

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic target of biophysical stimulation for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Viganò, M; Sansone, V; D'Agostino, M; Romeo, P; Perucca Orfei, C; de Girolamo, L

    2016-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders are regarded as a major cause of worldwide morbidity and disability, and they result in huge costs for national health care systems. Traditional therapies frequently turned out to be poorly effective in treating bone, cartilage, and tendon disorders or joint degeneration. As a consequence, the development of novel biological therapies that can treat more effectively these conditions should be the highest priority in regenerative medicine. Main body of the ...

  9. Possibilities of whole-body MRI for investigating musculoskeletal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenk, S.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Fischer, S.; Koetter, I.

    2004-01-01

    This contribution outlines possibilities and limitations of whole-body MRI for investigating musculoskeletal diseases. Benefits and drawbacks of the novel whole-body MRI technology are discussed and a possible whole-body MRI sequence protocol for musculoskeletal examinations is proposed. Muscle, joint and bone diseases are discussed in which the application of whole-body MRI may be of advantage. Particularly, polymyositis, muscledystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, spondylitis ancylosans, multiple trauma, skeletal metastases, multiple myeloma and malignant lymphoma are mentioned. Whole-body MRI opens new advantages for the examination of multifocal musculoskeletal diseases. The clinical benefit of this method for particular diseases has to be evaluated in further studies, however. (orig.) [de

  10. Musculoskeletal Dysfunctions in Patients With Chronic Pelvic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mieritz, Rune Mygind; Thorhauge, Kirsten; Forman, Axel

    2016-01-01

    stratified levels of self-reported pelvic pain, self-rated health, education, and work status based on musculoskeletal dysfunction status. METHODS: This study used a cross-sectional design to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal dysfunctions in women with CPP who were referred to a tertiary care...... between the groups with respect to self-rated health, education, work status, and pain level. Pain location was significantly different after Bonferroni correction in 1 out of the 36 aspects. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of CPP patients, 51% were categorized as having a musculoskeletal dysfunction. Overall...

  11. The Concept of Human Error and the Design of Reliable Human-Machine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1995-01-01

    The concept of human error is unreliable as a basis for design of reliable human-machine systems. Humans are basically highly adaptive and 'errors' are closely related to the process of adaptation and learning. Therefore, reliability of system operation depends on an interface that is not designed...... so as to support a pre-conceived operating procedure, but, instead, makes visible the deep, functional structure of the system together with the boundaries of acceptable operation in away that allows operators to 'touch' the boundaries and to learn to cope with the effects of errors in a reversible...... way. The concepts behind such 'ecological' interfaces are discussed, an it is argued that a 'typology' of visualization concepts is a pressing research need....

  12. An intelligent multi-media human-computer dialogue system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, J. G.; Bettinger, K. E.; Byoun, J. S.; Dobes, Z.; Thielman, C. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Sophisticated computer systems are being developed to assist in the human decision-making process for very complex tasks performed under stressful conditions. The human-computer interface is a critical factor in these systems. The human-computer interface should be simple and natural to use, require a minimal learning period, assist the user in accomplishing his task(s) with a minimum of distraction, present output in a form that best conveys information to the user, and reduce cognitive load for the user. In pursuit of this ideal, the Intelligent Multi-Media Interfaces project is devoted to the development of interface technology that integrates speech, natural language text, graphics, and pointing gestures for human-computer dialogues. The objective of the project is to develop interface technology that uses the media/modalities intelligently in a flexible, context-sensitive, and highly integrated manner modelled after the manner in which humans converse in simultaneous coordinated multiple modalities. As part of the project, a knowledge-based interface system, called CUBRICON (CUBRC Intelligent CONversationalist) is being developed as a research prototype. The application domain being used to drive the research is that of military tactical air control.

  13. A Systems Model for Teaching Human Resource Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George R. Greene

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Efficient and effective human resource management is a complex, involved, and interactive process. This article presents and discusses a unique systems approach model for teaching human resource (people management processes, and the important inter-relationships within that process. The model contains two unique components related to key sub-processes: incentives management and performance evaluation. We have not observed a model applying a systems thinking paradigm presented in any textbook, journal article, business publication, or other literature addressing the topic. For nearly three decades, the model has been used in teaching a comprehensive, meaningful understanding of the human resource management process that can be effectively implemented in both corporate and academic learning venues.

  14. Computational Human Performance Modeling For Alarm System Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies like adaptive automation systems and advanced alarms processing and presentation techniques in nuclear power plants is already having an impact on the safety and effectiveness of plant operations and also the role of the control room operator. This impact is expected to escalate dramatically as more and more nuclear power utilities embark on upgrade projects in order to extend the lifetime of their plants. One of the most visible impacts in control rooms will be the need to replace aging alarm systems. Because most of these alarm systems use obsolete technologies, the methods, techniques and tools that were used to design the previous generation of alarm system designs are no longer effective and need to be updated. The same applies to the need to analyze and redefine operators’ alarm handling tasks. In the past, methods for analyzing human tasks and workload have relied on crude, paper-based methods that often lacked traceability. New approaches are needed to allow analysts to model and represent the new concepts of alarm operation and human-system interaction. State-of-the-art task simulation tools are now available that offer a cost-effective and efficient method for examining the effect of operator performance in different conditions and operational scenarios. A discrete event simulation system was used by human factors researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop a generic alarm handling model to examine the effect of operator performance with simulated modern alarm system. It allowed analysts to evaluate alarm generation patterns as well as critical task times and human workload predicted by the system.

  15. Functional structure and dynamics of the human nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The status of an effort to define the directions needed to take in extending pilot models is reported. These models are needed to perform closed-loop (man-in-the-loop) feedback flight control system designs and to develop cockpit display requirements. The approach taken is to develop a hypothetical working model of the human nervous system by reviewing the current literature in neurology and psychology and to develop a computer model of this hypothetical working model.

  16. Wearable sensor system for human localization and motion capture

    OpenAIRE

    Zihajehzadeh, Shaghayegh

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in MEMS wearable inertial/magnetic sensors and mobile computing have fostered a dramatic growth of interest for ambulatory human motion capture (MoCap). Compared to traditional optical MoCap systems such as the optical systems, inertial (i.e. accelerometer and gyroscope) and magnetic sensors do not require external fixtures such as cameras. Hence, they do not have in-the-lab measurement limitations and thus are ideal for ambulatory applications. However, due to the manufacturi...

  17. BUSINESS AND HUMAN CAPITAL IN THE ECONOMIC SYSTEM: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zikunova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the process of transformation of the role of the human factor in the economic system, it shows the importance of entrepreneurship as an intangible resource of post-industrial development. Resource value of entrepreneurship is characterized on the basis of economic analysis of the functional role of entrepreneurship in the system. Showing methodological approaches to the study of entrepreneurship presented in the works of foreign representatives of business theory

  18. A Comparison between Human Selected, Derived and System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admpather

    Using a prototype implementation of our scheme, we compare the results of human-selected, derived passwords and system generated to reveal the practical viability of our approach in terms of results achieved, ease of implementation and use. Keywords: Security, Biometric, Behavioral, Keystroke dynamics, Password.

  19. A Comparison between Human Selected, Derived and System ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using a prototype implementation of our scheme, we compare the results of human-selected, derived passwords and system generated to reveal the practical viability of our approach in terms of results achieved, ease of implementation and use. Keywords: Security, Biometric, Behavioral, Keystroke dynamics, Password ...

  20. Biocomplexity in coupled natural–human systems: a multidimensional framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    S.T.A. Pickett; M.L. Cadenasso; J.M. Grove

    2005-01-01

    As defined by Ascher, biocomplexity results from a "multiplicity of interconnected relationships and levels. "However, no integrative framework yet exists to facilitate the application of this concept to coupled human-natural systems. Indeed, the term "biocomplexity" is still used primarily as a creative and provocative metaphor. To help advance its...