WorldWideScience

Sample records for human mobilised peripheral

  1. Mobilisation of toxic elements in the human respiratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Alves, L.C.; Palhano, M.J.; Bugalho de Almeida, A.

    2001-01-01

    The fate of respired particles in the respiratory system is inferred through the chemical characterisation of individual particles at the tracheal and bronchial mucosas, and the accumulation of toxic elements in lung alveoli and lymph nodes. The particles and tissue elemental distributions were identified and characterised using micro-PIXE elemental mapping of thin frozen sections using the ITN Nuclear Microprobe facility. Significant particle deposits are found at the distal respiratory tract. Al, Si, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn are elements detected at these accumulation areas. The elemental distributions in the different cellular environments of lymph nodes vary. The major compartments for Al, Si, Ti, Fe and Cr are the phagocytic cells and capsule of lymph nodes, while V and Ni are in the cortex and paracortex medullar areas which retain more than 70% of these two elements, suggesting high solubility of the latter in the cellular milieu. The elemental mobilisation from particles or deposits to surrounding tissues at the respiratory ducts evidences patterns of diffusion and removal that are different than those for elements in the respiratory tract. Mobilisation of elements such as V, Cr and Ni is more relevant at alveoli areas where gaseous exchange takes place. The apparent high solubility of V and Ni in the respiratory tract tissue points towards a deviation of the lymphatic system filtering efficiency for these elements when compared to others

  2. Acute aerobic exercise induces a preferential mobilisation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells into the peripheral blood in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Frankie F; Campbell, John P; Wadley, Alex J; Fisher, James P; Aldred, Sarah; Turner, James E

    2018-05-31

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important sentinel cells of the immune system responsible for presenting antigen to T cells. Exercise is known to cause an acute and transient increase in the frequency of DCs in the bloodstream in humans, yet there are contradictory findings in the literature regarding the phenotypic composition of DCs mobilised during exercise, which may have implications for immune regulation and health. Accordingly, we sought to investigate the composition of DC sub-populations mobilised in response to acute aerobic exercise. Nine healthy males (age, 21.9 ± 3.6 years; height, 177.8 ± 5.4 cm; body mass, 78.9 ± 10.8 kg; body mass index, 24.9 ± 3.3 kg·m 2 ; V̇O 2 MAX , 41.5 ± 5.1 mL·kg·min -1 ) cycled for 20 min at 80% V̇O 2 MAX . Blood was sampled at baseline, during the final minute of exercise and 30 min later. Using flow cytometry, total DCs were defined as Lineage- (CD3, CD19, CD20, CD14, CD56) HLA-DR+ and subsequently identified as plasmacytoid DCs (CD303+) and myeloid DCs (CD303-). Myeloid DCs were analysed for expression of CD1c and CD141 to yield four sub-populations; CD1c-CD141+; CD1c+CD141+; CD1c+CD141- and CD1c-CD141-. Expression of CD205 was also analysed on all DC sub-populations to identify DCs capable of recognising apoptotic and necrotic cells. Total DCs increased by 150% during exercise (F (1,10)  = 60; p < 0.05, η 2  = 0.9). Plasmacytoid DCs mobilised to a greater magnitude than myeloid DCs (195 ± 131% vs. 131 ± 100%; p < 0.05). Among myeloid DCs, CD1c-CD141- cells showed the largest exercise-induced mobilisation (167 ± 122%), with a stepwise pattern observed among the remaining sub-populations: CD1c+CD141- (79 ± 50%), followed by CD1c+CD141+ (44 ± 41%), with the smallest response shown by CD1c-CD141+ cells (23 ± 54%) (p < 0.05). Among myeloid DCs, CD205- cells were the most exercise responsive. All DC subsets returned to resting levels within

  3. Project mobilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; Limbrick, A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper identifies and reviews the issues to be addressed and the procedures to be followed during the mobilisation of projects using LFG as an energy source. Knowledge of the procedures involved in project mobilisation, their sequence and probable timescales, is essential for efficient project management. It is assumed that the majority of projects will be situated on existing, licensed landfill sites and, in addition to complying with the relevant conditions of the waste management licence and original planning consent, any proposed developments on the site will require a separate planning consent. Experience in the UK indicates that obtaining planning permission rarely constitutes a barrier to the development of schemes for the utilisation of LFG. Even so, an appreciation of the applicable environmental and planning legislation is essential as this will enable the developer to recognise the main concerns of the relevant planning authority at an early stage of the project, resulting in the preparation of an informed and well-structured application for planning permission. For a LFG utilisation scheme on an existing landfill site, the need to carry out an environmental assessment (EA) as part of the application for planning permission will, in vitually all cases, be discretionary. Even if not deemed necessary by the planning authority, an EA is a useful tool at the planning application stage, to identify and address potential problems and to support discussions with bodies such as the Environment Agency, from whom consents or authorisations may be required. Carrying out an EA can thus provide for more cost-effective project development and enhanced environmental protection. Typically, the principal contractual arrangements, such as the purchase of gas or the sale of electricity, will have been established before the project mobilisation phase. However, there are many other contractural arrangements that must be established, and consents and permits that may be

  4. Haemopoietic progenitor cells in human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwaan, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation reported is to purify haemopoietic progenitor cells from human peripheral blood using density gradient centrifugation in order to isolate a progenitor cell fraction without immunocompetent cells. The purification technique of peripheral blood flow colony forming unit culture (CFU-c) by means of density gradient centrifugation and a combined depletion of various rosettes is described. The results of several 'in vitro' characteristics of purified CFU-c suspensions and of the plasma clot diffusion chamber culture technique are presented. Irradiation studies revealed that for both human bone marrow and peripheral blood the CFU-c were less radioresistant than clusters. Elimination of monocytes (and granulocytes) from the test suspensions induced an alteration in radiosensitivity pararmeters. The results obtained with the different techniques are described by analysing peripheral progenitor cell activity in myeloproliferative disorders. (Auth.)

  5. PEMIMPIN MOBILISATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Abdullah Syarif

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Every human being is a holder of responsibility. A man as leader often forgot his duty. The current conditions not only shows the weakness of the mentality of leaders in various level of office, but the societies are unruly also adds the problem. A leader is not just enough to know a solution of a problem, but the idea that solution must be applied to the problems. The characteristics of a mobilizing leader are a quick job completed with satisfactory results, efficient and effective, able to communicate, exemplary, and able in giving motivation.

  6. Kaolinite Mobilisation in Sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Kets, Frans

    2013-01-01

    suggest that this effect is due to kaolinite clay mobilisation from the quartz grain surface; the mobilised particles subsequently plug the pore throats and reduce the permeability irreversibly. The expected hysteresis is observed when the salinity is reduced and increased; however, in contradiction...... the mobilised kaolinite particles either remain suspended and thereby increase the fluid viscosity, or form porous aggregates that can be destabilized by hydrodynamic forces. To address how the pore scale distribution of kaolinite relates to the permeability of the entire sample, we relate permeability...

  7. The capacity of peripheral blood stem cells mobilised with chemotherapy plus G-CSF to repopulate irradiated marrow stroma in vitro is similar to that of bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demuynck, H.; Dexter, T.M.; Testa, N.G.; Pettengell, R.; Campos, E. de

    1992-01-01

    After treatment of patients with intermediate or high grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma with chemotherapy plus G-CSF the numbers of haemopoietic progenitor cells in the circulation increased to a mean of 226-fold for mixed CFC (Mix-CFC), 278-fold for GM-CFC and 29-fold for erythroid burst forming unit (BFU-E). The mean increase was modest (7-12-fold) for patients treated with chemotherapy alone. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells harvested at the time of the peak in the numbers of progenitors, or 2-4 days before the peak, seeded onto irradiated marrow stroma in vitro, repopulated the stroma and generated active haemopoiesis at least as effectively as bone marrow cells on a cell per cell basis. This is in contrast to the poor repopulating capacity of pretreatment blood. The results indicate that not only the progenitor cells, but also the repopulating stem cells migrated into the blood after chemotherapy plus G-CSF in sufficient numbers to allow harvesting and successful grafting without the possible complication of late haemopoietic failure. (author)

  8. Peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation mobilised by r-metHuG-CSF (filgrastim); a less costly alternative to autologous bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Uyl-de Groot (Carin); D.J. Richel (Dirk); F.F.H. Rutten (Frans)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a retrospective study, we calculated the treatment costs of 63 patients who received either autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (r-metHuG-CSF) (filgrastim) (n=13) or without r-metHuG-CSF (n=22) or altenatively,

  9. Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Falaq Naz

    2012-06-29

    Jun 29, 2012 ... Genotoxic damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes of oral ... catechol estrogens and quinines, via redox reactions causes oxidative damage to .... volume was prepared for each donor. About, 0.8 ml of cell sus .... duce the adverse effects of OCs, such as the reduction in the estrogen content.

  10. TXNIP regulates peripheral glucose metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parikh, Hemang; Carlsson, Emma; Chutkow, William A

    2007-01-01

    combined human insulin/glucose clamp physiological studies with genome-wide expression profiling to identify thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) as a gene whose expression is powerfully suppressed by insulin yet stimulated by glucose. In healthy individuals, its expression was inversely correlated...... expression is consistently elevated in the muscle of prediabetics and diabetics, although in a panel of 4,450 Scandinavian individuals, we found no evidence for association between common genetic variation in the TXNIP gene and T2DM. CONCLUSIONS: TXNIP regulates both insulin-dependent and insulin......-independent pathways of glucose uptake in human skeletal muscle. Combined with recent studies that have implicated TXNIP in pancreatic beta-cell glucose toxicity, our data suggest that TXNIP might play a key role in defective glucose homeostasis preceding overt T2DM....

  11. Central and peripheral hemodynamics in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; González-Alonso, J; Helge, J W

    2015-01-01

    In humans, arm exercise is known to elicit larger increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) than leg exercise. However, the precise regulation of regional vascular conductances (VC) for the distribution of cardiac output with exercise intensity remains unknown. Hemodynamic responses were assessed...... perfusion pressure to increase O2 delivery, allowing a similar peak VO2 per kg of muscle mass in both extremities. In summary, despite a lower Qpeak during arm cranking the cardiovascular strain is much higher than during leg pedalling. The adjustments of regional conductances during incremental exercise...... to exhaustion depend mostly on the relative intensity of exercise and are limb-specific....

  12. Mouse forward genetics in the study of the peripheral nervous system and human peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Darlene S.; Popko, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Forward genetics, the phenotype-driven approach to investigating gene identity and function, has a long history in mouse genetics. Random mutations in the mouse transcend bias about gene function and provide avenues towards unique discoveries. The study of the peripheral nervous system is no exception; from historical strains such as the trembler mouse, which led to the identification of PMP22 as a human disease gene causing multiple forms of peripheral neuropathy, to the more recent identification of the claw paw and sprawling mutations, forward genetics has long been a tool for probing the physiology, pathogenesis, and genetics of the PNS. Even as spontaneous and mutagenized mice continue to enable the identification of novel genes, provide allelic series for detailed functional studies, and generate models useful for clinical research, new methods, such as the piggyBac transposon, are being developed to further harness the power of forward genetics. PMID:18481175

  13. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zhu, Jingde; Tian, Geng

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome) analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per...... strand), we report a comprehensive (92.62%) methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found...... research and confirms new sequencing technology as a paradigm for large-scale epigenomics studies....

  14. Endurance exercise training increases peripheral vascular response in human fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, K; Shimoda, M; Maeda, J; Takemiya, T

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure is changed by endurance exercise training. The healthy male subjects (training group; n = 6) performed endurance exercise training that consisted of cycle ergometer exercise 5 d.week-1 and 30 min.d-1 for a period of 8 weeks. Changes in the peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure in the human finger were measured by a differential digital photoplethysmogram (DeltaDPG) and blood pressure during passive movement of the arm to different vertical hand positions relative to heart level. Following 8 weeks of endurance training, percent changes in DeltaDPG from heart level in the training group increased significantly (mean +/- SD, -48.1 +/- 7. 3 to -58.7 +/- 9.3% at the lowered position, 46.1 +/- 13.4 to 84.6 +/- 8.8% at the elevated position, ppressure, also significantly changed in the training group over the 8 weeks (5.6 +/- 1.3 to 2.7 +/- 1.6 mV. V-1.s-1.mmHg-1 at the lowered position, 30.0 +/- 12.4 to 54.4 +/- 18. 9 mV.V-1.s-1.mmHg-1 at the elevated position ). Maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2 max) was significantly increased in the training group. On the other hand, the control group (n = 6) showed no significant changes in all parameters for 8 weeks. Therefore these results suggest that endurance exercise training induces an increase in peripheral vascular response to alteration of transmural pressure in the human finger.

  15. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno...... skeletal muscle, cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues of the limbs indicate that the situation is more complex. Measurements have been carried out during acute as well as chronic sympathetic denervation. Spinal sympathetic reflex mechanisms have been evaluated in tetraplegic patients, where supraspinal...

  16. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingrui Li

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold per strand, we report a comprehensive (92.62% methylome and analysis of the unique sequences in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from the same Asian individual whose genome was deciphered in the YH project. PBMC constitute an important source for clinical blood tests world-wide. We found that 68.4% of CpG sites and 80% displayed allele-specific expression (ASE. These data demonstrate that ASM is a recurrent phenomenon and is highly correlated with ASE in human PBMCs. Together with recently reported similar studies, our study provides a comprehensive resource for future epigenomic research and confirms new sequencing technology as a paradigm for large-scale epigenomics studies.

  17. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H

    2012-01-01

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral...... arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three...... demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output....

  18. Military labour mobilisation in colonial Lesotho during World War II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1940, Great Britain's wartime exploitation of the human and material resources of its colonial empire was extended to colonial Lesotho (then known as Basutoland). The aim of this article, therefore, is to trace the four-year military labour mobilisation process in that colony, with special attention to the timing, number and ...

  19. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors are decreased during cocaine withdrawal in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaid, J I; Notorangelo, M P; Pandey, S C; Reddy, P L; Pandey, G N; Davis, J M

    1994-07-01

    In the present study, homovanillic acid in plasma (pHVA) and benzodiazepine receptors (3H-PK11195 binding) in neutrophil membranes were determined in blood obtained from cocaine-dependent (DSM-III-R) adult male inpatients at baseline-(within 72 hr of last cocaine use) and after 3 weeks of cocaine abstinence, and normal controls. The mean (+/- SEM) pHVA at baseline (10.3 ng/ml +/- 1.1) was similar to normals and did not change after 3 weeks of cocaine abstinence. Similarly, the binding indices of benzodiazepine receptors in cocaine-dependent subjects as a group were not significantly different than in normal controls. In 10 cocaine-dependent subjects, however, where both blood samples were available, the number of 3H-PK11195 binding sites was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased after 3 weeks of cocaine abstinence (mean +/- sem: Bmax = 6371 +/- 657 fmol/mg protein) compared with baseline (Bmax = 7553 +/- 925 fmol/mg protein), although there were no differences in the binding affinity (mean +/- sem: KD = 8.6 +/- 1.2 nmol/L after 3 weeks of abstinence compared with 8.1 +/- 1.0 nmol/L at baseline). These preliminary results suggest that peripheral benzodiazepine receptors may play an important role in the pathophysiology of cocaine withdrawal in cocaine-dependent human subjects.

  20. Manipulation or Mobilisation for Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, Anita; Miller, Jordan; D'Sylva, Jonathan; Burnie, Stephen J.; Goldsmith, Charles H.; Graham, Nadine; Haines, Ted; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Manipulation and mobilisation are often used, either alone or combined with other treatment approaches, to treat neck pain. Objectives To assess if manipulation or mobilisation improves pain, function/disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life, and global perceived effect in adults

  1. Gene expression in human peripheral blood 48 hours after exposure to ionizing radiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of human peripheral blood 48 hours after irradiation ex vivo with graded doses of gamma rays. Results have been used in building and testing classifiers to...

  2. microRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the present study we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) incubated in microgravity condition simulated by a...

  3. Gene expression profiling of human peripheral blood lymphocytes cultured in modeled microgravity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the present study we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) incubated in microgravity condition simulated by a...

  4. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Sendai Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Filipa A C; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the efficient isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from circulating blood via density gradient centrifugation and subsequent generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured for 9 days to allow expansion of the erythroblast population. The erythroblasts are then used to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells using Sendai viral vectors, each expressing one of the four reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc.

  5. Positioning and early mobilisation in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Moira; Penney, Maree; Russell, Petra; Bailey, Emma

    Stroke unit care, providing early rehabilitation, improves long-term outcomes for patients following a stroke. Early mobilisation and good positioning are recognised as key aspects of care in stroke units. Nurses working on stroke units have an important role because they are able to implement positioning and early mobilisation strategies 24 hours a day, reducing the risk of complications and improving functional recovery. Patients benefit if nurses work effectively with the therapy team in positioning and early mobilisation. Nurses also need appropriate training and expertise to make best use of specialist equipment.

  6. Mobilising Investment in Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Taxes, loans and grants, trading schemes and white certificates, public procurement and investment in R&D or infrastructure: known collectively as 'economic instruments', these tools can be powerful means of mobilising the finances needed to achieve policy goals by implementing energy efficiency measures. The role of economic instruments is to kick-start the private financial markets and to motivate private investors to fund EE measures. They should reinforce and promote energy performance regulations. This IEA analysis addresses the fact that, to date, relatively little effort has been directed toward evaluating how well economic instruments work. Using the buildings sector to illustrate how such measures can support energy efficiency, this paper can help policy makers better select and design economic instruments appropriate to their policy objectives and national contexts. This report’s three main aims are to: 1) Examine how economic instruments are currently used in energy efficiency policy; 2) Consider how economic instruments can be more effective and efficient in supporting low-energy buildings; and 3) Assess how economic instruments should be funded, where public outlay is needed. Detailed case studies in this report assess examples of economic instruments for energy efficiency in the buildings sector in Canada (grants), France (tax relief and loans), Germany (loans and grants), Ireland (grants) and Italy (white certificates and tax relief).

  7. Effect of peripheral morphine in a human model of acute inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillesø, J; Hammer, N A; Pedersen, J L

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the presence of opioid inducible receptors on peripheral nerves and peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids. However, the effects of peripheral opioid administration in man are controversial. Our study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, th......Several studies have demonstrated the presence of opioid inducible receptors on peripheral nerves and peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids. However, the effects of peripheral opioid administration in man are controversial. Our study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo......-controlled, three-way crossover design in a human model of acute inflammatory pain (heat injury). We studied 18 healthy volunteers who each received morphine locally (2 mg), morphine systemically (2 mg), or placebo on three separate study days. The subjects received morphine infiltration subcutaneously (s.c.). 1 h......, but local morphine infiltration neither reduced pain during the burn, nor primary or secondary hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimuli after the burn. In conclusion, peripherally applied morphine had no acute antinociceptive effects in this human model of acute inflammatory pain....

  8. Invasin of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis activates human peripheral B cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, E; Carballeira, N; Vazquez, R; Dubinina, E; Bränden, H; Persson, H; Wolf-Watz, H

    1996-01-01

    The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cell surface-located protein invasin was found to promote binding between the pathogen and resting peripheral B cells via beta 1 integrin receptors (CD29). B cells responded by expressing several activation markers and by growing, In contrast, T cells did not react, although these cells express CD29. An isogenic invA mutant failed to activate B cells. The mutation could be complemented by providing the invA+ gene in trans. Purified invasin alone did not activat...

  9. Modelled temperature-dependent excitability behaviour of a generalised human peripheral sensory nerve fibre

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smit, Jacoba E

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine if a recently developed human Ranvier node model, which is based on a modified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, could predict the excitability behaviour in human peripheral sensory nerve fibres...

  10. Immunotoxicity assessment of rice-derived recombinant human serum albumin using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Fu

    Full Text Available Human serum albumin (HSA is extensively used in clinics to treat a variety of diseases, such as hypoproteinemia, hemorrhagic shock, serious burn injuries, cirrhotic ascites and fetal erythroblastosis. To address supply shortages and high safety risks from limited human donors, we recently developed recombinant technology to produce HSA from rice endosperm. To assess the risk potential of HSA derived from Oryza sativa (OsrHSA before a First-in-human (FIH trial, we compared OsrHSA and plasma-derived HSA (pHSA, evaluating the potential for an immune reaction and toxicity using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. The results indicated that neither OsrHSA nor pHSA stimulated T cell proliferation at 1x and 5x dosages. We also found no significant differences in the profiles of the CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell subsets between OsrHSA- and pHSA-treated cells. Furthermore, the results showed that there were no significant differences between OsrHSA and pHSA in the production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-10 and IL-4. Our results demonstrated that OsrHSA has equivalent immunotoxicity to pHSA when using the PBMC model. Moreover, this ex vivo system could provide an alternative approach to predict potential risks in novel biopharmaceutical development.

  11. A simple method for human peripheral blood monocyte Isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos C de Almeida

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a simple method using percoll gradient for isolation of highly enriched human monocytes. High numbers of fully functional cells are obtained from whole blood or buffy coat cells. The use of simple laboratory equipment and a relatively cheap reagent makes the described method a convenient approach to obtaining human monocytes.

  12. Potential Phosphorus Mobilisation in Peat Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsmann, Ditte M.; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Re-establishment of wetlands on peat soils containing phosphorus bound to iron(III)-oxides can lead to an undesirable phosphorus loss to the aquatic environment due to the reductive dissolution of iron(III)-oxides. Thus it is important to be able to assess the potential phosphorus mobilisation from...... peat soils before a re-establishment takes place. The potential phosphorus mobilisation from a peat soil depends not only on the geochemical characteristics but also on the redox conditions, the hydrological regime in the area as well as the hydro-physical properties of the soil. The hypothesis...... for this study is (i) the release of phosphorus in peat is controlled by the geochemistry; (ii) the mobilisation of phosphorus is controlled by both geochemistry and hydro-physics of the soil. For this study, 10 Danish riparian lowland areas with peat soil were selected based on their geochemical characteristics...

  13. Missing link or not, mobilise against delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Valerie J; Casarin, Annalisa

    2014-01-31

    Delirium is known to be a predictor of adverse outcomes. In a prospective study Abelha and colleagues showed that postoperative delirium was an independent risk factor for deterioration in functional capacity following discharge. While evidence for causality remains elusive, there is no doubt that patients who develop delirium are left with new functional and cognitive impairment. Finding a pharmacological treatment for the prevention and treatment of delirium is a priority in delirium research and the results of ongoing trials are awaited. Early mobilisation of ICU patients has been demonstrated to decrease delirium and improve functional outcomes. Resources should be directed to appropriate, progressive mobilisation of all critically ill patients as a priority.

  14. Immunomodulatory capacity of fungal proteins on the cytokine production of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurink, P.V.; Lull Noguera, C.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wichers, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Immunomodulation by fungal compounds can be determined by the capacity of the compounds to influence the cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMC). These activities include mitogenicity, stimulation and activation of immune effector cells. Eight mushroom strains

  15. How the introduction of a human resources information system helped the Democratic Republic of Congo to mobilise domestic resources for an improved health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likofata Esanga, Jean-Robert; Viadro, Claire; McManus, Leah; Wesson, Jennifer; Matoko, Nicaise; Ngumbu, Epiphane; Gilroy, Kate E; Trudeau, Daren

    2017-11-01

    The Democratic Republic of Congo has flagged health workforce management and compensation as issues requiring attention, including the problem of ghost workers (individuals on payroll who do not exist and/or show up at work). Recognising the need for reliable health workforce information, the government has worked to implement iHRIS, an open source human resources information system that facilitates health workforce management. In Kasaï Central and Kasaï Provinces, health workers brought relevant documentation to data collection points, where trained teams interviewed them and entered contact information, identification, photo, current job, and employment and education history into iHRIS on laptops. After uploading the data, the Ministry of Public Health used the database of over 11 500 verified health worker records to analyse health worker characteristics, density, compensation, and payroll. Both provinces had less than one physician per 10 000 population and a higher urban versus rural health worker density. Most iHRIS-registered health workers (57% in Kasaï Central and 73% in Kasaï) reported receiving no regular government pay of any kind (salaries or risk allowances). Payroll analysis showed that 27% of the health workers listed as salary recipients in the electronic payroll system were ghost workers, as were 42% of risk allowance recipients. As a result, the Ministries of Public Health, Public Service, and Finance reallocated funds away from ghost workers to cover salaries (n = 781) and risk allowances (n = 2613) for thousands of health workers who were previously under- or uncompensated due to lack of funds. The reallocation prioritised previously under- or uncompensated mid-level health workers, with 49% of those receiving salaries and 68% of those receiving risk allowances representing cadres such as nurses, laboratory technicians, and midwifery cadres. Assembling accurate health worker records can help governments understand health workforce

  16. Melanin-concentrating hormone in peripheral circulation in the human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naufahu, J; Alzaid, F; Fiuza Brito, M; Doslikova, B; Valencia, T; Cunliffe, A; Murray, J F

    2017-03-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide with a well-characterised role in energy homeostasis and emergent roles in diverse physiologic functions such as arousal, mood and reproduction. Work to date has predominantly focused on its hypothalamic functions using animal models; however, little attention has been paid to its role in circulation in humans. The aims of this study were to (a) develop a radioimmunoassay for the detection of MCH in human plasma; (b) establish reference ranges for circulating MCH and (c) characterise the pattern of expression of circulating MCH in humans. A sensitive and specific RIA was developed and cross-validated by RP-HPLC and MS. The effective range was 19.5-1248 pg MCH/mL. Blood samples from 231 subjects were taken to establish a reference range of 19.5-55.4 pg/mL for fasting MCH concentrations. There were no significant differences between male and female fasting MCH concentrations; however, there were correlations between MCH concentrations and BMI in males and females with excess fat (P < 0.001 and P = 0.020) and between MCH concentrations and fat mass in females with excess fat (P = 0.038). Plasma MCH concentrations rose significantly after feeding in a group of older individuals (n = 50, males P = 0.006, females P = 0.023). There were no robust significant correlations between fasting or post-prandial MCH and resting metabolic rate, plasma glucose, insulin or leptin concentrations although there were correlations between circulating MCH and leptin concentrations in older individuals (P = 0.029). These results indicate that the role of circulating MCH may not be reflective of its regulatory hypothalamic role. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  17. Mobilising private adaptation finance: developed country perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, W.P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The private sector is one of the sources of finance included in developed countries’ pledge in the UN climate negotiations to mobilise $100 billion annually by 2020 to support developing countries’ efforts to address climate change. For adaptation in particular, it remains unclear what

  18. Collaborative Research Partnerships for Knowledge Mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    This study examines elements of collaborative research partnerships (CRPs) between university researchers and organisations who engage in knowledge mobilisation activities in education. The study uses key informant interviews and document analysis from one type of partnership, and a survey of university-community partnerships across Canada to…

  19. Understanding the Mechanism of Arsenic Mobilisation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael

    2017-06-01

    Jun 1, 2017 ... Arsenic Mobilisation and Behaviour in Tailings Dams”, Ghana Mining Journal, ... chronic lung disease, gangrene of toes/black foot disease, body weakness, skin cancer and solid swelling of legs, osteoporosis, decreased birth ..... of soils and waters in and around the Imcheon ... Johnsongrass and Cotton.

  20. Two small lymphocyte subpopulations in human peripheral blood. I. Purification and surface marker profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, M; Hokland, P; Heron, I

    1978-01-01

    By means of simple rosette sedimentation methods two subsets from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been isolated: (1) (E, Fc)- and (2) (E, Ig)-. The first subset was obtained by centrifuging suspensions of macrophage-depleted PBL in which E and EA rosettes had been allowed to form simultan......By means of simple rosette sedimentation methods two subsets from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been isolated: (1) (E, Fc)- and (2) (E, Ig)-. The first subset was obtained by centrifuging suspensions of macrophage-depleted PBL in which E and EA rosettes had been allowed to form...... simultaneously. The dominant marker of these E- Fc- cells was surface Ig, and during 4 days of culture this population did not alter its surface markers. Subset 2 was obtained in two ways following rosette centrifugation with AET-treated SRBC and rabbit anti-human Ig-coated autologous RBC. This 'Null cell...

  1. Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Axon Regeneration After Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Animal Models and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Tessa

    2016-01-01

    Injured peripheral nerves regenerate their lost axons but functional recovery in humans is frequently disappointing. This is so particularly when injuries require regeneration over long distances and/or over long time periods. Fat replacement of chronically denervated muscles, a commonly accepted explanation, does not account for poor functional recovery. Rather, the basis for the poor nerve regeneration is the transient expression of growth-associated genes that accounts for declining regene...

  2. The Mobilisation of Muslim Women in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    Under the headline of ‘the mobilisation of Muslim women in Denmark', this paper contains a series of introductory considerations as well as a few preliminary findings on the relatively unexplored question of how and why Muslim women in Denmark form organisations, and via their organisations...... immigrant women´s organisations, this paper aims to explore patterns of networking among these women, and the level and nature of their interaction with other organisations and societal institutions....

  3. Rapid resetting of human peripheral clocks by phototherapy during simulated night shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Marc; Boudreau, Philippe; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2017-11-24

    A majority of night shift workers have their circadian rhythms misaligned to their atypical schedule. While bright light exposure at night is known to reset the human central circadian clock, the behavior of peripheral clocks under conditions of shift work is more elusive. The aim of the present study was to quantify the resetting effects of bright light exposure on both central (plasma cortisol and melatonin) and peripheral clocks markers (clock gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, PBMCs) in subjects living at night. Eighteen healthy subjects were enrolled to either a control (dim light) or a bright light group. Blood was sampled at baseline and on the 4 th day of simulated night shift. In response to a night-oriented schedule, the phase of PER1 and BMAL1 rhythms in PBMCs was delayed by ~2.5-3 h (P shift was observed for the other clock genes and the central markers. Three cycles of 8-h bright light induced significant phase delays (P night-oriented schedule and a rapid resetting effect of nocturnal bright light exposure on peripheral clocks.

  4. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Secretomes of Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura-Wakayama, Yukiko; Katagiri, Wataru; Osugi, Masashi; Kawai, Takamasa; Ogata, Kenichi; Sakaguchi, Kohei; Hibi, Hideharu

    2015-11-15

    Peripheral nerve regeneration across nerve gaps is often suboptimal, with poor functional recovery. Stem cell transplantation-based regenerative therapy is a promising approach for axon regeneration and functional recovery of peripheral nerve injury; however, the mechanisms remain controversial and unclear. Recent studies suggest that transplanted stem cells promote tissue regeneration through a paracrine mechanism. We investigated the effects of conditioned media derived from stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED-CM) on peripheral nerve regeneration. In vitro, SHED-CM-treated Schwann cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation, migration, and the expression of neuron-, extracellular matrix (ECM)-, and angiogenesis-related genes. SHED-CM stimulated neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and increased cell viability. Similarly, SHED-CM enhanced tube formation in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, a 10-mm rat sciatic nerve gap model was bridged by silicon conduits containing SHED-CM or serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. Light and electron microscopy confirmed that the number of myelinated axons and axon-to-fiber ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the SHED-CM group at 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. The sciatic functional index (SFI) and gastrocnemius (target muscle) wet weight ratio demonstrated functional recovery. Increased compound muscle action potentials and increased SFI in the SHED-CM group suggested sciatic nerve reinnervation of the target muscle and improved functional recovery. We also observed reduced muscle atrophy in the SHED-CM group. Thus, SHEDs may secrete various trophic factors that enhance peripheral nerve regeneration through multiple mechanisms. SHED-CM may therefore provide a novel therapy that creates a more desirable extracellular microenvironment for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  5. [Human herpesvirus-6 pneumonitis following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Yuu; Gotoh, Moritaka; Yoshizawa, Seiichiro; Akahane, Daigo; Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Ito, Yoshikazu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2018-01-01

    A-46-year-old man was diagnosed with peripheral T cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. He achieved a complete remission after pirarubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone (THP-COP) therapy and successful autologous peripheral blood stem-cell transplantation (AutoSCT). However, 6 months post AutoSCT, he complained of fever. Chest computed tomography of the patient displayed bilateral interstitial pneumonitis. Human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) DNA was detected in his bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Therefore, the patient was confirmed for HHV-6 pneumonitis. The treatment with foscarnet was effective, and no relapse was noticed in the patient. Besides, we have experienced pneumonitis of unknown origin in some patients after autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantations. Moreover, most of the above patients were clinically diagnosed using serum or plasma markers. Therefore, examining respiratory symptoms after AutoSCT would enable a more accurate diagnosis as well as treatment of patients with HHV-6 pneumonitis.

  6. Research on effects of ionizing radiation of human peripheral blood white cell adhesive molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haijun; Cheng Ying; Le Chen; Min Rui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the links between expression and function of adhesive molecule on the surface of irradiated peripheral blood white cells. Methods: Heparinized human peripheral blood was exposed to γ rays with different dose. At the different post-radiation time adhesive molecule expression on cellular surface was determined by double fluorescence labeling antibodies which were against adhesive molecule and special mark of granulocyte or mononuclear cell respectively with flow cytometry, and cellular adhesive ability to different matrixes mediated by adhesive molecule was estimated by commercializing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and crystalviolet dying. Results: A decline pattern of CD11b on surface of mononuclear cells and CD29 on surface of granulocyte with irradiation dose increase was found. The changes of adhesive ability of mononuclear cells to substance of β1-integrin and collagen-I was well related with irradiation dose. Conclusion: Good relationship shown by the changes of adhesive molecule expression and adhesive ability mediated by the molecules on the surface of peripheral blood white cells with radiation dose was primary base of further research on indicting exposure dose by biomarker. (authors)

  7. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Walker, Matthew P

    2015-07-15

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the "embodied" reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3510135-11$15.00/0.

  8. The effect of stress on core and peripheral body temperature in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Penning, Renske; Hellhammer, Juliane; Verster, Joris C; Klaessens, John H G M; Olivier, Berend; Kalkman, Cor J

    2013-09-01

    Even though there are indications that stress influences body temperature in humans, no study has systematically investigated the effects of stress on core and peripheral body temperature. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on body temperature using different readout measurements. In two independent studies, male and female participants were exposed to a standardized laboratory stress task (the Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) or a non-stressful control task. Core temperature (intestinal and temporal artery) and peripheral temperature (facial and body skin temperature) were measured. Compared to the control condition, stress exposure decreased intestinal temperature but did not affect temporal artery temperature. Stress exposure resulted in changes in skin temperature that followed a gradient-like pattern, with decreases at distal skin locations such as the fingertip and finger base and unchanged skin temperature at proximal regions such as the infra-clavicular area. Stress-induced effects on facial temperature displayed a sex-specific pattern, with decreased nasal skin temperature in females and increased cheek temperature in males. In conclusion, the amplitude and direction of stress-induced temperature changes depend on the site of temperature measurement in humans. This precludes a direct translation of the preclinical stress-induced hyperthermia paradigm, in which core temperature uniformly rises in response to stress to the human situation. Nevertheless, the effects of stress result in consistent temperature changes. Therefore, the present study supports the inclusion of body temperature as a physiological readout parameter of stress in future studies.

  9. Explant culture of human peripheral lung. I. Metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoner, G.D.; Harris, C.C.; Autrup, Herman

    1978-01-01

    the predominant alveolar epithelial cell type. Lamellar inclusion bodies were released from the type 2 cells and accumulated in the alveolar spaces. The metabolism of benzo[alpha]pyrene (BP) in human lung explants cultured for up to 7 days was investigated. Human lung explants had measurable aryl hydrocarbon......Human lung explants have been maintained in vitro for a period of 25 days. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the broncholar epithelial cells, type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, and stromal fibroblasts incorporated 3H-thymidine during the culture. After 7 to 10 days, type 2 cells were...... hydroxylase activity and could metabolize BP into forms that were bound to cellular DNA and protein. Peripheral lung had significantly lower aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity than cultured bronchus but both tissues had similar binding levels of BP to DNA. Radioautographic studies indicated that all cell...

  10. Synergistic effect of DHT and IGF-1 hyperstimulation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperlini, Esther; Spaziani, Sara; Mancini, Annamaria; Caterino, Marianna; Buono, Pasqualina; Orrù, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    The abuse of mixed or combined performance-enhancing drugs is widespread among athletes and amateurs, adults and adolescents. Clinical studies demonstrated that misuse of these doping agents is associated with serious adverse effects to many organs in human. Previously, we demonstrated in human peripheral blood lymphocytes that high doses of anabolic androgenic steroids, such as dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and growth factors, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), have effects at gene and protein levels. Supraphysiological treatments of DHT and IGF-1 affected the expression of genes involved in skeletal muscle disorders as well as in cell-mediated immunological response. At protein level, DHT hyperdosage affects cell motility and apoptosis; IGF-1 hyperstimulation triggers an active cytoskeletal reorganization and an overproduction of immune response- and inflammation-related cytokines. In this study, we investigate the combined effects of DHT and IGF-1 hyperdosage in peripheral blood lymphocytes using a differential proteomic approach. DHT and IGF-1 combined treatment affects cell adhesion, migration, and survival through modulation of expression levels of cytokines and paxillin-signaling-related proteins, and activation of several pathways downstream focal adhesion kinase. Our results indicate a synergistic effect of DHT and IGF-1 which has potential implications for health risk factors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Effect of drinking water disinfection by-products in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aftab; Kurzawa-Zegota, Malgorzata; Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Gopalan, Rajendran C; Plewa, Michael J; Anderson, Diana

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated by the chemical disinfection of water and may pose hazards to public health. Two major classes of DBPs are found in finished drinking water: haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). HAAs are formed following disinfection with chlorine, which reacts with iodide and bromide in the water. Previously the HAAs were shown to be cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. To determine the effect of HAAs in human somatic and germ cells and whether oxidative stress is involved in genotoxic action. In the present study both somatic and germ cells have been examined as peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm. The effects of three HAA compounds: iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA) and chloroacetic acid (CAA) were investigated. After determining appropriate concentration responses, oxygen radical involvement with the antioxidants, butylated hydroxanisole (BHA) and the enzyme catalase, were investigated in the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay under alkaline conditions, >pH 13 and the micronucleus assay. In the Comet assay, BHA and catalase were able to reduce DNA damage in each cell type compared to HAA alone. In the micronucleus assay, micronuclei (MNi) were found in peripheral lymphocytes exposed to all three HAAs and catalase and BHA were in general, able to reduce MNi induction, suggesting oxygen radicals play a role in both assays. These observations are of concern to public health since both human somatic and germ cells show similar genotoxic responses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Phases of daylight and the stability of color perception in the near peripheral human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panorgias, Athanasios; Kulikowski, Janus J; Parry, Neil R A; McKeefry, Declan J; Murray, Ian J

    2012-03-01

    Typical daylight extends from blue (morning sky) to orangey red (evening sky) and is represented mathematically as the Daylight Locus in color space. In this study, we investigate the impact of this daylight variation on human color vision. Thirty-eight color normal human observers performed an asymmetric color match in the near peripheral visual field. Unique hues were identified using a naming paradigm. The observers' performance for matching was almost perfectly coincident with the Daylight Locus but declined markedly in other regions. Interobserver variability reached a conspicuous minimum adjacent to the Daylight Locus and was maximal in the red and yellowish-green regions. In the naming task, unique blue and yellow were virtually coincident with the Daylight Locus. The results suggest that the mechanisms of color perception mediated by the phylogenetically older (blue-yellow) color pathway have been strongly influenced by the different phases of daylight.

  13. In vivo chicken model for peripheral intravascular human fibrin clot detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hui, K.Y.

    1988-01-01

    A chicken model was prepared that provides a simple and economical method of evaluating the use of fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody 64C5 in the detection of peripheral vascular thrombi. Human fibrin was clotted in segments of a chicken's femoral artery and vein prior to intravenous injection of radioiodinated antibody 64C5. After a 3-hr perfusion time, the thrombosed and contralateral control segments of the vessels were excised and counted for radioactivity. The radiolabeled 64C5 uptake ratio of the thrombosed segment to the control segment was 5.4 +/- 1.2 (p less than 0.007) in the femoral artery, and 3.8 +/- 1.1 (p less than 0.02) in the femoral vein. This in vivo chicken model may also find application in studies of targeting agents for human fibrin

  14. The DNA damage of high doses of X-ray on human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Zoulian; Jiang Qisheng; Li Fengsheng; He Rui; Song Xiujun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To detect the DNA damage of high doses of X-ray on human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Evaluation the level of DNA damage of human peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm after high doses of X-ray. Methods: Using human peripheral blood with normal blood routine and normal sperm,give the dose of 0 Gy, 2 Gy, 4 Gy, 6 Gy, 8 Gy, 10 Gy X-ray radiation with energy of 6MU. Detect the percentage of comet-like tail, tail length and content of DNA in tail of whole blood cell's DNA and sperm's DNA by SCGE technique in 1 hour. Results: The peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm's comet rate were 1.00±0.10%, 2.1±1.5%, respectively, have an evidently variance in 0 Gy group (υ=18, t=2.31>1.734, P 1.734, P 1.734, P<0.05). The peripheral blood nucleated cell's and sperm's comet rate were all 100%, 100%, have no-statistical significance in 8 Gy, 10 Gy group. Conclusion: The evidence is powerful enough. That the sperm's SCGE is more sensitive than peripheral blood nucleated cell's SCGE in reflect the X-ray damage in a certain extent (2-6 Gy). (authors)

  15. Peripheral inflammation acutely impairs human spatial memory via actions on medial temporal lobe glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil A; Doeller, Christian F; Voon, Valerie; Burgess, Neil; Critchley, Hugo D

    2014-10-01

    Inflammation impairs cognitive performance and is implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Rodent studies demonstrated key roles for inflammatory mediators in many processes critical to memory, including long-term potentiation, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. They also demonstrated functional impairment of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures by systemic inflammation. However, human data to support this position are limited. Sequential fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography together with experimentally induced inflammation was used to investigate effects of a systemic inflammatory challenge on human MTL function. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scanning was performed in 20 healthy participants before and after typhoid vaccination and saline control injection. After each scanning session, participants performed a virtual reality spatial memory task analogous to the Morris water maze and a mirror-tracing procedural memory control task. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data demonstrated an acute reduction in human MTL glucose metabolism after inflammation. The inflammatory challenge also selectively compromised human spatial, but not procedural, memory; this effect that was independent of actions on motivation or psychomotor response. Effects of inflammation on parahippocampal and rhinal glucose metabolism directly mediated actions of inflammation on spatial memory. These data demonstrate acute sensitivity of human MTL to mild peripheral inflammation, giving rise to associated functional impairment in the form of reduced spatial memory performance. Our findings suggest a mechanism for the observed epidemiologic link between inflammation and risk of age-related cognitive decline and progression of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cervical spine mobilisation forces applied by physiotherapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Rivett, Darren A; Robertson, Val J; Stojanovski, Elizabeth

    2010-06-01

    Postero-anterior (PA) mobilisation is commonly used in cervical spine treatment and included in physiotherapy curricula. The manual forces that students apply while learning cervical mobilisation are not known. Quantifying these forces informs the development of strategies for learning to apply cervical mobilisation effectively and safely. This study describes the mechanical properties of cervical PA mobilisation techniques applied by students, and investigates factors associated with force application. Physiotherapy students (n=120) mobilised one of 32 asymptomatic subjects. Students applied Grades I to IV central and unilateral PA mobilisation to C2 and C7 of one asymptomatic subject. Manual forces were measured in three directions using an instrumented treatment table. Spinal stiffness of mobilised subjects was measured at C2 and C7 using a device that applied a standard oscillating force while measuring this force and its concurrent displacement. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences between techniques and grades, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to calculate the inter- and intrastudent repeatability of forces, and linear regression was used to determine the associations between applied forces and characteristics of students and mobilised subjects. Mobilisation forces increased from Grades I to IV (highest mean peak force, Grade IV C7 central PA technique: 63.7N). Interstudent reliability was poor [ICC(2,1)=0.23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14 to 0.43], but intrastudent repeatability of forces was somewhat better (0.83, 95% CI 0.81 to 0.86). Higher applied force was associated with greater C7 stiffness, increased frequency of thumb pain, male gender of the student or mobilised subject, and a student being earlier in their learning process. Lower forces were associated with greater C2 stiffness. This study describes the cervical mobilisation forces applied by students, and the characteristics of the student and mobilised

  17. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LESIONS IN PERIPHERAL GANGLIA IN CHIMPANZEE AND IN HUMAN POLIOMYELITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodian, David; Howe, Howard A.

    1947-01-01

    1. The peripheral ganglia of eighteen inoculated chimpanzees and thirteen uninoculated controls, and of eighteen fatal human poliomyelitis cases, were studied for histopathological evidence of the route of transmission of virus from the alimentary tract to the CNS. 2. Lesions thought to be characteristic of poliomyelitis in inoculated chimpanzees could not be sharply differentiated from lesions of unknown origin in uninoculated control animals. Moreover, although the inoculated animals as a group, in comparison with the control animals, had a greater number of infiltrative lesions in sympathetic as well as in sensory ganglia, it was not possible to make satisfactory correlations between the distribution of these lesions and the routes of inoculation. 3. In sharp contrast with chimpanzees, the celiac and stellate ganglia of the human poliomyelitis cases were free of any but insignificant infiltrative lesions. Lesions in human trigeminal and spinal sensory ganglia included neuronal damage as well as focal and perivascular inflitrative lesions, as is well known. In most ganglia, as in monkey and chimpanzee sensory ganglia, these were correlated in intensify with the degree of severity of lesions in the region of the CNS receiving their axons. This suggested that lesions in sensory ganglia probably resulted from spread of virus centrifugally from the CNS, in accord with considerable experimental evidence. 4. Two principal difficulties in the interpretation of histopathological findings in peripheral ganglia were revealed by this study. The first is that the specificity of lesions in sympathetic ganglia has not been established beyond doubt as being due to poliomyelitis. The second is that the presence of characteristic lesions in sensory ganglia does not, and cannot, reveal whether the virus reached the ganglia from the periphery or from the central nervous system, except in very early preparalytic stages or in exceptional cases of early arrest of virus spread and of

  18. Investigation of micronuclei induction in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to EMF RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomiets, Irina A.; Triapitsina, Galina A.; Polevik, Nikolai D.; Pryakhin, Evgeny A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The widespread application of cellular phones is of great concern in view possible consequences for human health. The aim of this study is to assess the capability of electromagnetic fields (EMF) RF with frequency 925 MHz and modulation 217 Hz to induce genotoxic effects as evaluated by the in vitro micronucleus assay on peripheral blood lymphocytes. The flasks of peripheral blood samples collected from healthy volunteers (5 men and 5 women) were placed just on the oscillator of emitting antenna. The signals were produced by the laboratory research plant and were evaluated at four specific absorption rates (SARs) - 0; 0.29; 1.2; 8.1 W/kg. SARs were determined by the calorimetric method. Phytohaemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes were exposed three times for 10 minutes in the G o (the first 30 minutes after the beginning of cultivation), S (24 hours later), G 2 -M (after 48 hours from the beginning of cultivation) stages of the cell cycle. 72-hours cultures of lymphocytes were examined to determine the extent of micronuclei. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate the significance for comparison. The data indicated a significant increase of micronuclei in human lymphocytes exposed to EMF RF (6.5 ± 0.51 0/00; 7.1 ± 0.66 0/00; 7.0 ± 0.50 0/00) in comparison with sham-exposed lymphocytes (3.0 ± 0.60 0/00). There was not revealed a dose-dependent increase of micronuclei in human lymphocytes. It was suggested that the increase of micronuclei in lymphocytes is explicated by a particularity of EMF RF just near the oscillator of emitting antenna. (author)

  19. Cytogenetic Low-Dose Hyperradiosensitivity Is Observed in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, Isheeta [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Joiner, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of the ionizing radiation response curve at very low doses has been the subject of considerable debate. Linear-no-threshold (LNT) models are widely used to estimate risks associated with low-dose exposures. However, the low-dose hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) phenomenon, in which cells are especially sensitive at low doses but then show increased radioresistance at higher doses, provides evidence of nonlinearity in the low-dose region. HRS is more prominent in the G2 phase of the cell cycle than in the G0/G1 or S phases. Here we provide the first cytogenetic mechanistic evidence of low-dose HRS in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 2 normal healthy female donors were acutely exposed to cobalt 60 γ rays in either G0 or G2 using closely spaced doses ranging from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Structural chromosomal aberrations were enumerated, and the slopes of the regression lines at low doses (0-0.4 Gy) were compared with doses of 0.5 Gy and above. Results: HRS was clearly evident in both donors for cells irradiated in G2. No HRS was observed in cells irradiated in G0. The radiation effect per unit dose was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher for doses ≤0.4 Gy than for doses >0.5 Gy. Conclusions: These data provide the first cytogenetic evidence for the existence of HRS in human cells irradiated in G2 and suggest that LNT models may not always be optimal for making radiation risk assessments at low doses.

  20. Induction of mitotic micronuclei by X-ray contrast media in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, Z.; Moncada, R.; Kormano, M.; Satokari, K.; Eklund, R.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo cytogenetic effects of X-ray contrast media (CM) were determined by scoring micronuclei (MN) in 72-h cultures of human peripheral lymphocytes. Both ionic (sodium meglumine diatrizoate, methylglucamine diatrizoate, and sodium meglumine ioxaglate and nonionic CM (iosimide, iopromide, iohexol and iotrolan) were able to induce MN in lymphocytes. Based upon their calculated percent probabilities for MN induction, these agents could be ranked in their decreasing order of probability, as iosimide > sodium meglumine ioxaglate > iohexol > sodium meglumine diatrizoate > iopromide > methylglucamine diatrizoate > iotrolan. Stepwise logistic regression analysis of the data indicated that the frequency of MN in CM-exposed lymphocyte cultures was significantly higher than the frequency of MN in control cultures (P < 0.001). In clinical studies where 14 patients were injected with an ionic CM methylglucamine diatrizoate, lymphocyte cultures from 10 patients showed higher frequencies of MN. The differences between pre- and post-CM counts of MN were significant in a Mann-Whitney U test (P < 0.05). The effect of X-irradiation on MN formation in lymphocytes was separately determined and was found to be insignificant. These results indicate that irrespective of ionic and osmolality differences, X-ray contrast agents are capable of producing chromosomal damage in peripheral lymphocytes. Further studies are required to establish molecular mechanisms in the observed cytogenetic effects of CM in cell cultures. (Auth.)

  1. Peripheral injection of human umbilical cord blood stimulates neurogenesis in the aged rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanberg Paul R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life but dramatically decreases with increasing age. This decrease is mostly related to a decline in proliferative activity as a result of an impoverishment of the microenvironment of the aged brain, including a reduction in trophic factors and increased inflammation. Results We determined that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCBMC given peripherally, by an intravenous injection, could rejuvenate the proliferative activity of the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. This increase in proliferation lasted for at least 15 days after the delivery of the UCBMC. Along with the increase in proliferation following UCBMC treatment, an increase in neurogenesis was also found in the aged animals. The increase in neurogenesis as a result of UCBMC treatment seemed to be due to a decrease in inflammation, as a decrease in the number of activated microglia was found and this decrease correlated with the increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that a single intravenous injection of UCBMC in aged rats can significantly improve the microenvironment of the aged hippocampus and rejuvenate the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. Our results raise the possibility of a peripherally administered cell therapy as an effective approach to improve the microenvironment of the aged brain.

  2. Evaluation of an Immunomodulator Drug as a Radioprotectant on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sattarpour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: IMOD™, a selenium enriched extract of the plants Tanacetum vulgare, Urtica dioica, and Rosa canina, has an excellent effect on oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective effects of this immunomodulatory drug on human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods: Peripheral blood samples obtained from venipuncture of the brachial vein were treated with IMOD™ (5, 10, 15, 20 μl for 30 min and Cobalt 60 γ-rays (0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 Gy as the test groups and cultured with the control. We used the micronuclei assay, cell death detection, and cell toxicity assay to analyze the treatment effects. Results: The frequency of micronuclei were 1.66 (0 Gy, 5.33 (0.25 Gy, 9.67 (0.5 Gy, 17.67 (1 Gy, and 23.67 (2 Gy in the irradiated lymphocytes (P<0.001. The percentage of micronuclei frequency reduced to 20%, 26.83%, 37.68%, 16%, and 20.47% with IMOD™. Apoptosis and necrosis decreased significantly in the IMOD™ treated groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: IMOD™ may protect these cells against ionizing radiation.

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Regulatory T Cells Dynamics in Peripheral Blood in Human and Porcine Polytrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Serve

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeverely injured patients experience substantial immunological stress in the aftermath of traumatic insult, which often results in systemic immune dysregulation. Regulatory T cells (Treg play a key role in the suppression of the immune response and in the maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Little is known about their presence and dynamics in blood after trauma, and nothing is known about Treg in the porcine polytrauma model. Here, we assessed different subsets of Treg in trauma patients (TP and compared those to either healthy volunteers (HV or data from porcine polytrauma.MethodsPeripheral blood was withdrawn from 20 TP with injury severity score (ISS ≥16 at the admittance to the emergency department (ED, and subsequently on day 1 and at day 3. Ten HV were included as controls (ctrl. The porcine polytrauma model consisted of a femur fracture, liver laceration, lung contusion, and hemorrhagic shock resulting in an ISS of 27. After polytrauma, the animals underwent resuscitation and surgical fracture fixation. Blood samples were withdrawn before and immediately after trauma, 24 and 72 h later. Different subsets of Treg, CD4+CD25+, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+, CD4+CD25+CD127−, and CD4+CD25+CD127−FoxP3+ were characterized by flow cytometry.ResultsAbsolute cell counts of leukocytes were significantly increasing after trauma, and again decreasing in the follow-up in human and porcine samples. The proportion of human Treg in the peripheral blood of TP admitted to the ED was lower when compared to HV. Their numbers did not recover until 72 h after trauma. Comparable data were found for all subsets. The situation in the porcine trauma model was comparable with the clinical data. In porcine peripheral blood before trauma, we could identify Treg with the typical immunophenotype (CD4+CD25+CD127−, which were virtually absent immediately after trauma. Similar to the human situation, most of these cells expressed FoxP3, as assessed by

  4. Peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy; Chronic pain - peripheral neuropathy ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  5. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laulumaa Saara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  6. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA and this could be related to metabolic disturbances. This study investigated the association between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and metabolic risk factors in 1,019 subjects, aged...... 18-93 years. DNA damage was analyzed as strand breaks by the comet assay and levels of formamidopyrimidine (FPG-) and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1)-sensitive sites There was an association between age and levels of FPG-sensitive sites for women, but not for men. The same tendency......, cholesterol and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In the group of men, there were significant positive associations between alcohol intake, HbA1c and FPG-sensitive sites in multivariate analysis. The levels of metabolic risk factors were positively associated with age, yet only few subjects fulfilled all...

  7. Grass immunotherapy induces inhibition of allergen-specific human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, S; Hamilton, R G; Norman, P S; Ansari, A A

    1997-02-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from humans allergic to grass pollens (GR+ subjects) show strong in vitro proliferative responses to purified allergens from Lolium perenne pollen Lol p 1, and to a lesser extent to Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. By contrast, PBMC from grass allergic patients undergoing immunotherapy (GR + IT subjects) exhibit a very poor Lol p-specific proliferative response, similar to that observed in nongrass allergic subjects (GR-subjects). Unlike GR-subjects, both GR+ and GR + IT subjects have high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. While GR+ subjects exhibit a significant correlation between antigen-specific serum antibody and PBMC responses, GR + IT subjects do not show a correlation between the two responses. The possible mechanisms by which immunotherapy may modulate allergen-specific T cell proliferative response are discussed.

  8. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  9. Surgical manipulation compromises leukocyte mobilisation responses and inflammation after experimental cerebral ischaemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam eDenes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury results in peripheral inflammatory changes, although the impact of these processes on neuronal death and neuroinflammation is currently unclear. To facilitate the translation of experimental studies to clinical benefit, it is vital to characterize the mechanisms by which acute brain injury induces peripheral inflammatory changes, and how these are affected by surgical manipulation in experimental models. Here we show that in mice, even mild surgical manipulation of extracranial tissues induced marked granulocyte mobilisation (300% and systemic induction of cytokines. However, intracranial changes induced by craniotomy, or subsequent induction of focal cerebral ischaemia were required to induce egress of CXCR2-positive granulocytes from the bone marrow. CXCR2 blockade resulted in reduced mobilisation of granulocytes from the bone marrow, caused an unexpected increase in circulating granulocytes, but failed to effect brain injury induced by cerebral ischaemia. We also demonstrate that isoflurane anaesthesia interferes with circulating leukocyte responses, which could contribute to the reported vascular and neuroprotective effects of isoflurane. In addition, no immunosuppression develops in the bone marrow after experimental stroke. Thus, experimental models of cerebral ischaemia are compromised by surgery and anaesthesia in proportion to the severity of surgical stress and overall tissue injury. Understanding the inherent confounding effects of surgical manipulation and development of new models of cerebral ischaemia with minimal surgical intervention could facilitate better understanding of interactions between inflammation and brain injury.

  10. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  11. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban R Fernández

    Full Text Available Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  12. Optimizing the method for generation of integration-free induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haihui; Huang, Xia; Xu, Jing; Song, Lili; Liu, Shuping; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yuan, Weiping; Li, Yanxin

    2018-06-15

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from human peripheral blood provides a convenient and low-invasive way to obtain patient-specific iPSCs. The episomal vector is one of the best approaches for reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent status because of its simplicity and affordability. However, the efficiency of episomal vector reprogramming of adult peripheral blood cells is relatively low compared with cord blood and bone marrow cells. In the present study, integration-free human iPSCs derived from peripheral blood were established via episomal technology. We optimized mononuclear cell isolation and cultivation, episomal vector promoters, and a combination of transcriptional factors to improve reprogramming efficiency. Here, we improved the generation efficiency of integration-free iPSCs from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by optimizing the method of isolating mononuclear cells from peripheral blood, by modifying the integration of culture medium, and by adjusting the duration of culture time and the combination of different episomal vectors. With this optimized protocol, a valuable asset for banking patient-specific iPSCs has been established.

  13. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  14. Should we mobilise critically ill patients? A review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Enda D

    2009-12-01

    Neuromuscular weakness, a frequent complication of prolonged bed rest and critical illness, is associated with morbidity and mortality. Mobilisation physiotherapy has widespread application in patients hospitalised with non-critical illness.

  15. Opioid-induced delay in gastric emptying: a peripheral mechanism in humans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, D B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Opioids delay gastric emptying, which in turn may increase the risk of vomiting and pulmonary aspiration. Naloxone reverses this opiate action on gastric emptying, but it is not known whether this effect in humans is mediated by central or peripheral opiate antagonism. The importance of peripheral opioid receptor antagonism in modulating opioid-induced delay in gastric emptying was evaluated using methylnaltrexone, a quaternary derivative of the opiate antagonist naltrexone, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover placebo-controlled study, 11 healthy volunteers were given either placebo (saline), 0.09 mg\\/kg morphine, or 0.09 mg\\/kg morphine plus 0.3 mg\\/kg methylnaltrexone on three separate occasions before ingesting 500 ml deionized water. The rate of gastric emptying was measured by two methods: a noninvasive epigastric bioimpedance technique and the acetaminophen absorption test. RESULTS: The epigastric bioimpedance technique was sufficiently sensitive to detect opioid-induced changes in the rate of gastric emptying. The mean +\\/- SD time taken for the gastric volume to decrease to 50% (t0.5) after placebo was 5.5 +\\/- 2.1 min. Morphine prolonged gastric emptying to (t0.5) of 21 +\\/- 9.0 min (P < 0.03). Methylnaltrexone given concomitantly with morphine reversed the morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying to a t0.5 of 7.4 +\\/- 3.0 (P < 0.04). Maximum concentrations and area under the concentration curve from 0 to 90 min of serum acetaminophen concentrations after morphine were significantly different from placebo and morphine administered concomitantly with methylnaltrexone (P < 0.05). No difference in maximum concentration or area under the concentration curve from 0 to 90 min was noted between placebo and methylnaltrexone coadministered with morphine. CONCLUSIONS: The attenuation of morphine-induced delay in gastric emptying by methylnaltrexone suggests that the opioid effect is

  16. Discord in the gender harmony: Mobilising femininities at work

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Melissa; Kelan, Elisabeth K.

    2017-01-01

    This article seeks to aid our understanding of gendered inclusion by looking at how femininities are mobilised at work. Whilst within the popular press there is a growing neo-liberal discourse about women supporting other women in organisations, little consideration has been given to men’s reactions to women aligning with each other, in other words, women mobilising femininities. Furthermore, whilst studies of doing gender have considered this from an individual viewpoint, we are unclear abou...

  17. Mobilisation for public engagement: Benchmarking the practices of research institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entradas, Marta; Bauer, Martin M

    2017-10-01

    Studies on scientists' practices of public engagement have pointed to variations between disciplines. If variations at the individual level are reflected at the institutional level, then research institutes in Social Sciences (and Humanities) should perform higher in public engagement and be more involved in dialogue with the public. Using a nearly complete sample of research institutes in Portugal 2014 ( n = 234, 61% response rate), we investigate how public engagement varies in intensity, type of activities and target audiences across scientific areas. Three benchmark findings emerge. First, the Social Sciences and the Humanities profile differently in public engagement highlighting the importance of distinguishing between these two scientific areas often conflated in public engagement studies. Second, the Social Sciences overall perform more public engagement activities, but the Natural Sciences mobilise more effort for public engagement. Third, while the Social Sciences play a greater role in civic public engagement, the Natural Sciences are more likely to perform educational activities. Finally, this study shows that the overall size of research institutes, available public engagement funding and public engagement staffing make a difference in institutes' public engagement.

  18. Social Media, Deliberative Democracy and Social Mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Bodington, Malene; Lerche, Søren

    Over the past 20 years, researchers have studied how the Internet frames deliberative processes. What is needed to create a framework for dialogue & engagement, & how can the Internet be used to create & support social communities? (Castells 2001, Dyson 1997, Rheingold 1993). However, these appro......Over the past 20 years, researchers have studied how the Internet frames deliberative processes. What is needed to create a framework for dialogue & engagement, & how can the Internet be used to create & support social communities? (Castells 2001, Dyson 1997, Rheingold 1993). However......, these approaches have all taken a normative & meta-theoretical approach to the subject & are rarely grounded in empirical research. Much has been written about using social media in a rationally, purpose-driven or strategic way, relating it to corporations, political organisations, and the latest in relation...... to the Obama presidential campaign in 2008, where deliberative features were successfully used to mobilise and organise 2 millions activists through his social network, Mybo.com. However, very little literature addresses the deliberative processes, nor does much past research build on cases that have...

  19. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Ming-Wei; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lin, Wen-Chang; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Chen, Po-Hua; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2016-01-01

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. - Highlights: • We conducted a smoke reduction trial program and investigated the causal relationship between smoke and gene regulation. • MicroRNA and mRNA expression changes were examined in human PBMC. • MicroRNAs are important in regulating disease-causal genes after tobacco smoke reduction.

  20. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ming-Wei [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, Sung-Liang [Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wen-Chang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ching-Hui [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Hua [School of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yungling Leo, E-mail: leolee@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. - Highlights: • We conducted a smoke reduction trial program and investigated the causal relationship between smoke and gene regulation. • MicroRNA and mRNA expression changes were examined in human PBMC. • MicroRNAs are important in regulating disease-causal genes after tobacco smoke reduction.

  1. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells promote peripheral nerve repair via paracrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yuan Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs represent a promising young-state stem cell source for cell-based therapy. hUCMSC transplantation into the transected sciatic nerve promotes axonal regeneration and functional recovery. To further clarify the paracrine effects of hUCMSCs on nerve regeneration, we performed human cytokine antibody array analysis, which revealed that hUCMSCs express 14 important neurotrophic factors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, hepatocyte growth factor, neurotrophin-3, basic fibroblast growth factor, type I collagen, fibronectin and laminin were highly expressed. Treatment with hUCMSC-conditioned medium enhanced Schwann cell viability and proliferation, increased nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite growth from dorsal root ganglion explants. These findings suggest that paracrine action may be a key mechanism underlying the effects of hUCMSCs in peripheral nerve repair.

  2. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Komuta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration.

  3. Simulated night shift work induces circadian misalignment of the human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervezee, Laura; Cuesta, Marc; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2018-05-22

    Misalignment of the endogenous circadian timing system leads to disruption of physiological rhythms and may contribute to the development of the deleterious health effects associated with night shift work. However, the molecular underpinnings remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of a 4-day simulated night shift work protocol on the circadian regulation of the human transcriptome. Repeated blood samples were collected over two 24-hour measurement periods from eight healthy subjects under highly controlled laboratory conditions before and 4 days after a 10-hour delay of their habitual sleep period. RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells to obtain transcriptomic data. Cosinor analysis revealed a marked reduction of significantly rhythmic transcripts in the night shift condition compared with baseline at group and individual levels. Subsequent analysis using a mixed-effects model selection approach indicated that this decrease is mainly due to dampened rhythms rather than to a complete loss of rhythmicity: 73% of transcripts rhythmically expressed at baseline remained rhythmic during the night shift condition with a similar phase relative to habitual bedtimes, but with lower amplitudes. Functional analysis revealed that key biological processes are affected by the night shift protocol, most notably the natural killer cell-mediated immune response and Jun/AP1 and STAT pathways. These results show that 4 days of simulated night shifts leads to a loss in temporal coordination between the human circadian transcriptome and the external environment and impacts biological processes related to the adverse health effects associated to night shift work.

  4. Differential induction from X-irradiated human peripheral blood monocytes to dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshino, Hironori; Takahashi, Kenji; Monzen, Satoru; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which plays an essential role in the immune system. To clarify the influences of ionizing radiation on the differentiation to DCs, we focused on human peripheral blood monocytes and investigated whether X-irradiated monocytes can differentiate into DCs. The non-irradiated monocytes and 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were induced into immature DCs (iDCs) and mature DCs (mDCs) with appropriate cytokine stimulation, and the induced cells from each monocyte expressed each DC-expressing surface antigen such as CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR. However, the expression levels of CD40 and CD86 on the iDCs derived from the 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were higher than those of iDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. Furthermore, the mDCs derived from 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes had significantly less ability to stimulate allogeneic T cells in comparison to the mDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. There were no significant differences in the phagocytotic activity of the iDCs and cytokines detected in the supernatants conditioned by the DCs from the non-irradiated and irradiated monocytes. These results suggest that human monocytes which are exposed to ionizing radiation can thus differentiate into DCs, but there is a tendency that X-irradiation leads to an impairment of the function of DCs. (author)

  5. In vitro X-ray irradiation of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes enhances suppressor function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, H.; Tsunematsu, T.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of in vitro X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood T lymphocytes was studied with regard to their suppressor activity related to the concanavalin A (Con A)-induced suppressor system. To generate suppressor T lymphocytes, purified human T lymphocytes were incubated for 3 days in the first culture, with or without Con A. These lymphocytes were irradiated with various doses of X-ray before, mid or after the culture. After doing a second culture for 6 days, the suppressive influence of these cells on T lymphocyte proliferation rates stimulated with allogeneic mononuclear cells, and B lymphocyte proliferation rates stimulated with pokeweed mitogen was measured. Irradiation of cultures to which Con A had not been added induced much the same level of suppressor activity as seen in the cultures with Con A. The suppressor activity gradually increased with time from the irradiation to the suppressor cell assay. Suppressor T lymphocytes were resistant to X-ray irradiation and independent of DNA synthesis. However, irradiation-induced enhancement was minimal in cultures incubated with con A, regardless of the irradiation time. (author)

  6. Modelled temperature-dependent excitability behaviour of a generalised human peripheral sensory nerve fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jacoba E; Hanekom, Tania; Hanekom, Johan J

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if a recently developed human Ranvier node model, which is based on a modified version of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, could predict the excitability behaviour in human peripheral sensory nerve fibres with diameters ranging from 5.0 to 15.0 microm. The Ranvier node model was extended to include a persistent sodium current and was incorporated into a generalised single cable nerve fibre model. Parameter temperature dependence was included. All calculations were performed in Matlab. Sensory nerve fibre excitability behaviour characteristics predicted by the new nerve fibre model at different temperatures and fibre diameters compared well with measured data. Absolute refractory periods deviated from measured data, while relative refractory periods were similar to measured data. Conduction velocities showed both fibre diameter and temperature dependence and were underestimated in fibres thinner than 12.5 microm. Calculated strength-duration time constants ranged from 128.5 to 183.0 micros at 37 degrees C over the studied nerve fibre diameter range, with chronaxie times about 30% shorter than strength-duration time constants. Chronaxie times exhibited temperature dependence, with values overestimated by a factor 5 at temperatures lower than body temperature. Possible explanations include the deviated absolute refractory period trend and inclusion of a nodal strangulation relationship.

  7. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin− mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin − ) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin + ) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin − cell population. The ability of Lin + and Lin − to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin + and Lin − were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin + mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin − stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation

  8. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  9. Effects of mercury on the proliferation of human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwecka, K.; Poniedzialek, B.; Rzymski, P.; Karczewski, J.; Zurawski, J.; Wiktorowicz, K.

    2011-01-01

    Our project aimed to investigate the effects of mercury on the proliferation of human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. The lymphocytes were isolated from the blood collected from healthy donors at Regionalne Centrum Krwiodawstwa i Krwiolecznictwa in Poznan, Poland. For the purpose of cell culture, the lymphocyte suspension (25 · 10 4 cells/ml) in Eagle's medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum was prepared. Phytohaemagglutinin-L (PHA-L) was used in a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml to stimulate cell proliferation. Mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) in four different concentrations (1 μM, 10 μM, 50 μM, 100 μM) and [3H]-thymidine were added after 48 hours of incubation and the cell culture was continued for the next 24 hours. The rate of lymphocyte proliferation was measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation method with a liquid scintillation counter. Results indicate that higher concentrations of mercury (50 μM, 100 μM) inhibit the [3H]-thymidine incorporation of human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. The incorporation was lower than the control sample by 65% at a concentration of 50 μM, while at a concentration of 100 μM it fell to virtually zero. Moreover, the phase of lymphocyte proliferation cycle affected by mercuric chloride was also investigated. For this purpose HgCl 2 in 2 concentrations (10 μM, 50 μM) was added to the cell culture in 4 different time points: at the start of the cell culture and after 4, 24, and 48 hours of incubation. After 48 hours, [3H]-thymidine was added and the cell culture was continued for an additional 24 hours. The rate of cell proliferation was estimated by [3H]-thymidine incorporation using a liquid scintillation counter. The inhibition effect was observed in samples with metal added at the start of the cell culture and after 4 h of incubation, i.e. at the initial phase of the lymphocyte proliferation cycle. (authors)

  10. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Yu

    Full Text Available Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo-secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 (MMP-2, MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion.

  11. Direct Conversion of Human Fibroblasts into Schwann Cells that Facilitate Regeneration of Injured Peripheral Nerve In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Yoshihiro; Kishida, Tsunao; Tomita, Koichi; Yamamoto, Kenta; Numajiri, Toshiaki; Mazda, Osam

    2017-04-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) play pivotal roles in the maintenance and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system. Although transplantation of SCs enhances repair of experimentally damaged peripheral and central nerve tissues, it is difficult to prepare a sufficient number of functional SCs for transplantation therapy without causing adverse events for the donor. Here, we generated functional SCs by somatic cell reprogramming procedures and demonstrated their capability to promote peripheral nerve regeneration. Normal human fibroblasts were phenotypically converted into SCs by transducing SOX10 and Krox20 genes followed by culturing for 10 days resulting in approximately 43% directly converted Schwann cells (dSCs). The dSCs expressed SC-specific proteins, secreted neurotrophic factors, and induced neuronal cells to extend neurites. The dSCs also displayed myelin-forming capability both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, transplantation of the dSCs into the transected sciatic nerve in mice resulted in significantly accelerated regeneration of the nerve and in improved motor function at a level comparable to that with transplantation of the SCs obtained from a peripheral nerve. The dSCs induced by our procedure may be applicable for novel regeneration therapy for not only peripheral nerve injury but also for central nerve damage and for neurodegenerative disorders related to SC dysfunction. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1207-1216. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  12. Biological radiation dose estimation by chromosomal aberrations analysis in human peripheral blood (dose-effect curve)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.

    2001-09-01

    In order to draw a dose-effect curve, experimentally gamma ray induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes from eight healthy people were studied. Samples from 4 males and 4 females were irradiated in tubes with 0.15, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 gray of gamma ray (Co 60 at dose rate 0.3 Gy/min). Irradiated and control samples were incubated in 37 centigrade for 48 hours cell cultures. Cell cultures then were stopped and metaphases spread, Giemsa stained to score the induced chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal aberrations from 67888 metaphases were scored. Curves from the total number of dicentrics, dicentrics + rings and total numbers of breaks in cell for each individual or for all people were drawn. An increase of all chromosomal aberrations types with the elevation of the doses was observed. The yield of chromosome aberrations is related to the dose used. These curves give a quick useful estimation of the accidentally radiation exposure. (author)

  13. Midazolam inhibits chondrogenesis via peripheral benzodiazepine receptor in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Ching; Wu, King-Chuen; Huang, Bu-Miin; So, Edmund Cheung; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2018-05-01

    Midazolam, a benzodiazepine derivative, is widely used for sedation and surgery. However, previous studies have demonstrated that Midazolam is associated with increased risks of congenital malformations, such as dwarfism, when used during early pregnancy. Recent studies have also demonstrated that Midazolam suppresses osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Given that hypertrophic chondrocytes can differentiate into osteoblast and osteocytes and contribute to endochondral bone formation, the effect of Midazolam on chondrogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we applied a human MSC line, the KP cell, to serve as an in vitro model to study the effect of Midazolam on chondrogenesis. We first successfully established an in vitro chondrogenic model in a micromass culture or a 2D high-density culture performed with TGF-β-driven chondrogenic induction medium. Treatment of the Midazolam dose-dependently inhibited chondrogenesis, examined using Alcian blue-stained glycosaminoglycans and the expression of chondrogenic markers, such as SOX9 and type II collagen. Inhibition of Midazolam by peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) antagonist PK11195 or small interfering RNA rescued the inhibitory effects of Midazolam on chondrogenesis. In addition, Midazolam suppressed transforming growth factor-β-induced Smad3 phosphorylation, and this inhibitory effect could be rescued using PBR antagonist PK11195. This study provides a possible explanation for Midazolam-induced congenital malformations of the musculoskeletal system through PBR. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases

  15. The production of collagenase by adherent mononuclear cells cultured from human peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J S; Weiss, J; Ryhänen, L; Nies, K M; Rantala-Ryhänen, S; Uitto, J

    1984-12-01

    Mononuclear cells were isolated from human peripheral blood by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation, and the cells adherent to plastic substrata were cultured in serum-free media supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate. These cell cultures, which consisted predominantly of monocyte-macrophages as judged by nonspecific esterase staining, accumulated collagenase in the medium. This collagenase resembled other vertebrate collagenases in that it cleaved native triple-helical type I collagen at a locus 3/4-length away from the amino-terminal end of the molecule. The collagenase activity was inhibited by Na2EDTA, dithiothreitol, and fetal calf serum, while the addition of Ca++ or N-ethylmaleimide enhanced the enzyme activity. The accumulation of collagenase in the culture media was markedly enhanced by the incubation of cells with concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate. In the presence of cycloheximide, the levels of collagenase activity were markedly reduced, suggesting that active protein synthesis was required to express the enzyme activity. In additional experiments, monocytes were further purified by counterflow centrifugation-elutriation. The collagenase production was markedly increased in cultures enriched in monocyte-macrophages and devoid of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The accumulation of collagenase in monocyte cultures incubated for 48 hours in the presence of concanavalin A or phorbol myristic acetate was of the same order of magnitude as in parallel cultures containing the same number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes purified by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation and Plasmagel sedimentation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Edaravone protects human peripheral blood lymphocytes from γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis and DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Liu, Yinghui; Dong, Liangliang; Chu, Xiaoxia

    2015-03-01

    Radiation-induced cellular injury is attributed primarily to the harmful effects of free radicals, which play a key role in irradiation-induced apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the radioprotective efficacy of edaravone, a licensed clinical drug and a powerful free radical scavenger that has been tested against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes in studies of various diseases. Edaravone was pre-incubated with lymphocytes for 2 h prior to γ-irradiation. It was found that pretreatment with edaravone increased cell viability and inhibited generation of γ-radiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in lymphocytes exposed to 3 Gy γ-radiation. In addition, γ-radiation decreased antioxidant enzymatic activity, such as superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the level of reduced glutathione. Conversely, treatment with 100 μM edaravone prior to irradiation improved antioxidant enzyme activity and increased reduced glutathione levels in irradiated lymphocytes. Importantly, we also report that edaravone reduced γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis through downregulation of Bax, upregulation of Bcl-2, and consequent reduction of the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. The current study shows edaravone to be an effective radioprotector against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in lymphocytes in vitro. Finally, edaravone pretreatment significantly reduced DNA damage in γ-irradiated lymphocytes, as measured by comet assay (% tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, and olive tail moment) (p edaravone offers protection from radiation-induced cytogenetic alterations.

  17. Screening and fractionation of plant extracts with antiproliferative activity on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza-Fagundes Elaine M

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Three hundred and thirteen extracts from 136 Brazilian plant species belonging to 36 families were tested for their suppressive activity on phytohemaglutinin (PHA stimulated proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. The proliferation was evaluated by the amount of [³H]-thymidine incorporated by the cells. Twenty extracts inhibited or strongly reduced the proliferation in a dose-dependent manner at doses between 10 and 100 µg/ml. Three of these extracts appeared to be non-toxic to lymphocytes, according to the trypan blue permeability assay and visual inspection using optical microscopy. Bioassay-guided fractionation of Alomia myriadenia extract showed that myriadenolide, a labdane diterpene known to occur in this species, could account for the observed activity of the crude extract. Using a similar protocol, an active fraction of the extract from Gaylussacia brasiliensis was obtained. Analysis of the ¹H and13C NMR spectra of this fraction indicates the presence of an acetylated triterpene whose characterization is underway. The extract of Himatanthus obovatus is currently under investigation.

  18. Effects of exogenous and endogenous IL-2 on irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lansheng; Wang Ninghai; Luan Meiling

    1993-08-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were irradiated with 1 to 40 Gy of γ-ray, and then cultured with PHA to prepare supernatant containing IL-2 for observation of kinetics of endogenous IL-2 production and reversion of lymphocyte proliferation after adding a highly purified IL-2. IL-2 activity was determined by the ability to sustain IL-2 dependent cell line (CTLL), lymphocyte proliferation was determined by 3 H-TdR incorporation and T lymphocyte subsets by monoclonal antibodies. The experimental results showed that lymphocytes exposed to 60 Co synthesized less DNA than nonirradiated lymphocytes. The inhibitory effect can partially reversed by purified IL-2 at the γ-ray dose range of 1 to 10 Gy, while irradiation with 2.5 Gy resulted in a reduction of T cells and T subsets, and increase in CD + 4 /CD + 8 ratio. The ratio of subsets recovered after adding IL-2. The kinetics of IL-2 production showed that the endogenous IL-2 production rose markedly with increasing dose of irradiation at the range of 1 to 10 Gy, and the peak of IL-2 production was at the γ-ray dose of 10 Gy

  19. Catabolism of exogenously supplied thymidine to thymine and dihydrothymine by platelets in human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pero, R.W.; Johnson, D.; Olsson, A.

    1984-01-01

    The interference of platelets with the estimation of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human peripheral mononuclear leukocytes following genotoxic exposure was studied. A 96% reduction in the unscheduled DNA synthesis value was achieved by incubating [ 3 H]thymidine with platelet-rich plasma for 5 hr at 37 degrees. Using radioactive thymine-containing compounds, together with quantitative analyses based on thin-layer and ion-exchange chromatographies, we have shown that thymidine was converted to thymine which, in turn, was converted to dihydrothymine in platelet-rich plasma. The enzymes responsible were separated from platelet lysates by gel filtration and were identified as thymidine phosphorylase and dihydrothymine dehydrogenase. The phosphorylase reversibly catalyzed the formation of thymine from thymidine and converted bromodeoxyuridine to bromouracil. The dehydrogenase reversibly catalyzed the interconversion of thymine and dihydrothymine in a reaction dependent on NADP(H), and it was inhibited by diazouracil and by thymine. Nearly all the thymidine-catabolizing activity found in whole blood samples supplied exogenously with thymidine was accounted for by the platelets. Since most genetic toxicological tests that use blood samples do not involve removing platelets from the blood cell cultures, then it is concluded that precautions should be taken in the future to determine the influence of platelets on these test systems. This is particularly true for methods dependent on thymidine pulses such as unscheduled DNA synthesis, or those dependent on bromodeoxyuridine, such as sister chromatid exchanges, since this nucleoside is also a substrate for thymidine phosphorylase

  20. Adaptive response induced by low concentrations of MMC in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shuqing; Wang Bin; Jiang Jie

    1998-01-01

    Samples of cultured human peripheral lymphocytes were pre-treated with mitomycin C (MMC) in concentrations of 0.01∼0.1 μg/mL at 34 h of incubation and then exposed to 1.5 Gy of X-rays. Chromosome aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges and micronuclei for these lymphocytes were observed. The results show that the chromosome aberration rates for lymphocytes pre-treated with MMC in concentrations of 0.5 and 0.075 μg/mL and the frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges for lymphocytes pre-treated with MMC in concentrations of 0.01 μg/mL were significantly lower than their own expected values but the rates of micronuclei for lymphocytes pre-treated with MMC in concentrations of 0.05, 0.075 and 0.1 μg/mL were significantly higher than the expected values. Such results suggest that for studying the cross resistance of lymphocytes to chemicals and ionizing radiation, inconsistent conclusions may be obtained if different endpoints are based on

  1. Survival and PHA-stimulation of #betta#-irradiated human peripheral blood T lymphocyte subpopulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Darr, D.C.; Daulden, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral blood T lymphocyte subpopulations were identified and isolated on the basis of their ability to bind IgG (T-G), IgM (T-M), or neither immunoglobulin class (T-null). Lymphocytes were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 or 5.0 Gy of 60 Co #betta#-rays either as a T-cell suspension or as separated T cell subsets. Survival curves, determined 5 days after irradiation, revealed that each subset has radiosensitive and radioresistant portions, and that the T-G cell is the most sensitive subset. Mitotic indices of 48-h cultures showed that the response of unirradiated T lymphocytes to PHA varied greatly among the subsets, the highest indices being obtained for the T-M and the lowest for the T-G cells. With the possible exception of the T-G cells, the subsets are realtively resistant to mitotic effects of #betta#-rays. T-G cells suppress the PHA-induced mitotic response of the other T lymphocyte subsets, and this suppressor effect is radiosensitive, being abolished by 1.0 Gy. It is concluded that lymphocytes exposed to >= 1 Gy of #betta#-rays will have very few dividing B lymphocytes or T-G cells. This together with radiation-induced loss of T-G suppressor action means that the predominant lymphocyte types in mitosis after >=1 Gy are the radioresistant T-M and T-null cells. (orig.)

  2. Preliminary study on biological dosimetry using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis of human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingjie; Lu Xue; Feng Jiangbing; Chen Deqing; Chen Xiaosui

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) in biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Methods: Normal peripheral blood samples from two healthy males were exposed to different doses coblat-60 gamma-rays, ranged from 0 to 5 Gy, and the tail length (TL) and Oliver tail moment (TM) of the lymphocytes were analyzed with SCGE. The dose-effect curves of TL and TM were fitted respectively. The TL and TM of lymphocytes for eight radiation workers were analyzed with SCGE, cumulative doses were estimated using the fitted TL and TM equations, and then compared with the recorded monitoring doses. Results: The TLs or TMs of normal human lymphocytes were increased with the irradiation doses, and its relationship can be fitted with a linear-quadratic equations: Y=13.59 + 20.87X - 2.27 X 2 for TL, and Y = 8.50 + 15.04X - 1.43X 2 for TM, respectively (Y denotes TL or TM value, X is radiation dose). The doses estimated with TM equation were closer to the recorded monitoring doses than that with TL equation. Conclusions: The TM in lymphocytes analyzed with SCGE is a promising radiation biological dosimeter. (authors)

  3. Cryopreserved Human Allografts for the Reconstruction of Aortic and Peripheral Prosthetic Graft Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Matteo; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco; Ferraro, Stefania; Rivolta, Nicola; Ferrario, Massimo; Guttadauro, Chiara; Castelli, Patrizio; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2017-12-25

    Background : This study aimed to present cases with cryopreserved human allografts (CHAs) for vascular reconstruction in both aortic and peripheral infected prosthetic grafts. Materials and Methods : This is a single center, observational descriptive study with retrospective analysis. In all cases, the infected prosthetic graft material was completely removed. At discharge, patients were administered anticoagulants. Follow-up examinations included clinical visits, echo-color-Doppler ultrasounds, or computed tomography angiography within 30 days and at 3, 6, and 12 months after the treatment, and then twice per year. Results : We treated 21 patients (90% men, n=19) with the mean age of 71±12 years and mean interval between the initial operation and replacement with CHA of 30 months [range, 1-216; interquartile range (IQR), 2-36]. In-hospital mortality was 14% (n=3); no CHA-related complication led to death. Limb salvage was 100%. No patient was lost at the median follow-up of 14 months (range, 2-61; IQR, 6-39). No rupture, aneurysmal degeneration, or re-infection occurred. Estimated freedom from CHA-related adverse events (95% confidence interval, 43-63) was 95% at 3 years. Conclusion : In our experience, CHAs are a viable option for prosthetic graft infections and provide satisfactory clinical results and favorable stability because of a very low rate of CHA-related adverse events during follow-up.

  4. Chromosome aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes induced by single or fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Leonard, A.; Deknyudt, G.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is the effect of single (125 and 250 R) and fractionated (2x125 R) irradiation on the output of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood kept between irradiations at the temperature of 5 deg C. The single irradiation is carried out immediately after vein-puncture. In the case of fractionated irradiation the first dose of 125R is given after vein-puncture, the second, in the interval of 2, 8 and 24 hours. Blood is cultivated immediately after two irradiations in order to prepare metaphase plates for cytogenic analysis. Repair processes in cell heritage structures are not realised in blood irradiated by fractions which is kept at 5 deg C between irradiations. On the contrary, chromosome fragments, interstitial deletions, aberrant cells and cell breaks are found in a large amount in blood irradiated by fractions. They have appeared with the authentically high statistic difference as compared with the cells irradiated one time with the same dose. This effect is probably attained due to blood preservation

  5. Dissecting interferon-induced transcriptional programs in human peripheral blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Waddell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are key modulators of the immune system, and are central to the control of many diseases. The response of immune cells to stimuli in complex populations is the product of direct and indirect effects, and of homotypic and heterotypic cell interactions. Dissecting the global transcriptional profiles of immune cell populations may provide insights into this regulatory interplay. The host transcriptional response may also be useful in discriminating between disease states, and in understanding pathophysiology. The transcriptional programs of cell populations in health therefore provide a paradigm for deconvoluting disease-associated gene expression profiles.We used human cDNA microarrays to (1 compare the gene expression programs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs elicited by 6 major mediators of the immune response: interferons alpha, beta, omega and gamma, IL12 and TNFalpha; and (2 characterize the transcriptional responses of purified immune cell populations (CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells and monocytes to IFNgamma stimulation. We defined a highly stereotyped response to type I interferons, while responses to IFNgamma and IL12 were largely restricted to a subset of type I interferon-inducible genes. TNFalpha stimulation resulted in a distinct pattern of gene expression. Cell type-specific transcriptional programs were identified, highlighting the pronounced response of monocytes to IFNgamma, and emergent properties associated with IFN-mediated activation of mixed cell populations. This information provides a detailed view of cellular activation by immune mediators, and contributes an interpretive framework for the definition of host immune responses in a variety of disease settings.

  6. Allium sativum L. regulates in vitro IL-17 gene expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutia, Mouna; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Abouelazz, Omar; Elouaddari, Anass; Al Jahid, Abdellah; Elhou, Abdelhalim; Nadifi, Sellama; Jamal Eddine, Jamal; Habti, Norddine; Badou, Abdallah

    2016-09-29

    Allium sativum L. (A.S.) "garlic", one of the most interesting medicinal plants, has been suggested to contain compounds that could be beneficial in numerous pathological situations including cancer. In this work, we aimed to assess the immunomodulatory effect of A.S. preparation on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. Nontoxic doses of A.S. were identified using MTT assay. Effects on CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte proliferation were studied using flow cytometry. The effect of A.S. on cytokine gene expression was studied using qRT-PCR. Finally, qualitative analysis of A.S. was performed by HPLC approach. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA test. The nontoxic doses of A.S. preparation did not affect neither spontaneous nor TCR-mediated CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte proliferation. Interestingly, A.S. exhibited a statistically significant regulation of IL-17 gene expression, a cytokine involved in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In contrast, the expression of IL-4, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was unaffected. Qualitative analysis of A.S. ethanol preparation indicated the presence of three polyphenol bioactive compounds, which are catechin, vanillic acid and ferulic acid. The specific inhibition of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-17 without affecting cell proliferation in human PBMCs by the Allium sativum L. preparation suggests a potential valuable effect of the compounds present in this plant for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer, where IL-17 is highly expressed. The individual contribution of these three compounds to this global effect will be assessed.

  7. Human enterovirus in the gastrocnemius of patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Julian K S; Zhu, Zhen; Casale, George; Koutakis, Panagiotis; McComb, Rodney D; Swanson, Stanley; Thompson, Jonathan; Miserlis, Dimitrios; Johanning, Jason M; Haynatzki, Gleb; Pipinos, Iraklis I

    2013-08-06

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is characterized by myofiber degeneration and loss of function in muscles of the lower limbs. Human enterovirus (HEV) infection has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of muscle diseases. However, its association with PAD has not been studied. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that infectious HEV is present in skeletal muscle of patients with PAD and is associated with severity of disease. Gastrocnemius biopsies from 37 patients with PAD and 14 controls were examined for the presence of HEV RNA, viral capsid protein, viral RNA copy number, and viral infectivity. HEV RNA was detected in 54% of the biopsies from patients with PAD but was not detected in muscle biopsies from control patients. This difference in prevalence among PAD and control patients was significant at P<0.001. Viral RNA copy numbers were increased significantly at the later stages of disease; Fontaine Stage IV (10(5.50) copies/mg muscle wet weight, at P<0.005) and Stage III (10(4.87) copies/mg, at P<0.010) compared to Stage II (10(2.50) copies/mg). Viral replication was confirmed by the presence of the negative-strand of viral RNA in all specimens positive for HEV RNA. Cultures of HeLa and human skeletal muscle cells treated with muscle homogenates showed HEV replication and the presence of HEV capsid protein. Our data identified infectious HEV in the gastrocnemius of PAD patients but not in controls. Viral copy number and prevalence of infection were higher in the later stages of disease. Our data point to the need for further studies to determine the contribution of HEV infection to the pathophysiology of PAD.

  8. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molenaar Douwe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the potential to influence the amounts of cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10 and IL-12 and the ratio of IL-10/IL-12 produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Results A total of 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from diverse environmental and human sources were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate cytokine production in PBMCs. The L. plantarum strains induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 over an average 14-fold range and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 over an average 16-fold range. Comparisons of the strain-specific cytokine responses of PBMCs to comparative genome hybridization profiles obtained with L. plantarum WCFS1 DNA microarrays (also termed gene-trait matching resulted in the identification of 6 candidate genetic loci with immunomodulatory capacities. These loci included genes encoding an N-acetyl-glucosamine/galactosamine phosphotransferase system, the LamBDCA quorum sensing system, and components of the plantaricin (bacteriocin biosynthesis and transport pathway. Deletion of these genes in L. plantarum WCFS1 resulted in growth phase-dependent changes in the PBMC IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine profiles compared with wild-type cells. Conclusions The altered PBMC cytokine profiles obtained with the L. plantarum WCFS1 mutants were in good agreement with the predictions made by gene-trait matching for the 42 L. plantarum strains. This study therefore resulted in the identification of genes present in certain strains of L. plantarum which might be responsible for

  9. Human adipose stromal cells expanded in human serum promote engraftment of human peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells in NOD/SCID mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyun Hwa; Kim, Yeon Jeong; Seo, Su Yeong; Kim, Han Na; Lee, Jae Bong; Kim, Jae Ho; Chung, Joo Seop; Jung, Jin Sup

    2005-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), that have been reported to be present in bone marrow, adipose tissues, dermis, muscles, and peripheral blood, have the potential to differentiate along different lineages including those forming bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, and neuron. Therefore, hMSC are attractive candidates for cell and gene therapy. The optimal conditions for hMSC expansion require medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS). Some forms of cell therapy will involve multiple doses, raising a concern over immunological reactions caused by medium-derived FBS proteins. In this study, we cultured human adipose stromal cells (hADSC) and bone marrow stroma cells (HBMSC) in human serum (HS) during their isolation and expansion, and demonstrated that they maintain their proliferative capacity and ability for multilineage differentiation and promote engraftment of peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) cells mobilized from bone marrow in NOD/SCID mice. Our results indicate that hADSC and hBMSC cultured in HS can be used for clinical trials of cell and gene therapies, including promotion of engraftment after allogeneic HSC transplantation

  10. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmina, Nina S., E-mail: nin-kuzmin@youndex.ru; Lapteva, Nellya Sh.; Rubanovich, Alexander V.

    2016-04-15

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24–77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19–77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2–51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62–11.76, p=3.9×10{sup −7}). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10{sup −5}). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10{sup −7}). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging

  11. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzmina, Nina S.; Lapteva, Nellya Sh.; Rubanovich, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24–77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19–77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2–51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62–11.76, p=3.9×10 −7 ). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10 −5 ). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10 −7 ). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging and/or with

  12. HLA-C is necessary for optimal human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of human peripheral blood CD4 lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Miriam; Matucci, Andrea; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Soprana, Elisa; Rossolillo, Paola; Lopalco, Lucia; Zipeto, Donato; Siccardi, Antonio G; De Santis, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    The hypothesis that open conformers of HLA-C on target cells might directly exert an effect on their infectability by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been suggested previously. This was tested by exploiting the peculiar specificity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) L31 for HLA-C open conformers to show that normal levels of Env-driven fusion were restored in HLA-C transfectants of a major histocompatibility complex-deleted (fusion-incompetent) cell line. The physiological relevance of this finding is now confirmed in this report, where small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology was used to silence HLA-C expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from 11 healthy donors. Infectability by HIV (strains IIIB and Bal and primary isolates) was significantly reduced (P=0.016) in silenced cells compared with cells that maintained HLA-C expression in 10 of the 11 PBL donors. Normal infectability was resumed, together with HLA-C expression, when the effect of siRNA interference waned after several days in culture. Additional confirmation of the HLA-C effect was obtained in several assays employing HLA-C-positive and -negative cell lines, a number of HIV strains and also pseudoviruses. In particular, viruses pseudotyped with env genes from HIV strains AC10 and QH0692.42 were assayed on siRNA-silenced lymphocytes from three healthy donors: the differences in infection with pseudoviruses were even higher than those observed in infections with normal viruses.

  13. Cytokine secretion from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in vitro with metal particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachinho, Sandra C P; Pu, Fanrong; Hunt, John A

    2013-04-01

    The failure of implanted medical devices can be associated with changes in the production of cytokines by cells of the immune system. Cytokines released by peripheral blood mononuclear cells upon contact with metal particles were quantified to understand their role in implantation intergration and their importance as messengers in the recruitment of T-lymphocytes at the implantation site. Opsonization was utilised to understand the influence of serum proteins on particle-induced cytokine production and release. Different metal compositions were used in the particulate format, Titanium (Ti), Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V), and Stainless Steel 316L (SS), and were cultured in vitro with a mixed population of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes. The cells were also exposed to an exogenous stimulant mixture of phytohemagglutinin-P and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and opsonized particles with human serum. Interleukins, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were investigated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as they are an indicator of the inflammation evoked by particulate metals. It has been experimentally evidenced that metal particles induced higher amounts of IL-6 and IL-1 but very low amounts of TNF-α. T-lymphocyte activation was evaluated by the quantification of IL-2 and IFN-γ levels. The results showed that nonopsonized and opsonized metal particles did not induce the release of increased levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Electrical Stimulation to Enhance Axon Regeneration After Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Animal Models and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa

    2016-04-01

    Injured peripheral nerves regenerate their lost axons but functional recovery in humans is frequently disappointing. This is so particularly when injuries require regeneration over long distances and/or over long time periods. Fat replacement of chronically denervated muscles, a commonly accepted explanation, does not account for poor functional recovery. Rather, the basis for the poor nerve regeneration is the transient expression of growth-associated genes that accounts for declining regenerative capacity of neurons and the regenerative support of Schwann cells over time. Brief low-frequency electrical stimulation accelerates motor and sensory axon outgrowth across injury sites that, even after delayed surgical repair of injured nerves in animal models and patients, enhances nerve regeneration and target reinnervation. The stimulation elevates neuronal cyclic adenosine monophosphate and, in turn, the expression of neurotrophic factors and other growth-associated genes, including cytoskeletal proteins. Electrical stimulation of denervated muscles immediately after nerve transection and surgical repair also accelerates muscle reinnervation but, at this time, how the daily requirement of long-duration electrical pulses can be delivered to muscles remains a practical issue prior to translation to patients. Finally, the technique of inserting autologous nerve grafts that bridge between a donor nerve and an adjacent recipient denervated nerve stump significantly improves nerve regeneration after delayed nerve repair, the donor nerves sustaining the capacity of the denervated Schwann cells to support nerve regeneration. These reviewed methods to promote nerve regeneration and, in turn, to enhance functional recovery after nerve injury and surgical repair are sufficiently promising for early translation to the clinic.

  15. Cytological and cytochemical effects of sodium benzoate and gamma irradiation on human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, N.A.F.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro studies of human peripheral lymphocytes were conducted to elucidate and compare the effects of a suspected chemical clastogen, sodium benzoate, widely used in the food industry as an antimicrobial food additive, to that of a well-known physical mutagen, gamma rays. Blood from ten normal donors, five males and five females, was collected and treated with various doses of the two agents independently and in combination during G 0 or G 1 phase. Induction of structural chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and unscheduled DNA synthesis were used as parameters to monitor the effects of the two agents. Sodium benzoate at the same concentrations used in the food industry (0.05% and 0.10%) caused inhibition of mitosis and induced chromatid-type aberrations (gaps and breaks). The frequency of aberrations increased as the concentration of sodium benzoate increased. No increase in SCEs over the control level was observed as either concentration tested. The relative amount of DNA damage inflicted in the treated lymphocytes estimated as 3 H-tritiated thymidine incorporation (unscheduled DNA synthesis) was highly significant. In contrast, blood irradiated with 300, 600, or 900 rad 60 Co gamma rays produced chromatid and chromosome aberrations in cultured lymphocytes, dicentrics being the most frequent exchange event. The aberration yield was found to be dose-dependent and to fit the quadratic model. Unscheduled DNA synthesis as measured by lymphocyte 3 H-TdR incorporation following gamma irradiation was highly significantly increased with the largest uptake occurring during the first hour of incubation. The combined treatment of gamma irradiation plus 0.05% sodium benzoate did not increase the aberration frequencies over the independent irradiation treatments and had no effect on SCEs frequencies

  16. Peripheral and central components of habituation of heat pain perception and evoked potentials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greffrath, Wolfgang; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Treede, Rolf-Detlef

    2007-12-05

    For the neurophysiological examination of nociceptive pathways, contact-heat evoked potentials (contact-heat EPs) are elicited by repetitive brief noxious heat stimuli. Suppression of heat responses in primary nociceptive neurons during repetitive stimulation has been shown in animal models in vivo and in vitro. We now investigated whether heat pain and contact-heat EPs in humans display equivalent signs of habituation. Heat pain and EPs were elicited in 16 volunteers with a contact thermode (30 degrees Cs(-1)). Heat pulses at three intensities (pain threshold, moderate noxious and maximum available) were applied to the right forearm either by moving the thermode after each pulse to variable locations or when fixed to one location (inter-stimulus intervals 8-10s). Contact-heat EPs consisted of an early negativity in temporal leads (N1), followed by a biphasic response at the vertex (N2-P2). Pain ratings and contact-heat EPs (N1 and N2-P2 components) displayed significant temperature dependence. N2-P2 correlated positively with ratings. With stimulation at variable locations, both measures slowly decreased with time constants tau of 2 min (ratings) and 12 min (EPs). With stimulation at a fixed location, habituation was much faster for both, ratings (tau=10s) and EPs (tau=33 s). As a consequence, both measures were significantly reduced (pheat pain perception and contact-heat EPs display signs of rapid habituation when stimulation is restricted to a fixed location and thus, reflect fatigue of peripheral nociceptive neurons. Habituation within the central nervous system is slower and less pronounced.

  17. Allogeneic human dermal fibroblasts are viable in peripheral blood mononuclear co-culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restu Syamsul Hadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Transplanted allogeneic dermal fibroblasts retain stem cell subpopulations, and are easily isolated, expanded and stored using standard techniques. Their potential for regenerative therapy of chronic wounds should be evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine allogeneic fibroblast viability in the presence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Methods In this experimental study, fibroblasts were isolated from foreskin explants, expanded in the presence of serum, and stored using slow-freezing. We used one intervention group of allogeneic fibroblasts co-cultured with PBMC and 2 control groups of separate fibroblast and PBMC cultures.Fibroblasts were characterized by their collagen secretion and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4 expression. Viability was evaluated using water soluble tetrazolium-1 (WST-1 proliferation assay. Absorbances were measured at 450 nm. Data analysis was performed by student’s paired t-test. Results Dermal fibroblasts were shown to secrete collagen, express OCT4, be recoverable after cryopreservation, and become attached to the culture dish in a co-culture with PBMC. Co-cultured and control fibroblasts had no significantly different cell viabilities (p>0.05. Calculated viable cell numbers increased 1.8 and 5.1-fold, respectively, at days 2 and 4 in vitro. Both groups showed comparable doubling times at days 2 and 4 in vitro. PBMC did not interfere with allogeneic fibroblast viability and proliferative capacity Conclusions Allogeneic fibroblasts remain viable and proliferate in the presence of host PBMC. Future research should evaluate allogeneic human dermal fibroblast competency in clinical settings. Dermal fibroblasts are a potential source for cell therapy in chronic wound management.

  18. Nasal insulin changes peripheral insulin sensitivity simultaneously with altered activity in homeostatic and reward-related human brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, M; Kullmann, S; Ketterer, C; Guthoff, M; Linder, K; Wagner, R; Stingl, K T; Veit, R; Staiger, H; Häring, H-U; Preissl, H; Fritsche, A

    2012-06-01

    Impaired insulin sensitivity is a major factor leading to type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that the brain is involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether insulin action in the human brain regulates peripheral insulin sensitivity and examined which brain areas are involved. Insulin and placebo were given intranasally. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide were measured in 103 participants at 0, 30 and 60 min. A subgroup (n = 12) was also studied with functional MRI, and blood sampling at 0, 30 and 120 min. For each time-point, the HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated as an inverse estimate of peripheral insulin sensitivity. Plasma insulin increased and subsequently decreased. This excursion was accompanied by slightly decreased plasma glucose, resulting in an initially increased HOMA-IR. At 1 h after insulin spray, the HOMA-IR subsequently decreased and remained lower up to 120 min. An increase in hypothalamic activity was observed, which correlated with the increased HOMA-IR at 30 min post-spray. Activity in the putamen, right insula and orbitofrontal cortex correlated with the decreased HOMA-IR at 120 min post-spray. Central insulin action in specific brain areas, including the hypothalamus, may time-dependently regulate peripheral insulin sensitivity. This introduces a potential novel mechanism for the regulation of peripheral insulin sensitivity and underlines the importance of cerebral insulin action for the whole organism.

  19. Combustible and non-combustible tobacco product preparations differentially regulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimilli, Subhashini; Damratoski, Brad E; Prasad, G L

    2013-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and T cells play essential roles in innate and adaptive immune responses in protecting against microbial infections and in tumor surveillance. Although evidence suggests that smoking causes immunosuppression, there is limited information whether the use of smokeless tobacco (ST) products affects immune responses. In this study, we assessed the effects of two preparations of cigarette smoke, ST extract and nicotine on T cell and NK cell responses using Toll-like receptor-ligand stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The tobacco product preparations (TPPs) tested included whole smoke conditioned media (WS-CM), total particulate matter (TPM) and a ST product preparation in complete artificial saliva (ST/CAS). The PBMCs were stimulated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). A marked reduction of the expression of intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α was evident in NK cells and T cells treated with WS-CM and TPM. Consistently, attenuation of ligand-induced secretion of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) from PBMCs treated with WS-CM and TPM were observed. While the treatment with TPPs did not alter the expression of the maturation marker CD69, WS-CM and TPM inhibited the cytolytic activity of human PBMCs. Suppression of perforin by WS-CM was also detected. Although interference from the vehicle confounded the interpretation of effects of ST/CAS, some effects were evident only at high concentrations. Nicotine treatment minimally impacted expression of cytokines and cytolytic activity. Data presented herein suggests that the function of NK cells and T cells is influenced by exposure to TPPs (based on equi-nicotine units) in the following order: WS-CM>TPM>ST/CAS. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis put forward by others that chronic smoking leads to immunosuppression, an effect that may contribute to increased microbial infections and cancer incidence among smokers

  20. Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis Are Differentially Recognized by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Martínez-Álvarez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and S. brasiliensis are usually associated to sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis worldwide distributed. Comparative analyses between these two species indicate they contain genetic and physiological differences that are likely to impact the interaction with host cells. Here, we study the composition of the cell wall from conidia, yeast-like cells and germlings of both species and found they contained the same sugar composition. The carbohydrate proportion in the S. schenckii sensu stricto wall was similar across the three cell morphologies, with exception in the chitin content, which was significantly different in the three morphologies. The cell wall from germlings showed lower rhamnose content and higher glucose levels than other cell morphologies. In S. brasiliensis, the wall sugars were constant in the three morphologies, but glucose was lower in yeast-like cells. In S. schenckii sensu stricto cells most of chitin and β1,3-glucan were underneath wall components, but in S. brasiliensis germlings, chitin was exposed at the cell surface, and β1,3-glucan was found in the outer part of the conidia wall. We also compared the ability of these cells to stimulate cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The three S. schenckii sensu stricto morphologies stimulated increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, when compared to S. brasiliensis cells; while the latter, with exception of conidia, stimulated higher IL-10 levels. Dectin-1 was a key receptor for cytokine production during stimulation with the three morphologies of S. schenckii sensu stricto, but dispensable for cytokine production stimulated by S. brasiliensis germlings. TLR2 and TLR4 were also involved in the sensing of Sporothrix cells, with a major role for the former during cytokine stimulation. Mannose receptor had a minor contribution during cytokine stimulation by S. schenckii sensu stricto yeast-like cells and

  1. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). RESULTS/METHODOLOGY: We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease.

  2. Immunocapture and microplate-based activity and quantity measurement of pyruvate dehydrogenase in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Pervez, Hira; Andersen, Lars W; Uber, Amy; Montissol, Sophia; Patel, Parth; Donnino, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Background Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity is altered in many human disorders. Current methods require tissue samples and yield inconsistent results. We describe a modified method for measuring PDH activity from isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results/Methodology We found that PDH activity and quantity can be successfully measured in human PBMCs. Freeze-thaw cycles cannot efficiently disrupt the mitochondrial membrane. Processing time of up to 20 h does not affect PDH activity with proteinase inhibitor addition and a detergent concentration of 3.3% showed maximum yield. Sample protein concentration is correlated to PDH activity and quantity in human PBMCs from healthy subjects. Conclusion Measuring PDH activity from PBMCs is a novel, easy and less invasive way to further understand the role of PDH in human disease. PMID:25826140

  3. The modulating effect of royal jelly consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Rafat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to assess the radioprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study, peripheral blood samples were obtained on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 of the study from six healthy male volunteers taking a 1000 mg RJ capsule orally per day for 14 consecutive days. On each sampling day, all collected whole blood samples were divided into control and irradiated groups which were then exposed to the selected dose of 4 Gy X-ray. Percentage of apoptotic cells (Ap % was evaluated for all samples immediately after irradiation (Ap0 and also after a 24 h postirradiation incubation at 37°C in 5% CO2 (Ap24 by the use of neutral comet assay. Concerning Ap0, collected data demonstrated that the percentage of apoptotic cells in both control and irradiated groups did not significantly change during the study period. However, with respect to Ap24, the percentage of apoptotic cells in irradiated groups gradually reduced during the experiment, according to which a significant decrease was found after 14 days RJ consumption (P = 0.002. In conclusion, the present study revealed the protective role of 14 days RJ consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

  4. Vergence increases the gain of the human angular vestibulo-ocular reflex during peripheral hyposensitivity elicited by cold thermal irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, László T; Lundberg, Yunxia W; Büki, Béla

    2018-01-01

    When viewing a far target, the gain of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is around 1.0, but when viewing a near target there is an increased response. It has been shown that while this convergence-mediated modulation is unaffected by canal plugging and clinically practical transmastoid galvanic stimulation, it is eliminated by a partial peripheral gentamicin lesion. The aim of this study was to determine if convergence increases the gain during peripheral hyposensitivity elicited by cold thermal irrigation. The high frequency VOR gain was measured using video head impulse testing immediately after the cold caloric stimulus in 9 healthy human subjects with the lateral semicircular canals oriented approximately earth-vertical. Before caloric irrigation, near viewing (15 cm) increased the average VOR gain by 28% (from 1 to 1.28). Cold (24°C) water irrigation of the right ear decreased the gain to 0.66 (far viewing) and 0.82 (near viewing) (22% difference). Although vergence also increased the gain for impulses to the left to the same degree before caloric stimulus, the caloric irrigation itself (applied to the right ear) did not influence the gain for contralateral impulses. In our experiments vergence increased the gain of the human angular VOR during peripheral hyposensitivity elicited by cold thermal irrigation. These results suggest that cold irrigation does not abolish the function of the nonlinear/phasic vestibular afferent pathway.

  5. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J., E-mail: tokare@niehs.nih.gov

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  6. Stabilisation of microalgae: Iodine mobilisation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Clarke, William; Pratt, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Mobilisation of iodine during microalgae stabilisation was investigated, with the view of assessing the potential of stabilised microalgae as an iodine-rich fertiliser. An iodine-rich waste microalgae (0.35 ± 0.05 mg I g(-1) VS(added)) was stabilised under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Iodine mobilisation was linearly correlated with carbon emission, indicating iodine was in the form of organoiodine. Comparison between iodine and nitrogen mobilisation relative to carbon emission indicated that these elements were, at least in part, housed separately within the cells. After stabilisation, there were 0.22 ± 0.05 and 0.19 ± 0.01 mg g(-1) VS(added) iodine remaining in the solid in the aerobic and anaerobic processed material respectively, meaning 38 ± 5.0% (aerobic) and 50 ± 8.6% (anaerobic) of the iodine were mobilised, and consequently lost from the material. The iodine content of the stabilised material is comparable to the iodine content of some seaweed fertilisers, and potentially satisfies an efficient I-fertilisation dose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolation, propagation, and titration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from peripheral blood of infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 can be isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and is easily propagated on primary cells in vitro. Here we describe the method for bulk isolation of the HIV-1 quasispecies and a limiting dilution virus isolation protocol by which single coexisting clones can be obtained. In addition,

  8. Human capital in European peripheral regions: brain - drain and brain - gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Franciscus H.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Project goal - The overall goal of the project is to build a legitimate transnational network to transfer ideas and experiences and implement measures to reduce brain drain and foster brain gain while reinforcing the economical and spatial development of peripheral regions in NWE. This means a

  9. Simulation as a tool for developing knowledge mobilisation strategies: Innovative knowledge transfer in youth services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ungar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available While there are excellent models of knowledge mobilisation (KMb that address the opportunity for co-production and sharing of best practice knowledge among human service professionals, it remains unclear whether these models will work in less formal settings like community-based non-government organisations (NGOs where there are fewer resources for KMb. For three days, 65 policy-makers, senior staff of NGOs, mental health professionals, KMb specialists and youth participated in a set of simulation exercises to problem solve how to mobilise knowledge in less formal settings that provide services to children and youth in challenging contexts (CYCC. Based on simulation exercises used in other settings (such as the deployment of international aid workers, participants were first provided with reports synthesising best practice knowledge relevant to their workplaces. They then engaged in an appreciative inquiry process, and were finally tasked with developing innovative strategies for KMb. Observation notes and exit interviews were used to evaluate the process and assess impact. Findings related to the process of the simulation exercises show the technique of simulation to be useful but that it requires effort to keep participants focused on the task of KMb rather than the content of best practices within a focal population. With regard to developing innovative KMb strategies, findings suggest that service providers in less formal community-based services prefer KMb activities that promote one-to-one relationships, including the participation of youth themselves, who can speak to the effectiveness of the interventions they have experienced. Unexpectedly, the use of electronic communication, including social media, was not viewed very positively by participants. These results suggest that the use of simulation to search for innovative KMb strategies and to problem solve around barriers to KMb has the potential to inform new ways of co-producing and

  10. A Playful Multitude? Mobilising and Counter-Mobilising Immaterial Game Labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Dyer-Witheford

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the conceptual grid of "immaterial labour" in the age of Empire, this article is a preliminary portrait of work in the video and computer game development industry, a sector of creative, cognitive labour that exemplifies the allure but also the peril of new media work. Drawing on interviews we conducted with game developers in Canada , we examine the conditions of labour in game studios, this cultural industry's "work as play" ethos, the pleasures and potentialities of game production, the blemishes that mar this attractive vista, and the new infractions these tensions provoke. Confirming that Empire sets in motion potentialities it cannot fully control, we also observe an emergent counter-mobilisation of game labour, whose manifestations range from digital piracy to dissident games produced in the context of activism. These experiments of a playful multitude flow into the wider currents of tactical media, hacktivism, open-source software, and distributed computing that are generating tumults throughout the circuits of Empire.

  11. The uptake kinetics and immunotoxic effects of microcystin-LR in human and chicken peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankoff, Anna; Carmichael, Wayne W.; Grasman, Keith A.; Yuan, Moucun

    2004-01-01

    Microcystin-LR is a cyanobacterial heptapeptide that presents acute and chronic hazards to animal and human health. We investigated the influence of this toxin on human and chicken immune system modulation in vitro. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were treated with microcystin-LR at environmentally relevant doses of 1, 10 and 25 μg/ml for 12, 24, 48, 72 h (for proliferation assay cells were treated for 72 h). T-cell and B-cell proliferation as well as apoptosis and necrosis were determined in human and chicken samples. IL-2 and IL-6 production by human lymphocytes also was measured. In addition, uptake kinetics of microcystin-LR into human and chicken peripheral blood lymphocytes were calculated by Liquid Chromatography (LS) /Mass Spectrometry (MS) analysis. At the highest dose microcystin-LR decreased T-cell proliferation and all doses of microcystin-LR inhibited B-cell proliferation. The frequency of apoptotic and necrotic cells increased in a dose and time-dependent manner. Human lymphocytes responded to stimulation with microcystin-LR by increased production of IL-6 and decreased production of IL-2. Human lymphocytes were able to uptake from 0.014 to 1.663 μg/ml and chicken lymphocytes from 0.035 to 1.733 μg/ml of the microcystin-LR added to the cultures, depending on the treatment time and dose. In conclusion, microcystin-LR acted as an immunomodulator in cytokine production and down-regulated lymphocyte functions by induction of apoptosis and necrosis. However, further studies dealing with the influence of microcystin-LR on expression cytokine genes and transcription factors are necessary to confirm these hypotheses

  12. Ex vivo measurement of calpain activation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by detection of immunoreactive products of calpastatin degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek M Witkowski

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited proteolysis of multiple intracellular proteins by endogenous Ca-dependent cysteine proteases--calpains--is an important regulatory mechanism for cell proliferation, apoptosis etc. Its importance for cellular functions is stressed by existence of endogenous calpain inhibitors--calpastatins. The calpain-calpastatin system within living cells is in a fragile balance, which depends on both partners. The interdependence of calpain--a protease--and calpastatin--an endogenous inhibitor and at the same time a substrate for this enzyme makes any assessment of actual activity of this enzyme in the cells very difficult. In this work we made an attempt to estimate and compare the activity of calpain in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by assessing the levels of limited proteolysis of calpastatin in these cells by western blot, while at the same time the levels of calpain protein inside these cells was measured by flow cytometry. Our results indicate that it is possible to compare (semi-quantitatively the activities of calpain in peripheral blood CD4+ and CD19+ lymphocytes from various donors that way. Preliminary results showed that calpain activity is increased in the CD4+ T cells isolated from peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients as compared to control lymphocytes. Extremely high intrinsic activity of calpain was detected in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CD19+ cells. All this confirms the detection of immunoreactive products of calpastatin as a good maker of endogenous calpain activity.

  13. MAJOR AND LYMPHOCYTE POPULATIONS OF HUMAN PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES AND THEIR REFERENCE VALUES, AS ASSAYED BY MULTI-COLOUR CYTOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Khaidukov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Determination of lymphocyte subpopulations and their phenotypes is an important diagnostic feature, in order to elucidate some disturbances connected with immune system functioning. However, insufficient data are obtained when analyzing only major populations of peripheral lymphocytes. In order to perform clinical diagnostics, the data about minor lymphocytic populations and activated cellular pools seem to be more pertinent.Studies of peripheral blood cell subpopulations of healthy donors performed in different Russian regions allowed to assess quantitative distribution intervals for both major and minor immune cell subpopulations in humans. The results obtained, as compared with data from literature, provide an evidence for similar reference intervals for main immune cell subpopulations in healthy donors, independent on their habitation area.Present work has resulted into development of algorithms for cytometric studies and generation of certain panels of monoclonal antibodies enabling evaluation of all main lymphocyte subpopulations, as well as their minor subsets participating in emerging immune response. The distribution intervals have been estimated for such minor subpopulations, as B1- and B2-lymphocytes, memory B-cells, γδ- and αβT-cells, regulatory and naїve T-cells, cytotoxic and secretory NK-cell polupations.The results of present study, while been performed with peripheral blood of healthy donors, may provide a basis of reference values when studying subpopulation profile of immune cells.

  14. [Inhibitory effect and mechanism of tofacitinib on the secretion of cytokines by T cells in human peripheral blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kunlun; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Qiongli; Wu, Changyou

    2017-11-01

    Objective To study the inhibitory effect of tofacitinib on the production of cytokines by T cells in human peripheral blood and its mechanism. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified T cells were cultured and stimulated with anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 antibodies in the presence or absence of tofacitinib (0.5 μmol/L). The levels of interferon γ (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in the culture supernatants were detected by ELISA, and the expressions of activated molecules CD69 and CD25 on the surface of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells, the production of cytokines and the phosphorylation of signal transducers and transcriptional activators STAT1, STAT3, STAT4 in T cells were examined by flow cytometry. At the same time, the proliferation and apoptosis of T cells were observed by 5- (and 6-) carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining and the flow cy tometry with annexin V-FITC/PI, respectively. Results Tofacitinib inhibited the production of IFN-γ, TNF-α and the expression of CD25 on T cells from the peripheral blood. In addition, the proliferation and the phosphorylation of STAT1, STAT3, STAT4 by T cells were also depressed. However, tofacitinib had no effect on the secretion of IL-2, the expression of CD69 and the apoptosis of T cells. Conclusion Tofacitinib can inhibit the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α by T cells in the peripheral blood, and its mechanism might be related to the inhibitory effect of tofacitinib on the activation, proliferation and signal transduction in T cells.

  15. Ouabain exacerbates activation-induced cell death in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Esteves Mabel B.; Marques-Santos Luis F.; Affonso-Mitidieri Ottília R.; Rumjanek Vivian M.

    2005-01-01

    Lymphocytes activated by mitogenic lectins display changes in transmembrane potential, an elevation in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations, proliferation and/or activation induced cell death. Low concentrations of ouabain (an inhibitor of Na+,K+-ATPase) suppress mitogen-induced proliferation and increases cell death. To understand the mechanisms involved, a number of parameters were analyzed using fluorescent probes and flow cytometry. The addition of 100nM ouabain to cultures of peripheral b...

  16. Influence of X-ray on the P53 gene in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Wenwei; Cai Ting

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the reliability and safety of varying X-ray dosage. Methods: peripheral lymphocytes of five healthy volunteers were processed by varying X-rays, then detect the P53 gene mutation in 5-9 exons by PCR-SSCP silver staining, investigate the 249 th codon's mutation by PCR-RFLP, through immunohistochemistry staining monitor the abnormal expression of P53 and screen the apoptosis employing the Bio-dUTP terminal labelling technology included by DNA terminal transferase. Results: The frequency of apoptosis represents transparent dose-dependent manner with X-ray. When exposed to X-ray > 50 cGy after 48 h, the apoptosis group has evident difference compared with the control (P 0.05). After treating peripheral lymphocytes with 5-200 cGy X-ray and culturing 96 h, utilizing PCR-SSCP to determine the mutation in 5-9 exons, there was no single strand DNA abnormal migration. PCR-RFLP result indicates no mutation in the hotspot site-249 codon, and there was no obviously abnormal expression of P53 in immunohistochemistry staining. Conclusions: The apoptosis of peripheral lymphocytes is sensitive to the X-ray, and this can be a guideline or model reflecting the body state when exposing to the radiation

  17. Transcription factor fos-related antigen-2 induces progressive peripheral vasculopathy in mice closely resembling human systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Britta; Busch, Nicole; Jüngel, Astrid; Pileckyte, Margarita; Gay, Renate E; Michel, Beat A; Schett, Georg; Gay, Steffen; Distler, Jörg; Distler, Oliver

    2009-12-08

    Microvascular damage is one of the first pathological changes in systemic sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Fos-related antigen-2 (Fra-2), a transcription factor of the activator protein-1 family, in the peripheral vasculopathy of systemic sclerosis and examined the underlying mechanisms. Expression of Fra-2 protein was significantly increased in skin biopsies of systemic sclerosis patients compared with healthy controls, especially in endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Fra-2 transgenic mice developed a severe loss of small blood vessels in the skin that was paralleled by progressive skin fibrosis at 12 weeks of age. The reduction in capillary density was preceded by a significant increase in apoptosis in endothelial cells at week 9 as detected by immunohistochemistry. Similarly, suppression of Fra-2 by small interfering RNA prevented human microvascular endothelial cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis and improved both the number of tubes and the cumulative tube lengths in the tube formation assay. In addition, cell migration in the scratch assay and vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent chemotaxis in a modified Boyden chamber assay were increased after transfection of human microvascular endothelial cells with Fra-2 small interfering RNA, whereas proliferation was not affected. Fra-2 is present in human systemic sclerosis and may contribute to the development of microvasculopathy by inducing endothelial cell apoptosis and by reducing endothelial cell migration and chemotaxis. Fra-2 transgenic mice are a promising preclinical model to study the mechanisms and therapeutic approaches of the peripheral vasculopathy in systemic sclerosis.

  18. Frequency and genetic characterization of V(DD)J recombinants in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briney, Bryan S; Willis, Jordan R; Hicar, Mark D; Thomas, James W; Crowe, James E

    2012-09-01

    Antibody heavy-chain recombination that results in the incorporation of multiple diversity (D) genes, although uncommon, contributes substantially to the diversity of the human antibody repertoire. Such recombination allows the generation of heavy chain complementarity determining region 3 (HCDR3) regions of extreme length and enables junctional regions that, because of the nucleotide bias of N-addition regions, are difficult to produce through normal V(D)J recombination. Although this non-classical recombination process has been observed infrequently, comprehensive analysis of the frequency and genetic characteristics of such events in the human peripheral blood antibody repertoire has not been possible because of the rarity of such recombinants and the limitations of traditional sequencing technologies. Here, through the use of high-throughput sequencing of the normal human peripheral blood antibody repertoire, we analysed the frequency and genetic characteristics of V(DD)J recombinants. We found that these recombinations were present in approximately 1 in 800 circulating B cells, and that the frequency was severely reduced in memory cell subsets. We also found that V(DD)J recombination can occur across the spectrum of diversity genes, indicating that virtually all recombination signal sequences that flank diversity genes are amenable to V(DD)J recombination. Finally, we observed a repertoire bias in the diversity gene repertoire at the upstream (5') position, and discovered that this bias was primarily attributable to the order of diversity genes in the genomic locus. © 2012 The Authors. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Cytokine release from human peripheral blood leucocytes incubated with endotoxin with and without prior infection with influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Smith, H; Sweet, C

    1993-01-01

    Previous work with a neonatal ferret model for human SIDS had indicated that inflammation caused by a combination of influenza virus and bacterial endotoxin may be a cause of human SIDS. To determine whether cytokines may be involved in this inflammatory response, levels of interleukin (IL)-1 beta......, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha were examined, using ELISA assays, in culture supernatants of human peripheral blood leucocytes infected with influenza virus and subsequently incubated with endotoxin. Levels of TNF-alpha were increased compared to cells incubated with virus or endotoxin...... alone. Levels of IL-1 beta were also increased whereas levels of IL-6 were generally not enhanced. Cytokines appeared within 1-2 h of stimulation with virus or endotoxin and increased subsequently to reach maximum titres between 16 and 20 h post treatment. While levels of cytokine were much lower when...

  20. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-...

  1. Mobilising the Micro-Political Voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcilvenny, Paul Bruce

    2017-01-01

    A notable feature of the participatory communication repertoire developed by the Occupy movement is known as the “Human Microphone” or “People’s Mic”, reminiscent of the call-and-response format of action. A collection was made of more than 160 online amateur videos recorded at an Occupy protest...... site or event in which the Human Mic and the disaffiliative “mic check” were used in diverse ways. In 19 separate cases, more than one video recording was independently uploaded of the same event, thus giving a unique insight into the constitution of participation in a collective (and yet potentially...... dissensual) politico-interactional space from disparate technology-mediated spatial positions at the site. Ethnomethodological conversation analysis (EMCA) is used to analyse the social interactional accomplishment and collective organisation of the ‘voice’ of the Human Mic, including its propagation...

  2. Atomic resolution view into the structure–function relationships of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruskamo, Salla [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Yadav, Ravi P. [Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (CSSB-HZI), German Electron Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Sharma, Satyan; Lehtimäki, Mari [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Laulumaa, Saara [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (CSSB-HZI), German Electron Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael [Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, Göttingen (Germany); Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Juffer, André H. [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Kursula, Inari [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (CSSB-HZI), German Electron Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kursula, Petri, E-mail: petri.kursula@oulu.fi [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland); Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (CSSB-HZI), German Electron Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2 has been refined at 0.93 Å resolution. In combination with functional experiments in vitro, in vivo and in silico, the fine details of the structure–function relationships in P2 are emerging. P2 is a fatty acid-binding protein expressed in vertebrate peripheral nerve myelin, where it may function in bilayer stacking and lipid transport. P2 binds to phospholipid membranes through its positively charged surface and a hydrophobic tip, and accommodates fatty acids inside its barrel structure. The structure of human P2 refined at the ultrahigh resolution of 0.93 Å allows detailed structural analyses, including the full organization of an internal hydrogen-bonding network. The orientation of the bound fatty-acid carboxyl group is linked to the protonation states of two coordinating arginine residues. An anion-binding site in the portal region is suggested to be relevant for membrane interactions and conformational changes. When bound to membrane multilayers, P2 has a preferred orientation and is stabilized, and the repeat distance indicates a single layer of P2 between membranes. Simulations show the formation of a double bilayer in the presence of P2, and in cultured cells wild-type P2 induces membrane-domain formation. Here, the most accurate structural and functional view to date on P2, a major component of peripheral nerve myelin, is presented, showing how it can interact with two membranes simultaneously while going through conformational changes at its portal region enabling ligand transfer.

  3. Detection and quantification of live, apoptotic, and necrotic human peripheral lymphocytes by single-laser flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegler, T J; Hyun, W; Yen, T S; Stites, D P

    1995-05-01

    Regulation of peripheral lymphocyte number involves a poorly understood balance between cell renewal and loss. Disrupting this balance leads to a large number of disease states. Methods which allow qualitative and quantitative measurements of cell viability are increasingly valuable to studies directed at revealing the mechanisms underlying apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Here, we have characterized a method using single-laser flow cytometry that differentiates and quantifies the relative number of live, apoptotic, and late-stage apoptotic and necrotic peripheral lymphocytes. Following in vitro gamma irradiation and staining with acridine orange in combination with ethidium bromide, three distinct populations were seen by bivariate analysis of green versus red fluorescence. The identity of each distinct fluorescent population (whether live, apoptotic, or necrotic) was determined by sorting and examination of cellular morphology by electron microscopy. This flow cytometric method is directly compared with the techniques of trypan blue exclusion and DNA fragmentation to quantify cell death following exposure to various doses of in vitro gamma irradiation and postirradiation incubation times. We extend our findings to illustrate the utility of this method beyond analyzing radiation-induced apoptotic peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC); similar fluorescent patterns are shown for radiation- and corticosteroid-treated murine thymocytes, activated human PBMC, and PBMC from human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals. Our results demonstrate that dual-parameter flow cytometric analysis of acridine orange-ethidium bromide-stained lymphocytes is overall a superior method with increased sensitivity, greater accuracy, and decreased subjectivity in comparison with the other methods tested. By using standard laser and filter settings commonly available to flow cytometric laboratories, this method allows rapid measurement of a large number of cells from a

  4. A novel method to generate and culture human mast cells: Peripheral CD34+ stem cell-derived mast cells (PSCMCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmetzer, Oliver; Valentin, Patricia; Smorodchenko, Anna; Domenis, Rossana; Gri, Giorgia; Siebenhaar, Frank; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    The identification and characterization of human mast cell (MC) functions are hindered by the shortage of MC populations suitable for investigation. Here, we present a novel technique for generating large numbers of well differentiated and functional human MCs from peripheral stem cells (=peripheral stem cell-derived MCs, PSCMCs). Innovative and key features of this technique include 1) the use of stem cell concentrates, which are routinely discarded by blood banks, as the source of CD34+ stem cells, 2) cell culture in serum-free medium and 3) the addition of LDL as well as selected cytokines. In contrast to established and published protocols that use CD34+ or CD133+ progenitor cells from full blood, we used a pre-enriched cell population obtained from stem cell concentrates, which yielded up to 10(8) differentiated human MCs per batch after only three weeks of culture starting with 10(6) total CD34+ cells. The total purity on MCs (CD117+, FcεR1+) generated by this method varied between 55 and 90%, of which 4-20% were mature MCs that contain tryptase and chymase and show expression of FcεRI and CD117 in immunohistochemistry. PSCMCs showed robust histamine release in response to stimulation with anti-FcεR1 or IgE/anti-IgE, and increased proliferation and differentiation in response to IL-1β or IFN-γ. Taken together, this new protocol of the generation of large numbers of human MCs provides for an innovative and suitable option to investigate the biology of human MCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rosuvastatin reduces atherosclerotic lesions and promotes progenitor cell mobilisation and recruitment in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Marco R; Humboldt, Tim; Schäfer, Katrin; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2009-07-01

    Statins enhance incorporation of bone marrow-derived cells into experimental neointimal lesions. However, the contribution of progenitor cells to progression of spontaneous atherosclerotic plaques, and the possible modulatory role of statins in this process, remain poorly understood. We compared the effects of rosuvastatin (1 and 10mg/kg BW) and pravastatin (10mg/kg) on progenitor cell mobilisation, recruitment into atherosclerotic plaques, and lesion growth. Statins were administered over 8 weeks to apolipoprotein E knockout mice on atherogenic diet. In addition, mice were lethally irradiated, followed by transplantation of bone marrow from LacZ transgenic mice. Rosuvastatin reduced lesion area and intima-to-media ratio at the brachiocephalic artery compared to vehicle, while both parameters were not significantly altered by pravastatin. Rosuvastatin also augmented endothelialisation (P<0.05) and reduced the smooth muscle cells (SMC) content (P=0.042) of lesions. Numbers of c-kit, sca-1 and flk-1, sca-1 double-positive progenitor cells were significantly increased in rosuvastatin compared to control-treated mice, both in the bone marrow and the peripheral blood. Similarly, the number of spleen-derived acLDL, lectin double-positive progenitor cells (P=0.001) and colony-forming units (P=0.0104) was significantly increased in mice treated with rosuvastatin compared to vehicle alone. In the bone marrow, increased Akt and p42/44 MAP kinase phosphorylation and upregulated SDF1alpha mRNA expression were observed. Importantly, rosuvastatin treatment also increased the plasma levels of c-kit ligand (P=0.003), and the number of c-kit-positive cells within atherosclerotic lesions (P=0.041). Our findings suggest that rosuvastatin reduces the size of atherosclerotic plaques, and this effect appears to involve progenitor cell mobilisation and recruitment into vascular lesions.

  6. Distribution of cyclophilin B-binding sites in the subsets of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, A; Allain, F; Foxwell, B; Spik, G

    1997-08-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB) is a cyclosporin A (CsA)-binding protein, mainly associated with the secretory pathway and released in biological fluids. We have recently demonstrated that both free CyPB and CyPB-CsA complex specifically bind to peripheral blood T lymphocytes and are internalized. These results suggest that CyPB might promote the targeting of the drug into sensitive cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes are subdivided in several populations according to their biological functions and sensitivity to CsA. We have investigated the binding of CyPB to these different subsets using a CyPB derivatized by fluorescein through its single cysteine which retains its binding properties. We have confirmed that only T cells were involved in the interaction with CyPB. The ligand binding was found to be heterogeneously distributed on the different T-cell subsets and surface-bound CyPB was mainly associated with the CD4-positive cells. No significant difference was noted between the CD45RA and CD45RO subsets, demonstrating that CyPB-binding sites were equally distributed between native and memory T cells. CD3 stimulation of T lymphocytes led to a decrease in the CyPB-binding capacity, that may be explained by a down-regulation of the CyPB-receptor expression upon T-cell activation. Finally, we demonstrated that CyPB-receptor-positive cells, isolated on CyPB sulphydryl-coupled affinity matrices, are more sensitive to CyPB-complexed CsA than mixed peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggesting that CyPB potentiates CsA activity through the binding of the complex. Taken together, our results demonstrate that CyPB-binding sites are mainly associated with resting cells of the helper T lymphocyte, and that CyPB might modulate the distribution of CsA through the drug targeting to sensitive cells.

  7. Mobile media, mobility and mobilisation in the current museum field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2017-01-01

    Introducing the concept of a 'mobile museology' to describe how museums are currently set in motion by a confluence of cultural, technological and museological developments, this chapter traces the connections between mobile media and notions of mobility and mobilisation in the museum field....... As illustrated by current examples in the chapter, mobile phones have thus provided an opportunity for both augmenting and transcending the museum space, blurring former boundaries between institutions and their environments. At the same time, technological advances and digitial culture developments have also...... required and inspired museums to become organisationally mobile, and to mobilise collections, audiences and institutions in order to fulfill museum missions. In this perspective, mobile media are thus seen as both catalysts and instruments for current museum developments....

  8. Carbon dioxide triggered metal(loid) mobilisation in a mofette

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beulig, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and geologic storage is a frequently discussed option to reduce atmospheric CO2 concentrations with the long-term risk of leakage from storage sites to overlying aquifers and soils. We chose natural CO2 exhalations, so-called mofettes, in a wetland area in the Czech Republic...... as analogues to follow the fate of metal(loid)s under CO2-saturated conditions. Compared to the reference fluvisol at the study site, mofette soils exhibited lower pH (4.9 ± 0.05) and redox potential (300 ± 40 mV), as well as higher organic carbon contents. Poorly crystalline and crystalline Fe (hydr...... to complexation and/or adsorption to organic carbon and the small amount of Fe (hydr)oxides. A one-month-in-situ mobilisation experiment showed mobilisation of all investigated elements to the aqueous phase suggesting that desorption is the faster and initially dominating process while resorption is a secondary...

  9. Comparison of HPRT mutant frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes of smokers and non-smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivek Kumar, P.R.; Mary Mohankumar, N.; Chatterjee, Indranil; Jeevanram, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    The mutant frequency of hypoxanthine guanine phospho ribosyl transferase (HPRT) has been studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes of six non-smokers and six smokers. The mutant frequency was studied by following a Uniform Operating Protocol (UOP). The mean lymphocyte cloning efficiency of non-smokers and smokers was about 31 %. The mean mutant frequency obtained in smokers showed a marginal increase compared to that of non-smokers, but they were not significantly different (P= 0.1416). This paper discusses the methodology adopted and the results obtained with the preliminary finding. (author)

  10. Association between age and repair of oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We isolated PBMCs from subjects aged 18-83 years, as part of a health survey of the Danish population that focussed on lifestyle factors. The level of DNA repair activity was measured as incisions on potassium bromate-damaged DNA by the comet...... assay. There was an inverse association between age and DNA repair activity with a 0.65% decline in activity per year from age 18 to 83 (95% confidence interval: 0.16-1.14% per year). Univariate regression analysis also indicated inverse associations between DNA repair activity and waist-hip ratio (P...

  11. Anti-Islamic PEGIDA beyond Germany : explaining differences in mobilisation

    OpenAIRE

    BERNTZEN, Lars Erik; WEISSKIRCHER, Manès

    2016-01-01

    First published online: 28 October 2016 The rise of anti-Islamic PEGIDA (Patriotische Europäer gegen die Islamisierung des Abendlandes) is one of the latest sustained episodes of radical right mobilisation in Western Europe outside the electoral arena. This study provides a first comparative analysis of PEGIDA beyond Germany and its core region of Saxony. Combining protest event analysis with online data and network analysis, we identify why PEGIDA mustered low-scale support in some countr...

  12. Habituation of the initial responses to cold water immersion in humans: a central or peripheral mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M J; Eglin, C M; Golden, F S

    1998-10-15

    1. The initial respiratory and cardiac responses to cold water immersion are thought to be responsible for a significant number of open water deaths each year. Previous research has demonstrated that the magnitude of these responses can be reduced by repeated immersions in cold waterwhether the site of habituation is central or peripheral. 2. Two groups of subjects undertook two 3 min head-out immersions in stirred water at 10 C of the right-hand side of the body (R). Between these two immersions (3 whole days) the control group (n = 7) were not exposed to cold water, but the habituation group (n = 8) undertook a further six 3 min head-out immersions in stirred water at 10 C of the left-hand side of the body (L). 3. Repeated L immersions reduced (P immersion a reduction (P < 0.05) in the magnitude of the responses evoked was seen in the habituation group but not in the control group, despite both groups having identical skin temperature profiles. 4. It is concluded that the mechanisms involved in producing habituation of the initial responses are located more centrally than the peripheral receptors.

  13. Comparing and characterizing transient and steady-state tests of the peripheral chemoreflex in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfoh, Jamie R; Tymko, Michael M; Abrosimova, Maria; Boulet, Lindsey M; Foster, Glen E; Bain, Anthony R; Ainslie, Philip N; Steinback, Craig D; Bruce, Christina D; Day, Trevor A

    2016-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? We aimed to characterize the cardiorespiratory and cerebrovascular responses to transient and steady-state tests of the peripheral chemoreflex and to compare the hypoxic ventilatory responses (HVRs) between these tests. What is the main finding and its importance? The cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to transient tests were small in magnitude and short in duration. The steady-state isocapnic hypoxia test elicited a larger HVR than the transient 100% N(2) test, but the response magnitudes were correlated within individuals. The transient test of the HVR elicits fewer systemic effects than steady-state techniques and may have greater experimental utility than previously appreciated. Carotid chemoreceptors detect changes in arterial PO(2) and PCO(2), eliciting a peripheral chemoreflex (PCR). Steady-state (SS) hypoxia tests using dynamic end-tidal forcing (DEF) have been used to assess the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) but may be confounded by concomitant systemic effects. Transient tests of the PCR have also been developed but are not widely used, nor have the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses been characterized. We characterized the cardiorespiratory and cerebrovascular responses to transient tests of the PCR and compared the HVR between transient and SS-DEF tests. We hypothesized that the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to the transient tests would be minimal and that the respiratory responses elicited from the transient and SS-DEF tests would be different in magnitude and not well correlated within individuals. Participants underwent five consecutive trials of two transient tests [three-breath 100% N(2) (TT-N(2)) and a single-breath 13% CO(2), in air] and two 10 min SS-DEF tests [isocapnic (SS-ISO) and poikilocapnic (SS-POI) hypoxia]. In response to the transient tests, heart rate, mean arterial pressure and the middle and posterior cerebral artery blood velocity increased (all P

  14. Sexual dimorphism in hepatic, adipose tissue and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity in obese humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper W. ter Horst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and lipid metabolism differ between men and women, and women tend to have better whole-body or muscle insulin sensitivity. This may be explained, in part, by differences in sex hormones and adipose tissue distribution. Few studies have investigated gender differences in hepatic, adipose tissue and whole-body insulin sensitivity between severely obese men and women. In this study, we aimed to determine the differences in glucose metabolism between severely obese men and women using tissue-specific measurements of insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity was compared between age and body mass index (BMI-matched obese men and women by a two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. Basal endogenous glucose production and insulin sensitivity of the liver, adipose tissue and peripheral tissues were assessed. Liver fat content was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a subset of included subjects. We included 46 obese men and women (age, 48±2 vs 46±2 years, p=0.591; BMI, 41±1 vs 41±1 kg/m2, p=0.832. There was no difference in basal endogenous glucose production (14.4±1.0 vs 15.3±0.5 µmol•kg fat-free mass-1•min-1, p=0.410, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of free fatty acids, 71.6±3.6 vs 76.1±2.6%, p=0.314 or peripheral insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated rate of disappearance of glucose, 26.2±2.1 vs 22.7±1.7 µmol•kg-1•min-1, p=0.211. Obese men were characterized by lower hepatic insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production, 61.7±4.1 vs 72.8±2.5% in men vs women, resp., p=0.028. Finally, these observations could not be explained by differences in liver fat content (men vs women, 16.5±3.1 vs 16.0±2.5%, p=0.913, n=27.We conclude that obese men have lower hepatic, but comparable adipose tissue and peripheral tissue, insulin sensitivity compared to similarly obese women. Hepatic insulin resistance may

  15. Whole thorax irradiation of non-human primates induces persistent nuclear damage and gene expression changes in peripheral blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanaz A Ghandhi

    Full Text Available We investigated the cytogenetic and gene expression responses of peripheral blood cells of non-human primates (NHP, Macaca mulatta that were whole-thorax irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy. In this model, partial irradiation of NHPs in the thoracic region (Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation, WTLI allows the study of late radiation-induced lung injury, while avoiding acute radiation syndromes related to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injury. A transient drop in circulating lymphocytes and platelets was seen by 9 days, followed by elevations in respiratory rate, circulating neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes at 60-100 days, corresponding to computed tomography (CT and histologic evidence of pneumonitis, and elective euthanasia of four animals. To evaluate long-term DNA damage in NHP peripheral blood lymphocytes after 10 Gy WTLI, we used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN assay to measure chromosomal aberrations as post-mitotic micronuclei in blood samples collected up to 8 months after irradiation. Regression analysis showed significant induction of micronuclei in NHP blood cells that persisted with a gradual decline over the 8-month study period, suggesting long-term DNA damage in blood lymphocytes after WTLI. We also report transcriptomic changes in blood up to 30 days after WTLI. We isolated total RNA from peripheral blood at 3 days before and then at 2, 5 and 30 days after irradiation. We identified 1187 transcripts that were significantly changed across the 30-day time course. From changes in gene expression, we identified biological processes related to immune responses, which persisted across the 30-day study. Response to oxygen-containing compounds and bacteria were implicated by gene-expression changes at the earliest day 2 and latest, day 30 time-points. Gene expression changes suggest a persistent altered state of the immune system, specifically response to infection, for at least a month after WTLI.

  16. Whole thorax irradiation of non-human primates induces persistent nuclear damage and gene expression changes in peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandhi, Shanaz A; Turner, Helen C; Shuryak, Igor; Dugan, Gregory O; Bourland, J Daniel; Olson, John D; Tooze, Janet A; Morton, Shad R; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Cline, J Mark; Amundson, Sally A

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the cytogenetic and gene expression responses of peripheral blood cells of non-human primates (NHP, Macaca mulatta) that were whole-thorax irradiated with a single dose of 10 Gy. In this model, partial irradiation of NHPs in the thoracic region (Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation, WTLI) allows the study of late radiation-induced lung injury, while avoiding acute radiation syndromes related to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal injury. A transient drop in circulating lymphocytes and platelets was seen by 9 days, followed by elevations in respiratory rate, circulating neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes at 60-100 days, corresponding to computed tomography (CT) and histologic evidence of pneumonitis, and elective euthanasia of four animals. To evaluate long-term DNA damage in NHP peripheral blood lymphocytes after 10 Gy WTLI, we used the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay to measure chromosomal aberrations as post-mitotic micronuclei in blood samples collected up to 8 months after irradiation. Regression analysis showed significant induction of micronuclei in NHP blood cells that persisted with a gradual decline over the 8-month study period, suggesting long-term DNA damage in blood lymphocytes after WTLI. We also report transcriptomic changes in blood up to 30 days after WTLI. We isolated total RNA from peripheral blood at 3 days before and then at 2, 5 and 30 days after irradiation. We identified 1187 transcripts that were significantly changed across the 30-day time course. From changes in gene expression, we identified biological processes related to immune responses, which persisted across the 30-day study. Response to oxygen-containing compounds and bacteria were implicated by gene-expression changes at the earliest day 2 and latest, day 30 time-points. Gene expression changes suggest a persistent altered state of the immune system, specifically response to infection, for at least a month after WTLI.

  17. Permeability transition in human mitochondria persists in the absence of peripheral stalk subunits of ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiuya; Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2017-08-22

    The opening of a nonspecific channel, known as the permeability transition pore (PTP), in the inner membranes of mitochondria can be triggered by calcium ions, leading to swelling of the organelle, disruption of the inner membrane and ATP synthesis, and cell death. Pore opening can be inhibited by cyclosporin A mediated via cyclophilin D. It has been proposed that the pore is associated with the dimeric ATP synthase and the oligomycin sensitivity conferral protein (OSCP), a component of the enzyme's peripheral stalk, provides the site at which cyclophilin D interacts. Subunit b contributes a central α-helical structure to the peripheral stalk, extending from near the top of the enzyme's catalytic domain and crossing the membrane domain of the enzyme via two α-helices. We investigated the possible involvement of the subunit b and the OSCP in the PTP by generating clonal cells, HAP1-Δb and HAP1-ΔOSCP, lacking the membrane domain of subunit b or the OSCP, respectively, in which the corresponding genes, ATP5F1 and ATP5O , had been disrupted. Both cell lines preserve the characteristic properties of the PTP; therefore, the membrane domain of subunit b does not contribute to the PTP, and the OSCP does not provide the site of interaction with cyclophilin D. The membrane subunits ATP6, ATP8, and subunit c have been eliminated previously from possible participation in the PTP; thus, the only subunits of ATP synthase that could participate in pore formation are e, f, g, diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues (DAPIT), and the 6.8-kDa proteolipid.

  18. The miRNA and mRNA Signatures of Peripheral Blood Cells in Humans Infected with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiths Lueong

    Full Text Available Simple, reliable tools for diagnosis of human African Trypanosomiases could ease field surveillance and enhance patient care. In particular, current methods to distinguish patients with (stage II and without (stage I brain involvement require samples of cerebrospinal fluid. We describe here an exploratory study to find out whether miRNAs from peripheral blood leukocytes might be useful in diagnosis of human trypanosomiasis, or for determining the stage of the disease. Using microarrays, we measured miRNAs in samples from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense-infected patients (9 stage I, 10 stage II, 8 seronegative parasite-negative controls and 12 seropositive, but parasite-negative subjects. 8 miRNAs (out of 1205 tested showed significantly lower expression in patients than in seronegative, parasite-negative controls, and 1 showed increased expression. There were no clear differences in miRNAs between patients in different disease stages. The miRNA profiles could not distinguish seropositive, but parasitologically negative samples from controls and results within this group did not correlate with those from the trypanolysis test. Some of the regulated miRNAs, or their predicted mRNA targets, were previously reported changed during other infectious diseases or cancer. We conclude that the changes in miRNA profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes in human African trypanosomiasis are related to immune activation or inflammation, are probably disease-non-specific, and cannot be used to determine the disease stage. The approach has little promise for diagnostics but might yield information about disease pathology.

  19. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, E.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ali-Ghanbari, A.; Sharifzadeh, S.; Ranjbaran, R.; Mostafavi-pour, Z.; Zal, F.; Haghani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old). Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results Our results showed significant increase in  ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated. PMID:26396966

  20. Expression of the Kynurenine Pathway in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells: Implications for Inflammatory and Neurodegenerative Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Simon P; Franco, Nunzio F; Varney, Bianca; Sundaram, Gayathri; Brown, David A; de Bie, Josien; Lim, Chai K; Guillemin, Gilles J; Brew, Bruce J

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway is a fundamental mechanism of immunosuppression and peripheral tolerance. It is increasingly recognized as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory, neurodegenerative and malignant disorders. However, the temporal dynamics of kynurenine pathway activation and metabolite production in human immune cells is currently unknown. Here we report the novel use of flow cytometry, combined with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, to sensitively quantify the intracellular expression of three key kynurenine pathway enzymes and the main kynurenine pathway metabolites in a time-course study. This is the first study to show that up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), kynurenine 3-monoxygenase (KMO) and quinolinate phosphoribosyltransferase (QPRT) is lacking in lymphocytes treated with interferon gamma. In contrast, peripheral monocytes showed a significant elevation of kynurenine pathway enzymes and metabolites when treated with interferon gamma. Expression of IDO-1, KMO and QPRT correlated significantly with activation of the kynurenine pathway (kynurenine:tryptophan ratio), quinolinic acid concentration and production of the monocyte derived, pro-inflammatory immune response marker: neopterin. Our results also describe an original and sensitive methodological approach to quantify kynurenine pathway enzyme expression in cells. This has revealed further insights into the potential role of these enzymes in disease processes.

  1. Natural background radiation induces cytogenetic radioadaptive response more effectively than occupational exposure in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monfared, A.S.; Mozdarani, H.; Amiri, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ramsar, a city in the northern Iran, has the highest level of natural background radiation in the world. It has been clearly shown that low doses of ionising radiation can induce resistance to subsequent higher exposures. This phenomenon is termed radioadaptive response. We have compared induction of cytogenetic radioadaptive response by High Natural Background Radiation (HNBR) in Ramsar and X-ray occupational exposure as conditioning doses in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. 30 healthy control individuals, living in Ramsar but in normal background radiation areas, 15 healthy individuals from Talesh Mahalleh, a region with extraordinary high level of background radiation, and 7 X-ray radiographers working in Ramsar hospital located in normal natural background ionising radiation area were evaluated. Peripheral blood samples were prepared and exposed to challenge dose of 0 and 2 Gy. Lymphocytes were scored using analysis of metaphase, for the presence of chromosomal aberrations. An adaptive response was observed in HNBR and radiation workers groups in comparison with sham controls. A significant increase in adaptive response was observed in the HNBR group if compared with the occupationally exposed group. These findings indicate that both natural background radiation and occupational exposure could induce cytogenetic radioadaptive response and it is more significant regarding to natural background ionising radiation. (author)

  2. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi S.M.J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective: Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method: 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old. Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results: Our results showed significant increase in ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion: The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated.

  3. Effect of early and late mobilisation on split skin graft outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Bernard; Ha, Jennifer; Gurfinkel, Reuven

    2012-02-01

    There is an increasing trend towards early mobilisation post-split skin grafting of the lower limbs. This study was performed to determine if early mobilisation impacts negatively on graft healing and patient morbidity. A retrospective review of 48 cases of lower limb split skin grafts performed by the plastic surgery department at Royal Perth Hospital was undertaken. Patients were stratified into early and late mobilisation groups. No difference in outcome was identified with early mobilisation, but an increased rate of deconditioning with increased length of stay was present with late mobilisation. These results suggest that early mobilisation post-split skin grafting of the lower limb is beneficial to patient care and is associated with lower morbidity. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  4. Cytogenetic comparison of the responses of mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes to 60Co gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kligerman, A.D.; Halperin, E.C.; Erexson, G.L.; Honore, G.; Westbrook-Collins, B.; Allen, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the chromosome damaging effects of 60 Co gamma radiation on mouse and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Either whole blood or isolated and pelleted mononuclear leucocytes (MNLs) were irradiated with a 60 Co unit to yield exposures of 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy. In addition, mice were whole-body irradiated in vivo with the same doses so that an in vitro-in vivo comparison could be made. The results indicate that mouse PBLs irradiated in whole blood, whether in vivo or in vitro, respond similarly to 60 Co gamma rays as measured by dicentric chromosome formation. In addition, mouse and human PBLs showed a similar radiosensitivity, but because the mouse PBL data were best fitted to an exponential function and the human PBL data to a quadratic function, direct comparisons were difficult to make. Pelleted MNLs from mice were much less sensitive to the clastogenic effects of gamma radiation than whole blood. This is believed to be due to hypoxic conditions that developed during irradiation and transport. Human PBLs did not show a marked difference whether irradiated in whole blood or as pelleted MNLs in tissue culture medium

  5. Conversion of adult human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into induced neural stem cell by using episomal vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihe Tang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human neural stem cells (NSCs hold great promise for research and therapy in neural diseases. Many studies have shown direct induction of NSCs from human fibroblasts, which require an invasive skin biopsy and a prolonged period of expansion in cell culture prior to use. Peripheral blood (PB is routinely used in medical diagnoses, and represents a noninvasive and easily accessible source of cells. Here we show direct derivation of NSCs from adult human PB mononuclear cells (PB-MNCs by employing episomal vectors for transgene delivery. These induced NSCs (iNSCs can expand more than 60 passages, can exhibit NSC morphology, gene expression, differentiation potential, and self-renewing capability and can give rise to multiple functional neural subtypes and glial cells in vitro. Furthermore, the iNSCs carry a specific regional identity and have electrophysiological activity upon differentiation. Our findings provide an easily accessible approach for generating human iNSCs which will facilitate disease modeling, drug screening, and possibly regenerative medicine.

  6. Effects of Secondary Metabolites of Permafrost Bacillus sp. on Cytokine Synthesis by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenova, L F; Kolyvanova, S S; Bazhin, A S; Besedin, I M; Mel'nikov, V P

    2017-06-01

    We studied the effects of secondary metabolites of Bacillus sp. isolated from late Neogene permafrost on secretion of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-2, and IFNγ) and antiinflammatory (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It was found that metabolites of Bacillus sp. produced more potent effect on cytokine secretion than mitogen phytohemagglutinin and metabolites of Bacillus cereus, medicinal strain IP5832. Activity of metabolites depended on the temperature of bacteria incubation. "Cold" metabolites of Bacillus sp. (isolated at -5°C) primarily induced Th1-mediated secretion of IFNγ, while "warm" metabolites (obtained at 37°C) induced Th2-mediated secretion of IL-4. The results suggest that Bacillus sp. metabolites are promising material for the development of immunomodulating drugs.

  7. Microculture assay for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and for titration of infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, D H; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1990-04-01

    To define the optimal conditions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection in microcultures, experiments were conducted with different ratios of patient and donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Donor/patient PBMC ratios ranged from 1:1 to 1:125. Optimal results were obtained when 1,500,000 donor cells were cocultured with equal or smaller quantities of patient PBMCs. Thus, virologic endpoints could be achieved by diluting patient cells. Smaller numbers of donor cells, with or without larger numbers of patients cells, resulted in lower rates of HIV isolation. Similarly, the direct stimulation of patient PBMCs with phytohemagglutinin without the addition of normal donor cells lowered the sensitivity of the assay significantly. We suggest that a microculture procedure using a fixed quantity of donor cells with different dilutions of patient cells may be useful for monitoring changing HIV levels during antiviral therapy.

  8. Sensitivity of human peripheral lymphocyte chromosomes to various X-ray doses and subsequent storage in Plexiglass or glass containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Bulanova, M.; Geogieva, I.

    1979-01-01

    A study was performed to determine whether chromosomal aberrations produced in vitro by various X-ray doses in human lymphocytes were affected by post-irradiation storage of the blood in plastic or glass containers. Following X-ray doses of up to 400 R, the yields of cells with aberrations and the incidence of dicentrics, rings, interstitial deletions, symmetrical changes and chromosome fragments increased with dose. After storage of the irradiated lymphocytes in either Plexiglass or glass, the values for exchange aberrations, deletions and aberrant cells were compared. The only statistically significant difference was a slight increase in the percentage of aberrant cells stored in the plastic containers at the 400 R dose level. It was concluded that plastics appear to have a sensitizing effect on the genetic structure of the peripheral lymphocyte and thus the use of this material to store blood in biological dosimetry studies should be discouraged. (U.K.)

  9. Critical Role of Peripheral Vasoconstriction in Fatal Brain Hyperthermia Induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under Conditions That Mimic Human Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Albert H.; Wakabayashi, Ken T.; Baumann, Michael H.; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-01-01

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed “rave” parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22−23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ∼1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues. PMID:24899699

  10. Effects of Platelets on Platelet Concentrate Product on the Activation of Human Peripheral Blood Monocyte Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sadat Razavi Hoseini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Monocytes can interact with platelets due to their surface molecules such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, and form monocyte-platelet complex. In the present study, the effects of platelets interaction of platelet concentrates (PCs and peripheral blood monocytes were investigated in vitro as a model to predict the probable interactions of these cells and consequently activation of monocytes. Methods: In this experimental study, units of whole blood and PCs were prepared from Tehran Blood Transfusion Center. After isolation of monocytes from the whole blood, these cells were treated with PC- derived platelets. The activation of monocytes was assessed before and after treatment by the analysis of the respiratory burst of monocytes using dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR-123. The study data were analyzed using the non-parametric test of Wilcoxon. Results: The purity of monocytes was determined as 86.1±2 using NycoPrep method. The respiratory burst of monocytes was increased after exposure with platelets. In fact, the difference was significant when platelets were used on the 5th day of storage (P=0.001. Conclusions: The study findings revealed that platelets have an efficient capacity to stimulate and activate monocytes. The possible involvement of molecules in the interaction of platelet-monocyte demand to be further studied in future.

  11. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  12. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001, even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures.

  13. Identification of proangiogenic TIE2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) in human peripheral blood and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Mary Anna; De Palma, Michele; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Pucci, Ferdinando; Scielzo, Cristina; Zonari, Erika; Mazzieri, Roberta; Doglioni, Claudio; Naldini, Luigi

    2007-06-15

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, including tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), have been implicated in tumor progression. We recently described a lineage of mouse monocytes characterized by expression of the Tie2 angiopoietin receptor and required for the vascularization and growth of several tumor models. Here, we report that TIE2 expression in human blood identifies a subset of monocytes distinct from classical inflammatory monocytes and comprised within the less abundant "resident" population. These TIE2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) accounted for 2% to 7% of blood mononuclear cells in healthy donors and were distinct from rare circulating endothelial cells and progenitors. In human cancer patients, TEMs were observed in the blood and, intriguingly, within the tumors, where they represented the main monocyte population distinct from TAMs. Conversely, TEMs were hardly detected in nonneoplastic tissues. In vitro, TEMs migrated toward angiopoietin-2, a TIE2 ligand released by activated endothelial cells and angiogenic vessels, suggesting a homing mechanism for TEMs to tumors. Purified human TEMs, but not TEM-depleted monocytes, markedly promoted angiogenesis in xenotransplanted human tumors, suggesting a potentially critical role of TEMs in human cancer progression. Human TEMs may provide a novel, biologically relevant marker of angiogenesis and represent a previously unrecognized target of cancer therapy.

  14. DNA damage and methylation induced by glyphosate in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Reszka, Edyta; Woźniak, Katarzyna; Jabłońska, Ewa; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Bukowska, Bożena

    2017-07-01

    Glyphosate is a very important herbicide that is widely used in the agriculture, and thus the exposure of humans to this substance and its metabolites has been noted. The purpose of this study was to assess DNA damage (determination of single and double strand-breaks by the comet assay) as well as to evaluate DNA methylation (global DNA methylation and methylation of p16 (CDKN2A) and p53 (TP53) promoter regions) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to glyphosate. PBMCs were incubated with the compound studied at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 mM for 24 h. The study has shown that glyphosate induced DNA lesions, which were effectively repaired. However, PBMCs were unable to repair completely DNA damage induced by glyphosate. We also observed a decrease in global DNA methylation level at 0.25 mM of glyphosate. Glyphosate at 0.25 mM and 0.5 mM increased p53 promoter methylation, while it did not induce statistically significant changes in methylation of p16 promoter. To sum up, we have shown for the first time that glyphosate (at high concentrations from 0.5 to 10 mM) may induce DNA damage in leucocytes such as PBMCs and cause DNA methylation in human cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional and Pharmacological Analysis of Cardiomyocytes Differentiated from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Riedel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology have set the stage for routine derivation of patient- and disease-specific human iPSC-cardiomyocyte (CM models for preclinical drug screening and personalized medicine approaches. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs are an advantageous source of somatic cells because they are easily obtained and readily amenable to transduction. Here, we report that the electrophysiological properties and pharmacological responses of PBMC-derived iPSC CM are generally similar to those of iPSC CM derived from other somatic cells, using patch-clamp, calcium transient, and multielectrode array (MEA analyses. Distinct iPSC lines derived from a single patient display similar electrophysiological features and pharmacological responses. Finally, we demonstrate that human iPSC CMs undergo acute changes in calcium-handling properties and gene expression in response to rapid electrical stimulation, laying the foundation for an in-vitro-tachypacing model system for the study of human tachyarrhythmias.

  16. Mobilisation of toxic trace elements under various beach nourishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pit, Iris R.; Dekker, Stefan C.; Kanters, Tobias J.; Wassen, Martin J.; Griffioen, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    To enhance protection and maintain wide beaches for recreation, beaches are replenished with sand: so-called beach nourishments. We compared four sites: two traditional beach nourishments, a mega beach nourishment and a reference without beach nourishment. Two sites contain calcareous-rich sand, whereas the other two sites have calcareous-poor sand. We aimed to understand hydrogeochemical processes to indicate factors critical for the mobility of trace elements at nourishments. We therefore analysed the chemical characteristics of sediment and pore water to ascertain the main drivers that mobilise toxic trace elements. With Dutch Quality Standards for soil and groundwater, the characteristics of sediment and pore water were compared to Target Values (the values at which there is a sustainable soil quality) and Intervention Values (the threshold above which the soil's functions are at risk). The pore water characteristics revealed that Target Values were regularly exceeded, especially for the nourishment sites and mainly for Mo (78%), Ni (24%), Cr (55%), and As (21%); Intervention Values for shallow groundwater were occasionally exceeded for As (2%), Cr (2%) and Zn (2%). The sediment characteristics did not exceed the Target Values and showed that trace elements were mainly present in the fine fraction of <150 μm. The oxidation of sulphide minerals such as pyrite resulted into the elevated concentration for all nourishment sites, especially when an unsaturated zone was present and influence of rainwater was apparent. To prevent trace metal mobility at a mega beach nourishment it is important to retain seawater influences and limit oxidation processes. In this respect, a shoreface nourishment is recommended rather than a mega beach nourishment with a thick unsaturated zone. Consequently, we conclude that whether a site is carbonate-rich or carbonate-poor is unimportant, as the influence of seawater will prevent decalcification, creating a low risk of

  17. Ouabain exacerbates activation-induced cell death in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel B. Esteves

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Lymphocytes activated by mitogenic lectins display changes in transmembrane potential, an elevation in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations, proliferation and/or activation induced cell death. Low concentrations of ouabain (an inhibitor of Na+,K+-ATPase suppress mitogen-induced proliferation and increases cell death. To understand the mechanisms involved, a number of parameters were analyzed using fluorescent probes and flow cytometry. The addition of 100nM ouabain to cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes activated with 5µg/ml phytohemagglutinin (PHA did not modify the increased expression of the Fas receptor or its ligand FasL induced by the mitogen. However, treatment with ouabain potentiated apoptosis induced by an anti-Fas agonist antibody. A synergy between ouabain and PHA was also observed with regard to plasma membrane depolarization. PHA per se did not induce dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential but when cells were also exposed to ouabain a marked depolarization could be observed, and this was a late event. It is possible that the inhibitory effect of ouabain on activated peripheral blood lymphocytes involves the potentiation of some of the steps of the apoptotic process and reflects an exacerbation of the mechanism of activation-induced cell death.Quando linfócitos são ativados por lectinas mitogênicas apresentam mudanças do potencial de membrana, elevação das concentrações citoplasmáticas de cálcio, proliferação e/ou morte celular induzida por ativação (AICD. Concentrações baixas de ouabaína (um inibidor da Na,K-ATPase suprimem a proliferação induzida por mitógenos e aumentam a morte celular. Para entender os mecanismos envolvidos, uma série de parâmetros foram avaliados usando sondas fluorescentes e citometria de fluxo. A adição de 100nM de ouabaína para culturas de linfócitos de sangue periférico ativadas por fitohemaglutinina (PHA não modificou o aumento de expressão do receptor Fas ou de

  18. Optimizing recovery of frozen human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for flow cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Langhoff Hønge

    Full Text Available Live peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs can be frozen and thawed for later analyses by adding and removing a cryoprotectant, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO. Laboratories across the world use various procedures, but published evidence of optimal thawing procedures is scarce.PBMCs were separated from blood collected from healthy Danish blood donors, and stored at -80°C after adding of DMSO. The essential steps in the thawing procedure were modified and performance was evaluated by flow cytometry with respect to the percentage and total yield of viable PMBCs.The best-performing washing medium was Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640 at 37°C with 20% fetal bovine serum. When using 10 mL washing medium in a 15-mL Falcon tube, samples should be centrifuged for at least 10 minutes at 500 g. We failed to detect any differences between the tested methods of mixing PBMCs with washing medium. Likewise, neither the thawing duration nor centrifugation temperature (20°C and 37°C had any effect. PBMCs could be incubated (rested for up to eight hours in a 37°C 5% CO2 incubator without affecting cell counts, but incubating PBMCs for 16 hours significantly decreased viability and recovery. In general, high viability was not necessarily associated with high recovery.Changing the thawing procedure significantly impacted PBMC viability and live cell recovery. Evaluating both viability and live PBMC recovery are necessary to evaluate method performance. Investigation of differential loss of PBMC subtypes and phenotypic changes during thawing and incubation requires further evaluation.

  19. Human psychophysics and rodent spinal neurones exhibit peripheral and central mechanisms of inflammatory pain in the UVB and UVB heat rekindling models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jessica; Sikandar, Shafaq; McMahon, Stephen B; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Translational research is key to bridging the gaps between preclinical findings and the patients, and a translational model of inflammatory pain will ideally induce both peripheral and central sensitisation, more effectively mimicking clinical pathophysiology in some chronic inflammatory conditions. We conducted a parallel investigation of two models of inflammatory pain, using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alone and UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. We used rodent electrophysiology and human quantitative sensory testing to characterise nociceptive processing in the peripheral and central nervous systems in both models. In both species, UVB irradiation produces peripheral sensitisation measured as augmented evoked activity of rat dorsal horn neurones and increased perceptual responses of human subjects to mechanical and thermal stimuli. In both species, UVB with heat rekindling produces central sensitisation. UVB irradiation alone and UVB with heat rekindling are translational models of inflammation that produce peripheral and central sensitisation, respectively. The predictive value of laboratory models for human pain processing is crucial for improving translational research. The discrepancy between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain is an important consideration for drug targets, and here we describe two models of inflammatory pain that involve ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, which can employ peripheral and central sensitisation to produce mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats and humans. We use electrophysiology in rats to measure the mechanically- and thermally-evoked activity of rat spinal neurones and quantitative sensory testing to assess human psychophysical responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation in a model of UVB irradiation and in a model of UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. Our results demonstrate peripheral sensitisation in both species driven by UVB irradiation, with a clear mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of

  20. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, Saskia; Meijerink, Marjolein; Molenaar, Douwe; Bron, Peter A.; de Vos, Paul; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Wells, Jerry M.; Marco, Maria L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic

  1. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  2. Effects of blood transportation on human peripheral mononuclear cell yield, phenotype and function: implications for immune cell biobanking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Posevitz-Fejfár

    Full Text Available Human biospecimen collection, processing and preservation are rapidly emerging subjects providing essential support to clinical as well as basic researchers. Unlike collection of other biospecimens (e.g. DNA and serum, biobanking of viable immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and/or isolated immune cell subsets is still in its infancy. While certain aspects of processing and freezing conditions have been studied in the past years, little is known about the effect of blood transportation on immune cell survival, phenotype and specific functions. However, especially for multicentric and cooperative projects it is vital to precisely know those effects. In this study we investigated the effect of blood shipping and pre-processing delay on immune cell phenotype and function both on cellular and subcellular levels. Peripheral blood was collected from healthy volunteers (n = 9: at a distal location (shipped overnight and in the central laboratory (processed immediately. PBMC were processed in the central laboratory and analyzed post-cryopreservation. We analyzed yield, major immune subset distribution, proliferative capacity of T cells, cytokine pattern and T-cell receptor signal transduction. Results show that overnight transportation of blood samples does not globally compromise T- cell subsets as they largely retain their phenotype and proliferative capacity. However, NK and B cell frequencies, the production of certain PBMC-derived cytokines and IL-6 mediated cytokine signaling pathway are altered due to transportation. Various control experiments have been carried out to compare issues related to shipping versus pre-processing delay on site. Our results suggest the implementation of appropriate controls when using multicenter logistics for blood transportation aiming at subsequent isolation of viable immune cells, e.g. in multicenter clinical trials or studies analyzing immune cells/subsets. One important conclusion might

  3. Development of methods to examine the effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zussman, Lisa Ann

    In vitro methods to study the effect of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on leukocyte function using human peripheral blood were developed. These methods were demonstrated using the blood of 1-5 individuals and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) urban PM #1648, diesel PM #1650, silica PM, and a locally collected PM sample (New Jersey PM10). For the blood samples analyzed in this study NIST urban PM and New Jersey PM10 treatment mediated the release of granule contents from peripheral blood leukocytes and induced structural changes associated with degranulation. Flow cytometry revealed PM-induced changes in phagocytosis and cell structure associated with degranulation. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed NIST urban PM-induced cell structure changes were associated with PM internalization. Colorametric and electrophoretic methods showed no PM-induced release of primary granules and a slight PM-induced release of secondary granules associated with only NIST urban PM. Enzyme Immunosorbent Assays detected increased histamine release from basophils treated with NIST urban PM, a locally collected PM, and the soluble and insoluble components of these particles. NIST urban PM was found to be a potent inducer of histamine release in 4 out of 6 individuals tested. Fractionation studies revealed that soluble (aqueous) and insoluble fractions of NIST urban PM contain histamine-releasing activity. This was also demonstrated for the New Jersey PM10 sample for which the soluble fraction exhibited the most activity. Complementary studies with inhibitors of IgE-mediated histamine release conducted on one test subject suggest that PM-induced histamine release was partially mediated by IgE. A new hypothesis has been formed, suggesting that particle toxicity is related to PM-induced histamine release. Due to the bioactive nature of histamine and its association with many cardiopulmonary responses, the PM- mediated release of histamine should be investigated

  4. Generation of human iPSC line GRX-MCiPS4F-A2 from adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with Spanish genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Cabrera

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have generated iPSCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of a healthy man using heat sensitive and non-integrative Sendai virus containing Sox2, Oct3/4, c-Myc and Klf4. Human GRX-MCiPS4F-A2 cell line was established and characterized through this study.

  5. Human Flt3L generates dendritic cells from canine peripheral blood precursors: implications for a dog glioma clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Xiong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and carries a dismal prognosis. We have developed a conditional cytotoxic/immunotherapeutic approach using adenoviral vectors (Ads encoding the immunostimulatory cytokine, human soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (hsFlt3L and the conditional cytotoxic molecule, i.e., Herpes Simplex Type 1- thymide kinase (TK. This therapy triggers an anti-tumor immune response that leads to tumor regression and anti-tumor immunological memory in intracranial rodent cancer models. We aim to test the efficacy of this immunotherapy in dogs bearing spontaneous GBM. In view of the controversy regarding the effect of human cytokines on dog immune cells, and considering that the efficacy of this treatment depends on hsFlt3L-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs, in the present work we tested the ability of Ad-encoded hsFlt3L to generate DCs from dog peripheral blood and compared its effects with canine IL-4 and GM-CSF.Our results demonstrate that hsFlT3L expressed form an Ad vector, generated DCs from peripheral blood cultures with very similar morphological and phenotypic characteristics to canine IL-4 and GM-CSF-cultured DCs. These include phagocytic activity and expression of CD11c, MHCII, CD80 and CD14. Maturation of DCs cultured under both conditions resulted in increased secretion of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. Importantly, hsFlt3L-derived antigen presenting cells showed allostimulatory potential highlighting their ability to present antigen to T cells and elicit their proliferation.These results demonstrate that hsFlt3L induces the proliferation of canine DCs and support its use in upcoming clinical trials for canine GBM. Our data further support the translation of hsFlt3L to be used for dendritic cells' vaccination and gene therapeutic approaches from rodent models to canine patients and its future implementation in human clinical trials.

  6. Political Participation Online: The Replacement and the Mobilisation Hypotheses Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Linaa

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the state of political participation online more than ten years after the Internet’s great popular breakthrough as an everyday medium. Denmark is used as a case study to critically re-examine the frequently discussed replacement and mobilisation hypotheses on behalf of the ...... participation, efficacy and social capital seem to have less impact on online political participation. In the end, these findings are related to more overall discussions on the democratising potential of the Internet.......This article discusses the state of political participation online more than ten years after the Internet’s great popular breakthrough as an everyday medium. Denmark is used as a case study to critically re-examine the frequently discussed replacement and mobilisation hypotheses on behalf...... of the Internet. The pure replacement hypothesis is rejected. Instead, it is found that the Internet still supplements rather than replaces other media, even among heavy Internet users. The Internet is one among several media used by ‘media omnivores’, and political participation online supplements rather than...

  7. Distributed leadership to mobilise capacity for accreditation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, David; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Pawsey, Marjorie; Johnson, Brian; Robinson, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Inquiries into healthcare organisations have highlighted organisational or system failure, attributed to poor responses to early warning signs. One response, and challenge, is for professionals and academics to build capacity for quality and safety research to provide evidence for improved systems. However, such collaborations and capacity building do not occur easily as there are many stakeholders. Leadership is necessary to unite differences into a common goal. The lessons learned and principles arising from the experience of providing distributed leadership to mobilise capacity for quality and safety research when researching health care accreditation in Australia are presented. A case study structured by temporal bracketing that presents a narrative account of multi-stakeholder perspectives. Data are collected using in-depth informal interviews with key informants and ethno-document analysis. Distributed leadership enabled a collaborative research partnership to be realised. The leadership harnessed the relative strengths of partners and accounted for, and balanced, the interests of stakeholder participants involved. Across three phases, leadership and the research partnership was enacted: identifying partnerships, bottom-up engagement and enacting the research collaboration. Two principles to maximise opportunities to mobilise capacity for quality and safety research have been identified. First, successful collaborations, particularly multi-faceted inter-related partnerships, require distributed leadership. Second, the leadership-stakeholder enactment can promote reciprocity so that the collaboration becomes mutually reinforcing and beneficial to partners. The paper addresses the need to understand the practice and challenges of distributed leadership and how to replicate positive practices to implement patient safety research.

  8. Nocturnal variations in peripheral blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and heart rate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, J H; Kastrup, J; Christensen, H

    1991-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage uni.......0001). The synchronism of the nocturnal subcutaneous hyperemia and the decrease in systemic mean arterial blood pressure point to a common, possibly central nervous or humoral, eliciting mechanism.......Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow rate, together with systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate under ambulatory conditions, was measured in the lower legs of 15 normal human subjects for 12-20 h. The 133Xe-washout technique, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors, and a portable data storage unit...

  9. Manufacture of endothelial colony-forming progenitor cells from steady-state peripheral blood leukapheresis using pooled human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Georg; Fleck, Erika; Elser, Stefanie; Hermanutz-Klein, Ursula; Waidmann, Marc; Northoff, Hinnak; Seifried, Erhard; Schäfer, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Endothelial colony-forming progenitor cells (ECFCs) are promising candidates for cell therapies. However, ECFC translation to the clinic requires optimized isolation and manufacture technologies according to good manufacturing practice (GMP). ECFCs were manufactured from steady-state peripheral blood (PB) leukapheresis (11 donors), using GMP-compliant technologies including pooled human platelet (PLT) lysate, and compared to human umbilical cord endothelial cells, human aortic endothelial cells, and human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. Specific variables assessed were growth kinetics, phenotype, trophic factors production, stimulation of tube formation, and Dil-AcLDL uptake. ECFCs could be isolated from PB leukapheresis units with mean processed volume of 5411 mL and mean white blood cell (WBC) concentration factor of 8.74. The mean frequency was 1.44 × 10 -8 ECFCs per WBC, corresponding to a mean of 177.8 ECFCs per apheresis unit. Expandable for up to 12 cumulative population doublings, calculated projection showed that approximately 730 × 10 3 ECFCs could be manufactured from 1 apheresis unit. ECFCs produced epidermal growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, PLT-derived growth factor-B, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, featured high potential for capillary-like tubes formation, and showed no telomerase activity. They were characterized by CD29, CD31, CD44, CD105, CD117, CD133, CD144, CD146, and VEGF-R2 expression, with the most common subpopulation CD34+CD117-CD133-. Compared to controls, ECFCs featured greater Dil-AcLDL uptake and higher expression of CD29, CD31, CD34, CD44, CD144, and VEGF-R2. Here we show that isolation of ECFCs with proangiogenic profile from steady-state PB leukapheresis is feasible, marking a first step toward ECFC product manufacture according to GMP. © 2018 AABB.

  10. Individual differences in the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells detected in steady-state human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriya, Asami; Takahashi, Kenji; Kashiwakura, Ikuo; Inanami, Osamu; Kuwabara, Mikinori; Miura, Toshiaki; Abe, Yoshinao

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the individual differences in radiosensitivity of lineage-committed myeloid hematopoietic progenitors, colony-forming cells (CFC), detected in steady-state human peripheral blood (PB). Mononuclear cells were prepared from the buffy-coat of 30 individuals PB, and were assayed for CFC by semi-solid culture supplemented with cytokines. X irradiation was performed in the range of 0.5-4 Gy at a dose rate of about 80 cGy/min. The mean number of hematopoietic progenitor cells is 5866±3408 in 1 ml of buffy-coat, suggesting that the erythroid progenitor cells are the major population. The total CFC radiosensitivity parameter D 0 and n value are 1.18±0.24 and 1.89±0.98, respectively. Using a linear regression analysis, a statistically significant correlation is observed between the D 0 value and the surviving fraction at 4 Gy (r=0.611 p 0 parameter and the level of antioxidants, plasma uric acid, plasma bilirubin, and intracellular glutathione. The present study demonstrates that there are large individual differences in the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells as detected in steady-state human PB. These differences demonstrate almost no correlation with plasma or intracellular antioxidants. The prediction of individual differences in radiosensitivity of CFC can only be measured by 4 Gy irradiation. (author)

  11. The potential of electrical stimulation to promote functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury--comparisons between rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, T; Brushart, T M; Amirjani, N; Chan, K M

    2007-01-01

    The declining capacity for injured peripheral nerves to regenerate their axons with time and distance is accounted for, at least in part, by the chronic axotomy of the neurons and Schwann cell denervation prior to target reinnervation. A largely unrecognized site of delay is the surgical suture site where, in rats, 4 weeks is required for all neurons to regenerate their axons across the site. Low frequency stimulation for just 1 h after surgery accelerates this axon crossing in association with upregulation of neurotrophic factors in the neurons. We translated these findings to human patients by examining the number of reinnervated motor units in the median nerve-innervated thenar muscles before and after carpel tunnel release surgery in a randomized controlled trial. Motor unit number estimates (MUNE) in patients with moderate and severe carpal tunnel syndrome were significantly lower than normal. This number increased significantly by 6-8 months after surgery and reached normal values by 12 months in contrast to a non-significant increase in the control unstimulated group. Tests including the Purdue Pegboard Test verified the more rapid functional recovery after stimulation. The data indicate a feasible strategy to promote axonal regeneration in humans that has the potential to improve functional outcomes, especially in combination with strategies to sustain the regenerative capacity of neurons and the support of Schwann cells over distance and time.

  12. Jatropha curcas leaf and bark fractions protect against ultraviolet radiation-B induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundari, J; Selvaraj, R; Rajendra Prasad, N; Elumalai, R

    2013-11-01

    The present study is conducted to investigate the antioxidant potential of Jatropha curcas root bark extract (RB4 fraction) and leaf extract (L1 fraction), and to study their effects on UVB-radiation-induced DNA damage in cultured human blood lymphocytes. In this study, J. curcas showed strong antioxidant property in different free radical scavenging systems. Both the fractions effectively scavenged hydroxyl (OH), superoxide anion (O₂(·-)), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) and 2,2-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radical cation (ABTS(·+)) in a concentration-dependent manner. The IC₅₀ (Inhibitory Concentration 50) values of J. curcas fractions were compared to standard ascorbic acid used in this study. The antioxidant potential of a compound was directly proportional to the photoprotective effect. In this study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) were exposed to UVB-radiation and there was an increase in comet attributes (% tail DNA, tail length, tail movement and Olive tail moment). Jatropha curcas RB4 fraction and L1 fraction treatment before UVB-irradiation significantly decreased the % tail DNA, tail length, tail moment and Olive tail moment in irradiated HPBL. These results suggested that J. curcas exhibited strong antioxidant property and RB4 and L1 fractions protected UVB-radiation-induced DNA damage in HPBL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Two immunosuppressive compounds from the mushroom Rubinoboletus ballouii using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by bioactivity-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Long-Fei; Chan, Ben Chung-Lap; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Han, Quan-Bin; Leung, Ping-Chung; Liu, Ji-Kai; Fung, Kwok-Pui

    2013-10-15

    Rubinoboletus ballouii is an edible mushroom wildly grown in Yunnan province, China. Up till now, little was known about the chemical and biological properties of this mushroom. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of the ethanolic extract of Rubinoboletus ballouii and its fractions on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using bioactivity-guided fractionation. The crude extract of the fruiting bodies of RB was fractionated by high-speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC). Twelve fractions were obtained and the third fraction (Fraction C) exerted the most potent anti-inflammatory activities in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Further fractionation of fraction C led to the isolation of two single compounds which were elucidated as 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one and pistillarin, respectively. The results showed that both 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one and pistillarin exhibited significant immunosuppressive effects on phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs by inhibiting [methyl-(3)H]-thymidine uptake and inflammatory cytokines productions such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-1β. Besides, 1-ribofuranosyl-s-triazin-2(1H)-one was firstly found in natural resources, and pistillarin was also isolated from the family Boletaceae for the first time. They exhibited great potential in developing as anti-inflammatory reagents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Plant polyphenols mobilize nuclear copper in human peripheral lymphocytes leading to oxidatively generated DNA breakage: implications for an anticancer mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamim, Uzma; Hanif, Sarmad; Ullah, M F; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhat, Showket H; Hadi, S M

    2008-08-01

    It was earlier proposed that an important anti-cancer mechanism of plant polyphenols may involve mobilization of endogenous copper ions, possibly chromatin-bound copper and the consequent pro-oxidant action. This paper shows that plant polyphenols are able to mobilize nuclear copper in human lymphocytes, leading to degradation of cellular DNA. A cellular system of lymphocytes isolated from human peripheral blood and comet assay was used for this purpose. Incubation of lymphocytes with neocuproine (a cell membrane permeable copper chelator) inhibited DNA degradation in intact lymphocytes. Bathocuproine, which is unable to permeate through the cell membrane, did not cause such inhibition. This study has further shown that polyphenols are able to degrade DNA in cell nuclei and that such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine as well as bathocuproine (both of which are able to permeate the nuclear pore complex), suggesting that nuclear copper is mobilized in this reaction. Pre-incubation of lymphocyte nuclei with polyphenols indicates that it is capable of traversing the nuclear membrane. This study has also shown that polyphenols generate oxidative stress in lymphocyte nuclei which is inhibited by scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neocuproine. These results indicate that the generation of ROS occurs through mobilization of nuclear copper resulting in oxidatively generated DNA breakage.

  15. Regulation of tumor necrosis factor gene expression by ionizing radiation in human myeloid leukemia cells and peripheral blood monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.L.; Datta, R.; Hallahan, D.E.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that ionizing radiation induces the expression of certain cytokines, such as TNF alpha/cachectin. However, there is presently no available information regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cytokine gene expression by ionizing radiation. In this report, we describe the regulation of the TNF gene by ionizing radiation in human myeloid leukemia cells. The increase in TNF transcripts by x rays was both time- and dose-dependent as determined by Northern blot analysis. Similar findings were obtained in human peripheral blood monocytes. Transcriptional run-on analyses have demonstrated that ionizing radiation stimulates the rate of TNF gene transcription. Furthermore, induction of TNF mRNA was increased in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, ionizing radiation had little effect on the half-life of TNF transcripts. These findings indicate that the increase in TNF mRNA observed after irradiation is regulated by transcriptional mechanisms and suggest that production of this cytokine by myeloid cells may play a role in the pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation

  16. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, or interferon (IFN)-γ on either protein or mRNA levels. The anergic state of CD4+CD25+ T cells is not reversible by the addition of anti-CD28, anti–CTLA-4, anti–transforming growth factor β, or anti–IL-10 antibody. However, the refractory state of CD4+CD25+ T cells was partially reversible by the addition of IL-2 or IL-4. These data demonstrate that human blood contains a resident T cell population with potent regulatory properties. PMID:11390435

  17. Identification of proangiogenic TIE2-expressing monocytes (TEMs) in human peripheral blood and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Venneri, Mary Anna; De Palma, Michele; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Pucci, Ferdinando; Scielzo, Cristina; Zonari, Erika; Mazzieri, Roberta; Doglioni, Claudio; Naldini, Luigi

    2007-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells, including tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), have been implicated in tumor progression. We recently described a lineage of mouse monocytes characterized by expression of the Tie2 angiopoietin receptor and required for the vascularization and growth of several tumor models. Here, we report that TIE2 expression in human blood identifies a subset of monocytes distinct from classical inflammatory monocytes and comprised within the less abundant "resident" popul...

  18. Manipulation and mobilisation for neck pain contrasted against an inactive control or another active treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, Anita; Langevin, Pierre; Burnie, Stephen J.; Bédard-Brochu, Marie-Sophie; Empey, Brian; Dugas, Estelle; Faber-Dobrescu, Michael; Andres, Cristy; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charles H.; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L.; LeBlanc, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation and mobilisation are commonly used to treat neck pain. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, and previously updated in 2010. To assess the effects of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared wiith those of an inactive control or another active treatment on

  19. Time and dose dependent expression in the proteome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishad, S.; Ghosh, Anu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study is to investigate time and dose dependent differential protein expression pattern of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) after acute gamma irradiation. For this purpose, PBMCs extracted from eight healthy individuals were irradiated using 60 Co gamma rays (0.3 Gy and 1 Gy) and compared with sham irradiated controls. Total proteins were extracted 1 and 4 hour post irradiation and analyzed using 2-D gel electrophoresis. A fold change of 1.5 in spot intensity was considered as 'biological significant'. Protein identification was performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The MS/MS spectra were interrogated using Mascot 2.1 for searching against SWISS-PROT database. One-hour post irradiation, 18 proteins showed a significant difference between the sham (0 Gy) and 0.3 Gy irradiated group (6 proteins up-regulated and 12 proteins down-regulated) and 17 proteins between the sham (0 Gy) and 1 Gy irradiated group (9 proteins up-regulated and 8 down-regulated). Four hours after irradiation, 16 proteins were differentially expressed between the sham irradiated and 0.3 Gy treated group (5 proteins up-regulated and 11 proteins downregulated). Relatively high dose of 1 Gy showed modulation of 13 proteins (5 proteins upregulated and 8 proteins down regulated) after 4 hours. There were 15 proteins that were observed both at the early time point of 1-hour and the late time point of 4-hour. Important among these were, proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization like Actin, Plastin-2, Vinculin, PDZ and LIM domain protein, WD repeat containing protein and the chaperone proteins like HSP 90-alpha and Protein disulfide-isomerase A3. Proteins like thiol specific antioxidant peroxiredoxin-6 (indicating increased levels of ROS and oxidative stress) showed dose specific expression while proteins like Ras-related Rap-1b-like protein (involved in cell survival) were observed with both 0.3 Gy and 1 Gy. During the study, human peripheral blood

  20. In vitro expansion of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul [School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Selangor (Malaysia); Rohaya, M. A. W. [Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 50300, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin{sup −}) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin{sup +}) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin{sup −} cell population. The ability of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin{sup +} mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin{sup −} stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however

  1. Identity and Diversity of Human Peripheral Th and T Regulatory Cells Defined by Single-Cell Mass Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunicki, Matthew A; Amaya Hernandez, Laura C; Davis, Kara L; Bacchetta, Rosa; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2018-01-01

    Human CD3 + CD4 + Th cells, FOXP3 + T regulatory (Treg) cells, and T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells are essential for ensuring peripheral immune response and tolerance, but the diversity of Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell subsets has not been fully characterized. Independent functional characterization of human Th1, Th2, Th17, T follicular helper (Tfh), Treg, and Tr1 cells has helped to define unique surface molecules, transcription factors, and signaling profiles for each subset. However, the adequacy of these markers to recapitulate the whole CD3 + CD4 + T cell compartment remains questionable. In this study, we examined CD3 + CD4 + T cell populations by single-cell mass cytometry. We characterize the CD3 + CD4 + Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell populations simultaneously across 23 memory T cell-associated surface and intracellular molecules. High-dimensional analysis identified several new subsets, in addition to the already defined CD3 + CD4 + Th, Treg, and Tr1 cell populations, for a total of 11 Th cell, 4 Treg, and 1 Tr1 cell subsets. Some of these subsets share markers previously thought to be selective for Treg, Th1, Th2, Th17, and Tfh cells, including CD194 (CCR4) + FOXP3 + Treg and CD183 (CXCR3) + T-bet + Th17 cell subsets. Unsupervised clustering displayed a phenotypic organization of CD3 + CD4 + T cells that confirmed their diversity but showed interrelation between the different subsets, including similarity between Th1-Th2-Tfh cell populations and Th17 cells, as well as similarity of Th2 cells with Treg cells. In conclusion, the use of single-cell mass cytometry provides a systems-level characterization of CD3 + CD4 + T cells in healthy human blood, which represents an important baseline reference to investigate abnormalities of different subsets in immune-mediated pathologies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  3. Micronuclei induced by fast neutrons versus 60Co gamma-rays in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vral, A; Verhaegen, F; Thierens, H; De Ridder, L

    1994-03-01

    Here we compared the effectiveness of neutrons ( = 5.5 MeV) versus 60Co gamma-rays in producing micronuclei (MN) in human lymphocytes. To obtain dose-response data, blood samples of six donors were irradiated with doses ranging from 0.1 to 5 Gy for gamma-rays and 0.1-3 Gy for neutrons. A linear dependence of MN yield with dose was found for fast neutrons while for gamma-rays a nonlinear dependence existed. For both radiation qualities no significant interindividual differences were found. Derived relative biological effectiveness values decreased with increasing dose. The MN frequency distributions were overdispersed with respect to the Poisson distribution, with neutrons showing higher dispersion values than with gamma-rays. To compare the repair kinetics of both radiation qualities split-dose experiments were performed. A dose of 4 Gy gamma-rays (3 Gy neutrons) was delivered either as a single exposure or in two equal fractions separated by time intervals ranging from 30 min to 10 h (30 min to 7 h for neutrons). The data showed for gamma-rays a significant decline (30% +/- 10%) in MN yield with interfraction time due to repair of DNA damage. This repair is a continuous process starting almost immediately after the first of the two doses and lasting 3-5 h. For fast neutrons no decline was observed indicating irreparable damage.

  4. Effect of low-dose gamma radiation on HIV replication in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada); Conway, B. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Medicine; Montaner, J.S.G. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Dept. of Medicine]|[Canadian HIV Trials Network, Vancouver (Canada); O`Shaughnessy, M.V. [British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada)]|[British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, British Columbia (Canada). Faculty of Medicine]|[Canadian HIV Trials Network, Vancouver (Canada); Greenstock, C.L. [AECL Research, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada). Radiation Biology and Health Physics Branch

    1996-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that UV light and x-irradiation enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene expression. There are few published data on related effects of {gamma}-radiation. This may be of clinical relevance, as radiotherapy has been used extensively for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated conditions. We have studied the effects of {gamma}-radiation on HIV replication in mono-nuclear cells (MC). These cells were obtained from five seronegative healthy donors, exposed to 0-200 cGy {gamma}-radiation, stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) for 24 h, infected with a laboratory strain of HIV (HTLV-IIIB, multiplicity of infection = 0.001), then carried in culture for 14 days. Overall, when considering p24 antigen levels on days 7 and 11 in cultures established from cells exposed to 50 cGy, the maximal levels were significantly higher than those measured in the parallel control cultures taken as a whole (P < 0.05), with viral replication enhanced as much as 1000-fold in one case. No significant cytotoxicity was observed following exposure to doses up to 50 cGy. The mechanism of the observed effect remains unknown but may relate to direct gene activation and/or free radical generation, leading to such activation. To date, there is no evidence that viral stimulation occurs following therapeutic radiation in a clinical setting. (author).

  5. Dose Assessment using Chromosome Aberration Analyses in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The healthy five donors were recruited to establish the dose-response calibration curve for chromosomal aberrations by ionizing radiation exposure. Our cytogenetic results revealed that the mean frequency of chromosome aberration increased with increasing radiation dose. In this study, dicentric assay and CBMN assay were compared considering the sensitivity and accuracy of dose estimation. Therefore, these chromosome aberration analyses will be the foundation for biological dosimetric analysis with additional research methods such as translocation and PCC assay. The conventional analysis of dicentric chromosomes in HPBL was suggested by Bender and Gooch in 1962. This assay has been for many years, the golden standard and the most specific method for ionizing radiation damage. The dicentric assay technique in HPBL has been shown as the most sensitive biological method and reliable bio-indicator of quantifying the radiation dose. In contrast, the micronucleus assay has advantages over the dicentric assay since it is rapid and requires less specialized expertise, and accordingly it can be applied to monitor a big population. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a suitable method for micronuceli measurement in cultured human as well as mammalian cells. The aim of our study was to establish the dose response curve of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in HPBL by analyzing the frequency of dicentrics and micronuclei.

  6. Effect of low-dose gamma radiation on HIV replication in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.; Conway, B.; O'Shaughnessy, M.V.; Greenstock, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that UV light and x-irradiation enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gene expression. There are few published data on related effects of γ-radiation. This may be of clinical relevance, as radiotherapy has been used extensively for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated conditions. We have studied the effects of γ-radiation on HIV replication in mono-nuclear cells (MC). These cells were obtained from five seronegative healthy donors, exposed to 0-200 cGy γ-radiation, stimulated with phytohemagglutinin-P (PHA-P) for 24 h, infected with a laboratory strain of HIV (HTLV-IIIB, multiplicity of infection = 0.001), then carried in culture for 14 days. Overall, when considering p24 antigen levels on days 7 and 11 in cultures established from cells exposed to 50 cGy, the maximal levels were significantly higher than those measured in the parallel control cultures taken as a whole (P < 0.05), with viral replication enhanced as much as 1000-fold in one case. No significant cytotoxicity was observed following exposure to doses up to 50 cGy. The mechanism of the observed effect remains unknown but may relate to direct gene activation and/or free radical generation, leading to such activation. To date, there is no evidence that viral stimulation occurs following therapeutic radiation in a clinical setting. (author)

  7. Effect of surface modification of silica nanoparticles on toxicity and cellular uptake by human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankoff, Anna; Arabski, Michal; Wegierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Kruszewski, Marcin; Lisowska, Halina; Banasik-Nowak, Anna; Rozga-Wijas, Krystyna; Wojewodzka, Maria; Slomkowski, Stanislaw

    2013-05-01

    Silica nanoparticles have an interesting potential in drug delivery, gene therapy and molecular imaging due to the possibility of tailoring their surface reactivity that can be obtained by surface modification. Despite these potential benefits, there is concern that exposure of humans to certain types of silica nanomaterials may lead to significant adverse health effects. The motivation of this study was to determine the kinetics of cellular binding/uptake of the vinyl- and the aminopropyl/vinyl-modified silica nanoparticles into peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro, to explore their genotoxic and cytotoxic properties and to compare the biological properties of modified silica nanoparticles with those of the unmodified ones. Size of nanoparticles determined by SEM varied from 10 to 50 nm. The average hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential also varied from 176.7 nm (+18.16 mV) [aminopropyl/vinyl-modified] and 235.4 nm (-9.49 mV) [vinyl-modified] to 266.3 (-13.32 mV) [unmodified]. Surface-modified silica particles were internalized by lymphocytes with varying efficiency and expressed no cytotoxic nor genotoxic effects, as determined by various methods (cell viability, apoptosis/necrosis, oxidative DNA damage, chromosome aberrations). However, they affected the proliferation of the lymphocytes as indicated by a decrease in mitotic index value and cell cycle progression. In contrast, unmodified silica nanoparticles exhibited cytotoxic and genotoxic properties at high doses as well as interfered with cell cycle.

  8. Use of γ-H2AX Foci Assay on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes as Sensitive Biomarker of Exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajski, G.; Garaj-Vrhovac, V.; Geric, M.; Filipic, M.; Nunic, J.; Straser, A.; Zegura, B.

    2013-01-01

    In modern medicine, it is impossible to imagine diagnostics and treatments without equipment that emit radiation (X-ray, CT, PET, etc.). At the same time there is a need to minimize the amount of radiation that the patient will gain during such medical examination. In that manner ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle and dosimetry are the bases of assuring patients safety. The induction of gamma phosphorylated H2AX histone is newly developed tool in biodosimetry, which is more sensitive for the detection of radiation caused DNA damage than currently used micronucleus and comet assay. Gamma phosphorylation of H2AX histone is a consequence of DNA double strand breaks and its role is to trigger the DNA repair mechanisms. In this study, we tested the effect of 2 and 4 Gy X-rays on human peripheral blood lymphocytes from two healthy volunteers using γ-H2AX foci assay. The FITC signal from labelled antibodies was monitored using flow cytometry and clearly demonstrated the difference in control samples and irradiated samples. There was also the difference between the exposed blood samples from the two volunteers. The results of present study reveal new sensitive method that is capable of detecting changes in DNA when exposed to different doses of radiation, and thus potentially optimizing the ALARA principle.(author)

  9. Effects of interactive instructional techniques in a web-based peripheral nervous system component for human anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Edwin B; Walls, Richard T; Reilly, Frank D

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of interactive instructional techniques in a web-based peripheral nervous system (PNS) component of a first year medical school human anatomy course. Existing data from 9 years of instruction involving 856 students were used to determine (1) the effect of web-based interactive instructional techniques on written exam item performance and (2) differences between student opinions of the benefit level of five different types of interactive learning objects used. The interactive learning objects included Patient Case studies, review Games, Simulated Interactive Patients (SIP), Flashcards, and unit Quizzes. Exam item analysis scores were found to be significantly higher (p < 0.05) for students receiving the instructional treatment incorporating the web-based interactive learning objects than for students not receiving this treatment. Questionnaires using a five-point Likert scale were analysed to determine student opinion ratings of the interactive learning objects. Students reported favorably on the benefit level of all learning objects. Students rated the benefit level of the Simulated Interactive Patients (SIP) highest, and this rating was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than all other learning objects. This study suggests that web-based interactive instructional techniques improve student exam performance. Students indicated a strong acceptance of Simulated Interactive Patient learning objects.

  10. A comparison of the effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields and gamma ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savova, G.; Stankova, K. [Molecular Radiobiology and Prophylaxis Laboratory, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Kuzmanova, M. [Sofia University „St. Kl. Ohridski”, Faculty of Biology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    The usage of mobile phones increased significantly in the last 15 years. The concerns about the potential negative health effects arise, because of the daily use of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources. EMF, produced by cell phones may affect biological systems by increasing the production of free radicals, and even DNA damage. Other environmental factor, with an impact on humans’ life is the ionizing radiation. The main purpose of this work is to compare the effects of 900-MHz radiofrequency fields and gamma-ionizing radiation (γ-IR) on the levels of free radicals and DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The EMF generated, at a power of 2W used for cell phone applications, led to a significant increase in the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not in persisting DNA damage 2h post-exposure. In contrast, irradiation with 4Gy of gamma rays increased dramatically both - the intracellular ROS and the DNA damage compared to background. (author)

  11. Detection of individual radiosensitivity by radiation–induced micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and polymorphisms in DNA repair genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staynova, A.; Hadjidekova, V.; Popova, L.; Hristova, R. [Radiation Genetics Laboratory, National Centre of Radiobology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Savov, A. [National Genetic Laboratory, University Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    Aim: To investigate the association of two polymorphisms – in XRCC1 gene (Arg399Gln) and in APE1 gene (Asp148Glu) and the radiation induced frequency of micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Material and methods: Genomic DNA from 34 cancer patients and 52 controls were genotyped using PCR–RFLP technique. Micronucleus test (MNT) was performed on 15 cancer patients and 15 controls, before and after in vitro irradiation with 2Gy gamma rays. Results: The data showed that cancer patients had a significantly higher spontaneous frequency of cells with micronuclei than controls (P=0.009). No statistical difference was registered when comparing the mean frequency of cells with micronuclei after in vitro irradiation between these groups. Four subjects were selected as radiosensitive after applying cut–off of the mean frequency of radiation induced micronuclei. Three of them are carriers of the XRCC1 399Gln allele and two of them are carriers of the APE1 148Glu allele. (author)

  12. Effects of folic acid deficiency and MTHFRC677T polymorphisms on cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiayu; Liang Ziqing; Zou Tianning; Wang Xu

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis (APO) and necrosis (NEC) are two different types of cell death occurring in response to cellular stress factors. Cells with DNA damage may undergo APO or NEC. Folate is an essential micronutrient associated with DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) regulates intracellular folate metabolism. Folate deficiency and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms have been shown to be related to DNA damage. To verify the cytotoxic effects of folate deficiency on cells with different MTHFR C677T genotypes, 15 human peripheral lymphocyte cases with different MTHFR C677T genotypes were cultured in folic acid (FA)-deficient and -sufficient media for 9 days. Cytotoxicity was quantified using the frequencies of APO and NEC as endpoints, the nuclear division index (NDI), and the number of viable cells (NVC). These results showed that FA is an important factor in reducing cytotoxicity and increasing cell proliferation. Lymphocytes with the TT genotype proliferated easily under stress and exhibited different responses to FA deficiency than lymphocytes with the CC and CT genotypes. A TT individual may accumulate more cytotoxicity under cytotoxic stress, suggesting that the effects of FA deficiency on cytotoxicity are greater than the effects in individuals with the other MTHFR C677T variants.

  13. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Mingqian; Wang Jiongkun; Cai Jiye; Wu Yangzhe; Wang Xiaoping

    2008-01-01

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4 + T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4 + T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4 + T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4 + T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity

  14. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jones

    Full Text Available Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins.

  15. Nanostructure and force spectroscopy analysis of human peripheral blood CD4+ T cells using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Mingqian; Wang, Jiongkun; Cai, Jiye; Wu, Yangzhe; Wang, Xiaoping

    2008-09-12

    To date, nanoscale imaging of the morphological changes and adhesion force of CD4(+) T cells during in vitro activation remains largely unreported. In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the morphological changes and specific binding forces in resting and activated human peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells. The AFM images revealed that the volume of activated CD4(+) T cells increased and the ultrastructure of these cells also became complex. Using a functionalized AFM tip, the strength of the specific binding force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction was found to be approximately three times that of the unspecific force. The adhesion forces were not randomly distributed over the surface of a single activated CD4(+) T cell, indicated that the CD4 molecules concentrated into nanodomains. The magnitude of the adhesion force of the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction did not change markedly with the activation time. Multiple bonds involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction were measured at different activation times. These results suggest that the adhesion force involved in the CD4 antigen-antibody interaction is highly selective and of high affinity.

  16. Peripheral reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral collisions, that is, collisions involving a small amount of overlap of nuclear matter, are discussed including inclusive interactions, the magnitude of the peripheral cross section, fragmentation, a compilation of experiments and available data, limiting fragmentation, factorization, some models, fragment momentum distributions, and future research directions

  17. Microarray analysis of gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from dioxin-exposed human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Hubbard, Alan E.; Zhao, Xin; Baccarelli, Andrea; Pesatori, Angela C.; Smith, Martyn T.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is classified as a human carcinogen and exerts toxic effects on the skin (chloracne). Effects on reproductive, immunological, and endocrine systems have also been observed in animal models. TCDD acts through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway influencing largely unknown gene networks. An industrial accident in Seveso, Italy in 1976 exposed thousands of people to substantial quantities of TCDD. Twenty years after the exposure, this study examines global gene expression in the mononuclear cells of 26 Seveso female never smokers, with similar age, alcohol consumption, use of medications, and background plasma levels of 22 dioxin congeners unrelated to the Seveso accident. Plasma dioxin levels were still elevated in the exposed subjects. We performed analyses in two different comparison groups. The first included high-exposed study subjects compared with individuals with background TCDD levels (average plasma levels 99.4 and 6.7 ppt, respectively); the second compared subjects who developed chloracne after the accident, and those who did not develop this disease. Overall, we observed a modest alteration of gene expression based on dioxin levels or on chloracne status. In the comparison between high levels and background levels of TCDD, four histone genes were up-regulated and modified expression of HIST1H3H was confirmed by real-time PCR. In the comparison between chloracne case-control subjects, five hemoglobin genes were up-regulated. Pathway analysis revealed two major networks for each comparison, involving cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunological and hematological disease, and other pathways. Further examination of the role of these genes in dioxin induced-toxicity is warranted

  18. Clastogenic interactions of #betta# radiation and caffeine in human peripheral blood cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyes, B.G.; Koval, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine whether the micronucleus test could be used as a rapid assay for mutagenic interactions, we studied the effect of 50-800 R of #betta# radiation in combination with 10 - 6 -10 - 3 M caffeine in cultured human lymphocytes, with two treatment protocols. In one protocol (T 0 ), whole blood was irradiated with 50-800 R of #betta# radiation, then stimulated with PHA and cultured for 72, 96 or 120 h in the presence or absence of caffeine. Under these conditions, #betta# radiation produced micronuclei in proportion to dose but post-treatment with 1 mM caffein significantly decreased the number of micronuclei observed. The effect of caffeine was greater with the higher radiation doses and at earlier fixation times. Caffeine also decreased the mitotic index which, in turn, decreased the number of micronuclei observed; but caffeine post-treatment still had a significant effect even after mitotic activity was taken into account. In a second protocol (T 48 ), PHA-stimulated (actively cycling) cultures were irradiated 48 h after innoculation, then treated with caffeine, and fixed at 72 h post-innoculation (PI). With this protocol #betta# radiation produced more micronuclei than at T 0 ; this suggests that many of the cells damaged at T 0 are either lost or repaired. At T 48 1 mM caffeine significantly increased the number of micronuclei observed after #betta# radiation at all doses except 50 and 200 R. The mitotic index increased after 400-600 R, but only in the absence of caffeine. (orig./AJ)

  19. Inhibition of human peripheral blood lymphocyte function by protoporphyrin and longwave ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, K.E.; Yen, A.; Montisano, D.; Gigli, I.; Bigby, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    Modulation of immunologic effector cells by exogenous photoactive substances has been advanced as an underlying mechanism for the efficacy of various photochemotherapeutic regimens. It is also possible that endogenous photosensitizers, such as protoporphyrin, could similarly modify the function of immune cell types. The authors examined the effects of protoporphyrin plus longwave UV light on the ability of human PBL to proliferate in response to mitogens. Noncytotoxic dosages of protoporphyrin plus UV light suppressed PHA-stimulated proliferation of both PBMC and enriched T cells. CD8 + cells were more sensitive to this inhibitory effect than CD4 + cells. The inhibitory effect was also observed when proliferation was induced by the combination of a phorbol ester and ionomycin. Inhibition of PBMC proliferation was associated with inhibition of IL-2 secretion but proliferation was not restored with exogenous IL-2. Instead, the effect of protoporphyrin plus UV light may be on IL-2R. Cells treated with protoporphyrin and UV light did not display the increase in CD25 and β-chain of the IL-2R induced by PHA in control cells. In contrast to the effects of protoporphyrin and UV light on IL-2 and IL-2R α-chain protein expression, the accumulation of mRNA for these proteins induced by PHA was unaffected. None of the effects of protoporphyrin plus UV light on lymphocytes were observed in control experiments where cells were treated with either protoporphyrin or UV light alone. They conclude that biologically relevant dosages of protoporphyrin and UV light modify the function of circulating lymphocytes. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  20. cis-4-[{sup 18}F]-Fluoro-L-proline fails to detect peripheral tumors in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffels, Gabriele; Pauleit, Dirk [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics-Medicine, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich, FRG (Germany); Haas, Rainer; Kobbe, Guido [Department of Oncology, Hematology, and Clinical Immunology, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, FRG (Germany); Salber, Dagmar [C. and O. Vogt Institute of Brain Research, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, FRG (Germany); Hamacher, Kurt; Coenen, Heinz H. [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics - Nuclear Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich, Juelich, FRG (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics-Medicine, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich, FRG (Germany)], E-mail: k.j.langen@fz-juelich.de

    2008-11-15

    System A amino acid transport is increased in transformed and malignant cells. The amino acid 4-cis[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-proline (cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro) has been shown to be a substrate of the System A amino acid carrier. In this pilot study, we investigated the diagnostic potential of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro in patients with various tumors in comparison with [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Methods: Eight patients (seven females, one male, age range 43-77 years) with large primary, recurrent or metastatic tumors of different histologies were included in this study. One patient had a recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma; two patients, metastatic colon or rectal cancer; one, a metastatic endometrial cancer; one, a multiple myeloma; one, an Ewing sarcoma; one, a metastatic breast cancer and one, a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PET scans of the trunk were acquired at 1 h after intravenous injection of 400 MBq cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro and compared to PET scans with [{sup 18}F]FDG. Results: None of the tumors or metastatic lesions in this series of patients demonstrated relevant uptake of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro. In contrast, all tumors with exception of the multiple myeloma showed an intensive uptake of [{sup 18}F]FDG. The mean standardized uptake value of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro in the tumor or metastases was significantly lower than that of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake (1.7{+-}0.6 vs. 5.7{+-}3.0; n=8; P<.01). Conclusion: Although other System A-specific tracers have shown relevant tumor uptake, cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro fails to detect most types of human tumors. Based on these results, we cannot recommend a further evaluation of this tracer as a tumor-seeking agent.

  1. Mobilisering af barnets potentiale for en bedre fremtid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øland, Trine

    2014-01-01

    to the forming and education of the child, mobilising the child’s potential to secure the future and promote peace and international understanding. This article examines so far unexamined sources, i.e., 89 assessments of children’s book manuscripts from the private archives of Torben Gregersen (1911......Children’s books were one of the scenes where ‘progressive’ professionals - mostly teachers, psychologists and artists - around WWII fought the battle to change society through changed educational thinking. Especially after WWII it was acknowledged that children’s books could contribute...... development and national culture, and literary and aesthetic-artistic elements to a lesser extent. Thus, the article shows that the emergence of ‘progressive’ elements which in research on children’s literature normally are dated to the late 1960s, are not only present in the 1940s and 1950s...

  2. The mobilisation of sediment by demersal otter trawls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, F G; Summerbell, K

    2011-05-01

    The mobilisation of sediment by towed demersal fishing gears has been related to the release of nutrients, benthic infaunal mortality and the resuspension of phytoplankton cysts and copepod eggs. Hence, to understand the broader environmental and ecological implications of demersal fishing, it is important to be able to estimate accurately the amount of sediment put into the water column by towed gears. Experimental trials were carried out in the Moray Firth, Scotland, to measure the quantity of sediment remobilised by trawl gear components. It is demonstrated, for a given sediment type, that there is a relationship between the hydrodynamic drag of the gear element and the mass of sediment entrained behind it. A better understanding of this relationship and the hydrodynamic processes involved will lead to the development of accurate predictive models and aid the design of fishing gears of reduced impact. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to 60Co at single fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Lidia Maria; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de; Leite, M.F.; Goes, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy using gamma rays is a common modality of breast cancer treatment. The aim of this research is to investigate the biological response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to 60 Co irradiation at a single fraction of 10 Gy, 25 Gy and 50 Gy doses at 136,4 cGy.min -1 rate. Cells were irradiated at room temperature by the Theratron 80 radiotherapy system. Biological response was evaluated through cellular viability using MTT assay and nucleus damages visualized by Propidium Iodide assay and electrophoresis agarose gel after gamma irradiation. Nucleus damages induced by 60 Co irradiation were compared to damage caused by cell exposure to 10% methanol. The 50 Gy dose of irradiation did not stimulate nucleus damages at the same level as that affected by 10% methanol induction in the MDAMB-231. Further studies are necessary to understand these mechanisms in the MDAMB-231 human breast carcinoma cell line.(author)

  4. In vitro response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to {sup 60}Co at single fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Lidia Maria; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: lidia.andrade@unifenas.br; Leite, M.F. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Fisiologia e Biofisica; Goes, A.M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia

    2005-10-15

    Radiotherapy using gamma rays is a common modality of breast cancer treatment. The aim of this research is to investigate the biological response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed in vitro to {sup 60} Co irradiation at a single fraction of 10 Gy, 25 Gy and 50 Gy doses at 136,4 cGy.min{sup -1} rate. Cells were irradiated at room temperature by the Theratron 80 radiotherapy system. Biological response was evaluated through cellular viability using MTT assay and nucleus damages visualized by Propidium Iodide assay and electrophoresis agarose gel after gamma irradiation. Nucleus damages induced by {sup 60} Co irradiation were compared to damage caused by cell exposure to 10% methanol. The 50 Gy dose of irradiation did not stimulate nucleus damages at the same level as that affected by 10% methanol induction in the MDAMB-231. Further studies are necessary to understand these mechanisms in the MDAMB-231 human breast carcinoma cell line.(author)

  5. Mobilisation of toxic trace elements under various beach nourishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pit, Iris R; Dekker, Stefan C; Kanters, Tobias J; Wassen, Martin J; Griffioen, Jasper

    2017-12-01

    To enhance protection and maintain wide beaches for recreation, beaches are replenished with sand: so-called beach nourishments. We compared four sites: two traditional beach nourishments, a mega beach nourishment and a reference without beach nourishment. Two sites contain calcareous-rich sand, whereas the other two sites have calcareous-poor sand. We aimed to understand hydrogeochemical processes to indicate factors critical for the mobility of trace elements at nourishments. We therefore analysed the chemical characteristics of sediment and pore water to ascertain the main drivers that mobilise toxic trace elements. With Dutch Quality Standards for soil and groundwater, the characteristics of sediment and pore water were compared to Target Values (the values at which there is a sustainable soil quality) and Intervention Values (the threshold above which the soil's functions are at risk). The pore water characteristics revealed that Target Values were regularly exceeded, especially for the nourishment sites and mainly for Mo (78%), Ni (24%), Cr (55%), and As (21%); Intervention Values for shallow groundwater were occasionally exceeded for As (2%), Cr (2%) and Zn (2%). The sediment characteristics did not exceed the Target Values and showed that trace elements were mainly present in the fine fraction of <150 μm. The oxidation of sulphide minerals such as pyrite resulted into the elevated concentration for all nourishment sites, especially when an unsaturated zone was present and influence of rainwater was apparent. To prevent trace metal mobility at a mega beach nourishment it is important to retain seawater influences and limit oxidation processes. In this respect, a shoreface nourishment is recommended rather than a mega beach nourishment with a thick unsaturated zone. Consequently, we conclude that whether a site is carbonate-rich or carbonate-poor is unimportant, as the influence of seawater will prevent decalcification, creating a low risk of mobilisation

  6. Pregnancy increases mobilisation of lead from maternal skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulson, B.L.

    2000-01-01

    Lead is a neurotoxin that, even at low levels, is considered to result in neurobehavioural disorders such as cognitive deficits, learning disability and behavioural disturbances. The most recent study of Needleman et al. suggested an association between bone lead levels and antisocial and delinquent behaviour (Needleman et al., 1996). Although the neurobehavioural deficits associated with low-level lead exposure are best documented for early childhood exposures, the effects of lead on the developing nervous system are of concern. Lead readily crosses the placenta (Barltrop, 1969; Silbergeld, 1991) and changes in maternal blood lead potentially result in alterations to foetal exposure. Mobilisation of lead from body stores accumulated prior to pregnancy has been established in experimental animals (Buchet, 1977; Keller and Doherty, 1980). The cohort was to consist of 100 immigrants anticipated to provide 20 pregnant subjects who would be compared with two groups of control subjects: a matched immigrant nonpregnant control group and second-generation Australian pregnant controls. The pregnant subject also serves as her own control for a comparison of changes during pregnancy with those prior to conception. High precision lead isotopic compositions and lead concentrations were measured on: maternal blood and urine prenatally, monthly during pregnancy and post-pregnancy for 6 months; infant blood and urine for 6 months; and environmental measures sampled quarterly for 6-day duplicate diet, house dust and water, urban air and petrol. Results of this study confirm that lead is mobilised from skeletal stores at an accelerated rate during pregnancy and transferred to the foetus. This has implications for interpretations of neurobehavioural disorders attributed solely to post-natal exposure

  7. The Peripheral Whole Blood Transcriptome of Acute Pyelonephritis in Human Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Ichchha; Than, Nandor Gabor; Romero, Roberto; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Miranda, Jezid; Tarca, Adi L.; Bhatti, Gaurav; Draghici, Sorin; Yeo, Lami; Mazor, Moshe; Hassan, Sonia S.; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn

    2018-01-01

    Objective Human pregnancy is characterized by activation of the innate immune response and suppression of adaptive immunity. The former is thought to provide protection against infection to the mother, and the latter, tolerance against paternal antigens expressed in fetal cells. Acute pyelonephritis is associated with an increased risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome and sepsis in pregnant (vs. nonpregnant) women. The objective of this study was to describe the gene expression profile (transcriptome) of maternal whole blood in acute pyelonephritis. Method A case-control study was conducted to include pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis (n=15) and women with a normal pregnancy (n=34). Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 arrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA) were used for gene expression profiling. A linear model was used to test the association between the presence of pyelonephritis and gene expression levels while controlling for white blood cell count and gestational age. A fold change of 1.5 was considered significant at a false discovery rate of 0.1. A subset of differentially expressed genes (n=56) was tested with real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (cases, n=19; controls, n=59). Gene ontology and pathway analysis were applied. Results A total of 983 genes were differentially expressed in acute pyelonephritis: 457 were up-regulated and 526 were down-regulated. Significant enrichment of 300 biological processes and 63 molecular functions was found in pyelonephritis. Significantly impacted pathways in pyelonephritis included a) cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction; b) T-cell receptor signaling; c) Jak-STAT signaling; and d) complement and coagulation cascades. Of 56 genes tested by qRT-PCR, 48 (85.7%) had confirmation of differential expression. Conclusion This is the first study of the transcriptomic signature of whole blood in pregnant women with acute pyelonephritis. Acute infection during pregnancy is

  8. Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22 modulates alpha 6 integrin expression in the human endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Jonathan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PMP22, a member of the GAS3 family of tetraspan proteins, is associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Previous studies have shown that PMP22 is expressed in proliferative endometrium, but its function within this tissue is poorly understood. In this study, we first characterized the expression of PMP22 in the human menstrual cycle and began to characterize its function in the endometrium. Methods Using a combination of immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR, we characterized the expression of PMP22 in both proliferative and secretory endometrium. Differences in PMP22 expression between proliferative and secretory endometrium were determined using a Mann-Whitney U test. In order to investigate the influence of PMP22 on α6 integrin expression, cells were created that ectopically overexpressed PMP22 or expressed a siRNA to inhibit its expression. These cells were analyzed for changes in integrins and binding to extracellular matrices. Results In this study, we show that PMP22 expression is higher in proliferative phase than secretory phase. Functionally, we have begun to characterize the functional significance of this expression. Previous studies have suggested a link between PMP22 and α6 integrin, and therefore we asked whether PMP22 could associate or potentially modulate the expression of α6 integrin. Expression of both PMP22 and α6 integrin were detectable in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and we show that both proteins can associate and colocalize with each other. To understand if PMP22 directly altered the expression of a6 integrin, we examined cell lines with modulated levels of the protein. Overexpression of PMP22 was sufficient to increase α6 integrin surface expression with a concominant increase in binding to the extracellular matrix laminin, while a reduction in PMP22 suppressed α6 integrin surface expression. Conclusion These findings suggest a physiologic role for PMP22 on the

  9. Peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) modulates alpha 6 integrin expression in the human endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rajiv G; Sudhakar, Deepthi; Hogue, Claire P; Amici, Stephanie; Gordon, Lynn K; Braun, Jonathan; Notterpek, Lucia; Goodglick, Lee; Wadehra, Madhuri

    2011-04-25

    PMP22, a member of the GAS3 family of tetraspan proteins, is associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Previous studies have shown that PMP22 is expressed in proliferative endometrium, but its function within this tissue is poorly understood. In this study, we first characterized the expression of PMP22 in the human menstrual cycle and began to characterize its function in the endometrium. Using a combination of immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR, we characterized the expression of PMP22 in both proliferative and secretory endometrium. Differences in PMP22 expression between proliferative and secretory endometrium were determined using a Mann-Whitney U test. In order to investigate the influence of PMP22 on α6 integrin expression, cells were created that ectopically overexpressed PMP22 or expressed a siRNA to inhibit its expression. These cells were analyzed for changes in integrins and binding to extracellular matrices. In this study, we show that PMP22 expression is higher in proliferative phase than secretory phase. Functionally, we have begun to characterize the functional significance of this expression. Previous studies have suggested a link between PMP22 and α6 integrin, and therefore we asked whether PMP22 could associate or potentially modulate the expression of α6 integrin. Expression of both PMP22 and α6 integrin were detectable in endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, and we show that both proteins can associate and colocalize with each other. To understand if PMP22 directly altered the expression of a6 integrin, we examined cell lines with modulated levels of the protein. Overexpression of PMP22 was sufficient to increase α6 integrin surface expression with a concominant increase in binding to the extracellular matrix laminin, while a reduction in PMP22 suppressed α6 integrin surface expression. These findings suggest a physiologic role for PMP22 on the expression of α6 integrin. We predict that this may be important for the

  10. Cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells alter their gene expression when challenged with endocrine-disrupting chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wens, B.; De Boever, P.; Verbeke, M.; Hollanders, K.; Schoeters, G.

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have the potential to interfere with the hormonal system and may negatively influence human health. Microarray analysis was used in this study to investigate differential gene expression in human peripheral blood cells (PBMCs) after in vitro exposure to EDCs. PBMCs, isolated from blood samples of four male and four female healthy individuals, were exposed in vitro for 18 h to either a dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB126, 1 μM), a non-dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB153, 10 μM), a brominated flame retardant (BDE47, 10 μM), a perfluorinated alkyl acid (PFOA, 10 μM) or bisphenol (BPA, 10 μM). ANOVA analysis revealed a significant change in the expression of 862 genes as a result of EDC exposure. The gender of the donors did not affect gene expression. Hierarchical cluster analysis created three groups and clustered: (1) PCB126-exposed samples, (2) PCB153 and BDE47, (3) PFOA and BPA. The number of differentially expressed genes varied per compound and ranged from 60 to 192 when using fold change and multiplicity corrected p-value as filtering criteria. Exposure to PCB126 induced the AhR signaling pathway. BDE47 and PCB153 are known to disrupt thyroid metabolism and exposure influenced the expression of the nuclear receptors PPARγ and ESR2, respectively. BPA and PFOA did not induce significant changes in the expression of known nuclear receptors. Overall, each compound produced a unique gene expression signature affecting pathways and GO processes linked to metabolism and inflammation. Twenty-nine genes were significantly altered in expression under all experimental conditions. Six of these genes (HSD11B2, MMP11, ADIPOQ, CEL, DUSP9 and TUB) could be associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, microarray analysis identified that PBMCs altered their gene expression response in vitro when challenged with EDCs. Our screening approach has identified a number of gene candidates that warrant

  11. Correlation analyses revealed global microRNA-mRNA expression associations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Zhu, Jiang; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Xie, Fang-Fei; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Qiu, Ying-Hua; Lin, Xiang; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Neng-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2018-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate gene expression through binding to complementary sites in the 3'-untranslated regions of target mRNAs, which will lead to existence of correlation in expression between miRNA and mRNA. However, the miRNA-mRNA correlation patterns are complex and remain largely unclear yet. To establish the global correlation patterns in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), multiple miRNA-mRNA correlation analyses and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis were conducted in this study. We predicted and achieved 861 miRNA-mRNA pairs (65 miRNAs, 412 mRNAs) using multiple bioinformatics programs, and found global negative miRNA-mRNA correlations in PBMC from all 46 study subjects. Among the 861 pairs of correlations, 19.5% were significant (P correlation network was complex and highlighted key miRNAs/genes in PBMC. Some miRNAs, such as hsa-miR-29a, hsa-miR-148a, regulate a cluster of target genes. Some genes, e.g., TNRC6A, are regulated by multiple miRNAs. The identified genes tend to be enriched in molecular functions of DNA and RNA binding, and biological processes such as protein transport, regulation of translation and chromatin modification. The results provided a global view of the miRNA-mRNA expression correlation profile in human PBMCs, which would facilitate in-depth investigation of biological functions of key miRNAs/mRNAs and better understanding of the pathogenesis underlying PBMC-related diseases.

  12. Peripheral erythrocytes decrease upon specific respiratory challenge with grass pollen allergen in sensitized mice and in human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galateja Jordakieva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Specific hyper-responsiveness towards an allergen and non-specific airway hyperreactivity both impair quality of life in patients with respiratory allergic diseases. We aimed to investigate cellular responses following specific and non-specific airway challenges locally and systemically in i sensitized BALB/c mice challenged with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5, and in ii grass pollen sensitized allergic rhinitis subjects undergoing specific airway challenge in the Vienna Challenge Chamber (VCC. METHODS AND RESULTS: BALB/c mice (n = 20 were intraperitoneally immunized with grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 and afterwards aerosol challenged with either the specific allergen Phl p 5 (n = 10 or the non-specific antigen ovalbumin (OVA (n = 10. A protocol for inducing allergic asthma as well as allergic rhinitis, according to the united airway concept, was used. Both groups of exposed mice showed significantly reduced physical activity after airway challenge. Specific airway challenge further resulted in goblet cell hyperplasia, enhanced mucous secretion, intrapulmonary leukocyte infiltration and lymphoid follicle formation, associated with significant expression of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in splenocytes and also partially in lung tissue. Concerning circulating blood cell dynamics, we observed a significant drop of erythrocyte counts, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in both mouse groups, challenged with allergen or OVA. A significant decrease in circulating erythrocytes and hematocrit levels after airway challenges with grass pollen allergen was also found in grass pollen sensitized human rhinitis subjects (n = 42 at the VCC. The effects on peripheral leukocyte counts in mice and humans however were opposed, possibly due to the different primary inflammation sites. CONCLUSION: Our data revealed that, besides significant leukocyte dynamics, particularly erythrocytes are involved in acute hypersensitivity reactions to respiratory allergens

  13. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Butachlor exhibited strong binding affinity with DNA and produced 8-oxodG adducts. ► Butachlor induced DNA strand breaks and micronuclei formation in PBMN cells. ► Butachlor induced ROS and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential in cells. ► Butachlor resulted in cell cycle arrest and eventually caused cellular necrosis. -- Abstract: Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka = 1.2 × 10 4 M −1 ) and binding capacity (n = 1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2′,7′-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24 h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow

  14. Derivation of transgene-free human induced pluripotent stem cells from human peripheral T cells in defined culture conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Kishino

    Full Text Available Recently, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were established as promising cell sources for revolutionary regenerative therapies. The initial culture system used for iPSC generation needed fetal calf serum in the culture medium and mouse embryonic fibroblast as a feeder layer, both of which could possibly transfer unknown exogenous antigens and pathogens into the iPSC population. Therefore, the development of culture systems designed to minimize such potential risks has become increasingly vital for future applications of iPSCs for clinical use. On another front, although donor cell types for generating iPSCs are wide-ranging, T cells have attracted attention as unique cell sources for iPSCs generation because T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs have a unique monoclonal T cell receptor genomic rearrangement that enables their differentiation into antigen-specific T cells, which can be applied to novel immunotherapies. In the present study, we generated transgene-free human TiPSCs using a combination of activated human T cells and Sendai virus under defined culture conditions. These TiPSCs expressed pluripotent markers by quantitative PCR and immunostaining, had a normal karyotype, and were capable of differentiating into cells from all three germ layers. This method of TiPSCs generation is more suitable for the therapeutic application of iPSC technology because it lowers the risks associated with the presence of undefined, animal-derived feeder cells and serum. Therefore this work will lead to establishment of safer iPSCs and extended clinical application.

  15. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Gregory D.; Karns, Christina M.; Dow, Mark W.; Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants wer...

  16. Consumption of selenium-enriched broccoli increases cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated ex vivo, a preliminary human intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley-Hewitt, Kerry L; Chen, Ronan K-Y; Lill, Ross E; Hedderley, Duncan I; Herath, Thanuja D; Matich, Adam J; McKenzie, Marian J

    2014-12-01

    Selenium (Se) is a micronutrient essential for human health, including immune function. Previous research indicates that Se supplementation may cause a shift from T helper (Th)1- to Th2-type immune responses. We aim to test the potential health promoting effects of Se-enriched broccoli. In a human trial, 18 participants consumed control broccoli daily for 3 days. After a 3-day wash-out period, the participants were provided with Se-enriched broccoli containing 200 μg of Se per serving for 3 days. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples were collected at the start and end of each broccoli feeding period for analysis of total Se and measurement of cytokine production from PBMC stimulated with antigens ex vivo. Plasma Se content remained consistent throughout the control broccoli feeding period and the baseline of the Se-enriched broccoli period (1.22 μmol/L) and then significantly increased following 3 days of Se-enriched broccoli feeding. Interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-22) production from PBMC significantly increased after 3 days of Se-enriched broccoli feeding compared with baseline. This study indicates that consumption of Se-enriched broccoli may increase immune responses toward a range of immune challenges. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Primary quantitative analysis of the mtDNA4977bp deletion induced by lonizing radiation in human peripheral blood u-sing real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Zhikai; Liu Jiangong; Guo Wanlong; Zhang Shuxian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the influence of mtDNA4977bp deletion induced by different dose of γ ray in human peripheral blood in order to explore the feasibility of mtDNA4977bp deletion as biodosimeter. Methods: Human peripheral blood samples were collected from three healthy donors and irradiated by γ ray, MtDNA4977bp deletion was detected by real-time PCR. Results: It indicated that that from the range of 0 ∼ 8 Gy, the relationship between mtDNA4977bp deletion and irradiation dose represents certain curvilinear correlation (Y=1.2693+1.0660X+0.0198X 2 ). Conclusion: We find that γ ray has influence on the mtDNA4977bp deletion, so it may be an important biodosmeter in future. (authors)

  18. Effect of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on cytoskeleton of human peripheral blood monocytes with whole mount cell electron microscopy in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaomei; Guo Yuhua; Yin Zhiwei

    1992-01-01

    Whole mount cell electron microscopy was used in combination with selective extraction to prepare cytoskeletal framework. Cytoskeleton prepared by Triton X-100 treatment of human peripheral blood monocytes appeared on electron microscopy as a highly organized and interconnected three-dimensional matrix of different fibrous elements. By three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons it was demonstrated that different doses of 60 Co γ-rays caused distinctive and reproducible alterations of the cytoskeleton of intact human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The alterations were similar to those caused by cytochalasin B and by colchicine. From these observations and other workers'studies, it is presumed that 60 Co γ-ray irradiation may inhibit cytoplasmic microtubule and microfilament assembling

  19. Frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocyte cultures of human peripheral blood after the combined effect of γ-radiation and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nugis, V.Yu.; Pyatkin, E.K.

    1986-01-01

    Keeping of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, irradiated in vitro with 60 Co-γ-quanta at a dose of 3 Gy at G 0 phase, with caffeine of 16 and 160 μg/ml during cultivation with PHA had no appreciable influence on the fraquency of sister chromatid exchanges. A minor increase in the number of sister chromatid exchanges was only noted when nonirradiated and irradiated lymphocytes were cultured with 160 μg/ml caffeine

  20. Action of the poison of Apis mellifera bee and gamma radiation on bone marrow cells of Wistar rats and on lymphocytes of human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varanda, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    ''In vivo'' and ''in vitro'' experiments are performed to determine the radioprotective action of the poison of Apis mellifera bees. The frequency of chromosome aberrations, induced by gamma radiation, is studied in two assays: ''in vivo'' in bone marrow cells from Wistar rats and ''in vitro'' in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. The sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) are studied in the ''in vitro'' assays. (M.A.C.) [pt

  1. Killing effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells irradiated by γ ray on human gastric cancer MKN-28 cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Daocheng; Zhang Xianqing; Mu Shijie; Liu Zhongxiang; Xia Aijun; Huang Xiaofeng; An Qunxing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the killing effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) irradiated by γ ray on cultured human gastric cancer cell line MKN-28. Methods: The experiment were divided into MKN-28 tumor cell control group, PBMCs groups and MKN-28 cells with irradiated or non-irradiated PBMCs co-culture groups. Radidation dosage were from 0.5 to 3 Gy, acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining were used to observe the kill effect of PBMCs on tumor cells in different period. Results: After culture for 144h, the dead cells of several dosage irradiated PBMCs are much more than those of non-irradiated PBMCs group. At 240 hours of culture, the alive PBMCs deareses in number in both irradiated and non-irradiared groups, but decreases in radiated groups are more obvious. After culture for 72 h in the co-cultured groups, the difference is not evident among all radiation dosage groups. After 96-240 h of co-culture, the killing effect of 0.5-2Gy irradiated PBMCs on tumor cells is very strong, especially in 1Gy group, but the killing effect of PBMCs irradiated by 2.5-3Gy on tumor cells were weaker than that of 0.5-2Gy irradiated groups. At 240 hours co-cultured groups irradiated by 2.5-3Gy, tumor cells still survive and proliferate. Conclusion: Gamma ray irradiation have killing effect to some PBMCs. The cytocidal effect of PBMCs irradiated by 0.5-2Gy on tumor cells were increased. Chemotaxis and cytocidal effect of tumor cells to postirradiated PBMCs were also found. The killing effect of PBMCs irradiated by 2.5 and 3 Gy on tumor cells were restrained. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Calderón-Segura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calypso (thiacloprid, Poncho (clothianidin, Gaucho (imidacloprid, and Jade (imidacloprid are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5×10-6 to 5.7×10-5 M Jade; 2.8×10-4 to 1.7×10-3 M Gaucho; 0.6×10-1 to 1.4×10-1 M Calypso; 1.2×10-1 to 9.5×10-1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18×10-3 M Jade, 2.0×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.0×10-1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30×10-3 M Jade, 3.3×10-3 M Gaucho, 2.8×10-1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides.

  3. Do protons and X-rays induce cell-killing in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by different mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszczyk, J; Rawojć, K; Panek, A; Borkowska, A; Prasanna, P G S; Ahmed, M M; Swakoń, J; Gałaś, A

    2018-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in the technological and physical aspects of dose delivery and distribution in proton therapy. However, mode of cell killing induced by protons is less understood in comparison with X-rays. The purpose of this study is to see if there is any difference in the mode of cell-killing, induced by protons and X-rays in an ex vivo human peripheral blood lymphocyte (HPBL) model. HPBL were irradiated with 60 MeV proton beam or 250-kVp X-rays in the dose range of 0.3-4.0 Gy. Frequency of apoptotic and necrotic cells was determined by the Fluorescein (FITC)-Annexin V labelling procedure, 1 and 4 h after irradiation. Chip-based DNA Ladder Assay was used to confirm radiation-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Chip-based DNA Ladder Assay was used to confirm radiation-induced apoptosis. Ex vivo irradiation of HPBL with proton beams of 60 MeV or 250 kVp X-rays resulted in apoptotic as well as necrotic modes of cell-killing, which were evident at both 1 and 4 h after irradiation in the whole dose and time range. Generally, our results indicated that protons cause relatively higher yields of cell death that appears to be necrosis compared to X-rays. The analysis also demonstrates that radiation type and dose play a critical role in mode of cell-killing. Obtained results suggest that X-rays and protons induce cell-killing by different modes. Such differences in cell-killing modes may have implications on the potential of a given therapeutic modality to cause immune modulation via programmed cell death (X-rays) or necrotic cell death (proton therapy). These studies point towards exploring for gene expression biomarkers related necrosis or apoptosis to predict immune response after proton therapy.

  4. Modulation of gamma ray induced chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by Hippophae rhammnoides leaf extract, SBL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyagi, Anuradha; Madhu Bala

    2014-01-01

    Hippophae rhammnoides L. commonly known as seabuckthorn is a temperate shrub and native of Asia and Europe. It has high antioxidant potential and is known to the traditional Indian, Chinese and Tibetan medicinal system for treatment of multiple disorders viz., circulatory and digestive disorders, hepatic injuries, neoplasia etc. One time treatment with the standardized leaf extract from H. rhammnoides (SBL-1) before whole body irradiation with 60 Co (10 Gy), rendered more than 90% survival in non SBL-1 treated irradiated animals (J herbs, spices medi plants, 2009). Present study investigated the effects of SBL-1 treatment on chromosomal damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), with or without 60 Co-gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes were isolated from the blood drawn from different donors. The isolated lymphocytes were divided into several groups: Group 1-untreated control, Group 2-irradiated (2 Gy), Group 3, 4 and 5 were treated with different concentration of SBL-1, 30 min. after irradiation with 60 Co-gamma-rays (2 Gy). Group 6 was treated with the maximum concentration of SBL-1 used in the study. The metaphase spreading technique was used as per standard procedure to record chromosome breaks, dicentrics, acentrics and rings. The results were also recorded in terms of total aberrant metaphase and frequency of aberrant metaphase per 100 cells. In comparison to the untreated control, in the irradiated PBL culture, there was 8-fold increase in breaks, 211-folds in dicentrics, 75-folds in acentrics and 3-folds in rings (average data). SBL-1 alone at the highest concentration did not cause any significant change in number of breaks, dicentrics, acentrics and rings. The radiation induced aberrations decreased significantly by treatment with SBL-1 and the maximum decrease was observed when the cells were treated with 22μg/ml of SBL-1. These results demonstrated the anti-clastogenic activity of SBL-1 against gamma radiation induced damage. (author)

  5. Gene expression dose-response changes in microarrays after exposure of human peripheral lung epithelial cells to nickel(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert Y S; Zhao, Ailian; Alvord, W Gregory; Powell, Douglas A; Bare, Robert M; Masuda, Akira; Takahashi, Takashi; Anderson, Lucy M; Kasprzak, Kazimierz S

    2003-08-15

    Occupational exposure to nickel compounds is associated with lung cancer risk; both genotoxic and epigenetic mechanisms have been proposed. For comprehensive examination of the acute effects of nickel(II) acetate on gene expression in cultured human peripheral lung epithelial HPL1D cells, microarray analyses were carried out with cDNA chips (approximately 8000 cDNAs). Cells were exposed for 24 h to nontoxic (50, 100, and 200 microM) or toxic (400, 800, and 1600 microM) nickel(II) concentrations. Cluster analysis was applied to the 868 genes with > or = 2-fold change at any concentration. Two main clusters showed marked up- or down-regulation at the highest, toxic concentrations. The data further subdivided into 10 highly cohesive clusters with high probability, and of these only 2 had the same response trend at low nontoxic as at high concentrations, an observation of clear relevance to the process of high- to low-dose extrapolation in risk assessment. There were 113 genes showing > or = 2-fold change at the three lower nontoxic concentrations, those most relevant to in vivo carcinogenesis. In addition to expected responses of metallothionein, ferritin, and heat-shock proteins, the results revealed for the first time changed expression of some potential cancer-related genes in response to low-dose Ni(II): RhoA, dyskerin, interferon regulatory factor 1, RAD21 homologue, and tumor protein, translationally controlled. Overall, most of the genes impacted by nontoxic concentrations of nickel(II) acetate related to gene transcription, protein synthesis and stability, cytoskeleton, signaling, metabolism, cell membrane, and extracellular matrix.

  6. Dose response relationships and analysis of primary processes of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, E.

    1977-02-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 220 kV X-rays, 3 MeV electrons and 15 MeV neutrons. The frequency of dicentric, acentric and atypical chromosomes and the exhange aberrations were measured and dose effect curves were constructed. The aim is to prepare the chromosome analysis to a biological dosimetry. The aberration findings could be adapted to the linear-quadrativ model y = c+ αD + βD 2 . With increasing LET the quantity lambda increased which is a measure for the share of the linear and quadratical components of the dose effect obtained. In case of electrons the RBE-values increased with increasing doses. In the case of neutrons they had their maximum in the low dose range. The feed back distances which lead to formation of primary lesions are for X-rays and electrons approximately 1 μm, for neutrons 1.7 μm. In a fractionation experiment with X-rays, the time of formation of exchange aberrations in radiation-induced primary breaks was measured. The number of dicentric chromosomes decreased with increasing time, while the intercellular distribution was not changed. The number of primary breaks decreasing per temporal interval is proportional to the number of the existing primary breaks. The average feed back time during which the primary breaks lead to induction of dicentric chromosomes, is 110 min. In order to determine the correspondence of the results of in-vivo and in-vitro experiments 15 patients and their blood were irradiated with 60 C-γ-rays. No significant differences were measured. (AJ) [de

  7. Biological dosimetry of heavy ion induced chromosome lesions in human peripheral blood lymphocytes of different healthy donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groesser, T.; Rydberg, B.; Ritter, S.; Hessel, P.; Kraft, G.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In the presented work the effect of sparsely ionizing X-rays or densely ionizing carbon ions on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from healthy donors regarding the fluctuations in radiosensitivity within the same donor and between different donors was examined. This is not only of special interest for physicians and radiation biologists but also plays an important role in space flights because such fluctuations in the radiation response would reduce the accuracy of the biological dosimetry. In this context, biological changes in the aberration rate of metaphase cells as well as in cell proliferation and the mitotic index were measured. Since chromosome analyses are presently the most powerful biological method to quantify radiation exposure, the study focused on the measurements of chromosome aberrations in first-metaphase cells. The investigations showed that the aberration yield after 400 MeV/u carbon ion exposure (LET = 11 keV/micrometer) was higher than after X-irradiation. The aberration yield in first mitotic cells as well as the proportion of damaged cells was stable over the examined period up to 72h after exposure to X-rays or carbon ions. Furthermore, the results of the presented work revealed pronounced fluctuations in the measured parameters in the same donor as well as between different donors. If the dose effect curves of such parameters were used as calibration curves for radiation dose assessment these fluctuations will decrease their potential of use for dose estimation. This demonstrates that a general calibration curve for dose assessment might not be sufficiently precise and individual calibration curves might improve the accuracy of the biological dosimetry

  8. Multiple correlation analyses revealed complex relationship between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang-Fei; Deng, Fei-Yan; Wu, Long-Fei; Mo, Xing-Bo; Zhu, Hong; Wu, Jian; Guo, Yu-Fan; Zeng, Ke-Qin; Wang, Ming-Jun; Zhu, Xiao-Wei; Xia, Wei; Wang, Lan; He, Pei; Bing, Peng-Fei; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Lei, Shu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important regulator on the mRNA expression. However, a genome-wide correlation pattern between DNA methylation and mRNA expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) is largely unknown. The comprehensive relationship between mRNA and DNA methylation was explored by using four types of correlation analyses and a genome-wide methylation-mRNA expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in PBMCs in 46 unrelated female subjects. An enrichment analysis was performed to detect biological function for the detected genes. Single pair correlation coefficient (r T1 ) between methylation level and mRNA is moderate (-0.63-0.62) in intensity, and the negative and positive correlations are nearly equal in quantity. Correlation analysis on each gene (T4) found 60.1% genes showed correlations between mRNA and gene-based methylation at P correlation (R T4  > 0.8). Methylation sites have regulation effects on mRNA expression in eQTL analysis, with more often observations in region of transcription start site (TSS). The genes under significant methylation regulation both in correlation analysis and eQTL analysis tend to cluster to the categories (e.g., transcription, translation, regulation of transcription) that are essential for maintaining the basic life activities of cells. Our findings indicated that DNA methylation has predictive regulation effect on mRNA with a very complex pattern in PBMCs. The results increased our understanding on correlation of methylation and mRNA and also provided useful clues for future epigenetic studies in exploring biological and disease-related regulatory mechanisms in PBMC.

  9. In vitro evaluation of genotoxicity of avocado (Persea americana) fruit and leaf extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Paresh; Paul, Rajkumar; Ganesh, N

    2010-07-01

    Persea americana is much sought after both for the nutritional value of its fruit and the medicinal values of its various plant parts. A chromosomal aberration assay was undertaken to evaluate the potential genotoxicity of crude extracts from avocado fruits and leaves. Chromosomal aberrations were observed in cultured human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to separately increasing concentrations of 50% methanolic extracts of Persea americana fruit and leaves. The groups exposed to leaf and fruit extracts, respectively, showed a concentration-dependent increase in chromosomal aberrations as compared to that in a control group. The mean percentage total aberrant metaphases at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 300 mg/kg concentrations of leaf extract were found respectively to be 58 ± 7.05, 72 ± 6.41, and 78 ± 5.98, which were significantly higher (p < 0.0001 each) than that in the control group (6 ± 3.39). The mean percentage total aberrant metaphases at 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 300 mg/kg concentrations of fruit extract were found to be 18 ± 5.49, 40 ± 10.00, and 52 ± 10.20, respectively, which were significantly higher (p = 0.033, p < 0.0001, and p < 0.0001, respectively) than that for control (6 ± 3.39). Acrocentric associations and premature centromeric separation were the two most common abnormalities observed in both the exposed groups. The group exposed to leaf extracts also showed a significant number of a variety of other structural aberrations, including breaks, fragments, dicentrics, terminal deletion, minutes, and Robertsonian translocations. The group exposed to leaf extract showed higher frequency of all types of aberrations at equal concentrations as compared to the group exposed to fruit extract.

  10. Effect of paricalcitol and GcMAF on angiogenesis and human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Stefania; Morucci, Gabriele; Punzi, Tiziana; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Amato, Marcello; Aterini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone mineralization, vitamin D is involved in immune defence, cardiovascular function, inflammation and angiogenesis, and these pleiotropic effects are of interested in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. Here we investigated the effects of paricalcitol, a nonhypercalcemic vitamin D analogue, on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and signaling, and on angiogenesis. These effects were compared with those of a known inhibitor of angiogenesis pertaining to the vitamin D axis, the vitamin D-binding protein-derived Gc-macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). Since the effects of vitamin D receptor agonists are associated with polymorphisms of the gene coding for the receptor, we measured the effects of both compounds on mononuclear cells harvested from subjects harboring different BsmI polymorphisms. Paricalcitol inhibited mononuclear cell viability with the bb genotype showing the highest effect. GcMAF, on the contrary, stimulated cell proliferation, with the bb genotype showing the highest stimulatory effect. Both compounds stimulated 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation in mononuclear cells with the highest effect on the bb genotype. Paricalcitol and GcMAF inhibited the angiogenesis induced by proinflammatory prostaglandin E1. Polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor gene, known to be associated with the highest responses to vitamin D receptor agonists, are also associated with the highest responses to GcMAF. These results highlight the role of the vitamin D axis in chronic kidney disease, an axis which includes vitamin D, its receptor and vitamin D-binding protein-derived GcMAF.

  11. Evidence from Human and Animal Studies: Pathological Roles of CD8(+) T Cells in Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Peyret, Corentin; Shi, Xiang Qun; Siron, Nicolas; Jang, Jeong Ho; Wu, Sonia; Fournier, Sylvie; Zhang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) affect millions of people worldwide. Despite significant advances in understanding the pathology, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune-mediated neuropathies remain elusive. T lymphocytes definitely play an important role in disease pathogenesis and CD4(+) T cells have been the main area of research for decades. This is partly due to the fact that the most frequent animal model to study autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is experimental allergic neuritis (EAN). As it is induced commonly by immunization with peripheral nerve proteins, EAN is driven mainly by CD4(+) T cells. However, similarly to what has been reported for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, a significant body of evidence indicates that CD8(+) T cells may play a pathogenic role in GBS and CIDP disease development and/or progression. Here, we summarize clinical studies pertaining to the presence and potential role of CD8(+) T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. We also discuss the findings from our most recent studies using a transgenic mouse line (L31 mice) in which the T cell co-stimulator molecule B7.2 (CD86) is constitutively expressed in antigen presenting cells of the nervous tissues. L31 mice spontaneously develop peripheral neuropathy, and CD8(+) T cells are found accumulating in peripheral nerves of symptomatic animals. Interestingly, depletion of CD4(+) T cells accelerates disease onset and increases disease prevalence. Finally, we point out some unanswered questions for future research to dissect the critical roles of CD8(+) T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies.

  12. Evidence from Human and Animal Studies: Pathological Roles of CD8+ T Cells in Autoimmune Peripheral Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Peyret, Corentin; Shi, Xiang Qun; Siron, Nicolas; Jang, Jeong Ho; Wu, Sonia; Fournier, Sylvie; Zhang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune peripheral neuropathies such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) affect millions of people worldwide. Despite significant advances in understanding the pathology, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of immune-mediated neuropathies remain elusive. T lymphocytes definitely play an important role in disease pathogenesis and CD4+ T cells have been the main area of research for decades. This is partly due to the fact that the most frequent animal model to study autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is experimental allergic neuritis (EAN). As it is induced commonly by immunization with peripheral nerve proteins, EAN is driven mainly by CD4+ T cells. However, similarly to what has been reported for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, a significant body of evidence indicates that CD8+ T cells may play a pathogenic role in GBS and CIDP disease development and/or progression. Here, we summarize clinical studies pertaining to the presence and potential role of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. We also discuss the findings from our most recent studies using a transgenic mouse line (L31 mice) in which the T cell co-stimulator molecule B7.2 (CD86) is constitutively expressed in antigen presenting cells of the nervous tissues. L31 mice spontaneously develop peripheral neuropathy, and CD8+ T cells are found accumulating in peripheral nerves of symptomatic animals. Interestingly, depletion of CD4+ T cells accelerates disease onset and increases disease prevalence. Finally, we point out some unanswered questions for future research to dissect the critical roles of CD8+ T cells in autoimmune peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26528293

  13. Agent principal de rayonnement et de mobilisation stratégiques (h/f ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Dans ce contexte, l'agent principal de rayonnement et de mobilisation stratégiques élabore des démarches qui permettent de mobiliser les chercheurs et les principaux utilisateurs de la recherche dans les régions visées, afin de faire en sorte qu'ils aient l'occasion de participer à la définition des besoins de recherche dans ...

  14. Social Entrepreneurship and Mobilisation of Social Capital in European Social Enterprise - (Korean translation)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars; Spear, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Korean translation of ”Social Entrepreneurship and Mobilisation of Social Capital in European Social Enterprise”, with Roger Spear. In Marthe Nyssens (ed.) Social Enterprises: between Market, Public Policies and Community. London: Routledge.......Korean translation of ”Social Entrepreneurship and Mobilisation of Social Capital in European Social Enterprise”, with Roger Spear. In Marthe Nyssens (ed.) Social Enterprises: between Market, Public Policies and Community. London: Routledge....

  15. Overseas Voter Mobilisation in Singapore: Implications from Malaysia’s 13th General Election

    OpenAIRE

    James Gomez; Rusdi Omar

    2013-01-01

    "This paper discusses voter mobilisation and other election-related activities of Malaysian voters living, studying and working in Singapore in the context of Malaysia's 13th general election (GE13). According to the World Bank, nearly 400,000 Malaysians reside in the city-state. Thus these figures represent a significant Malaysian voter pool based in Singapore. Efforts to mobilise these voters for general elections or other causes have political implications for both countries, which became ...

  16. Prediction of phosphorus mobilisation in inundated floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, Roos; Lamers, Leon P.M.; Roelofs, Jan G.M.

    2008-01-01

    After flooding, iron reduction in riverine wetlands may cause the release of large quantities of phosphorus. As phosphorus is an important nutrient causing eutrophication in aquatic systems, it is important to have a tool to predict this potential release. In this study we examined the P release to the soil pore water in soil cores from floodplains in the Netherlands and from less anthropogenically influenced floodplains from Poland. During the inundation experiment, concentrations of P in the pore water rose to 2-90 times the initial concentrations. P release was not directly related to the geographic origin of the soils. An important predictor variable of P release was found in the ratio between the concentration of iron-bound P and amorphous iron. This ratio may provide a practical tool for the selection of new areas for wetland creation, and for impact assessment of plans for riverine wetland restoration and floodwater storage. - Mobilisation of phosphorus in floodplain wetland soils can be predicted with easily measurable soil characteristics

  17. Prediction of phosphorus mobilisation in inundated floodplain soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeb, Roos [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: r.loeb@science.ru.nl; Lamers, Leon P.M.; Roelofs, Jan G.M. [Department of Aquatic Ecology and Environmental Biology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Toernooiveld 1, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    After flooding, iron reduction in riverine wetlands may cause the release of large quantities of phosphorus. As phosphorus is an important nutrient causing eutrophication in aquatic systems, it is important to have a tool to predict this potential release. In this study we examined the P release to the soil pore water in soil cores from floodplains in the Netherlands and from less anthropogenically influenced floodplains from Poland. During the inundation experiment, concentrations of P in the pore water rose to 2-90 times the initial concentrations. P release was not directly related to the geographic origin of the soils. An important predictor variable of P release was found in the ratio between the concentration of iron-bound P and amorphous iron. This ratio may provide a practical tool for the selection of new areas for wetland creation, and for impact assessment of plans for riverine wetland restoration and floodwater storage. - Mobilisation of phosphorus in floodplain wetland soils can be predicted with easily measurable soil characteristics.

  18. Analysis of mtDNT 4977bp deletion induced by ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood nucleated cells using real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Tianli; Wang Ping; Han Lin; Liu Yulong; Liu Yumin

    2010-01-01

    To detect mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA) 4977bp deletion(triangle open mtDNA 4977 ) in human peripheral blood nucleated cells exposed to ionizing radiation in vitro by using real-time PCR, and explore possibility of the index as biodosimetry for estimating biological dose in radiation accident,six healthy individuals' peripheral blood was collected,and the blood samples were irradiated with 0,1,2,3,4 and 5 Gy 60 Co gamma-ray. The triangle open mtDNA 4977 and total mtDNA copy number(mtDNA total ) in the mtDNA samples were detected, and then the deletion rates were calculated. The results showed that the mtDNA total and triangle open mtDNA 4977 copy number, and the deletion rates of mtDNA 4977bp in the mtDNA samples from 6 healthy individuals' blood exposed to 1-5 Gy radiation were higher than that with the samples exposed to 0 Gy radiation(p 0.05). The results indicated that ionizing radiation can induce accumulation of the triangle open mtDNA 4977 and increase of mtDNA total copy number in human peripheral blood nucleated cells,but both the mtDNA 4977bp deletion and exposure dose(0-5 Gy) were not obviously correlated. (authors)

  19. Electron microscopy of human peripheral nerves of clinical relevance to the practice of nerve blocks. A structural and ultrastructural review based on original experimental and laboratory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, M A; Arriazu, R; Collier, C B; Sala-Blanch, X; Izquierdo, L; de Andrés, J

    2013-12-01

    The goal is to describe the ultrastructure of normal human peripheral nerves, and to highlight key aspects that are relevant to the practice of peripheral nerve block anaesthesia. Using samples of sciatic nerve obtained from patients, and dural sac, nerve root cuff and brachial plexus dissected from fresh human cadavers, an analysis of the structure of peripheral nerve axons and distribution of fascicles and topographic composition of the layers that cover the nerve is presented. Myelinated and unmyelinated axons, fascicles, epineurium, perineurium and endoneurium obtained from patients and fresh cadavers were studied by light microscopy using immunohistochemical techniques, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Structure of perineurium and intrafascicular capillaries, and its implications in blood-nerve barrier were revised. Each of the anatomical elements is analyzed individually with regard to its relevance to clinical practice to regional anaesthesia. Routine practice of regional anaesthetic techniques and ultrasound identification of nerve structures has led to conceptions, which repercussions may be relevant in future applications of these techniques. In this regard, the ultrastructural and histological perspective accomplished through findings of this study aims at enlightening arising questions within the field of regional anaesthesia. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Iodine and freeze-drying enhanced high-resolution MicroCT imaging for reconstructing 3D intraneural topography of human peripheral nerve fascicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liwei; Guo, Yongze; Qi, Jian; Zhu, Qingtang; Gu, Liqiang; Zheng, Canbin; Lin, Tao; Lu, Yutong; Zeng, Zitao; Yu, Sha; Zhu, Shuang; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Xi; Du, Yunfei; Yao, Zhi; Lu, Yao; Liu, Xiaolin

    2017-08-01

    The precise annotation and accurate identification of the topography of fascicles to the end organs are prerequisites for studying human peripheral nerves. In this study, we present a feasible imaging method that acquires 3D high-resolution (HR) topography of peripheral nerve fascicles using an iodine and freeze-drying (IFD) micro-computed tomography (microCT) method to greatly increase the contrast of fascicle images. The enhanced microCT imaging method can facilitate the reconstruction of high-contrast HR fascicle images, fascicle segmentation and extraction, feature analysis, and the tracing of fascicle topography to end organs, which define fascicle functions. The complex intraneural aggregation and distribution of fascicles is typically assessed using histological techniques or MR imaging to acquire coarse axial three-dimensional (3D) maps. However, the disadvantages of histological techniques (static, axial manual registration, and data instability) and MR imaging (low-resolution) limit these applications in reconstructing the topography of nerve fascicles. Thus, enhanced microCT is a new technique for acquiring 3D intraneural topography of the human peripheral nerve fascicles both to improve our understanding of neurobiological principles and to guide accurate repair in the clinic. Additionally, 3D microstructure data can be used as a biofabrication model, which in turn can be used to fabricate scaffolds to repair long nerve gaps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular cloning of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I-like proviral genome from the peripheral lymphocyte DNA of a patient with chronic neurologic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, E.P.; Mettus, R.V.; DeFreitas, E.; Wroblewska, Z.; Cisco, M.; Koprowski, H.

    1988-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), the etiologic agent of human T-cell leukemia, has recently been shown to be associated with neurologic disorders such as tropical spastic paraparesis, HTLV-associated myelopathy, and possibly with multiple sclerosis. In this communication, the authors have examined one specific case of neurologic disorder that can be classified as multiple sclerosis or tropical spastic paraparesis. The patient suffering from chronic neurologic disorder was found to contain antibodies to HTLV-I envelope and gag proteins in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the patient were shown to express viral RNA sequences by in situ hybridization. Southern blot analysis of the patient lymphocyte DNA revealed the presence of HTLV-I-related sequences. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from fresh peripheral lymphocytes stimulated with interleukin 2 revealed the presence of abundant amounts of genomic viral RNA with little or no subgenomic RNA. They have clones the proviral genome from the DNA of the peripheral lymphocytes and determined its restriction map. This analysis shows that this proviral genome is very similar if not identical to that of the prototype HTLV-I genome

  2. Improved Exercise Tolerance with Caffeine Is Associated with Modulation of both Peripheral and Central Neural Processes in Human Participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Mohr, Magni; Fulford, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    calcium handling and extracellular potassium regulation. Our aims were to investigate how caffeine (i) affects knee extensor PCr kinetics and pH during repeated sets of single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure and (ii) modulates the interplay between central and peripheral neural processes. We...... hypothesized that the caffeine-induced extension of exercise capacity during repeated sets of exercise would occur despite greater disturbance of the muscle milieu due to enhanced peripheral and corticospinal excitatory output, central motor drive, and muscle contractility. Methods: Nine healthy active young...

  3. Dose-effect of ionizing radiation-induced PIG3 gene expression alteration in human lymphoblastoid AHH-1 cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Jie; Zhang, De-Qin; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Feng, Jiang-Bin; Lu, Xue; Wang, Xin-Ru; Li, Kun-Peng; Chen, De-Qing; Mu, Xiao-Feng; Li, Shuang; Gao, Ling

    2015-01-01

    To identify new ionizing radiation (IR)-sensitive genes and observe the dose-effect of gene expression alteration (GEA) induced by IR. Microarray was used to screen the differentially expressed genes in human lymphoblastoid cells (AHH-1) using three doses of (60)Co γ-rays (0.5-8 Gy at 1 Gy/min). Given that p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) was consistently upregulated, the GEA of PIG3 in AHH-1 cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) induced by γ-rays (1 Gy/min) was measured at messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels. The GEA of PIG3 in AHH-1 cells exposed to neutron radiation (californium-252, 0.073 Gy/min) was also quantified. PIG3 was one of the seven differentially expressed genes found in the microarray analysis. The PIG3 mRNA and protein levels in AHH-1 cells were significantly increased from 1-10 Gy of γ-rays 8-72 h or 8-168 h after exposure, respectively. The enhancement was also observed in AHH-1 cells from 0.4-1.6 Gy of neutrons 48 h post-irradiation. The PIG3 mRNA levels (mRNA copy numbers) in HPBL were significantly increased from 1-8 Gy of γ-rays within 4-24 h post-irradiation, but the highest increase in signal-to-noise responsiveness is approximately two-fold, which was less than that of AHH-1 (approximately 20-fold). IR can upregulate the PIG3 gene expression in AHH-1 and HPBL in the early phase after exposure; however, the IR induced expression levels of PIG3 are greater in AHH-1 than HPBL.

  4. [The effect of isoflurane on the secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood monocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, W; Enzan, K; Masaki, Y; Kayaba, M; Suzuki, M

    1995-07-01

    The cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1 secreted from macrophages/monocytes proved to play important roles in the pathogenesis of endotoxemia, severe pancreatitis and other surgical injuries. However, it is still unclear how inhalational anesthetic agents influence the secretion of these cytokines from macrophages/monocytes. We investigated the effects of isoflurane on TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions increased after LPS stimulation and this increase was inhibited by isoflurane in dose-dependent fashion. The inhibitory action of isoflurane disappeared between 1 and 3 hours after stopping isoflurane inhalation. We concluded that isoflurane could inhibit TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta secretions from peripheral blood monocytes stimulated by LPS in a dose-dependent fashion and that the inhibitory action of isoflurane was reversible.

  5. The effects of high dose ionizing radiation on transcriptional regulation and paracrine signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, L.

    2015-01-01

    While it has long been accepted that direct cell-cell interactions and the replacement of injured tissues with injected cells exerts therapeutic effects, it is currently believed that, in addition, paracrine factors released from different cell types activate cytoprotective and regenerative processes. Cells are now seen as bioreactors that produce and release soluble factors which might be used as therapeutics. We have previously shown that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) release a plethora of paracrine factors that enhance wound healing, attenuate myocardial damage following acute myocardial infarction, abolish microvascular obstruction, improve neurological outcome after acute ischemic stroke and spinal cord injury and protect mice from experimental autoimmune myocarditis. These PBMC derived paracrine factors may exert their effects via the induction of cytoprotective pathways, augmentation of angiogenesis, induction of NO-depended vasodilation and inhibition of VASP dependent platelet aggregation, as well as driving auto-reactive CD4+ cells into apoptosis. To enhance the cellular secretory capacity, treatments which induce stress responses, such as hypoxic preconditioning or ionizing irradiation (IR), have been developed. Although these effects have been evaluated in several disease states there is little data available on the cellular effects of ionizing irradiation on human PBMCs and their secretome. In this study, we have thus undertaken to investigate the effects of IR on human PBMCs in terms of the induction of transcriptional changes and release of pleiotropic paracrine factors. There are three primary aims of this doctoral thesis: 1. To investigate cellular processes activated or repressed in human PBMCs following high dose ionizing radiation (60Gy) and high density cell cultivation (25*10"6 cells/ml) for up to 24 hours. 2. To identify paracrine factors released from these cells using a multi-methodical biochemical/bioinformatics approach. 3

  6. DNA damage response and role of shelterin complex in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Divyalakshmi; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are the DNA protein structures that cap the ends of linear DNA. It consists of short repetitive DNA sequences (TTAGGG)n and specialized telomere binding proteins. There are six telomeric proteins (TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TERF2, PTOP and POT1) called as shelterin complex/telosome which maintains telomere integrity. The function of this 'telosome' is to protect the natural ends of the chromosomes from being recognized as artificial DNA breaks, thereby preventing chromosome end-to-end fusions. DNA Damage Response (DDR) induced by radiation and its interaction with telomeric protein complex is poorly understood in human PBMCs at G 0 stage. Alterations in either telomeric DNA or telomere binding proteins can impair the function of the telosome, which may lead to senescence or apoptosis. Ionizing radiation which induces a plethora of DNA lesions in human cell may also alter the expression of telomere associated proteins. In the present study, we have made an attempt to study the DNA damage response of telomere proteins in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to gamma radiation. Venous blood samples were collected from eight random healthy volunteers and PBMCs were separated. Dose response as well as time point kinetics study was carried out at transcription as well as protein level. PBMCs were irradiated at various doses between 10 cGy to 2.0 Gy at a dose rate of 1.0 Gy/min. Total RNA was isolated for gene expression analysis at 0 hour and 4 hours respectively. cDNA was prepared and transcriptional pattern as studied using real time q-PCR where Taqman probes were used. Time point kinetics of transcriptional pattern of TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TERF2, PTOP and POT1 was carried out at 0 min, 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min for two different doses (1.0 Gy and 2.0 Gy). Dose response and time point kinetics of TRF2 was studied at similar doses using confocal microscopy. Our results revealed that at 2.0 Gy there was a two fold increase at the level of transcription

  7. Anti-inflammatory compound resveratrol suppresses homocysteine formation in stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroecksnadel, Katharina; Winkler, Christiana; Wirleitner, Barbara; Schennach, Harald; Weiss, Günter; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    Inflammation, immune activation and oxidative stress play a major role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders. In addition to markers of inflammation, moderate hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and there is a link between the activation of immunocompetent cells and the enhanced formation of homocysteine in vitro. Likewise, anti-inflammatory drugs and nutrients rich in antioxidant vitamins are able to reduce cardiovascular risk and to slow down the atherogenic process. Resveratrol, a phenolic antioxidant synthesized in grapes and vegetables and present in wine, has also been supposed to be beneficial for the prevention of cardiovascular events. Apart from its strong antioxidant properties, resveratrol has also been demonstrated to act as an anti-inflammatory agent. In this study the influence of resveratrol on the production of homocysteine by stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was investigated. Results were compared to earlier described effects of the anti-inflammatory compounds aspirin and salicylic acid and of the lipid-lowering drug atorvastatin. Stimulation of PBMCs with the mitogens concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin induced significantly higher homocysteine accumulation in supernatants compared with unstimulated cells. Treatment with 10-100 muM resveratrol suppressed homocysteine formation in a dose-dependent manner. Resveratrol did not influence the release of homocysteine from resting PBMCs. The data suggest that resveratrol may prevent homocysteine accumulation in the blood by suppressing immune activation cascades and the proliferation of mitogen-driven T-cells. The effect of resveratrol to down-regulate the release of homo-cysteine was comparable to the decline of neopterin concentrations in the same experiments. The suppressive effect of resveratrol was very similar to results obtained earlier with aspirin, salicylic acid and atorvastatin; however, it appeared that doses

  8. Effect of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells on cytokine production by peripheral blood naive, memory, and effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeira, Paula; Pedrosa, Monia; Pedreiro, Susana; Gomes, Joana; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-05

    The different distribution of T cells among activation/differentiation stages in immune disorders may condition the outcome of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. Indeed, the effect of MSCs in the different functional compartments of T cells is not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of human bone marrow MSCs on naturally occurring peripheral blood functional compartments of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells: naive, central memory, effector memory, and effector compartments. For that, mononuclear cells (MNCs) stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin were cultured in the absence/presence of MSCs. The percentage of cells expressing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon gamma (IFNγ), and interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-17, IL-9, and IL-6 and the amount of cytokine produced were assessed by flow cytometry. mRNA levels of IL-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA4) in purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and phenotypic and mRNA expression changes induced by PMA + ionomycin stimulation in MSCs, were also evaluated. MSCs induced the reduction of the percentage of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing TNF-α, IFNγ, and IL-2 in all functional compartments, except for naive IFNγ(+)CD4(+) T cells. This inhibitory effect differentially affected CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells as well as the T-cell functional compartments; remarkably, different cytokines showed distinct patterns of inhibition regarding both the percentage of producing cells and the amount of cytokine produced. Likewise, the percentages of IL-17(+), IL-17(+)TNF-α(+), and IL-9(+) within CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and of IL-6(+)CD4(+) T cells were decreased in MNC-MSC co-cultures. MSCs decreased IL-10 and increased IL-4 mRNA expression in stimulated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, whereas TGF-β was reduced in CD8(+) and augmented in CD4(+) T cells, with no changes for CTLA4. Finally, PMA

  9. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katika, Madhumohan R. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Hendriksen, Peter J.M. [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Shao, Jia [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Loveren, Henk van [Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, Maastricht University (Netherlands); National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands); Peijnenburg, Ad, E-mail: ad.peijnenburg@wur.nl [RIKILT-Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre (Netherlands)

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  10. Docking and molecular dynamics studies of peripheral site ligand–oximes as reactivators of sarin-inhibited human acetylcholinesterase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almeida, J.S.F.D. de; Cuya Guizado, T.R.; Guimarães, A.P.; Ramalho, T.C.; Gonçalves, A.S.; Koning, M.C. de; França, T.C.C.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, we performed docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies on two groups of long-tailored oximes designed as peripheral site binders of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and potential penetrators on the blood brain barrier. Our studies permitted to determine how the tails anchor

  11. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D. Scott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants were limited by inter-subject variability of Heschl’s gyrus. In addition to reorganized auditory cortex (cross-modal plasticity, a second gap in our understanding is the contribution of altered modality-specific cortices (visual intramodal plasticity in this case, as well as supramodal and multisensory cortices, especially when target detection is required across contrasts. Here we address these gaps by comparing fMRI signal change for peripheral versus perifoveal visual stimulation (11-15° vs. 2°-7° in congenitally deaf and hearing participants in a blocked experimental design with two analytical approaches: a Heschl’s gyrus region of interest analysis and a whole brain analysis. Our results using individually-defined primary auditory cortex (Heschl’s gyrus indicate that fMRI signal change for more peripheral stimuli was greater than perifoveal in deaf but not in hearing participants. Whole-brain analyses revealed differences between deaf and hearing participants for peripheral versus perifoveal visual processing in extrastriate visual cortex including primary auditory cortex, MT+/V5, superior-temporal auditory and multisensory and/or supramodal regions, such as posterior parietal cortex, frontal eye fields, anterior cingulate, and supplementary eye fields. Overall, these data demonstrate the contribution of neuroplasticity in multiple systems including primary auditory cortex, supramodal and multisensory regions, to altered visual processing in

  12. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  13. In vitro response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to 60Co at single fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Maria Andrade

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy using gamma rays is a common modality of breast cancer treatment. The aim of this research is to investigate the biological response of the human breast cancer cell line MDAMB-231 and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC exposed in vitro to 60 Co irradiation at a single fraction of 10 Gy, 25 Gy and 50 Gy doses at 136,4 cGy.min-1 rate. Cells were irradiated at room temperature by the Theratron 80 radiotherapy system. Biological response was evaluated through cellular viability using MTT assay and nucleus damages visualized by Propidium Iodide assay and electrophoresis agarose gel after gamma irradiation. Nucleus damages induced by 60Co irradiation were compared to damage caused by cell exposure to 10% methanol. The 50 Gy dose of irradiation did not stimulate nuclus damages at the same level as that affected by 10% methanol induction in the MDAMB-231. Further studies are necessary to understand these mechanisms in the MDAMB-231 human breast carcinoma cell line.Radioterapia utilizando radiação gama é uma modalidade comum no tratamento do câncer de mama. A proposta deste estudo é investigar a resposta biológica in vitro da linhagem celular MDAMB-231 de câncer de mama humano e células do sangue periférico humano (PBMC expostas à irradiação pelo Co60 em frações simples de 10Gy, 25Gy e 50Gy e 136,4cGy min-1 rate. As células foram irradiadas a temperatura ambiente usando o equipamento de radioterapia Theratron 80 radiotherapy system. A resposta biológica, após irradiação gama, foi avaliada através do ensaio do MTT para viabilidade celular e o do ensaio com Iodeto de Propídio para visualização do dano nuclear, além da eletroforese em gel de agarose. Os danos nucleares induzidos pelo Co60 foram comparados aos danos causados pela exposição das células à solução de metanol a 10%. Nós observamos que a dose de 50Gy não estimulou a mesma quantidade de danos nucleares que a solução de metanol a 10% nas c

  14. Smouldering peat fires in polluted landscapes and their impact on heavy metal mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Gareth; Rothwell, James; Shuttleworth, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Whilst wildfires are commonly viewed as a threat confined to Southern Europe, Australia, and North America, recognition of wildfire hazard in the UK has been growing in recent years. UK wildfires often occur on heathland vegetation underlain by peat. These areas can contain industrially-derived legacy pollutants, such as mercury, lead, and arsenic. Ignition of the peat can lead to long-term smouldering fires that are difficult to extinguish, leading to large-scale damage. While work on assessing post-fire damage of peatlands has focussed on carbon and nutrient dynamics, there has been little attention on the release of heavy metals following wildfires. This paper presents initial data from a preliminary study to assess heavy metal release from smouldering peat fires. A homogenised sample of peat from the Peak District National Park, UK was ignited, monitored using thermocouples and an IR camera, and left to smoulder until self-extinguished (~9 hours). Total mass loss was 61%. Samples of pre- and post-burn peat were analysed for their heavy metal concentrations using XRF, ICP-MS, and CVAFS. Sample analysis is ongoing, but initial data shows that there is a substantial (3x) relative enrichment in heavy metal concentrations in post-fire ash. This has important implications for subsequent mobilisation in the aquatic and terrestrial environments, as well as consequences for human health risk through atmospheric redistribution.

  15. The Effect of High Dose Cholecalciferol on Arterial Stiffness and Peripheral and Central Blood Pressure in Healthy Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bressendorff, Iain; Brandi, Lisbet; Schou, Morten

    2016-01-01

    and central blood pressure and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. RESULTS: 22 subjects in the cholecalciferol arm and 18 subjects in the placebo arm completed the 16 weeks of follow-up. There was no difference in changes in PWV, AIx corrected for heart rate or central or peripheral blood pressure between...... and blood pressure in healthy normotensive adults. METHODS: 40 healthy adults were randomised in this double-blinded study to either oral cholecalciferol 3000 IU/day or matching placebo and were followed for 16 weeks to examine any effects on pulse wave velocity (PWV), augmentation index (AIx), peripheral...... the two groups. There was no correlation between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and any of these parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Oral cholecalciferol 3000 IU/day does not affect arterial stiffness or blood pressure after 16 weeks of treatment in healthy normotensive adults. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT...

  16. Improved Exercise Tolerance with Caffeine Is Associated with Modulation of both Peripheral and Central Neural Processes in Human Participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Mohr, Magni; Fulford, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Background: Caffeine has been shown to enhance exercise performance and capacity. The mechanisms remain unclear but are suggested to relate to adenosine receptor antagonism, resulting in increased central motor drive, reduced perception of effort, and altered peripheral processes such as enhanced...... men performed five sets of intense single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure on four separate occasions: for two visits (6 mg·kg-1 caffeine vs placebo), quadriceps 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans were performed to quantify phosphocreatine kinetics and pH, and for the remaining two...... calcium handling and extracellular potassium regulation. Our aims were to investigate how caffeine (i) affects knee extensor PCr kinetics and pH during repeated sets of single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure and (ii) modulates the interplay between central and peripheral neural processes. We...

  17. Transcription factor Fos-Related Antigen-2 induces progressive peripheral vasculopathy in mice closely resembling human systemic sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, B; Busch, N; Jüngel, A; Pileckyte, M; Gay, R E; Michel, B A; Schett, G; Gay, S; Distler, J; Distler, O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Microvascular damage is one of the first pathological changes in systemic sclerosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Fos-related antigen-2 (Fra-2), a transcription factor of the activator protein-1 family, in the peripheral vasculopathy of systemic sclerosis and examined the underlying mechanisms. Methods and Results-Expression of Fra-2 protein was significantly increased in skin biopsies of systemic sclerosis patients compared with healthy controls, especially in endo...

  18. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Development of a Modular Assay for Detailed Immunophenotyping of Peripheral Human Whole Blood Samples by Multicolor Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul F. Rühle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of immune cells gained great significance in prognosis and prediction of therapy responses. For analyzing blood samples, the multicolor flow cytometry has become the method of choice as it combines high specificity on single cell level with multiple parameters and high throughput. Here, we present a modular assay for the detailed immunophenotyping of blood (DIoB that was optimized for an easy and direct application in whole blood samples. The DIoB assay characterizes 34 immune cell subsets that circulate the peripheral blood including all major immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. In addition, it evaluates their functional state and a few non-leukocytes that also have been associated with the outcome of cancer therapy. This DIoB assay allows a longitudinal and close-meshed monitoring of a detailed immune status in patients requiring only 2.0 mL of peripheral blood and it is not restricted to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It is currently applied for the immune monitoring of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (IMMO-GLIO-01 trial, NCT02022384, pancreatic cancer (CONKO-007 trial, NCT01827553, and head and neck cancer (DIREKHT trial, NCT02528955 and might pave the way for immune biomarker identification for prediction and prognosis of therapy outcome.

  20. Surfactant-induced mobilisation of trace metals from estuarine sediment: Implications for contaminant bioaccessibility and remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Anu [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Turner, Andrew [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: aturner@plymouth.ac.uk

    2009-02-15

    The mobilisation of metals (Al, Fe, Cd, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Zn) from contaminated estuarine sediment has been examined using commercially available surfactants. Metal release by the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), increased with increasing amphiphile concentration up to and above its critical micelle concentration (CMC). Metal mobilisation by the bile acid salt, sodium taurocholate, and the nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, however, did not vary with amphiphile concentration. SDS was the most efficient surfactant in mobilising metals from the sample, and Cd, Cu and Ni were released to the greatest extents (12-18% of total metal at [SDS] > CMC). Metal mobilisation appeared to proceed via complexation with anionic amphiphiles and denudation of hydrophobic host phases. Surfactants may play an important role in the solubilisation of metals in the digestive environment of deposit-feeding animals and, potentially, in the remediation of metal-contaminated soil and sediment. - Significant quantities of metals are mobilised from estuarine sediment by commercially available surfactants.

  1. Émeutes urbaines, sentiments d’injustice, mobilisations associatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Marlière

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cet article a pour objectif l’appréhension des répertoires de mobilisations politiques des jeunes dits « des cités ». Pour cela, il faut nous intéresser aux modes de vie de ces jeunes structurés depuis plus de trente ans maintenant autour du chômage et de la précarité et des nouvelles formes de ségrégation. Cette situation engendre chez les jeunes une certaine frustration sociale se manifestant sous la forme d’un sentiment d’injustice plus ou moins diffus. Si les émeutes urbaines constituent le mode d’action le plus médiatique, un certain nombre de jeunes adultes originaires « des cités » réagissent à travers un ensemble d’initiatives associatives nationales et locales comme le montrent les dernières échéances électorales.Urban riots, feeling of injustice and associative mobilizationsThis article’s objective are the understanding of the directories of the political youth called “cities”. For this, we must concern ourselves with life’s styles of the young people structured over 30 years now about unemployment and job insecurity and new forms of segregation. This creates youth frustration manifested as a feeling of injustice more or less diffuse. If the urban riots of action in the most media, a number of young adults from the “cities” are responding through a number of national associations and local initiatives as evidenced by the recent elections.Revueltas urbanas, sentimientos de injusticia, formas asociativasEste artículo tiene como objetivo el aprehender las diferentes formas de las movilizaciones políticas de los jóvenes de los barrios desfavorecidos. Para cumplirlo es necesario que nos interesemos por las maneras de vivir de esos jóvenes cuyas vidas se desarrollan dentro del paro, la precariedad y nuevas formas de segregación. Esta situación engendra una gran frustración social con conciencia más o menos difusa de ser víctimas de injusticias. Si las revueltas urbanas constituyen la

  2. Cocoa Consumption Alters the Global DNA Methylation of Peripheral Leukocytes in Humans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenti, Anna; Solà, Rosa; Valls, Rosa M; Caimari, Antoni; Del Bas, Josep M; Anguera, Anna; Anglés, Neus; Arola, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression and can be modified by different bioactive compounds in foods, such as polyphenols. Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols, but its role in DNA methylation is still unknown. The objective was to assess the effect of cocoa consumption on DNA methylation and to determine whether the enzymes involved in the DNA methylation process participate in the mechanisms by which cocoa exerts these effects in humans. The global DNA methylation levels in the peripheral blood were evaluated in 214 volunteers who were pre-hypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive or hypercholesterolemic. The volunteers were divided into two groups: 110 subjects who consumed cocoa (6 g/d) for two weeks and 104 control subjects. In addition, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from six subjects were treated with a cocoa extract to analyze the mRNA levels of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) genes. Cocoa consumption significantly reduced the DNA methylation levels (2.991±0.366 vs. 3.909±0.380, pcocoa effects on DNA methylation and three polymorphisms located in the MTHFR, MTRR, and DNMT3B genes. Furthermore, in PBMCs, the cocoa extract significantly lowered the mRNA levels of the DNMTs, MTHFR, and MTRR. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the consumption of cocoa decreases the global DNA methylation of peripheral leukocytes in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. In vitro experiments with PBMCs suggest that cocoa may exert this effect partially via the down-regulation of DNMTs, MTHFR and MTRR, which are key genes involved in this epigenetic process. Clinicaltrials.govNCT00511420 and NCT00502047.

  3. Cocoa Consumption Alters the Global DNA Methylation of Peripheral Leukocytes in Humans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Crescenti

    Full Text Available DNA methylation regulates gene expression and can be modified by different bioactive compounds in foods, such as polyphenols. Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols, but its role in DNA methylation is still unknown. The objective was to assess the effect of cocoa consumption on DNA methylation and to determine whether the enzymes involved in the DNA methylation process participate in the mechanisms by which cocoa exerts these effects in humans. The global DNA methylation levels in the peripheral blood were evaluated in 214 volunteers who were pre-hypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive or hypercholesterolemic. The volunteers were divided into two groups: 110 subjects who consumed cocoa (6 g/d for two weeks and 104 control subjects. In addition, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from six subjects were treated with a cocoa extract to analyze the mRNA levels of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR genes. Cocoa consumption significantly reduced the DNA methylation levels (2.991±0.366 vs. 3.909±0.380, p<0.001. Additionally, we found an association between the cocoa effects on DNA methylation and three polymorphisms located in the MTHFR, MTRR, and DNMT3B genes. Furthermore, in PBMCs, the cocoa extract significantly lowered the mRNA levels of the DNMTs, MTHFR, and MTRR. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the consumption of cocoa decreases the global DNA methylation of peripheral leukocytes in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. In vitro experiments with PBMCs suggest that cocoa may exert this effect partially via the down-regulation of DNMTs, MTHFR and MTRR, which are key genes involved in this epigenetic process.Clinicaltrials.govNCT00511420 and NCT00502047.

  4. Nutrigenomics in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells : the effects of fatty acids on gene expression profiles of human circulating cells as assessed in human intervention studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwens, M.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the effects of nutrition on the function and health of organs in the human body, such as liver and intestine, is difficult, because for this research organ tissue is needed. Since nutrition research is usually performed in healthy volunteers, this tissue is difficult to obtain. However,

  5. The effects of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on the cytoskeleton of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaomei; Guo Yuhua; Yin Zhiwei; Mao Zijun

    1990-03-01

    The whole mount cell electron microscopy in combination with selective extraction method for preparing cytoskeletal framework was applied. Cy toskeleton prepared by Triton X-100 treatment of mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes appeared in electron microscopy as a highly organized and interconnected three-dimensional matrix of different fibrous elements. Since such cytoskeletons are open membrane-free system, individual fibrous organizations can be identified by specific antibodies. An indirect immunogold procedure using monoclonal anti-tubulin or anti-actin antibodies was applied to visualize tubulin-or actin-containing structures. The three-dimensional visualization of Triton X-100 resistant cytoskeletons had been used to demonstrate that different doses of 60 Co γ-ray caused a distinctive and reproducible alterations of the cytoskeletons of intact mouse peritoneal macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The results showed that there were some similar alterations with those caused by cytochalasin B and by colchicine. From these observations and other workers' studies, it's likely that 60 Co γ-ray irradiation may inhibit cytoplasmic microtubule and microfilament assembling

  6. An alkaline comet assay study on the antimalarial drug atovaquone in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a study based on clinically relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinter, Domagoj; Gajski, Goran; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Atovaquone, a hydroxynaphthoquinone, is an anti-parasite drug, selectively targeting the mitochondrial respiratory chain of malaria parasite. It is used for both the treatment and prevention of malaria, usually in a fixed combination with proguanil. Although atovaquone has not often been associated with severe adverse reactions in the recommended dosages and has a relatively favorable side effect profile, the present study was undertaken to evaluate its cytogenotoxic potential towards human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Two different concentrations of atovaquone found in plasma when used in fixed-dose combination with proguanile hydrochloride were used with and without S9 metabolic activation: 2950 ng ml(-1) used for prophylactic treatment and 11 800 ng ml(-1) used in treatment of malaria. The results showed that lymphocyte viability was not affected after the treatment, suggesting that atovaquone was not cytotoxic in the given concentrations. With the alkaline comet assay we demonstrated that in human peripheral blood lymphocytes no significant changes in comet parameters occurred after the treatment. There were no differences in tested parameters with the addition of S9 metabolic activation, indicating that atovaquone either has no metabolite or it is not toxic in the given concentrations. Since no effects were observed after the treatment, it is to be concluded that atovaquone is safe from the aspect of genototoxicity in the recommended dosages. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Convalescence and hospital stay after colonic surgery with balanced analgesia, early oral feeding, and enforced mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the combined effects of pain relief by continuous epidural analgesia, early oral feeding and enforced mobilisation on convalescence and hospital stay after colonic resection. DESIGN: Uncontrolled pilot investigation. SETTING: University hospital, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 17...... unselected patients (median age 69 years) undergoing colonic resection. INTERVENTIONS: Patients received combined epidural and general anaesthesia during operations and after operation were given continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.25%, 4 ml hour and morphine 0.2 mg hour, for 96 hours and oral paracetamol 4 g....../daily. No patient had a nasogastric tube, and oral feeding with normal food and protein enriched solutions (1000 Kcal (4180 KJ/day) was instituted 24 hours postoperatively together with intensive mobilisation. RESULTS: Median visual analogue pain scores were zero at rest and minimal during coughing and mobilisation...

  8. Induction and persistence of multicentric chromosomes in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes following high-dose gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suto, Yumiko; Hirai, Momoki; Akiyama, Miho; Nakagawa, Takashi; Tominaga, Takako; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Sugiura, Nobuyuki; Yuki, Masanori; Nakayama, Fumiaki

    2012-01-01

    Among radiation-induced chromosome aberrations, multicentric chromosomes, as represented by dicentric chromosomes (dicentrics), are regarded as sensitive and specific biomarkers for assessing radiation dose in the 0 to 5 Gy range. The objective of this study was to characterize chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by a higher dose of radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed to 15 Gy gamma rays at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/min and harvested at 48, 50, 52, 54, 56 and 72 h. The first mitotic peak appeared at 52-54 h, showing about a 6 h mitotic delay as compared with nonirradiated control cultures. Cell-cycle analysis of parallel and simultaneous cultures by sister-chromatid differentiation staining suggests that metaphase cells examined in 48-56 h cultures were in the first mitosis after culture initiation. The mean dicentric equivalent counts ranged from 9.0 to 9.3 in consecutively harvested cultures with no significant differences among them. At 72 h, about 20% of dividing cells were tetraploid, persisting with faithfully replicated unstable chromosome aberrations. The non-random distribution of replicated chromosome pairs, deduced from multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis, led us to surmise that the predominant mechanism underlying the induction of tetraploid cells is endoreduplication. These findings suggest that a high-dose in vitro irradiation applied to peripheral blood lymphocytes may affect on the replication process, in addition to structural chromosome damage. (author)

  9. Winter to summer change in vitamin D status reduces systemic inflammation and bioenergetic activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K. Calton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D status [25(OHD] has recently been reported to be associated with altered cellular bioenergetic profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. No study has tracked the seasonal variation of 25(OHD and its putative influence on whole body energy metabolism, cellular bioenergetic profiles, inflammatory markers and clinical chemistry. Material and methods: Whole body energy metabolism and substrate utilisation were measured by indirect calorimetry. PBMCs obtained from the same subjects were isolated from whole blood, counted and freshly seeded. Bioenergetic analysis (mitochondrial stress test and glycolysis stress test was performed using the Seahorse XFe96 flux analyser. 25(OHD was assessed using the Architect immunoassay method. Results: 25(OHD increased by a median (IQR of 14.40 (20.13 nmol/L (p75 nmol/L. The absolute change in 25(OHD was not associated with altered bioenergetics. Conclusion: Seasonal improvements in 25(OHD was associated with reduced systemic inflammation, PBMC bioenergetic profiles and whole body energy metabolism. These observational changes in PBMC bioenergetics were most pronounced in those who had insufficient 25(OHD in winter. The data warrants confirmation through cause and effect study designs. Keywords: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Bioenergetics, Vitamin D, Season, Inflammation, Insulin sensitivity

  10. Explicit formula of finite difference method to estimate human peripheral tissue temperatures during exposure to severe cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, M A; Hussain, Fida

    2015-02-01

    During cold exposure, peripheral tissues undergo vasoconstriction to minimize heat loss to preserve the maintenance of a normal core temperature. However, vasoconstricted tissues exposed to cold temperatures are susceptible to freezing and frostbite-related tissue damage. Therefore, it is imperative to establish a mathematical model for the estimation of tissue necrosis due to cold stress. To this end, an explicit formula of finite difference method has been used to obtain the solution of Pennes' bio-heat equation with appropriate boundary conditions to estimate the temperature profiles of dermal and subdermal layers when exposed to severe cold temperatures. The discrete values of nodal temperature were calculated at the interfaces of skin and subcutaneous tissues with respect to the atmospheric temperatures of 25 °C, 20 °C, 15 °C, 5 °C, -5 °C and -10 °C. The results obtained were used to identify the scenarios under which various degrees of frostbite occur on the surface of skin as well as the dermal and subdermal areas. The explicit formula of finite difference method proposed in this model provides more accurate predictions as compared to other numerical methods. This model of predicting tissue temperatures provides researchers with a more accurate prediction of peripheral tissue temperature and, hence, the susceptibility to frostbite during severe cold exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fundamental studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) of human peripheral blood leukocytes using sheep red blood cells as target cells, and the effect of erythrophagocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    We investigated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of human peripheral blood leukocytes by using 51 Cr-labelled sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells and anti-SRBC rabbit antibody. Lysis of SRBC was mediated by either human peripheral lymphoid cells or phagocytes (Monocytes and granulocytes). SRBC were useful as target cells in ADCC assay against human lymphoid cells, since decreased cytotoxic activity of phagocyte-contaminated crude lymphocyte fraction was recovered by elimination of contaminating phagocytes. The monocytes inhibited ADCC of lymphoid cells through phagocytosis of SRBC. This assay system may be useful for estimating not only Fc receptor-mediated cytotoxicity but also Fc receptor-mediated phagocytic activity of human peripheral blood leukocytes. (author)

  12. Peripheral SLC6A4 DNA methylation is associated with in vivo measures of human brain serotonin synthesis and childhood physical aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsha Wang

    Full Text Available The main challenge in addressing the role of DNA methylation in human behaviour is the fact that the brain is inaccessible to epigenetic analysis in living humans. Using positron emission tomography (PET measures of brain serotonin (5-HT synthesis, we found in a longitudinal sample that adult males with high childhood-limited aggression (C-LHPA had lower in vivo 5-HT synthesis in the orbitofrontal cortex (OBFC. Here we hypothesized that 5-HT alterations associated with childhood aggression were linked to differential DNA methylation of critical genes in the 5-HT pathway and these changes were also detectable in peripheral white blood cells. Using pyrosequencing, we determined the state of DNA methylation of SLC6A4 promoter in T cells and monocytes isolated from blood of cohort members (N = 25 who underwent a PET scan, and we examined whether methylation status in the blood is associated with in vivo brain 5-HT synthesis. Higher levels of methylation were observed in both T cells and monocytes at specific CpG sites in the C-LHPA group. DNA methylation of SLC6A4 in monocytes appears to be associated more reliably with group membership than T cells. In both cell types the methylation state of these CpGs was associated with lower in vivo measures of brain 5-HT synthesis in the left and right lateral OBFC (N = 20 where lower 5-HT synthesis in C-LHPA group was observed. Furthermore, in vitro methylation of the SLC6A4 promoter in a luciferase reporter construct suppresses its transcriptional activity supporting a functional role of DNA methylation in SLC6A4 promoter regulation. These findings indicate that state of SLC6A4 promoter methylation is altered in peripheral white blood cells of individuals with physical aggression during childhood. This supports the relevance of peripheral DNA methylation for brain function and suggests that peripheral SLC6A4 DNA methylation could be a marker of central 5-HT function.

  13. Rethinking capacity building for knowledge mobilisation: developing multilevel capabilities in healthcare organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislov, Roman; Waterman, Heather; Harvey, Gill; Boaden, Ruth

    2014-11-15

    Knowledge mobilisation in healthcare organisations is often carried out through relatively short-term projects dependent on limited funding, which raises concerns about the long-term sustainability of implementation and improvement. It is becoming increasingly recognised that the translation of research evidence into practice has to be supported by developing the internal capacity of healthcare organisations to engage with and apply research. This process can be supported by external knowledge mobilisation initiatives represented, for instance, by professional associations, collaborative research partnerships and implementation networks. This conceptual paper uses empirical and theoretical literature on organisational learning and dynamic capabilities to enhance our understanding of intentional capacity building for knowledge mobilisation in healthcare organisations. The discussion is structured around the following three themes: (1) defining and classifying capacity building for knowledge mobilisation; (2) mechanisms of capability development in organisational context; and (3) individual, group and organisational levels of capability development. Capacity building is presented as a practice-based process of developing multiple skills, or capabilities, belonging to different knowledge domains and levels of complexity. It requires an integration of acquisitive learning, through which healthcare organisations acquire knowledge and skills from knowledge mobilisation experts, and experience-based learning, through which healthcare organisations adapt, absorb and modify their knowledge and capabilities through repeated practice. Although the starting point for capability development may be individual-, team- or organisation-centred, facilitation of the transitions between individual, group and organisational levels of learning within healthcare organisations will be needed. Any initiative designed to build capacity for knowledge mobilisation should consider the

  14. Manipulation and mobilisation for neck pain contrasted against an inactive control or another active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anita; Langevin, Pierre; Burnie, Stephen J; Bédard-Brochu, Marie-Sophie; Empey, Brian; Dugas, Estelle; Faber-Dobrescu, Michael; Andres, Cristy; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charles H; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L; LeBlanc, Francis

    2015-09-23

    Manipulation and mobilisation are commonly used to treat neck pain. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, and previously updated in 2010. To assess the effects of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared wiith those of an inactive control or another active treatment on pain, function, disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults experiencing neck pain with or without radicular symptoms and cervicogenic headache (CGH) at immediate- to long-term follow-up. When appropriate, to assess the influence of treatment characteristics (i.e. technique, dosage), methodological quality, symptom duration and subtypes of neck disorder on treatment outcomes. Review authors searched the following computerised databases to November 2014 to identify additional studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov, checked references, searched citations and contacted study authors to find relevant studies. We updated this search in June 2015, but these results have not yet been incorporated. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) undertaken to assess whether manipulation or mobilisation improves clinical outcomes for adults with acute/subacute/chronic neck pain. Two review authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, assessed risk of bias and applied Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methods (very low, low, moderate, high quality). We calculated pooled risk ratios (RRs) and standardised mean differences (SMDs). We included 51 trials (2920 participants, 18 trials of manipulation/mobilisation versus control; 34 trials of manipulation/mobilisation versus another treatment, 1 trial had two comparisons). Cervical manipulation versus inactive control: For subacute and chronic neck pain, a single manipulation (three trials, no meta

  15. Identifying key factors for mobilising under-utilised low carbon land resources : A case study on Kalimantan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goh, Chun Sheng; Junginger, Martin; Potter, Lesley; Faaij, André; Wicke, Birka

    2018-01-01

    Mobilising under-utilised low carbon (ULC) land for future agricultural expansion helps minimising further carbon stock loss. This study examined the regency cases in Kalimantan, a carbon loss hotspot, to understand the key factors for mobilising ULC land via narrative interviews with a range of

  16. Tidlig struktureret mobilisering og træning af kritisk syge patienter på et dansk intensivafsnit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup Sørensen, Katrine; Hvid, Sidsel; Rolving, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    derimod anvendelig i forhold til at tilpasse niveauet for mobilisering og træning. Relevans for klinisk praksis: Tidlig mobilisering og træning er mulig at indføre med en simpel algoritme, dog med hensyntagen til individuelle screeningskriterier fra sted til sted, da disse åbenbart ikke er nemme...

  17. Early mobilisation versus plaster immobilisation of simple elbow dislocations: Results of the FuncSiE multicentre randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.I.T. Iordens (Gijs); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); N.W.L. Schep (Niels); J. de Haan (Jeroen); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); D. Eygendaal (Denise); E.F. van Beeck (Ed); P. Patka (Peter); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); D. den Hartog (Dennis); R.S. Breederveld (Roelf S.); M.W.G.A. Bronkhorst (Maarten); M.R. de Vries (Mark); B.J. Dwars (Boudewijn); R. Haverlag (Robert); S.A.G. Meylaerts (Sven); J.W. Mulder (Jan-Willem); K.J. Ponsen (Kees-jan); W.H. Roerdink (Herbert); G.R. Roukema (Gert); I.B. Schipper (Inger); M.A. Schouten (Michel); J.B. Sintenie (Jan Bernard); S. Sivro (Senail); J.G.H. van den Brand (Johan); F.M. van der Linden (Frits); H.G.W.M. Meulen (Hub); E.J.M.M. Verleisdonk (Egbert); J.P.A.M. Vroemen (Jos); M. Waleboer (Marco); W.J. Willems (Jaap)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground/aim To compare outcome of early mobilisation and plaster immobilisation in patients with a simple elbow dislocation. We hypothesised that early mobilisation would result in earlier functional recovery. Methods From August 2009 to September 2012, 100 adult patients with a

  18. The Adverse Effects of Heavy Metals with and without Noise Exposure on the Human Peripheral and Central Auditory System: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Josée Castellanos

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to some chemicals in the workplace can lead to occupational chemical-induced hearing loss. Attention has mainly focused on the adverse auditory effects of solvents. However, other chemicals such as heavy metals have been also identified as ototoxic agents. The aim of this work was to review the current scientific knowledge about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure with and without co-exposure to noise in humans. PubMed and Medline were accessed to find suitable articles. A total of 49 articles met the inclusion criteria. Results from the review showed that no evidence about the ototoxic effects in humans of manganese is available. Contradictory results have been found for arsenic, lead and mercury as well as for the possible interaction between heavy metals and noise. All studies found in this review have found that exposure to cadmium and mixtures of heavy metals induce auditory dysfunction. Most of the studies investigating the adverse auditory effects of heavy metals in humans have investigated human populations exposed to lead. Some of these studies suggest peripheral and central auditory dysfunction induced by lead exposure. It is concluded that further evidence from human studies about the adverse auditory effects of heavy metal exposure is still required. Despite this issue, audiologists and other hearing health care professionals should be aware of the possible auditory effects of heavy metals.

  19. Improved Exercise Tolerance with Caffeine Is Associated with Modulation of both Peripheral and Central Neural Processes in Human Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna L. Bowtell

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundCaffeine has been shown to enhance exercise performance and capacity. The mechanisms remain unclear but are suggested to relate to adenosine receptor antagonism, resulting in increased central motor drive, reduced perception of effort, and altered peripheral processes such as enhanced calcium handling and extracellular potassium regulation. Our aims were to investigate how caffeine (i affects knee extensor PCr kinetics and pH during repeated sets of single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure and (ii modulates the interplay between central and peripheral neural processes. We hypothesized that the caffeine-induced extension of exercise capacity during repeated sets of exercise would occur despite greater disturbance of the muscle milieu due to enhanced peripheral and corticospinal excitatory output, central motor drive, and muscle contractility.MethodsNine healthy active young men performed five sets of intense single-leg knee extensor exercise to task failure on four separate occasions: for two visits (6 mg·kg−1 caffeine vs placebo, quadriceps 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans were performed to quantify phosphocreatine kinetics and pH, and for the remaining two visits (6 mg·kg−1 caffeine vs placebo, femoral nerve electrical and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the quadriceps cortical motor area were applied pre- and post exercise.ResultsThe total exercise time was 17.9 ± 6.0% longer in the caffeine (1,225 ± 86 s than in the placebo trial (1,049 ± 73 s, p = 0.016, and muscle phosphocreatine concentration and pH (p < 0.05 were significantly lower in the latter sets of exercise after caffeine ingestion. Voluntary activation (VA (peripheral, p = 0.007; but not supraspinal, p = 0.074, motor-evoked potential (MEP amplitude (p = 0.007, and contractility (contraction time, p = 0.009; and relaxation rate, p = 0.003 were significantly higher after caffeine consumption, but at

  20. Expression of NMDA receptor subunits in human blood lymphocytes: A peripheral biomarker in online computer game addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Shirazi, Mitra-Sadat; Vousooghi, Nasim; Alizadeh, Bentolhoda; Makki, Seyed Mohammad; Zarei, Seyed Zeinolabedin; Nazari, Shahrzad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2018-05-23

    Background and aims Repeated performance of some behaviors such as playing computer games could result in addiction. The NMDA receptor is critically involved in the development of behavioral and drug addictions. It has been claimed that the expression level of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain may be reflected in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). Methods Here, using a real-time PCR method, we have investigated the mRNA expression of GluN2A, GluN2D, GluN3A, and GluN3B subunits of the NMDA receptor in PBLs of male online computer game addicts (n = 25) in comparison with normal subjects (n = 26). Results Expression levels of GluN2A, GluN2D, and GluN3B subunits were not statistically different between game addicts and the control group. However, the mRNA expression of the GluN3A subunit was downregulated in PBLs of game addicts. Discussion and conclusions Transcriptional levels of GluN2A and GluN2D subunits in online computer game addicts are similar to our previously reported data of opioid addiction and are not different from the control group. However, unlike our earlier finding of drug addiction, the mRNA expression levels of GluN3A and GluN3B subunits in PBLs of game addicts are reduced and unchanged, respectively, compared with control subjects. It seems that the downregulated state of the GluN3A subunit of NMDA receptor in online computer game addicts is a finding that deserves more studies in the future to see whether it can serve as a peripheral biomarker in addiction studies, where the researcher wants to rule out the confusing effects of abused drugs.

  1. Generation of dendritic cells from human bone marrow mononuclear cells: advantages for clinical application in comparison to peripheral blood monocyte derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, L; Feuerer, M; Beckhove, P; Umansky, V; Schirrmacher, V

    2002-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) currently used for vaccination in clinical studies to induce immunity against malignant cells are normally generated from peripheral blood-derived monocytes. Here we studied conditions for the generation of DCs from unseparated human bone marrow (BM) mononuclear cells and compared them functionally with DCs from blood. The two types of DCs, from bone marrow (BM-DC) and peripheral blood (BL-DC), were generated in parallel from the same normal healthy donors by culturing in serum-free X-VIVO 20 medium containing GM-CSF and IL-4, and then the phenotypes and functions were compared. BM-DC generation occurred in 14 days and involved proliferative expansion from CD34 stem cells and differentiation while BL-DC generation occurred in 7 days from CD14 monocytes and involved only differentiation. A 7- to 25-fold higher number of DCs could be obtained from BM than from blood. BM-DC had similar phenotypes as BL-DC. The capacity to stimulate MLR reactivity in allogeneic T lymphocytes was higher with BM-DC than that with BL-DC. Also, the capacity to stimulate autologous memory T cell responses to tetanus toxoid (TT) or tuberculin (PPD) was higher with BM-DC than with BL-DC. These results suggest that BM-DC as produced here may be a very economic and useful source of professional antigen-presenting cells for anti-tumor immunotherapeutic protocols.

  2. A dose-effect curve of premature condensation chromosome ring in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood exposed to high dose of 60Co γ-rays in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Bo; Li Yufang; Liu Guangxian; Huang Shan; Jiang Benrong; Ai Huisheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To establish a dose-effect curve of premature condensation chromosome ring (PCC-R) in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood after exposed to high doses of γ-rays. Methods: Peripheral blood samples was drawn from three healthy individuals, and exposed to 60 Co γ-rays with doses between 0 and 30 Gy. The frequencies of PCC-R in premature condensation chromosome (PCC) cells obtained by Okadaic acid (OA) induction were calculated, and a dose-effect curve was fitted. Results: PCC index tapered with dose. Frequencies of PCC-R per cell increased until 20 Gy, and then saturation was observed. The results were fitted to a lineal model up to 20 Gy: y=-0.020 + 0.052D, where y was the frequencies of PCC-R per cell, D was the radiation dose(Gy). Conclusions: The highest dose could be estimated is 20 Gy by the dose-effect curve established with PCC-R method. Its utility and validity will be verified in the future application of radiation accident. (authors)

  3. Absence of DNA double-strand breaks in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging assessed by γH2AX flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasshauer, Martin; Staab, Wieland; Sohns, Jan M.; Ritter, Christian; Lotz, Joachim [Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Kruewel, Thomas; Stahnke, Vera C. [Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); Zapf, Antonia [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Medical Statistics, Goettingen (Germany); Rave-Fraenk, Margret [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Goettingen (Germany); Steinmetz, Michael [German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina [Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany); Schuster, Andreas [German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Goettingen (Germany); Goettingen Heart Center, Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, University Medical Center Goettingen (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is regarded as a non-harming and non-invasive imaging modality with high tissue contrast and almost no side effects. Compared to other cross-sectional imaging modalities, MRI does not use ionising radiation. Recently, however, strong magnetic fields as applied in clinical MRI scanners have been suspected to induce DNA double-strand breaks in human lymphocytes. In this study we investigated the impact of 3-T cardiac MRI examinations on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks in peripheral mononuclear cells by γH2AX staining and flow cytometry analysis. The study cohort consisted of 73 healthy non-smoking volunteers with 36 volunteers undergoing CMRI and 37 controls without intervention. Differences between the two cohorts were analysed by a mixed linear model with repeated measures. Both cohorts showed a significant increase in the γH2AX signal from baseline to post-procedure of 6.7 % (SD 7.18 %) and 7.8 % (SD 6.61 %), respectively. However, the difference between the two groups was not significant. Based on our study, γH2AX flow cytometry shows no evidence that 3-T MRI examinations as used in cardiac scans impair DNA integrity in peripheral mononuclear cells. (orig.)

  4. In vivo effects of myeloablative alkylator therapy on survival and differentiation of MGMTP140K-transduced human G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shanbao; Hartwell, Jennifer R; Cooper, Ryan J; Juliar, Beth E; Kreklau, Emi; Abonour, Rafat; Goebel, W Scott; Pollok, Karen E

    2006-05-01

    High-intensity alkylator-based chemotherapy is required to eradicate tumors expressing high levels of O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). This treatment, however, can lead to life-threatening myelosuppression. We investigated a gene therapy strategy to protect human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells (MPB) from a high-intensity alkylator-based regimen. We transduced MPB with an oncoretroviral vector that coexpresses MGMT(P140K) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (n = 5 donors). At 4 weeks posttransplantation into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice, cohorts were not treated or were treated with low- or high-intensity alkylating chemotherapy. In the high-intensity-treated cohort, it was necessary to infuse NOD/SCID bone marrow (BM) to alleviate hematopoietic toxicity. At 8 weeks posttreatment, human CD45+ cells in the BM of mice treated with either regimen were EGFP+ and contained MGMT-specific DNA repair activity. In cohorts receiving low-intensity therapy, both primitive and mature hematopoietic cells were present in the BM. Although B-lymphoid and myeloid cells were resistant to in vivo drug treatment in cohorts that received high-intensity therapy, no human CD34+ cells or B-cell precursors were detected. These data suggest that improved strategies to optimize repair of DNA damage in primitive human hematopoietic cells are needed when using high-intensity anti-cancer therapy.

  5. Modules de formation en durabilité et mobilisation des ressources

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Wind

    apprendre à lier la mobilisation des ressources à la planification stratégique; ... chercheurs et des ONG collaborant à des initiatives de défense de politiques. La ...... établissements membres à recruter des stagiaires qui ont contribué à la.

  6. A Model for Collaborative Working to Facilitate Knowledge Mobilisation in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Karen Elizabeth; Wallace, Annie; Crosland, Ann

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a model for collaborative working to facilitate knowledge mobilisation in public health. The model has been developed by university researchers who worked collaboratively with public health commissioners and strategic partners to evaluate a portfolio of short-term funded interventions to inform re-commissioning. Within this…

  7. Room to Manoeuvre: Mobilising the "Active Partner" in Home-School Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Olwen; Hustler, David; Stronach, Ian; Rodrigo, Marta; Beresford, Emma; Botcherby, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Offers an interpretation of the dynamics of home-school relations in terms of a matrix of "mobilisations" and "demolisations" among parents, teachers, and children based upon data collected in an action research and development project. Aims to establish some bases for practical and theoretical "manoeuvers." (CMK)

  8. Finding Feminism, Finding Voice? Mobilising Community Education to Build Women's Participation in Myanmar's Political Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maber, Elizabeth Jane Tregoning

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the role played by women activists and educators in mobilising community education to support new opportunities for women's activism in the context of Myanmar's political transition. Recent political reorientations in Myanmar which have resulted in a civilian-led democracy emerging from a repressive military regime, have…

  9. Developing a Knowledge Network for Applied Education Research to Mobilise Evidence in and for Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Carol; Pollock, Katina; Briscoe, Patricia; Carr-Harris, Shasta; Tuters, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: The importance of "evidence-informed practice" has risen dramatically in education and in other public policy areas. This article focuses on the importance of knowledge mobilisation strategies, processes and outputs. It is concerned with how these can support the adaptation and implementation of evidence from research and…

  10. Longwy: Higher Education and Health Mobilised in the Process of Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin, Magali; le Goff, Erwan

    2013-01-01

    For almost a century, Longwy has been one of the most important industrial areas of France, contributing the majority of the national production of cast iron and steel. The objective of this paper is to analyse how higher education, then health and well-being were mobilised in the process of regeneration of Longwy, which had been very harshly…

  11. Effects of flaxseed oil on anti-oxidative system and membrane deformation of human peripheral blood erythrocytes in high glucose level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Fu, Juan; Yu, Miao; Huang, Qingde; Wang, Di; Xu, Jiqu; Deng, Qianchun; Yao, Ping; Huang, Fenghong; Liu, Liegang

    2012-07-08

    The erythrocyte membrane lesion is a serious diabetic complication. A number of studies suggested that n-3 fatty acid could reduce lipid peroxidation and elevate α- or γ-tocopherol contents in membrane of erythrocytes. However, evidence regarding the protective effects of flaxseed oil, a natural product rich in n-3 fatty acid, on lipid peroxidation, antioxidative capacity and membrane deformation of erythrocytes exposed to high glucose is limited. Human peripheral blood erythrocytes were isolated and treated with 50 mM glucose to mimic hyperglycemia in the absence or presence of three different doses of flaxseed oil (50, 100 or 200 μM) in the culture medium for 24 h. The malondialdehyde (MDA) and L-glutathione (GSH) were measured by HPLC and LC/MS respectively. The phospholipids symmetry and membrane fatty acid composition of human erythrocytes were detected by flow cytometry and gas chromatograph (GC). The morphology of human erythrocyte was illuminated by ultra scanning electron microscopy. Flaxseed oil attenuated hyperglycemia-induced increase of MDA and decrease of GSH in human erythrocytes. Human erythrocytes treated with flaxseed oil contained higher C22:5 and C22:6 than those in the 50 mM glucose control group, indicating that flaxseed oil could reduce lipid asymmetric distribution and membrane perturbation. The ultra scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometer have also indicated that flaxseed oil could protect the membrane of human erythrocytes from deformation at high glucose level. The flaxseed oil supplementation may prevent lipid peroxidation and membrane dysfunction of human erythrocytes in hyperglycemia.

  12. Mobilisations collectives et femmes immigrées en France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Thiéblemont-Dollet

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Si nombreuses que soient les études ayant trait à l’immigration en France (et plus particulièrement masculine, aborder l’immigration sous l’angle des femmes immigrées et des processus communicationnels qu'elles ont développés en terre d’accueil est un apport essentiel aux sciences humaines. C’est pourquoi, cet article traite du thème de la mobilisation collective entre 2000 et 2008, par le biais des actions et des processus communicationnels mis en œuvre par des femmes immigrées ou issues de l’immigration, originaires du Maghreb et de l’Afrique de l’Ouest, plus particulièrement à partir de l’exemple du mouvement Ni Putes Ni Soumises. Analyser les réseaux d’interdépendance et de « contagion » entre ces actrices aux origines sociales identiques, faisant que ces femmes expriment un sentiment d’exclusion et associent leur statut social (chômage, profession sous-qualifiée, ethnique (origine maghrébine ou africaine et spatial (cité, banlieue, quartier dit difficile, à un même stigmate les reléguant à un univers discriminatoire, dégager les spécificités de leurs paroles selon les espaces et les temporalités où elles ont été délivrées, saisir leurs manières de s’organiser et leurs possibilités de mobilisation, sont les grands axes de cette réflexion. Suggérer enfin que ces femmes constituent un corps social émergent et mutant est une autre manière de lire ce texte. Émergent, parce qu’il est relativement récent du point de vue de sa visibilité dans la sphère publique et mutant, parce qu’il intègre des femmes qui participent d’un changement en train de se faire dans la société française et qui donnent une nouvelle image d’elles : non pas celle de féministes au sens classique du terme et de ce qui peut s’y rattacher, mais celle qui s’inscrit dans la perspective de comportement de genre à entendre comme mixité et modalités d’interaction entre femmes et hommes. Enfin

  13. Measurement of in vivo HGPRT-deficient mutant cell frequency using a modified method for cloning human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakoda, Masayuki; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kobuke, Kyoko; Awa, A.A.

    1987-07-01

    Approximately 80 % of human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes could be cloned in the presence of crude Interleukin-2, phytohemagglutinin, and X-irradiated autologous lymphocytes and Raji B-cells. This modified cloning method was used to measure the in vivo frequency of HGPRT-deficient mutant T-lymphocytes. Repeated experiments using blood from the same individuals revealed that the frequency of mutant cells was almost constant for each individual even though the cloning efficiency of lymphocytes varied somewhat from experiment to experiment. Approximately 80 % of both wild-type unselected and 6-thioguanine-resistant colonies had helper/inducer and about 20 % had suppressor/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte markers. No difference was observed in the distribution of lymphocyte subsets between wild and mutant lymphocyte colonies. (author)

  14. The MOVIN' project (Mobilisation Of Ventilated Intensive care patients at Nepean): A quality improvement project based on the principles of knowledge translation to promote nurse-led mobilisation of critically ill ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Anwar; Rajamani, Arvind; Fitzsimons, Fiona

    2017-10-01

    Prospective quality improvement project to evaluate the impact of a training programme to promote nurse-led mobilisation of intubated critically ill patients. This project involved an educational programme to upskill nurses and overcome the barriers/challenges to nurse-led mobilisation. Initial strategies focused on educating and upskilling nurses to attain competency in active mobilisation. Subsequent strategies focused on positive reinforcement to achieve a culture shift. A pre- and post-intervention audit was used to evaluate its effectiveness. A baseline audit showed that ∼9% of ventilated patients were mobilised. Several barriers were identified. Twenty-three nurses underwent training in actively mobilising ventilated patients. This increased their confidence levels and there was reduction in reported barriers. However, the rate of active mobilisation remained low (9.7%). Subsequently, a programme of positive reinforcement with rewards and visual reminders was introduced, which saw an increase in the number of nurse-led mobilisations of both ventilated patients (from 9.7% to 34.8%; p=0.0003), and non-ventilated patients (29.5% versus 62.9%; p=patients. However, to promote a culture change, training and competency must be combined with a multi-pronged approach including reminders, positive reinforcement and rewards. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Profile of the genes expressed in the human peripheral retina, macula, and retinal pigment epithelium determined through serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Dror; Blackshaw, Seth; Cepko, Constance L.; Dryja, Thaddeus P.

    2002-01-01

    We used the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) technique to catalogue and measure the relative levels of expression of the genes expressed in the human peripheral retina, macula, and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) from one or both of two humans, aged 88 and 44 years. The cone photoreceptor contribution to all transcription in the retina was found to be similar in the macula versus the retinal periphery, whereas the rod contribution was greater in the periphery versus the macula. Genes encoding structural proteins for axons were found to be expressed at higher levels in the macula versus the retinal periphery, probably reflecting the large proportion of ganglion cells in the central retina. In comparison with the younger eye, the peripheral retina of the older eye had a substantially higher proportion of mRNAs from genes encoding proteins involved in iron metabolism or protection against oxidative damage and a substantially lower proportion of mRNAs from genes encoding proteins involved in rod phototransduction. These differences may reflect the difference in age between the two donors or merely interindividual variation. The RPE library had numerous previously unencountered tags, suggesting that this cell type has a large, idiosyncratic repertoire of expressed genes. Comparison of these libraries with 100 reported nonocular SAGE libraries revealed 89 retina-specific or enriched genes expressed at substantial levels, of which 14 are known to cause a retinal disease and 53 are RPE-specific genes. We expect that these libraries will serve as a resource for understanding the relative expression levels of genes in the retina and the RPE and for identifying additional disease genes. PMID:11756676

  16. Proteomic validation of multifunctional molecules in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumi Kim

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are one of the most attractive therapeutic resources in clinical application owing to their multipotent capability, which means that cells can differentiate into various mesenchymal tissues such as bone, cartilage, fat, tendon, muscle and marrow stroma. Depending on the cellular source, MSCs exhibit different application potentials according to their different in vivo functions, despite similar phenotypic and cytological characteristics. To understand the different molecular conditions that govern the different application or differentiation potential of each MSC according to cellular source, we generated a proteome reference map of MSCs obtained from bone marrow (BM, umbilical cord blood (CB and peripheral blood (PB. We identified approximately 30 differentially regulated (or expressed proteins. Most up-regulated proteins show a cytoskeletal and antioxidant or detoxification role according to their functional involvement. Additionally, these proteins are involved in the increase of cell viability, engraftment and migration in pathological conditions in vivo. In summary, we examined differentially expressed key regulatory factors of MSCs obtained from several cellular sources, demonstrated their differentially expressed proteome profiles and discussed their functional role in specific pathological conditions. With respect to the field of cell therapy, it may be particularly crucial to determine the most suitable cell sources according to target disease.

  17. The Induction of Chromosome Aberrations and Micronuclei in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes at Low Doses of Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shmakova, N L; Krasavin, E A; Melnikova, L A; Fadeeva, T A

    2003-01-01

    The chromosome damage induced by the low doses of gamma-irradiation with ^{60}Co and X-rays in peripheral blood lymphocytes has been studied using different cytogenetic assays. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.01-1.0 Gy, simulated by PHA, and analysed for chromosome aberrations by the metaphase and the anaphase methods, by the micronucleus assay. Despite the quantitative differences in the amount of chromosome damage revealed by different methods, all of them demonstrated complex nonlinear dose dependence of the frequency of aberrant cells and aberrations. At the dose range of 0.01-0.05 Gy the cells showed the highest radiosensitivity; at 0.05-0.5 Gy the dose-independent induction of chromosome damage was revealed. At the doses of 0.5-1.0 Gy the dose-effect curves became linear with the decreased slope compared with the initial one (by a factor of 5 to 10 for different criteria) reflecting a higher radioresistance of the cells. These data confirm the idea that the direct linear extrapolation of high-dos...

  18. Incidence of micronuclei in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to modulated and unmodulated 2450 MHz radiofrequency fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalaxmi; Reddy, Abhishek B; McKenzie, Raymond J; McIntosh, Robert L; Prihoda, Thomas J; Wood, Andrew W

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral blood samples from four healthy volunteers were collected and aliquots were exposed in vitro for 2 h to either (i) modulated (wideband code division multiple access, WCDMA) or unmodulated continuous wave (CW) 2450 MHz radiofrequency (RF) fields at an average specific absorption rate of 10.9 W/kg or (ii) sham-exposed. Aliquots of the same samples that were exposed in vitro to an acute dose of 1.5 Gy ionizing gamma-radiation (GR) were used as positive controls. Half of the aliquots were treated with melatonin (Mel) to investigate if such treatment offers protection to the cells from the genetic damage, if any, induced by RF and GR. The cells in all samples were cultured for 72 h and the lymphocytes were examined to determine the extent of genetic damage assessed from the incidence of micronuclei (MN). The results indicated the following: (i) the incidence of MN was similar in incubator controls, and those exposed to RF/sham and Mel alone; (ii) there were no significant differences between WCDMA and CW RF exposures; (iii) positive control cells exposed to GR alone exhibited significantly increased MN; and (iv) Mel treatment had no effect on cells exposed to RF and sham, while such treatment significantly reduced the frequency of MN in GR-exposed cells. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Human eosinophils modulate peripheral blood mononuclear cell response to Schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweyongyere, R; Namanya, H; Naniima, P; Cose, S; Tukahebwa, E M; Elliott, A M; Dunne, D W; Wilson, S

    2016-08-01

    High numbers of eosinophils are observed in parasitic infections and allergic diseases, where they are proposed to be terminally differentiated effector cells that play beneficial role in host defence, or cause harmful inflammatory response. Eosinophils have been associated with killing of schistosomulae in vitro, but there is growing evidence that eosinophils can play additional immuno-regulatory role. Here, we report results of a study that examines peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) cytokine responses to Schistosoma mansoni adult worm antigen (SWA) when stimulated alone or enriched with autologous eosinophils. Production of the Th-2 type cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 was lower (P = 0·017, 0·018 and eosinophil cultures than in PBMC-only cultures stimulated with SWA. Substantial levels of IL-13, IL-10, interferon gamma and tumour necrosis factor alpha were recorded in cultures of eosinophils, but none of these cytokines showed significant association with the observed eosinophil-induced drop in cytokine responses of PBMC. Transwell experiments suggested that the observed effect is due to soluble mediators that downmodulate production of Th-2 type cytokines. This study shows that eosinophils may down-modulate schistosome-specific Th-2 type cytokine responses in S. mansoni-infected individuals. The mechanism of this immune modulation remains to be elucidated. © 2016 The Authors. Parasite Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Optimal Thawing of Cryopreserved Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells for Use in High-Throughput Human Immune Monitoring Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramu A. Subbramanian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC constitute an important component of immune monitoring studies as they allow for efficient batch- testing of samples as well as for the validation and extension of original studies in the future. In this study, we systematically test the permutations of PBMC thawing practices commonly employed in the field and identify conditions that are high and low risk for the viability of PBMC and their functionality in downstream ELISPOT assays. The study identifies the addition of ice-chilled washing media to thawed cells at the same temperature as being a high risk practice, as it yields significantly lower viability and functionality of recovered PBMC when compared to warming the cryovials to 37 °C and adding a warm washing medium. We found thawed PBMC in cryovials could be kept up to 30 minutes at 37 °C in the presence of DMSO before commencement of washing, which surprisingly identifies exposure to DMSO as a low risk step during the thawing process. This latter finding is of considerable practical relevance since it permits batch-thawing of PBMC in high-throughput immune monitoring environments.

  1. Effectiveness of exercise therapy and manual mobilisation in ankle sprain and functional instability: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wees, Philip J; Lenssen, Anton F; Hendriks, Erik J M; Stomp, Derrick J; Dekker, Joost; de Bie, Rob A

    2006-01-01

    This study critically reviews the effectiveness of exercise therapy and manual mobilisation in acute ankle sprains and functional instability by conducting a systematic review of randomised controlled trials. Trials were searched electronically and manually from 1966 to March 2005. Randomised controlled trials that evaluated exercise therapy or manual mobilisation of the ankle joint with at least one clinically relevant outcome measure were included. Internal validity of the studies was independently assessed by two reviewers. When applicable, relative risk (RR) or standardised mean differences (SMD) were calculated for individual and pooled data. In total 17 studies were included. In thirteen studies the intervention included exercise therapy and in four studies the effects of manual mobilisation of the ankle joint was evaluated. Average internal validity score of the studies was 3.1 (range 1 to 7) on a 10-point scale. Exercise therapy was effective in reducing the risk of recurrent sprains after acute ankle sprain: RR 0.37 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.74), and with functional instability: RR 0.38 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.62). No effects of exercise therapy were found on postural sway in patients with functional instability: SMD: 0.38 (95% CI -0.15 to 0.91). Four studies demonstrated an initial positive effect of different modes of manual mobilisation on dorsiflexion range of motion. It is likely that exercise therapy, including the use of a wobble board, is effective in the prevention of recurrent ankle sprains. Manual mobilisation has an (initial) effect on dorsiflexion range of motion, but the clinical relevance of these findings for physiotherapy practice may be limited.

  2. Knowledge mobilisation for policy development: implementing systems approaches through participatory dynamic simulation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freebairn, Louise; Rychetnik, Lucie; Atkinson, Jo-An; Kelly, Paul; McDonnell, Geoff; Roberts, Nick; Whittall, Christine; Redman, Sally

    2017-10-02

    Evidence-based decision-making is an important foundation for health policy and service planning decisions, yet there remain challenges in ensuring that the many forms of available evidence are considered when decisions are being made. Mobilising knowledge for policy and practice is an emergent process, and one that is highly relational, often messy and profoundly context dependent. Systems approaches, such as dynamic simulation modelling can be used to examine both complex health issues and the context in which they are embedded, and to develop decision support tools. This paper reports on the novel use of participatory simulation modelling as a knowledge mobilisation tool in Australian real-world policy settings. We describe how this approach combined systems science methodology and some of the core elements of knowledge mobilisation best practice. We describe the strategies adopted in three case studies to address both technical and socio-political issues, and compile the experiential lessons derived. Finally, we consider the implications of these knowledge mobilisation case studies and provide evidence for the feasibility of this approach in policy development settings. Participatory dynamic simulation modelling builds on contemporary knowledge mobilisation approaches for health stakeholders to collaborate and explore policy and health service scenarios for priority public health topics. The participatory methods place the decision-maker at the centre of the process and embed deliberative methods and co-production of knowledge. The simulation models function as health policy and programme dynamic decision support tools that integrate diverse forms of evidence, including research evidence, expert knowledge and localised contextual information. Further research is underway to determine the impact of these methods on health service decision-making.

  3. Generation, isolation, and maintenance of human mast cells and mast cell lines derived from peripheral blood or cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rådinger, Madeleine; Jensen, Bettina M; Kuehn, Hye Sun

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-mediated mast cell activation is a pivotal step in the initiation of allergic disorders including anaphylaxis and atopy. To date, studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms regulating these responses, and studies designed to identify potential ways to prevent them, have primarily been...... conducted in rodent mast cells. However, to understand how these responses pertain to human disease, and to investigate and develop novel therapies for the treatment of human mast cell-driven disease, human mast cell models may have greater relevance. Recently, a number of systems have been developed...... to allow investigators to readily obtain sufficient quantities of human mast cells to conduct these studies. These mast cells release the appropriate suite of inflammatory mediators in response to known mast cell activators including antigen. These systems have also been employed to examine the signaling...

  4. Can Melatonin Act as an Antioxidant in Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress Model in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solaleh Emamgholipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We aimed to investigate the possible effects of melatonin on gene expressions and activities of MnSOD and catalase under conditions of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. Materials and Methods. PBMCs were isolated from healthy subjects and treated as follows: (1 control (only with 0.1% DMSO for 12 h; (2 melatonin (1 mM for 12 h; (3 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h; (4 H2O2 (250 μM for 2 h following 10 h pretreatment with melatonin (1 mM. The gene expression was evaluated by real-time PCR. MnSOD and catalase activities in PBMCs were determined by colorimetric assays. Results. Pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin significantly augmented expression and activity of MnSOD which were diminished by H2O2. Melatonin treatment of PBMCs caused a significant upregulation of catalase by almost 2-fold in comparison with untreated cells. However, activity and expression of catalase increased by 1.5-fold in PBMCs under H2O2-induced oxidative stress compared with untreated cell. Moreover, pretreatment of PBMCs with melatonin resulted in a significant 1.8-fold increase in catalase expression compared to PBMCs treated only with H2O2. Conclusion. It seems that melatonin could prevent from undesirable impacts of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD downregulation. Moreover, melatonin could promote inductive effect of H2O2 on catalase mRNA expression.

  5. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exhibit Heterogeneous CD52 Expression Levels and Show Differential Sensitivity to Alemtuzumab Mediated Cytolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sambasiva P.; Sancho, Jose; Campos-Rivera, Juanita; Boutin, Paula M.; Severy, Peter B.; Weeden, Timothy; Shankara, Srinivas; Roberts, Bruce L.; Kaplan, Johanne M.

    2012-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that targets cell surface CD52 and is effective in depleting lymphocytes by cytolytic effects in vivo. Although the cytolytic effects of alemtuzumab are dependent on the density of CD52 antigen on cells, there is scant information regarding the expression levels of CD52 on different cell types. In this study, CD52 expression was assessed on phenotypically distinct subsets of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from normal donors. Results demonstrate that subsets of PBMCs express differing levels of CD52. Quantitative analysis showed that memory B cells and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) display the highest number while natural killer (NK) cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and basophils have the lowest number of CD52 molecules per cell amongst lymphoid and myeloid cell populations respectively. Results of complement dependent cytolysis (CDC) studies indicated that alemtuzumab mediated profound cytolytic effects on B and T cells with minimal effect on NK cells, basophils and pDCs, correlating with the density of CD52 on these cells. Interestingly, despite high CD52 levels, mDCs and monocytes were less susceptible to alemtuzumab-mediated CDC indicating that antigen density alone does not define susceptibility. Additional studies indicated that higher expression levels of complement inhibitory proteins (CIPs) on these cells partially contributes to their resistance to alemtuzumab mediated CDC. These results indicate that alemtuzumab is most effective in depleting cells of the adaptive immune system while leaving innate immune cells relatively intact. PMID:22761788

  6. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exhibit heterogeneous CD52 expression levels and show differential sensitivity to alemtuzumab mediated cytolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasiva P Rao

    Full Text Available Alemtuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that targets cell surface CD52 and is effective in depleting lymphocytes by cytolytic effects in vivo. Although the cytolytic effects of alemtuzumab are dependent on the density of CD52 antigen on cells, there is scant information regarding the expression levels of CD52 on different cell types. In this study, CD52 expression was assessed on phenotypically distinct subsets of lymphoid and myeloid cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from normal donors. Results demonstrate that subsets of PBMCs express differing levels of CD52. Quantitative analysis showed that memory B cells and myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs display the highest number while natural killer (NK cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs and basophils have the lowest number of CD52 molecules per cell amongst lymphoid and myeloid cell populations respectively. Results of complement dependent cytolysis (CDC studies indicated that alemtuzumab mediated profound cytolytic effects on B and T cells with minimal effect on NK cells, basophils and pDCs, correlating with the density of CD52 on these cells. Interestingly, despite high CD52 levels, mDCs and monocytes were less susceptible to alemtuzumab-mediated CDC indicating that antigen density alone does not define susceptibility. Additional studies indicated that higher expression levels of complement inhibitory proteins (CIPs on these cells partially contributes to their resistance to alemtuzumab mediated CDC. These results indicate that alemtuzumab is most effective in depleting cells of the adaptive immune system while leaving innate immune cells relatively intact.

  7. Analyses of the peripheral immunome following multiple administrations of avelumab, a human IgG1 anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Renee N; Lepone, Lauren M; Grenga, Italia; Jochems, Caroline; Fantini, Massimo; Madan, Ravi A; Heery, Christopher R; Gulley, James L; Schlom, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Multiple anti-PD-L1/PD-1 checkpoint monoclonal antibodies (MAb) have shown clear evidence of clinical benefit. All except one have been designed or engineered to omit the possibility to mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) as a second potential mode of anti-tumor activity; the reason for this is the concern of lysis of PD-L1 positive immune cells. Avelumab is a fully human IgG1 MAb which has been shown in prior in vitro studies to mediate ADCC versus a range of human tumor cells, and clinical studies have demonstrated anti-tumor activity versus a range of human cancers. This study was designed to investigate the effect on immune cell subsets in the peripheral blood of cancer patients prior to and following multiple administrations of avelumab. One hundred twenty-three distinct immune cell subsets in the peripheral blood of cancer patients ( n  = 28) in a phase I trial were analyzed by flow cytometry prior to and following one, three, and nine cycles of avelumab. Changes in soluble (s) CD27 and sCD40L in plasma were also evaluated. In vitro studies were also performed to determine if avelumab would mediate ADCC of PBMC. No statistically significant changes in any of the 123 immune cell subsets analyzed were observed at any dose level, or number of doses, of avelumab. Increases in the ratio of sCD27:sCD40L were observed, suggesting potential immune activation. Controlled in vitro studies also showed lysis of tumor cells by avelumab versus no lysis of PBMC from five donors. These studies demonstrate the lack of any significant effect on multiple immune cell subsets, even those expressing PD-L1, following multiple cycles of avelumab. These results complement prior studies showing anti-tumor effects of avelumab and comparable levels of adverse events with avelumab versus other anti-PD-1/PD-L1 MAbs. These studies provide the rationale to further exploit the potential ADCC mechanism of action of avelumab as well as other human IgG1 checkpoint

  8. Increased ICAM-1 Expression in Transformed Human Oral Epithelial Cells: Molecular Mechanism and Functional Role in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Adhesion and Lymphokine-Activated-Killer Cell Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T.-J.; Zhang, Xinli; Park, No-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) serves as a counter-receptor for the β2-integrins, LFA-1 and Mac-1, which are expressed on leukocytes. Although expression of ICAM-1 on tumor cells has a role in tumor progression and development, information on ICAM-1 expression and its role in oral cancer has not been established. Normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK), human papilloma virus (HPV)-immortalized human oral keratinocyte lines (HOK-16B, HOK-18A, and HOK-18C), and six human oral neoplastic cell lines (HOK-16B-BaP-T1, SCC-4, SCC-9, HEp-2, Tu-177 and 1483) were used to study ICAM-1 expression and its functional role in vitro. Our results demonstrated that NHOK express negligible levels of ICAM-1, whereas immortalized human oral keratinocytes and cancer cells express significantly higher levels of ICAM-1, except for HOK-16B-BaP-T1 and HEp-2. Altered mRNA half-lives did not fully account for the increased accumulation of ICAM-1 mRNA. Adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to epithelial cells correlated with cell surface ICAM-1 expression levels. This adhesion was inhibited by antibodies specific for either ICAM-1 or LFA-1/Mac-1, suggesting a role for these molecules in adhesion. In contrast, lymphokine-activated-killer (LAK) cell cytotoxic killing of epithelial cells did not correlate with ICAM-1 levels or with adhesion. Nonetheless, within each cell line, blocking of ICAM-1 or LFA-1/Mac-1 reduced LAK cells killing, suggesting that ICAM-1 is involved in mediating this killing. PMID:10938387

  9. WNK1/HSN2 mutation in human peripheral neuropathy deregulates KCC2 expression and posterior lateral line development in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Bercier

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 2 (HSNAII is a rare pathology characterized by an early onset of severe sensory loss (all modalities in the distal limbs. It is due to autosomal recessive mutations confined to exon "HSN2" of the WNK1 (with-no-lysine protein kinase 1 serine-threonine kinase. While this kinase is well studied in the kidneys, little is known about its role in the nervous system. We hypothesized that the truncating mutations present in the neural-specific HSN2 exon lead to a loss-of-function of the WNK1 kinase, impairing development of the peripheral sensory system. To investigate the mechanisms by which the loss of WNK1/HSN2 isoform function causes HSANII, we used the embryonic zebrafish model and observed strong expression of WNK1/HSN2 in neuromasts of the peripheral lateral line (PLL system by immunohistochemistry. Knocking down wnk1/hsn2 in embryos using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides led to improper PLL development. We then investigated the reported interaction between the WNK1 kinase and neuronal potassium chloride cotransporter KCC2, as this transporter is a target of WNK1 phosphorylation. In situ hybridization revealed kcc2 expression in mature neuromasts of the PLL and semi-quantitative RT-PCR of wnk1/hsn2 knockdown embryos showed an increased expression of kcc2 mRNA. Furthermore, overexpression of human KCC2 mRNA in embryos replicated the wnk1/hsn2 knockdown phenotype. We validated these results by obtaining double knockdown embryos, both for wnk1/hsn2 and kcc2, which alleviated the PLL defects. Interestingly, overexpression of inactive mutant KCC2-C568A, which does not extrude ions, allowed a phenocopy of the PLL defects. These results suggest a pathway in which WNK1/HSN2 interacts with KCC2, producing a novel regulation of its transcription independent of KCC2's activation, where a loss-of-function mutation in WNK1 induces an overexpression of KCC2 and hinders proper peripheral sensory nerve

  10. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure does not modulate Toll-like receptor signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, de S.; Bouwens, M.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.; Cuppen, J.J.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Hermans, P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on human health remain unclear. It has been reported that ELF-EMF may modulate the innate immune response to microorganisms in animal models and mammalian cell-lines. With the recently gained insight in innate immune signaling

  11. Winter to summer change in vitamin D status reduces systemic inflammation and bioenergetic activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Emily K; Keane, Kevin N; Raizel, Raquel; Rowlands, Jordan; Soares, Mario J; Newsholme, Philip

    2017-08-01

    Vitamin D status [25(OH)D] has recently been reported to be associated with altered cellular bioenergetic profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). No study has tracked the seasonal variation of 25(OH)D and its putative influence on whole body energy metabolism, cellular bioenergetic profiles, inflammatory markers and clinical chemistry. Whole body energy metabolism and substrate utilisation were measured by indirect calorimetry. PBMCs obtained from the same subjects were isolated from whole blood, counted and freshly seeded. Bioenergetic analysis (mitochondrial stress test and glycolysis stress test) was performed using the Seahorse XF e 96 flux analyser. 25(OH)D was assessed using the Architect immunoassay method. 25(OH)D increased by a median (IQR) of 14.40 (20.13)nmol/L (pwinter to summer and was accompanied by significant improvements in indices of insulin sensitivity, McAuley's index (p=0.019) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (p=0.028). PBMC mitochondrial parameters basal respiration, non-mitochondrial respiration, ATP production, proton leak, and maximal respiration decreased in summer compared to winter. Similarly, PBMC glycolytic parameters glycolytic activity, glucose response, and glycolytic capacity were all reduced in summer compared to winter. There was also a trend for absolute resting metabolic rate (RMR) to decrease (p=0.066). Markers of systemic inflammation MCP-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and IL-12p70 decreased significantly in summer compared to winter. Participants who entered winter with a low 25(OH)D (winter 25(OH)D concentrations of 50-75nmol/L or >75nmol/L. The absolute change in 25(OH)D was not associated with altered bioenergetics. Seasonal improvements in 25(OH)D was associated with reduced systemic inflammation, PBMC bioenergetic profiles and whole body energy metabolism. These observational changes in PBMC bioenergetics were most pronounced in those who had insufficient 25(OH)D in winter. The data warrants

  12. Characterization of coal fly ash nanoparticles and induced oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Ali, Al-Yousef Sulaiman; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-01-01

    The nano-sized particles present in coal fly ash (CFA) were characterized through the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The XRD data revealed the average crystallite size of the CFA nanoparticles (CFA-NPs) as 14 nm. TEM and SEM imaging demonstrated predominantly spherical and some polymorphic structures in the size range of 11 to 25 nm. The amount of heavy metal associated with CFA particles (μg/g) were determined as Fe (34160.0 ± 1.38), Ni (150.8 ± 0.78), Cu (99.3 ± 0.56) and Cr (64.0 ± 0.86). However, the bioavailability of heavy metals in terms of percent release was in the order as Cr > Ni > Cu > Fe in CFA-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extract. The comet and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assays revealed substantial genomic DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells treated with CFA-NPs in Aq and DMSO extracts. About 1.8 and 3.6 strand breaks per unit of DNA were estimated through alkaline unwinding assay at 1:100 DNA nucleotide/CFA ppm ratios with the Aq and DMSO extracts, respectively. The DNA and mitochondrial damage was invariably greater with CFA-DMSO extract vis-à-vis -Aq extract. Generation of superoxide anions (O 2 • − ) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) through metal redox-cycling, alteration in mitochondrial potential and 8-oxodG production elucidated CFA-NPs induced oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for CFA-induced genotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► CFA consists of spherical crystalline nanoparticles in size range of 11–25 nm. ► Alkaline unwinding assay revealed single-strandedness in CFA treated ctDNA. ► CFA nanoparticles exhibited the ability to induce ROS and oxidative DNA damage. ► Comet and CBMN assays revealed DNA and chromosomal breakage in PBMN cells. ► CFA-NPs resulted in mitochondrial membrane damage in PBMN cells.

  13. Characterization of coal fly ash nanoparticles and induced oxidative DNA damage in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ali, Al-Yousef Sulaiman [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Science, University of Dammam, P.O. Box 1683, Hafr Al Batin-31991 (Saudi Arabia); Musarrat, Javed, E-mail: musarratj1@yahoo.com [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Agricultural Microbiology, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, AMU, Aligarh202002 (India)

    2012-10-15

    The nano-sized particles present in coal fly ash (CFA) were characterized through the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. The XRD data revealed the average crystallite size of the CFA nanoparticles (CFA-NPs) as 14 nm. TEM and SEM imaging demonstrated predominantly spherical and some polymorphic structures in the size range of 11 to 25 nm. The amount of heavy metal associated with CFA particles ({mu}g/g) were determined as Fe (34160.0 {+-} 1.38), Ni (150.8 {+-} 0.78), Cu (99.3 {+-} 0.56) and Cr (64.0 {+-} 0.86). However, the bioavailability of heavy metals in terms of percent release was in the order as Cr > Ni > Cu > Fe in CFA-dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) extract. The comet and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assays revealed substantial genomic DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells treated with CFA-NPs in Aq and DMSO extracts. About 1.8 and 3.6 strand breaks per unit of DNA were estimated through alkaline unwinding assay at 1:100 DNA nucleotide/CFA ppm ratios with the Aq and DMSO extracts, respectively. The DNA and mitochondrial damage was invariably greater with CFA-DMSO extract vis-a-vis -Aq extract. Generation of superoxide anions (O{sub 2} Bullet {sup -}) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) through metal redox-cycling, alteration in mitochondrial potential and 8-oxodG production elucidated CFA-NPs induced oxidative stress as a plausible mechanism for CFA-induced genotoxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFA consists of spherical crystalline nanoparticles in size range of 11-25 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkaline unwinding assay revealed single-strandedness in CFA treated ctDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFA nanoparticles exhibited the ability to induce ROS and oxidative DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comet and CBMN assays revealed DNA and chromosomal

  14. Transforming growth factor beta-1 and interleukin-17 gene transcription in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the human response to infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Mary

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: The occurrence of severe sepsis may be associated with deficient pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFbeta-1) predominantly inhibits inflammation and may simultaneously promote IL-17 production. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a recently described pro-inflammatory cytokine, which may be important in auto-immunity and infection. We investigated the hypothesis that the onset of sepsis is related to differential TGFbeta-1 and IL-17 gene expression. METHODS: A prospective observational study in a mixed intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital wards in a university hospital. Patients (59) with severe sepsis; 15 patients with gram-negative bacteraemia but without critical illness and 10 healthy controls were assayed for TGFbeta-1, IL-17a, IL-17f, IL-6 and IL-1beta mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by quantitative real-time PCR and serum protein levels by ELISA. RESULTS: TGFbeta-1 mRNA levels are reduced in patients with bacteraemia and sepsis compared with controls (p=0.02). IL-6 mRNA levels were reduced in bacteraemic patients compared with septic patients and controls (p=0.008). IL-1beta mRNA levels were similar in all groups, IL-17a and IL-17f mRNA levels are not detectable in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. IL-6 protein levels were greater in patients with sepsis than bacteraemic and control patients (p<0.0001). Activated TGFbeta-1 and IL-17 protein levels were similar in all groups. IL-1beta protein was not detectable in the majority of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Down regulation of TGFbeta-1 gene transcription was related to the occurrence of infection but not the onset of sepsis. Interleukin-17 production in PBMC may not be significant in the human host response to infection.

  15. Impact of radiofrequency radiation on DNA damage and antioxidants in peripheral blood lymphocytes of humans residing in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zothansiama; Zosangzuali, Mary; Lalramdinpuii, Miriam; Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Radiofrequency radiations (RFRs) emitted by mobile phone base stations have raised concerns on its adverse impact on humans residing in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations. Therefore, the present study was envisaged to evaluate the effect of RFR on the DNA damage and antioxidant status in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) of individuals residing in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations and comparing it with healthy controls. The study groups matched for various demographic data including age, gender, dietary pattern, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, duration of mobile phone use and average daily mobile phone use. The RF power density of the exposed individuals was significantly higher (p base stations, showed significantly (p base station/s. The analysis of various antioxidants in the plasma of exposed individuals revealed a significant attrition in glutathione (GSH) concentration (p < 0.01), activities of catalase (CAT) (p < 0.001) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p < 0.001) and rise in lipid peroxidation (LOO) when compared to controls. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed a significant association among reduced GSH concentration (p < 0.05), CAT (p < 0.001) and SOD (p < 0.001) activities and elevated MN frequency (p < 0.001) and LOO (p < 0.001) with increasing RF power density.

  16. The discrepancy between human peripheral nerve chronaxie times as measured using magnetic and electric field stimuli: the relevance to MRI gradient coil safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recoskie, Bryan J; Chronik, Blaine A; Scholl, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) resulting from electric fields induced from the rapidly changing magnetic fields of gradient coils is a concern in MRI. Nerves exposed to either electric fields or changing magnetic fields would be expected to display consistent threshold characteristics, motivating the direct application of electric field exposure criteria from the literature to guide the development of gradient magnetic field exposure criteria for MRI. The consistency of electric and magnetic field exposures was tested by comparing chronaxie times for electric and magnetic PNS curves for 22 healthy human subjects. Electric and magnetic stimulation thresholds were measured for exposure of the forearm using both surface electrodes and a figure-eight magnetic coil, respectively. The average chronaxie times for the electric and magnetic field conditions were 109 ± 11 μs and 651 ± 53 μs (±SE), respectively. We do not propose that these results call into question the basic mechanism, namely that rapidly switched gradient magnetic fields induce electric fields in human tissues, resulting in PNS. However, this result does motivate us to suggest that special care must be taken when using electric field exposure data from the literature to set gradient coil PNS safety standards in MRI.

  17. Naturally induced secretions of the potato cyst nematode co-stimulate the proliferation of both tobacco leaf protoplasts and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverse, A; Rouppe van der Voort, J; Roppe van der Voort, C; Kavelaars, A; Smant, G; Schots, A; Bakker, J; Helder, J

    1999-10-01

    Naturally induced secretions from infective juveniles of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis co-stimulate the proliferation of tobacco leaf protoplasts in the presence of the synthetic phytohormones alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). With the use of a protoplast-based bioassay, a low-molecular-weight peptide(s) (cyst nematode secretions also co-stimulated mitogenesis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The stimulation of plant cells isolated from nontarget tissue--these nematodes normally invade the roots of potato plants--suggests the activation of a general signal transduction mechanism(s) by an oligopeptide(s) secreted by the nematode. Whether a similar oligopeptide-induced mechanism underlies human PBMC activation remains to be investigated. Reactivation of the cell cycle is a crucial event in feeding cell formation by cyst nematodes. The secretion of a mitogenic low-molecular-weight peptide(s) by infective juveniles of the potato cyst nematode could contribute to the redifferentiation of plant cells into such a feeding cell.

  18. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cell in vitro system to test the efficacy of food bioactive compounds: Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with BMI

    KAUST Repository

    Cifre, Margalida

    2016-11-22

    Scope: To analyse the usefulness of isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to rapidly/easily reflect n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) effects on lipid metabolism/inflammation gene profile, and evaluate if these effects are body mass index (BMI) dependent. Methods and results: PBMC from normoweight (NW) and overweight/obese (OW/OB) subjects were incubated with physiological doses of docosahexaenoic (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or their combination. PBMC reflected increased beta-oxidation-like capacity (CPT1A expression) in OW/OB but only after DHA treatment. However, insensitivity to n-3 LCPUFA was evident in OW/OB for lipogenic genes: both PUFA diminished FASN and SREBP1C expression in NW, but no effect was observed for DHA in PBMC from high-BMI subjects. This insensitivity was also evident for inflammation gene profile: all treatments inhibited key inflammatory genes in NW; nevertheless, no effect was observed in OW/OB after DHA treatment, and EPA effect was impaired. SLC27A2, IL6 and TNFα PBMC expression analysis resulted especially interesting to determine obesity-related n-3 LCPUFA insensitivity. Conclusion: A PBMC-based human in vitro system reflects n-3 LCPUFA effects on lipid metabolism/inflammation which is impaired in OW/OB. These results confirm the utility of PBMC ex vivo systems for bioactive-compound screening to promote functional food development and to establish appropriate dietary strategies for obese population.

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Exposed to Lassa Virus and to the Attenuated Mopeia/Lassa Reassortant 29 (ML29), a Vaccine Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan Carlos; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L.; Crasta, Oswald; Zhang, Yan; Mani, Sachin; Jett, Marti; Poonia, Bhawna; Djavani, Mahmoud; White, David M.; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV) are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG), as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease. PMID:24069471

  20. Transcriptome analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to Lassa virus and to the attenuated Mopeia/Lassa reassortant 29 (ML29, a vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Zapata

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is the causative agent of Lassa Fever and is responsible for several hundred thousand infections and thousands of deaths annually in West Africa. LASV and the non-pathogenic Mopeia virus (MOPV are both rodent-borne African arenaviruses. A live attenuated reassortant of MOPV and LASV, designated ML29, protects rodents and primates from LASV challenge and appears to be more attenuated than MOPV. To gain better insight into LASV-induced pathology and mechanism of attenuation we performed gene expression profiling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC exposed to LASV and the vaccine candidate ML29. PBMC from healthy human subjects were exposed to either LASV or ML29. Although most PBMC are non-permissive for virus replication, they remain susceptible to signal transduction by virus particles. Total RNA was extracted and global gene expression was evaluated during the first 24 hours using high-density microarrays. Results were validated using RT-PCR, flow cytometry and ELISA. LASV and ML29 elicited differential expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG, as well as genes involved in apoptosis, NF-kB signaling and the coagulation pathways. These genes could eventually serve as biomarkers to predict disease outcomes. The remarkable differential expression of thrombomodulin, a key regulator of inflammation and coagulation, suggests its involvement with vascular abnormalities and mortality in Lassa fever disease.

  1. Activation of human B lymphocytes. 8. Differential radiosensitivity of subpopulations of lymphoid cells involved in the polyclonally-induced PFC responses of peripheral blood B lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fauci, A S; Pratt, K R; Whalen, G [National Inst. of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1978-11-01

    The differential effect of various doses of irradiation on subpopulations of human peripheral blood lymphoid cells involved in the pokeweed mitogen induced PFC response against sheep red blood cells was studied. The plaque forming B cells were quite sensitive to low doses of irradiation with complete suppression of responses at 300 to 500 rad. On the contrary, helper T-cell function was resistant to 2000 rad. Co-culture of irradiated T cells with autologous or allogeneic B cells resulted in marked enhancement of PFC responses consistent with the suppression of naturally occurring suppressor cells with a resulting pure helper effect. Irradiated T-cell-depleted suspensions failed to produce this effect as did heat killed T cells, whereas mitomycin C treated T cells gave effects similar to irradiated T cells. These findings are consistent with a lack of requirement of cell division for a T-cell helper effect and a requirement of mitosis or another irradiation sensitive, mitomycin C sensitive process for a T-suppressor cell effect. These studies have potential relevance in the evaluation of subpopulations of human lymphoid cells involved in antibody production in normal individuals and in disease states.

  2. Protective effect of dry olive leaf extract in adrenaline induced DNA damage evaluated using in vitro comet assay with human peripheral leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarkapa, Andrea; Zivković, Lada; Zukovec, Dijana; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2014-04-01

    Excessive release of stress hormone adrenaline is accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species which may cause disruption of DNA integrity leading to cancer and age-related disorders. Phenolic-rich plant product dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) is known to modulate effects of various oxidants in human cells. The aim was to evaluate the effect of commercial DOLE against adrenaline induced DNA damage in human leukocytes by using comet assay. Peripheral blood leukocytes from 6 healthy subjects were treated in vitro with three final concentrations of DOLE (0.125, 0.5, and 1mg/mL) for 30 min at 37°C under two different protocols, pretreatment and post-treatment. Protective effect of DOLE was assessed from its ability to attenuate formation of DNA lesions induced by adrenaline. Compared to cells exposed only to adrenaline, DOLE displayed significant reduction (Padrenaline genotoxicity. Results indicate genoprotective and antioxidant properties in dry olive leaf extract, strongly supporting further explorations of its underlying mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytoskeletal proteins from human skin fibroblasts, peripheral blood leukocytes, and a lymphoblastoid cell line compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giometti, C.S.; Willard, K.E.; Anderson, N.L.

    1982-01-01

    Differences in proteins between cells grown as suspension cultures and those grown as attached cultures were studied by comparing the proteins of detergent-resistant cytoskeletons prepared from peripheral blood leukocytes and a lymphoblastoid cell line (GM607) (both grown as suspension cultures) and those of human skin fibroblasts (grown as attached cultures) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The major cytoskeletal proteins of the leukocytes were also present in the protein pattern of GM607 cytoskeletons. In contrast, the fibroblast cytoskeletal protein pattern contained four groups of proteins that differed from the patterns of the leukocytes and GM607. In addition, surface labeling of GM607 and human fibroblasts with 125 I demonstrated that substantial amounts of vimentin and actin are exposed at the surface of the attached fibroblasts, but there is little evidence of similar exposure at the surface of the suspension-grown GM607. These results demonstrate some differences in cytoskeletal protein composition between different types of cells could be related to their ability or lack of ability to grow as attached cells in tissue culture

  4. Pre-Treatment effects of peripheral tumors on brain and behavior: Neuroinflammatory mechanisms in humans and rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrepf, Andrew; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Pyter, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients suffer high levels of affective and cognitive disturbances, which have been attributed to diagnosis-related distress, impairment of quality of life, and side effects of primary treatment. An inflammatory microenvironment is also a feature of the vast majority of solid tumors. However, the ability of tumor-associated biological processes to affect the central nervous system (CNS) has only recently been explored in the context of symptoms of depression and cognitive disturbances. In this review, we summarize the burgeoning evidence from rodent cancer models that solid tumors alter neurobiological pathways and subsequent behavioral processes with relevance to affective and cognitive disturbances reported in human cancer populations. We consider, in parallel, the evidence from human clinical cancer research demonstrating that affective and cognitive disturbances are common in some malignancies prior to diagnosis and treatment. We further consider the underlying neurobiological pathways, including altered neuroinflammation, tryptophan metabolism, prostaglandin synthesis and associated neuroanatomical changes, that are most strongly implicated in the rodent literature and supported by analogous evidence from human cancer populations. We focus on the implications of these findings for behavioral researchers and clinicians, with particular emphasis on methodological issues and areas of future research. PMID:25958011

  5. Mobilising the Ethiopian Knowledge Diasporas: Framing the Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amazan, Rose C.

    2008-01-01

    The number of highly skilled Africans leaving their country of origin, many with PhDs, has reached disturbing proportions. Meanwhile, Africa spends billions per year to fill the capacity gaps that are created by the exodus of the highly skilled. In Africa, Ethiopia ranked first in terms of rate of loss of human capital. Many African governments…

  6. Convalescence and hospital stay after colonic surgery with balanced analgesia, early oral feeding, and enforced mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the combined effects of pain relief by continuous epidural analgesia, early oral feeding and enforced mobilisation on convalescence and hospital stay after colonic resection. DESIGN: Uncontrolled pilot investigation. SETTING: University hospital, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 17...... unselected patients (median age 69 years) undergoing colonic resection. INTERVENTIONS: Patients received combined epidural and general anaesthesia during operations and after operation were given continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.25%, 4 ml hour and morphine 0.2 mg hour, for 96 hours and oral paracetamol 4 g...... weight loss. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that a combined approach of optimal pain relief with balanced analgesia, enforced early mobilisation, and oral feeding, may reduce the length of convalescence and hospital stay after colonic operations....

  7. Hypoalgesic effect of a passive accessory mobilisation technique in patients with lateral ankle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hwee Koon; Wright, Anthony

    2011-08-01

    A randomised, double blind, repeated measures study was conducted to investigate the initial effects of an accessory mobilisation technique applied to the ankle joint in 13 patients with a unilateral sub-acute ankle supination injury. Ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, pressure pain threshold, visual analogue scale rating of pain during functional activity and ankle functional scores were assessed before and after application of treatment, manual contact control and no contact control conditions. There were significant improvements in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (p = 0.000) and pressure pain threshold (p = 0.000) during the treatment condition. However no significant effects were observed for the other measures. These findings demonstrate that mobilisation of the ankle joint can produce an initial hypoalgesic effect and an improvement in ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring mechanisms for mobilising industrial sustainability models across different industrial locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ole Morten Noel Brings

    2009-01-01

    Industrial symbiosis is a model of sustainability which suggests that agglomerations of industries can achieve considerable environmental benefits by engaging in inter-organisational waste recycling, energy cascading and water recovery. This article considers how such a complex inter-organisation......Industrial symbiosis is a model of sustainability which suggests that agglomerations of industries can achieve considerable environmental benefits by engaging in inter-organisational waste recycling, energy cascading and water recovery. This article considers how such a complex inter...... symbiosis model may in this way be mobilised across industrial localities as part of the global corporate search for marked access and cost reductions. This suggestion is supported by an illustrative case study shedding some light on the mechanisms for mobilising sustainability models across localities....

  9. Electron microscopic study of the myelinated nerve fibres and the perineurial cell basement membrane in the diabetic human peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBarrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; AlHayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.

    2009-01-01

    To study the quantitative and ultrastructural changes in myelinated nerve fibers and the basement membranes of the perineurial cells in diabetic nerves. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul-Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia from 2003 to 2005. Human sural nerves were obtained from 15 lower limbs and 5 diabetic nerve biopsies. The total mean and density of myelinated nerve fibers per fascicle were calculated, with density of microtubules and mitochondria in the axoplasm. The number of the perineurial cell basement membrane layers was counted, and thickness of the basement membrane was measured. Among the 15 diabetic and 5 normal human sural nerves, the average diameters, number and surface area of myelinated nerve fibers and axonal microtubules density were found to be less in diabetic nerves. Mitochondrial density was higher in diabetic axons. Thickness of the perineurial cell basement membrane had a greater mean, but the number of perineurial cell layers was less than that of the diabetic group. The inner cellular layer of the perineurium of the diabetic nerves contained large vacuoles containing electron-dense degenerated myelin. A few specimens showed degenerated myelinated nerve fibers, while others showed recovering ones. Retracted axoplasms were encountered with albumin extravasation. Diabetes caused an increase in perineurial permeability. The diabetic sural nerve showed marked decrease in the myelinated nerve fibres, increase degenerated mitochondria, and decreased microtubules. (author)

  10. The NAD+ precursor nicotinic acid improves genomic integrity in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after X-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidele, Kathrin; Beneke, Sascha; Bürkle, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    NAD + is an essential cofactor for enzymes catalyzing redox-reactions as well as an electron carrier in energy metabolism. Aside from this, NAD + consuming enzymes like poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases and sirtuins are important regulators involved in chromatin-restructuring processes during repair and epigenetics/transcriptional adaption. In order to replenish cellular NAD + levels after cleavage, synthesis starts from precursors such as nicotinamide, nicotinamide riboside or nicotinic acid to match the need for this essential molecule. In the present study, we investigated the impact of supplementation with nicotinic acid on resting and proliferating human mononuclear blood cells with a focus on DNA damage and repair processes. We observed that nicotinic acid supplementation increased NAD + levels as well as DNA repair efficiency and enhanced genomic stability evaluated by micronucleus test after x-ray treatment. Interestingly, resting cells displayed lower basal levels of DNA breaks compared to proliferating cells, but break-induction rates were identical. Despite similar levels of p53 protein upregulation after irradiation, higher NAD + concentrations led to reduced acetylation of this protein, suggesting enhanced SIRT1 activity. Our data reveal that even in normal primary human cells cellular NAD + levels may be limiting under conditions of genotoxic stress and that boosting the NAD + system with nicotinic acid can improve genomic stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. New nanostructural biomaterials based on active silicate systems and hydroxyapatite: characterization and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opačić-Galić, V; Petrović, V; Zivković, S; Jokanović, V; Nikolić, B; Knežević-Vukčević, J; Mitić-Ćulafić, D

    2013-06-01

    To characterize and investigate the genotoxic effect of a new endodontic cement based on dicalcium- and tricalcium-silicate (CS) with hydroxyapatite (HA) on human lymphocytes. Hydrothermal treatment was applied for synthesis of CS and HA. The final mixture HA-CS, with potential to be used in endodontic practice, is composed of CS (34%) and HA (66%). Human lymphocytes were incubated with HA, HA-CS and CS for 1 h, at 37 °C and 5% CO2. Cell viability was determined using the trypan blue exclusion assay. To evaluate the level of DNA damage comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) was performed. For the statistical analysis anova and Duncan's Post Hoc Test were used. The SEM analysis indicated that CS consisted mostly of agglomerates of several micrometers in size, built up from smaller particles, with dimensions between 117 and 477 nm. This is promising because dimensions of agglomerates are not comparable with channels inside the cell membranes, whereas their nano-elements provide evident activity, important for faster setting of these mixtures compared to MTA. Values of DNA damage obtained in the comet assay indicated low genotoxic risk of the new endodontic materials. The significantly improved setting characteristics and low genotoxic risk of the new material support further research. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  12. Mobile museology:An exploration of fashionable museums, mobilisation, and trans-museal mediation

    OpenAIRE

    Baggesen, Rikke Haller

    2015-01-01

    Drawing together perspectives from museology, digital culture studies and fashion theory, this thesis considers changes in and challenges for current - day museums as related to ‘mobile museology’. This concept is developed for and elucidated in the thesis to describe an orientation towards the fashionable, the ephemeral, and towards an (ideal) state of change and changeability. This orientation is characterised with the triplet concepts of mobile, mobility, and mobilisation, as related to mo...

  13. Decision-Making Tool for Cost-Efficient and Environmentally Friendly Wood Mobilisation

    OpenAIRE

    Matevž Triplat; Peter Prislan; Nike Krajnc

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: With development of forest management technologies, the efficiency of wood production was significantly improved, and thus the impact on forests has changed as well. The article presents a practical decision-making tool for selection of most suitable harvesting system, considering given terrain as well as expected soil conditions on harvesting sites. The decision-making tool should support cost-efficient and environmentally friendly mobilisation of wood. Materials a...

  14. A Long-Gap Peripheral Nerve Injury Therapy Using Human Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells (Sk-SCs): An Achievement of Significant Morphological, Numerical and Functional Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Saito, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Soeda, Shuichi; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Losses in vital functions of the somatic motor and sensory nervous system are induced by severe long-gap peripheral nerve transection injury. In such cases, autologous nerve grafts are the gold standard treatment, despite the unavoidable sacrifice of other healthy functions, whereas the prognosis is not always favorable. Here, we use human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (Sk-SCs) to reconstitute the function after long nerve-gap injury. Muscles samples were obtained from the amputated legs from 9 patients following unforeseen accidents. The Sk-SCs were isolated using conditioned collagenase solution, and sorted as CD34+/45- (Sk-34) and CD34-/45-/29+ (Sk-DN/29+) cells. Cells were separately cultured/expanded under optimal conditions for 2 weeks, then injected into the athymic nude mice sciatic nerve long-gap model (7-mm) bridging an acellular conduit. After 8-12 weeks, active cell engraftment was observed only in the Sk-34 cell transplanted group, showing preferential differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as formation of the myelin sheath and perineurium/endoneurium surrounding regenerated axons, resulted in 87% of numerical recovery. Differentiation into vascular cell lineage (pericyte and endothelial cells) were also observed. A significant tetanic tension recovery (over 90%) of downstream muscles following electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve (at upper portion of the gap) was also achieved. In contrast, Sk-DN/29+ cells were completely eliminated during the first 4 weeks, but relatively higher numerical (83% vs. 41% in axon) and functional (80% vs. 60% in tetanus) recovery than control were observed. Noteworthy, significant increase in the formation of vascular networks in the conduit during the early stage (first 2 weeks) of recovery was observed in both groups with the expression of key factors (mRNA and protein levels), suggesting the paracrine effects to angiogenesis. These results suggested that the human Sk

  15. A Long-Gap Peripheral Nerve Injury Therapy Using Human Skeletal Muscle-Derived Stem Cells (Sk-SCs: An Achievement of Significant Morphological, Numerical and Functional Recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Tamaki

    Full Text Available Losses in vital functions of the somatic motor and sensory nervous system are induced by severe long-gap peripheral nerve transection injury. In such cases, autologous nerve grafts are the gold standard treatment, despite the unavoidable sacrifice of other healthy functions, whereas the prognosis is not always favorable. Here, we use human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (Sk-SCs to reconstitute the function after long nerve-gap injury. Muscles samples were obtained from the amputated legs from 9 patients following unforeseen accidents. The Sk-SCs were isolated using conditioned collagenase solution, and sorted as CD34+/45- (Sk-34 and CD34-/45-/29+ (Sk-DN/29+ cells. Cells were separately cultured/expanded under optimal conditions for 2 weeks, then injected into the athymic nude mice sciatic nerve long-gap model (7-mm bridging an acellular conduit. After 8-12 weeks, active cell engraftment was observed only in the Sk-34 cell transplanted group, showing preferential differentiation into Schwann cells and perineurial/endoneurial cells, as well as formation of the myelin sheath and perineurium/endoneurium surrounding regenerated axons, resulted in 87% of numerical recovery. Differentiation into vascular cell lineage (pericyte and endothelial cells were also observed. A significant tetanic tension recovery (over 90% of downstream muscles following electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve (at upper portion of the gap was also achieved. In contrast, Sk-DN/29+ cells were completely eliminated during the first 4 weeks, but relatively higher numerical (83% vs. 41% in axon and functional (80% vs. 60% in tetanus recovery than control were observed. Noteworthy, significant increase in the formation of vascular networks in the conduit during the early stage (first 2 weeks of recovery was observed in both groups with the expression of key factors (mRNA and protein levels, suggesting the paracrine effects to angiogenesis. These results suggested that the

  16. Development of Anti-Human Mesothelin-Targeted Chimeric Antigen Receptor Messenger RNA-transfected Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes for Ovarian Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Xu, Xuequn; Li, Linhong; Ma, Ying; Jin, Qiu; Viley, Angelia; Allen, Cornell; Natarajan, Pachai; Shivakumar, Rama; Peshwa, Madhusudan V; Emens, Leisha A

    2018-04-02

    CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T/natural killer (NK)-cell therapies can result in durable clinical responses in B-cell malignancies. However, CAR-based immunotherapies have been much less successful in solid cancers, in part due to "on-target off-tumor" toxicity related to expression of target tumor antigens on normal tissue. Based on preliminary observations of safety and clinical activity in proof-of-concept clinical trials, tumor antigen-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) CAR transfection into selected, activated, and expanded T/NK cells may permit prospective control of "on-target off-tumor" toxicity. To develop a commercial product for solid tumors, mesothelin was selected as an antigen target based on its association with poor prognosis and overexpression in multiple solid cancers. It was hypothesized that selecting, activating, and expanding cells ex vivo prior to mRNA CAR transfection would not be necessary, thus simplifying the complexity and cost of manufacturing. Now, the development of anti-human mesothelin mRNA CAR transfected peripheral blood lymphocytes (CARMA-hMeso) is reported, demonstrating the manufacture and cryopreservation of multiple cell aliquots for repeat administrations from a single human leukapheresis. A rapid, automated, closed system for cGMP-compliant transfection of mRNA CAR in up to 20 × 10 9 peripheral blood lymphocytes was developed. Here we show that CARMA-hMeso cells recognize and lyse tumor cells in a mesothelin-specific manner. Expression of CAR was detectable over approximately 7 days in vitro, with a progressive decline of CAR expression that appears to correlate with in vitro cell expansion. In a murine ovarian cancer model, a single intraperitoneal injection of CARMA-hMeso resulted in the dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and improved survival of mice. Furthermore, repeat weekly intraperitoneal administrations of the optimal CARMA-hMeso dose further prolonged disease control and survival

  17. Towards a "fourth generation" of approaches to HIV/AIDS management: creating contexts for effective community mobilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine; Cornish, Flora

    2010-01-01

    Many biomedical and behavioural HIV/AIDS programmes aimed at prevention, care and treatment have disappointing outcomes because of a lack of effective community mobilisation. But community mobilisation is notoriously difficult to bring about. We present a conceptual framework that maps out those dimensions of social context that are likely to support or undermine community mobilisation efforts, proposing that attention should be given to three dimensions of social context: the material, symbolic and relational. This paper has four parts. We begin by outlining why community mobilisation is regarded as a core dimension of effective HIV/AIDS management: it increases the "reach" and sustainability of programmes; it is a vital component of the wider "task shifting" agenda given the scarcity of health professionals in many HIV/AIDS-vulnerable contexts. Most importantly it facilitates those social psychological processes that we argue are vital preconditions for effective prevention, care and treatment. Secondly we map out three generations of approaches to behaviour change within the HIV/AIDS field: HIV-awareness, peer education and community mobilisation. We critically evaluate each approach's underlying assumptions about the drivers of behaviour change, to frame our understandings of the pathways between mobilisation and health, drawing on the concepts of social capital, dialogue and empowerment. Thirdly we refer to two well-documented case studies of community mobilisation in India and South Africa to illustrate our claim that community mobilisation is unlikely to succeed in the absence of supportive material, symbolic and relational contexts. Fourthly we provide a brief overview of how the papers in this special issue help us flesh out our conceptualisation of the "health enabling social environment". We conclude by arguing for the urgent need for a 'fourth generation' of approaches in the theory and practice of HIV/AIDS management, one which pays far greater

  18. Overseas Voter Mobilisation in Singapore: Implications from Malaysia’s 13th General Election

    OpenAIRE

    James Gomez; Rusdi Omar

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses voter mobilisation and other election-related activities of Malaysian voters living, studying and working in Singapore in the context of Malaysia’s 13th general election (GE13). According to the World Bank, nearly 400,000 Malaysians reside in the city-state. Thus these figures represent a significant Malaysian voter pool based in Singapore. Efforts to mobilise these voters for general elections or other causes have political implications for both countries, which became...

  19. γ-H2AX as a biomarker of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and artificial skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Christophe E.; Dickey, Jennifer S.; Bonner, William M.; Sedelnikova, Olga A.

    2009-04-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure is inevitable in our modern society and can lead to a variety of deleterious effects including cancer and birth defects. A reliable, reproducible and sensitive assessment of exposure to IR and the individual response to that exposure would provide much needed information for the optimal treatment of each donor examined. We have developed a diagnostic test for IR exposure based on detection of the phosphorylated form of variant histone H2AX (γ-H2AX), which occurs specifically at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The cell responds to a nascent DSB through the phosphorylation of thousands of H2AX molecules flanking the damaged site. This highly amplified response can be visualized as a γ-H2AX focus in the chromatin that can be detected in situ with the appropriate antibody. Here we assess the usability of γ-H2AX focus formation as a possible biodosimeter for human exposure to IR using peripheral blood lymphocytes irradiated ex vivo and three-dimensional artificial models of human skin biopsies. In both systems, the tissues were exposed to 0.2-5 Gy, doses of IR that might be realistically encountered in various scenarios such as cancer radiotherapies or accidental exposure to radiation. Since the γ-H2AX response is maximal 30 min after exposure and declines over a period of hours as the cells repair the damage, we examined the time limitations of the useful detectability of γ-H2AX foci. We report that a linear response proportional to the initial radiation dose was obtained 48 and 24 h after exposure in blood samples and skin cells respectively. Thus, detection of γ-H2AX formation to monitor DNA damage in minimally invasive blood and skin tests could be useful tools to determine radiation dose exposure and analyze its effects on humans.

  20. Vaccine-Mediated Mechanisms Controlling Replication of Francisella tularensis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using a Co-culture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Eneslätt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell-mediated immunity (CMI is normally required for efficient protection against intracellular infections, however, identification of correlates is challenging and they are generally lacking. Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent, facultative intracellular bacterium and CMI is critically required for protection against the pathogen, but how this is effectuated in humans is poorly understood. To understand the protective mechanisms, we established an in vitro co-culture assay to identify how control of infection of F. tularensis is accomplished by human cells and hypothesized that the model will mimic in vivo immune mechanisms. Non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were expanded with antigen and added to cultures with adherent PBMC infected with the human vaccine strain, LVS, or the highly virulent SCHU S4 strain. Intracellular numbers of F. tularensis was followed for 72 h and secreted and intracellular cytokines were analyzed. Addition of PBMC expanded from naïve individuals, i.e., those with no record of immunization to F. tularensis, generally resulted in little or no control of intracellular bacterial growth, whereas addition of PBMC from a majority of F. tularensis-immune individuals executed static and sometimes cidal effects on intracellular bacteria. Regardless of infecting strain, statistical differences between the two groups were significant, P < 0.05. Secretion of 11 cytokines was analyzed after 72 h of infection and significant differences with regard to secretion of IFN-γ, TNF, and MIP-1β was observed between immune and naïve individuals for LVS-infected cultures. Also, in LVS-infected cultures, CD4 T cells from vaccinees, but not CD8 T cells, showed significantly higher expression of IFN-γ, MIP-1β, TNF, and CD107a than cells from naïve individuals. The co-culture system appears to identify correlates of immunity that are relevant for the understanding of mechanisms of the protective host immunity to

  1. Inhibition of Photo-Genotoxic Effects of UV Radiation on Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocites by Echinacea Purpurea (L.) Moench Herbal Extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segvic Klaric, M.; Kosalec, I.; Vladimir-Knezevic, S.; Blazekovic, B.; Milic, M.; Kopjar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has many negative effects on human skin, including acute and chronic inflammation and oxidative stress which might cause DNA damage leading to skin photoaging and photocarcinogenesis. It was suggested that intake of phenolic acids, which are active components of some medicinal plants, might reduce DNA damage caused by UV radiation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to check wheather the pretreatment of human peripheral blood lymphocytes with lyophilisate of Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EH) extract (1 and 10 mg/mL) could reduce or prevent primary DNA damage induced by UVC radiation (253.7 nm) in laboratory conditions. Primary DNA damage was studied using the alkaline comet assay on isolated human blood lymphocytes. Plant extract used in this experiment contains phenolic acids (3.47 %), flavonoids (0.13 %), tannins (0.86 %) and proanthocyanidins (0.26 %). HPLC analysis showed that lyophilisate of EH extract contains 3.65 % of chicoric acid. Exposure of lymphocytes to UV radiation (30 and 60 min) caused a significant increase in the level of primary DNA damage (P < 0.001). Pretreatment of cells with both concentrations of EH was not genotoxic, and successfully protected the cells against the effects of UV radiation (30 min). Both concentrations of EH significantly reduced comet tail length after 60 min of UV radiation, while only pre-treatment with 1 mg/mL significantly reduced the values of tail intensity and tail moment (P < 0.001). Positive results obtained in this study speak in favour of continuing the research on effectiveness of Echinacea purpurea preparations and their potential application in developing cosmetic products for skin protection. (author)

  2. Mobilisation, alteration, and redistribution of monosulfidic sediments in inland river systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, M D; Wong, V N L; Bush, R T; Sullivan, L A; Ward, N J; Zawadzki, A

    2012-12-15

    The accumulation of monosulfidic sediments in inland waterways is emerging as a major environmental issue. Mobilisation and suspension of monosulfidic sediments can result in deoxygenation, acidification of the water column and mobilisation of trace metals. The controls on monosulfidic sediment mobilisation and the critical thresholds for its scour and entrainment have not been established. This study examines the effect of a minor flood event (average return interval of 5 years) on sulfidic sediment scour in the Wakool River in southern NSW, Australia. Five profiles were sampled within a small (~300 m) reach before and after a minor flood event to determine the degree of sediment scour and transport. The results indicate substantial scour of both monosulfidic sediments and underlying bed sediments (approximately 2100 m(3)). Changes in the sediment geochemistry suggest large concentrations of monosulfidic sediments had been suspended in the water column, partially-oxidised and redeposited. This is supported by (210)Pb results from one of the profiles. These results suggest that these monosulfidic sediments can move as bed load during minor flood events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. IL-7 Enhances Thymic Human T Cell Development in "Human Immune System" Rag2-/-IL-2R{gamma}c-/- Mice without Affecting Peripheral T Cell Homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lent, Anja U.; Dontje, Wendy; Nagasawa, Maho; Siamari, Rachida; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Pouw, Stephan M.; Maijoor, Kelly A.; Weijer, Kees; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Blom, Bianca; Di Santo, James P.; Spits, Hergen; Legrand, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    IL-7 is a central cytokine in the development of hematopoietic cells, although interspecies discrepancies have been reported. By coculturing human postnatal thymus hematopoietic progenitors and OP9-huDL1 stromal cells, we found that murine IL-7 is approximately 100-fold less potent than human IL-7

  4. In vitro effect of the antimalarial drug proguanil hydrochloride on viability and DNA damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajski, Goran; Dinter, Domagoj; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2010-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of proguanil, a chemical substance used for treatment and prevention of malaria on viability and DNA integrity in human lymphocytes in vitro. Two different concentrations of proguanil obtained from the plasma concentrations were used: 130ng/ml used for prophylactic treatment and 520ng/ml used in treatment of malaria. Testing was done with and without metabolic activation. Viability of lymphocytes decreased in time and dose dependent manner. Comet assay parameters showed similar effects, indicating that some damage to DNA molecule can occur. Frequency of sister chromatid exchanges did not show significant deviation from the control samples. As for the proliferation kinetics no significant changes were noticed. Since majority of DNA damaging effect is induced after metabolic activation it is to be concluded that activity of proguanil is dependent upon the active metabolite cycloguanil and that monitoring should be conducted especially among frequent travellers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of synthetic and naturally occurring flavonoids on mitogen-induced proliferation of human peripheral-blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Toshihiko; Oka, Kitaro; Kawashima, Etsuko; Akiba, Mitsuo

    1989-01-01

    Examination was made of the effects of 17 synthetic and naturally occurring flavonoids on human lymphocyte proliferation in the presence of concanavalin A as a mitogen. Twelve of the flavonoids examined were mono-hydroxy of methoxy derivatives. The mitogen-induced response of lymphocytes was evaluated from the extent of the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into cells in vitro. All the compounds showed inhibitory effects; 4.5-77.7% of [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation was blocked by an 1.0 μg/ml concentration. The viability of lymphocytes before and after treatment, as assessed by a dye exclusion test, indicated no change, and thus the flavonoids may inhibit DNA synthesis. The flavonoids possessing 5-hydroxyl, 5-methoxyl and 6-methoxyl groups, and those with cyclohexyl instead of phenyl substituent (i.e. 2-cyclohexyl-benzopyran-4-one), showed the greatest inhibition. The inhibitory effect of any one of them was less than one half that of prednisolone, but essentially the same or somewhat exceeding that of bredinine of azathioprine. It would thus appear that the well-known anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoids may possibly arise in part from the inhibition of the proliferative response of lymphocytes

  6. Transfer of unstable chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes at cell division and their significance for the aberration frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, G.; Chang Tsangpi.

    1986-04-01

    In 48 h cultures, the fraction of human lymphocytes in 2nd mitosis was found to be between 0 and 42.5% (mean value 8.7%). The X-ray exposure from irradiating with 2 Gy resulted in a cell cycle delay which varied from donor to donor. A loss of nearly 50% of dicentric chromosomes and acentric fragments from unstable chromosomes occurred at cell division, while centric rings were not impeded. When dicentric chromosomes, or acentric fragments are found in 2nd mitosis, they show a characteristic differential staining, which means that chromatides at cell division fall free and are replicated in daughter cells. When plotting dose effect curves of dicentric chromosomes, up to 20% of 2nd mitosis fractions have little influence on the aberration rate. This may be additionally verified as part of the 'biological dosimetry' in a person with 24% of 2nd mitosis. When the rates of dicentric chromosomes exclusively evaluated from 1st mitosis after irradiation with 2.0 Gy were related to the donors age, no age-dependent sensitivity to radiation could be observed. Aberration rates which deviate from person to person are comparable to the results achieved by conventional staining methods. (orig./MG) [de

  7. An Integrated Workflow To Assess Technical and Biological Variability of Cell Population Frequencies in Human Peripheral Blood by Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burel, Julie G; Qian, Yu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Zapardiel-Gonzalo, Jose; Taplitz, Randy; Gilman, Robert H; Saito, Mayuko; de Silva, Aruna D; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Scheuermann, Richard H; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2017-02-15

    In the context of large-scale human system immunology studies, controlling for technical and biological variability is crucial to ensure that experimental data support research conclusions. In this study, we report on a universal workflow to evaluate both technical and biological variation in multiparameter flow cytometry, applied to the development of a 10-color panel to identify all major cell populations and T cell subsets in cryopreserved PBMC. Replicate runs from a control donation and comparison of different gating strategies assessed the technical variability associated with each cell population and permitted the calculation of a quality control score. Applying our panel to a large collection of PBMC samples, we found that most cell populations showed low intraindividual variability over time. In contrast, certain subpopulations such as CD56 T cells and Temra CD4 T cells were associated with high interindividual variability. Age but not gender had a significant effect on the frequency of several populations, with a drastic decrease in naive T cells observed in older donors. Ethnicity also influenced a significant proportion of immune cell population frequencies, emphasizing the need to account for these covariates in immune profiling studies. We also exemplify the usefulness of our workflow by identifying a novel cell-subset signature of latent tuberculosis infection. Thus, our study provides a universal workflow to establish and evaluate any flow cytometry panel in systems immunology studies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. The influence of gender- and age-related differences in the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells detected in steady-state human peripheral blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kengo; Kashiwakura, Ikuo; Kuwabara, Mikinori

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the importance of gender and aging on the individual radiosensitivity of lineage-committed myeloid hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) detected in mononuclear cells (MNCs) of steady-state human peripheral blood (PB), the clonogenic survival of HPCs, including colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage; burst-forming unit-erythroid; colony-forming unit-granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte cells derived from MNCs exposed to 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy X-irradiation were estimated. MNCs were prepared from the buffy-coats of 59 healthy individual blood donors. The results showed that large individual differences exist in the number of HSPCs, as well as in the surviving fraction of cells. Furthermore, the number of progenitor cells strongly correlated with their surviving fraction, suggesting that the radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitor cells decreases with the number of cells in the 10 5 cells population. A statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the surviving fraction observed at a dose of 0.5 Gy and the age of an individual, however, none of these correlations were observed after 2 Gy irradiation. No statistically significant difference was observed in individual radiosensitivity between males and females at either radiation dose. The present results indicated a correlation between the individual responsiveness of HSPCs to ionizing irradiation, especially to low dose irradiation, and aging. (author)

  9. In vitro safety assessment of the strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L.) water leaf extract and arbutin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurica, K; Brčić Karačonji, I; Mikolić, A; Milojković-Opsenica, D; Benković, V; Kopjar, N

    2018-04-25

    Strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L.) leaves have long been used in the traditional medicine of the Mediterranean region. One of their most bioactive constituents is the glycoside arbutin, whose presence makes A. unedo suitable as a potential substitute for bearberry [Arctostaphylos uva ursi (L.) Spreng] leaves, an herbal preparation widely used for treating urinary tract infections. The safety and biocompatibility of strawberry tree water leaf extract have not yet been documented well. This study estimated arbutin content in strawberry tree water leaf extract (STE) using high performance liquid chromatography. Furthermore, we performed an in vitro safety assessment of the 24 h exposure to three presumably non-toxic concentrations of standardized STE and arbutin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using the apoptosis/necrosis assay, the alkaline comet assay, and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. The STE was also tested for total antioxidant capacity and lipid peroxidation. At a concentration corresponding to the maximum allowable daily intake of arbutin, the tested extract was not cytotoxic, had a negligible potential for causing primary DNA damage and even hindered micronuclei formation in lymphocytes. It also showed a valuable antioxidant capacity, and did not exert marked lipid peroxidation. These promising results represent a solid frame for further development of STE-based herbal preparations. Although arbutin generally had a low DNA damaging potential, the slowing down of lymphocyte proliferation observed after 24 h of exposure points to a cytostatic effect, which merits further research.

  10. In-vitro assessment of cytotoxicity of halloysite nanotubes against HepG2, HCT116 and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farrukh Rafiq; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Azhar, Mudassar; Um, Soong Ho; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Hashmi, Shahkamal; Dar, Ahsana

    2015-11-01

    Halloysite is a clay mineral with chemical similarity to kaolin, a pharmaceutical ingredient. It consists of mainly aluminosilicate nanotubular particles in the size range of ∼ 200-1000 nm. Many studies have tried to empirically explore this novel clay for its potential in drug delivery systems but no work has yet studied its cytotoxicity from the perspective of oral drug delivery system. In this study, the halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) were subjected to size distribution analyses, which reveal more than 50% of nanotubes in the size range of 500 nm and rest mainly in the sub micrometer range. HNTs were then evaluated for in-vitro cytotoxicity against HCT116 (colorectal carcinoma) and HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) cells which represent the earliest entry point and the first accumulating organ, respectively, for nanoparticles en-route to systemic circulation after oral delivery. Moreover, HNTs were tested for their cytogenetic toxicity against human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Both these results collectively indicated that HNTs are generally safe at practical concentrations of excipients for oral dosage forms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Analyses of 123 Peripheral Human Immune Cell Subsets: Defining Differences with Age and between Healthy Donors and Cancer Patients Not Detected in Analysis of Standard Immune Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M. Lepone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in human immunology have led to the identification of novel immune cell subsets and the biological function of many of these subsets has now been identified. The recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of several immunotherapeutics for the treatment of a variety of cancer types and the results of ongoing immunotherapy clinical studies requires a more thorough interrogation of the immune system. We report here the use of flow cytometry-based analyses to identify 123 immune cell subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The use of these panels defines multiple differences in younger (< 40 years vs. older (≥ 40 years individuals and between aged-matched apparently healthy individuals and metastatic cancer patients, aspects not seen in the analysis of the following standard immune cell types: CD8, CD4, natural killer, natural killer-T, regulatory T, myeloid derived suppressor cells, conventional dendritic cells (DCs, plasmacytoid DCs and B cells. The use of these panels identifying 123 immune cell subsets may aid in the identification of patients who may benefit from immunotherapy, either prior to therapy or early in the immunotherapeutic regimen, for the treatment of cancer or other chronic or infectious diseases.

  12. Investigation of the cytotoxicity, antioxidative and immune-modulatory effects of Ligusticum porteri (Osha) root extract on human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Sparks, Jean; Omoruyi, Felix O

    2016-11-01

    Ligusticum porteri is a traditional Native American herb. The roots of L. porteri are traditionally used in the treatment of many diseases, however, its cytotoxicity, antioxidative and immune-modulatory effects need to be investigated. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the root extract at different doses on human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). The lymphocytes were incubated with different concentrations of the root extracts (0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 μg/mL) and harvested every 6 h for 2 d (Peffect of the herb against oxidative damage was determined by inducing oxidative stress with the administration of 50 μmol/L of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). Treatments with L. porteri at 200 and 400 μg/mL increased the viability of PBLs. The deleterious effect of H 2 O 2 was ameliorated by 400 μg/mL L. porteri treatment. Addition of 400 μg/mL L. porteri reduced lipid peroxidation in stressed PBLs by 94% (P0.05). The findings suggest that L. porteri might be a potential immune-modulating agent involving protective effects against oxidative damage.

  13. Expression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in naturally infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells: comparison of a standard co-culture technique with a newly developed microculture method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, B; Baur, A; Neundorfer, M; Jahn, G

    1991-05-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 29 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were cultured by two different methods. One was the standard co-culture technique, the other a newly developed microculture method. In this assay 10(6) PBMCs were cultivated in 250 microliters medium, no activating agents or allogeneic cells were present. P24 antigen production measured by this method was found in 7 out of 11 PBMC cultures of patients in the Walter Reed (WR) stage 1 or 2, whereas only 4 samples were positive by the co-culture procedure. Cultures from patients in the later stages of the disease (WR 5/6) showed a higher p24 production by the co-culture method than by the microculture assay. It is assumed that rapidly growing HIV strains can be better assessed by the co-culture method which may select for these strains. P24 expression can be more easily obtained by the microculture technique even in cases where slowly replicating strains may be present. In conclusion, results from the microculture procedure described may be a useful supplementation to findings observed by the co-culture method.

  14. Interaction of rotavirus with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a role in stimulating memory rotavirus specific T cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Martha C; Rodríguez, Luz-Stella; Franco, Manuel A; Angel, Juana

    2007-09-15

    We studied the interaction of RV with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from adult volunteers. After exposure of PBMC to rhesus RV (RRV), T and B lymphocytes, NK cells, monocytes, and myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressed RV non-structural proteins, at variable levels. Expression of these RV proteins was abolished if infection was done in the presence of anti-VP7 neutralizing antibodies or 10% autologous serum. Supernatants of RRV exposed PBMC contained TNF-alpha, IL-6, IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-2 and IL-10. Plasmacytoid DC were found to be the main source of IFN-alpha production, and in their absence the production of IFN-gamma and the frequency of RV specific T cells that secrete IFN-gamma diminished. Finally, we could not detect RV-antigen associated with the PBMC or expression of RV non-structural proteins in PBMC of acutely RV-infected children. Thus, although PBMC are susceptible to the initial steps of RV infection, most PBMC of children with RV-gastroenteritis are not infected.

  15. Multielemental fractionation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by size exclusion liquid chromatography coupled to UV and ICP-MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Gladys; Murillo, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    An analytical methodology is presented in this work to determine metal-biomolecule complexes size distribution patterns of several elements, among different compounds present in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A hyphenated technique based on size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled online to UV and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection is used. Two different SEC columns with separation ranges between 1,500-1,000,000 relative molecular mass (M(r)) (Nanofilm SEC-250) and 5,000 and 100,000 relative molecular mass (M(r)) (TSK-Gel G2000 SW) are used with 10 mmol/L tris-HCl at pH 7.3 as mobile phase. Retention behavior (retention time and peak-area ratios) remained unchanged for several successive separations. Metal-containing compounds are found to a wide range of M(r). Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, copper and zinc metallothionein, and copper and zinc transferrin are identified in PBMC samples. A high M(r) (147,000) metal-binding protein containing copper and zinc and a high M(r) (107,000) manganese-binding protein were also found; however, these remained unknown.

  16. The pattern and time course of somatosensory changes in the human UVB sunburn model reveal the presence of peripheral and central sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustorff, Burkhard; Sycha, Thomas; Lieba-Samal, Doris; Rolke, Roman; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Magerl, Walter

    2013-04-01

    The ultraviolet B (UVB) sunburn model was characterized with a comprehensive battery of quantitative sensory testing (QST). Primary hyperalgesia in UVB-irradiated skin and secondary hyperalgesia in adjacent nonirradiated skin were studied in 22 healthy subjects 24h after irradiation with UVB at 3-fold minimal erythema dose of a skin area 5 cm in diameter at the thigh and compared to mirror-image contralateral control areas. The time course of hyperalgesia over 96 h was studied in a subgroup of 12 subjects. Within the sunburn area, cold hyperesthesia (P=.01), profound generalized hyperalgesia to heat (Psunburn was surrounded by large areas of pinprick hyperalgesia (mean±SEM, 218±32 cm(2)) and a small rim of dynamic mechanical allodynia but no other sensory changes. Although of smaller magnitude, secondary hyperalgesia and dynamic mechanical allodynia adjacent to the UVB-irradiated area were statistically highly significant. Primary and secondary hyperalgesia developed in parallel within hours, peaked after 24-32 h, and lasted for more than 96 h. These data reveal that the UVB sunburn model activates a broad spectrum of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms and hence is a useful human surrogate model to be used as a screening tool for target engagement in phases 1 and 2a of drug development. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Immunoglobulin production induced in vitro by glucocorticoid hormones: T cell-dependent stimulation of immunoglobulin production without B cell proliferation in cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, J.; Dooley, N.J.; Koski, I.R.; Blaese, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The direct effects of steroid hormones on the production of immunoglobulins and DNA synthesis by human T and B lymphocytes was evaluated in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As detected by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay, the addition of 0.1 mM to 10 nM hydrocortisone to lymphocytes in culture in the absence of other stimulants or mitogens, resulted in the dramatic induction of immunoglobulin production with responses comparable to those seen in similar cultures stimulated with pokeweed mitogen. Steroid-stimulated immunoglobulin production was first seen after 48 h and peaked at 8-10 d of culture. The production of IgG, IgA, and IgM was induced following incubation with steroid. Glucocorticoids, but not estrogens or androgens, were capable of mediating this effect, and only compounds with affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor were active. The induction of immunoglobulin production was dependent on both T cells and monocytes; cultures depleted of either cell type did not produce immunoglobulin when stimulated with glucocorticoid hormones. Proliferation of B cells or T cells could not be detected by [/sup 3/H]thymidine incorporation or total cell recovery from steroid-stimulated cultures, even though such cultures demonstrated marked increases in immunoglobulin production. The mechanism responsible for this functional maturation of B cells to become high rate immunoglobulin producing cells is as yet undefined, although it appears to involve more than merely steroid mediated inactivation of suppressor T cells

  18. A New Synthetic Compound, 2-OH, Enhances Interleukin-2 and Interferon-γ Gene Expression in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woan-Fang Tzeng

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A new synthetic compound, 6-hydroxy-2-tosylisoquinolin-1(2H-one (2-OH, was selected for immunopharmacological activity tests. The effects of 2-OH on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC proliferation were determined by tritiated thymidine uptake. Compared to phytohemagglutinin (PHA; 5 μg/mL stimulation, 2-OH significantly enhanced PBMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The 50% enhancement activity (EC50 for 2-OH was 4.4±0.1 μM. In addition, effects of 2-OH on interleukin-2 (IL-2 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ production in PBMC were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Results demonstrated that 2-OH stimulated IL-2 and IFN-γ production in PBMC. Data from reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and real-time PCR indicated that IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expression in PBMC could be induced by 2-OH. Therefore, 2-OH enhanced IL-2 and IFN-γ production in PBMC by modulation their gene expression. We suggest that 2-OH may be an immunomodulatory agent.

  19. Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Severe Peripheral Artery Disease in a 20-Year-Old with Perinatally Acquired Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purva Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection confers an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including acute coronary syndrome (ACS. Patients with perinatally acquired HIV may be at increased risk due to the viral infection itself and exposure to HAART in utero or as part of treatment. A 20-year-old female with transplacentally acquired HIV infection presented with symptoms of transient aphasia, headache, palpitations, and blurry vision. She was admitted for hypertensive emergency with blood pressure 203/100 mmHg. Within a few hours, she complained of typical chest pain, and ECG showed marked ST depression. Troponin I levels escalated from 0.115 to 10.8. She underwent coronary angiogram showing 95% stenosis of the right coronary artery (RCA and severe peripheral arterial disease including total occlusion of both common iliacs and 95% infrarenal aortic stenosis with collateral circulation. She underwent successful percutaneous intervention with a drug-eluting stent to the mid-RCA. Patients with HIV are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Of these, coronary artery disease is one of the most critical complications of HIV. Perinatally acquired HIV infection can be a high-risk factor for cardiovascular disease. A high degree of suspicion is warranted in such patients, especially if they are noncompliant to their ART.

  20. [Peripheral arterial disease and cardiovascular risk factors among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus: a comparison between hospital out-patients and patients in a prison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri Pont, Marta; Borrallo Almansa, Rosa Maria; Almada Rivas, Guido; Carbó Díez, Miriam; Solé Arnau, Rosa; García Restoy, Enric

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients is more frequent than in the general population. Peripheral arterial disease measured by ankle-brachial index (ABI) and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) is not well known in all groups of HIV-infected patients. Transversal study of HIV-infected patients >45 years, seen as outpatients in hospital (HO) in 2008 and patients institutionalized in a prison in 2009. Cardiovascular risk factors, information on the HIV infection and healthy lifestyles were evaluated. ABI was measured at rest and was considered pathological when a value ≤ 0.9 or ≥ 1.3 was obtained. We included 71 patients (mean age of 50.6 ± 6.9 years, 86% male), 32 HO and 39 in prison. The most prevalent CVRF was smoking (80.2%) followed by an altered lipid profile (63.3%). The evolution time of HIV infection was 13.1 ± 7.1 years. 74.6% of patients didn't follow a heart-healthy diet and 25% were sedentary. The ABI was low in 7 cases (9.8%) and ≥ 1.3 in one. Patients in prison were younger, the rate of smokers and of individuals with low HDL were higher, the time of evolution of the HIV infections was longer and they were less adherent to a heart-healthy diet than in HO, reaching in all cases statistical significance (Pde Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromosome Aberrations Induced in Human Peripheral Blood by 2-MeV X-Irradiation to the Whole Body and In Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckton, Karin E.; Langlands, A. O.; Smith, P. G.; Looby, P. C.; Woodcock, G. E. [Medical Research Council, Clinical and Population Cytogenetics Research Unit, Western General Hospital Edinburgh (United Kingdom); McLelland, J. [Edinburgh Royal Infirmary and Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1969-11-15

    In recent years it has proved possible to correlate the incidence of ring and dicentric chromosomes in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes with given radiation doses both in vitro and following partial or whole body irradiation exposure in vivo In the present study a comparison is made between the yield of aberrations in six men with advanced cancer who received whole body irradiation in doses varying between 36 and 50 rads and the yield of aberrations in samples of their blood drawn before exposure and irradiated in vitro simultaneously to the same dose A comparison is also made between the yield of aberrations following in vitro irradiation to much higher doses of blood derived from these same cancer patients and blood from non cancer controls The significance of these findings is discussed with reference to biological dosimetry using chromosome aberrations as the parameter for both external and internal irradiation Apart from such a practical application it also appears possible to develop this technique to study the sensitivity of cells to chromosome breakage by radiation in selected populations such as mongols or persons with Fancom s anaemia where there is a higher than normal incidence of malignant disease. (author)

  2. Mapping the end points of large deletions affecting the hprt locus in human peripheral blood cells and cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, S.L.; Grosovsky, A.J.; Jones, I.M.; Burkhart-Schultz, K.; Fuscoe, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    We have examined the extent of of HPRT - total gene deletions in three mutant collections: spontaneous and X-ray-induced deletions in TK6 human B lymphoblasts, and HPRT - deletions arising in vivo in T cells. A set of 13 Xq26 STS markers surrounding hprt and spanning approximately 3.3 Mb was used. Each marker used was observed to be missing in at least one of the hprt deletion mutants analyzed. The largest deletion observed encompassed at least 3 Mb. Nine deletions extended outside of the mapped region in the centromeric direction (>1.7 Mb). In contrast, only two telomeric deletions extended to marker 342R (1.26 Mb), and both exhibited slowed or limited cell growth. These data suggest the existence of a gene, within the vicinity of 342R, which establishes the telomeric limit of recoverable deletions. Most (25/41) X-ray-induced total gene deletion mutants exhibited marker loss, but only 1/8 of the spontaneous deletions encompassed any Xq26 markers (P = 0.0187). Furthermore, nearly half (3/8) of the spontaneous 3' total deletion breakpoints were within 14 kb of the hprt coding sequence. In contrast, 40/41 X-ray-induced HPRT - total deletions extended beyond this point (P = 0.011). Although the overall representation of total gene deletions in the in vivo spectrum is low, 4/5 encompass Xq26 markers flanking hprt. This pattern differs significantly from spontaneous HPRT - large deletions occurring in vitro (P = 0.032) but resembles the spectrum of X-ray-induced deletions. 24 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  3. Evaluation of spontaneous and radiation-induced micronucleus frequency in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes depending on age and sex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kang, C. M.; Chung, H. C. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2002-12-15

    The goal of this study was to provide data on the dose-dependent production of MicroNucleus (MN) in human lymphocytes irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays and 50MeV neutron, and to evaluate predictive markers of intrinsic radiosensitivity in individuals for monitoring occupational or environmental radiation exposure. For the dose-response study, heparinized whole blood of 10 healthy volunteers was irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays employing of 0.25-8Gy. The MNs were observed all doses, and the numerical changes according to doses. In dose-response curves fit linear-quadratic form (alpha =0.31{+-}0.049, beta =0.0022{+-}0.0022) for {gamma}-rays, but (alpha=0.99{+-}0.528, beta =0.0093{+-}0.0047) for neutron. Neutrons were than {gamma}-rays effective in producing MN with dose-dependent manner. The frequency of MN varies with dose. The RBE (Relative Biological Effectiveness) for micronuclei was 2.370.17. Further studies were carried out to provide evidence for the existence of individual variations in age-dependent responses to radiation. Spontaneous and radiation-induced MN varies greatly among individuals, and little is known about the molecular mechanisms of this variability. It was shown that the increased level of spontaneous cell with MN was observed with increasing age. The relationship between radiosensitivity and the increased spontaneous level of MN may be in inverse proportion. These studies indicated that the MN assay have a high potential as a rapid, sensitive and accurate method which can be used to monitor a large population exposed to radiation for rapid triage in the case of a large-scale accident.

  4. Evaluation of spontaneous and radiation-induced micronucleus frequency in cultrued human peripheral blood lymphocytes depending on age and sex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, H. J.; Kang, C. M.; Chung, H. C. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this study was to provide data on the dose-dependent production of micronucleus (MN) in human lymphocytes irradiated with {sub 60} Co {gamma} -rays and 50MeV neutron, and to evaluate predictive markers of intrinsic radiosensitivity in individuals for monitoring occupational or environmental radiation exposure. For the dose-response study, heparinized whole blood of 10 healthy volunteers was irradiated with {sub 60} Co {gamma} -rays employing of 0.25-8Gy. The MNs were observed all doses, and the numerical changes according to doses. In dose-response curves fit linear- quadratic form (alpha =0.31{+-}0.049, beta =0.0022{+-}0.0022) for {gamma} -rays, but (alpha =0.99{+-}0.528, beta =0.0093{+-}0.0047) for neutron. Neutrons were than {gamma} -rays effective in producing MN with dose-dependent manner. The frequency of MN varies with dose. The RBE for micronuclei was 2.37{+-}0.17. Further studied are carried out to provide evidence for the existence of individual variations in age-dependent responses to radiation. Spontaneous and radiation-induced MN varies greatly between individuals, and little is known about the molecular mechanisms of this variability. It was shown that the increased level of spontaneous cell with MN was observed with increasing age. The relationship between radiosensitivity and the increased spontaneous level of MN may be in inverse proportion. These studies indicates that the MN assay have a high potential as a rapid, sensitive and accurate method which can be used to monitor a large population exposed to radiation for rapid triage in the case of a large-scale accident.

  5. The Generation of Human γδT Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Whole Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Koyanagi-Aoi, Michiyo; Taniguchi-Ikeda, Mariko; Yoshida, Yukiko; Azuma, Takeshi; Aoi, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    γδT cells constitute a small proportion of lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Unlike αβT cells, the anti-tumor activities are exerted through several different pathways in a MHC-unrestricted manner. Thus, immunotherapy using γδT cells is considered to be effective for various types of cancer. Occasionally, however, ex vivo expanded cells are not as effective as expected due to cell exhaustion. To overcome the issue of T-cell exhaustion, researchers have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that harbor the same T-cell receptor (TCR) genes as their original T-cells, which provide nearly limitless sources for antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). However, these technologies have focused on αβT cells and require a population of antigen-specific CTLs, which are purified by cell sorting with HLA-peptide multimer, as the origin of iPS cells. In the present study, we aimed to develop an efficient and convenient system for generating iPSCs that harbor rearrangements of the TCRG and TCRD gene regions (γδT-iPSCs) without cell-sorting. We stimulated human whole peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) culture using Interleukin-2 and Zoledronate to activate γδT cells. Gene transfer into those cells with the Sendai virus vector resulted in γδT cell-dominant expression of exogenous genes. The introduction of reprogramming factors into the stimulated PBMC culture allowed us to establish iPSC lines. Around 70% of the established lines carried rearrangements at the TCRG and TCRD gene locus. The γδT-iPSCs could differentiate into hematopoietic progenitors. Our technology will pave the way for new avenues toward novel immunotherapy that can be applied for various types of cancer. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2018;7:34-44. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  6. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cell in vitro system to test the efficacy of food bioactive compounds: Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids and their relation with BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifre, Margalida; Díaz-Rúa, Rubén; Varela-Calviño, Rubén; Reynés, Bàrbara; Pericás-Beltrán, Jordi; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2017-04-01

    To analyse the usefulness of isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to rapidly/easily reflect n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) effects on lipid metabolism/inflammation gene profile, and evaluate if these effects are body mass index (BMI) dependent. PBMC from normoweight (NW) and overweight/obese (OW/OB) subjects were incubated with physiological doses of docosahexaenoic (DHA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or their combination. PBMC reflected increased beta-oxidation-like capacity (CPT1A expression) in OW/OB but only after DHA treatment. However, insensitivity to n-3 LCPUFA was evident in OW/OB for lipogenic genes: both PUFA diminished FASN and SREBP1C expression in NW, but no effect was observed for DHA in PBMC from high-BMI subjects. This insensitivity was also evident for inflammation gene profile: all treatments inhibited key inflammatory genes in NW; nevertheless, no effect was observed in OW/OB after DHA treatment, and EPA effect was impaired. SLC27A2, IL6 and TNFα PBMC expression analysis resulted especially interesting to determine obesity-related n-3 LCPUFA insensitivity. A PBMC-based human in vitro system reflects n-3 LCPUFA effects on lipid metabolism/inflammation which is impaired in OW/OB. These results confirm the utility of PBMC ex vivo systems for bioactive-compound screening to promote functional food development and to establish appropriate dietary strategies for obese population. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Micronucleus assay for human peripheral blood lymphocytes as a biomarker of individual sensitivity to assessing radiation health risk in different population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.-M.; Jeon, H.-J.; Lee, Y.-S.; Lee, S.-J.; Jin, Y.-H.; Kim, Y.-H.; Kim, T.-W.; Cho, C.-K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Our studies were to evaluate micronucleus (MN) assay for human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) as a biomarker of individual sensitivity to assessing radiation health risk in different population in Korea. Further studied are carried out to provide evidence for the existence of individual variations in age-dependent responses. For the MN assay, HPBLs were irradiated with doses of 0, 1, 2, 4, 8Gy 60 Co γ-rays. Spontaneous frequencies not only vary greatly between individuals, but also working or living areas because of the groups with different lifestyle living in different ecological situation and the reaction to radiation exposure. It was shown that the increased level of spontaneous cell with MN was observed with increased age. The relationship between radiosensitivity and the increased spontaneous level of MN may be in inverse proportion. Age and gender are the most important demographic variables impact on MN index with MN frequencies in female being greater than those in male by a factor of depending on the age group. For both sexes, MN frequency was significantly and positively correlated with age. The main lifestyle factors influencing the MN index in subjects are significantly and positively correlated with smoking in measuring the spontaneous frequencies of micronuclei. The described results show that the genetic damaged rate like MN index in human populations is correlated significantly with age, sex and lifestyle factors. So far, it is evident that with regard to the application of MN assay all future studies to evaluate radiation health risks in different population have to take into account the influence of age, gender, and lifestyle. The results suggested that the MN assay have a high potential to ensure appropriate quality control and standard documentation protocol which can be used to monitor a large population exposed to radiation epidemiologically. We conclude that the determination of individual radiosensitivity with MN assay is

  8. Effects of vitamin K3 and K5 on proliferation, cytokine production, and regulatory T cell-frequency in human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Hiroshige; Ishizawa, Hitomi; Nakamura, Yurie; Tadokoro, Hiroko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2014-03-18

    The effects of vitamin K (VK) derivatives VK3 and VK5 on human immune cells have not been extensively investigated. We examined the effects of VK3 and VK5 on proliferation, apoptosis, cytokine production, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cell-frequency in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) activated by T cell mitogen in vitro. Anti-proliferative effects of VK3 and VK5 on T-cell mitogen activated PBMCs were assessed by WST assay procedures. Apoptotic cells were determined as Annexin V positive/propidium iodide (PI) negative cells. Cytokine concentrations in the supernatant of the culture medium were measured with bead-array procedures followed by analysis with flow cytometry. The CD4+CD25+Foxp3+Treg cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs were stained with fluorescence-labeled specific antibodies followed by flow cytometry. VK3 and VK5 suppressed the mitogen-activated proliferation of PBMCs significantly at 10-100μM (p<0.05). The data also suggest that VK3 and VK5 promote apoptosis in the mitogen-activated T cells. VK3 and VK5 significantly inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, interleukin (IL)-4, -6, and -10 from the activated PBMCs at 10-100μM (p<0.05). In contrast, VK3 and VK5 significantly increased Treg cell-frequency in the activated PBMCs at concentrations more than 10μM (p<0.001). Our data suggest that VK3 and VK5 attenuate T cell mediated immunity by inhibiting the proliferative response and inducing apoptosis in activated T cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamics of the Peripheral Membrane Protein P2 from Human Myelin Measured by Neutron Scattering--A Comparison between Wild-Type Protein and a Hinge Mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saara Laulumaa

    Full Text Available Myelin protein P2 is a fatty acid-binding structural component of the myelin sheath in the peripheral nervous system, and its function is related to its membrane binding capacity. Here, the link between P2 protein dynamics and structure and function was studied using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS. The P38G mutation, at the hinge between the β barrel and the α-helical lid, increased the lipid stacking capacity of human P2 in vitro, and the mutated protein was also functional in cultured cells. The P38G mutation did not change the overall structure of the protein. For a deeper insight into P2 structure-function relationships, information on protein dynamics in the 10 ps to 1 ns time scale was obtained using EINS. Values of mean square displacements mainly from protein H atoms were extracted for wild-type P2 and the P38G mutant and compared. Our results show that at physiological temperatures, the P38G mutant is more dynamic than the wild-type P2 protein, especially on a slow 1-ns time scale. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the enhanced dynamics of the mutant variant, especially within the portal region in the presence of bound fatty acid. The increased softness of the hinge mutant of human myelin P2 protein is likely related to an enhanced flexibility of the portal region of this fatty acid-binding protein, as well as to its interactions with the lipid bilayer surface requiring conformational adaptations.

  10. Stem cell collection in unmanipulated HLA-haploidentical/mismatched related transplantation with combined granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised blood and bone marrow for patients with haematologic malignancies: the impact of donor characteristics and procedural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Chen, X-H; Zhang, X; Gao, L; Gao, L; Kong, P-Y; Peng, X-G; Sun, A-H; Gong, Y; Zeng, D-F; Wang, Q-Y

    2010-06-01

    Unmanipulated haploidentical/mismatched related transplantation with combined granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised peripheral blood stem cells (G-PBSCs) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilised bone marrow (G-BM) has been developed as an alternative transplantation strategy for patients with haematologic malignancies. However, little information is available about the factors predicting the outcome of peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collection and bone marrow (BM) harvest in this transplantation. The effects of donor characteristics and procedure factors on CD34(+) cell yield were investigated. A total of 104 related healthy donors received granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) followed by PBSC collection and BM harvest. Male donors had significantly higher yields compared with female donors. In multiple regression analysis for peripheral blood collection, age and flow rate were negatively correlated with cell yield, whereas body mass index, pre-aphaeresis white blood cell (WBC) and circulating immature cell (CIC) counts were positively correlated with cell yields. For BM harvest, age was negatively correlated with cell yields, whereas pre-BM collection CIC counts were positively correlated with cell yield. All donors achieved the final product of >or=6 x10(6) kg(-1) recipient body weight. This transplantation strategy has been shown to be a feasible approach with acceptable outcomes in stem cell collection for patients who received HLA-haploidentical/mismatched transplantation with combined G-PBSCs and G-BM. In donors with multiple high-risk characteristics for poor aphaeresis CD34(+) cell yield, BM was an alternative source.

  11. Transplantation of Human Dental Pulp-Derived Stem Cells or Differentiated Neuronal Cells from Human Dental Pulp-Derived Stem Cells Identically Enhances Regeneration of the Injured Peripheral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Imran; Park, Ju-Mi; Kang, Young-Hoon; Byun, June-Ho; Kim, Dae-Geon; Kim, Joo-Heon; Kang, Dong-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2017-09-01

    Human dental mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the dental follicle, pulp, and root apical papilla of extracted wisdom teeth have been known to exhibit successful and potent neurogenic differentiation capacity. In particular, human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDPSCs) stand out as the most prominent source for in vitro neuronal differentiation. In this study, to evaluate the in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration potential of hDPSCs and differentiated neuronal cells from DPSCs (DF-DPSCs), a total of 1 × 10 6 hDPSCs or DF-hDPSCs labeled with PKH26 tracking dye and supplemented with fibrin glue scaffold and collagen tubulization were transplanted into the sciatic nerve resection (5-mm gap) of rat models. At 12 weeks after cell transplantation, both hDPSC and DF-hDPSC groups showed notably increased behavioral activities and higher muscle contraction forces compared with those in the non-cell transplanted control group. In immunohistochemical analysis of regenerated nerve specimens, specific markers for angiogenesis, axonal fiber, and myelin sheath increased in both the cell transplantation groups. Pretransplanted labeled PKH26 were also distinctly detected in the regenerated nerve tissues, indicating that transplanted cells were well-preserved and differentiated into nerve cells. Furthermore, no difference was observed in the nerve regeneration potential between the hDPSC and DF-hDPSC transplanted groups. These results demonstrate that dental pulp tissue is an excellent stem cell source for nerve regeneration, and in vivo transplantation of the undifferentiated hDPSCs could exhibit sufficient and excellent peripheral nerve regeneration potential.

  12. Relationships between human vitality and mitochondrial respiratory parameters, reactive oxygen species production and dNTP levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maynard, Scott; Keijzers, Guido; Gram, Martin

    2013-01-01

    . Therefore, we measured a number of cellular parameters related to mitochondrial activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from middle-aged men, and tested for association with vitality. These parameters estimate mitochondrial respiration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production...

  13. Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells promote interleukin-17 production from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy donors and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, S; Hu, J; Chen, Y; Yuan, T; Hu, H; Li, S

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation instigated by interleukin (IL)-17-producing cells is central to the development and pathogenesis of several human autoimmune diseases and animal models of autoimmunity. The expansion of IL-17-producing cells from healthy donors is reportedly promoted by mesenchymal stem cells derived from fetal bone marrow. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) were examined for their effects on lymphocytes from healthy donors and from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Significantly higher levels of IL-17 were produced when CD4(+) T cells from healthy donors were co-cultured with hUC-MSCs than those that were cultured alone. Blocking experiments identified that this effect might be mediated partially through prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) and IL-1β, without IL-23 involvement. We then co-cultured hUC-MSCs with human CD4(+) T cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Ex-vivo inductions of IL-17 by hUC-MSCs in stimulated lymphocytes were significantly higher in SLE patients than in healthy donors. This effect was not observed for IL-23. Taken together, our results represent that hUC-MSCs can promote the IL-17 production from CD4(+) T cells in both healthy donor and SLE patients. PGE2 and IL-1β might also be partially involved in the promotive effect of hUC-MSCs. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Van Boekel

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug.

  15. Interleukin 2 (IL 2) up-regulates its own receptor on a subset of human unprimed peripheral blood lymphocytes and triggers their proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harel-Bellan, A.; Bertoglio, J.; Quillet, A.; Marchiol, C.; Wakasugi, H.; Mishall, Z.; Fradelizi, D.

    1986-01-01

    Several reports indicate that human peripheral blood lymphoctyes (PBL) seeded in culture with purified or recombinant interleukin 2 (IL 2) immediately after separation from the blood display a substantial level of proliferation at day 5 or 6, even in the absence of any activating signal. The spontaneously IL 2 proliferating cells are large lymphocytes, and they co-purify on a Percoll gradient in the large granular lymphocytes (third (LGL) fraction) together with the natural killer (NK) activity. When LGL were separated into NKH1 (an NK-specific surface marker)-positive and NKH1-negative cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), proliferating cells were mainly found in the NKH1-negative fraction. On the contrary, when cells from Percoll fraction 3 were separated into OKT3-negative and positive cells, the majority of the proliferating cells was found in the OKT3-positive cells. These results indicate that spontaneously IL 2 proliferating (SIP) cells most probably belong to the T cell lineage, but are distinct from NK cells. Additional analysis of Il 2 receptor induced in culture with IL 2 was performed by [ 125 I]anti-TAC binding and by [ 3 H]Il 2 binding. Scatchard analysis of [ 3 H]IL 2 binding, in the range of concentrations leading to the detection of high-affinity binding sites, showed an affinity constant similar to that of conventional phytohemagglutinin blasts. The results indicate that SIP cells are preactivated cells circulating in the blood. They are large cells and represent a very small proportion of circulating lymphocytes (0.3%). They express a subliminar amount of IL 2 receptor. Cultivated in the presence of IL 2, IL 2 receptor expression is enhanced to a detectable level, and the SIP cells begin to proliferate. These SIP cells could be activated T cells in the course of a current immune response or memory T cells present in every normal individual

  16. The efficacy of a scaffold-free Bio 3D conduit developed from human fibroblasts on peripheral nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Yurie

    Full Text Available Although autologous nerve grafting is the gold standard treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, several alternative methods have been developed, including nerve conduits that use supportive cells. However, the seeding efficacy and viability of supportive cells injected in nerve grafts remain unclear. Here, we focused on a novel completely biological, tissue-engineered, scaffold-free conduit.We developed six scaffold-free conduits from human normal dermal fibroblasts using a Bio 3D Printer. Twelve adult male rats with immune deficiency underwent mid-thigh-level transection of the right sciatic nerve. The resulting 5-mm nerve gap was bridged using 8-mm Bio 3D conduits (Bio 3D group, n = 6 and silicone tube (silicone group, n = 6. Several assessments were conducted to examine nerve regeneration eight weeks post-surgery.Kinematic analysis revealed that the toe angle to the metatarsal bone at the final segment of the swing phase was significantly higher in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (-35.78 ± 10.68 versus -62.48 ± 6.15, respectively; p < 0.01. Electrophysiological studies revealed significantly higher compound muscle action potential in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (53.60 ± 26.36% versus 2.93 ± 1.84%; p < 0.01. Histological and morphological studies revealed neural cell expression in all regions of the regenerated nerves and the presence of many well-myelinated axons in the Bio 3D group. The wet muscle weight of the tibialis anterior muscle was significantly higher in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (0.544 ± 0.063 versus 0.396 ± 0.031, respectively; p < 0.01.We confirmed that scaffold-free Bio 3D conduits composed entirely of fibroblast cells promote nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

  17. Protection of ionizing radiation-induced cytogenetic damage by hydroalcoholic extract of Cynodon dactylon in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Upadhya, Dinesh; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2008-01-01

    The radiomodulatory potential of hydroalcoholic extract of a medicinal plant Cynodon dactylon (family: Poaceae) against radiation-induced cytogenetic damage was analyzed using Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79) cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) growing in vitro. Induction of micronuclei was used as an index of cytogenetic damage, evaluated in cytokinesis blocked binucleate cells. The hydroalcoholic Cynodon dactylon extract (CDE) rendered protection against the radiation-induced DNA damage, as evidenced by the significant (p<0.001) reduction in micronucleated binucleate cells (MNBNC%) after various doses of CDE treatment in V79 cells and HPBLs. The optimum dose of CDE (40 and 50 microg/ml in HPBLs and V79 cells, respectively) with the greatest reduction in micronuclei was further used in combination with various doses of gamma radiation (0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy) exposed 1 h after CDE treatment. A linear dose-dependent MNBNC% increase in radiation alone group was observed, while 40/50 microg/ml CDE significantly resulted in the reduction of MNBNC%, compared to the respective radiation alone groups. CDE resulted in a dose-dependent increase in free radical scavenging ability against various free radicals, viz., 2, 2-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH); 2, 2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS); superoxide anion (O2*-); hydroxyl radical (OH*) and nitric oxide radical (NO*) generated in vitro. Also, an excellent (70%) inhibition of lipid peroxidation in vitro was observed at a dose of 300 microg/ml CDE, attaining the saturation point at higher doses. The present findings demonstrated the radioprotective effect of CDE, also rendering protection against radiation-induced genomic instability and DNA damage. The observed radioprotective effect may be partly attributed to the free radical scavenging and antilipid peroxidative potential of CDE.

  18. Determination of Zidovudine Triphosphate Intracellular Concentrations in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font, Eva; Rosario, Osvaldo; Santana, Jorge; García, Hermes; Sommadossi, Jean-Pierre; Rodriguez, Jose F.

    1999-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) used against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) need to be activated intracellularly to their triphosphate moiety to inhibit HIV replication. Intracellular concentrations of these NRTI triphosphates, especially zidovudine triphosphate (ZDV-TP), are relatively low (low numbers of femtomoles per 106 cells) in HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Recently, several methods have used either high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled with radioimmunoassay to obtain in vivo measurements of ZDV-TP. The limit of detection (LOD) by these methods ranged from 20 to 200 fmol/106 cells. In this report, we describe the development of a method to determine intracellular ZDV-TP concentrations in HIV-infected patients using SPE and HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry for analysis. The LOD by this method is 4.0 fmol/106 cells with a linear concentration range of at least 4 orders of magnitude from 4.0 to 10,000 fmol/106 cells. In hispanic HIV-infected patients, ZDV-TP was detectable even when the sampling time after drug administration was 15 h. Intracellular ZDV-TP concentrations in these patients ranged from 41 to 193 fmol/106 cells. The low LOD obtained with this method will provide the opportunity for further in vivo pharmacokinetic studies of intracellular ZDV-TP in different HIV-infected populations. Furthermore, this methodology could be used to perform simultaneous detection of two or more NRTIs, such as ZDV-TP and lamivudine triphosphate. PMID:10582890

  19. Mobilisation of store Ca2+ activates tyrosine hydroxylase in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, S.; Marley, P.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Many receptor agonists are able to activate tyrosine hydroxylase (TOH) in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. The majority of these are dependent on extracellular Ca 2+ for this action. Entry of extracellular Ca 2+ through voltage-operated Ca 2+ channels is very effective at activating TOH. The contribution of the intracellular Ca 2+ stores to TOH activation however is not known. Previous studies have shown that mobilisation of intracellular Ca 2+ stores is effective at increasing phosphorylation of TOH, but its effect on TOH activity has not been studied. Therefore, in the present study, the effect of mobilisation of store Ca 2+ on TOH activity was investigated using primary cultures of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were prepared from abattoir tissue and cultured for 3-6 days. TOH activity was determined over 10 minutes, measuring the 14 CO 2 produced following the hydroxylation and rapid decarboxylation of 14 C-tyrosine offered to intact cells. Caffeine increased TOH activity in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximum response of 100% increase at 20mM. This effect was not due to osmolarity since 20mM sucrose had no effect.Nor was it due to inhibition of phosphodiesterases, since the effect of caffeine was still seen in the presence of 1mM IBMX. However,caffeine-induced TOH activation was substantially reduced in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ . The results suggest that TOH activity can be increased by mobilising intracellular Ca 2+ stores, but that this effect involves extracellular Ca 2+ influx, possibly through store-operated channels. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  20. Metal mobilisation in hydrothermal sediments at the TAG Hydrothermal Field (MAR, 26°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrieux, A. M.; Lichtschlag, A.; Martins, S.; Barriga, F. J.; Petersen, S.; Murton, B. J.

    2017-12-01

    Metalliferous sediments in the vicinity of hydrothermal systems are enriched in base metals, but few studies have addressed their potential as mineral resources. These metalliferous sediments have been accumulated by different processes and reflect modifications of the primary mineral deposits by: oxidation of the chimney materials, in situ precipitation of low-temperature minerals and mass wasting. To understand the post-formation processes in metalliferous sediments, we investigated sub-seafloor metal mobilisation in different geological environments. This presentation focuses on the TAG Hydrothermal Field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 26°N) and explores sediment and pore water compositions using ICP-MS and ICP-OES. We use reactive transport modelling to interpret the degree of metal remobilisation and to identify the most important geochemical reactions in the different sediments. The pore water concentrations measured in sediments above inactive sulphide mounds present constant major elements composition that indicates this environment is dominated by complete exchange with seawater. The sediments, that are mainly composed of hematite and goethite formed during the oxidation of sulphides, have low Cu concentrations (sediments and capped by more recent sediment slumping. In the depositionary channels, pore waters show metal concentrations affected by diagenesis and redox-sensitive metals are released at depth (e.g. Mn2+ and Cu2+). The leaching of the primary sulphides (e.g. deprecated grains of chalcopyrite), and metal mobilisation lead to an enrichment of Cu and Zn at shallower depth. Here, some stratigraphic horizons scavenge metallic cations back into solid phases and form Mn-oxide crusts between 30 and 60 cm, in which Cu concentrations also increase. Our results demonstrate that metal mobilisation differs depending on the geological environment and their related accumulation processes, causing the absence of Cu on the top of inactive hydrothermal mounds but enriched

  1. Community mobilisation in the 21st century: updating our theory of social change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The article explores the Freirian theory of social change underpinning health-related community mobilisation in poor and marginalised communities. Highlighting potential shortcomings of its essentialist understandings of power and identity, and linear notions of change, it examines how lessons from the 'new left', and burgeoning global protest movements, can rejuvenate the field given the growing complexity of 21st-century social inequalities. It suggests the need for a pastiche of approaches to accommodate health struggles in different times and places. However, while needing some updating, Freire's profound and actionable understandings of the symbolic and material dimensions of social inequalities remain a powerful starting point for activism.

  2. Electrokinetic mobilisation of toluene and chlorinated ethenes in low permeable soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middeldorp, P.; Sinke, A. [TNO Environment Energy and Process Innovation, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    An electrokinetic horizontal soil column setup was developed to study the effect of electric current on the mobilisation and biodegradation of organic pollutants in soil. Toluene and tetrachloroethene (PCE) were injected between the two electrodes in the center of the soil column and a DC current of 1 V/cm was applied. We observed a breakthrough of PCE and toluene at the cathode side after 8 days and 11 days respectively. This short experiment shows the possibility to enhance the mobility of non-ionic organic pollutants through electro-osmosis. (orig.)

  3. Immune Modulation in Normal Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) (Lymphocytes) in Response to Benzofuran-2-Carboxylic Acid Derivative KMEG during Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Elvis; Mann, Vivek; Ellis, Ivory; Mansoor, Elvedina; Olamigoke, Loretta; Marriott, Karla Sue; Denkins, Pamela; Williams, Willie; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2017-08-01

    Microgravity and radiation exposure during space flight have been widely reported to induce the suppression of normal immune system function, and increase the risk of cancer development in humans. These findings pose a serious risk to manned space missions. Interestingly, recent studies have shown that benzofuran-2-carboxylic acid derivatives can inhibit the progression of some of these devastating effects on earth and in modeled microgravity. However, these studies had not assessed the impacts of benzofuran-2- carboxylic acid and its derivatives on global gene expression under spaceflight conditions. In this study, the ability of a specific benzofuran-2-carboxylic acid derivative (KMEG) to confer protection from radiation and restore normal immune function was investigated following exposure to space flight conditions on the ISS. Normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (lymphocytes) treated with 10 µ g/ml of KMEG together with untreated control samples were flown on Nanoracks hardware on Spacex-3 flight. The Samples were returned one month later and gene expression was analyzed. A 1g-ground control experiment was performed in parallel at the Kennedy spaceflight center. The first overall subtractive unrestricted analysis revealed 78 genes, which were differentially expressed in space flight KMEG, untreated lymphocytes as compared to the corresponding ground controls. However, in KMEG-treated space flight lymphocytes, there was an increased expression of a group of genes that mediate increased transcription, translation and innate immune system mediating functions of lymphocytes as compared to KMEG-untreated samples. Analysis of genes related to T cell proliferation in spaceflight KMEG-treated lymphocytes compared to 1g-ground KMEG- treated lymphocytes revealed six T cell proliferation and signaling genes to be significantly upregulated (p trafficking, promote early response, mediating C-myc related proliferation, promote antiapoptotic activity and protects

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset ... 10 percent disabling by VA's rating regulations. About peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of the peripheral ...

  5. Inductive potential of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to mature neutrophils from X-irradiated human peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumori, Takeo; Yoshino, Hironori; Hayashi, Masako; Takahashi, Kenji; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) has been used for treatment of neutropenia. Filgrastim, Nartograstim, and Lenograstim are clinically available in Japan. However, the differences in potential benefit for radiation-induced disorder between these types of rhG-CSFs remain unknown. Therefore, the effects of three different types of rhG-CSFs on granulocyte progenitor cells and expansion of neutrophils from nonirradiated or 2 Gy X-irradiated human CD34 + hematopoietic progenitor cells were examined. For analysis of granulocyte colony-forming units (CFU-G) and a surviving fraction of CFU-G, nonirradiated or X-irradiated CD34 + cells were cultured in methylcellulose containing rhG-CSF. These cells were cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with rhG-CSF, and the expansion and characteristics of neutrophils were analyzed. All three types of rhG-CSFs increased the number of CFU-G in a dose-dependent manner; however, Lenograstim is superior to others because of CFU-G-derived colony formation at relatively low doses. The surviving fraction of CFU-G was independent of the types of rhG-CSFs. Expansion of neutrophils by rhG-CSF was largely attenuated by X-irradiation, though no significant difference in neutrophil number was observed between the three types of rhG-CSFs under both nonirradiation and X-irradiation conditions. In terms of functional characteristics of neutrophils, Lenograstim-induced neutrophils produced high levels of reactive oxygen species compared to Filgrastim, when rhG-CSF was applied to nonirradiated CD34 + cells. In conclusion, different types of rhG-CSFs lead to different effects when rhG-CSF is applied to nonirradiated CD34 + cells, though Filgrastim, Nartograstim, and Lenograstim show equal effects on X-irradiated CD34 + cells. (author)

  6. Regional and systemic distribution of anti-tumor x anti-CD3 heteroaggregate antibodies and cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes in a human colon cancer xenograft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.; Ramsey, P.S.; Kerr, L.A.; McKean, D.J.; Donohue, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    Anti-tumor antibody (317G5) covalently coupled to an anti-CD3 antibody (OKT3) produces a heteroaggregate (HA) antibody that can target PBL to lyse tumor cells expressing the appropriate tumor Ag. The i.v. and i.p. distribution of radiolabeled HA antibody 317G5 x OKT3 and of radiolabeled cultured human PBL were studied in athymic nude mice bearing solid intraperitoneal tumor established from the human colon tumor line, LS174T. Mice were injected with 125I-labeled HA antibody, 125I-labeled anti-tumor mAb, or 111In-labeled PBL, and at designated timepoints tissues were harvested and measured for radioactivity. 125I-317G5 x OKT3 localized specifically to tumor sites. Tumor radioactivity levels (percent injected dose/gram) were lower with 125I-317G5 x OKT3 HA antibody than with 125I-317G5 anti-tumor mAb, but were similar to levels reported for other anti-tumor mAb. The major difference in radioactivity levels observed between i.v. and i.p. administration of 125I-317G5 x OKT3 was an increase in hepatic radioactivity after i.v. HA antibody administration. HA antibodies produced from F(ab')2 fragments, which exhibit decreased m. w. and decreased Fc receptor-mediated binding, demonstrated improved tumor:tissue ratios as compared to intact antibody HA. 125I-317G5 F(ab')2 x OKT3 F(ab')2 antibody levels were equivalent to intact HA antibody levels in tumor, but were lower than intact HA antibody levels in the blood, bowel, and liver. Tumor:bowel ratios (20:1 at 48 h) were highest when 317G5 F(ab')2 x OKT3 F(ab')2 was injected i.p. Autoradiography confirmed that anti-tumor x anti-CD3 HA antibodies localized specifically to intraperitoneal tumor; that i.p. administered HA antibodies penetrated tumor directly; and that i.v. administered HA antibodies distributed along tumor vasculature

  7. Possible effects of mobilisation on acute post-operative pain and nociceptive function after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, T H; Kristensen, B B; Gaarn-Larsen, L

    2012-01-01

    anaesthesia and analgesia underwent an exercise (mobilisation) strategy on the first post-operative morning consisting of 25-m walking twice, with a 20-min interval. Pain was assessed at rest and during passive hip and knee flexion before, and 5 and 20 min after walk, as well as during walk. Nociceptive......BACKGROUND: Experimental studies in animals, healthy volunteers, and patients with chronic pain suggest exercise to provide analgesia in several types of pain conditions and after various nociceptive stimuli. To our knowledge, there is no data on the effects of exercise on pain and nociceptive...... function in surgical patients despite early mobilisation being an important factor to enhance recovery. We therefore investigated possible effects of mobilisation on post-operative pain and nociceptive function after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: Thirty patients undergoing TKA under standardised...

  8. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  9. Harvesting, processing and inventory management of peripheral blood stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijovic Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available By 2003, 97% autologous transplants and 65% of allogeneic transplants in Europe used mobilised peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC. Soon after their introduction in the early 1990′s, PBSC were associated with faster haemopoietic recovery, fewer transfusions and antibiotic usage, and a shorter hospital stay. Furthermore, ease and convenience of PBSC collection made them more appealing than BM harvests. Improved survival has hitherto been demonstrated in patients with high risk AML and CML. However, the advantages of PBSC come at a price of a higher incidence of extensive chronic GVHD. In order to be present in the blood, stem cells undergo the process of "mobilisation" from their bone marrow habitat. Mobilisation, and its reciprocal process - homing - are regulated by a complex network of molecules on the surface of stem cells and stromal cells, and enzymes and cytokines released from granulocytes and osteoclasts. Knowledge of these mechanisms is beginning to be exploited for clinical purposes. In current practice, stem cell are mobilised by use of chemotherapy in conjunction with haemopoietic growth factors (HGF, or with HGF alone. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor has emerged as the single most important mobilising agent, due to its efficacy and a relative paucity of serious side effects. Over a decade of use in healthy donors has resulted in vast experience of optimal dosing and administration, and safety matters. PBSC harvesting can be performed on a variety of cell separators. Apheresis procedures are nowadays routine, but it is important to be well versed in the possible complications in order to avoid harm to the patient or donor. To ensure efficient collection, harvesting must begin when sufficient stem cells have been mobilised. A rapid, reliable, standardized blood test is essential to decide when to begin harvesting; currently, blood CD34+ cell counting by flow cytometry fulfils these criteria. Blood CD34+ cell counts strongly

  10. Climate and enterprises: from mobilisation to action. Seven proposals to prepare the after-COP21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayme, Arnaud; Derumaux, Quentin; Authier, Marc-Antoine; Monterno, Alexia de; Piolot, Lucie

    2015-11-01

    Based on meetings with 30 representatives of enterprises and institutions, this report first outlines that the COP21 takes place within a context characterised by a momentum which is to be exploited as awareness grows quickly, as data published by the IPCC is a consensus. It outlines that national climate contributions represent a positive methodological evolution and discusses the importance of bilateral agreements (example and the China-USA agreement), and gives an overview of remaining obstacles (financing the struggle against climate change, level playing field for European enterprises, how to support the losers of energy transition). The mobilisation of enterprises is then described as a new lever in the struggle against climate change: strong signals are sent by the financial sector; enterprises are facing many challenges. This mobilisation is presented as an unavoidable stake in negotiations. A necessary action of public authorities is outlined. Some proposals are stated regarding public financing of the struggle against climate change, the focussing of regulatory constraints on this struggle, public commissioning as a lever for a successful environmental transition, and the role of public authorities as a mediator between civil society and enterprises

  11. Arsenic and selenium mobilisation from organic matter treated mine spoil with and without inorganic fertilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Clemente, Rafael; Mestrot, Adrien; Meharg, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Organic matter amendments are applied to contaminated soil to provide a better habitat for re-vegetation and remediation, and olive mill waste compost (OMWC) has been described as a promising material for this aim. We report here the results of an incubation experiment carried out in flooded conditions to study its influence in As and metal solubility in a trace elements contaminated soil. NPK fertilisation and especially organic amendment application resulted in increased As, Se and Cu concentrations in pore water. Independent of the amendment, dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) was the most abundant As species in solution. The application of OMWC increased pore water dissolved organic-carbon (DOC) concentrations, which may explain the observed mobilisation of As, Cu and Se; phosphate added in NPK could also be in part responsible of the mobilisation caused in As. Therefore, the application of soil amendments in mine soils may be particularly problematic in flooded systems. Highlights: ► Organic and inorganic amendments were added to a mine soil in flooding conditions. ► Olive mill waste compost (OMWC) provoked As, Se and Cu solubilisation. ► Dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) was the predominant As species in pore water. ► Selenium volatilisation from soils was intense. - The addition of organic amendment and/or inorganic fertiliser to a trace element contaminated soil in flooded conditions led to As, Cu and Se solubilisation.

  12. Advocacy, communication and social mobilisation for tuberculosis control in Pakistan: a qualitative case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Z; Khan, W; Rizwan, S

    2013-03-01

    A national-level study in four districts, one each in all four provinces of Pakistan, a high tuberculosis (TB) burden country. To examine how advocacy, communication and social mobilisation (ACSM) campaigns by the National Tuberculosis Programme (NTP) in Pakistan engaged the populations of interest, to what extent they were successful in promoting services and desired behaviours, and how these campaigns could be improved. This was a qualitative case study comprising 13 focus groups and 36 individual interviews in four districts. All three levels of the ACSM programme, i.e., planners, implementers and beneficiaries, were included among the respondents. Improved political commitment, availability of funds, partnership with the private sector, visibility of the NTP and access to directly observed treatment (DOT) were achieved. Individual and social environmental issues of poor patients and marginalised communities were addressed to some extent, and could be improved in the future. Empathy and respect from physicians, and better service delivery of the DOTS-based programme were desired by the patients. The strategic advocacy ensured political and financial commitment; however, identification and targeting of vulnerable populations, and carrying out context-based social mobilisation and effective counselling are crucial to increase the use of DOT. Evaluations should be built-in from the beginning to increase the evidence on effectiveness of ACSM campaigns.

  13. Regarding the quantification of peripheral microcirculation--Comparing responses evoked in the in vivo human lower limb by postural changes, suprasystolic occlusion and oxygen breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Henrique; Ferreira, Hugo; Bujan, Ma Julia; Rodrigues, Luis Monteiro

    2015-05-01

    The human skin is an interesting model to explore microcirculation, particularly if using noninvasive technologies such as LDF (Laser Doppler Flowmetry) and tc (transcutaneous) gasimetry and methods as near as possible from the normal physiological state. In this study, we combined those technologies with three classical approaches--leg raising from supine, suprasystolic occlusion (in the ankle), and normobaric oxygen breathing to explore distal peripheral circulation in the foot. These methods are often cited, but a comparative assessment has not been done. The goal of this study was to identify relevant flow related descriptors, method-related advantages and pitfalls, and eventually, to find the best experimental approach. Volunteers (both genders, 22.1 ± 3.7 years old) were subjected to these methods and variables registered during basal, challenge and stabilization phases. Descriptive and comparative statistics were obtained, adopting a 95% confidence level. All flow-related quantitative descriptors potentially useful for the analysis were identified and compared. As expected, male patients consistently showed higher LDF levels and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and lower tcpO2 values. However, lower results were recorded in the supine position, suggesting a postural dependence. Both leg raising and suprasystolic occlusion produced a hyperemic response after provocation, although different in magnitude, significantly reducing LDF and tcpO2 during provocation. The oxygen breathing method provided the most patient-friendly protocol, consistently reducing LDF (potentially by the inhibition of production of local vasodilators). TEWL increased during the provocation phase in all protocols, although not significantly. Baseline tcpO2 was found to correlate positively with the peak tcpO2 during oxygen breathing and basal LDF with peak flow during leg raising and suprasystolic occlusion. No statistical correlation between TEWL and LDF could be demonstrated under the

  14. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leni Moldovan

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs, have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene, defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all p<0.03 with age (R2 = -0.23, vascular stiffness (R2 = -0.24, and central aortic pressure (R2 = -0.19 and positively correlated with body mass index (R2 = 0.72, in women. The co-expression of three neovascular markers was validated at the single-cell level using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The overall gene expression in this cardiovascular module was reduced by 72±22% in the patients compared with controls. However, the compactness of both modules was increased in the patients' samples, which was reflected in reduced dispersion of their nodes' degrees of connectivity, suggesting a more primitive character of the patients' CSPCs. In conclusion, our results show that the relationship between CSPCs and vascular function is encoded in modules of the PBMCs transcriptional

  15. Spontaneous micronucleus frequencies in human peripheral blood lymphocytes as a screening test for an individual variation in a different population and radiation-induced micronucleus induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang-Mo; Jeon, Hye-Jeong; Cho, Chul-Koo

    2004-01-01

    Our studies were to evaluate the role of epigenetic factors in the variation of radiosensitivity on human peripheral blood lymphocytes by measuring the frequencies of micronucleus (MN) from 293 healthy subjects of different population for assessing the radiation health risk in Korea. We analyzed the frequencies of both spontaneous and in vitro 60 Co γ-rays or 50MeV neutron-induced MNs. The frequencies of spontaneous NMs not only vary greatly between individuals, but also working or living areas. The increased levels of cells with spontaneous MNs were observed with an increasing age. The frequencies of spontaneous MNs were significantly higher in females than in males. For both sexes, MN frequency was significantly and positively correlated with age. Age and gender are the most important demographic variables impacting on the MN index. Donors who had ever smoked showed significantly increased frequencies of MNs compared to nonsmokers. The main lifestyle factors influencing the MN index in the subjects are correlated significantly and positively with smoke while measuring the spontaneous frequencies of micronuclei. Therefore, it is evident that with regard to the application of MN assay all future studies to evaluate the association between radiosensitivity and susceptibility for radiation health risks in different populations should take into account the effect of age, gender and lifestyle. For the dose-response study, the induced MNs were observed at all doses, and the numerical changes according to doses. The dose-response curves were fitted with a linear-quadratic forms of the dose, and the results were different for γ-rays and neutrons significantly. Neutrons were more effective than γ-rays in producing MN with a dose-dependent manner. The frequency of MN varies with dose. The RBE for a micronuclei was 2.37 ± 0.17. The results suggested that the MN assay have a high potential to ensure appropriate quality control and a standard documentation protocol, which

  16. As to the clastogenic-, sister-chromatid exchange inducing-and cytotoxic activity of inosine triphosphate in cultures of human peripheral lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormittag, W; Brannath, W

    2001-05-09

    The influence of commercial inosine triphosphate (ITP) on the chromosome aberration rate, the mitotic rate, sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency, and the proportion of first (X1), second (X2) and third (X3) division metaphases was investigated in 72h cultures of human peripheral lymphocytes. The blood donors had mild inactive arthrosis and a normal health check-up. All cultures of each volunteer were set-up simultaneously. In contrast to a previous report [Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 278 (1990) 238-244], it was demonstrated in two preliminary studies (number of subjects, n=5 each) that ITP at a final concentration of 100 microM does not induce chromosomal aberrations and, furthermore, that not ITP concentrations higher than 100 microM but ITP doses higher than 3.8mM prohibit culture growth. Based on these results, cultures with a final ITP concentration of 3.6mM (max.) and 1.8mM (max./2) were compared with control cultures (number of subjects n=10; three males and seven females, mean age x=57.6 years). Whereas no increase in the chromosomal breakage rate was observed in cultures with an ITP concentration of 1.8mM and only a marginally significant one (P=0.048) for 3.6mM ITP cultures, a highly significant induction of SCEs, not only at an ITP concentration of 3.6mM (Prate from 0 to 1.8mM as well as from 1.8 to 3.6mM in the aberration studies (all P values are equal to smallest possible one for a sample size of 10, namely, 0.002), and in the SCE studies there is a significant decrease in the X3 frequency when ITP is increased (0-1.8mM: P=0.0061 and 1.8-3.6mM: Pchanges significantly only at the second dose step (0-1.8mM ITP: P=0.22 and 1.8-3.6mM ITP: P<0.0001). The results are discussed.

  17. Human recombinant antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3 cloned from peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals with immunity to malaria demonstrate antiparasitic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundquist, Rasmus; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed; Jafarshad, Ali

    2006-01-01

    against MSP-3 residues 194 to 257 (MSP-3(194-257)) on the molecular level. mRNA from peripheral blood leukocytes from clinically immune individuals was used as a source of Fab (fragment antibody) genes. A Fab-phage display library was made, and three distinct antibodies designated RAM1, RAM2, and RAM3...

  18. Gamma-H2AX as a biomarker of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation in targeted and bystander human artificial skin models and peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Christophe; Dickey, Jennifer; Bonner, William; Sedelnikova, Olga

    Ionizing radiation (IR) exposure is inevitable. In addition to exposure from cosmic rays, the sun and radioactive substances, modern society has created new sources of radiation exposure such as space and high altitude journeys, X-ray diagnostics, radiological treatments and the increasing threat of radiobiological terrorism. For these reasons, a reliable, reproducible and sensitive assessment of dose and time exposure to IR is essential. We developed a minimally invasive diagnostic test for IR exposure based on detection of a phosphorylated variant of histone H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which occurs specifically at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The phosphorylation of thousands of H2AX molecules forms a gamma-H2AX focus in the chromatin flanking the DSB site that can be detected in situ. We analyzed gamma- H2AX focus formation in both directly irradiated cells as well as in un-irradiated "bystanders" in close contact with irradiated cells. In order to insure minimal invasiveness, we examined commercially available artificial skin models as a surrogate for human skin biopsies as well as peripheral blood lymphocytes. In human skin models, cells in a thin plane were microbeamirradiated and gamma-H2AX formation was measured both in irradiated and in distal bystander cells over time. In irradiated cells DSB formation reached a maximum at 15-30 minutes post- IR and then declined within several hours; all cells were affected. In marked contrast, the incidence of DSBs in bystander cells reached a maximum by 12-48 hours post-irradiation, gradually decreasing over the 7 day time course. At the maxima, 40-60% of bystander cells were affected. Similarly, we analyzed blood samples exposed to IR ex vivo at doses ranging from 0.02 to 3 Gy. The amount of DNA damage was linear in respect to radiation dose and independent of the age or sex of the blood donor. The method is highly reproducible and highly sensitive. In directly irradiated cells, the number of gamma-H2AX foci peaked

  19. 'SASA! is the medicine that treats violence'. Qualitative findings on how a community mobilisation intervention to prevent violence against women created change in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyegombe, Nambusi; Starmann, Elizabeth; Devries, Karen M; Michau, Lori; Nakuti, Janet; Musuya, Tina; Watts, Charlotte; Heise, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) violates women's human rights and is a serious public health concern. Historically strategies to prevent IPV have focussed on individuals and their relationships without addressing the context under which IPV occurs. Primary prevention of IPV is a relatively new focus of international efforts and what SASA!, a phased community mobilisation intervention, seeks to achieve. Conducted in Kampala, Uganda, between 2007 and 2012, the SASA! Study is a cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the community-level impact of SASA! This nested qualitative study explores pathways of individual- and community-level change as a result of SASA! Forty in-depth interviews with community members (20 women, 20 men) were conducted at follow-up, audio recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis complemented by constant comparative methods. SASA! influenced the dynamics of relationships and broader community norms. At the relationship level, SASA! is helping partners to explore the benefits of mutually supportive gender roles; improve communication on a variety of issues; increase levels of joint decision-making and highlight non-violent ways to deal with anger or disagreement. Not all relationships experienced the same breadth and depth of change. At the community level, SASA! has helped foster a climate of non-tolerance of violence by reducing the acceptability of violence against women and increasing individuals' skills, willingness, and sense of responsibility to act to prevent it. It has also developed and strengthened community-based structures to catalyse and support on-going activism to prevent IPV. This paper provides evidence of the ways in which community-based violence prevention interventions may reduce IPV in low-income settings. It offers important implications for community mobilisation approaches and for prevention of IPV against women. This research has demonstrated the potential of social norm change

  20. Spatial variability of herbicide mobilisation and transport at catchment scale: insights from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Doppler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During rain events, herbicides can be transported from their point of application to surface waters, where they may harm aquatic organisms. Since the spatial pattern of mobilisation and transport is heterogeneous, the contributions of different fields to the herbicide load in the stream may vary considerably within one catchment. Therefore, the prediction of contributing areas could help to target mitigation measures efficiently to those locations where they reduce herbicide pollution the most.

    Such spatial predictions require sufficient insight into the underlying transport processes. To improve the understanding of the process chain of herbicide mobilisation on the field and the subsequent transport through the catchment to the stream, we performed a controlled herbicide application on corn fields in a small agricultural catchment (ca. 1 km2 with intensive crop production in the Swiss Plateau. Water samples were collected at different locations in the catchment (overland flow, tile drains and open channel for two months after application in 2009, with a high temporal resolution during rain events. We also analysed soil samples from the experimental fields and measured discharge, groundwater level, soil moisture and the occurrence of overland flow at several locations. Several rain events with varying intensities and magnitudes occurred during the study period. Overland flow and erosion were frequently observed in the entire catchment. Infiltration excess and saturation excess overland flow were both observed. However, the main herbicide loss event was dominated by infiltration excess.

    Despite the frequent and wide-spread occurrence of overland flow, most of this water did not reach the channel directly, but was retained in small depressions in the catchment. From there, it reached the stream via macropores and tile drains. Manholes of the drainage system and storm drains for road and farmyard runoff acted as

  1. Effects of experimental acidification on mobilisation of metals from sediments of limed and non-limed lakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waellstedt, Teresia; Borg, Hans

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the influence of pH on the mobilisation of metals from lake sediments, intact sediment cores with overlying water were sampled from one lime treated lake and one acidified lake. The overlying water of two cores from each lake was successively acidified to pH 4.2 over a period of 3 months. In the acid treated samples from the limed lake, the initial concentrations of Al, Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn in the overlying water were generally lower and the final concentrations were higher than in the acid treated samples from the acidified lake. The labile inorganic fraction of Al (Al i ) was increasingly dominating as pH decreased. Redox potential and pH in the sediment indicated that the upper two centimetres were involved in the exchange reactions. The experiment showed that mobilisation of metals from sediments can occur and the results indicated that mobilisation could contribute to increased concentrations of metals in lake water during reacidification of formerly lime treated lakes. - Reacidification leads to mobilisation of metals from lake sediments

  2. The de Bono LAMS Sequence Series: Template Designs as Knowledge-Mobilising Strategy for 21st Century Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobozy, Eva

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the five interlocking de Bono LAMS sequences are introduced as a new form of generic template designs. This transdisciplinary knowledge-mobilising strategy is based on Edward de Bono's attention-directing ideas and thinking skills, commonly known as the CoRT tools. The development of the de Bono LAMS sequence series is an important…

  3. Overseas Voter Mobilisation in Singapore: Implications from Malaysia’s 13th General Election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses voter mobilisation and other election-related activities of Malaysian voters living, studying and working in Singapore in the context of Malaysia’s 13th general election (GE13. According to the World Bank, nearly 400,000 Malaysians reside in the city-state. Thus these figures represent a significant Malaysian voter pool based in Singapore. Efforts to mobilise these voters for general elections or other causes have political implications for both countries, which became apparent following Singapore-based Malaysians’ activities to encourage Malaysians to return home to cast their votes during the 13th general election. Singapore’s strict public assembly laws led to several legal issues related to the voter mobilisation and election campaign activities undertaken by Malaysians in the city-state. These legal issues became a source of friction between the two countries during the elections as government leaders and authorities on both sides of the causeway accused the other of interfering in domestic political matters. Given the growing number of Malaysians in Singapore and the likely repeat of Malaysian voter mobilisation activities in Singapore in the run-up to the fourteenth general election (GE14 in 2018, issues related to the election activities of Malaysian voters in Singapore stand to be another set of factors that will shape the health of bilateral relations between these two countries.

  4. Mobilisation of heavy metals into the urine by CaEDTA: relation to erythrocyte and plasma concentrations and exposure indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, S; Aono, H; Murata, K

    1986-09-01

    To investigate the effects of calcium disodium ethylenediamine tetra-acetate (CaEDTA) on the urinary excretion, erythrocyte, and plasma concentrations and exposure indicators of seven heavy metals, CaEDTA was administered by intravenous infusion to 20 workers exposed to lead, zinc, and copper. The workers' blood lead concentrations ranged from 22 to 59 micrograms/dl (mean 38 micrograms/dl (1.8 mumol/l]. The 24 hour urinary excretion of metals after CaEDTA administration (mobilisation yield) was on average 13 times the background excretion for lead, 11 times for zinc, 3.8 times for manganese, 3.4 times for cadmium, 1.3 times for copper, and 1.1 times for chromium; no significant increase was found for mercury. The mobilisation yield of lead (MPb) was significantly correlated with whole blood and erythrocyte concentrations and the urinary excretion of lead but not with its plasma concentration; similarly, the mobilisation yield of cadmium was significantly correlated with its erythrocyte concentration. In addition, MPb was significantly correlated with intra-erythrocytic enzyme delta-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase activity and urinary coproporphyrin excretion. The relation between the mobilisation yield of heavy metals and their body burden (and toxic signs) is discussed in the light of these findings.

  5. Tax posttranslational modifications and interaction with calreticulin in MT-2 cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells of human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Fernando; Quintremil, Sebastian; Alberti, Carolina; Barriga, Andres; Cartier, Luis; Puente, Javier; Ramírez, Eugenio; Ferreira, Arturo; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Valenzuela, Maria Antonieta

    2014-04-01

    The human retrovirus human T cell lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Axonal degeneration in HAM/TSP patients occurs without neuron infection, with the secreted viral Tax protein proposed to be involved. We previously found that Tax secreted into the culture medium of MT-2 cells (HTLV-1-infected cell line) produced neurite retraction in neuroblastoma cells differentiated to neuronal type. To assess the relevance of Tax posttranslational modifications on this effect, we addressed the question of whether Tax secreted by MT-2 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HTLV-1-infected subjects is modified. The interaction of Tax with calreticulin (CRT) that modulates intracellular Tax localization and secretion has been described. We studied Tax localization and modifications in MT-2 cells and its interaction with CRT. Intracellular Tax in MT-2 cells was assessed by flow cytometry, corresponding mainly to a 71-kDa protein followed by western blot. This protein reported as a chimera with gp21 viral protein-confirmed by mass spectrometry-showed no ubiquitination or SUMOylation. The Tax-CRT interaction was determined by confocal microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation. Extracellular Tax from HAM/TSP PBMCs is ubiquitinated according to western blot, and its interaction with CRT was shown by coimmunoprecipitation. A positive correlation between Tax and CRT secretion was observed in HAM/TSP PBMCs and asymptomatic carriers. For both proteins inhibitors and activators of secretion showed secretion through the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi complex. Tax, present in PBMC culture medium, produced neurite retraction in differentiated neuroblastoma cells. These results suggest that Tax, whether ubiquitinated or not, is active for neurite retraction.

  6. Materials mobilised by the French economy: a decrease stabilised since the crisis of 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calatayud, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    This publication proposes data illustrating the evolution of the use of natural resources, and more particularly materials mobilised by the French economy and population since 1990. The evolution of domestic material consumption is described through that of domestic extraction, and of imports and exports, through the apparent and global material consumption in 2013, and the evolution of apparent domestic material consumption, and of the quantity of materials extracted from the French territory, imported or exported. Tables indicate these evolutions since 1990 for the different materials (biomass, wood, metallic ores, minerals used in construction or industry, coal, oil, natural gas, products based on fossil fuels). The rate between hidden flows and apparent flows is shown to be steady. It is also outlined that the recession has intensified material productivity but decreased material consumption per inhabitant. This material consumption per inhabitant is compared with that of European and non-European countries

  7. Domestic saving mobilisation and small business creation: The case of Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LC Forje

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Promoting savings and providing a basis for lending to the poor is a growing concern in many developing countries. Cameroon has a culture of savings mobilisation known as njangi/tontine. The njangi is contributions given to members in a rotating form at the end of every sitting, and tontine is voluntary savings held by the group. This study reveals that njangi/tontine groups only lend money to group members and suggests that a micro village bank known as MC2 could be used as guarantor to ensure that group monies lent to non-group members are repaid. Encouragement and improvement in the function of such voluntary savings could promote the creation of small businesses in the country.  The Cameroonian government needs to improve fighting corruption and a functional justice system to ensure security.

  8. Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Amini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary systemic vasculitis in pre-capillary arteries is associated with peripheral neuropathy. In some types of systematic vasculitis about 60 % of patients have peripheral nervous system (PNS involvement. In vasculitic peripheral neuropathies (VPN a necrotizing and inflammatory process leads to narrowing of vasa nervorum lumen and eventually the appearance of ischemic lesions in peripheral nerves. Some features might be suggestive of VPN, like: axonal nerve degeneration, wallerian-like degeneration, and diameter irregularity of nerve. Peripheral nervous system (PNS destruction during systemic vasculitides should be considered, due to its frequency and early occurrence in vasculitis progression. The first line treatment of non systematic VPNs is corticosteroid agents, but these drugs might worsen the VPNs or systemic vasculitis.

  9. Nuclear energy: from scientist mobilisation to the rise of counter-expertise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcu, Sezin

    2006-01-01

    The management of nuclear energy in France was restricted until the mid 1970's to a small circle of government experts. Within the scientific community criticism against nuclear power mostly targeted nuclear weapons while the sphere of civil nuclear energy remained unchallenged. The launch of the French nuclear programme in 1974 led to the first protest against civil nuclear power and its management within the scientific community. The mobilisation of thousands of researchers against the programme, initially through a petition, the so-called 'Appeal of the 400', then through the creation of an association, the 'Group of Scientists for Information on Nuclear Energy (GSIEN)', beside reflecting a rupture in the relations with science, progress and decision-making processes in the nuclear field, also expressed in the following decades the appropriation of critical knowledge on nuclear risks by the actors of non-governmental organisations. The criticism raised by scientists in 1975 therefore underlies two major shifts between the 1950's to 1990's in collective action vis-a-vis nuclear risk: from the mobilisation of 'distinguished scientists' against the atom bomb in the 1950's and 1960's (Joliot, Russell, Einstein, Rostand) to the politicisation of nuclear power by 'critical scientists' in the post-May 1968 period (GSIEN) and finally, after the Chernobyl accident, to the rise of associations of counter-expertise on nuclear energy (creation of expert NGOs such as the Commission for Independent Research and Information on Radioactivity-CRIIRAD and the Association for the Control of Radioactivity in the West-ACRO). This paper examines the crucial role that the community of physicists has played in transforming the relations between scientists, science, expertise and society

  10. Effect of blood component coatings of enosseal implants on proliferation and synthetic activity of human osteoblasts and cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Himlová, L.; Kubies, Dana; Hulejová, H.; Bartová, J.; Riedel, Tomáš; Štikarová, J.; Suttnar, J.; Pešáková, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 2016 (2016), 8769347_1-8769347_15 ISSN 0962-9351 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT13297; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : peripheral blood mononuclear cells * cytokine * osteoblasts Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.232, year: 2016

  11. The range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V: a comparison of active vs passive flexion mobilisation regimes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Panchal, J

    1997-10-01

    A number of early postoperative mobilisation regimes have been developed in an attempt to increase tendon excursion and gliding and thereby reduce formation of adhesions following repair of flexor tendons. Early active flexion mobilisation regimes are becoming more popular, and have replaced early passive flexion regimes in many centres. The aim of the present study was: (a) to determine the range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V, and (b) to compare the excursion ranges between active (Belfast) and passive (modified Duran) flexion mobilisation regimes postoperatively. This was done (a) in two cadavers, and (b) in two patients intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 10 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks. With passive flexion, the mean tendon excursion in Zone V in cadavers was 1 mm for flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons respectively. With simulated active flexion, the mean tendon excursion was 14 mm, 10 mm and 11 mm respectively. The mean tendon excursion in clinical cases intraoperatively following passive flexion was 2 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively; following simulated active flexion it was 10 mm, 11 mm and 11 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively. On the tenth day following repair, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL were 1 mm, 4 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 3 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm on active flexion respectively. Three weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 1 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm on passive flexion as compared to 5 mm, 15 mm on active flexion respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 9 mm, 7 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 12 mm, 33 mm and 20 mm on active flexion respectively. These results demonstrate an increased excursion of repaired flexor tendons in Zone V following an active flexion mobilisation regime as compared to a passive flexion mobilisation regime.

  12. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this page My Cart Donating peripheral blood stem cells Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is a nonsurgical procedure to collect ... Donating bone marrow Donor experiences videos Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is one of two methods of ...

  13. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Utah Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... more slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  14. Effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on central and peripheral T lymphocyte reconstitution after sublethal irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongxia; Guo Mei; Sun Xuedong; Ai Huisheng; Sun Wanjun; Hu Hailan; Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is one of the most critical cytokines used for the treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). In addition to the hematopoietic effects of G-CSF on the differentiation and proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells, G-CSF is also known to have immunomodulatory effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether G-CSF could accelerate central and peripheral T lymphocyte recovery after a sublethal dose of irradiation. Female BALB/c mice were subjected to 6 Gy of total body irradiation and then were treated with either 100 μg/kg G-CSF or an equal volume of PBS once daily for 14 days. Percentages of thymocyte subpopulations including CD4- CD8-, CD4+ CD8+, CD4+ CD8- and CD4- CD8+ T cells, peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers specific to the 257-bp T cell receptor rearrangement excision circles (sjTRECs). The proliferative capacity of splenic mononuclear cells upon exposure to ConA was measured by using the Cell Count Kit-8 (CCK-8). G-CSF treatment promoted thymocyte regeneration, accelerated the recovery of CD4+ CD8+ cells and increased the frequency of thymocyte sjTRECs. These effects were more prominent at early time points (Day 28) after irradiation. G-CSF also increased the rate of recovery of peripheral CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells and shortened the period of severe lymphopenia following irradiation. G-CSF also increased the splenic mononuclear cell mitotic responsiveness to ConA more than control-treated cells. Our results show that G-CSF accelerates T cell recovery through both thymic-dependent and thymic-independent pathways, which could be used to increase the rate of immune reconstitution after sublethal irradiation. (author)

  15. Forensic differentiation between peripheral and menstrual blood in cases of alleged sexual assault-validating an immunochromatographic multiplex assay for simultaneous detection of human hemoglobin and D-dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkötter, Hannah; Dias Filho, Claudemir Rodrigues; Schwender, Kristina; Stadler, Christian; Vennemann, Marielle; Pacheco, Ana Claudia; Roca, Gabriela

    2018-05-01

    Sexual assault is a serious offense and identification of body fluids originating from sexual activity has been a crucial aspect of forensic investigations for a long time. While reliable tests for the detection of semen and saliva have been successfully implemented into forensic laboratories, the detection of other body fluids, such as vaginal or menstrual fluid, is more challenging. Especially, the discrimination between peripheral and menstrual blood can be highly relevant for police investigations because it provides potential evidence regarding the issue of consent. We report the forensic validation of an immunochromatographic test that allows for such discrimination in forensic stains, the SERATEC PMB test, and its performance on real casework samples. The PMB test is a duplex test combining human hemoglobin and D-dimer detection and was developed for the identification of blood and menstrual fluid, both at the crime scene and in the laboratory. The results of this study showed that the duplex D-dimer/hemoglobin assay reliably detects the presence of human hemoglobin and identifies samples containing menstrual fluid by detecting the presence of D-dimers. The method distinguished between menstrual and peripheral blood in a swab from a historical artifact and in real casework samples of alleged sexual assaults. Results show that the development of the new duplex test is a substantial progress towards analyzing and interpreting evidence from sexual assault cases.

  16. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oval in shape. Diagnosis A doctor's evaluation Sometimes culture The diagnosis of peripheral ulcerative keratitis is suspected when the doctor sees the affected cornea in a person who also has a severe and/or long- ...

  17. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  18. Peripheral biomarkers revisited: integrative profiling of peripheral samples for psychiatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi-Takagi, Akiko; Vawter, Marquis P; Iwamoto, Kazuya

    2014-06-15

    Peripheral samples, such as blood and skin, have been used for decades in psychiatric research as surrogates for central nervous system samples. Although the validity of the data obtained from peripheral samples has been questioned and other state-of-the-art techniques, such as human brain imaging, genomics, and induced pluripotent stem cells, seem to reduce the value of peripheral cells, accumulating evidence has suggested that revisiting peripheral samples is worthwhile. Here, we re-evaluate the utility of peripheral samples and argue that establishing an understanding of the common signaling and biological processes in the brain and peripheral samples is required for the validity of such models. First, we present an overview of the available types of peripheral cells and describe their advantages and disadvantages. We then briefly summarize the main achievements of omics studies, including epigenome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome analyses, as well as the main findings of functional cellular assays, the results of which imply that alterations in neurotransmission, metabolism, the cell cycle, and the immune system may be partially responsible for the pathophysiology of major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Finally, we discuss the future utility of peripheral samples for the development of biomarkers and tailor-made therapies, such as multimodal assays that are used as a battery of disease and trait pathways and that might be potent and complimentary tools for use in psychiatric research. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  19. Promoting peripheral myelin repair

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the ...

  20. The role of complement receptors type 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21) in promoting C3 fragment deposition and membrane attack complex formation on normal peripheral human B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Pedersen, Morten Løbner; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke Hansen

    2002-01-01

    Normal human B lymphocytes are known to activate the alternative pathway (AP) of complement, leading to C3-fragment deposition and membrane attack complex (MAC) formation. The process is mediated via complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21), with complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) playing...... a subsidiary role. In this study, we examine the relative contributions of CR1 and CR2 to the deposition of C3 fragments and MAC on B lymphocytes under circumstances where all complement pathways are operational. C3-fragment deposition and MAC formation were assessed on human peripheral B lymphocytes...... in the presence of 30% autologous serum. Blocking the CR2 ligand-binding site with monoclonal antibody (mAb) FE8 resulted in significant reduction (37.9+/-11.9%) in C3-fragment deposition, whereas MAC formation was only marginally affected (12.1+/-22.2% reduction). Blocking the CR1 binding-site resulted...

  1. Engagement militant et politisation des mobilisations au sein des oppositions urbaines à Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Petit

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available La Municipalité du Grand Istanbul met en œuvre depuis quelques années une « politique de transformation urbaine » pour faire d’Istanbul une ville moderne et compétitive sur la scène mondiale. Les mobilisations locales et les mouvements protestataires se multiplient pour infléchir une politique qui domine aujourd’hui l’agenda urbain « néolibéral » et empêcher les démolitions et déplacements de population escomptés. Au-delà de la distance au politique généralement affichée – condition de légitimité dans le système sécuritaire mis en place en Turquie après le coup d’État de 1980 – ces « oppositions urbaines » sont traversées par des débats sur la place du politique dans la mobilisation. À partir de l’étude sociologique de deux associations de quartiers et de deux mouvements de « professionnels urbains », cette contribution analyse le travail de définition des cadrages et répertoires d’action propres à chaque mouvement. Elle fait apparaître le rôle de ces professionnels urbains dans la requalification politique du désaccord qui divise les oppositions urbaines entre une stratégie « experte » et une stratégie plus politique. L’analyse met néanmoins en évidence le caractère dynamique et relatif – en termes de contextes et d’échelles – des stratégies d’appropriation des politiques publiques locales et des processus de politisation des « mouvements urbains ».The Istanbul Greater Municipality has been implementing for a few years numerous ‘urban renewal projects’ to change Istanbul into a modern and competitive city on the global scene. Reacting to the demolitions and evictions of entire neighbourhoods caused by these projects, some inhabitants and ‘urban professionals’ mobilize within new movements and neighbourdhood associations. Beyond the distance they usually show towards politics – a condition of legitimacy in the securitarian system introduced in

  2. Comparative effectiveness of manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument in treatment of non-specific neck pain: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Peter

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck pain is a common problem and different forms of manual therapy are used in its treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to critically appraise the literature that directly compared manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument for non-specific neck pain. Methods Electronic databases (MEDLINE, MANTIS and CINAHL were searched from their inception to October 2005 for all English language randomised clinical trials that directly compared manipulation, mobilisation and the Activator instrument. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select the studies and these studies were then evaluated using validated criteria. Results Five such studies were identified. The methodological quality was mostly poor. Findings from the studies were mixed and no one therapy was shown to be more effective than the others. Conclusion Further high quality research has to be done before a recommendation can be made as to the most effective manual method for non-specific neck pain.

  3. ‘The only way is Essex’: Gender, union and mobilisation among fire service control room staff

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, Lynne; Moore, Sian; Tainsh, Kate; Taylor, Phil; Wright, Tessa

    2017-01-01

    This contribution to On the Front Line records a dialogue between two female Fire Brigades Union (FBU) representatives in the Essex Emergency Control Room who led industrial action over the imposition of a shift system that stretched their work–life balance to breaking point and constrained their ability to work full-time. Their testimony reveals how male members were mobilised in the interests of predominantly female control staff. Kate and Lynne’s discussion illuminates the interaction of g...

  4. Mobilising culture against domestic violence in migrant and ethnic communities: practitioner perspectives from Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Kumar, Rachel; Kurian, Priya A; Young-Silcock, Faith; Narasimhan, Nirmala

    2017-07-01

    Studies on domestic violence in ethnic minority communities highlight that social norms, family structures and cultural practices are among the key triggers of violence against women. Not surprisingly, most anti-violence interventions in these communities aim to redeem women from the oppressive features of these cultures. More recently, however, emergent scholarship advocates mobilising, rather than erasing, culture within existing anti-violence strategies. This paper explores the nature of culturally informed interventions used by front-line workers. It presents the findings of a small-scale qualitative study in Aotearoa/New Zealand, where around 13% of the population are currently deemed to be from minority ethnic communities. Interviews and one focus group were conducted with nine practitioners - including social workers, counsellors and the police - in Hamilton, Aotearoa in 2013-2014. Based on thematic analysis, the paper identifies two core strands: (a) the distinctive profile of ethnic violence and (b) the strategies that mobilise culture in anti-violence interventions. Specifically within the former strand, it was found that violence in the ethnic community was distinctive for the following reasons: the heightened sense of stigma surrounding disclosure and the consequent silence by women who suffer from it; the lack of trust in authority; and the fear of conventional safety plans necessitating longer time periods for rapport-building. Among the strategies that mobilise culture, the study found that practitioners used a family approach; engaged men in their interventions, at times reinforcing gendered roles; utilised micro-interventions; and deployed cultural tropes, especially around spirituality, as a strategy. The conclusion points to the gap between interventions that challenge and mobilise cultures. While anecdotally, the latter are perceived to be relevant and effective in anti-violence interventions, there is need for a fuller assessment and better

  5. Antigenotoxic Effect of Curcumin and Carvacrol against Parathion Induced DNA Damage in Cultured Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes and Its Relation to GSTM1 and GSTT1 Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of organophosphorus pesticides has been extensively increased and these compounds signify a major class of agricultural pesticides today. We studied antigenotoxic potential of curcumin and carvacrol against the parathion induced DNA damage in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes using sister chromatid exchanges as a biomarker of genotoxicity. Heparinised fresh blood from healthy individuals was treated with 2.5 μg/mL concentration of parathion in presence of curcumin and carvacrol in order to observe the antigenotoxic potential of both curcumin and carvacrol. Significant reduction (P0.05 of GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphism on genotoxicity of parathion and antigenotoxic potential of curcumin and carvacrol.

  6. Establishment of human iPSC line NCCSi003-A from CD34+cells of peripheral blood collected during apheresis of healthy donor from Indian ethnicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Fernandes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We present generation of iPSCs from CD34+ cells isolated from peripheral blood, collected during apheresis of a healthy female individual. We nucleofected the CD34+cells by episomal vectors containing Oct4, Sox2, L-Myc, Lin28, Klf4 and p53DD (dominant negative mutation in p53. The resultant colonies showed cobble-stone appearance and stained positive for alkaline phosphatase. The colonies demonstrated presence of pluripotency markers by immunofluorescence, flow-cytometry and PCR. The plasmids were lost from cells subsequently during passages as assessed by PCR. Karyotype analysis demonstrated a stable genome. The cells had capability to differentiate to cells from all three-germ lineages in vitro.

  7. The number of in-out catheterisations is reduced by mobilising the postoperative patient with bladder needs to the toilet in the recovery room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anette Maria; Olsen, Karsten S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients are diagnosed with postoperative urine retention in the recovery room and treated with in-out catheterisation (IOC). OBJECTIVES: We hypothesised that the use of IOC could be reduced by mobilising patients to the toilet to pass urine instead of offering a bedpan or urinal...... ward mobilisation were 85 (37 to 139) min in Group I and 180 (118 to 245) min in Group C (P strategy decreased the number of IOCs, duration of stay in the recovery...

  8. Kinematic real-time feedback is more effective than traditional teaching method in learning ankle joint mobilisation: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, Manuel; Ruiz-Muñoz, Maria; Ávila-Bolívar, Ana Belén; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2016-10-06

    To analyse the effect of real-time kinematic feedback (KRTF) when learning two ankle joint mobilisation techniques comparing the results with the traditional teaching method. Double-blind randomized trial. Faculty of Health Sciences. undergraduate students with no experience in manual therapy. Each student practised intensely for 90 min (45 min for each mobilisation) according to the random methodology assigned (G1: traditional method group and G2: KRTF group). G1: an expert professor supervising the student's practice, the professorstudent ratio was 1:8. G2: placed in front of a station where, while they performed the manoeuvre, they received a KRTF on a laptop. total time of mobilisation, time to reach maximum amplitude, maximum angular displacement in the three axes, maximum and average velocity to reach the maximum angular displacement, average velocity during the mobilisation. Among the pre-post intervention measurements, there were significant differences within the two groups for all outcome variables, however, G2 (KRTF) achieved significantly greater improvements in kinematic parameters for the two mobilisations (significant increase in displacement, velocity and significant reduction in the mobilisations runtime) than G1. Ankle plantar flexion: G1's measurement stability (post-intervention) ranged between 0.491 and 0.687, while G2's measurement stability ranged between 0.899 and 0.984. Ankle dorsal flexion mobilisation: G1 the measurement stability (post-intervention) ranged from 0.543 and 0.684 while G2 ranged between 0.899 and 0.974. KRTF was proven to be more effective tool than traditional teaching method in the teaching - learning process of two joint mobilisation techniques. NCT02504710.

  9. A Modified Ficoll-Paque Gradient Method for Isolating Mononuclear Cells from the Peripheral and Umbilical Cord Blood of Humans for Biobanks and Clinical Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanjuan; Xu, Hui; Li, Yonghong; Wei, Chaojun; Guo, Rui; Wang, Fang; Wu, Yu; Liu, Jing; Jia, Jing; Yan, Junwen; Qi, Xiaoming; Li, Yuanting; Gao, Xiaoling

    2018-04-01

    Although the Ficoll-Paque method is classically used to isolate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), modifications in this method are required for a more rapid and economic output for biobanks and clinical laboratories, particularly in developing countries. In this study, we addressed this issue by modifying the Ficoll-Paque method for the isolation of PBMCs or mononuclear cells from the peripheral and the umbilical cord blood of healthy and diseased (infected, anemic, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) adult individuals. In the modified method, we initiated the cell isolation process from the buffy coat layer, which appears in the interface between the plasma and sediments after centrifugation, instead of using the whole blood as described in the classic method. Although the PBMC yield by the modified method was about 12% less than in the classic method, the number of PBMCs isolated by the modified method was more than one million, which is enough for different research/diagnostic purposes, such as multi-omics detection. Assessment of cell viability and purity by hematology analyzer and trypan blue showed no significant difference between the viability and purity of the PBMCs isolated by these two methods in almost all groups, except samples from the infected and cord blood groups, where lower PBMC purity with higher granulocyte contamination were observed. In addition, at delayed processing time points, all parameters for the two methods were decreased in a time-dependent manner, especially at 8, 12, or 24 hours after the sample collection. In summary, the performance of PBMC isolation by the classic and modified methods mainly relies on the PBMC ratio in original samples. The modified method could be preferred for PBMC isolation because of its time and cost savings, especially for the biobanks and clinical laboratories in developing countries.

  10. Knowledge mobilisation in healthcare: a critical review of health sector and generic management literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlie, Ewan; Crilly, Tessa; Jashapara, Ashok; Peckham, Anna

    2012-04-01

    The health policy domain has displayed increasing interest in questions of knowledge management and knowledge mobilisation within healthcare organisations. We analyse here the findings of a critical review of generic management and health-related literatures, covering the period 2000-2008. Using 29 pre-selected journals, supplemented by a search of selected electronic databases, we map twelve substantive domains classified into four broad groups: taxonomic and philosophical (e.g. different types of knowledge); theoretical discourse (e.g. critical organisational studies); disciplinary fields (e.g. organisational learning and Information Systems/Information Technology); and organisational processes and structures (e.g. organisational form). We explore cross-overs and gaps between these traditionally separate literature streams. We found that health sector literature has absorbed some generic concepts, notably Communities of Practice, but has not yet deployed the performance-oriented perspective of the Resource Based View (RBV) of the Firm. The generic literature uses healthcare sites to develop critical analyses of power and control in knowledge management, rooted in neo-Marxist/labour process and Foucauldian approaches. The review generates three theoretically grounded statements to inform future enquiry, by: (a) importing the RBV stream; (b) developing the critical organisational studies perspective further; and (c) exploring the theoretical argument that networks and other alternative organisational forms facilitate knowledge sharing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effectiveness of mobilisation with movement for chronic medial ankle pain: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Penso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Purpose: It has been shown that approximatelythirty percent of those sustaining an ankle sprain are likely to develop chronicfunctional limitations. Mulligan has developed mobilisation with movement (MWMfor treatment of joint dysfunction and suggests that it is a positional fault of the jointthat causes pain and movement restriction. Method: This single case reports on the effects of a MWM technique on chronicmedial ankle pain. The patient was a 25-year-old female runner who had experiencedpain since an initial ankle sprain at 8 years of age. The main findings of the subjective and physical examinations were decrease in active and passive dorsiflexion and eversion range of motion (ROM, shortening of gastrocnemiusand soleus muscles and the functional limitation of pain when running. The patient was treated twice with the MWMtechnique.Results: Outcomes of immediate reduction in pain, restoration of full dorsiflexion and eversion ROM, increase in calfmuscle length and pain free running were observed. This was maintained over a four-month follow up period.Conclusion: This case concurs with previous studies detailing increases in range of motion and restoration of painfree movement as well as adding new support for the resolution of chronic pain with MWM.

  12. Municipal mobilisation of materials for the landscape conservation; Kommunale Mobilisierung von Landschaftspflegematerial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruening, Arnd; Kottbusch, Bastian; Haensch, David; Hartz, Franziska [Bruening-Megawatt GmbH, Fischerhude (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Since summer 2012, Bruening-Megawatt GmbH has been making more intensive efforts in coordinating community mobilisation of landscape management material. Such material is an important factor in maintaining full supply to the 6 biomass power (and thermal energy) plants, under contract to Bayernfonds BestEnergy 1 GmbH and Co. KG (BBE). These plants, located at Niesky, Leipzig, Bad Arolsen, Steinau an der Strasse, Langelsheim and Rieste, each have an output of 5 MW/h and consume approx. 200 tonnes of solid fuel every day. Already a proportion amounting to 1/10 of this requirement (approx. 25 tonnes, or 1 truck-trailer load) originates from community projects during the landscape maintenance months. For the period from October to February this yields a total of approximately 3,750 tonnes per power plant. Summed up over all 6 BBE plants, Bruning-Megawatt GmbH thus supplies approximately 22,500 tonnes of landscape management material originating from cooperation with municipalities and towns, to these biomass power (and thermal energy) plants. This amount is accordingly reduced during the summer months. These projects prove to be financially practical for the municipalities. They do not need to pay third parties for the disposal of branch cuttings and hedgerow trimmings, and Bruening-Megawatt GmbH pays them a fixed amount per tonne, depending on the quality of the clippings. (orig.)

  13. Deliberated opinion of the Environmental Authority on the national strategy for biomass mobilisation (SNMB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthod, Christian; Clement, Marc; Duval, Francois; Ledenvic, Philippe; Letourneux, Francois; Muller, Serge; Orizet, Francois-Regis; Perrin, Therese; Ullmann, Gabriel; Vindimian, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This document first presents the context of the French project of national strategy for biomass mobilisation (SNMB) as an application of the law related to energy transition for a green growth, and also as an item within the complex set of strategic documents such as the national strategy for low carbon, the national programme for forest and wood, the multi-year programming of energy, regional climate-air-energy schemes. It presents the SNMB project, its scope (with some recommendations made by the Environmental Authority), the usage challenges, the present situation of biomass with respect to the SNMB objectives for different biomass sources (forest, agriculture, breeding, by-products and wastes). It briefly discusses procedures related to the SNMB and to its environmental assessment. The second section addresses the analysis of the environmental assessment. It formulates some methodological recommendations, discusses the articulation with other programmes, and the initial analysis of the environment and of its perspectives of evolution, comments the justification of choices made regarding substitution solutions. It comments the analysis of likely effects of the SNMB implementation, and measures to avoid, mitigate or compensate these impacts. It briefly discusses the assessment of Natura 2000 effects, and choices made by the SNMB regarding indicators and modalities of environmental follow-up

  14. Is wartime mobilisation a suitable policy model for rapid national climate mitigation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delina, Laurence L.; Diesendorf, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Climate science suggests that, to have a high probability of limiting global warming to an average temperature increase of 2 °C, global greenhouse gas emissions must peak by 2020 and be reduced to close to zero by 2040. However, the current trend is heading towards at least 4 °C by 2100 and little effective action is being taken. This paper commences the process of developing contingency plans for a scenario in which a sudden major global climate impact galvanises governments to implement emergency climate mitigation targets and programs. Climate activists assert that rapid mitigation is feasible, invoking the scale and scope of wartime mobilisation strategies. This paper draws upon historical accounts of social, technological and economic restructurings in several countries during World War 2 in order to investigate potential applications of wartime experience to radical, rigorous and rapid climate mitigation strategies. We focus on the energy sector, the biggest single contributor to global climate change, in developed and rapidly developing countries. We find that, while wartime experience suggests some potential strategies for rapid climate mitigation in the areas of finance and labour, it also has severe limitations, resulting from its lack of democratic processes. - Highlights: • The paper explores the strengths and weaknesses of using wartime experience as a model for rapid climate mitigation. • Wartime experience suggests some potential strategies for rapid climate mitigation in the areas of finance and labour. • Wartime experience also has severe limitations, resulting from its lack of democratic processes

  15. The policy work of piloting: Mobilising and managing conflict and ambiguity in the English NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Simon; Checkland, Kath; Hodgson, Damian; McBride, Anne; Elvey, Rebecca; Parkin, Stephen; Rothwell, Katy; Pierides, Dean

    2017-04-01

    In spite of their widespread use in policy making in the UK and elsewhere, there is a relatively sparse literature specifically devoted to policy pilots. Recent research on policy piloting has focused on the role of pilots in making policy work in accordance with national agendas. Taking this as a point of departure, the present paper develops the notion of pilots doing policy work. It does this by situating piloting within established theories of policy formulation and implementation, and illustrating using an empirical case. Our case is drawn from a qualitative policy ethnography of a local government pilot programme aiming to extend access to healthcare services. Our case explores the collective entrepreneurship of regional policy makers together with local pilot volunteers. We argue that pilots work to mobilise and manage the ambiguity and conflict associated with particular policy goals, and in their structure and design, shape action towards particular outcomes. We conclude with a discussion of the generative but managed role which piloting affords to local implementers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The efficacy of manual joint mobilisation/manipulation in treatment of lateral ankle sprains: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Janice K; Reiman, Michael P; Sylvain, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Lateral ankle sprains are common and can have detrimental consequences to the athlete. Joint mobilisation/manipulation may limit these outcomes. Systematically summarise the effectiveness of manual joint techniques in treatment of lateral ankle sprains. This review employed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A computer-assisted literature search of MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, OVID and Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) (January 1966 to March 2013) was used with the following keywords alone and in combination 'ankle', 'sprain', 'injuries', 'lateral', 'manual therapy', and 'joint mobilisation'. The methodological quality of individual studies was assessed using the PEDro scale. After screening of titles, abstracts and full articles, eight articles were kept for examination. Three articles achieved a score of 10 of 11 total points; one achieved a score of 9; two articles scored 8; one article scored a 7 and the remaining article scored a 5. Three articles examined joint techniques for acute sprains and the remainder examined subacute/chronic ankle sprains. Outcome measures included were pain level, ankle range of motion, swelling, functional score, stabilometry and gait parameters. The majority of the articles only assessed these outcome measures immediately after treatment. No detrimental effects from the joint techniques were revealed in any of the studies reviewed. For acute ankle sprains, manual joint mobilisation diminished pain and increased dorsiflexion range of motion. For treatment of subacute/chronic lateral ankle sprains, these techniques improved ankle range-of-motion, decreased pain and improved function.

  17. The hydrodynamic drag and the mobilisation of sediment into the water column of towed fishing gear components

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, F. G.; Summerbell, Keith David

    2016-12-01

    The hydrodynamic drag of towed fishing gears leads to direct impacts on the benthic environment, and can play a major role in the overall economic efficiency of the fishing operation and emissions of nitrogen oxides, sulphur oxides and greenhouse gases such as CO2. Here we investigate some of the underpinning processes which govern these issues and make direct hydrodynamic drag measurements and calculate the hydrodynamic drag coefficients for a range of well-defined gear components that, when fished, are in contact with the seabed. We measure the concentration and particle size distribution of the sediment mobilised into the water column in the wake of these gear elements, at a range of towing speeds, and demonstrate that as the hydrodynamic drag increases the amount of sediment mobilised also increases. We also vary the weight of the elements and show that this does not influence the amount of sediment put into the water column. These results provide a better understanding of the physical and mechanical processes that take place when a towed fishing gear interacts with the seabed. They will permit the development of more fuel efficient gears and gears of reduced benthic impact and will improve the empirical modelling of the sediment mobilised into the turbulent wake behind towed fishing gears which will lead to better assessments of the environmental and ecological impact of fishing gears.

  18. Mitogenic Activity of a Water-Soluble Adjuvant (Bu-WSA) Obtained from Bacterionema matruchotii: IV. Synergistic Effects of Bu-WSA on Concanavalin A-Induced Proliferative Response of Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Toshimasa; Okumura, Seiichi; Tsushi, Masao; Nakano, Masayasu

    1982-07-01

    Butanol-extracted water-soluble adjuvant (Bu-WSA) obtained from Bacterionema matruchotii was cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) in the presence of sub- and/or supra-optimal mitogenic concentrations of concanavalin A (Con A). The addition of Bu-WSA resulted in increased tritiated thymidine incorporation above that produced by Con A alone. Bu-WSA by itself is not mitogenic for PBM and in fact produced a decrease in thymidine uptake compared to the control. We investigated the response of subpopulation(s) of PBM to Bu-WSA, Con A and a mixture of Bu-WSA and Con A. Separation of PBM into purified T cells, B cells and macrophages showed that cell-cell cooperation of T cells with B cells or macrophages is necessary for the observed synergistic effect of Bu-WSA with Con A. A marked increase in thymidine incorporation by the mixture of T and B cell populations occurred, while only a small amount of thymidine was incorporated when the B cell population was absent. Mitomycin treatment revealed that the response could be ascribed to the T-cell response with a B-cell helper effect. Moreover, Con A and Bu-WSA appeared to act on the same T cell population. This model may provide unique information about the activation of human peripheral blood T cells compared with the activation of these cells by other mitogens. © owned by Center for Academic Publications Japan (Publisher).

  19. Mitogenic activity of a water-soluble adjuvant (Bu-WSA) obtained from Bacterionema matruchotii. IV. Synergistic effects of Bu-WSA on Concanavalin A-induced proliferative response of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, T; Okumura, S; Tsushi, M; Nakano, M

    1982-01-01

    Butanol-extracted water-soluble adjuvant (Bu-WSA) obtained from Bacterionema matruchotii was cultured with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) in the presence of sub- and/or supra-optimal mitogenic concentrations of concanavalin A (Con A). The addition of Bu-WSA resulted in increased tritiated thymidine incorporation above that produced by Con A alone. Bu-WSA by itself is not mitogenic for PBM and in fact produced a decrease in thymidine uptake compared to the control. We investigated the response of subpopulation(s) of PBM to Bu-WSA, Con A and a mixture of Bu-WSA and Con A. Separation of PBM into purified T cells, B cells and macrophages showed that cell-cell cooperation of T cells with B cells or macrophages is necessary for the observed synergistic effect of Bu-WSA with Con A. A marked increase in thymidine incorporation by the mixture of T and B cell populations occurred, while only a small amount of thymidine was incorporated when the B cell population was absent. Mitomycin treatment revealed that the response could be ascribed to the T-cell response with a B-cell helper effect. Moreover, Con A and Bu-WSA appeared to act on the same T cell population. This model may provide unique information about the activation of human peripheral blood T cells compared with the activation of these cells by other mitogens.

  20. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  1. Mobilisation of lipophilic pollutants from blubber in northern elephant seal pups (Mirounga angustirostris) during the post-weaning fast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, Caroline [Institut des Sciences de la Vie, UCLouvain, Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Dirtu, Alin C. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toxicological Center, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteit Antwerpen, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Department of Chemistry, “Al. I. Cuza” University of Iasi, 700506 Iasi (Romania); Stas, Marie [Institut des Sciences de la Vie, UCLouvain, Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Guiot, Yves [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, UCLouvain, Brussels (Belgium); Malarvannan, Govindan [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toxicological Center, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteit Antwerpen, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Das, Krishna [Laboratoire d’Océanologie, MARE Center B6c, Université de Liège, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Costa, Daniel P. [Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, University of California Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Rd, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States); Crocker, Daniel E. [Department of Biology, Sonoma State University, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (United States); Covaci, Adrian [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Toxicological Center, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteit Antwerpen, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Debier, Cathy, E-mail: cathy.debier@uclouvain.be [Institut des Sciences de la Vie, UCLouvain, Croix du Sud 2/L7.05.08, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Northern elephant seals (NES) (Mirounga angustirostris) from the Año Nuevo State Reserve (CA, USA) were longitudinally sampled during the post-weaning fast in order to study the mobilisation and redistribution of various classes of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p′-DDE) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) between blubber and blood. Inner and outer blubber layers were analysed separately. Organohalogenated compounds were detected in all blubber samples in the decreasing order of their concentrations: p,p′-DDE>PCBs⪢HCB>PBDEs. The concentrations of all studied compounds were homogeneously distributed in the blubber layer at early fast, since the concentrations of POPs were statistically not different in the inner and outer layers. With the progression of the fast, the concentrations of PBDEs, PCBs and p,p′-DDE increased more sharply in inner blubber than in outer blubber. As a result, their levels became significantly higher in inner blubber as compared to outer blubber at late fast. The rise of pollutant concentrations in blubber might result from a less efficient mobilisation than triglycerides and/or a reuptake by adipocytes of some of the pollutants released into the circulation. The mobilisation of pollutants from blubber was higher at late fast. An increase of pollutant concentrations was observed in serum between early and late fast. Lower halogenated congeners (i.e. tetra-CBs) were present in higher proportions in serum, whereas the higher halogenated congeners (i.e. hepta-CBs) were mainly found in the inner and outer blubber layers. The transfer ratios of both PBDEs and PCBs from inner blubber to serum decreased with the number of chlorine and bromine atoms. In addition, the distribution of both types of compounds between serum and blubber was strongly influenced by their lipophilic character (log K{sub ow} values), with more

  2. Processes and challenges of community mobilisation for latrine promotion under Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan in rural Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routray, Parimita; Torondel, Belen; Jenkins, Marion W; Clasen, Thomas; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter

    2017-05-16

    Despite efforts to eradicate it, open defecation remains widely practiced in India, especially in rural areas. Between 2013 and 2014, 50 villages in one district of Odisha, India, received a sanitation programme under the Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA - "Clean India Campaign"), the successor of India's Total Sanitation Campaign. This paper documents the strategies and processes of NBA community mobilisation for latrine promotion in these villages and assesses the strengths and limitations of the mobilisation activities. NBA's community mobilisation activities were observed and assessed against the programme's theory of change in 10 randomly selected programme villages from start to finish. Additional data was collected through review of documents, individual interviews (n = 80) and focus group discussions (n = 26) with staff of the implementing NGOs and community members. Our study revealed the lack of a consistent implementation strategy, lack of capacities and facilitation skills of NGO staff to implement sanitation programmes, political interference, challenges in accessing government financial incentives for latrine construction, and lack of clarity on the roles and responsibilities among government and NGO staff, leading to failure in translating government policies into sustainable actions. Social divisions and village dynamics related to gender and caste further constrained the effectiveness of mobilisation activities. Meetings were often dominated by male members of upper caste households, and excluded low caste community members and views of women. Community discussions revolved largely around the government's cash incentive for latrines. Activities aimed at creating demand for sanitation and use of latrines often resonated poorly with community members. An assessment by the implementers, 1 year after community mobilisation found 19% of households had a completed latrine across the 50 villages, a marginal increase of 7 percentage points over baseline. In

  3. Processes and challenges of community mobilisation for latrine promotion under Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan in rural Odisha, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parimita Routray

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite efforts to eradicate it, open defecation remains widely practiced in India, especially in rural areas. Between 2013 and 2014, 50 villages in one district of Odisha, India, received a sanitation programme under the Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA – “Clean India Campaign”, the successor of India’s Total Sanitation Campaign. This paper documents the strategies and processes of NBA community mobilisation for latrine promotion in these villages and assesses the strengths and limitations of the mobilisation activities. Methods NBA’s community mobilisation activities were observed and assessed against the programme’s theory of change in 10 randomly selected programme villages from start to finish. Additional data was collected through review of documents, individual interviews (n = 80 and focus group discussions (n = 26 with staff of the implementing NGOs and community members. Results Our study revealed the lack of a consistent implementation strategy, lack of capacities and facilitation skills of NGO staff to implement sanitation programmes, political interference, challenges in accessing government financial incentives for latrine construction, and lack of clarity on the roles and responsibilities among government and NGO staff, leading to failure in translating government policies into sustainable actions. Social divisions and village dynamics related to gender and caste further constrained the effectiveness of mobilisation activities. Meetings were often dominated by male members of upper caste households, and excluded low caste community members and views of women. Community discussions revolved largely around the government’s cash incentive for latrines. Activities aimed at creating demand for sanitation and use of latrines often resonated poorly with community members. An assessment by the implementers, 1 year after community mobilisation found 19% of households had a completed latrine across the 50

  4. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (EURACi001-A, EURACi002-A, EURACi003-A) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of three patients carrying mutations in the CAV3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Benzoni, Patrizia; Landi, Sara; Murano, Carmen; Langione, Marianna; Motta, Benedetta M; Baratto, Serena; Silipigni, Rosamaria; Di Segni, Marina; Pramstaller, Peter P; DiFrancesco, Dario; Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Barbuti, Andrea; Rossini, Alessandra

    2018-03-01

    Caveolinopathies are a heterogeneous family of genetic pathologies arising from alterations of the caveolin-3 gene (CAV3), encoding for the isoform specifically constituting muscle caveolae. Here, by reprogramming peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from three patients carrying the ΔYTT deletion, T78K and W101C missense mutations in caveolin-3. iPSCs displayed normal karyotypes and all the features of pluripotent stem cells in terms of morphology, specific marker expression and ability to differentiate in vitro into the three germ layers. These lines thus represent a human cellular model to study the molecular basis of caveolinopathies. Resource table. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Does the addition of deep breathing exercises to physiotherapy-directed early mobilisation alter patient outcomes following high-risk open upper abdominal surgery? Cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Y R; Li, S K; Rickard, M J F X

    2013-09-01

    To investigate whether the inclusion of deep breathing exercises in physiotherapy-directed early mobilisation confers any additional benefit in reducing postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) when patients are treated once daily after elective open upper abdominal surgery. This study also compared postoperative outcomes following early and delayed mobilisation. Cluster randomised controlled trial. Single-centre study in a teaching hospital. Eighty-six high-risk patients undergoing elective open upper abdominal surgery. Three groups: early mobilisation (Group A), early mobilisation plus breathing exercises (Group B), and delayed mobilisation (mobilised from third postoperative day) plus breathing exercises (Group C). PPCs and postoperative outcomes [number of days until discharge from physiotherapy, physiotherapy input and length of stay (LOS)]. There was no significant difference in PPCs between Groups A and B. The LOS for Group A {mean 10.7 [standard deviation (SD) 5.0] days} was significantly shorter than the LOS for Groups B [mean 16.7 (SD 9.7) days] and C [mean 15.2 (SD 9.8) days; P=0.036]. The greatest difference was between Groups A and B (mean difference -5.93, 95% confidence interval -10.22 to -1.65; P=0.008). Group C had fewer smokers (26%) and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (0%) compared with Group B (53% and 14%, respectively). This may have led to fewer PPCs in Group C, but the difference was not significant. Despite Group C having fewer PPCs and less physiotherapy input, the number of days until discharge from physiotherapy and LOS were similar to Group B. The addition of deep breathing exercises to physiotherapy-directed early mobilisation did not further reduce PPCs compared with mobility alone. PPCs can be reduced with once-daily physiotherapy if the patients are mobilised to a moderate level of exertion. Delayed mobilisation tended to increase physiotherapy input and the number of days until discharge from physiotherapy

  6. Circulating brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and frequency of BDNF positive T cells in peripheral blo