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Sample records for human mif receptor

  1. MIF is a noncognate ligand of CXC chemokine receptors in inflammatory and atherogenic cell recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernhagen, J.; Krohn, R.; Lue, H.; Gregory, J.L.; Zernecke, A.; Koenen, R.R.; Dewor, M.; Georgiev, I.; Schober, A.; Leng, L.; Kooistra, T.; Fingerle-Rowson, G.; Ghezzi, P.; Kleemann, R.; McColl, S.R.; Bucala, R.; Hickey, M.J.; Weber, C.

    2007-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a critical role in inflammatory diseases and atherogenesis. We identify the chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4 as functional receptors for MIF. MIF triggered G αi- and integrin-dependent arrest and chemotaxis of monocytes and T cells,

  2. Arrest functions of the MIF ligand/receptor axes in atherogenesis

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    Sabine eTillmann

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF has been defined as an important chemokine-like function (CLF chemokine with an essential role in monocyte recruitment and arrest. Adhesion of monocytes to the vessel wall and their transendothelial migration are critical in atherogenesis and many other inflammatory diseases. Chemokines carefully control all steps of the monocyte recruitment process. Those chemokines specialized in controlling arrest are typically immobilized on the endothelial surface, mediating the arrest of rolling monocytes by chemokine receptor-triggered pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 functions as an important arrest receptor on monocytes. An arrest function has been revealed for the bona fide CXCR2 ligands CXCL1 and CXCL8, but genetic studies also suggested that additional arrest chemokines are likely to be involved in atherogenic leukocyte recruitment. While CXCR2 is known to interact with numerous CXC chemokine ligands, the CLF-chemokine MIF, which structurally does not belong to the CXC chemokine sub-family, was surprisingly identified as a non-cognate ligand of CXCR2, responsible for critical arrest functions during the atherogenic process. MIF was originally identified as macrophage migration inhibitory factor, but is now known as a potent inflammatory cytokine with chemokine-like functions including chemotaxis and leukocyte arrest. This review will cover the mechanisms underlying these functions, including MIF’s effects on LFA1 integrin activity and signal transduction, and will discuss the structural similarities between MIF and the bona fide CXCR2 ligand CXCL8 while emphasizing the structural differences. As MIF also interacts with CXCR4, a chemokine receptor implicated in CXCL12-elicited lymphocyte arrest, the arrest potential of the MIF/CXCR4 axis will also be scrutinized as well as the recently identified role of pericyte MIF in attracting leukocytes exiting through venules as part of the pericyte 'motility

  3. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble factor that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in...

  4. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in the effects of oxidative stress on human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Ae; Sotani, Yasuyuki; Ibrahim, Diah Gemala; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is the major cause of treatment failure in individuals who undergo surgery for retinal detachment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. Oxidative stress is thought to play a role in the progression of retinal diseases including PVR. We have now examined the effects of oxidative stress on the EMT and related processes in the human RPE cell line. We found that H 2 O 2 induced the contraction of RPE cells in a three-dimensional collagen gel. Analysis of a cytokine array revealed that H 2 O 2 specifically increased the release of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) from RPE cells. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses showed that H 2 O 2 increased the expression of MIF in RPE cells. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that H 2 O 2 upregulated the expression of α-SMA and vimentin and downregulated that of ZO-1 and N-cadherin. Consistent with these observations, the transepithelial electrical resistance of cell was reduced by exposure to H 2 O 2 . The effects of oxidative stress on EMT-related and junctional protein expression as well as on transepithelial electrical resistance were inhibited by antibodies to MIF, but they were not mimicked by treatment with recombinant MIF. Finally, analysis with a profiling array for mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling revealed that H 2 O 2 specifically induced the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Our results thus suggest that MIF may play a role in induction of the EMT and related processes by oxidative stress in RPE cells and that it might thereby contribute to the pathogenesis of PVR. Proliferative vitreoretinopathy is a major complication of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, and both oxidative stress and induction of the EMT in RPE cells are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of this condition. We have now

  5. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF in Clinical Kidney Disease - review

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    Annette eBruchfeld

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions including sepsis, autoimmune disease, atherogenesis, plaque instability and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. MIF in plasma and urine is significantly elevated in patients with Acute Kidney injury (AKI and elevated MIF in serum is associated with markers of oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness and markers of myocardial damage in Chronic Kidney disease (CKD. Furthermore MIF seems to be involved in vascular processes and cardiovascular disease associated with CKD, glomerulonephritis, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and possibly also in progression to renal failure. Moreover, in active ANCA-associated vasculitis plasma MIF-levels have been shown to be significantly elevated as compared with samples from patients in remission. A significant difference in the genotype frequency of high production MIF -173 G/C genotype has been found in end-stage renal disease (ESRD, compared to controls. Inhibition of MIF in a diabetic nephropathy model ameliorated blood glucose and albuminuria and in a model of adult polycystic kidney disease cyst growth was delayed. Preclinical studies support a potential therapeutic role for MIF in AKI and in a number of chronic kidney diseases whereas these data in human disease are still observational. Future interventional studies are needed to delineate the role of MIF as a treatment target in clinical kidney disease. Keywords: MIF, , AKI, CKD, glomerulonephritis, vasculitis, MIF gene polymorphism, diabetic nephropathy, ADPKD

  6. Bisphenol A Alters β-hCG and MIF Release by Human Placenta: An In Vitro Study to Understand the Role of Endometrial Cells

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    C. Mannelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A proper fetomaternal immune-endocrine cross-talk in pregnancy is fundamental for reproductive success. This might be unbalanced by exposure to environmental chemicals, such as bisphenol A (BPA. As fetoplacental contamination with BPA originates from the maternal compartment, this study investigated the role of the endometrium in BPA effects on the placenta. To this end, in vitro decidualized stromal cells were exposed to BPA 1 nM, and their conditioned medium (diluted 1 : 2 was used on chorionic villous explants from human placenta. Parallel cultures of placental explants were directly exposed to 0.5 nM BPA while, control cultures were exposed to the vehicle (EtOH 0.1%. After 24–48 h, culture medium from BPA-treated and control cultures was assayed for concentration of hormone human Chorionic Gonadotropin (β-hCG and cytokine Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF. The results showed that direct exposure to BPA stimulated the release of both MIF and β-hCG. These effects were abolished/diminished in placental cultures exposed to endometrial cell-conditioned medium. GM-MS analysis revealed that endometrial cells retain BPA, thus reducing the availability of this chemical for the placenta. The data obtained highlight the importance of in vitro models including the maternal component in reproducing the effects of environmental chemicals on human fetus/placenta.

  7. Invariant Chain Complexes and Clusters as Platforms for MIF Signaling

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    Robert Lindner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Invariant chain (Ii/CD74 has been identified as a surface receptor for migration inhibitory factor (MIF. Most cells that express Ii also synthesize major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II molecules, which depend on Ii as a chaperone and a targeting factor. The assembly of nonameric complexes consisting of one Ii trimer and three MHC II molecules (each of which is a heterodimer has been regarded as a prerequisite for efficient delivery to the cell surface. Due to rapid endocytosis, however, only low levels of Ii-MHC II complexes are displayed on the cell surface of professional antigen presenting cells and very little free Ii trimers. The association of Ii and MHC II has been reported to block the interaction with MIF, thus questioning the role of surface Ii as a receptor for MIF on MHC II-expressing cells. Recent work offers a potential solution to this conundrum: Many Ii-complexes at the cell surface appear to be under-saturated with MHC II, leaving unoccupied Ii subunits as potential binding sites for MIF. Some of this work also sheds light on novel aspects of signal transduction by Ii-bound MIF in B-lymphocytes: membrane raft association of Ii-MHC II complexes enables MIF to target Ii-MHC II to antigen-clustered B-cell-receptors (BCR and to foster BCR-driven signaling and intracellular trafficking.

  8. Crystal structure of the human eIF4AIII–CWC22 complex shows how a DEAD-box protein is inhibited by a MIF4G domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Gretel; Schüssler, Steffen; Basquin, Claire; Le Hir, Hervé; Conti, Elena

    2013-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins are involved in all aspects of RNA processing. They bind RNA in an ATP-dependent manner and couple ATP hydrolysis to structural and compositional rearrangements of ribonucleoprotein particles. Conformational control is a major point of regulation for DEAD-box proteins to act on appropriate substrates and in a timely manner in vivo. Binding partners containing a middle domain of translation initiation factor 4G (MIF4G) are emerging as important regulators. Well-known examples are eIF4G and Gle1, which bind and activate the DEAD-box proteins eIF4A and Dbp5. Here, we report the mechanism of an inhibiting MIF4G domain. We determined the 2.0-Å resolution structure of the complex of human eIF4AIII and the MIF4G domain of the splicing factor Complexed With Cef1 (CWC22), an essential prerequisite for exon junction complex assembly by the splicing machinery. The CWC22 MIF4G domain binds both RecA domains of eIF4AIII. The mode of RecA2 recognition is similar to that observed in the activating complexes, yet is specific for eIF4AIII. The way the CWC22 MIF4G domain latches on the eIF4AIII RecA1 domain is markedly different from activating complexes. In the CWC22–eIF4AIII complex, the RNA-binding and ATP-binding motifs of the two RecA domains do not face each other, as would be required in the active state, but are in diametrically opposite positions. The binding mode of CWC22 to eIF4AIII reveals a facet of how MIF4G domains use their versatile structural frameworks to activate or inhibit DEAD-box proteins. PMID:24218557

  9. Crystal structure of the human eIF4AIII-CWC22 complex shows how a DEAD-box protein is inhibited by a MIF4G domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Gretel; Schüssler, Steffen; Basquin, Claire; Le Hir, Hervé; Conti, Elena

    2013-11-26

    DEAD-box proteins are involved in all aspects of RNA processing. They bind RNA in an ATP-dependent manner and couple ATP hydrolysis to structural and compositional rearrangements of ribonucleoprotein particles. Conformational control is a major point of regulation for DEAD-box proteins to act on appropriate substrates and in a timely manner in vivo. Binding partners containing a middle domain of translation initiation factor 4G (MIF4G) are emerging as important regulators. Well-known examples are eIF4G and Gle1, which bind and activate the DEAD-box proteins eIF4A and Dbp5. Here, we report the mechanism of an inhibiting MIF4G domain. We determined the 2.0-Å resolution structure of the complex of human eIF4AIII and the MIF4G domain of the splicing factor Complexed With Cef1 (CWC22), an essential prerequisite for exon junction complex assembly by the splicing machinery. The CWC22 MIF4G domain binds both RecA domains of eIF4AIII. The mode of RecA2 recognition is similar to that observed in the activating complexes, yet is specific for eIF4AIII. The way the CWC22 MIF4G domain latches on the eIF4AIII RecA1 domain is markedly different from activating complexes. In the CWC22-eIF4AIII complex, the RNA-binding and ATP-binding motifs of the two RecA domains do not face each other, as would be required in the active state, but are in diametrically opposite positions. The binding mode of CWC22 to eIF4AIII reveals a facet of how MIF4G domains use their versatile structural frameworks to activate or inhibit DEAD-box proteins.

  10. Structural basis for decreased induction of class IB PI3-kinases expression by MIF inhibitors

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    Singh, Abhay Kumar [Edward A. Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis MO USA; Pantouris, Georgios [Department of Pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven CT USA; Borosch, Sebastian [Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen Germany; Rojanasthien, Siripong [Edward A. Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis MO USA; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang [Edward A. Doisy Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis MO USA

    2016-09-13

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a master regulator of proinflammatory cytokines and plays pathological roles when not properly regulated in rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, atherosclerosis, asthma and cancer. Unlike canonical cytokines, MIF has vestigial keto-enol tautomerase activity. Most of the current MIF inhibitors were screened for the inhibition of this enzymatic activity. However, only some of the enzymatic inhibitors inhibit receptor-mediated biological functions of MIF, such as cell recruitment, through an unknown molecular mechanism. The goal of this study was to understand the molecular basis underlying the pharmacological inhibition of biological functions of MIF. Here, we demonstrate how the structural changes caused upon inhibitor binding translate into the alteration of MIF-induced downstream signalling. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor activates phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) that play a pivotal role in immune cell recruitment in health and disease. There are several different PI3K isoforms, but little is known about how they respond to MIF. We demonstrate that MIF up-regulates the expression of Class IB PI3Ks in leucocytes. We also demonstrate that MIF tautomerase active site inhibitors down-regulate the expression of Class IB PI3Ks as well as leucocyte recruitment in vitro and in vivo. Finally, based on our MIF:inhibitor complex crystal structures, we hypothesize that the reduction in Class IB PI3K expression occurs because of the displacement of Pro1 towards the second loop of MIF upon inhibitor binding, which results in increased flexibility of the loop 2 and sub-optimal MIF binding to its receptors. These results will provide molecular insights for fine-tuning the biological functions of MIF.

  11. Comparative analysis of macrophage migration inhibitory factors (MIFs) from the parasitic nematode Onchocerca volvulus and the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Ajonina-Ekoti, Irene; Kurosinski, Marc Andre; Younis, Abuelhassan Elshazly; Ndjonka, Dieudonne; Tanyi, Manchang Kingsley; Achukwi, Mbunkah; Eisenbarth, Albert; Ajonina, Caroline; Lüersen, Kai; Breloer, Minka; Brattig, Norbert W; Liebau, Eva

    2013-09-01

    The macrophage migration inhibitory factors (MIFs) from the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus (OvMIF) were compared to the MIFs from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (CeMIF) with respect to molecular, biochemical and immunological properties. Except for CeMIF-4, all other MIFs demonstrated tautomerase activity. Surprisingly, OvMIF-1 displayed oxidoreductase activity. The strongest immunostaining for OvMIF-1 was observed in the outer cellular covering of the adult worm body, the syncytial hypodermis; moderate immunostaining was observed in the uterine wall. The generation of a strong humoral immune response towards OvMIF-1 and reduced reactivity to OvMIF-2 was indicated by high IgG levels in patients infected with O. volvulus and cows infected with the closely related Onchocerca ochengi, both MIFs revealing identical amino acid sequences. Using Litomosoides sigmodontis-infected mice, a laboratory model for filarial infection, MIFs derived from the tissue-dwelling O. volvulus, the rodent gut-dwelling Strongyloides ratti and from free-living C. elegans were recognized, suggesting that L. sigmodontis MIF-specific IgM and IgG1 were produced during L. sigmodontis infection of mice and cross-reacted with all MIF proteins tested. Thus, MIF apparently functions as a target of B cell response during nematode infection, but in the natural Onchocerca-specific human and bovine infection, the induced antibodies can discriminate between MIFs derived from parasitic or free-living nematodes.

  12. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) modulates trophic signaling through interaction with serine protease HTRA1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fex Svenningsen, Åsa; Loering, Svenja; Sørensen, Anna Lahn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a small conserved protein, is abundant in the immune- and central nervous system (CNS). MIF has several receptors and binding partners that can modulate its action on a cel-lular level. It is upregulated in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer although...... its function is far from clear. Here, we report the finding of a new binding partner to MIF, the ser-ine protease HTRA1. This enzyme cleaves several growth factors, extracellular matrix molecules and is implicated in some of the same diseases as MIF. We show that the func-tion of the binding between...

  13. Expression of CD74, the receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor, in non-small cell lung cancer.

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    McClelland, Marc; Zhao, Liujian; Carskadon, Shannon; Arenberg, Douglas

    2009-02-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a multifunctional cytokine that is overexpressed in lung cancer. The MIF receptor was recently discovered and found to be the invariant chain of the HLA class II molecule, CD74. We hypothesized that the expression of this receptor-ligand pair in lung cancer is associated with the angiogenic activity and level of CXC chemokine expression in human specimens of non-small cell lung cancer. We, therefore, performed immunolocalization of CD74 and compared it with the localization of MIF in non-small cell lung cancer to determine their respective locations, as well as the relationship between the co-expression of MIF-CD74 and angiogenic CXC chemokines with tumor angiogenesis. We found intense CD74 expression by immunohistochemistry in 57 of 70 tumors with minimal to no staining in the remaining 13 tumors. Comparing the localization of CD74 with its putative ligand, MIF, we found that CD74 and MIF were co-expressed in tumors in close proximity, and that co-expression of the MIF-CD74 pair was associated with both higher levels of tumor-associated angiogenic CXC chemokines (ie, the ELR score) and greater vascularity compared with tumors in which MIF-CD74 co-expression was not present. We also found that MIF induced angiogenic CXC chemokine expression in an autocrine manner in vitro, a function that was specifically inhibited by antibodies to CD74.

  14. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current clinical practice employs the use of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), as biomarkers to appropriately select patients that would benefit from targeted therapy against these major molecular pathways of the disease. This study aims at ...

  15. Human presynaptic receptors.

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    Schlicker, Eberhard; Feuerstein, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Presynaptic receptors are sites at which transmitters, locally formed mediators or hormones inhibit or facilitate the release of a given transmitter from its axon terminals. The interest in the identification of presynaptic receptors has faded in recent years and it may therefore be justified to give an overview of their occurrence in the autonomic and central nervous system; this review will focus on presynaptic receptors in human tissues. Autoreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which a given transmitter restrains its further release, though in some instances may also increase its release. Inhibitory autoreceptors represent a typical example of a negative feedback; they are tonically activated by the respective endogenous transmitter and/or are constitutively active. Autoreceptors also play a role under pathophysiological conditions, e.g. by limiting the massive noradrenaline release occurring during congestive heart failure. They can be used for therapeutic purposes; e.g., the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist mirtazapine is used as an antidepressant and the inverse histamine H3 receptor agonist pitolisant has been marketed as a new drug for the treatment of narcolepsy in 2016. Heteroreceptors are presynaptic receptors at which transmitters from adjacent neurons, locally formed mediators (e.g. endocannabinoids) or hormones (e.g. adrenaline) can inhibit or facilitate transmitter release; they may be subject to an endogenous tone. The constipating effect of the sympathetic nervous system or of the antihypertensive drug clonidine is related to the activation of inhibitory α2-adrenoceptors on postganglionic parasympathetic neurons. Part of the stimulating effect of adrenaline on the sympathetic nervous system during stress is related to its facilitatory effect on noradrenaline release via β2-adrenoceptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain immune interactions and air pollution: macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF), prion cellular protein (PrPC), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) in cerebrospinal fluid and MIF in serum differentiate urban children exposed to severe vs. low air pollution

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    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Cross, Janet V.; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Kavanaugh, Michael; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Chao, Chih-kai; Thompson, Charles; Chang, Jing; Zhu, Hongtu; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Mexico City Metropolitan Area children chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune responses along with accumulation of misfolded proteins observed in the early stages of Alzheimer and Parkinson's diseases. A complex modulation of serum cytokines and chemokines influences children's brain structural and gray/white matter volumetric responses to air pollution. The search for biomarkers associating systemic and CNS inflammation to brain growth and cognitive deficits in the short term and neurodegeneration in the long-term is our principal aim. We explored and compared a profile of cytokines, chemokines (Multiplexing LASER Bead Technology) and Cellular prion protein (PrPC) in normal cerebro-spinal-fluid (CSF) of urban children with high vs. low air pollution exposures. PrPC and macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) were also measured in serum. Samples from 139 children ages 11.91 ± 4.2 years were measured. Highly exposed children exhibited significant increases in CSF MIF (p = 0.002), IL6 (p = 0.006), IL1ra (p = 0.014), IL-2 (p = 0.04), and PrPC (p = 0.039) vs. controls. MIF serum concentrations were higher in exposed children (p = 0.009). Our results suggest CSF as a MIF, IL6, IL1Ra, IL-2, and PrPC compartment that can possibly differentiate air pollution exposures in children. MIF, a key neuro-immune mediator, is a potential biomarker bridge to identify children with CNS inflammation. Fine tuning of immune-to-brain communication is crucial to neural networks appropriate functioning, thus the short and long term effects of systemic inflammation and dysregulated neural immune responses are of deep concern for millions of exposed children. Defining the linkage and the health consequences of the brain / immune system interactions in the developing brain chronically exposed to air pollutants ought to be of pressing importance for public health

  17. Brain immune interactions and air pollution: Macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF, Prion cellular protein (PrPC, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra, and Interleukin-2 (IL-2 in cerebrospinal fluid and MIF in serum differentiate urban children exposed to severe versus low air pollution.

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    Lilian eCalderon-Garciduenas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mexico City Metropolitan Area children chronically exposed to high concentrations of air pollutants exhibit an early brain imbalance in genes involved in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune responses along with accumulation of misfolded proteins observed in the early stages of Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases. A complex modulation of serum cytokines and chemokines influences children’s brain structural and gray/white matter volumetric responses to air pollution. The search for biomarkers associating systemic and CNS inflammation to brain growth and cognitive deficits in the short term and neurodegeneration in the long-term is our principal aim. We explored and compared a profile of cytokines, chemokines (Multiplexing LASER Bead Technology and Cellular prion protein (PrPC in normal cerebro-spinal-fluid (CSF of urban children with high versus low air pollution exposures. PrPC and macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF were also measured in serum. Samples from 139 children ages 11.91±4.2 y were measured. Highly exposed children exhibited significant increases in CSF MIF (p=0.002, IL6 (p=0.006, IL1ra (p=0.014, IL-2 (p=0.04, and PrPC (p=0.039 v controls. MIF serum concentrations were higher in exposed children (p=0.009. Our results suggest CSF as a MIF, IL6, IL1Ra, IL-2, and PrPC compartment that can possibly differentiate air pollution exposures in children. MIF, a key neuro-immune mediator, is a potential biomarker bridge to identify children with CNS inflammation. Fine tuning of immune-to-brain communication is crucial to neural networks appropriate functioning, thus the short and long term effects of systemic inflammation and dysregulated neural immune responses are of deep concern for millions of exposed children. Defining the linkage and the health consequences of the brain/ immune system interactions in the developing brain chronically exposed to air pollutants ought to be of pressing importance for public health.

  18. MIF inhibition interferes with the inflammatory and T cell-stimulatory capacity of NOD macrophages and delays autoimmune diabetes onset.

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    Hannelie Korf

    Full Text Available Macrophages contribute in the initiation and progression of insulitis during type 1 diabetes (T1D. However, the mechanisms governing their recruitment into the islets as well as the manner of retention and activation are incompletely understood. Here, we investigated a role for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF and its transmembrane receptor, CD74, in the progression of T1D. Our data indicated elevated MIF concentrations especially in long-standing T1D patients and mice. Additionally, NOD mice featured increased MIF gene expression and CD74+ leukocyte frequencies in the pancreas. We identified F4/80+ macrophages as the main immune cells in the pancreas expressing CD74 and showed that MIF antagonism of NOD macrophages prevented their activation-induced cytokine production. The physiological importance was highlighted by the fact that inhibition of MIF delayed the onset of autoimmune diabetes in two different diabetogenic T cell transfer models. Mechanistically, macrophages pre-conditioned with the MIF inhibitor featured a refractory capacity to trigger T cell activation by keeping them in a naïve state. This study underlines a possible role for MIF/CD74 signaling pathways in promoting macrophage-mediated inflammation in T1D. As therapies directed at the MIF/CD74 pathway are in clinical development, new opportunities may be proposed for arresting T1D progression.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa MifS-MifR Two-Component System Is Specific for α-Ketoglutarate Utilization.

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    Gorakh Tatke

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, metabolically versatile opportunistic pathogen that elaborates a multitude of virulence factors, and is extraordinarily resistant to a gamut of clinically significant antibiotics. This ability, in part, is mediated by two-component regulatory systems (TCS that play a crucial role in modulating virulence mechanisms and metabolism. MifS (PA5512 and MifR (PA5511 form one such TCS implicated in biofilm formation. MifS is a sensor kinase whereas MifR belongs to the NtrC superfamily of transcriptional regulators that interact with RpoN (σ54. In this study we demonstrate that the mifS and mifR genes form a two-gene operon. The close proximity of mifSR operon to poxB (PA5514 encoding a ß-lactamase hinted at the role of MifSR TCS in regulating antibiotic resistance. To better understand this TCS, clean in-frame deletions were made in P. aeruginosa PAO1 creating PAO∆mifS, PAO∆mifR and PAO∆mifSR. The loss of mifSR had no effect on the antibiotic resistance profile. Phenotypic microarray (BioLOG analyses of PAO∆mifS and PAO∆mifR revealed that these mutants were unable to utilize C5-dicarboxylate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG, a key tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate. This finding was confirmed using growth analyses, and the defect can be rescued by mifR or mifSR expressed in trans. These mifSR mutants were able to utilize all the other TCA cycle intermediates (citrate, succinate, fumarate, oxaloacetate or malate and sugars (glucose or sucrose except α-KG as the sole carbon source. We confirmed that the mifSR mutants have functional dehydrogenase complex suggesting a possible defect in α-KG transport. The inability of the mutants to utilize α-KG was rescued by expressing PA5530, encoding C5-dicarboxylate transporter, under a regulatable promoter. In addition, we demonstrate that besides MifSR and PA5530, α-KG utilization requires functional RpoN. These data clearly suggests that P. aeruginosa MifSR TCS

  20. The amphibian melanization inhibiting factor (MIF) blocks the alpha-MSH effect on mouse malignant melanocytes.

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    López-Contreras, A M; Martínez-Liarte, J H; Solano, F; Samaraweera, P; Newton, J M; Bagnara, J T

    1996-12-01

    We have found that a melanization inhibitory factor (MIF) extracted from the ventral skin of Rana forreri has a slight inhibitory effect on the activity levels of tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase in B16/F10 and Cloudman S-91 murine melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, this factor appears to block the effects of alpha-MSH on these enzymatic activities. However, MIF treatment does not affect the melanogenic action of theophylline on the same cells, suggesting that MIF acts proximal to MSH-mediated cAMP formation, possibly by interaction with the MSH receptor. In this way, we show that this amphibian factor has biological activity on mammalian melanocytes. This suggests the existence of mammalian counterparts of amphibian MIF in the mouse integument that might regulate epidermal melanocytes. These peptides might be related to the agouti protein, as they share similar mechanisms of action. The interaction of different peptides with the MSH receptor would be a complex but general mechanism responsible for many mammalian coat color variants.

  1. Progesterone Inhibits Human Myometrial Contractions by Action on Membrane Receptors

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    Remzi Gokdeniz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The mechanisms for myometrial inhibition are still being investigated Aim: To examine mechanisms of progesterone (P4 inhibition of uterine contractility. Methods: Prospective study Tertiary care center at St. Joseph’s Hospital and at Maricopa Hospital, Phoenix, AZ and research center in Arizona, USA. During 2010-2011, 24 women given birth by cesarean section. Uterine tissues from women (n=24 at term were suspended in organ chambers and exposed to various agents. Contractility was registered and compared before and after addition of agents. Tissues were treated with P4 alone, a progestin (R5020 with low affinity to the progesterone membrane receptor (mPR, or a non-sex steroid (cholesterol. Other tissues were pretreated with inhibitors of adenylate cyclase (SQ 22536, phosphodiesterase (rolipram, nitric oxide (NO synthases (L-NAME or a nuclear P4 receptor antagonist (mifepristone, MIF, followed by P4. Data were analyzed by ANOVA. Results: P4 (P0.05 inhibitory effects. P4 inhibition is not blocked by MIF, SQ, ODQ, rolipram or L-NAME (P>0.05. Conclusions: P4 rapidly inhibits myometrial contractility by nongenomic mechanisms through action on mPR but not via cAMP, cGMP, or NO [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 92-102

  2. Expression and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF in melioidosis.

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    W Joost Wiersinga

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF has emerged as a pivotal mediator of innate immunity and has been shown to be an important effector molecule in severe sepsis. Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important cause of community-acquired sepsis in Southeast-Asia. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of MIF in melioidosis.MIF expression was determined in leukocytes and plasma from 34 melioidosis patients and 32 controls, and in mice infected with B. pseudomallei. MIF function was investigated in experimental murine melioidosis using anti-MIF antibodies and recombinant MIF. Patients demonstrated markedly increased MIF mRNA leukocyte and MIF plasma concentrations. Elevated MIF concentrations were associated with mortality. Mice inoculated intranasally with B. pseudomallei displayed a robust increase in pulmonary and systemic MIF expression. Anti-MIF treated mice showed lower bacterial loads in their lungs upon infection with a low inoculum. Conversely, mice treated with recombinant MIF displayed a modestly impaired clearance of B. pseudomallei. MIF exerted no direct effects on bacterial outgrowth or phagocytosis of B. pseudomallei.MIF concentrations are markedly elevated during clinical melioidosis and correlate with patients' outcomes. In experimental melioidosis MIF impaired antibacterial defense.

  3. Molecular pharmacology of human NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Maiken; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Andersen, Karen Toftegaard

    2012-01-01

    current knowledge of the relationship between NMDA receptor structure and function. We summarize studies on the biophysical properties of human NMDA receptors and compare these properties to those of rat orthologs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive pharmacological characterization that allows side......-by-side comparison of agonists, un-competitive antagonists, GluN2B-selective non-competitive antagonists, and GluN2C/D-selective modulators at recombinant human and rat NMDA receptors. The evaluation of biophysical properties and pharmacological probes acting at different sites on the receptor suggest...... that the binding sites and conformational changes leading to channel gating in response to agonist binding are highly conserved between human and rat NMDA receptors. In summary, the results of this study suggest that no major detectable differences exist in the pharmacological and functional properties of human...

  4. Vacuum-assisted closure increases ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I expression in wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiyang; Pan, Zhenyu; Hu, Xiang; Li, Zonghuan; Zhao, Yong; Yu, Ai-Xi

    2014-05-01

    Severe traumatic wounds are challenging to manage during surgery. The introduction of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is a breakthrough in wound management. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of VAC on cytokines in wounds during the management of severe traumatic wounds following initial debridement. VAC and conventional wound care (CWC) were independently applied to severe traumatic wounds on pigs. The expression levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), migration inhibitory factor (MIF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor, collagen I and human fibroblast collagenase 1 were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. VAC significantly increased the expression of ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I compared with that induced by CWC at the protein and mRNA levels. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that VAC therapy is an effective method for treating severe traumatic wounds, as it increases the expression of cytokines in wounds. VAC significantly increases the expression of ICAM-1, MIF, VEGF and collagen I to manage severe traumatic wounds.

  5. Altered Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Response in Mif−/− Mice Reveals a Role of Mif for Inflammatory-Th1 Response in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriko Itzel Sánchez-Zamora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (Mif is highly expressed in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. However, there is limited information about how Mif influences the activation of macrophages (Mφ and dendritic cells (DC in T1DM. To address this issue, we induced T1DM by administering multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ to Mif−/− or wild-type (Wt BALB/c mice. We found that Mif−/− mice treated with STZ (Mif−/−STZ developed lower levels of hyperglycemia, inflammatory cytokines, and specific pancreatic islet antigen- (PIAg- IgG and displayed reduced cellular infiltration into the pancreatic islets compared to Wt mice treated with STZ (WtSTZ. Moreover, Mφ and DC from Mif−/−STZ displayed lower expression of MHC-II, costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, and CD40, Toll-like receptor- (TLR- 2, and TLR-4 than WtSTZ. These changes were associated with a reduced capacity of Mφ and DC from Mif−/−STZ to induce proliferation in ovalbumin-specific T cells. All the deficiencies observed in Mif−/−STZ were recovered by exogenous administration of recombinant Mif. These findings suggest that Mif plays a role in the molecular mechanisms of Mφ and DC activation and drives T cell responses involved in the pathology of T1DM. Therefore, Mif is a potential therapeutic target to reduce the pathology of T1DM.

  6. Altered Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Response in Mif−/− Mice Reveals a Role of Mif for Inflammatory-Th1 Response in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Mendoza, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (Mif) is highly expressed in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, there is limited information about how Mif influences the activation of macrophages (Mφ) and dendritic cells (DC) in T1DM. To address this issue, we induced T1DM by administering multiple low doses of streptozotocin (STZ) to Mif−/− or wild-type (Wt) BALB/c mice. We found that Mif−/− mice treated with STZ (Mif−/−STZ) developed lower levels of hyperglycemia, inflammatory cytokines, and specific pancreatic islet antigen- (PIAg-) IgG and displayed reduced cellular infiltration into the pancreatic islets compared to Wt mice treated with STZ (WtSTZ). Moreover, Mφ and DC from Mif−/−STZ displayed lower expression of MHC-II, costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, and CD40, Toll-like receptor- (TLR-) 2, and TLR-4 than WtSTZ. These changes were associated with a reduced capacity of Mφ and DC from Mif−/−STZ to induce proliferation in ovalbumin-specific T cells. All the deficiencies observed in Mif−/−STZ were recovered by exogenous administration of recombinant Mif. These findings suggest that Mif plays a role in the molecular mechanisms of Mφ and DC activation and drives T cell responses involved in the pathology of T1DM. Therefore, Mif is a potential therapeutic target to reduce the pathology of T1DM. PMID:27699180

  7. Inflammation and cancer: macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)--the potential missing link.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conroy, H

    2010-11-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was the original cytokine, described almost 50 years ago and has since been revealed to be an important player in pro-inflammatory diseases. Recent work using MIF mouse models has revealed new roles for MIF. In this review, we present an increasing body of evidence implicating the key pro-inflammatory cytokine MIF in specific biological activities related directly to cancer growth or contributing towards a microenvironment favouring cancer progression.

  8. Human receptors for sweet and umami taste

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaodong; Staszewski, Lena; Xu, Hong; Durick, Kyle; Zoller, Mark; Adler, Elliot

    2002-01-01

    The three members of the T1R class of taste-specific G protein-coupled receptors have been hypothesized to function in combination as heterodimeric sweet taste receptors. Here we show that human T1R2/T1R3 recognizes diverse natural and synthetic sweeteners. In contrast, human T1R1/T1R3 responds to the umami taste stimulus l-glutamate, and this response is enhanced by 5′-ribonucleotides, a hallmark of umami taste. The ligand specificities of rat T1R2/T1R3 and T1R1/T1R3 correspond to those of t...

  9. Investigations on possible role of MIF gene polymorphism in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 88; Issue 1. Investigations on possible role of MIF gene polymorphism in progression of chikungunya infection into cases of acute flaccid paralysis and chronic arthropathy. Shweta Ramdas Fulsundar Subarna Roy Sathya Prakash Manimunda Shiv Shankar Singh A. P. Sugunan ...

  10. Metal ions and human sperm mannose receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoff, S; Cooper, G W; Centola, G M; Jacob, A; Hershlag, A; Hurley, I R

    2000-09-01

    Zinc and lead concentrations were measured in seminal plasma from fertile donors, infertile men with varicocoele and men undergoing work-ups for in vitro fertilization. Ejaculated spermatozoa from these subjects were incubated in vitro with various metal ions and/or dibromoethane and dibromochloropropane. Mannose receptor expression was correlated with metal and toxicant levels. Sperm distributions of potassium channels were compared with lead ions and calcium channels with zinc ions. Mannose receptor expression by capacitated spermatozoa increased linearly with seminal plasma zinc levels, and correlated inversely with lead levels. Cobalt had no effect on mannose receptor expression, but nickel had a concentration-dependent biphasic effect. Mannose receptor expression was not affected by dibromoethane and dibromochloropropane if the cholesterol content of the sperm membrane was high, but mannose receptor expression was decreased in low cholesterol spermatozoa by exposures below estimated permissive exposure limits. Potassium channels and lead ions co-localized over the entire head of human spermatozoa, while both calcium channels and zinc ions were confined to the equatorial segment of the head. Mannose receptor expression on the external surface of the human sperm plasma membrane is a biomarker for the effects of transition and heavy metals and organic toxicants on sperm fertility potential.

  11. Pattern-recognition receptors in human eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnhammar, Anne Månsson; Cardell, Lars Olaf

    2012-05-01

    The pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) family includes Toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) -like receptors (NLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). They recognize various microbial signatures or host-derived danger signals and trigger an immune response. Eosinophils are multifunctional leucocytes involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory processes, including parasitic helminth infection, allergic diseases, tissue injury and tumour immunity. Human eosinophils express several PRRs, including TLR1-5, TLR7, TLR9, NOD1, NOD2, Dectin-1 and RAGE. Receptor stimulation induces survival, oxidative burst, activation of the adhesion system and release of cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-α and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor), chemokines (interleukin-8 and growth-related oncogene-α) and cytotoxic granule proteins (eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil peroxidase and major basic protein). It is also evident that eosinophils play an immunomodulatory role by interacting with surrounding cells. The presence of a broad range of PRRs in eosinophils indicates that they are not only involved in defence against parasitic helminths, but also against bacteria, viruses and fungi. From a clinical perspective, eosinophilic PRRs seem to be involved in both allergic and malignant diseases by causing exacerbations and affecting tumour growth, respectively. © 2012 The Authors. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Genes that encodes NAGT, MIF1 and MIF2 are not virulence factors for kala-azar caused by Leishmania infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Guedes Alcoforado Aguiar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Kala-azar is a disease resulting from infection by Leishmania donovani and Leishmania infantum. Most patients with the disease exhibit prolonged fever, wasting, anemia and hepatosplenomegaly without complications. However, some patients develop severe disease with hemorrhagic manifestations, bacterial infections, jaundice, and edema dyspnea, among other symptoms, followed by death. Among the parasite molecules that might influence the disease severity are the macrophage migration inhibitory factor-like proteins (MIF1 and MIF2 and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase (NAGT, which act in the first step of protein N-glycosylation. This study aimed to determine whether MIF1, MIF2 and NAGT are virulence factors for severe kala-azar. Methods To determine the parasite genotype in kala-azar patients from Northeastern Brazil, we sequenced the NAGT genes of L. infantum from 68 patients as well as the MIF1 and MIF2 genes from 76 different subjects with diverse clinical manifestations. After polymerase chain reaction (PCR, the fragments were sequenced, followed by polymorphism identification. Results The nucleotide sequencing of the 144 amplicons revealed the absence of genetic variability of the NAGT, MIF1 and MIF2 genes between the isolates. The conservation of these genes suggests that the clinical variability of kala-azar does not depend upon these genes. Additionally, this conservation suggests that these genes may be critical for parasite survival. Conclusions NAGT, MIF1 and MIF2 do not alter the severity of kala-azar. NAGT, MIF1 and MIF2 are highly conserved among different isolates of identical species and exhibit potential for use in phylogenetic inferences or molecular diagnosis.

  13. Cellular receptors for human enterovirus species A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorihiro eNishimura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Human enterovirus species A (HEV-A is one of the four species of HEV in the genus Enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae. Among HEV-A, coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16 and enterovirus 71 (EV71 are the major causative agents of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. Some other types of HEV-A are commonly associated with herpangina. Although HFMD and herpangina due to HEV-A are common febrile diseases among infants and children, EV71 can cause various neurological diseases, such as aseptic meningitis and fatal encephalitis.Recently, two human transmembrane proteins, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 and scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2, were identified as functional receptors for EV71 and CVA16. In in vitro infection experiments using the prototype HEV-A strains, PSGL-1 and SCARB2 could be responsible for the specific receptors for EV71 and CVA16. However, the involvement of both receptors in the in vitro and in vivo infections of clinical isolates of HEV-A has not been clarified yet. To elucidate a diverse array of the clinical outcome of HEV-A-associated diseases, the identification and characterization of HEV-A receptors may provide useful information in understanding the HEV-A pathogenesis at a molecular level.

  14. Beta adrenergic receptors in human cavernous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhabuwala, C.B.; Ramakrishna, C.V.; Anderson, G.F.

    1985-04-01

    Beta adrenergic receptor binding was performed with /sup 125/I iodocyanopindolol on human cavernous tissue membrane fractions from normal tissue and transsexual procedures obtained postoperatively, as well as from postmortem sources. Isotherm binding studies on normal fresh tissues indicated that the receptor density was 9.1 fmoles/mg. with a KD of 23 pM. Tissue stored at room temperature for 4 to 6 hours, then at 4C in saline solution for 19 to 20 hours before freezing showed no significant changes in receptor density or affinity, and provided evidence for the stability of postmortem tissue obtained within the same time period. Beta receptor density of 2 cavernous preparations from transsexual procedures was not significantly different from normal control tissues, and showed that high concentrations of estrogen received by these patients had no effect on beta adrenergic receptor density. Displacement of /sup 125/iodocyanopindolol by 5 beta adrenergic agents demonstrated that 1-propranolol had the greatest affinity followed by ICI 118,551, zinterol, metoprolol and practolol. When the results of these displacement studies were subjected to Scatfit, non- linear regression line analysis, a single binding site was described. Based on the relative potency of the selective beta adrenergic agents it appears that these receptors were of the beta 2 subtype.

  15. Studies on guinea-pig macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). II. Purification of MIF after treatment with reducing and denaturing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotkes, P; Pick, E

    1979-09-01

    Treatment of guinea-pig macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) containing culture supernatants with the denaturing agents guanidine hydrochloride (Gu HCl) or urea, in the presence or absence of the reducing agent 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), or with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), does not destroy biological activity. Alkylation of reduced MIF preparations results in a considerable decrease or total loss of MIF activity. Treatment of supernatants with the combinations, Gu HCl and 2-ME or urea and 2-ME results in the recovery of MIF activity in association with molecules less than 30,000 in molecular weight (mol. wt). After removal of the agents by dialysis, MIF activity is found associated with molecules larger than 30,000. The reduction in mol. wt is dependent on the presence of 2-ME. When MIF-containing supernatants are treated with urea and SDS and fractionated by preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) in the presence of the same agents, MIF activity is recovered in the mol. wt range of 42,000--80,000. When supernatants are treated with 2-me, in addition to urea and SDS, and preparative PAGE is performed in their presence, MIF activity is found associated with material having a mol. wt of 15,000--18,000. Analytical SDS-PAGE of this fraction reveals two or three closely grouped bands corresponding to the above mol. wt range.

  16. Involvement of MIF in basement membrane damage in chronically UVB-exposed skin in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yoshihisa

    Full Text Available Solar ultraviolet (UV B radiation is known to induce matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs that degrade collagen in the basement membrane. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pluripotent cytokine that plays an essential role in the pathophysiology of skin inflammation induced by UV irradiation. This study examined the effects of MIF on basement membrane damage following chronic UVB irradiation in mice. The back skin of MIF transgenic (Tg and wild-type (WT mice was exposed to UVB three times a week for 10 weeks. There was a decrease in intact protein levels of type IV collagen and increased basement membrane damage in the exposed skin of the MIF Tg mice compared to that observed in the WT mice. Moreover, the skin of the MIF Tg mice exhibited higher MIF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and protein levels than those observed in the WT mice. We also found that chronic UVB exposure in MIF Tg mice resulted in higher levels of neutrophil infiltration in the dermis compared with that observed in the WT mice. In vitro experiments revealed that MIF induced increases in the MMPs expression, including that of MMP-9 in keratinocytes and MMP-2 in fibroblasts. Cultured neutrophils also secreted MMP-9 stimulated by MIF. Therefore, MIF-mediated basement membrane damage occurs primarily through MMPs activation and neutrophil influx in murine skin following chronic UVB irradiation.

  17. Computer Modeling of Human Delta Opioid Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Dzimbova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of selective agonists of δ-opioid receptor as well as the model of interaction of ligands with this receptor is the subjects of increased interest. In the absence of crystal structures of opioid receptors, 3D homology models with different templates have been reported in the literature. The problem is that these models are not available for widespread use. The aims of our study are: (1 to choose within recently published crystallographic structures templates for homology modeling of the human δ-opioid receptor (DOR; (2 to evaluate the models with different computational tools; and (3 to precise the most reliable model basing on correlation between docking data and in vitro bioassay results. The enkephalin analogues, as ligands used in this study, were previously synthesized by our group and their biological activity was evaluated. Several models of DOR were generated using different templates. All these models were evaluated by PROCHECK and MolProbity and relationship between docking data and in vitro results was determined. The best correlations received for the tested models of DOR were found between efficacy (erel of the compounds, calculated from in vitro experiments and Fitness scoring function from docking studies. New model of DOR was generated and evaluated by different approaches. This model has good GA341 value (0.99 from MODELLER, good values from PROCHECK (92.6% of most favored regions and MolProbity (99.5% of favored regions. Scoring function correlates (Pearson r = -0.7368, p-value = 0.0097 with erel of a series of enkephalin analogues, calculated from in vitro experiments. So, this investigation allows suggesting a reliable model of DOR. Newly generated model of DOR receptor could be used further for in silico experiments and it will give possibility for faster and more correct design of selective and effective ligands for δ-opioid receptor.

  18. IL-21 Receptor Expression in Human Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L. Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tendinopathy remain unclear, with much debate as to whether inflammation or degradation has the prominent role. Increasing evidence points toward an early inflammatory infiltrate and associated inflammatory cytokine production in human and animal models of tendon disease. The IL-21/IL-21R axis is a proinflammatory cytokine complex that has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. This project aimed to investigate the role and expression of the cytokine/receptor pair IL-21/IL-21R in human tendinopathy. We found significantly elevated expression of IL-21 receptor message and protein in human tendon samples but found no convincing evidence of the presence of IL-21 at message or protein level. The level of expression of IL-21R message/protein in human tenocytes was significantly upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα/IL-1β in vitro. These findings demonstrate that IL-21R is present in early human tendinopathy mainly expressed by tenocytes and macrophages. Despite a lack of IL-21 expression, these data again suggest that early tendinopathy has an inflammatory/cytokine phenotype, which may provide novel translational targets in the treatment of tendinopathy.

  19. Diversity and inter-connections in the CXCR4 chemokine receptor/ligand family: molecular perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas ePawig

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 mediate the homing of progenitor cells in the bone marrow and their recruitment to sites of injury, as well as affect processes such as cell arrest, survival and angiogenesis. CXCL12 was long thought to be the sole CXCR4 ligand, but more recently the atypical chemokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF was identified as an alternative, non-cognate ligand for CXCR4 and shown to mediate chemotaxis and arrest of CXCR4-expressing T-cells. This has complicated the understanding of CXCR4-mediated signaling and associated biological processes. Compared to CXCL12/CXCR4-induced signaling, only few details are known on MIF/CXCR4-mediated signaling and it remains unclear to which extent MIF and CXCL12 reciprocally influence CXCR4 binding and signaling. Furthermore, the atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3 (previously CXCR7 has added to the complexity of CXCR4 signaling due to its ability to bind CXCL12 and MIF, and evoke CXCL12- and MIF-triggered signaling independently of CXCR4. Also, extracellular ubiquitin (eUb and the viral protein gp120 (HIV have been reported as CXCR4 ligands, whereas viral chemokine vMIP-II (Herpesvirus and human beta-defensin 3 (HBD-3 have been identified as CXCR4 antagonists. This review will provide insight into the diversity and inter-connections in the CXCR4 receptor/ligand family. We will discuss signaling pathways initiated by binding of CXCL12 vs MIF to CXCR4, elaborate on how ACKR3 affects CXCR4 signaling and summarize biological functions of CXCR4 signaling mediated by CXCL12 or MIF. Also, we will discuss eUb and gp120 as alternative ligands for CXCR4, and describe vMIP-II and HBD-3 as antagonists for CXCR4. Detailed insight into biological effects of CXCR4 signaling und underlying mechanisms, including diversity of CXCR4 ligands and inter-connections with other (chemokine receptors, is clinically important, as the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 has been approved as stem cell mobilizer in

  20. Correlation Between Urine Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF/Creatinine Ratio and Time After Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Sabaghi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Despite the long-standing association of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF with delayed-type hypersensitivity response,the potential role Of MIF in chronic allograft nephropathy is unknown.The association between upregulation of MIF expression, macrophage and T cell infiltration and the severity of chronic allograft nephropathy suggests that MIF may be an important mediator in the process of chronic allograft nephropathy.Therefore,the aims of this study were to measure urine concentration of MIF after renal transplantation,and to determine if it increases with time.  Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study twenty-two pediatric patients   (case, group A who received kidney transplants between 1999 and 2006, and forty  healthy children (control, group B were recruited. Urine MIF and creatinine were  assessed in all patients.Urine MIF concentrations were quantitated by ELISA.Results: The mean ratios of urine MIF/Creatinine (Cr were calculated as 5.046(SEM=2.04 pg/μmol creatinine in transplanted-kidney patients (group A and 1.85(SEM=0.35 pg/μmol creatinine in healthy individuals(group B.Agood significant  correlation was seen between urine MIF/Cr ratio and time after kidney transplantation  in recipients (P=0.002, rSpearman = +0.633.  Conclusion: This study shows significant correlation between urine MIF/Cr ratio and time passed after transplantation. Increasing MIF/Cr ratios were seen in patients with a longer post transplantation period. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the  role of macrophages in chronic renal nephropathy especially chronic rejection with additive studies and then study the effect of anti-MIF antibodies in the treatment of this condition. 

  1. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  2. PET imaging of human cardiac opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villemagne, Patricia S.R.; Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Frost, James J. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The presence of opioid peptides and receptors and their role in the regulation of cardiovascular function has been previously demonstrated in the mammalian heart. The aim of this study was to image {mu} and {delta} opioid receptors in the human heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Five subjects (three females, two males, 65{+-}8 years old) underwent PET scanning of the chest with [{sup 11}C]carfentanil ([{sup 11}C]CFN) and [{sup 11}C]-N-methyl-naltrindole ([{sup 11}C]MeNTI) and the images were analyzed for evidence of opioid receptor binding in the heart. Either [{sup 11}C]CFN or [{sup 11}C]MeNTI (20 mCi) was injected i.v. with subsequent dynamic acquisitions over 90 min. For the blocking studies, either 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of naloxone was injected i.v. 5 min prior to the injection of [{sup 11}C]CFN and [{sup 11}C]MeNTI, respectively. Regions of interest were placed over the left ventricle, left ventricular chamber, lung and skeletal muscle. Graphical analysis demonstrated average baseline myocardial binding potentials (BP) of 4.37{+-}0.91 with [{sup 11}C]CFN and 3.86{+-}0.60 with [{sup 11}C]MeNTI. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg naloxone prior to [{sup 11}C]CFN produced a 25% reduction in BP in one subject in comparison with baseline values, and a 19% decrease in myocardial distribution volume (DV). Administration of 1 mg/kg of naloxone before [{sup 11}C]MeNTI in another subject produced a 14% decrease in BP and a 21% decrease in the myocardial DV. These results demonstrate the ability to image these receptors in vivo by PET. PET imaging of cardiac opioid receptors may help to better understand their role in cardiovascular pathophysiology and the effect of abuse of opioids and drugs on heart function. (orig.)

  3. Pattern of hormone receptors and human epidermal growth factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women globally. With immunohistochemistry (IHC), breast cancer is classified into four groups based on IHC profile of estrogen receptor (ER)/progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) expression, positive (+) and/or ...

  4. MIF-Mediated Hemodilution Promotes Pathogenic Anemia in Experimental African Trypanosomosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Stijlemans

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Animal African trypanosomosis is a major threat to the economic development and human health in sub-Saharan Africa. Trypanosoma congolense infections represent the major constraint in livestock production, with anemia as the major pathogenic lethal feature. The mechanisms underlying anemia development are ill defined, which hampers the development of an effective therapy. Here, the contribution of the erythropoietic and erythrophagocytic potential as well as of hemodilution to the development of T. congolense-induced anemia were addressed in a mouse model of low virulence relevant for bovine trypanosomosis. We show that in infected mice, splenic extramedullary erythropoiesis could compensate for the chronic low-grade type I inflammation-induced phagocytosis of senescent red blood cells (RBCs in spleen and liver myeloid cells, as well as for the impaired maturation of RBCs occurring in the bone marrow and spleen. Rather, anemia resulted from hemodilution. Our data also suggest that the heme catabolism subsequent to sustained erythrophagocytosis resulted in iron accumulation in tissue and hyperbilirubinemia. Moreover, hypoalbuminemia, potentially resulting from hemodilution and liver injury in infected mice, impaired the elimination of toxic circulating molecules like bilirubin. Hemodilutional thrombocytopenia also coincided with impaired coagulation. Combined, these effects could elicit multiple organ failure and uncontrolled bleeding thus reduce the survival of infected mice. MIF (macrophage migrating inhibitory factor, a potential pathogenic molecule in African trypanosomosis, was found herein to promote erythrophagocytosis, to block extramedullary erythropoiesis and RBC maturation, and to trigger hemodilution. Hence, these data prompt considering MIF as a potential target for treatment of natural bovine trypanosomosis.

  5. Human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER 2)/neu expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... 3Department of Pathology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430060, China. 4Department of ... To investigate the relationship between the expression/amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor ... epidermal growth factor receptor family; HER 2, human epidermal ...

  6. Differences in the interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with receptor from normal, denervated and myasthenic human muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Lefvert, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with different kinds of human skeletal muscle receptor was investigated. The reaction of most receptor antibodies was strongest with receptor from a patient with myasthenia gravis and with receptor from denervated muscle. Results obtained with these receptors were well correlated. The binding of most receptor antibodies to receptor from functionally normal muscle was much weaker and also qualitatively different. In a few patients with moder...

  7. Overview of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF as a Potential Biomarker Relevant to Adiposity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Nishihira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The cytokine “macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF” is generally recognized as a proinflammatory cytokine, and MIF is involved in broad range of acute and chronic inflammatory states. With regard to glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, MIF is produced by pancreatic β cells and acts as a positive regulator of insulin secretion. In contrast, it is evident that MIF expressed in adipose tissues causes insulin resistance. Concerning MIF gene analysis, we found four alleles: 5-, 6-, 7-and 8-CATT at position −794 of MIF gene in a Japanese population. Genotypes without the 5-CATT allele were more common in the obese subjects than in the lean or overweight groups. It is conceivable that promoter polymorphism in the MIF gene is profoundly linked with obesity relevant to lifestyle diseases, such as diabetes. Obesity has become a serious social issue due to the inappropriate nutritional balance, and the consumption of functional foods (including functional foods to reduce fat mass is expected to overcome this issue. In this context, MIF would be a reliable quantitative biomarker to evaluate the effects of functional foods on adiposity.

  8. Polymorphisms in human muscarinic receptor subtype genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; Teitsma, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of polymorphisms have been reported in muscarinic receptor subtype genes, mostly in M₁ and M₂ and, to a lesser extent, M₃ receptors. Most studies linking such genetic variability to phenotype have been performed for brain functions, but a more limited amount of information is also

  9. Variation in macrophage migration inhibitory factor [MIF] immunoreactivity during bovine gestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulesu, L.; Pfarrer, C.; Romagnoli, R.

    2012-01-01

    reestablishment of vascularisation, the vasculature in the caruncular area showed MIF reactivity. While supporting involvement of MIF in different placental types, the spatio-temporal variation in the bovine placenta suggests a regulatory role for MIF mainly in the interhemal barrier and during vascular......, the caruncular epithelium during pregnancy showed stronger staining for MIF. The intercaruncular epithelium in non-pregnant endometrium showed some reaction apically with increasing intensity at uterine gland openings; in contrast, at day 18 of gestation this staining was markedly increased. During gestation...... both caruncular and trophoblast epithelium of the placentomes were positive with different intensity in relation to the gestational stage. In the uterine glands, some strongly stained cells were present. The mature binucleated trophoblast giant cells were negative throughout pregnancy. During...

  10. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R

    1996-01-01

    of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist, carbachol...

  11. A Secreted MIF Cytokine Enables Aphid Feeding and Represses Plant Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naessens, Elodie; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giordanengo, Philippe; Baron, Olga Lucia; Minet-Kebdani, Naïma; Keller, Harald; Coustau, Christine

    2015-07-20

    Aphids attack virtually all plant species and cause serious crop damages in agriculture. Despite their dramatic impact on food production, little is known about the molecular processes that allow aphids to exploit their host plants. To date, few aphid salivary proteins have been identified that are essential for aphid feeding, and their nature and function remain largely unknown. Here, we show that a macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is secreted in aphid saliva. In vertebrates, MIFs are important pro-inflammatory cytokines regulating immune responses. MIF proteins are also secreted by parasites of vertebrates, including nematodes, ticks, and protozoa, and participate in the modulation of host immune responses. The finding that a plant parasite secretes a MIF protein prompted us to question the role of the cytokine in the plant-aphid interaction. We show here that expression of MIF genes is crucial for aphid survival, fecundity, and feeding on a host plant. The ectopic expression of aphid MIFs in leaf tissues inhibits major plant immune responses, such as the expression of defense-related genes, callose deposition, and hypersensitive cell death. Functional complementation analyses in vivo allowed demonstrating that MIF1 is the member of the MIF protein family that allows aphids to exploit their host plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cytokine that is secreted by a parasite to modulate plant immune responses. Our findings suggest a so-far unsuspected conservation of infection strategies among parasites of animal and plant species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain Activation by Peptide Pro-Leu-Gly-NH (MIF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reas S. Khan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MIF-1 (Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2 is a tripeptide for which the therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease and depression has been indicated by many studies. However, the cellular mechanisms of action of MIF-1 are not yet clear. Here, we show the specific brain regions responsive to MIF-1 treatment by c-Fos mapping, and determine the kinetics of cellular signaling by western blotting of pERK, pSTAT3, and c-Fos in cultured neurons. The immunoreactivity of c-Fos was increased 4 hours after MIF-1 treatment in brain regions critically involved in the regulation of mood, anxiety, depression, and memory. The number of cells activated was greater after peripheral treatment (intravenous delivery than after intracerebroventricular injection. In cultured SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, c-Fos was induced time- and dose-dependently. The activation of cellular c-Fos was preceded by a transient increase of mitogen-activated protein kinase pERK but a reduction of phosphorylated Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (pSTAT3 initially. We conclude that MIF-1 can modulate multiple cellular signals including pERK, and pSTAT3 to activate c-Fos. The cellular activation in specific brain regions illustrates the biochemical and neuroanatomical basis underlying the therapeutic effect of MIF-1 in Parkinson's disease and depression.

  13. Evaluation of MIF -173 G/C Polymorphism in Turkish Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürel, Çevik; İnanır, Ahmet; Nursal, Ayşe Feyda; Tekcan, Akın; Rüstemoğlu, Aydın; Yigit, Serbülent

    2016-11-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease mainly affecting the spine and sacroiliac joints. Macrophage migration inhibitory (MIF) factor is a regulatory cytokine that inhibits random immune cell migration. MIF gene promoter polymorphisms play a role in the progression of several inflammatory disorders. To investigate the relationship between the MIF gene -173 G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and AS. Cross-sectional study. In this study, a total of 161 AS and 194 normal controls were recruited. The MIF gene -173 G/C SNP was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction using the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of genotype distribution (p>0.05). When wild-type G/G and G/C+C/C genotypes are compared in terms of clinical characteristics, there is a significant difference between the average age and the duration of disease in AS patients (p<0.05). No significant relationship between AS disease and MIF -173 G/C polymorphism was found. MIF -173 G/C polymorphism (C allele) may affect the time of onset and the duration of disease in AS patients.

  14. Crystal structure of the human σ1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hayden R; Zheng, Sanduo; Gurpinar, Esin; Koehl, Antoine; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C

    2016-04-28

    The human σ1 receptor is an enigmatic endoplasmic-reticulum-resident transmembrane protein implicated in a variety of disorders including depression, drug addiction, and neuropathic pain. Recently, an additional connection to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has emerged from studies of human genetics and mouse models. Unlike many transmembrane receptors that belong to large, extensively studied families such as G-protein-coupled receptors or ligand-gated ion channels, the σ1 receptor is an evolutionary isolate with no discernible similarity to any other human protein. Despite its increasingly clear importance in human physiology and disease, the molecular architecture of the σ1 receptor and its regulation by drug-like compounds remain poorly defined. Here we report crystal structures of the human σ1 receptor in complex with two chemically divergent ligands, PD144418 and 4-IBP. The structures reveal a trimeric architecture with a single transmembrane domain in each protomer. The carboxy-terminal domain of the receptor shows an extensive flat, hydrophobic membrane-proximal surface, suggesting an intimate association with the cytosolic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in cells. This domain includes a cupin-like β-barrel with the ligand-binding site buried at its centre. This large, hydrophobic ligand-binding cavity shows remarkable plasticity in ligand recognition, binding the two ligands in similar positions despite dissimilar chemical structures. Taken together, these results reveal the overall architecture, oligomerization state, and molecular basis for ligand recognition by this important but poorly understood protein.

  15. Expression of haemopexin receptors by cultured human cytotrophoblast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. van Dijk (Hans); M.J. Kroos; J.S. Starreveld; H.G. van Eijk (Henk); S.P. Tang; D.X. Song

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe expression of cell-surface haemopexin (Hx) receptors on human cytotrophoblasts was assessed by using four different Hx species purified from plasma: human Hx isolated by wheatgerm-affinity chromatography, human Hx isolated by haem-agarose-affinity

  16. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  17. Expression of the endocannabinoid receptors in human fascial tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Fede

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1 and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2 in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation.

  18. The Insect Ortholog of the Human Orphan Cytokine Receptor CRLF3 Is a Neuroprotective Erythropoietin Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Hahn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cytokine erythropoietin (Epo mediates various cell homeostatic responses to environmental challenges and pathological insults. While stimulation of vertebrate erythrocyte production is mediated by homodimeric “classical” Epo receptors, alternative receptors are involved in neuroprotection. However, their identity remains enigmatic due to complex cytokine ligand and receptor interactions and conflicting experimental results. Besides the classical Epo receptor, the family of type I cytokine receptors also includes the poorly characterized orphan cytokine receptor-like factor 3 (CRLF3 present in vertebrates including human and various insect species. By making use of the more simple genetic makeup of insect model systems, we studied whether CRLF3 is a neuroprotective Epo receptor in animals. We identified a single ortholog of CRLF3 in the beetle Tribolium castaneum, and established protocols for primary neuronal cell cultures from Tribolium brains and efficient in vitro RNA interference. Recombinant human Epo as well as the non-erythropoietic Epo splice variant EV-3 increased the survival of serum-deprived brain neurons, confirming the previously described neuroprotective effect of Epo in insects. Moreover, Epo completely prevented hypoxia-induced apoptotic cell death of primary neuronal cultures. Knockdown of CRLF3 expression by RNA interference with two different double stranded RNA (dsRNA fragments abolished the neuroprotective effect of Epo, indicating that CRLF3 is a crucial component of the insect Epo-responsive receptor. This suggests that a common urbilaterian ancestor of the orphan human and insect cytokine receptor CRLF3 served as a neuroprotective receptor for an Epo-like cytokine. Our work also suggests that vertebrate CRLF3, like its insect ortholog, might represent a tissue protection-mediating receptor.

  19. Evidence for Alpha Receptors in the Human Ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeb, Ralph; Knopf, Joy; Golijanin, Dragan; Bourne, Patricia; Erturk, Erdal

    2007-04-01

    An immunohistochemical and western blot expression analysis of human ureters was performed in order to characterize the alpha-1-adrenergic receptor distribution along the length of the human ureteral wall. Mapping the distribution will assist in understanding the potential role alpha -1-adrenergic receptors and their subtype density might have in the pathophysiology of ureteral colic and stone passage. Patients diagnosed with renal cancer or bladder cancer undergoing nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy, or cystectomy had ureteral specimens taken from the proximal, mid, distal and tunneled ureter. Tissues were processed for fresh frozen examination and fixed in formalin. None of the ureteral specimens were involved with cancer. Serial histologic sections and immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies specific for alpha-1-adrenergic receptor subtypes (alpha 1a, alpha 1b, alpha 1d). The sections were examined under a light microscope and scored as positive or negative. In order to validate and quantify the alpha receptor subtypes along the human ureter. Western blotting techniques were applied. Human ureter stained positively for alpha -1-adrenergic receptors. Immunostaining appeared red, with intense reaction in the smooth muscle of the ureter and endothelium of the neighboring blood vessels. There was differential expression between all the receptors with the highest staining for alpha-1D subtype. The highest protein expression for all three subtypes was in the renal pelvis and decreased with advancement along the ureter to the distal ureter. At the distal ureter, there was marked increase in expression as one progressed towards the ureteral orifice. The same pattern of protein expression was exhibited for all three alpha -1-adrenergic receptor subtypes. We provide preliminary evidence for the ability to detect and quantify the alpha-1-receptor subtypes along the human ureter which to the best of our knowledge has never been done with

  20. Null mutation for Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF is associated with less aggressive bladder cancer in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsimikas John

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory cytokines may promote tumorigenesis. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a proinflammatory cytokine with regulatory properties over tumor suppressor proteins involved in bladder cancer. We studied the development of bladder cancer in wild type (WT and MIF knockout (KO mice given N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl-nitrosamine (BBN, a known carcinogen, to determine the role of MIF in bladder cancer initiation and progression. Methods 5-month old male C57Bl/6 MIF WT and KO mice were treated with and without BBN. Animals were sacrificed at intervals up to 23 weeks of treatment. Bladder tumor stage and grade were evaluated by H&E. Immunohistochemical (IHC analysis was performed for MIF and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, a measure of vascularization. MIF mRNA was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Poorly differentiated carcinoma developed in all BBN treated mice by week 20. MIF WT animals developed T2 disease, while KO animals developed only T1 disease. MIF IHC revealed predominantly urothelial cytoplasmic staining in the WT control animals and a shift toward nuclear staining in WT BBN treated animals. MIF mRNA levels were 3-fold higher in BBN treated animals relative to controls when invasive cancer was present. PECAM-1 staining revealed significantly more stromal vessels in the tumors in WT animals when compared to KOs. Conclusion Muscle invasive bladder cancer with increased stromal vascularity was associated with increased MIF mRNA levels and nuclear redistribution. Consistently lower stage tumors were seen in MIF KO compared to WT mice. These data suggest that MIF may play a role in the progression to invasive bladder cancer.

  1. MIF Participates in Toxoplasma gondii-Induced Pathology Following Oral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Kalil; Feijó, Daniel F.; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Souza, Heitor S. P.; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is essential for controlling parasite burden and survival in a model of systemic Toxoplasma gondii infection. Peroral T. gondii infection induces small intestine necrosis and death in susceptible hosts, and in many aspects resembles inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Considering the critical role of MIF in the pathogenesis of IBD, we hypothesized that MIF participates in the inflammatory response induced by oral infection with T. gondii. Methodology/Principal Findings Mif deficient (Mif−/−) and wild-type mice in the C57Bl/6 background were orally infected with T. gondii strain ME49. Mif−/− mice had reduced lethality, ileal inflammation and tissue damage despite of an increased intestinal parasite load compared to wt mice. Lack of MIF caused a reduction of TNF-α, IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-23 and an increased expression of IL-22 in ileal mucosa. Moreover, suppressed pro-inflammatory responses at the ileal mucosa observed in Mif−/− mice was not due to upregulation of IL-4, IL-10 or TGF-β. MIF also affected the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) but not MMP-2 in the intestine of infected mice. Signs of systemic inflammation including the increased concentrations of inflammatory cytokines in the plasma and liver damage were less pronounced in Mif−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. Conclusion/Significance In conclusion, our data suggested that in susceptible hosts MIF controls T. gondii infection with the cost of increasing local and systemic inflammation, tissue damage and death. PMID:21977228

  2. Effect of Tyr-MIF-1 peptides on blood ACTH and corticosterone concentration induced by three experimental models of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocheva, A; Dzambazova, E; Hadjiolova, R; Traikov, L; Mincheva, R; Bivolarski, I

    2008-10-01

    1. Studies, using a wide variety of stressors, have clearly indicated that the pattern of neuroendocrine response is dependent upon the stress stimulus applied. 2. The Tyr-MIF-1 family of peptides (Tyr-MIF-1s) includes MIF-1, Tyr-MIF-1, Tyr-W-MIF-1 and Tyr-K-MIF-1. These neuropeptides, neuromodulators are able to inhibit the expression of some forms of stress-induced analgesia. 3. The aim of this study was to compare changes in ACTH and corticosterone (CORT) concentration after various stressors (immobilization, cold and heat), as well as after injection of investigated Tyr-MIF-1s peptides. 4. According to our results, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system was activated by all the stressors applied. Heat and immobilization are stronger stressors, as the exposure of animals to a high ambient temperature and immobilization resulted in the highest rise of plasma ACTH and CORT concentration when compared with cold stress. Moreover, all the investigated peptides from Tyr-MIF-1 family, administered after application of stressors, inhibited the elevations in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) plasma concentrations significantly. 5. In conclusion, the various stressors applied seem to induce a different response of the HPA system as judged by quantitative changes in ACTH and CORT release. We suggest that Tyr-MIF-1 peptides may possess anti-stressor effects, as they inhibited stress-induced rising in two hormones that were investigated.

  3. The genomic organization of the human GLP-1 receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmen, A; Walkenbach, A; Füller, P; Lankat-Buttgereit, B; Göke, R; Göke, B

    1998-01-01

    The genomic organization of the human gene encoding the receptor for glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 (7-37)/(7-36) amide) was analyzed to reveal the relationship to other G-protein-coupled receptors. The coding sequence of the GLP-1 receptor is interrupted by 12 introns. These introns are uniformly distributed within the open reading frame. The length of the introns varies between 6.6 kb and 100 bp, in contrast to the relative constant length of 100 bp of the exons. All of the exon/intron splice junctions characterized followed the consensus GT-AG rule. A comparison of the genomic structure with other related receptor genes indicates that the exon/intron organization is well-conserved among the VIP/ glucagon/secretin receptor family.

  4. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing; Li, Fang; (Harvard-Med); (UMM-MED)

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homology in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.

  5. Receptor-driven, multimodal mapping of the human amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedo, Olga; Zilles, Karl; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Schleicher, Axel; Mohlberg, Hartmut; Bludau, Sebastian; Amunts, Katrin

    2017-11-29

    The human amygdala consists of subdivisions contributing to various functions. However, principles of structural organization at the cellular and molecular level are not well understood. Thus, we re-analyzed the cytoarchitecture of the amygdala and generated cytoarchitectonic probabilistic maps of ten subdivisions in stereotaxic space based on novel workflows and mapping tools. This parcellation was then used as a basis for analyzing the receptor expression for 15 receptor types. Receptor fingerprints, i.e., the characteristic balance between densities of all receptor types, were generated in each subdivision to comprehensively visualize differences and similarities in receptor architecture between the subdivisions. Fingerprints of the central and medial nuclei and the anterior amygdaloid area were highly similar. Fingerprints of the lateral, basolateral and basomedial nuclei were also similar to each other, while those of the remaining nuclei were distinct in shape. Similarities were further investigated by a hierarchical cluster analysis: a two-cluster solution subdivided the phylogenetically older part (central, medial nuclei, anterior amygdaloid area) from the remaining parts of the amygdala. A more fine-grained three-cluster solution replicated our previous parcellation including a laterobasal, superficial and centromedial group. Furthermore, it helped to better characterize the paralaminar nucleus with a molecular organization in-between the laterobasal and the superficial group. The multimodal cyto- and receptor-architectonic analysis of the human amygdala provides new insights into its microstructural organization, intersubject variability, localization in stereotaxic space and principles of receptor-based neurochemical differences.

  6. Drug Repositioning and Pharmacophore Identification in the Discovery of Hookworm MIF Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Cho; J Vermeire; J Merkel; L Leng; X Du; R Bucala; M Cappello; E Lolis

    2011-12-31

    The screening of bioactive compound libraries can be an effective approach for repositioning FDA-approved drugs or discovering new pharmacophores. Hookworms are blood-feeding, intestinal nematode parasites that infect up to 600 million people worldwide. Vaccination with recombinant Ancylostoma ceylanicum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (rAceMIF) provided partial protection from disease, thus establishing a 'proof-of-concept' for targeting AceMIF to prevent or treat infection. A high-throughput screen (HTS) against rAceMIF identified six AceMIF-specific inhibitors. A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sodium meclofenamate, could be tested in an animal model to assess the therapeutic efficacy in treating hookworm disease. Furosemide, an FDA-approved diuretic, exhibited submicromolar inhibition of rAceMIF tautomerase activity. Structure-activity relationships of a pharmacophore based on furosemide included one analog that binds similarly to the active site, yet does not inhibit the Na-K-Cl symporter (NKCC1) responsible for diuretic activity.

  7. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and thyroid hormone alterations in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mårten; Börjesson, Ola; Avik, Aune; Bratt, Johan; Anderstam, Björn; Qureshi, Abdul R; Miller, Edmund J; Gunnarsson, Iva; Bruchfeld, Annette

    2013-05-20

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine known to be released from lymphocytes, macrophages and endothelial cells and also in animal models shown to be inducible with glucocorticoids (GC). In contrast, thyroxine seems to antagonize MIF activity. To investigate whether MIF is increased in active antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) and possible correlations with GC dosing and thyroid hormone levels, 27 consecutive patients with active AAV were studied and followed prospectively. Disease activity was assessed using Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score 2003 (BVAS) at baseline and at follow-up at 3 and 6 months, along with MIF, thyroid hormones free triiodothyronine (fT3) and free thyroxine (fT4), C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatinine. MIF was elevated significantly at baseline compared with follow-up at 3 and 6 months (8,618 pg/mL versus 5,696 and 6,212 respectively; P < 0.002) but did not correlate to CRP, GC dose, creatinine or organ involvement. fT3 was depressed significantly at baseline compared with follow-up (1.99 pg/mL versus 2.31 and 2.67 respectively; P = 0.01) and correlated inversely to the BVAS score at baseline. We found a significant correlation between the MIF/fT4 ratio at baseline versus MIF/fT4 ratio at 6 months (ρ = 0.52, P < 0.005) and a trend between the baseline MIF/fT3 ratio versus MIF/fT3 ratio at 6 months (ρ = 0.39, P = 0.05). These results suggest a possible role for MIF and thyroid status in AAV. Further studies could reveal whether the association between AAV and thyroid hormone levels in the context of elevated MIF may present a link as well as a target of treatment.

  8. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shoko, E-mail: satosho@rs.tus.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Shirakawa, Hitoshi, E-mail: shirakah@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Tomita, Shuhei, E-mail: tomita@med.tottori-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Yonago 683-8503 (Japan); Tohkin, Masahiro, E-mail: tohkin@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Medical Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Science, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 267-8603 (Japan); Gonzalez, Frank J., E-mail: gonzalef@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Metabolism, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Komai, Michio, E-mail: mkomai@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Nutrition, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  10. Cloning and sequence analysis of the human brain beta-adrenergic receptor. Evolutionary relationship to rodent and avian beta-receptors and porcine muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, F Z; Lentes, K U; Gocayne, J; Fitzgerald, M; Robinson, D; Kerlavage, A R; Fraser, C M; Venter, J C

    1987-01-26

    Two cDNA clones, lambda-CLFV-108 and lambda-CLFV-119, encoding for the beta-adrenergic receptor, have been isolated from a human brain stem cDNA library. One human genomic clone, LCV-517 (20 kb), was characterized by restriction mapping and partial sequencing. The human brain beta-receptor consists of 413 amino acids with a calculated Mr of 46480. The gene contains three potential glucocorticoid receptor-binding sites. The beta-receptor expressed in human brain was homology with rodent (88%) and avian (52%) beta-receptors and with porcine muscarinic cholinergic receptors (31%), supporting our proposal [(1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 272 276] that adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are structurally related. This represents the first cloning of a neurotransmitter receptor gene from human brain.

  11. Role of dopamine D2 receptors in human reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenegger, Christoph; Naef, Michael; Linssen, Anke; Clark, Luke; Gandamaneni, Praveen K; Müller, Ulrich; Robbins, Trevor W

    2014-09-01

    Influential neurocomputational models emphasize dopamine (DA) as an electrophysiological and neurochemical correlate of reinforcement learning. However, evidence of a specific causal role of DA receptors in learning has been less forthcoming, especially in humans. Here we combine, in a between-subjects design, administration of a high dose of the selective DA D2/3-receptor antagonist sulpiride with genetic analysis of the DA D2 receptor in a behavioral study of reinforcement learning in a sample of 78 healthy male volunteers. In contrast to predictions of prevailing models emphasizing DA's pivotal role in learning via prediction errors, we found that sulpiride did not disrupt learning, but rather induced profound impairments in choice performance. The disruption was selective for stimuli indicating reward, whereas loss avoidance performance was unaffected. Effects were driven by volunteers with higher serum levels of the drug, and in those with genetically determined lower density of striatal DA D2 receptors. This is the clearest demonstration to date for a causal modulatory role of the DA D2 receptor in choice performance that might be distinct from learning. Our findings challenge current reward prediction error models of reinforcement learning, and suggest that classical animal models emphasizing a role of postsynaptic DA D2 receptors in motivational aspects of reinforcement learning may apply to humans as well.

  12. Role of formic receptors in soluble urokinase receptor-induced human vascular smooth muscle migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, Enrico A; Fu, Yuyang; Davies, Mark G

    2015-05-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration in response to urokinase is dependent on binding of the urokinase molecule to the urokinase plasminogen receptor (uPAR) and cleavage of the receptor. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the soluble uPAR (suPAR) in VSMC migration. Human VSMCs were cultured in vitro. Linear wound and Boyden microchemotaxis assays of migration were performed in the presence of suPAR. Inhibitors to G-protein signaling and kinase activation were used to study these pathways. Assays were performed for mitogen-activated protein kinase and epidermal growth factor receptor activation. suPAR induced concentration-dependent migration of VSMC, which was G protein-dependent and was blocked by Gαi and Gβγ inhibitors. Removal of the full uPAR molecule by incubation of the cells with a phospholipase did not interfere with this response. suPAR induced ERK1/2, p38(MAPK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase [JNK] activation in a Gαi/Gβγ-dependent manner, and interruption of these signaling pathways prevented suPAR-mediated migration. suPAR activity was independent of plasmin activity. suPAR did not activate epidermal growth factor receptor. Interruption of the low affinity N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe receptor (FPRL1) but not high affinity N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe receptor (FPR) prevented cell migration and activation in response to suPAR. suPAR increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and activity, and this was dependent on the low affinity N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe receptor (FPRL1) and ERK1/2. suPAR induces human smooth muscle cell activation and migration independent of the full uPAR through activation of the G protein-coupled receptor FPRL1, which is not linked to the plasminogen activation cascade. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. P2Y Receptors Sensitize Mouse and Human Colonic Nociceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, James R F; Tranter, Michael M; McGuire, Cian; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Thaha, Mohamed A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Michael, Gregory J; Baker, Mark D; Knowles, Charles H; Winchester, Wendy J; Bulmer, David C

    2016-02-24

    Activation of visceral nociceptors by inflammatory mediators contributes to visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain associated with many gastrointestinal disorders. Purine and pyrimidine nucleotides (e.g., ATP and UTP) are strongly implicated in this process following their release from epithelial cells during mechanical stimulation of the gut, and from immune cells during inflammation. Actions of ATP are mediated through both ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. P2X receptor activation causes excitation of visceral afferents; however, the impact of P2Y receptor activation on visceral afferents innervating the gut is unclear. Here we investigate the effects of stimulating P2Y receptors in isolated mouse colonic sensory neurons, and visceral nociceptor fibers in mouse and human nerve-gut preparations. Additionally, we investigate the role of Nav1.9 in mediating murine responses. The application of UTP (P2Y2 and P2Y4 agonist) sensitized colonic sensory neurons by increasing action potential firing to current injection and depolarizing the membrane potential. The application of ADP (P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2Y13 agonist) also increased action potential firing, an effect blocked by the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500. UTP or ADP stimulated afferents, including mouse and human visceral nociceptors, in nerve-gut preparations. P2Y1 and P2Y2 transcripts were detected in 80% and 56% of retrogradely labeled colonic neurons, respectively. Nav1.9 transcripts colocalized in 86% of P2Y1-positive and 100% of P2Y2-positive colonic neurons, consistent with reduced afferent fiber responses to UTP and ADP in Na(v)1.9(-/-) mice. These data demonstrate that P2Y receptor activation stimulates mouse and human visceral nociceptors, highlighting P2Y-dependent mechanisms in the generation of visceral pain during gastrointestinal disease. Copyright © 2016 Hockley et al.

  14. Multiple human prolactin receptors and signaling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-15

    Feb 15, 2010 ... native splicing within exons, intron retention, alternative transcription start and termination sites, deletion ... By analysis of human PAC library, two alter- native promoters, a generic promoter hPIII common to ..... Goffin V, Bernichtein S, Touraine P, Kelly PA (2005). Development and potential clinical uses of ...

  15. Selective localization of oxytocin receptors and vasopressin 1a receptors in the human brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sara M; Smith, Aaron L; Goodman, Mark M; Bales, Karen L

    2017-04-01

    Intranasal oxytocin (OT) affects a suite of human social behaviors, including trust, eye contact, and emotion recognition. However, it is unclear where oxytocin receptors (OXTR) and the structurally related vasopressin 1a receptors (AVPR1a) are expressed in the human brain. We have previously described a reliable, pharmacologically informed receptor autoradiography protocol for visualizing these receptors in postmortem primate brain tissue. We used this technique in human brainstem tissue to identify the neural targets of OT and vasopressin. To determine binding selectivity of the OXTR radioligand and AVPR1a radioligand, sections were incubated in four conditions: radioligand alone, radioligand with the selective AVPR1a competitor SR49059, and radioligand with a low or high concentration of the selective OXTR competitor ALS-II-69. We found selective OXTR binding in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, a conserved region of OXTR expression in all primate species investigated to date. We found selective AVPR1a binding in the nucleus prepositus, an area implicated in eye gaze stabilization. The tissue's postmortem interval (PMI) was not correlated with either the specific or nonspecific binding of either radioligand, indicating that it will not likely be a factor in similar postmortem studies. This study provides critical data for future studies of OXTR and AVPR1a in human brain tissue.

  16. Designing exons for human olfactory receptor gene subfamilies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 35; Issue 3. Designing exons for human olfactory receptor gene subfamilies using a mathematical paradigm. Sk Sarif Hassan Pabitra Pal Choudhury Amita Pal R L Brahmachary Arunava Goswami. Articles Volume 35 Issue 3 September 2010 pp 389-393 ...

  17. Multiple human prolactin receptors and signaling | Ding | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human prolactin receptor (PRLR) transcripts and their protein products exhibit heterogenic structures and functions. This multiplicity constitutes a gene regulatory system. Short PRLR might modulate longer PRLR structures and signaling. Here we overviewed 10 forms (including two putative forms) of PRLR structures, ...

  18. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Recherche Louis- Charles Simard, Montreal, Canada. Four nor- mal human breast tissues from reduction mammoplasties of pre- menopausal women were obtained...to hormone resistance. Cancer Res 1990; 50: 6208-17. 22. Karnik PS, Kulkarni S, Lui XP, Budd GT, Bukowski RM. Estrogen receptor mutations in

  19. Membrane Estrogen and HER-2 Receptors in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    1986). Expression of the epider- mal growth factor receptors on human cervical , ovarian and vulvar carcinomas. Cancer Res.,46: 285-293. 9.) Coussens...neurone signaling; immune and inflammatory reactions; apoptosis Aldosterone Promotion of reabsorption of sodium and excretion of potassium in kidney

  20. GLP-1 receptor localization in monkey and human tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pyke, Charles; Heller, R Scott; Kirk, Rikke Kaae

    2014-01-01

    and increase heart rate. Using a new monoclonal antibody for immunohistochemistry, we detected GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in important target organs in humans and monkeys. In the pancreas, GLP-1R was predominantly localized in β-cells with a markedly weaker expression in acinar cells. Pancreatic ductal epithelial...

  1. Expression of histamine receptors in the human endolymphatic sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M Nue; Kirkeby, S; Vikeså, J.

    2016-01-01

    in 2012. This leaves betahistine (Betaserc) as the only drug for potential prevention of the incapacitating attacks of dizziness, tinnitus and hearing loss. However, the histamine receptors targeted by betahistine have never been demonstrated in the human ES. Accordingly, this study aims to investigate...

  2. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptors in human endometrial carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Ottesen, B

    1993-01-01

    Little data exist on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGF-Rs) in human endometrial cancer. EGF-R status was studied in 65 patients with endometrial carcinomas and in 26 women with nonmalignant postmenopausal endometria, either inactive/atrophic endometrium or adenomatous...

  3. Syncytin-1 and its receptor is present in human gametes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, B; Lemmen, J G; Petersen, M R

    2014-01-01

    MAIN PURPOSE AND RESEARCH QUESTION: To determine whether the true fusogen Syncytin-1 and its receptor (ASCT-2) is present in human gametes using qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. METHODS: Donated oocytes and spermatozoa, originating from a fertility center in tertiary referral unive...

  4. Crystal Structure of the Human Laminin Receptor Precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson,K.; Wu, J.; Hubbard, S.; Meruelo, D.

    2008-01-01

    The human laminin receptor (LamR) interacts with many ligands, including laminin, prions, Sindbis virus, and the polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and has been implicated in a number of diseases. LamR is overexpressed on tumor cells, and targeting LamR elicits anti-cancer effects. Here, we report the crystal structure of human LamR, which provides insights into its function and should facilitate the design of novel therapeutics targeting LamR.

  5. Linking Functional Domains of the Human Insulin Receptor with the Bacterial Aspartate Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Leland; Morgan, David O.; Koshland, Daniel E.; Clauser, Eric; Moe, Gregory R.; Bollag, Gideon; Roth, Richard A.; Rutter, William J.

    1986-11-01

    A hybrid receptor has been constructed that is composed of the extracellular domain of the human insulin receptor fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of the bacterial aspartate chemoreceptor. This hybrid protein can be expressed in rodent (CHO) cells and displays several functional features comparable to wild-type insulin receptor. It is localized to the cell surface, binds insulin with high affinity, forms oligomers, and is recognized by conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies. Although most of the expressed protein accumulates as a 180-kDa proreceptor, some processed 135-kDa receptor can be detected on the cell surface by covalent cross-linking. Expression of the hybrid receptor inhibits the insulin-activated uptake of 2-deoxyglucose by CHO cells. Thus, this hybrid is partially functional and can be processed; however, it is incapable of native transmembrane signaling. The results indicate that the intact domains of different types of receptors can retain some of the native features in a hybrid molecule but specific requirements will need to be satisfied for transmembrane signaling.

  6. Sex hormone receptors are present in the human suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijver, Frank P M; Swaab, Dick F

    2002-05-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the clock of the brain that orchestrates circadian and circannual biological rhythms, such as the rhythms of hormones, body temperature, sleep and mood. These rhythms are frequently disturbed in menopause and even more so in dementia and can be restored in postmenopausal women by sex hormone replacement therapy (SHRT). Although it seems clear, both from clinical and experimental studies, that sex hormones influence circadian rhythms, it is not known whether this is by a direct or an indirect effect on the SCN. Therefore, using immunocytochemistry in the present study, we investigated whether the human SCN expresses sex hormone receptors in 5 premenopausal women and 5 young men. SCN neurons appeared to contain estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha), estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) and progesterone receptors. Median ratings of ER immunoreactivity per individual and per gender group revealed a statistically significantly stronger nuclear ERalpha expression pattern in female SCN neurons (p sexual dimorphic tendency was observed for nuclear ERbeta (p > 0.1) and progesterone receptors (p > 0.7). These data seem to support previously reported functional and structural SCN differences in relation to sex and sexual orientation and indicate for the first time that estrogen and progesterone may act directly on neurons of the human biological clock. In addition, the present findings provide a potential neuroendocrine mechanism by which SHRT can act to improve or restore SCN-related rhythm disturbances, such as body temperature, sleep and mood. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Neurotrophin receptors expression and JNK pathway activation in human astrocytomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraziotis Theodore

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins are growth factors that regulate cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis in the nervous system. Their diverse actions are mediated through two different transmembrane – receptor signaling systems: Trk receptor tyrosine kinases (TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and p75NTR neurotrophin receptor. Trk receptors promote cell survival and differentiation while p75NTR induces, in most cases, the activity of JNK-p53-Bax apoptosis pathway or suppresses intracellular survival signaling cascades. Robust Trk activation blocks p75NTR -induced apoptosis by suppressing the JNK-p53-Bax pathway. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the expression levels of neurotrophin receptors, Trks and p75NTR, and the activation of JNK pathway in human astrocytomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic brain tissue. Methods Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded serial sections from 33 supratentorial astrocytomas (5 diffuse fibrillary astrocytomas, WHO grade II; 6 anaplastic astrocytomas, WHO grade III; 22 glioblastomas multiforme, WHO grade IV were immunostained following microwave pretreatment. Polyclonal antibodies against TrkA, TrkB, TrkC and monoclonal antibodies against p75NTR and phosphorylated forms of JNK (pJNK and c-Jun (pc-Jun were used. The labeling index (LI, defined as the percentage of positive (labeled cells out of the total number of tumor cells counted, was determined. Results Moderate to strong, granular cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for TrkA, TrkB and TrkC receptors was detected in greater than or equal to 10% of tumor cells in the majority of tumors independently of grade; on the contrary, p75NTR receptor expression was found in a small percentage of tumor cells (~1% in some tumors. The endothelium of tumor capillaries showed conspicuous immunoreactivity for TrkB receptor. Trk immunoreactivity seemed to be localized in some neurons and astrocytes in non-neoplastic tissue. Phosphorylated forms of JNK (pJNK and c-Jun (pc-Jun were

  8. Structure and function of the human megalin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagil, Robert

    Megalin is an endocytic lipoprotein receptor expressed widely throughout the body, ranging from the proximal tubule in the kidneys to the cochlea in the inner ear. Megalin is known to bind over 50 different ligands and is involved in protein clearance of the renal ultrafiltrate via endocytosis...... was studied using NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the tenth CR domain from the human megalin receptor was solved using NMR spectroscopy and a HADDOCK model of the complex between this domain and gentamicin was determined. The structural complex showed that a Trp residue and three Asp residues from megalin...

  9. Mapping the calcitonin receptor in human brain stem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Rebekah L; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Waldvogel, Henry J

    2016-01-01

    understanding of these hormone systems by mapping CTR expression in the human brain stem, specifically the medulla oblongata. Widespread CTR-like immunoreactivity was observed throughout the medulla. Dense CTR staining was noted in several discrete nuclei, including the nucleus of the solitary tract...... receptors (AMY) are a heterodimer formed by the coexpression of CTR with receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). CTR with RAMP1 responds potently to both amylin and CGRP. The brain stem is a major site of action for circulating amylin and is a rich site of CGRP binding. This study aimed to enhance our...

  10. Transient Suppression of TGFβ Receptor Signaling Facilitates Human Islet Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangwei; Fischbach, Shane; Song, Zewen; Gaffar, Iljana; Zimmerman, Ray; Wiersch, John; Prasadan, Krishna; Shiota, Chiyo; Guo, Ping; Ramachandran, Sabarinathan; Witkowski, Piotr; Gittes, George K

    2016-04-01

    Although islet transplantation is an effective treatment for severe diabetes, its broad application is greatly limited due to a shortage of donor islets. Suppression of TGFβ receptor signaling in β-cells has been shown to increase β-cell proliferation in mice, but has not been rigorously examined in humans. Here, treatment of human islets with a TGFβ receptor I inhibitor, SB-431542 (SB), significantly improved C-peptide secretion by β-cells, and significantly increased β-cell number by increasing β-cell proliferation. In addition, SB increased cell-cycle activators and decreased cell-cycle suppressors in human β-cells. Transplantation of SB-treated human islets into diabetic immune-deficient mice resulted in significant improvement in blood glucose control, significantly higher serum and graft insulin content, and significantly greater increases in β-cell proliferation in the graft, compared with controls. Thus, our data suggest that transient suppression of TGFβ receptor signaling may improve the outcome of human islet transplantation, seemingly through increasing β-cell number and function.

  11. Expression and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in melioidosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W.J.; Calandra, T.; Kager, L.M.; Windt, G.J. van der; Roger, T.; Roy, D. Le; Florquin, S.; Peacock, S.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Poll, T. van der

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has emerged as a pivotal mediator of innate immunity and has been shown to be an important effector molecule in severe sepsis. Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important cause of community-acquired sepsis in

  12. Expression and Function of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in Melioidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W.J.; Calandra, T.; Kager, L.M.; van der Windt, G.J.W.; Roger, T.; le Roy, D.; Florquin, S.; Peacock, S.J.; Sweep, F.C.G.J.; van der Poll, T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has emerged as a pivotal mediator of innate immunity and has been shown to be an important effector molecule in severe sepsis. Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is an important cause of community-acquired sepsis in

  13. Comprehensive Analysis of Mouse Bitter Taste Receptors Reveals Different Molecular Receptive Ranges for Orthologous Receptors in Mice and Humans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossow, Kristina; Hübner, Sandra; Roudnitzky, Natacha; Slack, Jay P.; Pollastro, Federica; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    One key to animal survival is the detection and avoidance of potentially harmful compounds by their bitter taste. Variable numbers of taste 2 receptor genes expressed in the gustatory end organs enable bony vertebrates (Euteleostomi) to recognize numerous bitter chemicals. It is believed that the receptive ranges of bitter taste receptor repertoires match the profiles of bitter chemicals that the species encounter in their diets. Human and mouse genomes contain pairs of orthologous bitter receptor genes that have been conserved throughout evolution. Moreover, expansions in both lineages generated species-specific sets of bitter taste receptor genes. It is assumed that the orthologous bitter taste receptor genes mediate the recognition of bitter toxins relevant for both species, whereas the lineage-specific receptors enable the detection of substances differently encountered by mice and humans. By challenging 34 mouse bitter taste receptors with 128 prototypical bitter substances in a heterologous expression system, we identified cognate compounds for 21 receptors, 19 of which were previously orphan receptors. We have demonstrated that mouse taste 2 receptors, like their human counterparts, vary greatly in their breadth of tuning, ranging from very broadly to extremely narrowly tuned receptors. However, when compared with humans, mice possess fewer broadly tuned receptors and an elevated number of narrowly tuned receptors, supporting the idea that a large receptor repertoire is the basis for the evolution of specialized receptors. Moreover, we have demonstrated that sequence-orthologous bitter taste receptors have distinct agonist profiles. Species-specific gene expansions have enabled further diversification of bitter substance recognition spectra. PMID:27226572

  14. Alcohol- and alcohol antagonist-sensitive human GABAA receptors: tracking δ subunit incorporation into functional receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2010-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn(2+) block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABA(A)Rs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs.

  15. Behavioral analysis of Drosophila transformants expressing human taste receptor genes in the gustatory receptor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Ryota; Sasaki, Yuko; Morita, Hiromi; Komai, Michio; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Goto, Tomoko; Furuyama, Akira; Isono, Kunio

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic Drosophila expressing human T2R4 and T2R38 bitter-taste receptors or PKD2L1 sour-taste receptor in the fly gustatory receptor neurons and other tissues were prepared using conventional Gal4/UAS binary system. Molecular analysis showed that the transgene mRNAs are expressed according to the tissue specificity of the Gal4 drivers. Transformants expressing the transgene taste receptors in the fly taste neurons were then studied by a behavioral assay to analyze whether transgene chemoreceptors are functional and coupled to the cell response. Since wild-type flies show strong aversion against the T2R ligands as in mammals, the authors analyzed the transformants where the transgenes are expressed in the fly sugar receptor neurons so that they promote feeding ligand-dependently if they are functional and activate the neurons. Although the feeding preference varied considerably among different strains and individuals, statistical analysis using large numbers of transformants indicated that transformants expressing T2R4 showed a small but significant increase in the preference for denatonium and quinine, the T2R4 ligands, as compared to the control flies, whereas transformants expressing T2R38 did not. Similarly, transformants expressing T2R38 and PKD2L1 also showed a similar preference increase for T2R38-specific ligand phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and a sour-taste ligand, citric acid, respectively. Taken together, the transformants expressing mammalian taste receptors showed a small but significant increase in the feeding preference that is taste receptor and also ligand dependent. Although future improvements are required to attain performance comparable to the endogenous robust response, Drosophila taste neurons may serve as a potential in vivo heterologous expression system for analyzing chemoreceptor function.

  16. Pharmacological assessment of adrenergic receptors in human varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, V M; Rud, K S; Gloviczki, P

    2000-06-01

    Experiments were to characterize pharmacologically adrenergic receptors in human varicose veins to the natural transmitter norepinephrine and to an extract of Ruscus. Greater saphenous veins and varicose tributaries from patients undergoing elective surgery for primary varicose disease and portions of greater saphenous veins from patients undergoing peripheral arterial reconstruction (control) were suspended for the measurement of isometric force in organ chambers. Concentration response curves were obtained to norepinephrine or the extract of Ruscus aculeatus in the absence and presence of selective antagonists of alpha, and alpha2 adrenergic receptors. Norepinephrine and Ruscus extract caused concentration-dependent contractions in all veins. Contractions to norepinephrine were greater in control veins than in varicose tributaries. Contractions to the extract were greater in varicose tributaries than in greater saphenous veins from varicose patients. Contractions to norepinephrine were reduced similarly by alpha and alpha2-adrenergic agonists in control and varicose veins but to a greater extent by alpha2-blockade in greater saphenous veins from varicose patients. Contractions to Ruscus extract were not reduced by alpha-adrenergic blockade in control veins but were reduced by alpha2-adrenergic blockade in varicose veins. These results suggest a differential distribution of alpha adrenergic receptors on greater saphenous veins from non-varicose patients compared to those with primary varicose disease. Venotropic agents from plant extract probably exert effects by way of multiple receptor and non-receptor mediated events.

  17. Formation of Imploding Plasma Liners for HEDP and MIF Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Case, Andrew [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Brockington, Samuel [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Messer, Sarah [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Bomgardner, Richard [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Phillips, Mike [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Wu, Linchun [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA (United States); Elton, Ray [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-11-11

    Plasma jets with high density and velocity have a number of important applications in fusion energy and elsewhere, including plasma refueling, disruption mitigation in tokamaks, magnetized target fusion, injection of momentum into centrifugally confined mirrors, plasma thrusters, and high energy density plasmas (HEDP). In Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF), for example, an imploding material liner is used to compress a magnetized plasma to fusion conditions and to confine the resulting burning plasma inertially to obtain the necessary energy gain. The imploding shell may be solid, liquid, gaseous, or a combination of these states. The presence of the magnetic field in the target plasma suppresses thermal transport to the plasma shell, thus lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target to fusion conditions. This allows the required imploding momentum flux to be generated electromagnetically using off-the-shelf pulsed power technology. Practical schemes for standoff delivery of the imploding momentum flux are required and are open topics for research. One approach for accomplishing this, called plasma jet driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF), uses a spherical array of pulsed plasma guns to create a spherically imploding shell of very high velocity, high momentum flux plasma. This approach requires development of plasma jet accelerators capable of achieving velocities of 50-200 km/s with very precise timing and density profiles, and with high total mass and density. Low-Z plasma jets would require the higher velocities, whereas very dense high-Z plasma shells could achieve the goal at velocities of only 50-100 km/s. In this report, we describe our work to develop the pulsed plasma gun technology needed for an experimental scientific exploration of the PJMIF concept, and also for the other applications mentioned earlier. The initial goal of a few hundred of hydrogen at 200 km/s was eventually replaced with accelerating 8000 μg of argon or xenon to 50 km

  18. Characterisation of the expression of NMDA receptors in human astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chak Lee

    Full Text Available Astrocytes have long been perceived only as structural and supporting cells within the central nervous system (CNS. However, the discovery that these glial cells may potentially express receptors capable of responding to endogenous neurotransmitters has resulted in the need to reassess astrocytic physiology. The aim of the current study was to characterise the expression of NMDA receptors (NMDARs in primary human astrocytes, and investigate their response to physiological and excitotoxic concentrations of the known endogenous NMDAR agonists, glutamate and quinolinic acid (QUIN. Primary cultures of human astrocytes were used to examine expression of these receptors at the mRNA level using RT-PCR and qPCR, and at the protein level using immunocytochemistry. The functionality role of the receptors was assessed using intracellular calcium influx experiments and measuring extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity in primary cultures of human astrocytes treated with glutamate and QUIN. We found that all seven currently known NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, NR2D, NR3A and NR3B are expressed in astrocytes, but at different levels. Calcium influx studies revealed that both glutamate and QUIN could activate astrocytic NMDARs, which stimulates Ca2+ influx into the cell and can result in dysfunction and death of astrocytes. Our data also show that the NMDAR ion channel blockers, MK801, and memantine can attenuate glutamate and QUIN mediated cell excitotoxicity. This suggests that the mechanism of glutamate and QUIN gliotoxicity is at least partially mediated by excessive stimulation of NMDARs. The present study is the first to provide definitive evidence for the existence of functional NMDAR expression in human primary astrocytes. This discovery has significant implications for redefining the cellular interaction between glia and neurons in both physiological processes and pathological conditions.

  19. Endothelin-1 downregulates Mas receptor expression in human cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiheng; Tang, Yamei; Yang, Zuocheng; Liu, Shaojun; Liu, Yong; Li, Yan; He, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction. The Mas receptor is a functional binding site for angiotensin (Ang)‑(1-7), which is now considered a critical component of the RAS and exerts cardioprotective effects. To the best of our knowledge, the present study aimed to examine, for the first time, the effects of ET-1 on Mas expression in cultured human cardiomyocytes. Human cardiomyocytes were treated with ET-1 at different concentrations (1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 nM) for varied time periods (0.5, 1.5, 3, 4.5 or 6 h) with or without the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, endothelin A (ETA) receptor blocker BQ123 and ETB receptor blocker BQ788, or different kinase inhibitors. ET-1 decreased the Mas mRNA level in a statistically significant dose- and time-dependent manner within 4.5 h, which was reflected in the dose-dependent downregulation of Mas promoter activity, Mas protein levels and Ang-(1-7) binding on the cell membrane. Actinomycin D (1 mg/ml), BQ123 (1 µM), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) siRNA and inhibitor PD169316 (25 µM), completely eliminated the inhibitory effects of ET-1 on Mas expression in human cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that ET-1 downregulates Mas expression at the transcription level in human cardiomyocytes via the ETA receptor by a p38 MAPK‑dependent mechanism. This study provides novel insights into the function of ET-1 and the Ang‑(1-7)/Mas axis in cardiac pathophysiology.

  20. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor and thyroid hormone receptors are involved in human endometrial physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanova, Lusine; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Lindeberg, Maria; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Sparre, Lottie Skjöldebrand; Hovatta, Outi

    2011-01-01

    To study the expression, distribution, and function of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) and thyroid hormone receptors (TR) α1, α2, and β1 in human endometrium. Experimental clinical study. University hospital. 31 fertile women. Endometrial biopsy samples obtained throughout the menstrual cycle. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and Western blot to study the expression of TSHR, TRα1, TRα2, and TRβ1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and proteins in human endometrium. We found TSHR, TRα1, TRα2 and TRβ1 mRNA and proteins expressed in human endometrium. Immunostaining for TSHR in the luminal epithelium and TRα1 and β1 in the glandular and luminal epithelium increased statistically significantly on luteinizing hormone (LH) days 6 to 9, coinciding with appearance of pinopodes. Endometrial stromal and Ishikawa cells expressed mRNA for TSHR, TR, and iodothyronine deiodinases 1-3. After 48 hours, TSH significantly increased leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and LIF receptor (LIFR) messenger RNA (mRNA) in endometrial stromal cells, but decreased their expression in Ishikawa cells. Glucose transporter 1 mRNA was up-regulated by TSH in Ishikawa cells. We found that TSH statistically significantly increased secretion of free triiodothyronine (T3) and total thyroxin (T4) by Ishikawa cells compared with nonstimulated cells. Thyroid hormones are directly involved in endometrial physiology. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with multiple epitopes on the human insulin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Soos, M A; Siddle, K; Baron, M D; Heward, J M; Luzio, J P; Bellatin, J; Lennox, E S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies for the human insulin receptor were produced following immunization of mice with IM-9 lymphocytes and/or purified placental receptor. Four separate fusions yielded 28 antibodies, all of which reacted with receptor from human placenta, liver and IM-9 cells. Some antibodies cross-reacted to varying degrees with receptor from rabbit, cow, pig and sheep, but none reacted with rat receptor. At least 10 distinct epitopes were recognized as indicated by species specificity and ...

  2. Regulation of human sperm motility by opioid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirregoitia, E; Subiran, N; Valdivia, A; Gil, J; Zubero, J; Irazusta, J

    2012-05-01

    The endogenous opioid system has been reported to have important functions in human reproduction. Practically all the components of this peptide system have been discovered in human sperm cells, but their functions in these cells are far from being well understood. In the present work, we report the effects of opioid agonism and antagonism on human sperm motility, a parameter which is crucially associated with male fertility. Morphine (10(-7) M), a μ- opioid receptor agonist, decreased both the percentage of motile progressive sperm and three measured velocities without altering the linearity, straightness or vigour of sperm cells. This effect was reversed by naloxone. Higher doses of morphine did not have further effects on the measured parameters. The incubation of sperm cells with the δ-opioid receptor agonist D-penicillamine (2,5)-enkephalin did not affect sperm cell motility. However, naltrindole, a specific δ-receptor antagonist, reduced the linear and curvilinear velocities, as well as linearity, straightness and the amplitude of head displacement, and beat frequency. In summary, our results indicate that the endogenous opioid system may regulate opioid motility in vitro. These finding suggest that the endogenous opioid system could be useful as a biochemical tool for the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. The biological effects of XTC-MIF: quantitative comparison with Xenopus bFGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J B; Howes, G; Symes, K; Cooke, J; Smith, J C

    1990-01-01

    Mesoderm in Xenopus and other amphibian embryos is induced by signals from the vegetal hemisphere acting on equatorial or animal hemisphere cells. These signals are diffusible and two classes of candidate signal molecule have been identified: the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) types. In this paper, we compare the effects of cloned Xenopus basic FGF (XbFGF) and electophoretically homogeneous XTC-MIF (a TGF-beta-like factor obtained from a Xenopus cell line) on animal pole explants. We find that they have a similar minimum active concentration (0.1-0.2 ng ml-1) but that, nonetheless, XTC-MIF is at least 40 times more active in inducing muscle. In general, we find that the two factors cause inductions of significantly different characters in terms of tissue type, morphology, gene expression and timing. At low concentrations (0.1-1.0 ng ml-1) both factors induce the differentiation of 'mesenchyme' and 'mesothelium' as well as blood-like cells. These latter cells do not, however, react with an antibody to Xenopus globin. This raised the possibility that the identification of red blood cells in other studies on mesoderm induction might have been mistaken, but combinations of animal pole regions with ventral vegetal pole regions confirmed that genuine erythrocytes are formed. The identity of the blood-like cells formed in response to the inducing factors remains unknown. At higher concentrations XTC-MIF induces neural tissue, notochord, pronephros and substantial and often segmented muscle. By contrast, XbFGF only induces significant amounts of muscle above 24 ng ml-1 and even then this is much less than that induced by XTC-MIF. For both factors an exposure of less than 30 min is effective. Competence of animal pole cells to respond to XbFGF is completely lost by the beginning of gastrulation (stage 10) while competence to XTC-MIF is detectable until somewhat later (stage 11). Since animal pole tissue is known to be able to

  4. The role of GABAB receptors in human reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ort, Andres; Kometer, Michael; Rohde, Judith; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-10-01

    Behavioral evidence from human studies suggests that the γ-aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABAB receptor) agonist baclofen modulates reinforcement learning and reduces craving in patients with addiction spectrum disorders. However, in contrast to the well established role of dopamine in reinforcement learning, the mechanisms by which the GABAB receptor influences reinforcement learning in humans remain completely unknown. To further elucidate this issue, a cross-over, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was performed in healthy human subjects (N=15) to test the effects of baclofen (20 and 50mg p.o.) on probabilistic reinforcement learning. Outcomes were the feedback-induced P2 component of the event-related potential, the feedback-related negativity, and the P300 component of the event-related potential. Baclofen produced a reduction of P2 amplitude over the course of the experiment, but did not modulate the feedback-related negativity. Furthermore, there was a trend towards increased learning after baclofen administration relative to placebo over the course of the experiment. The present results extend previous theories of reinforcement learning, which focus on the importance of mesolimbic dopamine signaling, and indicate that stimulation of cortical GABAB receptors in a fronto-parietal network leads to better attentional allocation in reinforcement learning. This observation is a first step in our understanding of how baclofen may improve reinforcement learning in healthy subjects. Further studies with bigger sample sizes are needed to corroborate this conclusion and furthermore, test this effect in patients with addiction spectrum disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of interleukin-8 receptors in non-human primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, V.; Coto, E.; Gonzalez-Roces, S.; Lopez-Larrea, C. [Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo (Spain)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Interleukin-8 is a chemokine with a potent neutrophil chemoatractant activity. In humans, two different cDNAs encoding human IL8 receptors designated IL8RA and IL8RB have been cloned. IL8RA binds IL8, while IL8RB binds IL8 as well as other {alpha}-chemokines. Both human IL8Rs are encoded by two genes physically linked on chromosome 2. The IL8RA and IL8RB genes have open reading frames (ORF) lacking introns. By direct sequencing of the polymerase chain reaction products, we sequenced the IL8R genes of cell lines from four non-human primates: chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and macaca. The IL8RB encodes an ORF in the four non-human primates, showing 95%-99% similarity to the human IL8RB sequence. The IL8RA homologue in gorilla and chimpanzee consisted of two ORF 98%-99% identical to the human sequence. The macaca and orangutan IL8RA homologues are pseudogenes: a 2 base pair insertion generated a sequence with several stop codons. In addition, we describe the physical linkage of these genes in the four non-human primates and discuss the evolutionary implications of these findings. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Immunologic analysis of human breast cancer progesterone receptors. 1. Immunonaffinity purification of transformed receptors and production of monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, P.A.; Suba, E.J.; Lawler-Heavner, J.; Elashry-Stowers, D.; Wei, L.L.; Toft, D.O.; Sullivan, W.P.; Horwitz, K.B.; Edwards, D.P.

    1987-09-22

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb), designated PR-6, produced against chick oviduct progesterone receptors cross-reacts with the M/sub r/ 120,000 human B receptors. An immunomatrix prepared with PR-6 was used to purify progesterone receptors (PR) from T47D human breast cancer cells. Single-step immunoaffinity chromatography results in enrichment of B receptors (identified by immunoblot with PR-6 and by photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)promegestone) to a specific activity of 1915 pmol/mg of protein (or 23% purity) and with 27% yield. Purity and yields as judged by gel electrophoresis and densitometric scanning of the B protein were approximately 1.7-fold higher due to partial loss in hormone binding activity at the elution step. B receptors purified under these conditions are transformed and biologically active. They were maintained as undergraded 120-kDa doublets and retained both hormone and DNA binding activities. These purified B receptors were used as immunogen for production of four monoclonal antibodies against human PR. Three of the MAbs, designated as B-30 (IgG/sub 1/), B-64 (IgG/sub 1/), and B-11 (IgM), are specific for B receptors. The fourth MAb, A/B-52 (IgG/sub 1/), reacts with both A and B receptors. The IgG MAbs are monospecific for human PR since they recognize and absorb native receptor-hormone complexes, displace the sedimentation of 4S receptors on salt containing sucrose gradients, and, by immunoblot assay of crude T47D cytosol, react only with receptor polypeptides. Although mice were injected with B receptors only, production of A/B-52 which recognized both A and B receptors provides evidence that these two proteins share regions of structural homology.

  7. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D.; Betz, Robin M.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L.; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E.; Shoichet, Brian K.; Dror, Ron O.; Roth, Bryan L. (UNCSM); (UNC); (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (UCSF)

    2017-01-01

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD’s key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR—a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD’s slow binding kinetics may be due to a “lid” formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD’s binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD’s actions at human serotonin receptors.

  8. Crystal Structure of an LSD-Bound Human Serotonin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Daniel; Wang, Sheng; McCorvy, John D; Betz, Robin M; Venkatakrishnan, A J; Levit, Anat; Lansu, Katherine; Schools, Zachary L; Che, Tao; Nichols, David E; Shoichet, Brian K; Dror, Ron O; Roth, Bryan L

    2017-01-26

    The prototypical hallucinogen LSD acts via serotonin receptors, and here we describe the crystal structure of LSD in complex with the human serotonin receptor 5-HT2B. The complex reveals conformational rearrangements to accommodate LSD, providing a structural explanation for the conformational selectivity of LSD's key diethylamide moiety. LSD dissociates exceptionally slow from both 5-HT2BR and 5-HT2AR-a major target for its psychoactivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that LSD's slow binding kinetics may be due to a "lid" formed by extracellular loop 2 (EL2) at the entrance to the binding pocket. A mutation predicted to increase the mobility of this lid greatly accelerates LSD's binding kinetics and selectively dampens LSD-mediated β-arrestin2 recruitment. This study thus reveals an unexpected binding mode of LSD; illuminates key features of its kinetics, stereochemistry, and signaling; and provides a molecular explanation for LSD's actions at human serotonin receptors. PAPERCLIP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular characterization of a cloned human oxytocin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T; Makino, Y; Saji, F; Takemura, M; Inoue, T; Kikuchi, T; Kubota, Y; Azuma, C; Nobunaga, T; Tokugawa, Y

    1994-10-01

    We describe here the binding and functional properties of a cloned human oxytocin receptor (OTR). We established a transient OTR expression system on COS-1 cells, which do not express vasopressin receptors. With the transfected cells and [3H]oxytocin, the dissociation constant (Kd) of OTR to oxytocin was 6.0 +/- 1.1 nmol/l; the binding properties of several oxytocin-related peptides were also examined. The functional properties of OTR were determined by an electrophysiological method, using a Xenopus laevis oocyte injected with in vitro transcribed OTR mRNA. These two methods showed that [Phe2,Orn8]vasotocin, a vasopressin agonist, was an OTR antagonist. A combination of these methods using cloned OTR cDNA is a novel and effective method for the investigation of oxytocin-related ligands.

  10. Glycine receptor mouse mutants: model systems for human hyperekplexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Natascha; Langlhofer, Georg; Kluck, Christoph J; Villmann, Carmen

    2013-11-01

    Human hyperekplexia is a neuromotor disorder caused by disturbances in inhibitory glycine-mediated neurotransmission. Mutations in genes encoding for glycine receptor subunits or associated proteins, such as GLRA1, GLRB, GPHN and ARHGEF9, have been detected in patients suffering from hyperekplexia. Classical symptoms are exaggerated startle attacks upon unexpected acoustic or tactile stimuli, massive tremor, loss of postural control during startle and apnoea. Usually patients are treated with clonazepam, this helps to dampen the severe symptoms most probably by up-regulating GABAergic responses. However, the mechanism is not completely understood. Similar neuromotor phenotypes have been observed in mouse models that carry glycine receptor mutations. These mouse models serve as excellent tools for analysing the underlying pathomechanisms. Yet, studies in mutant mice looking for postsynaptic compensation of glycinergic dysfunction via an up-regulation in GABAA receptor numbers have failed, as expression levels were similar to those in wild-type mice. However, presynaptic adaptation mechanisms with an unusual switch from mixed GABA/glycinergic to GABAergic presynaptic terminals have been observed. Whether this presynaptic adaptation explains the improvement in symptoms or other compensation mechanisms exist is still under investigation. With the help of spontaneous glycine receptor mouse mutants, knock-in and knock-out studies, it is possible to associate behavioural changes with pharmacological differences in glycinergic inhibition. This review focuses on the structural and functional characteristics of the various mouse models used to elucidate the underlying signal transduction pathways and adaptation processes and describes a novel route that uses gene-therapeutic modulation of mutated receptors to overcome loss of function mutations. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  11. Toll-like receptors, chemokine receptors and death receptor ligands responses in SARS coronavirus infected human monocyte derived dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law Helen KW

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SARS outbreak in 2003 provides a unique opportunity for the study of human responses to a novel virus. We have previously reported that dendritic cells (DCs might be involved in the immune escape mechanisms for SARS-CoV. In this study, we focussed on the gene expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs, chemokine receptors (CCRs and death receptor ligands in SARS-CoV infected DCs. We also compared adult and cord blood (CB DCs to find a possible explanation for the age-dependent severity of SARS. Results Our results demonstrates that SARS-CoV did not modulate TLR-1 to TLR-10 gene expression but significantly induced the expression of CCR-1, CCR-3, and CCR-5. There was also strong induction of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, but not Fas ligand gene expression in SARS-CoV infected DCs. Interestingly, the expressions of most genes studied were higher in CB DCs than adult DCs. Conclusion The upregulation of chemokines and CCRs may facilitate DC migration from the infection site to the lymph nodes, whereas the increase of TRAIL may induce lymphocyte apoptosis. These findings may explain the increased lung infiltrations and lymphoid depletion in SARS patients. Further explorations of the biological significance of these findings are warranted.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE OLFACTORY RECEPTORS EXPRESSED IN HUMAN SPERMATOZOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eFlegel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of external cues is fundamental for human spermatozoa to locate the oocyte in the female reproductive tract. This task requires a specific chemoreceptor repertoire that is expressed on the surface of human spermatozoa, which is not fully identified to date. Olfactory receptors (ORs are candidate molecules and have been attributed to be involved in sperm chemotaxis and chemokinesis, indicating an important role in mammalian spermatozoa. An increasing importance has been suggested for spermatozoal RNA, which led us to investigate the expression of all 387 OR genes. This study provides the first comprehensive analysis of OR transcripts in human spermatozoa of several individuals by RNA-Seq. We detected 91 different transcripts in the spermatozoa samples that could be aligned to annotated OR genes. Using stranded mRNA-Seq, we detected a class of these putative OR transcripts in an antisense orientation, indicating a different function, rather than coding for a functional OR protein. Nevertheless, we were able to detect OR proteins in various compartments of human spermatozoa, indicating distinct functions in human sperm. A panel of various OR ligands induced Ca2+ signals in human spermatozoa, which could be inhibited by mibefradil. This study indicated that a variety of ORs are expressed at the mRNA and protein level in human spermatozoa and demonstrates that ORs are involved in the physiological processes.

  13. MIF Drives Pancreatic Cancer Aggressiveness by Downregulating NR3C2 | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancreatic cancer, while relatively rare, is an aggressive disease ranked as the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the US. Because most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and their tumors resist available treatments, novel therapeutic targets are urgently needed. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine that is elevated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer, and may provide a molecular link between inflammation and cancer, though the mechanism is unknown.

  14. Association Between Genetic Polymorphism of the MIF Gene and Colorectal Cancer in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramireddy, Latha; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Peng, Ching-Tien; Hu, Rouh-Mei; Ke, Tao-Wei; Chiang, Hua-Che; Chang, Sheng-Chi; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lo, Wan-Yu

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the highest leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Taiwan. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has recently been defined as a novel protumorigenic factor that promotes cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. The aim of the present study is to identify the association between MIF gene polymorphism and CRC. A case-control study was designed to test the hypothesis. A total of 192 biopsy-diagnosed CRC patients (CRC) and 256 healthy subjects (control) were recruited. Genotyping of four single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs; rs755662, rs11548059, rs1049829, rs1803976) at chromosome positions 755662 (5' UTR), 11548059 (exon2), 1049829 (exon2), 1803976 (exon3) was performed using a Taqman SNP genotyping assay. There is a significant difference in genotype frequency distribution of rs755662 polymorphism between CRC patients and controls (P = 0.011). No significant difference was found in the frequency distribution of rs11548059, rs1049829, rs1803976 polymorphism in CRC patients and controls (P = 0.660, P = 0.700, and P = 0.959, respectively). Moreover, the MIF-173 SNP was also significantly associated with young patients (age polymorphism (rs755662) was associated with susceptibility, patient age, and stages of CRC in Taiwanese. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerpohl, Ole; Bens, Susanne; Appari, Mahesh; Werner, Ralf; Korn, Bernhard; Drop, Stenvert L S; Verheijen, Frans; van der Zwan, Yvonne; Bunch, Trevor; Hughes, Ieuan; Cools, Martine; Riepe, Felix G; Hiort, Olaf; Siebert, Reiner; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  16. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  17. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  18. Identification of Human P2X1 Receptor-interacting Proteins Reveals a Role of the Cytoskeleton in Receptor Regulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Ulyana; Roberts, Jonathan A.; Evans, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    P2X1 receptors are ATP-gated ion channels expressed by smooth muscle and blood cells. Carboxyl-terminally His-FLAG-tagged human P2X1 receptors were stably expressed in HEK293 cells and co-purified with cytoskeletal proteins including actin. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D inhibited P2X1 receptor currents with no effect on the time course of the response or surface expression of the receptor. Stabilization of the cytoskeleton with jasplakinolide had no effect on P2X1 receptor currents but decreased receptor mobility. P2X2 receptor currents were unaffected by cytochalasin, and P2X1/2 receptor chimeras were used to identify the molecular basis of actin sensitivity. These studies showed that the intracellular amino terminus accounts for the inhibitory effects of cytoskeletal disruption similar to that shown for lipid raft/cholesterol sensitivity. Stabilization of the cytoskeleton with jasplakinolide abolished the inhibitory effects of cholesterol depletion on P2X1 receptor currents, suggesting that lipid rafts may regulate the receptor through stabilization of the cytoskeleton. These studies show that the cytoskeleton plays an important role in P2X1 receptor regulation. PMID:21757694

  19. Analysis of NR3A receptor subunits in human native NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Anna; Eriksson, Maria; Muly, E Chris

    2007-01-01

    NR3A, representing the third class of NMDA receptor subunits, was first studied in rats, demonstrating ubiquitous expression in the developing central nervous system (CNS), but in the adult mainly expressed in spinal cord and some forebrain nuclei. Subsequent studies showed that rodent and non-human...... primate NR3A expression differs. We have studied the distribution of NR3A in the human CNS and show a widespread distribution of NR3A protein in adult human brain. NR3A mRNA and protein were found in all regions of the cerebral cortex, and also in the subcortical forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain. Only...... very low levels of NR3A mRNA and protein could be detected in homogenized adult human spinal cord, and in situ hybridization showed that expression was limited to ventral motoneurons. We found that NR3A is associated with NR1, NR2A and NR2B in adult human CNS, suggesting the existence of native NR1-NR2...

  20. Oxytocin Receptor (OXTR Polymorphisms and Attachment in Human Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances S Chen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ordinary variations in human infants’ attachment behaviors—their proclivity to seek and accept comfort from caregivers—are associated with a wide range of individual differences in psychological functioning in adults. The current investigation examined variation in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene as one possible source of these variations in infant attachment. One hundred and seventy-six infants (77 Caucasian, 99 non-Caucasian were classified as securely or insecurely attached based on their behavior in the Strange Situation (Ainsworth et al., 1976. The A allele at OXTR rs2254298 was associated with attachment security in the non-Caucasian infants (p < .005. These findings underscore the importance of oxytocin in the development of human social behavior and support its role in social stress-regulation and the development of trust.

  1. Developmental changes in human dopamine neurotransmission: cortical receptors and terminators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothmond Debora A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dopamine is integral to cognition, learning and memory, and dysfunctions of the frontal cortical dopamine system have been implicated in several developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC is critical for working memory which does not fully mature until the third decade of life. Few studies have reported on the normal development of the dopamine system in human DLPFC during postnatal life. We assessed pre- and postsynaptic components of the dopamine system including tyrosine hydroxylase, the dopamine receptors (D1, D2 short and D2 long isoforms, D4, D5, catechol-O-methyltransferase, and monoamine oxidase (A and B in the developing human DLPFC (6 weeks -50 years. Results Gene expression was first analysed by microarray and then by quantitative real-time PCR. Protein expression was analysed by western blot. Protein levels for tyrosine hydroxylase peaked during the first year of life (p O-methyltransferase (p = 0.024 were significantly higher in neonates and infants as was catechol-O-methyltransferase protein (32 kDa, p = 0.027. In contrast, dopamine D1 receptor mRNA correlated positively with age (p = 0.002 and dopamine D1 receptor protein expression increased throughout development (p Conclusions We find distinct developmental changes in key components of the dopamine system in DLPFC over postnatal life. Those genes that are highly expressed during the first year of postnatal life may influence and orchestrate the early development of cortical neural circuitry while genes portraying a pattern of increasing expression with age may indicate a role in DLPFC maturation and attainment of adult levels of cognitive function.

  2. MIF Promotes Classical Activation and Conversion of Inflammatory Ly6Chigh Monocytes into TipDCs during Murine Toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan de Dios Ruiz-Rosado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF mediates immunity against Toxoplasma gondii infection by inducing inflammatory cytokines required to control the parasite replication. However, the role of this inflammatory mediator in the cell-mediated immune response against this infection is still poorly understood. Here, we used T. gondii-infected WT and Mif−/− mice to analyze the role of MIF in the maturation of CD11b+ and CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs. We found that MIF promotes maturation of CD11b+ but not CD8α+ DCs, by inducing IL-12p70 production and CD86 expression. Infected Mif−/− mice showed significantly lower numbers of TNF and inducible nitric oxide synthase- (iNOS- producing DCs (TipDCs compared to infected WT mice. The adoptive transfer of Ly6Chigh monocytes into infected WT or Mif−/− mice demonstrated that MIF participates in the differentiation of Ly6Chigh monocytes into TipDCs. In addition, infected Mif−/− mice display a lower percentage of IFN-γ-producing natural killer (NK cells compared to WT mice, which is associated with reducing numbers of TipDCs in Mif−/− mice. Furthermore, administration of recombinant MIF (rMIF into T. gondii-infected Mif−/− mice restored the numbers of TipDCs and reversed the susceptible phenotype of Mif−/− mice. Collectively, these results demonstrate an important role for MIF inducing cell-mediated immunity to T. gondii infection.

  3. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in human breast cancer. Correlation with histologic subtype and degree of differentiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed, R H; Lakatua, D J; Haus, E; Yasmineh, W J

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic review of 490 consecutive human breast biopsy and mastectomy specimens were correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptor content of the tissue, by subtype and degree of differentiation...

  4. Characterization of human endothelial cell urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor protein and messenger RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnathan, E S; Kuo, A; Karikó, K

    1990-01-01

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells in culture (HUVEC) express receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activators (u-PA). The immunochemical nature of this receptor and its relationship to u-PA receptors expressed by other cell types is unknown. Cross-linking active site-blocked u-PA to HUVEC...

  5. Blocking Mineralocorticoid Receptors Impairs, Blocking Glucocorticoid Receptors Enhances Memory Retrieval in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Ulrike; Besedovsky, Luciana; Lange, Tanja; Born, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Memory retrieval is impaired at very low as well as very high cortisol levels, but not at intermediate levels. This inverted-U-shaped relationship between cortisol levels and memory retrieval may originate from different roles of the mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) that bind cortisol with distinctly different affinity. Here, we examined the role of MRs and GRs in human memory retrieval using specific receptor antagonists. In two double-blind within-subject, cross-over designed studies, young healthy men were asked to retrieve emotional and neutral texts and pictures (learnt 3 days earlier) between 0745 and 0915 hours in the morning, either after administration of 400 mg of the MR blocker spironolactone vs placebo (200 mg at 2300 hours and 200 mg at 0400 hours, Study I) or after administration of the GR blocker mifepristone vs placebo (200 mg at 2300 hours, Study II). Blockade of MRs impaired free recall of both texts and pictures particularly for emotional material. In contrast, blockade of GRs resulted in better memory retrieval for pictures, with the effect being more pronounced for neutral than emotional materials. These findings indicate indeed opposing roles of MRs and GRs in memory retrieval, with optimal retrieval at intermediate cortisol levels likely mediated by high MR but concurrently low GR activation. PMID:23303058

  6. The genomic structure of the human UFO receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Faust, M; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1993-02-01

    Using a DNA transfection-tumorigenicity assay we have recently identified the UFO oncogene. It encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by the juxtaposition of two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats in its extracellular domain. Here we describe the genomic organization of the human UFO locus. The UFO receptor is encoded by 20 exons that are distributed over a region of 44 kb. Different isoforms of UFO mRNA are generated by alternative splicing of exon 10 and differential usage of two imperfect polyadenylation sites resulting in the presence or absence of 1.5-kb 3' untranslated sequences. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analyses revealed multiple transcriptional initiation sites including a major site 169 bp upstream of the translation start site. The promoter region is GC rich, lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains potential recognition sites for a variety of trans-acting factors, including Sp1, AP-2 and the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Proto-UFO and its oncogenic counterpart exhibit identical cDNA and promoter regions sequences. Possible modes of UFO activation are discussed.

  7. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human prostatic urethra expresses vitamin D receptor and responds to vitamin D receptor ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeglio, P; Chavalmane, A K; Fibbi, B; Filippi, S; Marchetta, M; Marini, M; Morelli, A; Penna, G; Vignozzi, L; Vannelli, G B; Adorini, L; Maggi, M

    2010-11-01

    Chronic inflammation is now considered a determinant of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), promoting, together with the hormonal milieu, prostate overgrowth and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Prostatic urethra actively participates in determining progression of LUTS associated with BPH. To investigate the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the ability of the VDR agonist elocalcitol to reduce inflammatory responses in human prostatic urethra (hPU) cells. Human prostatic urethra, prostate and bladder neck were obtained from patients affected by BPH. Immunohistochemical studies for VDR expression were performed in tissue samples, from which primary cell cultures were also derived. In hPU cells, proliferation and chemiotaxis were studied, along with Rho kinase (ROCK) activity (MYPT-1 phosphorylation) by western blot. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed for VDR, cyclooxygenase (COX-2), and interleukin (IL)-8 expression. Urethra displays higher VDR expression compared to prostate and bladder neck tissues. The VDR agonist elocalcitol partially reverts COX-2 and IL-8 mRNA upregulation induced by a pro-inflammatory cytokine mixture (IL-17, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α) and inhibits cell migration in urethral cells. Elocalcitol prevents activation of ROCK, as previously demonstrated in bladder and prostate cell cultures. Our results suggest that prostatic urethra is, within the lower urinary tract, a novel target for VDR agonists, as shown by the capacity of elocalcitol to inhibit ROCK activity and to limit inflammatory responses in human primary urethra cells.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with multiple epitopes on the human insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soos, M A; Siddle, K; Baron, M D; Heward, J M; Luzio, J P; Bellatin, J; Lennox, E S

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies for the human insulin receptor were produced following immunization of mice with IM-9 lymphocytes and/or purified placental receptor. Four separate fusions yielded 28 antibodies, all of which reacted with receptor from human placenta, liver and IM-9 cells. Some antibodies cross-reacted to varying degrees with receptor from rabbit, cow, pig and sheep, but none reacted with rat receptor. At least 10 distinct epitopes were recognized as indicated by species specificity and binding competition experiments. All of these epitopes appeared to be on extracellular domains of the receptor as shown by binding of antibodies to intact cells. In some cases the epitopes were further localized to alpha or beta subunits by immunoblotting. Several antibodies inhibited binding of 125I-insulin to the receptor, some had no effect on binding, and others enhanced the binding of 125I-insulin. It is concluded that these antibodies will be valuable probes of receptor structure and function.

  10. A combined computational and structural model of the full-length human prolactin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Papaleo, Elena; Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg

    2016-01-01

    The prolactin receptor is an archetype member of the class I cytokine receptor family, comprising receptors with fundamental functions in biology as well as key drug targets. Structurally, each of these receptors represent an intriguing diversity, providing an exceptionally challenging target...... for structural biology. Here, we access the molecular architecture of the monomeric human prolactin receptor by combining experimental and computational efforts. We solve the NMR structure of its transmembrane domain in micelles and collect structural data on overlapping fragments of the receptor with small...

  11. Association of Genetic Polymorphisms in TNF and MIF Gene with the Risk of Primary Dysmenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, Hatice Yilmaz; Ozsoy, Asker Zeki; Karakus, Nevin; Delibas, Ilhan Bahri; Isguder, Cigdem Kunt; Yigit, Serbulent

    2016-08-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea, which affects 90 % of adolescent girls and more than 50 % of menstruating women worldwide, is characterized by recurrent pain during menses in the absence of a detectable organic disease. The aim of this study is to assess the association between MIF -173 and TNF -308 genetic polymorphisms and the clinical features of primary dysmenorrhea. The study population comprised 154 unrelated female patients with clinical diagnosis of dysmenorrhea, and a total of 144 control subjects were recruited consecutively. The MIF -173G > C promoter polymorphism (rs755622) and TNF gene -308G > A (rs1800629) polymorphism were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Two fragments (268 and 97 bp) were seen when the G allele was present at position -173, and three fragments (206, 97, and 62 bp) were observed when the C allele was present. Two fragments (87 and 20 bp) were seen when G allele was present at position -308. There were statistically significant associations between age at menarche and history of back pain among dysmenorrhea patients and MIF gene -173G > C polymorphism (p = 0.003 and p = 0.042, respectively). The genotype and allele frequencies of -308G > A polymorphism showed statistically significant differences between dysmenorrhea patients and controls (p = 0.023 and p = 0.009, respectively). A high association was also observed when the patients were compared with the controls according to the GG genotype versus GA+AA genotypes (p = 0.009). The present study showed that the TNF-α -308 GG genotype may be a useful tool to predict the susceptibility of dysmenorrhea.

  12. The assay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies with human TSH/LH-CG chimeric receptor expressed on chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ka Hee; Kim, Chang Min [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    TSH/LH-CG chimera cDNA is transfected to CHO-K1 cell to obtain the chimeric receptor expressed on the cell surface. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurements are determined using chimeric receptors and under these conditions activity of TSAb and TSBAb in the sera of the Graves` patients. The results obtained are compared to those of TSAb assays using FRTL5 cells CHO-TSHR cells which have wild type human TSH receptor. The transfection procedure of chimeric receptor gene to CHO-K1 cells are on going. The optimal conditions for TSAb and TSBAb measurement using chimeric receptor will be determined after success of transfection procedure. If this study is successfully completed, not only the heterogeneity of Graves. IgG but also pathogenesis of Graves` disease will be elucidated. (author). 25 refs.

  13. Purification of family B G protein-coupled receptors using nanodiscs: Application to human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Cai

    Full Text Available Family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs play vital roles in hormone-regulated homeostasis. They are drug targets for metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis. Despite their importance, the signaling mechanisms for family B GPCRs at the molecular level remain largely unexplored due to the challenges in purification of functional receptors in sufficient amount for biophysical characterization. Here, we purified the family B GPCR human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor (GLP1R, whose agonists, e.g. exendin-4, are used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The receptor was expressed in HEK293S GnTl- cells using our recently developed protocol. The protocol incorporates the receptor into the native-like lipid environment of reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL particles, also known as nanodiscs, immediately after the membrane solubilization step followed by chromatographic purification, minimizing detergent contact with the target receptor to reduce denaturation and prolonging stabilization of receptor in lipid bilayers without extra steps of reconstitution. This method yielded purified GLP1R in nanodiscs that could bind to GLP-1 and exendin-4 and activate Gs protein. This nanodisc purification method can potentially be a general strategy to routinely obtain purified family B GPCRs in the 10s of microgram amounts useful for spectroscopic analysis of receptor functions and activation mechanisms.

  14. Insulin causes insulin-receptor internalization in human erythrocyte ghosts.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelleher, R S; Murray, E F; Peterson, S W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation with insulin on insulin-receptor internalization by erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. The number of surface insulin receptors decreased by 30-40% after incubation of ghosts with insulin. Total insulin-receptor binding to solubilized ghosts was the same in insulin-incubated and control ghosts, whereas insulin binding to an internal vesicular fraction was substantially increased in insulin-incubated ghosts. Our findings suggest that erythrocyte-ghost insulin receptor...

  15. Estrogen receptor coregulator binding modulators (ERXs) effectively target estrogen receptor positive human breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Ganesh V; Sareddy, Gangadhara Reddy; Ma, Shihong; Lee, Tae-Kyung; Viswanadhapalli, Suryavathi; Li, Rui; Liu, Xihui; Murakami, Shino; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Lee, Wan-Ru; Mann, Monica; Krishnan, Samaya Rajeshwari; Manandhar, Bikash; Gonugunta, Vijay K; Strand, Douglas; Tekmal, Rajeshwar Rao; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Vadlamudi, Ratna K

    2017-01-01

    The majority of human breast cancer is estrogen receptor alpha (ER) positive. While anti-estrogens/aromatase inhibitors are initially effective, resistance to these drugs commonly develops. Therapy-resistant tumors often retain ER signaling, via interaction with critical oncogenic coregulator proteins. To address these mechanisms of resistance, we have developed a novel ER coregulator binding modulator, ERX-11. ERX-11 interacts directly with ER and blocks the interaction between a subset of coregulators with both native and mutant forms of ER. ERX-11 effectively blocks ER-mediated oncogenic signaling and has potent anti-proliferative activity against therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant human breast cancer cells. ERX-11 is orally bioavailable, with no overt signs of toxicity and potent activity in both murine xenograft and patient-derived breast tumor explant models. This first-in-class agent, with its novel mechanism of action of disrupting critical protein-protein interactions, overcomes the limitations of current therapies and may be clinically translatable for patients with therapy-sensitive and therapy-resistant breast cancers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26857.001 PMID:28786813

  16. The effects of morphine on human 5-HT3A receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittmann, Maria; Peters, I.; Schaaf, T.; Wartenberg, H. C.; Wirz, S.; Nadstawek, J.; Urban, B. W.; Barann, M.

    2006-01-01

    5-HT3 receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that are involved in the modulation of emesis and pain. In this study, we investigated whether the opioid analgesic, morphine, exerts specific effects on human 5-HT3 receptors. Whole-cell patches from HEK-293 cells stably transfected with the human

  17. Polyclonal antibodies directed against human placental Fcgamma receptor. Characterization of the antibodies and their interaction with the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulska, J; Lisowski, J

    1987-01-01

    Antibodies to the putative Fc gamma receptor (Fc gamma R) of human placenta were raised by immunization of rabbits with the receptor purified form syncytiotrophoblast plasma membranes of human placenta. The rabbit antibodies were of IgG class and their F(ab')2 fragment interacted with Fc receptors in solubilized form and membrane-bound, as well. Immunological reactivity of the antibodies with Fc gamma R was demonstrated using immunodiffusion, solid-phase immunoassay, and ELISA. Studies on interaction of the antibodies with the isolated placental Fc gamma R showed that antigenic determinants of the receptor were different from the IgG-binding site. Rabbit anti-human placental Fc gamma R crossreacted, to various extent, with Fc gamma R-positive human cell lines showing antigenic relatedness of the placental receptor with Fc gamma R on other cell types. The antibodies showed only a weak crossreactivity with guinea pig peritoneal macrophage Fc gamma R. SDS-PAGE analysis of immunoprecipitates obtained by treatment of detergent lysates of 3H-labeled human placental trophoblasts membranes with the rabbit antibodies or with human IgG showed the presence of the some components which were observed in the case of the isolated, purified placental Fc gamma R: Mr of 123,000 and 52,000-56,000 under nonreducing conditions, and Mr of 64,000-67,000, 52,000-56,000, and 26,000-29,000, under reducing conditions. The polypeptide chains of the purified human placental receptor resolved in SDS-PAGE and transferred on nitrocellulose strips were able to interact both with the rabbit anti-placental receptor IgG F(ab')2 fragments and with human IgG. This gives an evidence that human placental Fc gamma R polypeptide chains Mr of approx. 64,000, 54,000, and 28,000 contain antigenic determinants of the receptor and binding sites for the Fc region of IgG, as well.

  18. The PLX- α project: demonstrating the viability of spherically imploding plasma liners as an MIF driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, S. C.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Cassibry, J. T.; Gilmore, M.; Samulyak, R.; Stoltz, P.; the PLX-α Team

    2015-11-01

    Under ARPA-E's ALPHA program, the Plasma Liner Experiment-ALPHA (PLX- α) project aims to demonstrate the viability and scalability of spherically imploding plasma liners as a standoff, high-implosion-velocity magneto-inertial-fusion (MIF) driver that is potentially compatible with both low- and high- β targets. The project has three major objectives: (a) advancing existing contoured-gap coaxial-gun technology to achieve higher operational reliability/precision and better control/reproducibility of plasma-jet properties and profiles; (2) conducting ~ π / 2 -solid-angle plasma-liner experiments with 9 guns to demonstrate (along with extrapolations from modeling) that the jet-merging process leads to Mach-number degradation and liner uniformity that are acceptable for MIF; and (3) conducting 4 π experiments with up to 60 guns to demonstrate the formation of an imploding spherical plasma liner for the first time, and to provide empirical ram-pressure and uniformity scaling data for benchmarking our codes and informing us whether the scalings justify further development beyond ALPHA. This talk will provide an overview of the PLX- α project as well as key research results to date. Supported by ARPA-E's ALPHA program; original PLX construction supported by DOE Fusion Energy Sciences.

  19. Bioelectronic tongue using heterodimeric human taste receptor for the discrimination of sweeteners with human-like performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun Seok; Jin, Hye Jun; Ahn, Sae Ryun; Kim, Daesan; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Un-Kyung; Simons, Christopher T; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Tai Hyun

    2014-10-28

    The sense of taste helps humans to obtain information and form a picture of the world by recognizing chemicals in their environments. Over the past decade, large advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms of taste detection and mimicking its capability using artificial sensor devices. However, the detection capability of previous artificial taste sensors has been far inferior to that of animal tongues, in terms of its sensitivity and selectivity. Herein, we developed a bioelectronic tongue using heterodimeric human sweet taste receptors for the detection and discrimination of sweeteners with human-like performance, where single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors were functionalized with nanovesicles containing human sweet taste receptors and used to detect the binding of sweeteners to the taste receptors. The receptors are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of human taste receptor type 1 member 2 (hTAS1R2) and human taste receptor type 1 member 3 (hTAS1R3), which have multiple binding sites and allow a human tongue-like broad selectivity for the detection of sweeteners. This nanovesicle-based bioelectronic tongue can be a powerful tool for the detection of sweeteners as an alternative to labor-intensive and time-consuming cell-based assays and the sensory evaluation panels used in the food and beverage industry. Furthermore, this study also allows the artificial sensor to exam the functional activity of dimeric GPCRs.

  20. Conserved cysteine residues in the extracellular loop of the human P2X(1) receptor form disulfide bonds and are involved in receptor trafficking to the cell surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ennion, Steven J; Evans, Richard J

    2002-01-01

    P2X receptors contain 10 conserved cysteines in the extracellular loop. To investigate whether these residues form disulfide bonds, we created a series of single and double cysteine-alanine mutants in the human P2X(1) receptor...

  1. Conserved Cysteine Residues in the Extracellular Loop of the Human P2X1 Receptor Form Disulfide Bonds and Are Involved in Receptor Trafficking to the Cell Surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steven J. Ennion; Richard J. Evans

    2002-01-01

    P2X receptors contain 10 conserved cysteines in the extracellular loop. To investigate whether these residues form disulfide bonds, we created a series of single and double cysteine-alanine mutants in the human P2X 1 receptor...

  2. Immunologic analysis of human breast cancer progesterone receptors. 2. Structure, phosphorylation, and processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, L.L.; Sheridan, P.L.; Krett, N.L.; Francis, M.D.; Toft, D.O.; Edwards, D.P.; Horwitz, K.B.

    1987-09-22

    The authors have used a monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against chick oviduct progesterone receptors (PR), that cross-reacts with human PR, to analyze PR structure and phosphorylation. This MAb, designated PR-6, interacts only with B receptors (M/sub r/ 120,000) of T47D human breast cancer cells; it has no affinity for A receptors (M/sub r/ 94,000) or for proteolytic fragments from either protein. The antibody immunoprecipitates native B receptors and was used to study the structure of native untransformed 8S and transformed 4S receptors, using sucrose density gradient analysis, photoaffinity labeling, and gel electrophoresis. The independence of A- and B-receptor complexes was confirmed by the fining that purified, transformed B receptors bind well to DNA-cellulose. Additional studies focused on the covalent modifications of receptors. The previously described shifts in apparent molecular weight of nuclear PR following R5020 treatment using in situ photoaffinity labeling. To show whether these shifts can be explained by receptor phosphorylation, untreated cells and hormone-treated cells were metabolically labeled with (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, and the B receptors were isolated by immunoprecipitation with PR-6 and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. In both treatment states, B receptors were labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P, thus demonstrating directly that human PR are phosphoproteins. Since B receptors were labeled in the absence of hormone and also after their in vivo transformation by hormone, they appear to be substrates for two phosphorylation reactions, one in the untransformed state and another after they are tightly bound to chromatin. The second phosphorylation may account for the mobility shift of the receptors on SDS gels. On the basis of these data a model of human PR structure and subcellular receptor dynamics is presented.

  3. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jäntti, Maria H., E-mail: maria.jantti@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Mandrika, Ilona, E-mail: ilona@biomed.lu.lv [Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites Str. 1, Riga LV 1067 (Latvia); Kukkonen, Jyrki P., E-mail: jyrki.kukkonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, POB 66, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1}, OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an effective way

  4. Variation in umami perception and in candidate genes for the umami receptor in mice and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemura, Noriatsu; Shirosaki, Shinya; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Islam, A A Shahidul; Ogiwara, Yoko; Kawai, Misako; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2009-09-01

    The unique taste induced by monosodium glutamate is referred to as umami taste. The umami taste is also elicited by the purine nucleotides inosine 5'-monophosphate and guanosine 5'-monophosphate. There is evidence that a heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptor, which consists of the T1R1 (taste receptor type 1, member 1, Tas1r1) and the T1R3 (taste receptor type 1, member 3, Tas1r3) proteins, functions as an umami taste receptor for rodents and humans. Splice variants of metabotropic glutamate receptors, mGluR(1) (glutamate receptor, metabotropic 1, Grm1) and mGluR(4) (glutamate receptor, metabotropic 4, Grm4), also have been proposed as taste receptors for glutamate. The taste sensitivity to umami substances varies in inbred mouse strains and in individual humans. However, little is known about the relation of umami taste sensitivity to variations in candidate umami receptor genes in rodents or in humans. In this article, we summarize current knowledge of the diversity of umami perception in mice and humans. Furthermore, we combine previously published data and new information from the single nucleotide polymorphism databases regarding variation in the mouse and human candidate umami receptor genes: mouse Tas1r1 (TAS1R1 for human), mouse Tas1r3 (TAS1R3 for human), mouse Grm1 (GRM1 for human), and mouse Grm4 (GRM4 for human). Finally, we discuss prospective associations between variation of these genes and umami taste perception in both species.

  5. Expression of the human muscarinic receptor gene m2 in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voith, G.; Dingermann, T. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-11-01

    We have expressed a functional human muscarinic M2 receptor, under the control of the homologous discoidin I{gamma} promoter, in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. The use of a contact site A leader peptide ensured insertion of the newly synthesized receptor protein into the plasma membrane. Due to the characteristics of the discoidin I{gamma} promoter, the M2 receptor is expressed during late growth and early development. The heterologously expressed M2 receptors show binding characteristics similar to authentic receptors. Membranes as well as whole cells can be used in ligand binding assays. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Promoter Polymorphisms (−794 CATT5–8 and −173 G>C: Relationship with mRNA Expression and Soluble MIF Levels in Young Obese Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Matia-García

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the relationship of −794 CATT5–8 and −173 G>C MIF polymorphisms with mRNA and soluble MIF in young obese subjects. A total of 250 young subjects, 150 normal-weight and 100 obese subjects, were recruited in the study. Genotyping of −794 CATT5–8 and −173 G>C MIF polymorphisms was performed by PCR and PCR-RFLP, respectively. MIF mRNA expression was determined by real-time PCR and serum MIF levels were measured using an ELISA kit. For both MIF promoter polymorphisms, no significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies between groups were observed. MIF mRNA expression was slightly higher in obese subjects than in normal-weight subjects (1.38-fold, while soluble MIF levels did not show differences between groups. In addition, we found an increase in MIF mRNA expression in carriers of the 6,6 and C/C genotypes and the 6G haplotype of the −794 CATT5–8 and −173 G>C MIF polymorphisms, although it was not significant. In conclusion, this study found no relationship between obesity and MIF gene promoter polymorphisms with MIF mRNA expression in young obese subjects.

  7. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Promoter Polymorphisms (−794 CATT5–8 and −173 G>C): Relationship with mRNA Expression and Soluble MIF Levels in Young Obese Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matia-García, Inés; Salgado-Goytia, Lorenzo; Muñoz-Valle, José F.; García-Arellano, Samuel; Hernández-Bello, Jorge; Salgado-Bernabé, Aralia B.; Parra-Rojas, Isela

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the relationship of −794 CATT5–8 and −173 G>C MIF polymorphisms with mRNA and soluble MIF in young obese subjects. A total of 250 young subjects, 150 normal-weight and 100 obese subjects, were recruited in the study. Genotyping of −794 CATT5–8 and −173 G>C MIF polymorphisms was performed by PCR and PCR-RFLP, respectively. MIF mRNA expression was determined by real-time PCR and serum MIF levels were measured using an ELISA kit. For both MIF promoter polymorphisms, no significant differences in the genotype and allele frequencies between groups were observed. MIF mRNA expression was slightly higher in obese subjects than in normal-weight subjects (1.38-fold), while soluble MIF levels did not show differences between groups. In addition, we found an increase in MIF mRNA expression in carriers of the 6,6 and C/C genotypes and the 6G haplotype of the −794 CATT5–8 and −173 G>C MIF polymorphisms, although it was not significant. In conclusion, this study found no relationship between obesity and MIF gene promoter polymorphisms with MIF mRNA expression in young obese subjects. PMID:25972622

  8. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analysis of human farnesoid X receptor in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Zhan

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4 is a ligand-activated transcription factor, belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and is essential in regulating bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency is implicated in numerous liver diseases and mice with modulation of FXR have been used as animal models to study liver physiology and pathology. We have reported genome-wide binding of FXR in mice by chromatin immunoprecipitation - deep sequencing (ChIP-seq, with results indicating that FXR may be involved in regulating diverse pathways in liver. However, limited information exists for the functions of human FXR and the suitability of using murine models to study human FXR functions.In the current study, we performed ChIP-seq in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs treated with a synthetic FXR agonist, GW4064 or DMSO control. In parallel, RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq and RNA microarray were performed for GW4064 or control treated PHHs and wild type mouse livers, respectively.ChIP-seq showed similar profiles of genome-wide FXR binding in humans and mice in terms of motif analysis and pathway prediction. However, RNA-seq and microarray showed more different transcriptome profiles between PHHs and mouse livers upon GW4064 treatment.In summary, we have established genome-wide human FXR binding and transcriptome profiles. These results will aid in determining the human FXR functions, as well as judging to what level the mouse models could be used to study human FXR functions.

  9. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  10. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  11. Activation of human peroxisome-activated receptor-gamma ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity in children has become an epidemic and recent research suggests a possible contribution from exposure to environmental chemicals. Several chemicals, such as phthalates, brominated flame retardants, and perfluorinated chemicals, are common in house dust on floors where children play and are suspected obesogens. Obesogens can act via a mechanism that involves activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARy). A previous study found that dust collected from children’s homes binds to PPARy. Here, we investigated the ability of house dust to activate PPARy in a transiently transfected cell assay. Dust samples were collected in 2012 from carpeted and hardwood floors in children’s homes using thimbles fitted into a vacuum cleaner hose (“TEO” samples), or from homes in an adult cohort NIEHS study. Dust was extracted with 50:50 hexane:acetone, sonicated, centrifuged, and the organic layer collected. This was repeated 2X. The extracts were filtered to remove particulates, dried with purified nitrogen, and reconstituted in DMS0 at 200 ug/ul. COS-1 cells were transfected for 24 hrs with a human PPARy vector containing a luciferase reporter, and exposed for 24 hrs to negative controls water or DMSO (0.1%), positive controls Troglitazone (3 uM in water) or Rosiglitazone (100 nM in DMSO), or dust extracts serially diluted in DMEM at 50, 100, and 200 ug/ml in 0.1% DMSO. Cells were lysed and luciferase activity was measured. Data were log-tra

  12. Stoichiometries of transferrin receptors 1 and 2 in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloupková, Maja; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A

    2010-01-15

    Mutations in either the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE, or transferrin receptor 2, TfR2, result in a similarly severe form of the most common type of iron overload disease called hereditary hemochromatosis. Models of the interactions between HFE, TfR1, and TfR2 imply that these proteins are present in different molar concentrations in the liver, where they control expression of the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, in response to body iron loading. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo levels of mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR and concentrations of these proteins by quantitative immunoblotting in human liver tissues. The level of TfR2 mRNA was 21- and 63-fold higher than that of TfR1 and HFE, respectively. Molar concentration of TfR2 protein was the highest and determined to be 1.95 nmol/g protein in whole cell lysates and 10.89 nmol/g protein in microsomal membranes. Molar concentration of TfR1 protein was 4.5- and 6.1-fold lower than that of TfR2 in whole cell lysates and membranes, respectively. The level of HFE protein was below 0.53 nmol/g of total protein. HFE is thus present in substoichiometric concentrations with respect to both TfR1 and TfR2 in human liver tissue. This finding supports a model, in which availability of HFE is limiting for formation of complexes with TfR1 or TfR2. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Receptor mediated agglutination of human spermatozoa by spermagglutinating factor isolated from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Siftjit; Prabha, Vijay; Sarwal, Abha

    2010-12-01

    We examined spermagglutinating factor isolated from Staphylococcus aureus for evidence of receptor mediated agglutination of human spermatozoa. Binding to spermatozoa by spermagglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus with a high degree of specificity indicates receptor-ligand interaction. To examine this interaction we isolated and purified the ligand and the receptor. To assess receptor mediated agglutination of spermatozoa further we blocked spermagglutination induced by spermagglutinating factor in the presence of receptor. Spermagglutinating factor induced spermagglutination was competitively inhibited by adding purified receptor, indicating that sperm agglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus attaches to specific receptors on human spermatozoa. The spermagglutinating factor receptor was a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 57 kDa. Spermagglutinating factor induced spermagglutination and at higher concentrations had a spermicidal effect, which was inhibited by introducing the receptor. As observed on scanning electron microscopy studies, incubating spermatozoa with spermagglutinating factor showed profound morphological alterations. However, spermatozoa with normal morphology were noted when incubated with spermagglutinating factor in the presence of receptor, indicating that morphological alterations may account for spermatozoa agglutination by spermagglutinating factor. Results suggest that spermagglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus may bind specifically to sperm surface receptor sites before causing spermagglutination. Copyright © 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nicotinic acid receptor abnormalities in human skin cancer: implications for a role in epidermal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yira Bermudez

    Full Text Available Chronic UV skin exposure leads to epidermal differentiation defects in humans that can be largely restored by pharmacological doses of nicotinic acid. Nicotinic acid has been identified as a ligand for the human G-protein-coupled receptors GPR109A and GPR109B that signal through G(i-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. We have examined the expression, cellular distribution, and functionality of GPR109A/B in human skin and skin derived epidermal cells.Nicotinic acid increases epidermal differentiation in photodamaged human skin as judged by the terminal differentiation markers caspase 14 and filaggrin. Both GPR109A and GPR109B genes are transcribed in human skin and in epidermal keratinocytes, but expression in dermal fibroblasts is below limits of detection. Receptor transcripts are greatly over-expressed in squamous cell cancers. Receptor protein in normal skin is prominent from the basal through granular layers of the epidermis, with cellular localization more dispersive in the basal layer but predominantly localized at the plasma membrane in more differentiated epidermal layers. In normal human primary and immortalized keratinocytes, nicotinic acid receptors show plasma membrane localization and functional G(i-mediated signaling. In contrast, in a squamous cell carcinoma derived cell line, receptor protein shows a more diffuse cellular localization and the receptors are nearly non-functional.The results of these studies justify future genetic and pharmacological intervention studies to define possible specific role(s of nicotinic acid receptors in human skin homeostasis.

  15. Identification of insulin in the tear film and insulin receptor and IGF-1 receptor on the human ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Eduardo M; Cunha, Daniel A; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2002-04-01

    Insulin produces pleiotropic effects on sensitive tissues, including the ocular surface, through the tyrosine kinase insulin receptor. Cerebrospinal fluid and secreted fluids, such as milk and saliva, have been reported to contain insulin. In the present study, the presence of insulin was examined in tear film, and the expression of insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor was examined in the human cornea and conjunctiva. Stimulated tear samples collected from 33 volunteers (17 men, 16 women), aged 23 to 51 years, who were fed or fasted for 12 hours, were assayed for total protein and insulin content by the biuret dye test and a radioimmunoassay, respectively. Frozen sections of human cornea (n = 4) and conjunctiva (n = 3) were incubated with anti-insulin receptor and anti-IGF-1 receptor antibodies and developed with a secondary antibody-peroxidase conjugate. Insulin was detected in all tear samples analyzed, the mean concentration being 0.404 +/- 0.129 ng/mL. There were no gender-related differences. In fed subjects, tears tended toward a higher insulin content than those in fasted individuals. There was no linear correlation between insulin and total protein content (mean, 4.61 +/- 0.79 mg/mL) in the tear film. Insulin and IGF-1 receptors were detected in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm of corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study represents the first demonstration of insulin in human tear film and the presence of insulin and IGF-1 receptor on the human ocular surface. These results suggest that the pancreatic hormone may play a metabolic and/or mitogenic role on the ocular surface.

  16. Inhibition of macrophage migration inhibitory factor decreases proliferation and cytokine expression in bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leifheit Erica C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of various inflammatory cytokines in maintaining tumor cell growth and viability is well established. Increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF has previously been associated with various types of adenocarcinoma. Methods MIF IHC was used to localize MIF in human bladder tissue. ELISA and Western blot analysis determined the synthesis and secretion of MIF by human bladder transitional cell carcinoma cells. The effects of MIF inhibitors (high molecular weight hyaluronate (HA, anti-MIF antibody or MIF anti-sense on cell growth and cytokine expression were analyzed. Results Human bladder cancer cells (HT-1376 secrete detectable amounts of MIF protein. Treatment with HA, anti-MIF antibody and MIF anti-sense reduced HT-1376 cell proliferation, MIF protein secretion, MIF gene expression and secreted inflammatory cytokines. Our evidence suggests MIF interacts with the invariant chain, CD74 and the major cell surface receptor for HA, CD44. Conclusions This study is the first to report MIF expression in the human bladder and these findings support a role for MIF in tumor cell proliferation. Since MIF participates in the inflammatory response and bladder cancer is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, these new findings suggest that neutralizing bladder tumor MIF may serve as a novel therapeutic treatment for bladder carcinoma.

  17. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high...... densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT2 receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT2 receptor...... agonist, Compound 21 (C21) penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT2 receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped from the cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i...

  18. Somatostatin receptors in human adrenal gland tumors--immunohistochemical study.

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Stepień; Hanna Pisarek; Robert Kubiak; Marek Pawlikowski

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors subtypes (SSTR 1-5) were demonstrated in surgically obtained adrenal gland tumors by means of immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results of the present study demonstrate that somatostatin receptors are expressed in adrenal tumors in a varied manner which is specific in each case. It provides different diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  19. Somatostatin receptors in human adrenal gland tumors--immunohistochemical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Stepień

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Somatostatin receptors subtypes (SSTR 1-5 were demonstrated in surgically obtained adrenal gland tumors by means of immunohistochemistry (IHC. Results of the present study demonstrate that somatostatin receptors are expressed in adrenal tumors in a varied manner which is specific in each case. It provides different diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  20. Striatal μ-opioid receptor availability predicts cold pressor pain threshold in healthy human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagelberg, Nora; Aalto, Sargo; Tuominen, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Previous PET studies in healthy humans have shown that brain μ-opioid receptor activation during experimental pain is associated with reductions in the sensory and affective ratings of the individual pain experience. The aim of this study was to find out whether brain μ-opioid receptor binding...... at the resting state, in absence of painful stimulation, can be a long-term predictor of experimental pain sensitivity. We measured μ-opioid receptor binding potential (BP(ND)) with μ-opioid receptor selective radiotracer [(11)C]carfentanil and positron emission tomography (PET) in 12 healthy male subjects...... the potential associations between μ-opioid receptor BP(ND) and psychophysical measures. The results show that striatal μ-opioid receptor BP(ND) predicts cold pressor pain threshold, but not cold pressor pain tolerance or tactile sensitivity. This finding suggests that striatal μ-opioid receptor density...

  1. Molecular cloning and pharmacology of functionally distinct isoforms of the human histamine H(3) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wellendorph, Petrine; Goodman, M W; Burstein, E S

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of histamine H(3) receptors suggests the presence of distinct receptor isoforms or subtypes. We herein describe multiple, functionally distinct, alternatively spliced isoforms of the human H(3) receptor. Combinatorial splicing at three different sites creates at least six distinct...... receptor isoforms, of which isoforms 1, 2, and 4, encode functional proteins. Detailed pharmacology on isoforms 1 (unspliced receptor), and 2 (which has an 80 amino acid deletion within the third intracellular loop of the protein) revealed that both isoforms displayed robust responses to a series of known...... revealed a rank order of potency at both isoforms of clobenpropit>iodophenpropit>thioperamide, and these drugs are fivefold less potent at isoform 2 than isoform 1. To further explore the pharmacology of H(3) receptor function, we screened 150 clinically relevant neuropsychiatric drugs for H(3) receptor...

  2. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 up-regulation by Fcγ-receptor activation in human neutrophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Mireille; Lagarde, Stéphanie; Laflamme, Cynthia; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Marois, Louis; Naccache, Paul H.; Pouliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    We shed new light on the expression and function of the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) family, associated with inflammation and hyperalgesia, in human granulocytes. Resting cells expressed constitutive levels of PAR-2 and PAR-3 mRNA but not PAR-1 or PAR-4. Based on flow cytometry, stimulation with opsonized bacteria (Bop) specifically up-regulated cell surface expression of PAR-2 in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner, independent of transcription or de novo protein synthesis. Primary granules were identified as a source of preformed PAR-2 that can readily be mobilized at the surface on fusion with the plasma membrane. Cellular response to PAR-2 activation, measured as changes in intracellular calcium concentration, was enhanced in PAR-2 up-regulated cells. Increase of cell-surface PAR-2 and of cell responsiveness were dependent specifically on the engagement of immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding receptors. Together, our results reveal that mobilization of intracellular granules, in response to Ig-receptor activation, up-regulates PAR-2 surface expression and makes neutrophils more responsive to proteinase activity. This enhanced response to PAR-2 activation indicates that molecular communication between pain and inflammation may be more important than previously believed.—St-Onge, M., Lagarde, S., Laflamme, C., Rollet-Labelle, E., Marois, L., Naccache, P. H., Pouliot, M. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 up-regulation by Fcγ-receptor activation in human neutrophils. PMID:20154268

  3. Insulin-Induced Electrophysiology Changes in Human Pleura Are Mediated via Its Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouritas, V. K.; Ioannou, M.; Foroulis, C. N.; Desimonas, N.; Evaggelopoulos, K.; Gourgoulianis, K. I.; Molyvdas, P. A.; Hatzoglou, C.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Insulin directly changes the sheep pleural electrophysiology. The aim of this study was to investigate whether insulin induces similar effects in human pleura, to clarify insulin receptor's involvement, and to demonstrate if glibenclamide (hypoglycemic agent) reverses this effect. Methods. Human parietal pleural specimens were mounted in Ussing chambers. Solutions containing insulin or glibenclamide and insulin with anti-insulin antibody, anti-insulin receptor antibody, and glibenclamide were used. The transmesothelial resistance (R TM) was determined. Immunohistochemistry for the presence of Insulin Receptors (IRa, IRb) was also performed. Results. Insulin increased R TM within 1st min (P = .016), when added mesothelially which was inhibited by the anti-insulin and anti-insulin receptor antibodies. Glibenclamide also eliminated the insulin-induced changes. Immunohistochemistry verified the presence of IRa and IRb. Conclusion. Insulin induces electrochemical changes in humans as in sheep via interaction with its receptor. This effect is abolished by glibenclamide. PMID:20814548

  4. Effects of antihistamines on the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, Bassem; Khanian, Seyedeh Soha; Ashoor, Abrar; Prytkova, Tatiana; Ghattas, Mohammad A; Atatreh, Noor; Nurulain, Syed M; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Oz, Murat

    2015-01-05

    Effects of the histamine H₁ receptor (H1R) antagonists (antihistamines), promethazine (PMZ), orphenadrine (ORP), chlorpheniramine (CLP), pyrilamine (PYR), diphenhydramine (DPH), citerizine (CTZ), and triprolidine (TRP) on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes were investigated. Antihistamines inhibited the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order PYR>CLP>TRP>PMZ>ORP≥DPH≥CTZ. Among the antihistamines, PYR showed the highest reversible inhibition of acetylcholine (100 µM)-induced responses with IC₅₀ of 6.2 µM. PYR-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. Specific binding of [¹²⁵I] α-bungarotoxin, a selective antagonist for α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was not changed in the presence of PYR suggesting a non-competitive inhibition of nicotinic receptors. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that PYR can potentially bind allosterically with the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that the H₂-H₄ receptor antagonists tested in this study (10 µM) showed negligible inhibition of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, H₁ receptor antagonists inhibited the function of human α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, with varying potencies. These results emphasize the importance of α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor for future pharmacological/toxicological profiling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor conveys innate immunity to Trypanosoma brucei in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; De Muylder, Géraldine; Nielsen, Marianne J

    2008-01-01

    receptor also recognized the complex between hemoglobin and haptoglobin-related protein, which explains its ability to capture trypanolytic HDLs. Thus, in humans the presence of haptoglobin-related protein has diverted the function of the trypanosome haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor to elicit innate host...... immunity against the parasite....

  6. Crystal structure of the human urokinase plasminogen activator receptor bound to an antagonist peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llinas, Paola; Le Du, Marie Hélène; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    . This knowledge combined with the discovery of a convergent binding motif shared by the antagonist peptide and uPA allowed us to build a model of the human uPA-uPAR complex. This model reveals that the receptor-binding module of uPA engages the uPAR central cavity, thus leaving the external receptor surface...

  7. Dioxin increases the interaction between aryl hydrocarbon receptor and estrogen receptor alpha at human promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Shaaima; Valen, Eivind; Sandelin, Albin Gustav

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) induced the recruitment of estrogen receptor- (ER ) to AHR-regulated genes and that AHR is recruited to ER -regulated genes. However, these findings were limited to a small number of well-characterized AHR- or ER -responsive...... regions bound by both AHR and ER . Conventional and sequential ChIPs confirmed the recruitment of AHR and ER to many of the identified regions. Transcription factor binding site analysis revealed an overrepresentation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor response elements in regions bound by both AHR and ER...

  8. Purinergic receptors expressed in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, A; Ploug, Thorkil; Bune, L T

    2012-01-01

    Purinergic receptors are present in most tissues and thought to be involved in various signalling pathways, including neural signalling, cell metabolism and local regulation of the microcirculation in skeletal muscles. The present study aims to determine the distribution and intracellular content...... of purinergic receptors in skeletal muscle fibres in patients with type 2 diabetes and age-matched controls. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were obtained from six type 2 diabetic patients and seven age-matched controls. Purinergic receptors were analysed using light and confocal microscopy...

  9. Humanized versus murine anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies for immunoscintigraphic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Alvarez-Ruiz, Daniel; Becquer-Viart, Maria de Los Angeles; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando

    2000-02-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized antibody h-R3 (IgG{sub 1}), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R, was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. Results are compared with its murine version ior egf/r3 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intravenously with 10 {mu}g/100 {mu}Ci of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled mAbs. The mAb ior C5 that recognizes an antigen expressed preferentially on the surface of malignant and cytoplasm of normal colorectal cells was used as negative control. Immunoreactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled mAbs was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay on A431 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions determined by Lindmo method. Among all organs significant accumulation was found in tumor (6.14{+-}2.50 %ID/g, 5.06{+-}2.61 %ID/g for murine and humanized mAbs, respectively) 4 h after injection. The immunoreactive fractions were found to be 0.88 and 0.81 for murine and humanized mAb, respectively. Thus, we expect better results using the humanized mAb h-R3 for diagnostic immunoscintigraphy.

  10. -173G/C polymorphism in the promoter of MIF is associated with hepatitis B virus infection in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z S; Yin, C C; Han, S; Jiang, F L; Guo, W G; Wu, L Q; Liu, S H

    2015-07-28

    In addition to the host immune response, genetic and environmental factors play crucial roles in the manifestation of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) -173G/C polymorphism (rs755622), located in the promoter region of MIF, may play integral roles in diverse processes, including the immune response. Thus, the MIF -173G/C polymorphism may influence the immune response to HBV during natural infection. We investigated whether the MIF -173G/C polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to HBV infection in a Chinese Han population. A total of 596 HBV infection cases and 612 age-matched controls were recruited for the study. Genotyping of the MIF -173G/C polymorphism was performed using the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. The frequencies of the alleles and genotypes in patients and controls were compared using the χ(2) test. Carriers of the variant C allele in MIF -173 G/C were at significantly higher risk of HBV infection than carriers of the wild-type allele (P = 0.032, odds ratio = 0.799, 95% confidence interval = 0.651-0.981). However, there was no significant difference in the distribution of MIF -173G/C genotypes between case and control groups in either population (P = 0.096, degrees of freedom = 2). Our findings indicate that the G to C base change in MIF -173 G/C confers an increased risk of development of HBV infection by altering the expression of MIF in our Chinese Han population.

  11. Profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Verbeurgt

    Full Text Available Olfactory perception is mediated by a large array of olfactory receptor genes. The human genome contains 851 olfactory receptor gene loci. More than 50% of the loci are annotated as nonfunctional due to frame-disrupting mutations. Furthermore haplotypic missense alleles can be nonfunctional resulting from substitution of key amino acids governing protein folding or interactions with signal transduction components. Beyond their role in odor recognition, functional olfactory receptors are also required for a proper targeting of olfactory neuron axons to their corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. Therefore, we anticipate that profiling of olfactory receptor gene expression in whole human olfactory mucosa and analysis in the human population of their expression should provide an opportunity to select the frequently expressed and potentially functional olfactory receptors in view of a systematic deorphanization. To address this issue, we designed a TaqMan Low Density Array (Applied Biosystems, containing probes for 356 predicted human olfactory receptor loci to investigate their expression in whole human olfactory mucosa tissues from 26 individuals (13 women, 13 men; aged from 39 to 81 years, with an average of 67±11 years for women and 63±12 years for men. Total RNA isolation, DNase treatment, RNA integrity evaluation and reverse transcription were performed for these 26 samples. Then 384 targeted genes (including endogenous control genes and reference genes specifically expressed in olfactory epithelium for normalization purpose were analyzed using the same real-time reverse transcription PCR platform. On average, the expression of 273 human olfactory receptor genes was observed in the 26 selected whole human olfactory mucosa analyzed, of which 90 were expressed in all 26 individuals. Most of the olfactory receptors deorphanized to date on the basis of sensitivity to known odorant molecules, which are described in the literature, were

  12. Comparative analysis of ginsenosides in human glucocorticoid receptor binding, transactivation, and transrepression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Catherine; Lau, Aik Jiang; Wang, RuiQi; Chang, Thomas K H

    2017-11-15

    Conflicting data exist on the effect of ginsenosides on transactivation of human glucocorticoid receptor α (herein referred to as glucocorticoid receptor), and relatively little is known regarding the effect of these chemicals on transrepression of this receptor. We investigated the effect of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD), PPD-type ginsenosides (Rb1, Rb2, Rc, Rd, Rh2, and Compound K), 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT), and PPT-type ginsenosides (Re, Rf, Rg1, and Rh1) on glucocorticoid receptor binding, transactivation, and transrepression. Each ginsenoside was less efficacious than dexamethasone (positive control) in binding to the ligand-binding domain of glucocorticoid receptor. Among the ginsenosides investigated, Rh2 had the smallest IC50 value (15 ± 1µM), whereas it was 0.02 ± 0.01µM for dexamethasone. In contrast to dexamethasone, none of the ginsenosides influenced glucocorticoid receptor transactivation or transrepression in LS180 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, as assessed in a dual-luciferase reporter gene assay. Rh2 did not affect the endogenous mRNA level of tyrosine aminotransferase (marker for glucocorticoid receptor transactivation) or corticosteroid-binding globulin (marker for glucocorticoid receptor transrepression) in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. This chemical also did not alter the response by a glucocorticoid receptor agonist (dexamethasone or Compound A) in the dual-luciferase reporter gene assay or target gene expression assay. In conclusion, ginsenosides were less efficacious and less potent than dexamethasone in binding to the ligand-binding domain of glucocorticoid receptor. The number of glycosylated groups was associated with a decrease in receptor binding potency. PPD-type and PPT-type ginsenosides are not modulators of glucocorticoid receptor transactivation or transrepression in LS180 and HepG2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Desensitization of the human 5-HT4 receptor in isolated atria of transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergs, Ulrich; Fritsche, Julia; Fabian, Stephanie; Christ, Josepha; Neumann, Joachim

    2017-10-01

    In the human cardiovascular system, serotonin (5-HT) exerts positive inotropic and chronotropic effects mediated by 5-HT4 receptors. Moreover, 5-HT4 receptor stimulation can cause arrhythmias in the human heart. Response to 5-HT can fade due to desensitization of the receptor system and/or activation of phosphodiesterases. In this study, we investigated a potential desensitization of the human 5-HT4(a) receptor expressed in the mouse heart. Therefore, we have used atrial preparations of transgenic (TG) mice with cardiac myocyte-specific overexpression of the human 5-HT4(a) receptor and their non-transgenic littermates (WT). Homologous (by 5-HT) and potentially heterologous (by isoprenaline) desensitization of the 5-HT4 receptor was investigated in atria of TG mice. 5-HT increased force of contraction in isolated electrically paced left atria and beating rate in spontaneously beating right atria only in preparations from TG but not from WT. Pre-treatment of isolated atria with high concentrations (10-600 μM) of 5-HT for 60 min attenuated the positive inotropic effects and the positive chronotropic effects of 5-HT in TG atria. Several inhibitors of desensitization including Zn2+, sucrose, and paroxetine were tested. Whereas sucrose was without any effect and Zn2+ only was partially effective, paroxetine was able to inhibit desensitization favoring at least in part a G-protein receptor-coupled kinase-mediated mechanism of 5-HT4 receptor desensitization in the TG mouse heart. In addition, desensitization of ventricular 5-HT4 receptors was noted in isolated perfused hearts (Langendorff preparations) from TG mice. In summary, we show homologous desensitization of the 5-HT4 receptor in the heart of a transgenic mouse model possibly dependent on active G-protein receptor-coupled kinase. The exact mechanism and a potentially heterologous desensitization have to be elucidated by further investigations.

  14. Comparative distribution of human and avian type sialic acid influenza receptors in the pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major determinant of influenza infection is the presence of virus receptors on susceptible host cells to which the viral haemagglutinin is able to bind. Avian viruses preferentially bind to sialic acid α2,3-galactose (SAα2,3-Gal linked receptors, whereas human strains bind to sialic acid α2,6-galactose (SAα2,6-Gal linked receptors. To date, there has been no detailed account published on the distribution of SA receptors in the pig, a model host that is susceptible to avian and human influenza subtypes, thus with potential for virus reassortment. We examined the relative expression and spatial distribution of SAα2,3-GalG(1-3GalNAc and SAα2,6-Gal receptors in the major organs from normal post-weaned pigs by binding with lectins Maackia amurensis agglutinins (MAA II and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA respectively. Results Both SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors were extensively detected in the major porcine organs examined (trachea, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, heart, skeletal muscle, cerebrum, small intestine and colon. Furthermore, distribution of both SA receptors in the pig respiratory tract closely resembled the published data of the human tract. Similar expression patterns of SA receptors between pig and human in other major organs were found, with exception of the intestinal tract. Unlike the limited reports on the scarcity of influenza receptors in human intestines, we found increasing presence of SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors from duodenum to colon in the pig. Conclusions The extensive presence of SAα2,3-Gal and SAα2,6-Gal receptors in the major organs examined suggests that each major organ may be permissive to influenza virus entry or infection. The high similarity of SA expression patterns between pig and human, in particular in the respiratory tract, suggests that pigs are not more likely to be potential hosts for virus reassortment than humans. Our finding of relative abundance of SA receptors

  15. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and its two receptors in normal human endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海燕; 陈贵安

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: We try to demonstrate the expression of vascular endothelial growthfactor (VEGF) and its receptors, flt-1 and KDR, in normal human emdometrium duringthe menstrual cycle.Methods: Immunohistochemical method was used to observe the expression ofVEGF and its two receptors in emdometrium throughout the normal menstrual cyclemeanwhile the isoforms of VEGF were also detected by Western blot analysis. The en-dothelial cells of micro-vessels were marked with Ⅷ factor antibody.Results: VEGF and its receptors existed in endometrial glandular, stromal and vas-cular endothelial cells of human endometrium. Their expressions were higher in the mid-secretory phase of menstrual cycle and highest at menstruation. VEGF121 and VEGF165were the predominant isoforms in normal human endometrium.Conclusion: The expression of VEGF and its two receptors showed cycle-dependentin human endometrium, probably involved in embryonic implantation and endometrialproliferation and differentiation.

  16. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwasako, Kenji, E-mail: kuwasako@fc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi [Division of Circulation and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kato, Johji [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  17. The 5-HT2A receptor binding pattern in the human brain is strongly genetically determined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Arfan, Haroon; Haugbol, Steven

    2007-01-01

    With the appropriate radiolabeled tracers, positron emission tomography (PET) enables in vivo human brain imaging of markers for neurotransmission, including neurotransmitter synthesis, receptors, and transporters. Whereas structural imaging studies have provided compelling evidence that the human...... brain anatomy is largely genetically determined, it is currently unknown to what degree neuromodulatory markers are subjected to genetic and environmental influence. Changes in serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptors have been reported to occur in various neuropsychiatric disorders and an association between...

  18. Identification of Aminopeptidase N as a Cellular Receptor for Human Coronavirus-229E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-12

    including the various cellular processes necessary for virus component synthesis, assembly and egress. While many eucaryotic cells possess...with host cells . The purpose of this research project was to characterize and identity the cellular receptor(s) for HCV-229E. Assays to detect virus...binding demonstrated that HCV-229E would bind to membranes from hUman respiratory and intestinal epithelium and from several susceptible human cell

  19. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. (National Heart and Lung Institute, London (England))

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  20. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya (Stanford-MED); (Kyoto); (Gakushuin); (Kyushu)

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  1. 5-HT2 receptors mediate functional modulation of GABAa receptors and inhibitory synaptic transmissions in human iPS-derived neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Hu, Lingli; Liu, Chunhua; Su, Zhenghui; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin; Guo, Yiping; He, Jufang

    2016-02-03

    Neural progenitors differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) hold potentials for treating neurological diseases. Serotonin has potent effects on neuronal functions through multiple receptors, underlying a variety of neural disorders. Glutamate and GABA receptors have been proven functional in neurons differentiated from iPS, however, little is known about 5-HT receptor-mediated modulation in such neuronal networks. In the present study, human iPS were differentiated into cells possessing featured physiological properties of cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording was used to examine the involvement of 5-HT2 receptors in functional modulation of GABAergic synaptic transmission. We found that serotonin and DOI (a selective agonist of 5-HT2A/C receptor) reversibly reduced GABA-activated currents, and this 5-HT2A/C receptor mediated inhibition required G protein, PLC, PKC, and Ca(2+) signaling. Serotonin increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs), which could be mimicked by α-methylserotonin, a 5-HT2 receptor agonist. In contrast, DOI reduced both frequency and amplitude of mIPSCs. These findings suggested that in iPS-derived human neurons serotonin postsynaptically reduced GABAa receptor function through 5-HT2A/C receptors, but presynaptically other 5-HT2 receptors counteracted the action of 5-HT2A/C receptors. Functional expression of serotonin receptors in human iPS-derived neurons provides a pre-requisite for their normal behaviors after grafting.

  2. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  3. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, Robert P.; Peng, Wenjie; Grant, Oliver C.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Zhu, Xueyong; Bouwman, Kim M.; de la Pena, Alba T. Torrents; van Breemen, Marielle J.; Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Woods, Robert J.; Verheije, Monique H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Paulson, James C.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2017-06-15

    The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA) mutation (Q226L) that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal) to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal), as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  4. Species difference in the G protein selectivity of the human and bovine A1-adenosine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jockers, R; Linder, M E; Hohenegger, M; Nanoff, C; Bertin, B; Strosberg, A D; Marullo, S; Freissmuth, M

    1994-12-23

    The purified bovine brain A1-adenosine receptor has previously been shown to discriminate among closely related G protein alpha-subunits. To obtain analogous information for the human receptor, the cDNA coding for the human A1-adenosine receptor was inserted into a plasmid placing the synthesis of the receptor protein under the control of the MalE promoter. Following induction by maltose, active receptor accumulated in Escherichia coli membranes. Binding of the antagonist 8-[3H]cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine to E. coli membranes (KD approximately 2 nM, Bmax approximately 0.2-0.4 pmol/mg) showed the appropriate pharmacological profile. Incubation of E. coli membranes with purified Go,i-reconstituted guanine nucleotide-sensitive high affinity binding of the agonist (-)[125I] N6-3-(iodo-4-hydroxyphenylisopropyl)adenosine to the receptor (KD approximately 1 nM). In the presence of purified beta gamma-subunit, the recombinant receptor interacted equally well with the recombinant G protein alpha-subunits Gi alpha-1, Gi alpha-2, Gi alpha-3; G(o) alpha displayed a lower affinity for the receptor while Gs alpha was inactive. Parallel experiments were carried out in bovine and human brain membranes pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide to inactivate the endogenous G(o)/Gi proteins; Gi alpha-3 was most potent in reconstituting 125I-HPIA binding to bovine membranes, while Gi alpha-1, Gi alpha-2, and G(o) alpha displayed similar affinities. However, in human membranes, Gi alpha-1, Gi alpha-2, and Gi alpha-3, were equipotent and high concentrations of G(o) alpha were required to promote 125I-HPIA binding. These observations show (i) that functional human A1-adenosine receptors were synthesized in E. coli; (ii) that the pattern of G protein coupling is identical for the recombinant human A1-receptor and its counterpart in the native membrane; (iii) and that species differences between bovine and human receptor exist not only in their pharmacological profile but also in their G

  5. Variable NK cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands in immunity, reproduction and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2013-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, in which they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of the MHC-C gene in hominids drove the evolution of a system of NK cell receptors for MHC-C molecules that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. By contrast, the human system of MHC-C receptors seems to have been subject to different selection pressures that have acted in competition on the immunological and reproductive functions of MHC class I molecules. We suggest that this compromise facilitated the development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out of Africa and populate other continents.

  6. Some properties of human neuronal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors fused to the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Eleonora; Mileo, Anna M.; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Eusebi, Fabrizio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2002-01-01

    The functional properties and cellular localization of the human neuronal α7 nicotinic acetylcholine (AcCho) receptor (α7 AcChoR) and its L248T mutated (mut) form were investigated by expressing them alone or as gene fusions with the enhanced version of the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Xenopus oocytes injected with wild-type (wt), mutα7, or the chimeric subunit cDNAs expressed receptors that gated membrane currents when exposed to AcCho. As already known, AcCho currents generated by wtα7 receptors decay much faster than those elicited by the mutα7 receptors. Unexpectedly, the fusion of GFP to the wt and mutated α7 receptors led to opposite results: the AcCho-current decay of the wt receptors became slower, whereas that of the mutated receptors was accelerated. Furthermore, repetitive applications of AcCho led to a considerable “run-down” of the AcCho currents generated by mutα7-GFP receptors, whereas those of the wtα7-GFP receptors remained stable or increased in amplitude. The AcCho-current run-down of mutα7-GFP oocytes was accompanied by a marked decrease of α-bungarotoxin binding activity. Fluorescence, caused by the chimeric receptors expressed, was seen over the whole oocyte surface but was more intense and abundant in the animal hemisphere, whereas it was much weaker in the vegetal hemisphere. We conclude that fusion of GFP to wtα7 and mutα7 receptors provides powerful tools to study the distribution and function of α7 receptors. We also conclude that fused genes do not necessarily recapitulate all of the properties of the original receptors. This fact must be borne close in mind whenever reporter genes are attached to proteins. PMID:11891308

  7. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Progesterone receptor structure and protease activity in primary human endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, P D; Clarke, C L; Satyaswaroop, P G

    1988-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were used to investigate progesterone receptor structure (isoforms) in 33 primary human endometrial tumors. The monoclonal antibodies recognized on protein blots two progesterone receptor proteins with molecular weights of 116,000 and 81,000. The Mr 116,000 protein appeared as a triplet, while a single band was found for the Mr 81,000 protein. The triplet/singlet structure was found in all progesterone receptor-positive tumors, regardless of the degree of tumor differentiation. Protease activity, which gave rise to a false-negative pattern on protein blots, was found in approximately one-half of the tumors in which it was investigated. Inclusion of a cocktail of protease inhibitors during sample preparation resulted in the maintenance of the triplet/singlet progesterone receptor structure. Mixing experiments using a progesterone receptor-rich human endometrial carcinoma (EnCa 101), which lacks protease activity, and protease-containing primary tumor homogenates indicated that the protease was leupeptin sensitive. Interestingly, while the proteolytic activity reduced or eliminated the triplet/singlet progesterone receptor structure seen on protein blot analysis, it did not affect progesterone receptor concentration measured by Scatchard analysis. Sample preparation in the presence of protease inhibitors is therefore a requisite for structural analysis of the progesterone receptor in endometrial tumors.

  9. Transforming Growth Factor-B Receptors in Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    and purification of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) DNA. Bacterial stocks were plated on LB-agar supplemented with 12.5 /(g/ml chloramphenicol ...Y., and Derynck, R. (1996). Receptor- associated Mad homologues synergize as effectors of the TGF-/3 response. Nature 383: 168-172.

  10. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  11. Estrogen and progesterone receptors in human breast cancer. Correlation with histologic subtype and degree of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, R H; Lakatua, D J; Haus, E; Yasmineh, W J

    1986-09-01

    Microscopic review of 490 consecutive human breast biopsy and mastectomy specimens were correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptor content of the tissue, by subtype and degree of differentiation. Of the 4 grades of differentiation, the less differentiated Grade III and IV tumors showed significantly lower levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors in infiltrating ductal and lobular carcinoma (P less than 0.001). In contrast, patients with medullary carcinoma had the lowest tissue levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors with approximately 80% of the cases with less than 10 fmol/mg protein. Patients with mucinous carcinoma had the highest percentages of positive estrogen and progesterone receptor levels (75% and 87%, respectively). Sixty-three percent of the patients with Grade IV infiltrating ductal carcinoma were younger than 53 years of age (P less than 0.001). Patients younger than 53 years of age with Grade II and III infiltrating ductal carcinoma also had significantly lower levels of estrogen receptors, but not of progesterone receptors, than those patients older than 53 years of age (P less than 0.001). Nineteen of 20 "normal" breast tissue specimens were negative (less than 3 fmol/mg protein) for estrogen and progesterone receptors. About 50% of 17 tissue specimens from benign breast lesions (fibroadenoma, fibrocystic disease, sclerosing adenosis) showed positive estrogen (greater than 10 fmol/mg protein) or progesterone receptor values. In two patients with gynecomastia, no estrogen or progesterone receptors were detectable.

  12. Ligand-specific homology modeling of human cannabinoid (CB1) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Rizi; Chang, Chia-en A

    2012-09-01

    Cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is a therapeutic drug target, and its structure and conformational changes after ligand binding are of great interest. To study the protein conformations in ligand bound state and assist in drug discovery, CB1 receptor homology models are needed for computer-based ligand screening. The known CB1 ligands are highly diverse structurally, so CB1 receptor may undergo considerable conformational changes to accept different ligands, which is challenging for molecular docking methods. To account for the flexibility of CB1 receptor, we constructed four CB1 receptor models based on four structurally distinct ligands, HU-210, ACEA, WIN55212-2 and SR141716A, using the newest X-ray crystal structures of human β₂ adrenergic receptor and adenosine A(2A) receptor as templates. The conformations of these four CB1-ligand complexes were optimized by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The models revealed interactions between CB1 receptor and known binders suggested by experiments and could successfully discriminate known ligands and non-binders in our docking assays. MD simulations were used to study the most flexible ligand, ACEA, in its free and bound states to investigate structural mobility achieved by the rearrangement of the fatty acid chain. Our models may capture important conformational changes of CB1 receptor to help improve accuracy in future CB1 drug screening. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Temporal trend of autonomic nerve function and HSP27, MIF and PAI-1 in type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin Zimmerman

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: Neither the neuroprotective substance HSP27 nor the inflammatory substances, MIF and PAI-1 were associated with measures of cardiovascular autonomic nerve function, but a deterioration of such function was observed in relation to increasing HbA1c in T1D during a 20-year follow-up period. Improved glucose control might be associated with protection against autonomic neuropathy in T1D.

  14. A Mini Zinc-Finger Protein (MIF from Gerbera hybrida Activates the GASA Protein Family Gene, GEG, to Inhibit Ray Petal Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meixiang Han

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Petal appearance is an important horticultural trail that is generally used to evaluate the ornamental value of plants. However, knowledge of the molecular regulation of petal growth is mostly derived from analyses of Arabidopsis thaliana, and relatively little is known about this process in ornamental plants. Previously, GEG (Gerbera hybrida homolog of the gibberellin [GA]–stimulated transcript 1 [GAST1] from tomato, a gene from the GA stimulated Arabidopsis (GASA family, was reported to be an inhibitor of ray petal growth in the ornamental species, G. hybrida. To explore the molecular regulatory mechanism of GEG in petal growth inhibition, a mini zinc-finger protein (MIF was identified using yeast one-hybrid (Y1H screen. The direct binding of GhMIF to the GEG promoter was verified by using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a dual-luciferase assay. A yeast two-hybrid (Y2H revealed that GhMIF acts as a transcriptional activator. Transient transformation assay indicated that GhMIF is involved in inhibiting ray petal elongation by activating the expression of GEG. Spatiotemporal expression analyses and hormone treatment assay showed that the expression of GhMIF and GEG is coordinated during petal development. Taken together, these results suggest that GhMIF acts as a direct transcriptional activator of GEG, a gene from the GASA protein family to regulate the petal elongation.

  15. Transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels and blood pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Baumunk, Daniel; Krause, Hans

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) cation channels are involved in the regulation of blood pressure, but this has not been studied using human renal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that the expression of TRPC3 in human renal tissue is associated with blo...

  16. Re-evaluation of the prolactin receptor expression in human breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galsgaard, Elisabeth Douglas; Rasmussen, Birgitte Bruun; Folkesson, Charlotta Grånäs

    2009-01-01

    The pituitary hormone PRL is involved in tumorigenesis in rodents and humans. PRL promotes proliferation, survival and migration of cancer cells acting via the PRL receptor (PRLR). Aiming to perform a large-scale immunohistochemical (IHC) screening of human mammary carcinomas for PRLR expression,...

  17. Increasing epidermal growth factor receptor expression in human melanocytic tumor progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, P. E.; Moretti, S.; Koenders, P. G.; Weterman, M. A.; van Muijen, G. N.; Gianotti, B.; Ruiter, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Different results have been reported on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in human melanocytic lesions, which may be due to different methodologic approaches. Therefore, we compared EGFR expression in six human melanoma cell lines by utilizing the monoclonal antibodies 2E9,

  18. MAPK signaling pathway regulates cerebrovascular receptor expression in human cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansar, Saema; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Waldsee, Roya

    2013-01-01

    if the upregulation of contractile cerebrovascular receptors after 48 h of organ culture of human cerebral arteries involves MAPK pathways and if it can be prevented by a MEK1/2 inhibitor. Human cerebral arteries were obtained from patients undergoing intracranial tumor surgery. The vessels were divided into ring...

  19. Assay of oestrogen and progestin receptors in human meningioma cytosols using immunological methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankenstein, M.A.; Meulen-Dijk, C. van der; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1987-01-01

    Oestrogen (ER) and progestin receptors (PR) were assayed in human meningioma cytosol by radioligand binding assay with Scatchard plot analysis and by monoclonal antibody based enzyme immunoassays. For comparison, human breast cancer tissues were used. Results of both assays agreed very well. For

  20. Functional antagonism of different angiotensin II type I receptor blockers in human arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voors, AA; Buikema, H; van Buiten, A; Lubeck, RH; Boonstra, PW; van Veldhuisen, DJ; van Gilst, WH

    Objectives. To evaluate and compare the functional type and the degree of antagonism of the selective angiotensin II type I receptor blockers (ARB) losartan, EXP 3174 (the active metabolite of losartan), valsartan and candesartan in human internal mammary arteries. Methods. Human internal mammary

  1. High glucose-induced oxidative stress increases transient receptor potential channel expression in human monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wuensch, Tilo; Thilo, Florian; Krueger, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channel-induced cation influx activates human monocytes, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of high glucose-induced oxidative stress on TRP channel expression in human monocytes....

  2. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, W.; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human

  3. Ivermectin binding sites in human and invertebrate Cys-loop receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynagh, Timothy Peter; Lynch, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    Ivermectin is a gold standard antiparasitic drug that has been used successfully to treat billions of humans, livestock and pets. Until recently, the binding site on its Cys-loop receptor target had been a mystery. Recent protein crystal structures, site-directed mutagenesis data and molecular...... for a wide variety of human neurological disorders....

  4. Characterization of gastrins and their receptor in solid human gastric adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Eiland, Signe; Svendsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The gastrin and the gastrin/CCK-B receptor genes are co-expressed in several carcinomas. The primary translational product, progastrin, however, is processed to several peptides of which only those that are α-amidated at their C-terminus are receptor ligands. So far, characterization...... of the progastrin-derived peptides in gastric cancer has not been reported. The authors therefore examined the molecular nature of gastrin and its receptor in human gastric carcinomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty patients with adenocarcinoma underwent partial or total gastrectomy. In samples from each carcinoma......, gastrin peptides were characterized, using a library of sequence-specific immunoassays. Expression was also demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the gastrin and gastrin/CCK-B receptor gene expression was quantitated using real-time PCR, and the receptor protein demonstrated by western...

  5. Human complement receptor type 1/CD35 is an Epstein-Barr Virus receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogembo, Javier G; Kannan, Lakshmi; Ghiran, Ionita; Nicholson-Weller, Anne; Finberg, Robert W; Tsokos, George C; Fingeroth, Joyce D

    2013-02-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) attachment to primary B cells initiates virus entry. Although CD21 is the only known receptor for EBVgp350/220, a recent report documents EBV-infected B cells from a patient genetically deficient in CD21. On normal resting B cells, CD21 forms two membrane complexes: one with CD19 and another with CD35. Whereas the CD21/CD19 complex is widely retained on immortalized and B cell tumor lines, the related complement-regulatory protein CD35 is lost. To determine the role(s) of CD35 in initial infection, we transduced a CD21-negative pre-B cell and myeloid leukemia line with CD35, CD21, or both. Cells expressing CD35 alone bound gp350/220 and became latently infected when the fusion receptor HLA II was coexpressed. Temporal, biophysical, and structural characteristics of CD35-mediated infection were distinct from CD21. Identification of CD35 as an EBV receptor uncovers a salient role in primary infection, addresses unsettled questions of virus tropism, and underscores the importance of EBVgp350/220 for vaccine development. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Complement Receptor Type 1/CD35 Is an Epstein-Barr Virus Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier G. Ogembo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV attachment to primary B cells initiates virus entry. Although CD21 is the only known receptor for EBVgp350/220, a recent report documents EBV-infected B cells from a patient genetically deficient in CD21. On normal resting B cells, CD21 forms two membrane complexes: one with CD19 and another with CD35. Whereas the CD21/CD19 complex is widely retained on immortalized and B cell tumor lines, the related complement-regulatory protein CD35 is lost. To determine the role(s of CD35 in initial infection, we transduced a CD21-negative pre-B cell and myeloid leukemia line with CD35, CD21, or both. Cells expressing CD35 alone bound gp350/220 and became latently infected when the fusion receptor HLA II was coexpressed. Temporal, biophysical, and structural characteristics of CD35-mediated infection were distinct from CD21. Identification of CD35 as an EBV receptor uncovers a salient role in primary infection, addresses unsettled questions of virus tropism, and underscores the importance of EBVgp350/220 for vaccine development.

  7. Hispolon inhibits the growth of estrogen receptor positive human breast cancer cells through modulation of estrogen receptor alpha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Hyang; Jang, Soon Young; Cho, In-Hye [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Darong [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong-Ho, E-mail: jonghokim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacy, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Human estrogen receptor α (ERα) is a nuclear transcription factor that is a major therapeutic target in breast cancer. The transcriptional activity of ERα is regulated by certain estrogen-receptor modulators. Hispolon, isolated from Phellinus linteus, a traditional medicinal mushroom called Sanghwang in Korea, has been used to treat various pathologies, such as inflammation, gastroenteric disorders, lymphatic diseases, and cancers. In this latter context, Hispolon has been reported to exhibit therapeutic efficacy against various cancer cells, including melanoma, leukemia, hepatocarcinoma, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells. However, ERα regulation by Hispolon has not been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of Hispolon on the growth of breast cancer cells. We found that Hispolon decreased expression of ERα at both mRNA and the protein levels in MCF7 and T47D human breast cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Hispolon decreased the transcriptional activity of ERα. Hispolon treatment also inhibited expression of the ERα target gene pS2. We propose that Hispolon, an anticancer drug extracted from natural sources, inhibits cell growth through modulation of ERα in estrogen-positive breast cancer cells and is a candidate for use in human breast cancer chemotherapy. - Highlights: • Hispolon decreased ERα expression at both mRNA and protein levels. • Hispolon decreased ERα transcriptional activity. • Hispolon treatment inhibited expression of ERα target gene pS2. • Shikonin is a candidate chemotherapeutic target in the treatment of human breast cancer.

  8. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, A.; da Cunha-Bang, S.; McMahon, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    [C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely...... than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT receptors with [C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input...... significantly decreased [C]Cimbi-36 binding in all cortical regions with no effects in cerebellum. These results confirm that [C]Cimbi-36 binding is selective for 5-HT receptors in the cerebral cortex and that cerebellum is an appropriate reference tissue for quantification of 5-HT receptors in the human brain...

  9. Crystal structure of the human OX2 orexin receptor bound to the insomnia drug suvorexant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Kolb, Peter; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    The orexin (also known as hypocretin) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to orexin neuropeptides in the central nervous system to regulate sleep and other behavioural functions in humans. Defects in orexin signalling are responsible for the human diseases of narcolepsy and cataplexy; inhibition of orexin receptors is an effective therapy for insomnia. The human OX2 receptor (OX2R) belongs to the β branch of the rhodopsin family of GPCRs, and can bind to diverse compounds including the native agonist peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and the potent therapeutic inhibitor suvorexant. Here, using lipid-mediated crystallization and protein engineering with a novel fusion chimaera, we solved the structure of the human OX2R bound to suvorexant at 2.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals how suvorexant adopts a π-stacked horseshoe-like conformation and binds to the receptor deep in the orthosteric pocket, stabilizing a network of extracellular salt bridges and blocking transmembrane helix motions necessary for activation. Computational docking suggests how other classes of synthetic antagonists may interact with the receptor at a similar position in an analogous π-stacked fashion. Elucidation of the molecular architecture of the human OX2R expands our understanding of peptidergic GPCR ligand recognition and will aid further efforts to modulate orexin signalling for therapeutic ends.

  10. A minimized human insulin-receptor-binding motif revealed in a Conus geographus venom insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menting, John G; Gajewiak, Joanna; MacRaild, Christopher A; Chou, Danny Hung-Chieh; Disotuar, Maria M; Smith, Nicholas A; Miller, Charleen; Erchegyi, Judit; Rivier, Jean E; Olivera, Baldomero M; Forbes, Briony E; Smith, Brian J; Norton, Raymond S; Safavi-Hemami, Helena; Lawrence, Michael C

    2016-10-01

    Insulins in the venom of certain fish-hunting cone snails facilitate prey capture by rapidly inducing hypoglycemic shock. One such insulin, Conus geographus G1 (Con-Ins G1), is the smallest known insulin found in nature and lacks the C-terminal segment of the B chain that, in human insulin, mediates engagement of the insulin receptor and assembly of the hormone's hexameric storage form. Removal of this segment (residues B23-B30) in human insulin results in substantial loss of receptor affinity. Here, we found that Con-Ins G1 is monomeric, strongly binds the human insulin receptor and activates receptor signaling. Con-Ins G1 thus is a naturally occurring B-chain-minimized mimetic of human insulin. Our crystal structure of Con-Ins G1 reveals a tertiary structure highly similar to that of human insulin and indicates how Con-Ins G1's lack of an equivalent to the key receptor-engaging residue PheB24 is mitigated. These findings may facilitate efforts to design ultrarapid-acting therapeutic insulins.

  11. New in vitro tools to study human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) biology: discovery and comparison of human CAR inverse agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küblbeck, Jenni; Jyrkkärinne, Johanna; Molnár, Ferdinand; Kuningas, Tiina; Patel, Jayendra; Windshügel, Björn; Nevalainen, Tapio; Laitinen, Tuomo; Sippl, Wolfgang; Poso, Antti; Honkakoski, Paavo

    2011-12-05

    The human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3) is one of the key regulators of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolism. The unique properties of human CAR, such as the high constitutive activity and the complexity of signaling, as well as the lack of functional and predictive cell-based assays to study the properties of the receptor, have hindered the discovery of selective human CAR ligands. Here we report a novel human CAR inverse agonist, 1-[(2-methylbenzofuran-3-yl)methyl]-3-(thiophen-2-ylmethyl) urea (S07662), which suppresses human CAR activity, recruits the corepressor NCoR in cell-based assays, and attenuates the phenytoin- and 6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO)-induced expression of CYP2B6 mRNA in human primary hepatocytes. The properties of S07662 are also compared with those of known human CAR inverse agonists by using an array of different in vitro and in silico assays. The identified compound S07662 can be used as a chemical tool to study the biological functions of human CAR and also as a starting point for the development of new drugs for various conditions involving the receptor.

  12. Receptor dysfunction and hormone resistance in human diseases--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, C; Famuyiwa, O

    1978-01-01

    Studies of the hormone-receptor interaction have introduced a new chapter in endocrine and metabolic disorders. Receptor (R) dysfunction in human diseases, due either to an alteration in the number or affinity of the R, or to antibodies against the R, is reviewed and classified in the first part of this paper. Disorders where hormone resistance has been implicated, but where R studies are still unavailable are also presented.

  13. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J.S.; Thanos, P K; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interactio...

  14. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  15. The role of proline residues in the structure and function of human MT2 melatonin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazna, Petr; Grycova, Lenka; Balik, Ales; Zemkova, Hana; Friedlova, Eliska; Obsilova, Veronika; Obsil, Tomas; Teisinger, Jan

    2008-11-01

    Melatonin functions as an essential regulator of various physiological processes in all vertebrate species. In mammals, two G protein-coupled melatonin receptors (GPCR) mediate some melatonin's actions: MT1 and MT2. Transmembrane domains (TM) of most GPCRs contain a set of highly conserved proline residues that presumably play important structural and functional roles. As TM segments of MT2 receptor display several interesting differences in expression of specific proline residues compared to other rhodopsin-like receptors (rGPCRs), we investigated the role of proline residues in the structure and function of this receptor. All prolines in TM segments of MT2 receptor were individually replaced with alanine and/or glycine. In addition, the unusual NAxxY motif located in TM7 was mutated to generate highly conserved NPxxY motif found in the majority of rGPCR proteins. Following transient expression in CHO-K1 cells, binding properties of the mutant receptors and their ability to transduce signals were analyzed using (125)I-mel- and [(35)S]GTPgammaS-binding assays, respectively. The impact of the performed mutations on the receptor structure was assessed by molecular dynamic simulations of MT2 receptors embedded in the fully hydrated phospholipid bilayer. Our results indicate that residues P174, P212 and P266 are important for the ligand binding and/or signaling of the human MT2 receptor. We also show that changes within the unusual NAxxY sequence in the TM7 (mutations A305P and A305V) produce defective MT2 receptors indicating an important role of this motif in the function of melatonin receptors.

  16. X-ray structures define human P2X3 receptor gating cycle and antagonist action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Steven E.; Lü, Wei; Oosterheert, Wout; Shekhar, Mrinal; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Gouaux, Eric

    2016-10-01

    P2X receptors are trimeric, non-selective cation channels activated by ATP that have important roles in the cardiovascular, neuronal and immune systems. Despite their central function in human physiology and although they are potential targets of therapeutic agents, there are no structures of human P2X receptors. The mechanisms of receptor desensitization and ion permeation, principles of antagonism, and complete structures of the pore-forming transmembrane domains of these receptors remain unclear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the human P2X3 receptor in apo/resting, agonist-bound/open-pore, agonist-bound/closed-pore/desensitized and antagonist-bound/closed states. The open state structure harbours an intracellular motif we term the ‘cytoplasmic cap’, which stabilizes the open state of the ion channel pore and creates lateral, phospholipid-lined cytoplasmic fenestrations for water and ion egress. The competitive antagonists TNP-ATP and A-317491 stabilize the apo/resting state and reveal the interactions responsible for competitive inhibition. These structures illuminate the conformational rearrangements that underlie P2X receptor gating and provide a foundation for the development of new pharmacological agents.

  17. Purinergic receptors and calcium signalling in human pancreatic duct cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette R; Krabbe, Simon; Novak, Ivana

    2008-01-01

    pancreatic duct cell lines PANC-1 and CFPAC-1. Expression of P2 receptors was examined using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Both cell lines, and also Capan-1 cells, express RNA transcripts for the following receptors: P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11-14 and P2X1, P2X2, P2X4, P2X5, P2X6 and P2X7. Using Fura-2......ATP, commonly used to stimulate P2X7 receptors, elicited non-oscillatory and transient Ca(2+) responses. Ivermectin, a potentiator of P2X4 receptors, increased Ca(2+) signals evoked by ATP. The single cell Ca(2+) measurements indicated functional expression of P2Y2 and other P2Y receptors, and notably...... expression of P2X4 and P2X7 receptors. Expression of P2Y2, P2X4 and P2X7 receptors was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. This fingerprint of P2 receptors in human pancreatic duct models forms the basis for studying effect of nucleotides on ion and fluid secretion, as well as on Ca(2+) and tissue homeostasis...

  18. TRPA1 receptor is upregulated in human oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, J; Perkecz, A; Knie, L; Sétáló, G; Tornóczki, T; Pintér, E; Bán, Á

    2017-03-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology with antigen-specific and non-specific mechanisms. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a non-selective cation channel activated by noxious stimuli such as oxidative stress products evoking pain and release of proinflammatory mediators from sensory nerve endings culminating in neurogenic inflammation. Extraneuronal TRPA1s, for example, on immune cells possess yet unknown functions. We studied the buccal mRNA expression (qPCR) and protein localization (immunohistochemistry) of TRPA1 receptors and key OLP mediator transcripts in oral mucosa samples of healthy volunteers (n = 9), OLP patients (n = 43), and OLP-like hyperkeratotic patients (n = 12). We measured 27.7- and 25.5-fold TRPA1 mRNA increase in OLP and OLP-like hyperkeratotic patients compared to healthy controls. TRPA1 transcripts elevated 2.4-fold in hypertensive OLP but not in hyperkeratotic patients compared to counterparts, reduced by 1.6-fold by angiotensin-convertase inhibitor intake. TRPA1 messenger RNA was more coexpressed with transcripts of tumor necrosis factor α than with interferon γ. Keratinocytes, macrophages but not T cells expressed TRPA1. We provided evidence for the extraneuronal presence and upregulation of the proinflammatory TRPA1 receptor in buccal samples of patients with OLP. This may implicate the ion channel in the pathomechanism of OLP. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Stoichiometries of Transferrin Receptors 1 and 2 in Human Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Chloupková, Maja; Zhang, An-Sheng; Enns, Caroline A.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in either the hereditary hemochromatosis protein, HFE, or transferrin receptor 2, TfR2, result in a similarly severe form of the most common type of iron overload disease called hereditary hemochromatosis. Models of the interactions between HFE, TfR1, and TfR2 imply that these proteins are present in different molar concentrations in the liver, where they control expression of the iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin, in response to body iron loading. The aim of this study was to deter...

  20. Reproductive physiology of a humanized GnRH receptor mouse model: application in evaluation of human-specific analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Javier A; Kohout, Trudy; Pineda, Rafael; Maki, Richard A; Scott Struthers, R; Millar, Robert P

    2013-07-01

    The human GnRH receptor (GNRHR1) has a specific set of properties with physiological and pharmacological influences not appropriately modeled in laboratory animals or cell-based systems. To address this deficiency, we have generated human GNRHR1 knock-in mice and described their reproductive phenotype. Measurement of pituitary GNRHR1 transcripts from homozygous human GNRHR1 knock-in (ki/ki) mice revealed a severe reduction (7- to 8-fold) compared with the mouse Gnrhr1 in wild-type mice. ¹²⁵I-GnRH binding assays on pituitary membrane fractions corroborated reduced human GNRHR1 protein expression in ki/ki mice, as occurs with transfection of human GNRHR1 in cell lines. Female homozygous knock-in mice displayed normal pubertal onset, indicating that a large reduction in GNRHR1 expression is sufficient for this process. However, ki/ki females exhibited periods of prolonged estrous and/or metestrous and reduced fertility. No impairment was found in reproductive maturity or adult fertility in male ki/ki mice. Interestingly, the serum LH response to GnRH challenge was reduced in both knock-in males and females, indicating a reduced GNRHR1 signaling capacity. Small molecules targeting human GPCRs usually have poor activities at homologous rodent receptors, thus limiting their use in preclinical development. Therefore, we tested a human-specific GnRH1 antagonist, NBI-42902, in our mouse model and demonstrated abrogation of a GnRH1-induced serum LH rise in ki/ki mice and an absence of effect in littermates expressing the wild-type murine receptor. This novel model provides the opportunity to study the human receptor in vivo and for screening the activity of human-specific GnRH analogs.

  1. GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells: Anatomical localization and characterization by autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latouche, J.; Crumeyrolle-Arias, M.; Jordan, D.; Kopp, N.; Augendre-Ferrante, B.; Cedard, L.; Haour, F. (Institut Pasteur, Paris (France))

    1989-09-01

    The presence of receptors for GnRH in human ovary has been investigated by quantitative autoradiography. Simultaneous visualization and characterization of specific receptors on frozen sections were obtained on six pairs of human ovaries. Among them only one exhibited a large preovulatory follicle. This dominant follicle exhibited a specific and high affinity binding capacity for {sup 125}I-GnRHa exclusively localized on the granulosa cell layer. Analysis of saturation curve indicates a Kd value of 0.22 nM and Bmax of 9.6 fmol/mg protein. In contrast LH-hCG binding sites were present in all antral follicles. These data demonstrate for the first time the presence of high affinity GnRH receptors in human granulosa cells at a late stage of follicular maturation.

  2. Engineered botulinum neurotoxin B with improved efficacy for targeting human receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Liang; Peng, Lisheng; Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Liu, Sai Man; Park, SunHyun; Yu, Feifan; Boone, Christopher; Palan, Shilpa; Beard, Matthew; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Stenmark, Pål; Krupp, Johannes; Dong, Min

    2017-07-03

    Botulinum neurotoxin B is a Food and Drug Administration-approved therapeutic toxin. However, it has lower binding affinity toward the human version of its major receptor, synaptotagmin II (h-Syt II), compared to mouse Syt II, because of a residue difference. Increasing the binding affinity to h-Syt II may improve botulinum neurotoxin B's therapeutic efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Here we utilized the bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid method and carried out a saturation mutagenesis screen in the Syt II-binding pocket of botulinum neurotoxin B. The screen identifies E1191 as a key residue: replacing it with M/C/V/Q enhances botulinum neurotoxin B binding to human synaptotagmin II. Adding S1199Y/W or W1178Q as a secondary mutation further increases binding affinity. Mutant botulinum neurotoxin B containing E1191M/S1199Y exhibits ~11-fold higher efficacy in blocking neurotransmission than wild-type botulinum neurotoxin B in neurons expressing human synaptotagmin II, demonstrating that enhancing receptor binding increases the overall efficacy at functional levels. The engineered botulinum neurotoxin B provides a platform to develop therapeutic toxins with improved efficacy.Humans are less sensitive to the therapeutic effects of botulinum neurotoxin B (BoNT/B) than the animal models it is tested on due to differences between the human and the mouse receptors. Here, the authors engineer BoNT/B to improve its affinity to human receptors and enhance its therapeutic efficacy.

  3. Structure of human Aichi virus and implications for receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiangxi; Ren, Jingshan; Kotecha, Abhay; Walter, Thomas S; Yuan, Shuai; Yamashita, Teruo; Tuthill, Tobias J; Fry, Elizabeth E; Rao, Zihe; Stuart, David I

    2016-09-05

    Aichi virus (AiV), an unusual and poorly characterized picornavirus, classified in the genus Kobuvirus, can cause severe gastroenteritis and deaths in children below the age of five years, especially in developing countries(1,2). The seroprevalence of AiV is approximately 60% in children under the age of ten years and reaches 90% later in life(3,4). There is no available vaccine or effective antiviral treatment. Here, we describe the structure of AiV at 3.7 Å. This first high-resolution structure for a kobuvirus is intermediate between those of the enteroviruses and cardioviruses, with a shallow, narrow depression bounded by the prominent VP0 CD loops (linking the C and D strands of the β-barrel), replacing the depression known as the canyon, frequently the site of receptor attachment in enteroviruses. VP0 is not cleaved to form VP2 and VP4, so the 'VP2' β-barrel structure is complemented with a unique extended structure on the inside of the capsid. On the outer surface, a polyproline helix structure, not seen previously in picornaviruses is present at the C terminus of VP1, a position where integrin binding motifs are found in some other picornaviruses. A peptide corresponding to this polyproline motif somewhat attenuates virus infectivity, presumably blocking host-cell attachment. This may guide cellular receptor identification.

  4. Up-regulation of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in previously transplanted, denervated nonfailing human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, H M; White, M; Port, J D; Handwerger, D; Larrabee, P; Klein, J; Roden, R A; Skerl, L; Renlund, D G; Feldman, A M

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction in denervated, previously transplanted human ventricular myocardium. In model systems, surgical denervation typically results in both presynaptic and postsynaptic supersensitivity in beta-adrenergic receptor pathways and alteration in G protein-mediated signal transduction. We examined beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction in the left and right ventricles removed from nine subjects with a previous transplant and surgical denervation 25 +/- 4 months after their first transplantation. Twenty-six hearts removed from organ donors served as control hearts. Total beta-adrenergic receptor density and stimulation of muscle contraction in isolated right ventricular trabeculae by the nonselective agonist isoproterenol were similar in the transplant and donor groups. Beta 1-receptor density was not different in the left ventricles of the two groups but tended to be reduced (by 29%, p = 0.09) in transplant right ventricles. By contrast, beta 2-receptor density was higher in transplant left and right ventricles relative to the respective values in donor ventricles by 33% in left ventricles and 97% in right ventricles (both p < 0.05). Isoproterenol, which in particulate fractions of human heart stimulates adenylyl cyclase primarily via beta 2-receptors, produced a greater increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate generation in membranes prepared from transplant left ventricles and right ventricles compared with donors. In contrast, guanosine 5'-[beta,gamma-imido]triphosphate, sodium fluoride and forskolin, which stimulate adenylyl cyclase through nonreceptor/G protein-sensitive mechanisms, yielded similar degrees of adenylyl cyclase stimulation in the two groups, and both pertussis toxin- and cholera toxin-catalyzed adenosine diphosphate ribosylation were not altered in transplanted left ventricles. These data indicate that the transplanted human heart exhibits an up-regulation of

  5. The antibiotic azithromycin is a motilin receptor agonist in human stomach: comparison with erythromycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, John; Sanger, Gareth J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The antibiotic azithromycin is a suggested alternative to erythromycin for treating patients with delayed gastric emptying. However, although hypothesized to activate motilin receptors, supportive evidence is unavailable. This was investigated using recombinant and naturally expressed motilin receptors in human stomach, comparing azithromycin with erythromycin. Experimental Approach [125I]-motilin binding and calcium flux experiments were conducted using human recombinant motilin receptors in CHO cells. Neuromuscular activities were studied using circular muscle of human gastric antrum, after electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic nerves. Key Results Azithromycin (1–100 μM) and erythromycin (3–30 μM) concentration-dependently displaced [125I]-motilin binding to the motilin receptor (52 ± 7 and 58 ± 18% displacement at 100 and 30 μM respectively). Azithromycin, erythromycin and motilin concentration-dependently caused short-lived increases in intracellular [Ca2+] in cells expressing the motilin receptor. EC50 values were, respectively, 2.9, 0.92 and 0.036 μM (n = 3 each); and maximal activities were similar. In human stomach, EFS evoked cholinergically mediated contractions, attenuated by simultaneous nitrergic activation. Azithromycin and erythromycin lactobionate (30–300 μM each) facilitated these contractions (apparent Emax values of 2007 ± 396 and 1924 ± 1375%, n = 3–4 each concentration, respectively). These actions were slow in onset and faded slowly. The higher concentrations also evoked short-lived muscle contraction. Contractions to a submaximally effective concentration of carbachol were unaffected by either drug. Conclusions and Implications Azithromcyin activates human recombinant motilin receptors in therapeutically relevant concentrations, similar to erythromycin. In humans, gastric antrum azithromycin caused long-lasting facilitation of cholinergic activity. These actions explain the gastric prokinetic

  6. The human receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and glycosylation variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Ploug, M

    1990-01-01

    The receptor for human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) was purified from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated U937 cells by temperature-induced phase separation of detergent extracts, followed by affinity chromatography with immobilized diisopropyl fluorophosphate-treated u....... The protein has a high content of cysteine residues. The NH2-terminal sequence is not closely related to any known sequence. The identification of the purified and sequenced protein with the human u-PA receptor is based on the following findings: 1) the ability of the purified protein to bind u-PA and its...

  7. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callihan Phillip

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors.

  8. Intercellular calcium signaling occurs between human osteoblasts and osteoclasts and requires activation of osteoclast P2X7 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas R; Henriksen, Zanne; Sørensen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    that human osteoclasts expressed functional P2Y1 receptors, but, unexpectedly, desensitization of P2Y1 did not block calcium signaling to osteoclasts. We also found that osteoclasts expressed functional P2X7 receptors and showed that pharmacological inhibition of these receptors blocked calcium signaling...

  9. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  10. Involvement of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor in apoptosis during human fetal adrenal gland development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoux, E; Breault, L; Lehoux, J G; Gallo-Payet, N

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a link between the highly expressed angiotensin II (Ang II) type 2 receptor (AT2) in human fetal adrenal cells and the proposed apoptotic activity in the center of the gland. There was an important increase in apoptotic DNA fragmentation with age in adrenal glands of fetuses from 15-20 weeks gestation. Adrenal cells showing the characteristic apoptotic internucleosomal DNA fragmentation were localized in the central portion of the fetal zone. In cells cultured for 24 h, Ang II, via the AT2 receptor, induced DNA fragmentation and cleavage of the DNA repair enzyme, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Furthermore, characteristic membrane blebbing was observed specifically on cells of the fetal zone. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that stimulation with Ang II or CGP 42112 (an agonist of the AT2 receptor) strongly modified the actin network, now localized exclusively along the plasma membrane, with a predominance of labeling at the base of the bleb formation. This rearrangement of actin distribution was different in cells from the definitive zone, corroborating the observation that these cells express many more Ang II type 1 receptors (AT1) than AT2 receptors. Taken together, our data indicate that the AT2 receptor is involved in the apoptotic process observed in the human fetal adrenal gland and could participate in the morphological changes occurring after birth, leading to involution of the fetal zone.

  11. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Effects of dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonism on human planning and spatial working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naef, M; Müller, U; Linssen, A; Clark, L; Robbins, T W; Eisenegger, C

    2017-04-25

    Psychopharmacological studies in humans suggest important roles for dopamine (DA) D2 receptors in human executive functions, such as cognitive planning and spatial working memory (SWM). However, studies that investigate an impairment of such functions using the selective DA D2/3 receptor antagonist sulpiride have yielded inconsistent results, perhaps because relatively low doses were used. We believe we report for the first time, the effects of a higher (800 mg p.o.) single dose of sulpiride as well as of genetic variation in the DA receptor D2 gene (DA receptor D2 Taq1A polymorphism), on planning and working memory. With 78 healthy male volunteers, we apply a between-groups, placebo-controlled design. We measure outcomes in the difficult versions of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery One-Touch Stockings of Cambridge and the self-ordered SWM task. Volunteers in the sulpiride group showed significant impairments in planning accuracy and, for the more difficult problems, in SWM. Sulpiride administration speeded response latencies in the planning task on the most difficult problems. Volunteers with at least one copy of the minor allele (A1+) of the DA receptor D2 Taq1A polymorphism showed better SWM capacity, regardless of whether they received sulpiride or placebo. There were no effects on blood pressure, heart rate or subjective sedation. In sum, a higher single dose of sulpiride impairs SWM and executive planning functions, in a manner independent of the DA receptor D2 Taq1A polymorphism.

  13. Palindromic nucleotide analysis in human T cell receptor rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available Diversity of T cell receptor (TCR genes is primarily generated by nucleotide insertions upon rearrangement from their germ line-encoded V, D and J segments. Nucleotide insertions at V-D and D-J junctions are random, but some small subsets of these insertions are exceptional, in that one to three base pairs inversely repeat the sequence of the germline DNA. These short complementary palindromic sequences are called P nucleotides. We apply the ImmunoSeq deep-sequencing assay to the third complementarity determining region (CDR3 of the β chain of T cell receptors, and use the resulting data to study P nucleotides in the repertoire of naïve and memory CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells. We estimate P nucleotide distributions in a cross section of healthy adults and different T cell subtypes. We show that P nucleotide frequency in all T cell subtypes ranges from 1% to 2%, and that the distribution is highly biased with respect to the coding end of the gene segment. Classification of observed palindromic sequences into P nucleotides using a maximum conditional probability model shows that single base P nucleotides are very rare in VDJ recombination; P nucleotides are primarily two bases long. To explore the role of P nucleotides in thymic selection, we compare P nucleotides in productive and non-productive sequences of CD8(+ naïve T cells. The naïve CD8(+ T cell clones with P nucleotides are more highly expanded.

  14. Influence of combined thrombin stimulation, surface activation, and receptor occupancy on organization of GPIb/IX receptors on human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J G; Krumwiede, M; Cocking-Johnson, D; Escolar, G

    1994-09-01

    Down-regulation and clearance of as many as 60-80% of GPIb/IX receptors from exposed surfaces on thrombin-activated platelets to channels of the open canalicular system (OCS) is considered to be a fundamental mechanism regulating platelet adhesivity in vitro and in vivo. The present study has combined thrombin stimulation in suspension, surface activation on formvar grids, receptor occupancy by von Willebrand factor (vWF) and exposure to anti-vWF antibody in an effort to demonstrate the removal of GPIb/IX receptors from activated cells. Individually the stimuli failed to cause any change in the frequency of GPIb/IX receptors. Combined, the stimuli were no more effective than when each was used alone. The only way to cause GPIb/IX to move was to add anti-vWF to thrombin-activated platelets allowed to spread on formvar grids and covered with multimers of ristocetin-activated human or bovine vWF. Translocation of GPIb/IX-vWF-anti-vWF complexes from peripheral margins into caps over cell centres, however, did not clear the peripheral zone of vWF binding capacity. Exposure of capped platelets after fixation to a second incubation with vWF demonstrated as many multimers extending from the central cap to the peripheral margins as were seen on platelets exposed a single time to vWF. Antibodies to GPIb, but not to GPIIb/IIIA, prevented the second labelling by vWF. Down-regulation or clearance of GPIb/IX, in light of this study, does not appear to be a fundamental mechanism modulating platelet adhesivity.

  15. The Fc and not CD4 Receptor Mediates Antibody Enhancement of HIV Infection in Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homsy, Jacques; Meyer, Mia; Tateno, Masatoshi; Clarkson, Sarah; Levy, Jay A.

    1989-06-01

    Antibodies that enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infectivity have been found in the blood of infected individuals and in infected or immunized animals. These findings raise serious concern for the development of a safe vaccine against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To address the in vivo relevance and mechanism of this phenomenon, antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity in peripheral blood macrophages, lymphocytes, and human fibroblastoid cells was studied. Neither Leu3a, a monoclonal antibody directed against the CD4 receptor, nor soluble recombinant CD4 even at high concentrations prevented this enhancement. The addition of monoclonal antibody to the Fc receptor III (anti-FcRIII), but not of antibodies that react with FcRI or FcRII, inhibited HIV type 1 and HIV type 2 enhancement in peripheral blood macrophages. Although enhancement of HIV infection in CD4+ lymphocytes could not be blocked by anti-FcRIII, it was inhibited by the addition of human immunoglobulin G aggregates. The results indicate that the FcRIII receptor on human macrophages and possibly another Fc receptor on human CD4+ lymphocytes mediate antibody-dependent enhancement of HIV infectivity and that this phenomenon proceeds through a mechanism independent of the CD4 protein.

  16. Expression and purification of functional human mu opioid receptor from E.coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbin Ma

    Full Text Available N-terminally his-tagged human mu opioid receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor was produced in E.coli employing synthetic codon-usage optimized constructs. The receptor was expressed in inclusion bodies and membrane-inserted in different E.coli strains. By optimizing the expression conditions the expression level for the membrane-integrated receptor was raised to 0.3-0.5 mg per liter of culture. Milligram quantities of receptor could be enriched by affinity chromatography from IPTG induced cultures grown at 18°C. By size exclusion chromatography the protein fraction with the fraction of alpha-helical secondary structure expected for a 7-TM receptor was isolated, by CD-spectroscopy an alpha-helical content of ca. 45% was found for protein solubilised in the detergent Fos-12. Receptor in Fos-12 micelles was shown to bind endomorphin-1 with a K(D of 61 nM. A final yield of 0.17 mg functional protein per liter of culture was obtained.

  17. Expression and purification of functional human mu opioid receptor from E.coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanbin; Kubicek, Jan; Labahn, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    N-terminally his-tagged human mu opioid receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor was produced in E.coli employing synthetic codon-usage optimized constructs. The receptor was expressed in inclusion bodies and membrane-inserted in different E.coli strains. By optimizing the expression conditions the expression level for the membrane-integrated receptor was raised to 0.3-0.5 mg per liter of culture. Milligram quantities of receptor could be enriched by affinity chromatography from IPTG induced cultures grown at 18°C. By size exclusion chromatography the protein fraction with the fraction of alpha-helical secondary structure expected for a 7-TM receptor was isolated, by CD-spectroscopy an alpha-helical content of ca. 45% was found for protein solubilised in the detergent Fos-12. Receptor in Fos-12 micelles was shown to bind endomorphin-1 with a K(D) of 61 nM. A final yield of 0.17 mg functional protein per liter of culture was obtained.

  18. Activation of prostaglandin EP receptors by lubiprostone in rat and human stomach and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassil, A K; Borman, R A; Jarvie, E M; McArthur-Wilson, R J; Thangiah, R; Sung, E Z H; Lee, K; Sanger, G J

    2008-05-01

    Lubiprostone (Amitiza), a possible ClC-2 channel opener derived from prostaglandin E(1) and indicated for the treatment of constipation, increases chloride ion transport and fluid secretion into the intestinal lumen. As lubiprostone may also directly modulate gastrointestinal motility, we investigated its actions and the possible involvement of prostaglandin EP receptor activation on rat and human isolated gastrointestinal preparations. Rat and human isolated preparations were mounted in tissue baths for isometric recording. The effects of lubiprostone on muscle tension and on electrically stimulated, neuronal contractions were investigated in the absence and presence of EP receptor antagonists. In rat and human stomach longitudinal muscle, lubiprostone induced a contraction (pEC(50) of 7.0+/-0.0, n=4 and 6.4+/-0.2, n=3, respectively), which was inhibited by pretreatment with the EP(1) receptor antagonist, EP(1)A 300 nM (pEC(50) reduced to 6.2+/-0.2, n=6), but not by the EP(3) or EP(4) receptor antagonists (L-798106 and GW627368X, respectively, 1 microM, P>0.05). Lubiprostone also reduced electrically stimulated, neuronal contractions in rat and human colon circular muscle preparations (pIC(50) of 8.9+/-0.4, n=7 and 8.7+/-0.9, n=6, respectively), an effect mediated pre-junctionally. This effect was reduced by the EP(4) receptor antagonist (pIC(50) of 6.7+/-1.1, n=7 and 7.7+/-0.4, n=6, respectively) but not by EP(1) or EP(3) receptor antagonists. In rats and humans, lubiprostone contracts stomach longitudinal muscle and inhibits neuronally mediated contractions of colon circular muscle. Experiments are now needed to determine if this additional activity of lubiprostone contributes to its clinical efficacy and/or side-effect profile.

  19. Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN): a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Avijit; Jatana, Nidhi; Latha, N

    2014-09-21

    Dopamine receptors (DR) are one of the major neurotransmitter receptors present in human brain. Malfunctioning of these receptors is well established to trigger many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Taking into consideration that proteins function collectively in a network for most of the biological processes, the present study is aimed to depict the interactions between all dopamine receptors following a systems biology approach. To capture comprehensive interactions of candidate proteins associated with human dopamine receptors, we performed a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis of all five receptors and their protein partners by mapping them into human interactome and constructed a human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN). We explored the topology of dopamine receptors as molecular network, revealing their characteristics and the role of central network elements. More to the point, a sub-network analysis was done to determine major functional clusters in human DRIN that govern key neurological pathways. Besides, interacting proteins in a pathway were characterized and prioritized based on their affinity for utmost drug molecules. The vulnerability of different networks to the dysfunction of diverse combination of components was estimated under random and direct attack scenarios. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is unique to put all five dopamine receptors together in a common interaction network and to understand the functionality of interacting proteins collectively. Our study pinpointed distinctive topological and functional properties of human dopamine receptors that have helped in identifying potential therapeutic drug targets in the dopamine interaction network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of the human ABCC6 gene is induced by retinoids through the retinoid X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajewski, Marcin; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Pulaski, Lukasz

    2006-12-01

    Mutations in the human ABCC6 gene are responsible for the disease pseudoxanthoma elasticum, although the physiological function or substrate of the gene product (an ABC transporter known also as MRP6) is not known. We found that the expression of this gene in cells of hepatic origin (where this gene is predominantly expressed in the body) is significantly upregulated by retinoids, acting as agonists of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) rather than the retinoid A receptor (RAR). The direct involvement of this nuclear receptor in the transcriptional regulation of ABCC6 gene expression was confirmed by transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This constitutes the first direct proof of previously suggested involvement of nuclear hormone receptors in ABCC6 gene expression and the first identification of a transcription factor which may be relevant to regulation of ABCC6 level in tissues and in some PXE patients.

  1. Positive selection moments identify potential functional residues in human olfactory receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Weisinger-Lewin, Y.; Lancet, D.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated mutation analysis and molecular models of olfactory receptors have provided evidence that residues in the transmembrane domains form a binding pocket for odor ligands. As an independent test of these results, we have calculated positive selection moments for the alpha-helical sixth transmembrane domain (TM6) of human olfactory receptors. The moments can be used to identify residues that have been preferentially affected by positive selection and are thus likely to interact with odor ligands. The results suggest that residue 622, which is commonly a serine or threonine, could form critical H-bonds. In some receptors a dual-serine subsite, formed by residues 622 and 625, could bind hydroxyl determinants on odor ligands. The potential importance of these residues is further supported by site-directed mutagenesis in the beta-adrenergic receptor. The findings should be of practical value for future physiological studies, binding assays, and site-directed mutagenesis.

  2. Low Expression of Estrogen Receptor-α and Progesterone Receptor in Human Breast Cancer Tissues Is Associated With High-Grade Human Cytomegalovirus Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbar, Afsar; Touma, Joel; Costa, Helena; Davoudi, Belghis; Bukholm, Ida Rashid; Sauer, Torill; Vetvik, Katja; Geisler, Jürgen; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia

    2017-11-01

    The underlying mechanisms for breast cancer (BC) are largely unknown. We investigated possible correlations between the expression levels of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins and established histopathological markers of BC, including expression of estrogen receptor (ER)-α, the progesterone receptor (PgR), and HER2. We retrospectively examined paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens of BC (n = 62), ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 19), and adjacent normal breast tissue (n = 42) for HCMV immediate-early protein (IE), HCMV late antigen, HCMV DNA and RNA, and investigated possible correlations between them and expression of ER-α, PgR, and HER2. HCMV DNA and RNA were detected in all examined infiltrating BCs. High-grade positivity for HCMV-IE was detected in 77% of infiltrating BCs, 39% of ductal carcinomas in situ, and 7% of tumor-free breast tissue samples. HCMV expression correlated inversely with ER-α (P = .02) and PgR (P = .003) expression. HER2 expression was also reduced in HCMV-positive samples without reaching a level of statistical significance (P = .09). The negative correlation between high-grade expression HCMV-IE and hormone receptor expression suggests a role for HCMV in hormone receptor-negative BC tumors, possibly by forcing BC cells into a more aggressive phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fatty acids with in vitro binding affinity for human opioid receptors from the fungus Emericella nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, Amer H; León, Francisco; Radwan, Mohamed M; Wang, Xiaoning; Dale, Olivia R; Husni, Afeef S; Rosa, Luiz H; Cutler, Stephen J

    2013-11-06

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of the EtOAc extracts of the epiphytic fungus Emericella nidulans resulted in the isolation of a mixture of two fatty acids. This mixture showed 98% binding affinity to human δ opioid receptor. These two fatty acids were identified as palmitic (PAM), 1, and linoleic acids (LNA), 2, by 1D NMR as well as by GC/MS analysis, after their methylation. We found that different ratio mixtures of 1 and 2 showed variations in selective binding activities to human δ opioid receptors. Five more fatty acids, arachidonic acid (ARA), 3, cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexanoic acid (DHA), 4, cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 5, linolenic acid (ALA), 6, and γ-linolenic acid (GLA), 7, were evaluated for their binding affinity for opioid receptors. ARA, 3, displayed affinity to δ and μ human opioid receptors with 68% and 80%, respectively. GLA, 7, showed selective binding affinity to μ receptor with a value of 55%. These findings provide fascinating insight into the use of foods with high concentrations of fatty acids.

  4. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Kanamarlapudi

    Full Text Available Adenosine diphosphate (ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6 in the internalization and function of P2Y(1 and P2Y(12 purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1 or P2Y(12 purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function.

  5. Distribution of catecholaminergic neurotransmitters and related receptors in human bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Bruzzone, Paolo; Tonnarini, Gianfranco; Cavallotti, Daniela

    2004-01-01

    The functions of the bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) are under the control of the autonomic nervous system (sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers). The relationships between the adrenergic nerve fibers and beta-adrenergic receptors were studied in the human BALT with the aim to demonstrate a probable neuromodulation. Morphological observations (staining with hematoxylin-eosin and scanning electron microscopy images) were carried out on samples of human BALT harvested during autopsies. Moreover, histochemical staining for norepinephrine (adrenaline = adrenergic nerve fibers) as well as for other catecholamines was performed. Finally, beta-adrenergic receptors were stained by means of a beta-blocking, radiolabeled drug (pindolol 125I). All our data were submitted to morphometric analysis (quantitative analysis of images and statistical analysis of data). Our results provide direct evidence of the presence and distribution of catecholaminergic nerve fibers and related beta-adrenergic receptors in BALT. beta-Adrenergic receptors are present above all in the most richly innervated part of the BALT, and are, therefore, in close relationship with their related adrenergic nerve fibers. Studies on the distribution of adrenergic neurotransmitters and related beta-adrenergic receptors in the human BALT are the first step for the demonstration of a probable neuromodulation of BALT.

  6. Dopamine D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of prefrontal signals in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahnt, Thorsten; Weber, Susanna C; Haker, Helene; Robbins, Trevor W; Tobler, Philippe N

    2015-03-04

    The prefrontal cortex houses representations critical for ongoing and future behavior expressed in the form of patterns of neural activity. Dopamine has long been suggested to play a key role in the integrity of such representations, with D2-receptor activation rendering them flexible but weak. However, it is currently unknown whether and how D2-receptor activation affects prefrontal representations in humans. In the current study, we use dopamine receptor-specific pharmacology and multivoxel pattern-based functional magnetic resonance imaging to test the hypothesis that blocking D2-receptor activation enhances prefrontal representations. Human subjects performed a simple reward prediction task after double-blind and placebo controlled administration of the D2-receptor antagonist amisulpride. Using a whole-brain searchlight decoding approach we show that D2-receptor blockade enhances decoding of reward signals in the medial orbitofrontal cortex. Examination of activity patterns suggests that amisulpride increases the separation of activity patterns related to reward versus no reward. Moreover, consistent with the cortical distribution of D2 receptors, post hoc analyses showed enhanced decoding of motor signals in motor cortex, but not of visual signals in visual cortex. These results suggest that D2-receptor blockade enhances content-specific representations in frontal cortex, presumably by a dopamine-mediated increase in pattern separation. These findings are in line with a dual-state model of prefrontal dopamine, and provide new insights into the potential mechanism of action of dopaminergic drugs. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354104-08$15.00/0.

  7. Kinin B1 receptors contributes to acute pain following minor surgery in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahim Jaime S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinins play an important role in regulation of pain and hyperalgesia after tissue injury and inflammation by activating two types of G-protein-coupled receptors, the kinin B1 and B2 receptors. It is generally accepted that the B2 receptor is constitutively expressed, whereas the B1 receptor is induced in response to inflammation. However, little is known about the regulatory effects of kinin receptors on the onset of acute inflammation and inflammatory pain in humans. The present study investigated the changes in gene expression of kinin receptors and the levels of their endogenous ligands at an early time point following tissue injury and their relation to clinical pain, as well as the effect of COX-inhibition on their expression levels. Results Tissue injury resulted in a significant up-regulation in the gene expression of B1 and B2 receptors at 3 hours post-surgery, the onset of acute inflammatory pain. Interestingly, the up-regulation in the gene expression of B1 and B2 receptors was positively correlated to pain intensity only after ketorolac treatment, signifying an interaction between prostaglandins and kinins in the inflammatory pain process. Further, the gene expression of both B1 and B2 receptors were correlated. Following tissue injury, B1 ligands des-Arg9-BK and des-Arg10-KD were significantly lower at the third hour compared to the first 2 hours in both the placebo and the ketorolac treatment groups but did not differ significantly between groups. Tissue injury also resulted in the down-regulation of TRPV1 gene expression at 3 hours post-surgery with no significant effect by ketorolac treatment. Interestingly, the change in gene expression of TRPV1 was correlated to the change in gene expression of B1 receptor but not B2 receptor. Conclusions These results provide evidence at the transcriptional level in a clinical model of tissue injury that up-regulation of kinin receptors are involved in the development of the

  8. Cloning and expression of the human N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit NR3A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Maria; Nilsson, Anna; Froelich-Fabre, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    Native N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are heteromeric assemblies of four or five subunits. The NMDA receptor subunits, NR1, NR2A, NR2B, NR2C, and NR2D have been cloned in several species, including man. The NR3A subunit, which in rodents is predominantly expressed during early development......, seems to function by reducing the NMDA receptor response. The human homologue to the rat NR3A, however, had not been cloned. In order to study the functions of the human NR3A (hNR3A), we have cloned and sequenced the hNR3A. It was found to share 88% of the DNA sequence with the rat gene, corresponding...

  9. Identification of hormonal receptors in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa Pascual, M.; Lage, A.; Diaz, J.W.; Moreno, L.; Marta Diaz, T. (Instituto de Oncologia y Radiobiologia, La Habana (Cuba))

    1981-01-01

    The experience in the implementation of a technique for determining hormono-dependence of human breast cancer is presented. The results found with the use of the technique in 50 patients with malignant breast cancer treated at IOR are examined and discussed.

  10. PTRF/cavin-1 and MIF proteins are identified as non-small cell lung cancer biomarkers by label-free proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Gámez-Pozo

    Full Text Available With the completion of the human genome sequence, biomedical sciences have entered in the "omics" era, mainly due to high-throughput genomics techniques and the recent application of mass spectrometry to proteomics analyses. However, there is still a time lag between these technological advances and their application in the clinical setting. Our work is designed to build bridges between high-performance proteomics and clinical routine. Protein extracts were obtained from fresh frozen normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer samples. We applied a phosphopeptide enrichment followed by LC-MS/MS. Subsequent label-free quantification and bioinformatics analyses were performed. We assessed protein patterns on these samples, showing dozens of differential markers between normal and tumor tissue. Gene ontology and interactome analyses identified signaling pathways altered on tumor tissue. We have identified two proteins, PTRF/cavin-1 and MIF, which are differentially expressed between normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer. These potential biomarkers were validated using western blot and immunohistochemistry. The application of discovery-based proteomics analyses in clinical samples allowed us to identify new potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer.

  11. Receptor blocking drugs and amphetamine anorexia in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, E; Trenchard, E; Silverstone, T

    1987-01-01

    The interaction between the receptor antagonist thymoxamine (THYM), propranolol (PPL) and metergoline (MTG) with dexamphetamine (d-Amp)-induced anorexia was examined in a series of studies in normal female volunteers. Visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of hunger were made and food intake was measured using an automated solid food dispenser (AFD). d-Amp (10 mg) significantly depressed hunger ratings compared to placebo in two of the three studies and its effect was countered by the addition of MTG (4 mg). d-Amp significantly reduced food intake compared to placebo in two studies. In all trials the reduction in food intake following d-Amp was significantly greater than would have been predicted from its effect on hunger. THYM (160 mg) and PPL (40 mg) were associated with no changes in food intake when given alone or with d-Amp, MTG increased food intake (but not significantly) and the combined effects of MTG and d-Amp was the algebraic sum of the effect of each; but there appeared to be no true pharmacological interaction between blocker and anorectic. The results indicated that there may be some dissociation between the effect of d-Amp on hunger and food intake but have failed to produce evidence that noradrenergic pathways are involved. The results are consistent with the theories that d-Amp anorexia does not involve the release of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) but that 5-HT pathways are involved in the feeding process.

  12. Inhibitory effects of two G protein-coupled receptor kinases on the cell surface expression and signaling of the human adrenomedullin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwasako, Kenji, E-mail: kuwasako@med.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Toshio [Noto Marine Laboratory, Division of Marine Environmental Studies, Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa, 927-0553 (Japan); Nagata, Sayaka [Division of Circulatory and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Jiang, Danfeng; Hayashi, Hidetaka [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Murakami, Manabu [Department of Pharmacology, Hirosaki University, Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, 036-8562 (Japan); Hattori, Yuichi [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama, 930-0194 (Japan); Kitamura, Kazuo [Division of Circulatory and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan); Kato, Johji [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, 889-1692 (Japan)

    2016-02-19

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR, a family B GPCR) to form the type 1 adrenomedullin receptor (AM{sub 1} receptor). Here, we investigated the effects of the five non-visual GPCR kinases (GRKs 2 through 6) on the cell surface expression of the human (h)AM{sub 1} receptor by cotransfecting each of these GRKs into HEK-293 cells that stably expressed hRAMP2. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that when coexpressed with GRK4 or GRK5, the cell surface expression of the AM{sub 1} receptor was markedly decreased prior to stimulation with AM, thereby attenuating both the specific [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-induced cAMP production. These inhibitory effects of both GRKs were abolished by the replacement of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of CLR with that of the calcitonin receptor (a family B GPCR) or β{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor (a family A GPCR). Among the sequentially truncated CLR C-tail mutants, those lacking the five residues 449–453 (Ser-Phe-Ser-Asn-Ser) abolished the inhibition of the cell surface expression of CLR via the overexpression of GRK4 or GRK5. Thus, we provided new insight into the function of GRKs in agonist-unstimulated GPCR trafficking using a recombinant AM{sub 1} receptor and further determined the region of the CLR C-tail responsible for this GRK function. - Highlights: • We discovered a novel function of GRKs in GPCR trafficking using human CLR/RAMP2. • GRKs 4 and 5 markedly inhibited the cell surface expression of human CLR/RAMP2. • Both GRKs exhibited highly significant receptor signaling inhibition. • Five residues of the C-terminal tail of CLR govern this function of GRKs.

  13. LH-Receptor Gene Expression in Human Granulosa and Cumulus Cells from Antral and Preovulatory Follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Janni Vikkelsø; Kristensen, Stine Gry; Nielsen, Maria Eilsø

    2012-01-01

    Context:Human granulosa cells (GC) acquire LH receptor (LHR) expression during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Currently, the precise follicular stage is unknown, and specific roles of LH in the follicular development are not fully understood.Objective:Our objective was to measure LH...

  14. Blockade of alcohol's amnestic activity in humans by an alpha5 subtype benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J; Besson, Marie; Wilson, Susan J; Dawson, Gerard R; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2007-12-01

    Alcohol produces many subjective and objective effects in man including pleasure, sedation, anxiolysis, plus impaired eye movements and memory. In human volunteers we have used a newly available GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist that is selective for the alpha5 subtype (a5IA) to evaluate the role of this subtype in mediating these effects of alcohol on the brain. After pre-treatment with a5IA, we found almost complete blockade of the marked impairment caused by alcohol (mean breath concentration 150mg/100ml) of word list learning and partial but non-significant reversal of subjective sedation without effects on other measures such as intoxication, liking, and slowing of eye movements. This action was not due to alterations in alcohol kinetics and so provides the first proof of concept that selectively decreasing GABA-A receptor function at a specific receptor subtype can offset some actions of alcohol in humans. It also supports growing evidence for a key role of the alpha5 subtype in memory. Inverse agonists at other GABA-A receptor subtypes may prove able to reverse other actions of alcohol, and so offer a new approach to understanding the actions of alcohol in the human brain and in the treatment of alcohol related disorders in humans.

  15. Key region of laminin receptor 1 for interaction with human period 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... The 67 kDa laminin receptor 1 (Lamr1) is a novel protein that interacts with human circadian clock protein period 1 (hPer1). We confirmed the interaction between hPer1 and complete Lamr1 (295 amino acids) through yeast two-hybrid system in the present study. And we identified the interaction between.

  16. Aging Effects of Caenorhabditis elegans Ryanodine Receptor Variants Corresponding to Human Myopathic Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Nicoll Baines

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Delaying the decline in skeletal muscle function will be critical to better maintenance of an active lifestyle in old age. The skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor, the major intracellular membrane channel through which calcium ions pass to elicit muscle contraction, is central to calcium ion balance and is hypothesized to be a significant factor for age-related decline in muscle function. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a key model system for the study of human aging, and strains were generated with modified C. elegans ryanodine receptors corresponding to human myopathic variants linked with malignant hyperthermia and related conditions. The altered response of these strains to pharmacological agents reflected results of human diagnostic tests for individuals with these pathogenic variants. Involvement of nerve cells in the C. elegans responses may relate to rare medical symptoms concerning the central nervous system that have been associated with ryanodine receptor variants. These single amino acid modifications in C. elegans also conferred a reduction in lifespan and an accelerated decline in muscle integrity with age, supporting the significance of ryanodine receptor function for human aging.

  17. Identification of Odorant-Receptor Interactions by Global Mapping of the Human Odorome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audouze, Karine Marie Laure; Tromelin, Anne; Le Bon, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    The human olfactory system recognizes a broad spectrum of odorants using approximately 400 different olfactory receptors ( hORs). Although significant improvements of heterologous expression systems used to study interactions between ORs and odorant molecules have been made, screening the olfacto...

  18. Vitamin D receptor and vitamin D metabolizing enzymes are expressed in the human male reproductive tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg Jensen, Martin; Nielsen, John E; Jørgensen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is expressed in human testis, and vitamin D (VD) has been suggested to affect survival and function of mature spermatozoa. Indeed, VDR knockout mice and VD deficient rats show decreased sperm counts and low fertility. However, the cellular response to VD is complex...

  19. Estrogen receptors in the human male bladder, prostatic urethra, and prostate. An immunohistochemical and biochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Balslev, E; Juul, B R

    1995-01-01

    The distribution and quantity of estrogen receptors (ERs) in the human male bladder, prostatic urethra and the prostate were studied in eight males with recurrent papillomas of the bladder or monosymptomatic hematuria (median age 61 years), 14 men undergoing transurethral resection due to benign...

  20. Predicting dopamine D2 receptor occupancy in humans using a physiology-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Martin; Kozielska, Magdalena; Pilla Reddy, Venkatesh; Vermeulen, An; Barton, Hugh A.; Grimwood, Sarah; de Greef, Rik; Groothuis, Genoveva; Danhof, Meindert; Proost, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: A hybrid physiology-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic model (PBPKPD) was used to predict the time course of dopamine receptor occupancy (D2RO) in human striatum following the administration of antipsychotic (AP) drugs, using in vitro and in silico information. Methods: A hybrid

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  2. Pulsatile atheroprone shear stress affects the expression of transient receptor potential channels in human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Vorderwülbecke, Bernd J; Marki, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the study was to assess whether pulsatile atheroprone shear stress modulates the expression of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, TRPC3, TRPC6, TRPM7, and TRPV1 mRNA, in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. Exposure of cultured vascular endothelial cells to defined...

  3. Interleukin-6 receptor expression in contracting human skeletal muscle: regulating role of IL-6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Pernille; Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    Contracting muscle fibers produce and release IL-6, and plasma levels of this cytokine are markedly elevated in response to physical exercise. We recently showed autocrine regulation of IL-6 in human skeletal muscle in vivo and hypothesized that this may involve up-regulation of the IL-6 receptor...

  4. Differential distribution of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in developing human cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Karin; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Sinico, Martine; Aronica, Eleonora

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal and glial cells in human cerebral cortex are enriched in group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Developmental regulation of mGluRs has been shown in rodent brain and recent studies suggest an involvement of mGluR-mediated glutamate signaling in the proliferation and survival of

  5. Partial functional complementation between human and mouse cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrell, Helen E; Abraham, Alexander M; Cardin, Rhonda D

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (CMV) proteins US28 and UL33 are homologous to chemokine receptors (CKRs). Knockout of the mouse CMV M33 protein (UL33 homologue) results in substantial attenuation of salivary gland infection/replication and reduced efficiency of reactivation from tissue explants. M33...

  6. Murine cytomegalovirus (CMV) M33 and human CMV US28 receptors exhibit similar constitutive signaling activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldhoer, Maria; Kledal, Thomas N; Farrell, Helen

    2002-01-01

    Cellular infection by cytomegalovirus (CMV) is associated with very early G-protein-mediated signal transduction and reprogramming of gene expression. Here we investigated the involvement of human CMV (HCMV)-encoded US27, US28, and UL33 receptors as well as murine CMV-encoded M33 transmembrane (7TM...

  7. Probing the Evolutionary History of Human Bitter Taste Receptor Pseudogenes by Restoring Their Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide; Behrens, Maik; Sainz, Eduardo; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Drayna, Dennis

    2017-07-01

    Lineage-specific gene losses can be driven by selection or environmental adaptations. However, a lack of studies on the original function of species-specific pseudogenes leaves a gap in our understanding of their role in evolutionary histories. Pseudogenes are of particular relevance for taste perception genes, which encode for receptors that confer the ability to both identify nutritionally valuable substances and avoid potentially harmful substances. To explore the role of bitter taste pseudogenization events in human origins, we restored the open reading frames of the three human-specific pseudogenes and synthesized the reconstructed functional hTAS2R2, hTAS2R62 and hTAS2R64 receptors. We have identified ligands that differentially activate the human and chimpanzee forms of these receptors and several other human functional TAS2Rs. We show that these receptors are narrowly tuned, suggesting that bitter-taste sensitivities evolved independently in different species, and that these pseudogenization events occurred because of functional redundancy. The restoration of function of lineage-specific pseudogenes can aid in the reconstruction of their evolutionary history, and in understanding the forces that led to their pseudogenization. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  8. Identification of Odorant-Receptor Interactions by Global Mapping of the Human Odorome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audouze, Karine Marie Laure; Tromelin, Anne; Le Bon, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    The human olfactory system recognizes a broad spectrum of odorants using approximately 400 different olfactory receptors ( hORs). Although significant improvements of heterologous expression systems used to study interactions between ORs and odorant molecules have been made, screening the olfactory...

  9. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human anti-mullerian hormone type II receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Visser (Jenny); A. McLuskey; T. van Beers (T.); D.O. Weghuis (D. Olde); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.P.N. Themmen (Axel)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractUsing the rat anti-müllerian hormone type II receptor (AMHRII) cDNA as a probe, two overlapping lambda phage clones containing the AMHRII gene were isolated from a human genomic library. Sequence analysis of the exons was performed and the exon/intron boundaries were determined. The

  10. Synergistic activation of human pregnane X receptor by binary cocktails of pharmaceutical and environmental compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Delfosse, V.; Dendele, B.; Huet, T; Grimaldi, M.; Boulahtouf, A; Gerbal-Chaloin, S; Beucher, B.; Roecklin, D.; Müller, C.; Rahmani, R.; Cavaillès, V.; Daujat-Chavanieu, M. (M.); Vivat, V; Pascussi, J.M.; Balaguer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are chronically exposed to multiple exogenous substances, including environmental pollutants, drugs and dietary components. Many of these compounds are suspected to impact human health, and their combination in complex mixtures could exacerbate their harmful effects. Here we demonstrate that a pharmaceutical oestrogen and a persistent organochlorine pesticide, both exhibiting low efficacy when studied separately, cooperatively bind to the pregnane X receptor, leading to synergistic act...

  11. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    Two methods have been used to examine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor distribution in human scalp and foreskin. The first employed [125I]EGF viable explants and autoradiography to determine the EGF binding pattern while the second used a monoclonal antibody to the human EGF receptor to map...

  12. Large-scale overproduction, functional purification and ligand affinities of the His-tagged human histamine H1 receptor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratnala, V.R.; Swarts, H.G.P.; Oostrum, J. van; Leurs, R.; Groot, H.J.M. de; Bakker, R.; Grip, W.J. de

    2004-01-01

    This report describes an efficient strategy for amplified functional purification of the human H1 receptor after heterologous expression in Sf9 cells. The cDNA encoding a C-terminally histidine-tagged (10xHis) human histamine H1 receptor was used to generate recombinant baculovirus in a Spodoptera

  13. AII amacrine cells express the MT1 melatonin receptor in human and macaque retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Judite; Wankiewicz, Ellen; Brown, Gregory M; Fujieda, Hiroki

    2003-09-01

    AII amacrine cells are critical interneurons in the rod pathway of mammalian retina, active primarily in dim lighting conditions. Melatonin, a neuromodulator produced at night in the retina, is believed to induce retinal adaptation to dim lighting conditions in most vertebrate species examined to date, including humans. We hypothesized that melatonin may influence retinal light adaptation by acting on AII cells directly and thus investigated whether melatonin receptors were expressed in AII neurons. Postmortem nonpathological eyes from four human donors as well as two eyes from two Macaque Fasicularis monkeys were analyzed. Double immunocytochemistry was performed using an anti-MT(1) antibody and an antibody to calretinin, an AII marker. Analysis utilized confocal microscopy. A polyclonal anti-calretinin antibody labelled amacrine cells exhibiting the distinct AII morphology, in both human and macaque retina. MT(1) immunoreactivity in macaque retina was similar to human staining, in that horizontal, amacrine and ganglion cell bodies were stained, as were inner segments of photoreceptors. In human retina 86% of calretinin positive cells expressed the MT(1) receptor peripherally, whereas centrally, 78% colocalization was observed. In the macaque retina, 100% of AII amacrine cells expressed MT(1) immunoreactivity both centrally and peripherally. That virtually all AII neurons express the MT(1) receptor in both human and macaque retina, may provide the first evidence demonstrating a role for melatonin in AII regulation, furthering the hypothesis of melatonin function in retinal light adaptation.

  14. Research on influence of interferon on immune stress and HMGB1, MIF, GM-CSF in patients with condyloma acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chun Yan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe the influence of interferon on immune stress and HMGB1, MIF, GMCSF in patients with condyloma acuminatum. Methods: A total of 240 cases of patients with condyloma acuminatum were randomly divided into two groups, control group and observation group, each group of 120 cases. The CO2 laser was used for the removal of warts in all patients, while patients in the observation group were combined with interferon. Then the differences of curative effect and the recurrence of patients between the two groups were compared, and the change of T-lymphocyte subsets and serum inflammatory cytokines, HMGB1, MIF, GMCSF in the two groups were compared before and after treatment. Results: The cure rate of observation group was 88.33%, significantly higher than that of control group by 65%. The recurrence rate of the observation group was 10.83% which was significantly lower than that of the control group by 30.83%. Three, six months after treatment, the CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ of patients in observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group, and CD8+ was significantly lower than that in the control group; the serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-γ were notably higher than those of control group, while the IL-4, IL-10 levels of patients were lower than those in control group; the serum levels of HMGB1, MIF, GM-CSF were lower than control group too. The difference between groups was statistically significant. Conclusion: Interferon can regulate T-lymphocyte subsets, inhibit inflammatory reaction and change the immune stress state, thereby profitably improving the cure rate and reduce the recurrence rate of CA patients.

  15. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratochwil Nicole A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Results By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. Conclusion From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor

  16. Genetic Variations in the Human Cannabinoid Receptor Gene Are Associated with Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  17. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  18. Characterization of CB1 cannabinoid receptor immunoreactivity in postmortem human brain homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús, M López; Sallés, J; Meana, J J; Callado, L F

    2006-06-30

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the predominant type of cannabinoid receptor in the CNS, in which it displays a unique anatomical distribution and is present at higher densities than most other known seven transmembrane domain receptors. Nevertheless, as with almost all seven transmembrane domain receptors, the tertiary and quaternary structure of this receptor is still unknown. Studies of CB1 in rat cerebral tissue are scarce, and even less is known regarding the expression of CB1 in the human brain. Thus, the aim of the present work was to characterize CB1 expression in membranes from postmortem human brain using specific antisera raised against this protein. Western blot analysis of P1 and P2 fractions, and crude plasma membrane preparations from the prefrontal cortex showed that CB1 migrated as a 60 kDa monomer under reducing conditions. These data were confirmed by blotting experiments carried out with human U373MG astrocytoma cells as a positive control for CB1 expression and wild-type CHO cells as negative control. In addition, when proteins were solubilized in the absence of dithiothreitol, the anti-human CB1 antiserum detected a new band migrating at around 120 kDa corresponding in size to a putative CB1 dimer. This band was sensitive to reducing agents (50 mM dithiothreitol) and showed sodium dodecylsulphate stability, suggesting the existence of disulfide-linked CB1 dimers in the membrane preparations. Important differences in the anatomical distribution of CB1 were observed with regard to that described previously in monkey and rat; in the human brain, CB1 levels were higher in cortex and caudate than in the cerebellum.

  19. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Matsunaga

    Full Text Available Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level. As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater

  20. Evaluation of Ginkgo biloba extract as an activator of human glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Aik Jiang; Yang, Guixiang; Rajaraman, Ganesh; Baucom, Christie C; Chang, Thomas K H

    2013-01-30

    Ginkgo biloba, which is one of the most frequently used herbal medicines, is commonly used in the management of several conditions, including memory impairment. Previously, it was reported to decrease the expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor and the biosynthesis of glucocorticoids, thereby regulating glucocorticoid levels. However, it is not known whether Ginkgo biloba extract regulates the function of the glucocorticoid receptor. We determined whether Ginkgo biloba extract and several of its chemical constituents affect the activity of human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR). A hGR-dependent reporter gene assay was conducted in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and hGR target gene expression assays were performed in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Multiple lots and concentrations of the extract and several of its chemical constituents (ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, ginkgolide C, ginkgolide J, and bilobalide) did not increase hGR activity, as assessed by a cell-based luciferase reporter gene assay. The extract did not influence the expression of hGR target genes, including tyrosine aminotransferase (hTAT), constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR), or pregnane X receptor (hPXR), in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Moreover, hGR antagonism by mifepristone (also known as RU486) did not attenuate the extent of induction of hCAR- and hPXR-regulated target genes CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 by Ginkgo biloba extract. Ginkgo biloba extract, ginkgolide A, ginkgolide B, ginkgolide C, ginkgolide J, and bilobalide are not activators of hGR. Furthermore, the extract does not influence the hGR-hCAR or the hGR-hPXR signaling pathway in primary cultures of human hepatocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Approaching heterogeneity of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in surgical specimens of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asioli, Sofia; Maletta, Francesca; Verdun di Cantogno, Ludovica; Satolli, Maria A; Schena, Marina; Pecchioni, Carla; Botta, Cristina; Chiusa, Luigi; Molinaro, Luca; Conti, Luca; Viale, Giuseppe; Ingravallo, Giuseppe; Maiorano, Eugenio; Sapino, Anna

    2012-11-01

    Gastric cancer shows intratumoral heterogeneity for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression. We evaluated whether the number of tissue blocks analyzed or the antibodies used may influence the immunohistochemical results in gastrectomy specimens. Clinicopathologic data from 148 patients receiving gastric surgery for cancer were collected. One tissue block for each of 88 primary tumors and 60 paired primary tumors and metastases was examined for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status by immunohistochemistry using 3 different antibodies (HercepTest, CB11, and 4B5) and by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Two additional tissue blocks of the primary tumor were tested by immunohistochemistry if the results were negative on the first tissue block. The concordance among the 3 antibodies was 94.5% (testing 1 tissue block). Two cases showed a clinically significant discrepancy between primary tumor (score 0) and lymph nodes metastases (score 3+). Additional block analysis increased both the sensitivity (from 63% to 83%) and the accuracy (from 91% to 94%) of immunohistochemistry as compared with fluorescent in situ hybridization. The multiblock approach could potentially identify a greater number of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive gastric cancers, particularly those with higher levels of intratumor heterogeneity. In turn, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positivity correlated with a worse prognosis (P=.011) and was an independent variable in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 1.57). In conclusion, testing more than 1 tissue block of cancer from specimens of gastric resection provides a more reliable human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 assessment regardless of the antibody used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Awaken olfactory receptors of humans and experimental animals by coffee odourants to induce appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorri, Yaser; Sabeghi, Maryam; Kurien, Biji T

    2007-01-01

    Smell and its mechanism has been of interest to scientists for many years. Smell, not only provides a sensual pleasure of food and perfumes for humans but also reminds us of past memories, thoughts, locations and finally warns of dangers such as fire. One of the uses of coffee beans is on perfume counters, enabling people to distinguish between perfume fragrances. We hypothesize that coffee can be also used to refresh olfactory receptors after cooking, since people usually experience loss of appetite after cooking. We have experienced an increase in appetite, after cooking, by smelling coffee beans. This is probably due to the detachment of food odourants from olfactory receptors by the coffee odourant molecules. We also think that coffee smell could be used in animal research studies, to keep animals healthy by stimulating their appetite. In a recent study, 28 different odourants have been identified from coffee. One or more of these odourants may have strong binding affinity to olfactory receptors which results in detachment of other odourants from the receptors. The high vibration intensity from coffee odourant molecules may cause the detachment of food odourant from olfactory receptors. Another hypothesis might be the unique structure of these coffee odourants. Studies need to be done to investigate the effect of coffee smell on salivary flow and appetite in animals and humans.

  3. High-resolution crystal structure of the human CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhenhua; Yin, Jie; Chapman, Karen; Grzemska, Magdalena; Clark, Lindsay; Wang, Junmei; Rosenbaum, Daniel M

    2016-11-16

    The human cannabinoid G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) CB1 and CB2 mediate the functional responses to the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG), as well as the widely consumed plant (phyto)cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)(1). The cannabinoid receptors have been the targets of intensive drug discovery efforts owing to the therapeutic potential of modulators for controlling pain(2), epilepsy(3), obesity(4), and other maladies. Although much progress has recently been made in understanding the biophysical properties of GPCRs, investigations of the molecular mechanisms of the cannabinoids and their receptors have lacked high-resolution structural data. We used GPCR engineering and lipidic cubic phase (LCP) crystallization to determine the structure of the human CB1 receptor bound to the inhibitor taranabant at 2.6 Å resolution. The extracellular surface of CB1, including the highly conserved membrane-proximal amino-terminal (N-terminal) region, is distinct from other lipid-activated GPCRs and forms a critical part of the ligand binding pocket. Docking studies further demonstrate how this same pocket may accommodate the cannabinoid agonist THC. Our CB1 structure provides an atomic framework for studying cannabinoid receptor function, and will aid the design and optimization of cannabinoid system modulators for therapeutic ends.

  4. Structural Disorder in the Complex of Human Pregnane X Receptor and the Macrolide Antibiotic Rifampicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Orans, Jillian; Moore, Linda B.; Xue, Yu; Peng, Li; Collins, Jon L.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Lambert, Millard H.; Kliewer, Steven A.; Redinbo, Matthew R. (U. of Texas-SMED); (UNC)

    2010-07-13

    The human nuclear xenobiotic receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), detects a variety of structurally distinct endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and controls expression of genes central to drug and cholesterol metabolism. The macrolide antibiotic rifampicin, a front-line treatment for tuberculosis, is an established PXR agonist and, at 823 Da, is one of the largest known ligands for the receptor. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of human PXR in complex with rifampicin. We also use structural and mutagenesis data to examine the origins of the directed promiscuity exhibited by the PXRs across species. Three structurally flexible loops adjacent to the ligand-binding pocket of PXR are disordered in this crystal structure, including the 200-210 region that is part of a sequence insert novel to the promiscuous PXRs relative to other members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The 4-methyl-1-piperazinyl ring of rifampicin, which would lie adjacent to the disordered protein regions, is also disordered and not observed in the structure. Taken together, our results indicate that one wall of the PXR ligand-binding cavity can remain flexible even when the receptor is in complex with an activating ligand. These observations highlight the key role that structural flexibility plays in PXR's promiscuous response to xenobiotics.

  5. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (Pcells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  6. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (Pmuscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  7. Molecular modeling of the human serotonin(1A) receptor : role of membrane cholesterol in ligand binding of the receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paila, Yamuna Devi; Tiwari, Shrish; Sengupta, Durba; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin(1A) receptors are important neurotransmitter receptors and belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although it is an important drug target, the crystal structure of the serotonin(1A) receptor has not been solved yet. Earlier homology models of the serotonin(1A)

  8. Development and validation of fluorescent receptor assays based on the human recombinant estrogen receptor subtypes alpha and beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de boer, T; Otjens, D; Muntendam, A; Meulman, E; van Oostijen, M; Ensing, K

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of two fluorescent receptor assays for the hRec-estrogen receptor subtypes alpha and beta. As a labelled ligand an autofluorescent phyto-estrogen (coumestrol) has been used. The estrogen receptor (ER) belongs to the nuclear receptor family, a

  9. Characterization of gastrins and their receptor in solid human gastric adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Eiland, Signe; Svendsen, Lars Bo; Vainer, Ben; Hannibal, Jens; Rehfeld, Jens Frederik

    2013-06-01

    The gastrin and the gastrin/CCK-B receptor genes are co-expressed in several carcinomas. The primary translational product, progastrin, however, is processed to several peptides of which only those that are α-amidated at their C-terminus are receptor ligands. So far, characterization of the progastrin-derived peptides in gastric cancer has not been reported. The authors therefore examined the molecular nature of gastrin and its receptor in human gastric carcinomas. Twenty patients with adenocarcinoma underwent partial or total gastrectomy. In samples from each carcinoma, gastrin peptides were characterized, using a library of sequence-specific immunoassays. Expression was also demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the gastrin and gastrin/CCK-B receptor gene expression was quantitated using real-time PCR, and the receptor protein demonstrated by western blotting. α-Amidated gastrins were detectable in 16 of 20 carcinomas (median concentration 2.1 pmol/g tissue; range 0-386 pmol/g tissue). The tissue concentrations correlated closely to the gastrin mRNA contents (r = 0.75, p gastrins, were detected in 19 carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry corroborated gastrin expression in carcinoma cells. Chromatography revealed extensive progastrin processing with α-amidated gastrin-34 and -17 (tyrosyl-sulfated as well as non-sulfated) as major products. Finally, gastrin/CCK-B receptor mRNA and protein were detected in all tumors. The results show that the elements for a local loop of α-amidated gastrins and their receptor are detectable in 80% of human gastric adenocarcinomas. Therefore, the results support the contention that locally expressed gastrin may be involved in the tumorigenesis of gastric adenocarcinomas.

  10. Activated human mast cells induce LOX-1-specific scavenger receptor expression in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervi Alanne-Kinnunen

    Full Text Available Activated mast cells in atherosclerotic lesions degranulate and release bioactive compounds capable of regulating atherogenesis. Here we examined the ability of activated human primary mast cells to regulate the expression of the major scavenger receptors in cultured human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs.Components released by immunologically activated human primary mast cells induced a transient expression of lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1 mRNA in HMDMs, while the expression of two other scavenger receptors, MSR1 and CD36, remained unaffected. The LOX-1-inducing secretory components were identified as histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1, which exhibited a synergistic effect on LOX-1 mRNA expression. Histamine induced a transient expression of LOX-1 protein. Mast cell -induced increase in LOX-1 expression was not associated with increased uptake of oxidized LDL by the macrophages.Mast cell-derived histamine, TNF-α, and TGF-β1 act in concert to induce a transient increase in LOX-1 expression in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The LOX-1-inducing activity potentially endows mast cells a hitherto unrecognized role in the regulation of innate immune reactions in atherogenesis.

  11. Altered levels of laminin receptor mRNA in various human carcinoma cells that have different abilities to bind laminin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Liotta, L A; Jaye, M

    1986-01-01

    The human laminin receptor was purified and molecularly cloned to investigate its biosynthetic regulation. Laminin receptor from normal and neoplastic tissue was preparatively affinity purified to homogeneity based on the high affinity of the receptor for laminin. The apparent molecular weight...... of the receptor from different carcinoma sources and from normal placental tissue is in the range of 68-72 kDa. Isoelectric focusing and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis indicated that the receptor protein consists of one major polypeptide chain with a pI value of 6.4 +/- 0.2. Laminin receptor cDNA clones were...... isolated after screening a human endothelial lambda gt11 cDNA library with a monoclonal antibody directed against a domain of the laminin receptor involved in ligand binding. Definitive identification of the cDNA clones was based on comparison of cDNA sequence with the amino acid sequence of a cyanogen...

  12. Potent and long-lasting inhibition of human P2X2 receptors by copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punthambaker, Sukanya; Hume, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    P2X receptors are ion channels gated by ATP. In rodents these channels are modulated by zinc and copper. Zinc is co-released with neurotransmitter at some synapses and can modulate neuronal activity, but the role of copper in the brain is unclear. Rat P2X2 receptors show potentiation by 2–100 µM zinc or copper in the presence of a submaximal concentration of ATP but are inhibited by zinc or copper at concentrations above 100 µM. In contrast, human P2X2 (hP2X2) receptors show no potentiation and are strongly inhibited by zinc over the range of 2–100 µM. The effect of copper on hP2X2 is of interest because there are human brain disorders in which copper concentration is altered. We found that hP2X2 receptors are potently inhibited by copper (IC50 = 40 nM). ATP responsiveness recovered extremely slowly after copper washout, with full recovery requiring over 1 h. ATP binding facilitated copper binding but not unbinding from this inhibitory site. A mutant receptor in which the first six extracellular cysteines were deleted, C(1–6)S, showed normal copper inhibition, however reducing agents dramatically accelerated recovery from copper inhibition in wild type hP2X2 and the C(1–6)S mutant, indicating that the final two disulfide bonds are required to maintain the high affinity copper binding site. Three histidine residues required for normal zinc inhibition were also required for normal copper inhibition. Humans with untreated Wilson’s disease have excess amounts of copper in the brain. The high copper sensitivity of hP2X2 receptors suggests that they are non-functional in these patients. PMID:24067922

  13. Cortical layers: Cyto-, myelo-, receptor- and synaptic architecture in human cortical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Zilles, Karl

    2017-08-12

    Cortical layers have classically been identified by their distinctive and prevailing cell types and sizes, as well as the packing densities of cell bodies or myelinated fibers. The densities of multiple receptors for classical neurotransmitters also vary across the depth of the cortical ribbon, and thus determine the neurochemical properties of cyto- and myeloarchitectonic layers. However, a systematic comparison of the correlations between these histologically definable layers and the laminar distribution of transmitter receptors is currently lacking. We here analyze the densities of 17 different receptors of various transmitter systems in the layers of eight cytoarchitectonically identified, functionally (motor, sensory, multimodal) and hierarchically (primary and secondary sensory, association) distinct areas of the human cerebral cortex. Maxima of receptor densities are found in different layers when comparing different cortical regions, i.e. laminar receptor densities demonstrate differences in receptorarchitecture between isocortical areas, notably between motor and primary sensory cortices, specifically the primary visual and somatosensory cortices, as well as between allocortical and isocortical areas. Moreover, considerable differences are found between cytoarchitectonical and receptor architectonical laminar patterns. Whereas the borders of cyto- and myeloarchitectonic layers are well comparable, the laminar profiles of receptor densities rarely coincide with the histologically defined borders of layers. Instead, highest densities of most receptors are found where the synaptic density is maximal, i.e. in the supragranular layers, particularly in layers II-III. The entorhinal cortex as an example of the allocortex shows a peculiar laminar organization, which largely deviates from that of all the other cortical areas analyzed here. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Drug delivery to the human and mouse uterus using immunoliposomes targeted to the oxytocin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jonathan W; Hua, Susan; Ilicic, Marina; Tolosa, Jorge M; Butler, Trent; Robertson, Sarah; Smith, Roger

    2017-03-01

    The ability to provide safe and effective pharmacotherapy during obstetric complications, such as preterm labor or postpartum hemorrhage, is hampered by the systemic toxicity of therapeutic agents leading to adverse side effects in the mother and fetus. Development of novel strategies to target tocolytic and uterotonic agents specifically to uterine myocytes would improve therapeutic efficacy while minimizing the risk of side effects. Ligand-targeted liposomes have emerged as a reliable and versatile platform for targeted drug delivery to specific cell types, tissues or organs. Our objective was to develop a targeted drug delivery system for the uterus utilizing an immunoliposome platform targeting the oxytocin receptor. We conjugated liposomes to an antibody that recognizes an extracellular domain of the oxytocin receptor. We then examined the ability of oxytocin receptor-targeted liposomes to deliver contraction-blocking (nifedipine, salbutamol and rolipram) or contraction-enhancing (dofetilide) agents to strips of spontaneously contracting myometrial tissue in vitro (human and mouse). We evaluated the ability of oxytocin receptor-targeted liposomes to localize to uterine tissue in vivo, and assessed if targeted liposomes loaded with indomethacin were capable of preventing lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth in mice. Oxytocin receptor-targeted liposomes loaded with nifedipine, salbutamol or rolipram consistently abolished human myometrial contractions in vitro, while oxytocin receptor-targeted liposomes loaded with dofetilide increased contraction duration. Nontargeted control liposomes loaded with these agents had no effect. Similar results were observed in mouse uterine strips. Following in vivo administration to pregnant mice, oxytocin receptor-targeted liposomes localized specifically to the uterine horns and mammary tissue. Targeting increased localization to the uterus 7-fold. Localization was not detected in the maternal brain or fetus. Targeted

  15. Ligation of human Fc receptor like-2 by monoclonal antibodies down-regulates B-cell receptor-mediated signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Mahdi; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Ulivieri, Cristina; Amirghofran, Zahra; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Shokri, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling and its regulation through negative and positive regulators are critical for balancing B-cell response and function. Human Fc receptor like-2 (FCRL2), a member of the newly identified FCRL family, could influence B-cell signalling due to possession of both immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation and inhibitory motifs (ITAM and ITIM). Since the natural ligand of FCRL2 has not been identified, we generated FCRL2-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and employed them to investigate the influence of FCRL2 stimulation on BCR signalling in an FCRL2-expressing B-cell line. Two anti-FCRL2 mAb-producing hybridoma clones (5A7-E7 and 3D8-G8) were selected. None of the mAbs displayed any cross-reactivity with the other members of the FCRL family including recombinant FCRL1, -3, -4 and -5, as tested by FACS and ELISA techniques. Engagement of the FCRL2 by these mAbs resulted in significant inhibition of BCR signalling mediators such as calcium mobilization and phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases Erk, p38 and Jnk. These findings indicate that the FCRL2 ITIM motifs are functional and the anti-FCRL2 mAbs may mimic the natural ligand of FCRL2 by induction of inhibitory signals in B cells. PMID:24797767

  16. Involvement of toll-like receptor 4 and Fc receptors gamma in human neutrophil priming by endotoxins from escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanov, D S; Prokhorenko, I R

    2013-02-01

    By using the fMLP-induced respiratory burst approach, the involvement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in human neutrophil priming by S- or Re-glycoforms of endotoxin from Escherichia coli has been elucidated. The priming effect of Re-glycoform is more pronounced than that of the S-glycoform. Unexpectedly, fMLP-triggered generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by endotoxin primed neutrophils was amplified by preincubation of the cells with anti-TLR4 (HTA125) antibodies or with isotype-matched immunoglobulin IgG2a. The most significant finding of our study is that neutrophils exposed to anti-TLR4 antibodies retain their ability to distinguish between S- or Re-glycoforms being primed, respectively. Moreover, differentiated effect of HTA125 antibodies on functional responses of neutrophils during their priming and fMLP stimulation was revealed. Taking these results into consideration, it is reasonable to assume that there is a contribution of Fcγ receptors to fMLP-induced ROS generation by neutrophils preincubated with HTA125 or IgG2a and primed by endotoxins.

  17. Mammographic features of calcifications in DCIS: correlation with oestrogen receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon; Won, Jae-Kyung; Jeon, Yoon-Kyung; Park, In Ae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Han, Wonshik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    This study investigated the correlation of oestrogen receptor (ER) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status with the probability of malignancy (POM) of mammographic calcifications in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). A total of 101 women (age range, 27-83 years) with pure DCIS that presented as mammographic calcifications were included. Three radiologists independently reviewed mammograms according to the BI-RADS lexicon and provided 100-point POM scores and a BI-RADS category. ER, HER2 and breast cancer subtypes were determined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Pairwise correlations between POM and IHC biomarker scores were calculated, and mammographic features were compared between breast cancer subtypes. HER2 level positively correlated with the POM score (P < 0.0001) and BI-RADS category (P < 0.0001), and ER level inversely correlated with the POM score (P < 0.013) and BI-RADS category (P < 0.010). Fine linear branching (P = 0.004) and segmental (P = 0.014) calcifications were significantly associated with HER2-positive cancers, and clustered calcifications were more frequently observed in ER-positive cancers (P = 0.014). HER2 status in DCIS correlated positively with the POM of mammographic calcifications, as determined by radiologists on the basis of the BI-RADS lexicon. (orig.)

  18. Data on overlapping brain disorders and emerging drug targets in human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avijit Podder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Intercommunication of Dopamine Receptors (DRs with their associate protein partners is crucial to maintain regular brain function in human. Majority of the brain disorders arise due to malfunctioning of such communication process. Hence, contributions of genetic factors, as well as phenotypic indications for various neurological and psychiatric disorders are often attributed as sharing in nature. In our earlier research article entitled “Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN: a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network” (Podder et al., 2014 [1], we had depicted a holistic interaction map of human Dopamine Receptors. Given emphasis on the topological parameters, we had characterized the functionality along with the vulnerable properties of the network. In support of this, we hereby provide an additional data highlighting the genetic overlapping of various brain disorders in the network. The data indicates the sharing nature of disease genes for various neurological and psychiatric disorders in dopamine receptors connecting protein-protein interactions network. The data also indicates toward an alternative approach to prioritize proteins for overlapping brain disorders as valuable drug targets in the network.

  19. Studies on luteinizing hormone receptors of human corpora lutea during menstrual cycle and pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Yasushi (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-10-01

    With the purpose of explicating the lifespan of human corpora lutea, using human corpora lutea of the menstrual cycle and pregnancy, binding of /sup 125/I-LH to the 20,000g cell membrane fraction was examined. 1) Specific bindings of /sup 125/I-LH, /sup 125/I-HCG were demonstrated in the 20,000g cell membrane fraction. Although LH and HCG were parallel in inhibiting /sup 125/I-LH binding, HCG was found to be more effective. FSH did not inhibit binding. 2) Binding of /sup 125/I-LH was dependent on time, temperature, /sup 125/I-LH concentration, amount of the cell membrane fraction protein and pH. The highest binding was seen at pH 6.0 while incubating for 60 min at 37/sup 0/C. 3) The number of LH receptors in human corpora lutea of the menstrual cycle increased towards midluteal phase, especially on 5th day from ovulation, and decreased towards late luteal phase. LH receptor was not found in corpus albicans. The apparent dissociation constant of each corpus luteum did not change throughout the menstrual cycle. 4) Corpora lutea of pregnancy contained a few or no receptors which bound /sup 125/I-LH specifically. These data suggest that LH receptor is an important factor regulating the lifespan of corpus luteum and exogenous HCG has effect on luteal insufficiency, but the effect of HCG on threatened abortion is uncertain.

  20. Positive inotropy mediated via CGRP receptors in isolated human myocardial trabeculae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saetrum Opgaard, O; Hasbak, P; de Vries, R

    2000-01-01

    Isometric contractile force were studied on isolated human myocardial trabeculae that were paced at 1.0 Hz in tissue baths. Alpha calcitonin gene-related peptide (alpha-CGRP) had a potent positive inotropic effect in most trabeculae from both the right atrium and left ventricle, and this effect...... was partially antagonized by the CGRP(1) receptor antagonist alpha-CGRP-(8-37) (10(-6) M). Amylin and the CGRP(2) receptor agonist [Cys(acetylmethoxy)(2, 7)]CGRP had a positive inotropic effect in some trabeculae, whereas adrenomedullin had no inotropic effect. Using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain...

  1. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 is a functional receptor for the emerging human coronavirus-EMC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, V Stalin; Mou, Huihui; Smits, Saskia L; Dekkers, Dick H W; Müller, Marcel A; Dijkman, Ronald; Muth, Doreen; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Zaki, Ali; Fouchier, Ron A M; Thiel, Volker; Drosten, Christian; Rottier, Peter J M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Bosch, Berend Jan; Haagmans, Bart L

    2013-03-14

    Most human coronaviruses cause mild upper respiratory tract disease but may be associated with more severe pulmonary disease in immunocompromised individuals. However, SARS coronavirus caused severe lower respiratory disease with nearly 10% mortality and evidence of systemic spread. Recently, another coronavirus (human coronavirus-Erasmus Medical Center (hCoV-EMC)) was identified in patients with severe and sometimes lethal lower respiratory tract infection. Viral genome analysis revealed close relatedness to coronaviruses found in bats. Here we identify dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4; also known as CD26) as a functional receptor for hCoV-EMC. DPP4 specifically co-purified with the receptor-binding S1 domain of the hCoV-EMC spike protein from lysates of susceptible Huh-7 cells. Antibodies directed against DPP4 inhibited hCoV-EMC infection of primary human bronchial epithelial cells and Huh-7 cells. Expression of human and bat (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) DPP4 in non-susceptible COS-7 cells enabled infection by hCoV-EMC. The use of the evolutionarily conserved DPP4 protein from different species as a functional receptor provides clues about the host range potential of hCoV-EMC. In addition, it will contribute critically to our understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of this emerging human coronavirus, and may facilitate the development of intervention strategies.

  2. HindIII identifies a two allele DNA polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caenazzo, L.; Hoehe, M.R.; Hsieh, W.T.; Berrettini, W.H.; Bonner, T.I.; Gershon, E.S. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-09-11

    HCNR p5, a 0.9 kb BamHI/EcoRI fragment from the human cannabinoid receptor gene inserted into pUC19, was used as probe. The fragment is located in an intron approximately 14 kb 5{prime} of the initiation codon. This fragment is a clean single copy sequence by genomic blotting. Hybridization of human genomic DNA digested with HindIII identified a two allele RFLP with bands at 5.5 (A1) and 3.3 kb (A2). The human cannabinoid receptor gene has been genetically mapped in CEPH reference pedigrees to the centromeric/q region of chromosome 6. In situ hybridization localizes it to 6q14-q15. Codominant segregation has been observed in 26 informative two- and three-generation CEPH pedigrees and in 14 medium-sized disease families.

  3. MAGE (M-file/Mif Automatic GEnerator): A graphical interface tool for automatic generation of Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework configuration files and Matlab scripts for results analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chęciński, Jakub; Frankowski, Marek

    2016-10-01

    We present a tool for fully-automated generation of both simulations configuration files (Mif) and Matlab scripts for automated data analysis, dedicated for Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework (OOMMF). We introduce extended graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for fast, error-proof and easy creation of Mifs, without any programming skills usually required for manual Mif writing necessary. With MAGE we provide OOMMF extensions for complementing it by mangetoresistance and spin-transfer-torque calculations, as well as local magnetization data selection for output. Our software allows for creation of advanced simulations conditions like simultaneous parameters sweeps and synchronic excitation application. Furthermore, since output of such simulation could be long and complicated we provide another GUI allowing for automated creation of Matlab scripts suitable for analysis of such data with Fourier and wavelet transforms as well as user-defined operations.

  4. Receptor recognition sites reside in both lobes of human serum transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, A B; Tam, B M; Woodworth, R C; Oliver, R W; Green, B N; Lin, L N; Brandts, J F; Savage, K J; Lineback, J A; MacGillivray, R T

    1997-08-15

    The binding of iron by transferrin leads to a significant conformational change in each lobe of the protein. Numerous studies have shown that the transferrin receptor discriminates between iron-saturated and iron-free transferrin and that it modulates the release of iron. Given these observations, it seems likely that there is contact between each lobe of transferrin and the receptor. This is the case with chicken transferrin, in which it has been demonstrated unambiguously that both lobes are required for binding and iron donation to occur [Brown-Mason and Woodworth (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 1866-1873]. Further support to this contention is added by the ability of both N- and C-domain-specific monoclonal antibodies to block the binding of a solution containing both lobes [Mason, Brown and Church (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 9011-9015]. In the present study a similar conclusion is reached for the binding of human serum transferrin to the transferrin receptor. With the use of recombinant N- and C-lobes of human transferrin produced in a mammalian expression system, we show that both lobes are required to achieve full binding. (Production of recombinant C-lobe in the baby hamster kidney cell system is reported here for the first time.) Each lobe is able to donate iron to transferrin receptors on HeLa S3 cells in the presence of the contralateral lobe. The results are not identical with the chicken system, because the C-lobe alone shows a limited ability to bind to receptors and to donate iron. Further complications arise from the relatively weak re-association between the two lobes of human transferrin compared with the re-association of the ovotransferrin lobes. However, domain-specific monoclonal antibodies to either lobe block the binding of N- and C-lobe mixtures in the human system, thus substantiating the need for both.

  5. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  6. Contemporary North American influenza H7 viruses possess human receptor specificity: Implications for virus transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belser, Jessica A; Blixt, Ola; Chen, Li-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Avian H7 influenza viruses from both the Eurasian and North American lineage have caused outbreaks in poultry since 2002, with confirmed human infection occurring during outbreaks in The Netherlands, British Columbia, and the United Kingdom. The majority of H7 infections have resulted in self......-limiting conjunctivitis, whereas probable human-to-human transmission has been rare. Here, we used glycan microarray technology to determine the receptor-binding preference of Eurasian and North American lineage H7 influenza viruses and their transmissibility in the ferret model. We found that highly pathogenic H7N7...

  7. Variation in umami perception and in candidate genes for the umami receptor in mice and humans1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirosaki, Shinya; Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Sanematsu, Keisuke; Islam, AA Shahidul; Ogiwara, Yoko; Kawai, Misako; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2009-01-01

    The unique taste induced by monosodium glutamate is referred to as umami taste. The umami taste is also elicited by the purine nucleotides inosine 5′-monophosphate and guanosine 5′-monophosphate. There is evidence that a heterodimeric G protein–coupled receptor, which consists of the T1R1 (taste receptor type 1, member 1, Tas1r1) and the T1R3 (taste receptor type 1, member 3, Tas1r3) proteins, functions as an umami taste receptor for rodents and humans. Splice variants of metabotropic glutamate receptors, mGluR1 (glutamate receptor, metabotropic 1, Grm1) and mGluR4 (glutamate receptor, metabotropic 4, Grm4), also have been proposed as taste receptors for glutamate. The taste sensitivity to umami substances varies in inbred mouse strains and in individual humans. However, little is known about the relation of umami taste sensitivity to variations in candidate umami receptor genes in rodents or in humans. In this article, we summarize current knowledge of the diversity of umami perception in mice and humans. Furthermore, we combine previously published data and new information from the single nucleotide polymorphism databases regarding variation in the mouse and human candidate umami receptor genes: mouse Tas1r1 (TAS1R1 for human), mouse Tas1r3 (TAS1R3 for human), mouse Grm1 (GRM1 for human), and mouse Grm4 (GRM4 for human). Finally, we discuss prospective associations between variation of these genes and umami taste perception in both species. PMID:19625681

  8. A DNA vaccine co-expressing Trichinella spiralis MIF and MCD-1 with murine ubiquitin induces partial protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, F; Xu, L; Yan, R; Song, X; Li, X

    2013-03-01

    Co-expression of Trichinella spiralis macrophage migration inhibitory factor (TsMIF) with T. spiralis cystatin-like domain protein (TsMCD-1) in a DNA vaccine induces a Th1 immune response and partial protection against T. spiralis infection. The present study evaluated whether co-expression of mouse ubiquitin (Ub) with TsMIF and TsMCD-1 might improve the immune response against T. spiralis infection. Groups of BALB/c mice were immunized twice at 2-week intervals with 100 μg of plasmid DNA encoding either a TsMIF-TsMCD-1 fusion protein (pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1) or an Ub-co-expressing triple fusion protein Ub-TsMIF-TsMCD-1 (pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1). Control animals were immunized with pVAX1-Ub or blank vector plasmid. Specific antibody levels (IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgM, IgA, IgE) against the recombinant protein TsMIF-TsMCD-1, serum cytokines (interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IL-17), CD4+/CD8+ T cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses were monitored. Challenge infection was performed 2 weeks after the second immunization and worm burden was assayed at 35 days post-challenge. Antibody responses induced by pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 were significantly lower than for TsMIF-TsMCD-1, but the vaccine induced increased levels of Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) and increased T-cell cytotoxicity. The reduction of worm burden (37.95%) following immunization with pVAX1-Ub-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 was significantly greater than that induced by the pVAX1-Tsmif-Tsmcd-1 vaccine (23.17%; P< 0.05).

  9. Changes in the hemagglutinin of H5N1 viruses during human infection--influence on receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusat, Martin; Liu, Junfeng; Palma, Angelina S; Childs, Robert A; Liu, Yan; Wharton, Stephen A; Lin, Yi Pu; Coombs, Peter J; Martin, Stephen R; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Chen, Zi; Stevens, David J; Hien, Vo Minh; Thanh, Tran Tan; Nhu, Le Nguyen Truc; Nguyet, Lam Anh; Ha, Do Quang; van Doorn, H Rogier; Hien, Tran Tinh; Conradt, Harald S; Kiso, Makoto; Gamblin, Steve J; Chai, Wengang; Skehel, John J; Hay, Alan J; Farrar, Jeremy; de Jong, Menno D; Feizi, Ten

    2013-12-01

    As avian influenza A(H5N1) viruses continue to circulate in Asia and Africa, global concerns of an imminent pandemic persist. Recent experimental studies suggest that efficient transmission between humans of current H5N1 viruses only requires a few genetic changes. An essential step is alteration of the virus hemagglutinin from preferential binding to avian receptors for the recognition of human receptors present in the upper airway. We have identified receptor-binding changes which emerged during H5N1 infection of humans, due to single amino acid substitutions, Ala134Val and Ile151Phe, in the hemagglutinin. Detailed biological, receptor-binding, and structural analyses revealed reduced binding of the mutated viruses to avian-like receptors, but without commensurate increased binding to the human-like receptors investigated, possibly reflecting a receptor-binding phenotype intermediate in adaptation to more human-like characteristics. These observations emphasize that evolution in nature of avian H5N1 viruses to efficient binding of human receptors is a complex multistep process. Copyright © 2013 The Authros. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of AMPA receptor function by the human memory-associated gene KIBRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Lauren; Volk, Lenora; Anggono, Victor; Johnson, Richard C; Yu, Yilin; Duning, Kerstin; Kremerskothen, Joachim; Xia, Jun; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L

    2011-09-22

    KIBRA has recently been identified as a gene associated with human memory performance. Despite the elucidation of the role of KIBRA in several diverse processes in nonneuronal cells, the molecular function of KIBRA in neurons is unknown. We found that KIBRA directly binds to the protein interacting with C-kinase 1 (PICK1) and forms a complex with α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptors (AMPARs), the major excitatory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. KIBRA knockdown accelerates the rate of AMPAR recycling following N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-induced internalization. Genetic deletion of KIBRA in mice impairs both long-term depression and long-term potentiation at hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses. Moreover, KIBRA knockout mice have severe deficits in contextual fear learning and memory. These results indicate that KIBRA regulates higher brain function by regulating AMPAR trafficking and synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with human directed social behavior in dogs (Canis familiaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kis

    Full Text Available The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (-212AG, 19131AG and one known (rs8679684 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the regulatory regions (5' and 3' UTR of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104 and Border Collie (N = 103 dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3' and 5' UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene-behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system.

  12. Acute activation, desensitization and smoldering activation of human acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campling, Barbara G; Kuryatov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral effects of nicotine and other nicotinic agonists are mediated by AChRs in the brain. The relative contribution of acute activation versus chronic desensitization of AChRs is unknown. Sustained "smoldering activation" occurs over a range of agonist concentrations at which activated and desensitized AChRs are present in equilibrium. We used a fluorescent dye sensitive to changes in membrane potential to examine the effects of acute activation and chronic desensitization by nicotinic AChR agonists on cell lines expressing human α4β2, α3β4 and α7 AChRs. We examined the effects of acute and prolonged application of nicotine and the partial agonists varenicline, cytisine and sazetidine-A on these AChRs. The range of concentrations over which nicotine causes smoldering activation of α4β2 AChRs was centered at 0.13 µM, a level found in smokers. However, nicotine produced smoldering activation of α3β4 and α7 AChRs at concentrations well above levels found in smokers. The α4β2 expressing cell line contains a mixture of two stoichiometries, namely (α4β2)2β2 and (α4β2)2α4. The (α4β2)2β2 stoichiometry is more sensitive to activation by nicotine. Sazetidine-A activates and desensitizes only this stoichiometry. Varenicline, cytisine and sazetidine-A were partial agonists on this mixture of α4β2 AChRs, but full agonists on α3β4 and α7 AChRs. It has been reported that cytisine and varenicline are most efficacious on the (α4β2)2α4 stoichiometry. In this study, we distinguish the dual effects of activation and desensitization of AChRs by these nicotinic agonists and define the range of concentrations over which smoldering activation can be sustained.

  13. Acute activation, desensitization and smoldering activation of human acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara G Campling

    Full Text Available The behavioral effects of nicotine and other nicotinic agonists are mediated by AChRs in the brain. The relative contribution of acute activation versus chronic desensitization of AChRs is unknown. Sustained "smoldering activation" occurs over a range of agonist concentrations at which activated and desensitized AChRs are present in equilibrium. We used a fluorescent dye sensitive to changes in membrane potential to examine the effects of acute activation and chronic desensitization by nicotinic AChR agonists on cell lines expressing human α4β2, α3β4 and α7 AChRs. We examined the effects of acute and prolonged application of nicotine and the partial agonists varenicline, cytisine and sazetidine-A on these AChRs. The range of concentrations over which nicotine causes smoldering activation of α4β2 AChRs was centered at 0.13 µM, a level found in smokers. However, nicotine produced smoldering activation of α3β4 and α7 AChRs at concentrations well above levels found in smokers. The α4β2 expressing cell line contains a mixture of two stoichiometries, namely (α4β22β2 and (α4β22α4. The (α4β22β2 stoichiometry is more sensitive to activation by nicotine. Sazetidine-A activates and desensitizes only this stoichiometry. Varenicline, cytisine and sazetidine-A were partial agonists on this mixture of α4β2 AChRs, but full agonists on α3β4 and α7 AChRs. It has been reported that cytisine and varenicline are most efficacious on the (α4β22α4 stoichiometry. In this study, we distinguish the dual effects of activation and desensitization of AChRs by these nicotinic agonists and define the range of concentrations over which smoldering activation can be sustained.

  14. Inotropic action of the puberty hormone kisspeptin in rat, mouse and human: cardiovascular distribution and characteristics of the kisspeptin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Maguire

    Full Text Available Kisspeptins, the ligands of the kisspeptin receptor known for its roles in reproduction and cancer, are also vasoconstrictor peptides in atherosclerosis-prone human aorta and coronary artery. The aim of this study was to further investigate the cardiovascular localisation and function of the kisspeptins and their receptor in human compared to rat and mouse heart. Immunohistochemistry and radioligand binding techniques were employed to investigate kisspeptin receptor localisation, density and pharmacological characteristics in cardiac tissues from all three species. Radioimmunoassay was used to detect kisspeptin peptide levels in human normal heart and to identify any pathological changes in myocardium from patients transplanted for cardiomyopathy or ischaemic heart disease. The cardiac function of kisspeptin receptor was studied in isolated human, rat and mouse paced atria, with a role for the receptor confirmed using mice with targeted disruption of Kiss1r. The data demonstrated that kisspeptin receptor-like immunoreactivity localised to endothelial and smooth muscle cells of intramyocardial blood vessels and to myocytes in human and rodent tissue. [(125I]KP-14 bound saturably, with subnanomolar affinity to human and rodent myocardium (K(D = 0.12 nM, human; K(D = 0.44 nM, rat. Positive inotropic effects of kisspeptin were observed in rat, human and mouse. No response was observed in mice with targeted disruption of Kiss1r. In human heart a decrease in cardiac kisspeptin level was detected in ischaemic heart disease. Kisspeptin and its receptor are expressed in the human, rat and mouse heart and kisspeptins possess potent positive inotropic activity. The cardiovascular actions of the kisspeptins may contribute to the role of these peptides in pregnancy but the consequences of receptor activation must be considered if kisspeptin receptor agonists are developed for use in the treatment of reproductive disorders or cancer.

  15. N-terminal tagging of human P2X7 receptor disturbs calcium influx and dye uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreisig, Karin; Kristensen, Nikolaj Pagh; Dommer, Maja Wallentin; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2017-12-30

    The P2X7 receptor is a frequently studied member of the purinergic receptor family signalling via channel opening and membrane pore formation. Fluorescent imaging is an important molecular method for studying cellular receptor expression and localization. Fusion of receptors to fluorescent proteins might cause major functional changes and requires careful functional evaluation such as has been done for the rat P2X7 receptor. This study examines fusion constructs of the human P2X7 receptor. We assessed surface expression, channel opening with calcium influx, and pore formation using YO-PRO-1 dye uptake in response to BzATP stimulation in transfected cells. We found that tagging at the N-terminal of the human P2X7 receptor with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) disturbed channel opening and pore formation despite intact surface expression. A triple hemagglutinin (3HA) fused to the N-terminal also disrupted pore formation but not channel opening showing that even a small tag alters the normal function of the receptor. Together, this suggests that in contrast to what has been observed for the rat P2X7 receptor, the human P2X7 receptor contains N-terminal motifs important for signalling that prevent the construction of a functionally active fusion protein.

  16. Differentiated human midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells express excitatory strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors containing α2β subunits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Wegner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human fetal midbrain-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs may deliver a tissue source for drug screening and regenerative cell therapy to treat Parkinson's disease. While glutamate and GABA(A receptors play an important role in neurogenesis, the involvement of glycine receptors during human neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation as well as their molecular and functional characteristics in NPCs are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated NPCs in respect to their glycine receptor function and subunit expression using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Whole-cell recordings demonstrate the ability of NPCs to express functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors after differentiation for 3 weeks in vitro. Pharmacological and molecular analyses indicate a predominance of glycine receptor heteromers containing α2β subunits. Intracellular calcium measurements of differentiated NPCs suggest that glycine evokes depolarisations mediated by strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors and not by D-serine-sensitive excitatory glycine receptors. Culturing NPCs with additional glycine, the glycine-receptor antagonist strychnine, or the Na(+-K(+-Cl(- co-transporter 1 (NKCC1-inhibitor bumetanide did not significantly influence cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that NPCs derived from human fetal midbrain tissue acquire essential glycine receptor properties during neuronal maturation. However, glycine receptors seem to have a limited functional impact on neurogenesis and dopaminergic differentiation of NPCs in vitro.

  17. Expression of neurokinin B/NK3 receptor and kisspeptin/KISS1 receptor in human granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ortega, J; Pinto, F M; Fernández-Sánchez, M; Prados, N; Cejudo-Román, A; Almeida, T A; Hernández, M; Romero, M; Tena-Sempere, M; Candenas, L

    2014-12-01

    Are neurokinin B (NKB), NK3 receptor (NK3R), kisspeptin (KISS1) and kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) expressed in human ovarian granulosa cells? The NKB/NK3R and kisspeptin/KISS1R systems are co-expressed and functionally active in ovarian granulosa cells. The NKB/NK3R and KISS1/KISS1R systems are essential for reproduction. In addition to their well-recognized role in hypothalamic neurons, these peptide systems may contribute to the control of fertility by acting directly on the gonads, but such a direct gonadal role remains largely unknown. This study analyzed matched mural granulosa cells (MGCs) and cumulus cells (CCs) collected from preovulatory follicles of oocyte donors at the time of oocyte retrieval. The samples were provided by 56 oocyte donor women undergoing ovarian stimulation treatment. Follicular fluid samples containing MGCs and cumulus-oocyte complexes were collected after transvaginal ultrasound-guided oocyte retrieval. RT-PCR, quantitative real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry and western blot were used to investigate the pattern of expression of the NKB/NK3R and KISS/KISS1R systems in MGCs and CCs. Intracellular free Ca(2+) levels, [Ca(2+)]i, in MGCs after exposure to NKB or KISS1, in the presence or not of tachykinin receptor antagonists, were also measured. NKB/NK3R and KISS1/KISS1R systems were expressed, at the mRNA and protein levels, in MGCs and CCs, with significantly higher expression in CCs. Kisspeptin increased the [Ca(2+)]i in the cytosol of human MGCs while exposure to NKB failed to induce any change in [Ca(2+)]i. However, the [Ca(2+)]i response to kisspeptin was reduced in the presence of NKB. The inhibitory effect of NKB was only partially mimicked by the NK3R agonist, senktide and marginally suppressed by the NK3R-selective antagonist SB 222200. Yet, a cocktail of antagonists selective for the NK1, NK2 and NK3 receptors blocked the effect of NKB. The granulosa and cumulus cells were obtained from oocyte donors undergoing ovarian

  18. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriti Tyagi

    Full Text Available The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites.Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively.Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1 showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3 showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1 utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite.Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host.

  19. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Kriti; Gupta, Deepali; Saini, Ekta; Choudhary, Shilpa; Jamwal, Abhishek; Alam, Mohd. Shoeb; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh K.; Sharma, Yagya D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs) to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites. Methods Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively. Results Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1) showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3) showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1) utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s) as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite. Conclusions Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s) by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host. PMID:26393350

  20. Specific alleles of bitter receptor genes influence human sensitivity to the bitterness of aloin and saccharin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronin, Alexey N; Xu, Hong; Tang, Huixian; Zhang, Lan; Li, Qing; Li, Xiaodong

    2007-08-21

    Variation in human taste is a well-known phenomenon. However, little is known about the molecular basis for it. Bitter taste in humans is believed to be mediated by a family of 25 G protein-coupled receptors (hT2Rs, or TAS2Rs). Despite recent progress in the functional expression of hT2Rs in vitro, up until now, hT2R38, a receptor for phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), was the only gene directly linked to variations in human bitter taste. Here we report that polymorphism in two hT2R genes results in different receptor activities and different taste sensitivities to three bitter molecules. The hT2R43 gene allele, which encodes a protein with tryptophan in position 35, makes people very sensitive to the bitterness of the natural plant compounds aloin and aristolochic acid. People who do not possess this allele do not taste these compounds at low concentrations. The same hT2R43 gene allele makes people more sensitive to the bitterness of an artificial sweetener, saccharin. In addition, a closely related gene's (hT2R44's) allele also makes people more sensitive to the bitterness of saccharin. We also demonstrated that some people do not possess certain hT2R genes, contributing to taste variation between individuals. Our findings thus reveal new examples of variations in human taste and provide a molecular basis for them.

  1. The expression of Mas-receptor of the renin-angiotensin system in the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaajanen, A; Kalesnykas, G; Vapaatalo, H; Uusitalo, H

    2015-07-01

    The local renin-angiotensin system has been held to be expressed in many organs, including the eye. It has an important role in the regulation of local fluid homeostasis, cell proliferation, fibrosis, and vascular tone. Mas-receptor (Mas-R) is a potential receptor acting mainly opposite to the well-known angiotensin II receptor type 1. The aim of this study was to determine if Mas-R is expressed in the human eye. Seven enucleated human eyes were used in immunohistochemical detection of Mas-R and its endogenous ligand angiotensin (1-7) [Ang(1-7)]. Both light microscopy and immunofluorescent detection methods were used. A human kidney preparation sample was used as control. The Mas-R was found to have nuclear localization, and localized in the retinal nuclear layers and in the structures of the anterior segment of the eye. A cytoplasmic immunostaining pattern of Ang(1-7) was found in the inner and outer nuclear and plexiform layers of the retina and in the ciliary body. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing Mas-R expression in the human eye. Its localization suggests that it may have a role in physiological and pathological processes in the anterior part of the eye and in the retina.

  2. Impact of gene polymorphisms of gonadotropins and their receptors on human reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarini, Livio; Santi, Daniele; Marino, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Gonadotropins and their receptors' genes carry several single-nucleotide polymorphisms resulting in endocrine genotypes modulating reproductive parameters, diseases, and lifespan leading to important implications for reproductive success and potential relevance during human evolution. Here we illustrate common genotypes of the gonadotropins and gonadotropin receptors' genes and their clinical implications in phenotypes relevant for reproduction such as ovarian cycle length, age of menopause, testosterone levels, polycystic ovary syndrome, and cancer. We then discuss their possible role in human reproduction and adaptation to the environment. Gonadotropins and their receptors' variants are differently distributed among human populations. Some hints suggest that they may be the result of natural selection that occurred in ancient times, increasing the individual chance of successful mating, pregnancy, and effective post-natal parental cares. The gender-related differences in the regulation of the reproductive endocrine systems imply that many of these genotypes may lead to sex-dependent effects, increasing the chance of mating and reproductive success in one sex at the expenses of the other sex. Also, we suggest that sexual conflicts within the FSH and LH-choriogonadotropin receptor genes contributed to maintain genotypes linked to subfertility among humans. Because the distribution of polymorphic markers results in a defined geographical pattern due to human migrations rather than natural selection, these polymorphisms may have had only a weak impact on reproductive success. On the contrary, such genotypes could acquire relevant consequences in the modern, developed societies in which parenthood attempts often occur at a later age, during a short, suboptimal reproductive window, making clinical fertility treatments necessary. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  3. Crystal structure of the Sema-PSI extracellular domain of human RON receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinlin L Chao

    Full Text Available Human RON (Recepteur d'Origine Nantais receptor tyrosine kinase is a cell surface receptor for Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP. RON mediates signal transduction pathways that regulate cell adhesion, invasion, motility and apoptosis processes. Elevated levels of RON and its alternatively spliced variants are implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumor cells. The binding of MSP α/β heterodimer to the extracellular region of RON receptor induces receptor dimerization and activation by autophosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domains. The ectodomain of RON, containing the ligand recognition and dimerization domains, is composed of a semaphorin (Sema, Plexins-Semaphorins-Integrins domain (PSI, and four Immunoglobulins-Plexins-Transcription factor (IPT domains. High affinity association between MSP and RON is mediated by the interaction between MSP β-chain and RON Sema, although RON activation requires intact RON and MSP proteins. Here, we report the structure of RON Sema-PSI domains at 1.85 Å resolution. RON Sema domain adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller fold, followed by disulfide bond rich, cysteine-knot PSI motif. Comparison with the homologous Met receptor tyrosine kinase reveals that RON Sema-PSI contains distinguishing secondary structural features. These define the receptors' exclusive selectivity towards their respective ligands, RON for MSP and Met for HGF. The RON Sema-PSI crystal packing generates a homodimer with interface formed by the Sema domain. Mapping of the dimer interface using the RON homology to Met, MSP homology to Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, and the structure of the Met/HGF complex shows the dimer interface overlapping with the putative MSPβ binding site. The crystallographically determined RON Sema-PSI homodimer may represent the dimer assembly that occurs during ligand-independent receptor activation and/or the inhibition of the constitutive activity of RONΔ160 splice variant by the soluble RON

  4. [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethylflumazenil: a novel tracer for PET imaging of human benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruender, G.; Lange-Asschenfeldt, C.; Vernaleken, I.; Lueddens, H. [Dept. of Psychiatry, Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Siessmeier, T.; Buchholz, H.-G.; Bartenstein, P. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Stoeter, P. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany); Drzezga, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technical University of Munich (Germany); Roesch, F. [Inst. for Nuclear Chemistry, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    5-(2'-[{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyl)flumazenil ([{sup 18}F]FEF) is a fluorine-18 labelled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for central benzodiazepine receptors. Compared with the established [{sup 11}C]flumazenil, it has the advantage of the longer half-life of the fluorine-18 label. After optimisation of its synthesis and determination of its in vitro receptor affinities, we performed first PET studies in humans. PET studies in seven healthy human volunteers were performed on a Siemens ECAT EXACT whole-body scanner after injection of 100-280 MBq [{sup 18}F]FEF. In two subjects, a second PET scan was conducted after pretreatment with unlabelled flumazenil (1 mg or 2.5 mg i.v., 3 min before tracer injection). A third subject was studied both with [{sup 18}F]FEF and with [{sup 11}C]flumazenil. Brain radioactivity was measured for 60-90 min p.i. and analysed with a region of interest-oriented approach and on a voxelwise basis with spectral analysis. Plasma radioactivity was determined from arterial blood samples and metabolites were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. In human brain, maximum radioactivity accumulation was observed 4{+-}2 min p.i., with a fast clearance kinetics resulting in 50% and 20% of maximal activities at about 10 and 30 min, respectively. [{sup 18}F]FEF uptake followed the known central benzodiazepine receptor distribution in the human brain (occipital cortex >temporal cortex >cerebellum >thalamus >pons). Pretreatment with unlabelled flumazenil resulted in reduced tracer uptake in all brain areas except for receptor-free reference regions like the pons. Parametric images of distribution volume and binding potential generated on a voxelwise basis revealed two- to three-fold lower in vivo receptor binding of [{sup 18}F]FEF compared with [{sup 11}C]flumazenil, while relative uptake of [{sup 18}F]FEF was higher in the cerebellum, most likely owing to its relatively higher affinity for benzodiazepine receptors containing the

  5. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulton, Emma Jane [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Levy, Lisa [Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States); Lampe, Johanna W. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Public Health Sciences Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (United States); Shen, Danny D. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States); Tracy, Julia [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Shuhart, Margaret C. [Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine (United States); Thummel, Kenneth E. [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States); Eaton, David L., E-mail: deaton@uw.edu [Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health, University of Washington (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington (United States); Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Washington (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity. ► Humanized PXR

  6. Complement Receptor Type 1 Suppresses Human B Cell Functions in SLE Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariann Kremlitzka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement receptors (CRs play an integral role in innate immunity and also function to initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. Our earlier results showed that complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35 is a potent inhibitor of the B cell receptor- (BCR- induced functions of human B lymphocytes. Here we show that this inhibition occurs already at the initial steps of B cell activation since ligation of CR1 reduces the BCR-induced phosphorylation of key signaling molecules such as Syk and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs. Furthermore, our data give evidence that although B lymphocytes of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients express lower level of CR1, the inhibitory capacity of this complement receptor is still maintained and its ligand-induced clustering results in significant inhibition of the main B cell functions, similar to that found in the case of healthy individuals. Since we have found that reduced CR1 expression of SLE patients does not affect the inhibitory capacity of the receptor, our results further support the therapeutical potential of CD35 targeting the decrease of B cell activation and autoantibody production in autoimmune patients.

  7. Complement Receptor Type 1 Suppresses Human B Cell Functions in SLE Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremlitzka, Mariann; Mácsik-Valent, Bernadett; Polgár, Anna; Kiss, Emese; Poór, Gyula; Erdei, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Complement receptors (CRs) play an integral role in innate immunity and also function to initiate and shape the adaptive immune response. Our earlier results showed that complement receptor type 1 (CR1, CD35) is a potent inhibitor of the B cell receptor- (BCR-) induced functions of human B lymphocytes. Here we show that this inhibition occurs already at the initial steps of B cell activation since ligation of CR1 reduces the BCR-induced phosphorylation of key signaling molecules such as Syk and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, our data give evidence that although B lymphocytes of active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients express lower level of CR1, the inhibitory capacity of this complement receptor is still maintained and its ligand-induced clustering results in significant inhibition of the main B cell functions, similar to that found in the case of healthy individuals. Since we have found that reduced CR1 expression of SLE patients does not affect the inhibitory capacity of the receptor, our results further support the therapeutical potential of CD35 targeting the decrease of B cell activation and autoantibody production in autoimmune patients.

  8. The dynamics of interleukin-8 and its interaction with human CXC receptor I peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendrick, Agnieszka; Holliday, Michael; Isern, Nancy G.; Zhang, Fengli; Camilloni, Carlo; Huynh, Chi; Vendruscolo, Michele; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2014-01-20

    Interleukin-8 (CXCL8, IL-8) is a pro-inflammatory chemokine important for the regulation of inflammatory and immune responses via its interaction with G-protein coupled receptors, including CXC receptor 1 (CXCR1). CXCL8 exists as both a monomer and as a dimer at physiological concentrations, yet the molecular basis of CXCL8 interaction with its receptor as well as the importance of CXCL8 dimer formation remain poorly characterized. Although several biological studies have indicated that both the CXCL8 monomer and dimer are active, biophysical studies have reported conflicting results regarding the binding of CXCL8 to CXCR1. To clarify this problem, we expressed and purified a peptide (hCXCR1pep) corresponding to the N-terminal region of human CXCR1 (hCXCR1) and utilized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to interrogate the binding of wild-type CXCL8 and a previously reported mutant (CXCL8M) that stabilizes the monomeric form. Our data reveal that CXCL8M engages hCXCR1pep with a slightly higher affinity than CXCL8, and that CXCL8 does not dissociate upon binding hCXCR1pep. These investigations also indicate that CXCL8 exhibits inherent flexibility within its receptor-binding site on multiple timescales, which may help explain the versatility in this interleukin for engaging its target receptors.

  9. Identification of gain-of-function variants of the human prolactin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, Vincent; Bogorad, Roman L; Touraine, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    There is currently no known genetic disease linked to prolactin (PRL) or its receptor (PRLR) in humans. Recently, we identified three missense variants of the PRLR in patients presenting with breast tumors. Two of them (named PRLR(I146L) and PRLR(I76V)) had been reported earlier, but failed to draw much attention because the eventual impact of these substitutions on receptor properties remained unknown. In this chapter, we describe the various bioassays (cell types and readouts) that led to the discovery that both variants exhibit gain-of-function properties. Reconstituted cell models involving Ba/F3, HEK293, and MCF-7 cell lines all highlighted the constitutive, PRL-independent potency of PRLR(I146L) to trigger downstream signaling, leading to antiapoptotic and proliferation properties. The lower level of basal activity of PRLR(I76V) could be demonstrated only in the very sensitive Ba/F3 cell assay. While comparative analysis of ligands is a routine procedure in many labs, comparison of receptor variants de facto imposes the use of different cell clones (or population) in which each receptor variant is expressed individually. This is more delicate, as one must ensure that differences in biological responses really reflect differences in the intrinsic properties of receptor variants, and not any feature of cell clones/populations that are used, which could bias the interpretation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P.; Brennan, Sarah C.; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X.; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D.; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Colecraft, Henry M.; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R.

    2016-07-19

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+and PO43-ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ions stabilize the active state, PO43-ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits.

  11. Differential distribution of the JC virus receptor-type sialic acid in normal human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eash, Sylvia; Tavares, Rosemarie; Stopa, Edward G; Robbins, Scott H; Brossay, Laurent; Atwood, Walter J

    2004-02-01

    JC virus (JCV), a member of the polyomavirus family, causes a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Although glial cells are the principal target of JCV productive infection in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy patients, little is known regarding the site of JCV persistence and the mechanisms by which the virus spreads to the CNS to cause disease. Previous work has demonstrated the presence of replicating JCV DNA in B lymphocytes from peripheral blood, tonsil, and spleen and it has been hypothesized that lymphocytes may be one site of JCV persistence. Detection of viral gene products in renal tubules and excretion of JC virions in the urine suggests JCV persistence in the kidney. A respiratory route of viral transmission has also been hypothesized implicating the lung as another possible site of persistent JCV infection. Earlier studies from our laboratory have shown that terminal alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid is a critical component of the JCV receptor. In this report we examined the tissue distribution of this JCV receptor-type sialic acid in a panel of normal human tissues. Our results demonstrate that in normal brain JCV receptor-type sialic acids are expressed on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, but not on cortical neurons. The receptor-type sialic acid is also more highly expressed on B lymphocytes than on T lymphocytes in normal human spleen and tonsil. In addition, both the kidney and lung express abundant levels of alpha 2-6-linked sialic acids. Our data show a striking correlation between the expression of the JCV receptor-type sialic acid on cells and their susceptibility to infection by the virus. These findings also support the hypothesis of JCV persistence in lymphoid tissue and B-cell-facilitated viral dissemination to the CNS.

  12. Sleep deprivation increases cerebral serotonin 2A receptor binding in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmenhorst, David; Kroll, Tina; Matusch, Andreas; Bauer, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin and its cerebral receptors play an important role in sleep-wake regulation. The aim of the current study is to investigate the effect of 24-h total sleep deprivation on the apparent serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) binding capacity in the human brain to test the hypothesis that sleep deprivation induces global molecular alterations in the cortical serotonergic receptor system. Volunteers were tested twice with the subtype-selective radiotracer [(18)F]altanserin and positron emission tomography (PET) for imaging of 5-HT(2A)Rs at baseline and after 24 h of sleep deprivation. [(18)F]Altanserin binding potentials were analyzed in 13 neocortical regions of interest. The efficacy of sleep deprivation was assessed by questionnaires, waking electroencephalography, and cognitive performance measurements. Sleep laboratory and neuroimaging center. Eighteen healthy volunteers. Sleep deprivation. A total of 24 hours of sleep deprivation led to a 9.6% increase of [(18)F]altanserin binding on neocortical 5-HT(2A) receptors. Significant region-specific increases were found in the medial inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and anterior cingulate, parietal, sensomotoric, and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices. This study demonstrates that a single night of total sleep deprivation causes significant increases of 5-HT(2A)R binding potentials in a variety of cortical regions although the increase declines as sleep deprivation continued. It provides in vivo evidence that total sleep deprivation induces adaptive processes in the serotonergic system of the human brain.

  13. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2009-01-01

    the ETA and ETB receptor intracellular signaling in human VSMCs and used phosphorylation (activation) of ERK1/2 as a functional signal molecule for endothelin receptor activity. RESULTS: Subconfluent human VSMCs were stimulated by ET-1 at different concentrations (1 nM-1 microM). The activation of ERK1....../2 was examined by immunofluorescence, Western blot and phosphoELISA using specific antibody against phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. ET-1 induced a concentration- and time- dependent activation of ERK1/2 with a maximal effect at 10 min. It declined to baseline level at 30 min. The ET-1-induced activation of ERK1....../2 was completely abolished by MEK1/2 inhibitors U0126 and SL327, and partially inhibited by the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059. A dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan or the ETA antagonist BQ123 blocked the ET-1 effect, while the ETB antagonist BQ788 had no significant effect. However, a selective ETB receptor...

  14. Hybrid Synthetic Receptors on MOSFET Devices for Detection of Prostate Specific Antigen in Human Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Vibha K; Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Bowen, Chris R; Taylor, John T; Bowen, Jenna L; Allender, Chris J; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-12-06

    The study reports the use of extended gate field-effect transistors (FET) for the label-free and sensitive detection of prostate cancer (PCa) biomarkers in human plasma. The approach integrates for the first time hybrid synthetic receptors comprising of highly selective aptamer-lined pockets (apta-MIP) with FETs for sensitive detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) at clinically relevant concentrations. The hybrid synthetic receptors were constructed by immobilizing an aptamer-PSA complex on gold and subjecting it to 13 cycles of dopamine electropolymerization. The polymerization resulted in the creation of highly selective polymeric cavities that retained the ability to recognize PSA post removal of the protein. The hybrid synthetic receptors were subsequently used in an extended gate FET setup for electrochemical detection of PSA. The sensor was reported to have a limit of detection of 0.1 pg/mL with a linear detection range from 0.1 pg/mL to 1 ng/mL PSA. Detection of 1-10 pg/mL PSA was also achieved in diluted human plasma. The present apta-MIP sensor developed in conjunction with FET devices demonstrates the potential for clinical application of synthetic hybrid receptors for the detection of clinically relevant biomarkers in complex samples.

  15. A Butter Aroma Recombinate Activates Human Class-I Odorant Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithe, Christiane; Andersen, Gaby; Malki, Agne; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2015-11-04

    With ∼400 olfactory G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), humans sensitively perceive ∼230 key aroma compounds as best natural agonists of ∼10000 food volatiles. An understanding of odorant coding, thus, critically depends on the knowledge about interactions of key food aroma chemicals and their mixtures with their cognate receptors. Genetically designed test cell systems enable the screening, deorphaning, and characterization of single odorant receptors (OR). This study shows for the food aroma-specific and quantitative butter aroma recombinate, and its single components, specific in vitro class-I OR activity patterns, as well as the activation of selected OR in a concentration-dependent manner. Recently, chemosensory receptors, especially class-I OR, were demonstrated to be expressed on blood leukocytes, which may encounter foodborne aroma compounds postprandially. This study shows that butter aroma recombinate induced chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils in a defined gradient, and in a concentration-dependent and pertussis toxin-sensitive manner, suggesting at least a GPCR-mediated activation of blood leukocytes by key food odorants.

  16. A single mutation in Taiwanese H6N1 influenza hemagglutinin switches binding to human-type receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, Robert P.; Tzarum, Netanel; Peng, Wenjie; Thompson, Andrew J.; Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de la Pena, Alba T. Torrents; van Breemen, Marielle J.; Bouwman, Kim M.; Zhu, Xueyong; McBride, Ryan; Yu, Wenli; Sanders, Rogier W.; Verheije, Monique H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Paulson, James C.

    2017-07-10

    In June 2013, the first case of human infection with an avian H6N1 virus was reported in a Taiwanese woman. Although this was a single non-fatal case, the virus continues to circulate in Taiwanese poultry. As with any emerging avian virus that infects humans, there is concern that acquisition of human-type receptor specificity could enable transmission in the human population. Despite mutations in the receptor-binding pocket of the human H6N1 isolate, it has retained avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal) receptor specificity. However, we show here that a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a change from Gly to Asp at position 225 (G225D), completely switches specificity to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal) receptors. Significantly, G225D H6 loses binding to chicken trachea epithelium and is now able to bind to human tracheal tissue. Structural analysis reveals that Asp225 directly interacts with the penultimate Gal of the human-type receptor, stabilizing human receptor binding.

  17. Use of plasma C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, neutrophils,macrophage migration inhibitory factor, soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 in combination to diagnose infections: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Andersen, Ove; Kronborg, Gitte

    2007-01-01

    department and department of infectious diseases at a university hospital. A multiplex immunoassay measuring soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator (suPAR) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM)-1 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was used in parallel...

  18. TRA-418, a novel compound having both thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonistic and prostaglandin I(2) receptor agonistic activities: its antiplatelet effects in human and animal platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, N; Miyamoto, M; Isogaya, M; Suzuki, M; Ikezawa, S; Ohno, M; Otake, A; Umemura, K

    2003-08-01

    TRA-418 is a novel compound that has been found in our screening for compounds having both thromboxane A2 (TP) receptor antagonistic and prostaglandin I2 (IP) receptor agonistic activities. In the binding assays, TRA-418 showed a 10-fold higher affinity to TP-receptors than IP-receptors. TRA-418 inhibited platelet aggregation induced by the TP-receptor agonist, U-46619 and by arachidonic acid at concentrations lower than those required for inhibition of ADP-induced aggregations. Furthermore, TRA-418 inhibited not only platelet aggregation induced by ADP alone, but also that induced by ADP in the presence of the TP-receptor antagonist, SQ-29548. When the IC50 values of TRA-418 for platelet aggregation were estimated in platelet preparations from monkeys, dogs, cats, and rats using ADP and arachidonic acid as the platelet stimulating agents, it was found that the values estimated in monkey platelets were quite similar to those estimated in human platelets. In ex vivo platelet aggregation in monkeys, TRA-418 exhibited significant inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid-induced aggregation in platelet preparations from monkeys treated at 3 micro g kg min-1 or higher doses, where neither a significant decrease in blood pressure nor a significant increase in heart rate was observed. These results are consistent with the fact that TRA-418 has a relatively potent TP-receptor antagonistic activity together with a relatively weak IP-receptor agonistic activity.

  19. Castration resistance in human prostate cancer is conferred by a frequently occurring androgen receptor splice variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shihua; Sprenger, Cynthia C.T.; Vessella, Robert L.; Haugk, Kathleen; Soriano, Kathryn; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Page, Stephanie T.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Sun, Huiying; Nelson, Peter S.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of prostate cancer following castration is associated with increased androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling despite AR blockade. Recent studies suggest that these activities are due to the generation of constitutively active AR splice variants, but the mechanisms by which these splice variants could mediate such effects are not fully understood. Here we have identified what we believe to be a novel human AR splice variant in which exons 5, 6, and 7 are deleted (ARv567es) and demonstrated that this variant can contribute to cancer progression in human prostate cancer xenograft models in mice following castration. We determined that, in human prostate cancer cell lines, ARv567es functioned as a constitutively active receptor, increased expression of full-length AR (ARfl), and enhanced the transcriptional activity of AR. In human xenografts, human prostate cancer cells transfected with ARv567es cDNA formed tumors that were resistant to castration. Furthermore, the ratio of ARv567es to ARfl expression within the xenografts positively correlated with resistance to castration. Importantly, we also detected ARv567es frequently in human prostate cancer metastases. In summary, these data indicate that constitutively active AR splice variants can contribute to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancers and may serve as biomarkers for patients who are likely to suffer from early recurrence and are candidates for therapies directly targeting the AR rather than ligand. PMID:20644256

  20. Human dopamine D4 receptor gene: frequent occurrence of a null allele and observation of homozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöthen, M M; Cichon, S; Hemmer, S; Hebebrand, J; Remschmidt, H; Lehmkuhl, G; Poustka, F; Schmidt, M; Catalano, M; Fimmers, R

    1994-12-01

    We report a null mutation in the first exon of the human dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene. The mutation is predicted to result in a truncated non-functional protein and is the first natural nonsense mutation found in a human dopamine receptor gene. It occurs with a frequency of about 2% in the general population. The distribution of the mutation was found to be similar in healthy controls and patients suffering from psychiatric diseases which included schizophrenia, bipolar affective disorder and Tourette's syndrome, indicating that heterozygosity for this mutation in the DRD4 gene is not causally related to major psychiatric diseases. We also identified an adult male who is homozygous for this mutation. He shows no symptoms of major psychiatric illness, but he displays somatic ailments including acousticous neurinoma, obesity and some disturbances of the autonomic nervous system. Some of these symptoms might be related to the absence of functional DRD4 protein.

  1. The urokinase receptor and its structural homologue C4.4A in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B; Ploug, M

    2008-01-01

    in the human genome. The structural relationship between the two proteins is, however, not reflected at the functional level. Whereas uPAR has a well-established role in regulating and focalizing uPA-mediated plasminogen activation to the surface of those cells expressing the receptor, the biological function...... of C4.4A remains elusive. Nonetheless, both uPAR and C4.4A have been implicated in human pathologies such as wound healing and cancer. A large body of experimental evidence thus demonstrates that high levels of uPAR in resected tumour tissue as well as in plasma are associated with poor prognosis......The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its structural homologue C4.4A are multidomain members of the Ly6/uPAR/alpha-neurotoxin protein domain family. Both are glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane glycoproteins encoded by neighbouring genes located on chromosome 19q13...

  2. CB2 receptor agonists protect human dopaminergic neurons against damage from HIV-1 gp120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Hu

    Full Text Available Despite the therapeutic impact of anti-retroviral therapy, HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND remains a serious threat to AIDS patients, and there currently remains no specific therapy for the neurological manifestations of HIV-1. Recent work suggests that the nigrostriatal dopaminergic area is a critical brain region for the neuronal dysfunction and death seen in HAND and that human dopaminergic neurons have a particular sensitivity to gp120-induced damage, manifested as reduced function (decreased dopamine uptake, morphological changes, and reduced viability. Synthetic cannabinoids inhibit HIV-1 expression in human microglia, suppress production of inflammatory mediators in human astrocytes, and there is substantial literature demonstrating the neuroprotective properties of cannabinoids in other neuropathogenic processes. Based on these data, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that synthetic cannabinoids will protect dopaminergic neurons against the toxic effects of the HIV-1 protein gp120. Using a human mesencephalic neuronal/glial culture model, which contains dopaminergic neurons, microglia, and astrocytes, we were able to show that the CB1/CB2 agonist WIN55,212-2 blunts gp120-induced neuronal damage as measured by dopamine transporter function, apoptosis and lipid peroxidation; these actions were mediated principally by the CB2 receptor. Adding supplementary human microglia to our cultures enhances gp120-induced damage; WIN55,212-2 is able to alleviate this enhanced damage. Additionally, WIN55,212-2 inhibits gp120-induced superoxide production by purified human microglial cells, inhibits migration of human microglia towards supernatants generated from gp120-stimulated human mesencephalic neuronal/glial cultures and reduces chemokine and cytokine production from the human mesencephalic neuronal/glial cultures. These data suggest that synthetic cannabinoids are capable of protecting human dopaminergic neurons from

  3. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin....../vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold...

  4. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  5. Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K Mendu

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is the most prominent neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain, where it activates neuronal GABA-A receptors (GABA-A channels located at synapses and outside of synapses. The GABA-A receptors are primary targets of many clinically useful drugs. In recent years, GABA has been shown to act as an immunomodulatory molecule. We have examined in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells which subunit isoforms of the GABA-A channels are expressed. The channel physiology and drug specificity is dictated by the GABA-A receptor subtype, which in turn is determined by the subunit isoforms that make the channel. There were 5, 8 and 13 different GABA-A subunit isoforms identified in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, respectively. Importantly, the γ2 subunit that imposes benzodiazepine sensitivity on the GABA-A receptors, was only detected in the mouse T cells. Immunoblots and immunocytochemistry showed abundant GABA-A channel proteins in the T cells from all three species. GABA-activated whole-cell transient and tonic currents were recorded. The currents were inhibited by picrotoxin, SR95531 and bicuculline, antagonists of GABA-A channels. Clearly, in both humans and rodents T cells, functional GABA-A channels are expressed but the subtypes vary. It is important to bear in mind the interspecies difference when selecting the appropriate animal models to study the physiological role and pharmacological properties of GABA-A channels in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells and when selecting drugs aimed at modulating the human T cells function.

  6. Crystal structure of the human beta2 adrenergic G-protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Choi, Hee-Jung; Rosenbaum, Daniel M

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for hormones and neurotransmitters has been hindered by their low natural abundance, inherent structural flexibility, and instability in detergent solutions. Here we report a structure of the human beta2 adrenoceptor (beta2AR), which....... These differences may be responsible for the relatively high basal activity and structural instability of the beta2AR, and contribute to the challenges in obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of non-rhodopsin GPCRs....

  7. A functional genetic variation of the 5-HT2a receptor affects human memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Henke, Katharina; Aerni, Amanda; Coluccia, Daniel; Wollmer, M Axel; Hock, Christoph; Nitsch, Roger M; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2003-11-01

    Human memory capacity is highly variable across individuals and is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. A roughly 50% heritability estimate indicates that naturally occurring genetic variations have an important impact on this cognitive ability. Therefore, we investigated a functional variation of a memory-related serotonin receptor in 349 healthy young volunteers, and found 21% poorer memory performance in subjects with the rare variant.

  8. Docking-based Screening of Ficus religiosa Phytochemicals as Inhibitors of Human Histamine H2 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Amit; Yadav, Birendra Singh; Singh, Swati; Maurya, Pramod Kumar; Mishra, Alok; Srivastva, Shweta; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Singh, Nand Kumar; Mani, Ashutosh

    2017-10-01

    Ficus religiosa L. is generally known as Peepal and belongs to family Moraceae. The tree is a source of many compounds having high medicinal value. In gastrointestinal tract, histamine H2 receptors have key role in histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion. Their over stimulation causes its excessive production which is responsible for gastric ulcer. This study aims to screen the range of phytochemicals present in F. religiosa for binding with human histamine H2 and identify therapeutics for a gastric ulcer from the plant. In this work, a 3D-structure of human histamine H2 receptor was modeled by using homology modeling and the predicted model was validated using PROCHECK. Docking studies were also performed to assess binding affinities between modeled receptor and 34 compounds. Molecular dynamics simulations were done to identify most stable receptor-ligand complexes. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and screening was done to evaluate pharmacokinetic properties of compounds. The results suggest that seven ligands, namely, germacrene, bergaptol, lanosterol, Ergost-5-en-3beta-ol, α-amyrin acetate, bergapten, and γ-cadinene showed better binding affinities. Among seven phytochemicals, lanosterol and α-amyrin acetate were found to have greater stability during simulation studies. These two compounds may be a suitable therapeutic agent against histamine H2 receptor. This study was performed to screen antiulcer compounds from F. religiosa. Molecular modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation studies were performed with selected phytochemicals from F. religiosa. The analysis suggests that Lanosterol and α-amyrin may be a suitable therapeutic agent against histamine H2 receptor. This study facilitates initiation of the herbal drug discovery process for the antiulcer activity. Abbreviations used: ADMET: Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity, DOPE: Discrete Optimized Potential Energy, OPLS: Optimized potential for liquid

  9. Value of the radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) for targeting of GLP-1 receptor-expressing pancreatic tissues in mice and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Bern (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. Moreover, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers for somatostatin and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor targeting of tumours. The present preclinical study determines therefore the value of an established GLP-1 receptor antagonist for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in mice and humans. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in mice pancreas and insulinomas as well as in human insulinomas; competition experiments were performed in the presence of increasing concentration of GLP-1(7-36)amide or exendin(9-39). The antagonist {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) labels mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells and mouse insulinomas, but it does not label human pancreatic {beta}-cells and insulinomas. High affinity displacement (IC{sub 50} approximately 2 nM) is observed in mouse {beta}-cells and insulinomas with either the exendin(9-39) antagonist or GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist. For comparison, the agonist {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide intensively labels mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells, mouse insulinoma and human insulinomas; high affinity displacement is observed for the GLP-1(7-36)amide in all tissues; however, a 5 and 20 times lower affinity is found for exendin(9-39) in the mouse and human tissues, respectively. This study reports a species-dependent behaviour of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) that can optimally target GLP-1 receptors in mice but not in human tissue. Due to its overly low binding affinity, this antagonist is an inadequate targeting agent for human GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues, as opposed to the GLP-1 receptor agonist, GLP-1(7-36)amide. (orig.)

  10. Canine distemper virus isolated from a monkey efficiently replicates on Vero cells expressing non-human primate SLAM receptors but not human SLAM receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Na; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Jianzhong; Xu, Weiwei; Li, Tiansong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Lei; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Yang, Songtao; Gao, Yuwei; Hu, Guixue; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-08-02

    In 2008, an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in monkeys was reported in China. We isolated CDV strain (subsequently named Monkey-BJ01-DV) from lung tissue obtained from a rhesus monkey that died in this outbreak. We evaluated the ability of this virus on Vero cells expressing SLAM receptors from dog, monkey and human origin, and analyzed the H gene of Monkey-BJ01-DV with other strains. The Monkey-BJ01-DV isolate replicated to the highest titer on Vero cells expressing dog-origin SLAM (10(5.2±0.2) TCID50/ml) and monkey-origin SLAM (10(5.4±0.1) TCID50/ml), but achieved markedly lower titers on human-origin SLAM cells (10(3.3±0.3) TCID50/ml). Phylogenetic analysis of the full-length H gene showed that Monkey-BJ01-DV was highly related to other CDV strains obtained during recent CDV epidemics among species of the Canidae family in China, and these Monkey strains CDV (Monkey-BJ01-DV, CYN07-dV, Monkey-KM-01) possessed a number of amino acid specific substitutions (E276V, Q392R, D435Y and I542F) compared to the H protein of CDV epidemic in other animals at the same period. Our results suggested that the monkey origin-CDV-H protein could possess specific substitutions to adapt to the new host. Monkey-BJ01-DV can efficiently use monkey- and dog-origin SLAM to infect and replicate in host cells, but further adaptation may be required for efficient replication in host cells expressing the human SLAM receptor.

  11. Stimulation of the Angiotensin II AT2 Receptor is Anti-inflammatory in Human Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Monocytic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menk, Mario; Graw, Jan Adriaan; von Haefen, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Recently, AT2 receptors have been discovered on the surface of human immunocompetent cells such as monocytes. Data on regulative properties of this receptor on the cellular immune response are poor. We hypothesized that direct stimulation of the AT2 receptor mediates anti-inflammatory responses...... in these cells. Human monocytic THP-1 and U937 cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the selective AT2 receptor agonist Compound 21 (C21). Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and IL-1β were analyzed on both the transcriptional...... and the translational level over course of time. Treatment with C21 attenuated the expression of TNFα, IL-6, and IL-10 after LPS challenge in both cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner. We conclude that selective AT2 receptor stimulation acts anti-inflammatory in human monocytes. Modulation of cytokine...

  12. Polymorphism and genetic mapping of the human oxytocin receptor gene on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelini, S.; Urbanek, M.; Goldman, D. [National Institute of Health-National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-19

    Centrally administered oxytocin has been reported to facilitate affiliative and social behaviors, in functional harmony with its well-known peripheral effects on uterine contraction and milk ejection. The biological effects of oxytocin could be perturbed by mutations occurring in the sequence of the oxytocin receptor gene, and it would be of interest to establish the position of this gene on the human linkage map. Therefore we identified a polymorphism at the human oxytocin receptor gene. A portion of the 3{prime} untranslated region containing a 30 bp CA repeat was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), revealing a polymorphism with two alleles occurring with frequencies of 0.77 and 0.23 in a sample of Caucasian CEPH parents (n = 70). The CA repeat polymorphism we detected was used to map the human oxytocin receptor to chromosome 3p25-3p26, in a region which contains several important genes, including loci for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) and renal cell carcinoma. 53 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Triazoloquinazolines as Human A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists: A QSAR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Sil Lee

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple linear regression analysis was performed on the quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR of the triazoloquinazoline adenosine antagonists for human A3receptors. The data set used for the QSAR analysis encompassed the activities of 33triazoloquinazoline derivatives and 72 physicochemical descriptors. A template moleculewas derived using the known molecular structure for one of the compounds when bound tothe human A2B receptor, in which the amide bond was in a cis-conformation. All the testcompounds were aligned to the template molecule. In order to identify a reasonable QSARequation to describe the data set, we developed a multiple linear regression program thatexamined every possible combination of descriptors. The QSAR equation derived from thisanalysis indicates that the spatial and electronic effects is greater than that of hydrophobiceffects in binding of the antagonists to the human A3 receptor. It also predicts that a largesterimol length parameter is advantageous to activity, whereas large sterimol widthparameters and fractional positive partial surface areas are nonadvatageous.

  14. Pleurocidin, a novel antimicrobial peptide, induces human mast cell activation through the FPRL1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, P; Catalli, A; Leggiadro, C; Douglas, S E; Kulka, M

    2014-01-01

    Pleurocidins are a novel family of α-helical cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) that are structurally and functionally similar to cathelicidins, one of the major CAP families. As cathelicidins stimulate mast cell chemotaxis and mediator release, we postulated that pleurocidins similarly activate mast cells. A screen of 20 pleurocidin peptides revealed that some were capable of degranulating the human mast cell line LAD2 (Laboratory of Allergic Diseases 2). Pleurocidin NRC-04 caused LAD2 to adhere, migrate, degranulate, and release cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Moreover, pleurocidin increased intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in mast cells and induced the production of proinflammatory chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1/C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1β/CCL4. Our evaluation of possible cellular mechanisms suggested that G proteins, phosphoinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), phospholipase C (PLC), and phosphokinase C (PKC) were involved in pleurocidin-induced mast cell activation as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of pertussis toxin (G protein inhibitor), wortmanin (PI3K inhibitor), U-73122 (PLC inhibitor), and Ro-31-8220 (PKC inhibitor), respectively. We also found that human mast cells expressed the N-formyl-peptide receptor 1 (FPRL1) receptor and FPRL1-specific inhibitor affected pleurocidin-mediated activation of mast cell. Our finding that the novel CAP pleurocidin activated human mast cell through G protein-coupled receptor signaling suggests that this peptide might have immunomodulatory functions.

  15. Poliovirus trafficking toward central nervous system via human poliovirus receptor-dependent and -independent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seii eOHKA

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In humans, paralytic poliomyelitis results from the invasion of the central nervous system by circulating poliovirus (PV via the blood-brain barrier (BBB. After the virus enters the central nervous system (CNS, it replicates in neurons, especially in motor neurons (MNs, inducing the cell death that causes paralytic poliomyelitis. Along with this route of dissemination, neural pathway has been reported in humans, monkeys, and PV-sensitive human PV receptor (hPVR/CD155-transgenic (Tg mice. We demonstrated that a fast retrograde axonal transport process is required for PV dissemination through the sciatic nerve of hPVR-Tg mice and that intramuscularly inoculated PV causes paralysis in a hPVR-dependent manner. We also showed that hPVR-independent axonal transport of PV exists in hPVR-Tg and non-Tg mice, indicating that several different pathways for PV axonal transport exist in these mice. Circulating PV after intravenous inoculation in mice cross the BBB at a high rate in a hPVR-independent manner. Recently, we identified transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1 of mouse brain capillary endothelial cells as a binding protein to PV, implicating that TfR1 is a possible receptor for PV to permeate the BBB.

  16. Orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ is a key regulator of human fibrinogen gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lu, Yan; Jung, Yoon Seok; Lee, Ji-min; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Yong Soo; Kim, Jina; Dewidar, Bedair; Jeong, Won-IL; Lee, In-Kyu; Cho, Sung Jin; Dooley, Steven; Lee, Chul-Ho; Li, Xiaoying

    2017-01-01

    Fibrinogen, 1 of 13 coagulation factors responsible for normal blood clotting, is synthesized by hepatocytes. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating fibrinogen gene expression have not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we identified estrogen-related receptor gamma (ERRγ) as a novel transcriptional regulator of human fibrinogen gene expression. Overexpression of ERRγ specially increased fibrinogen expression in human hepatoma cell line. Cannabinoid receptor types 1(CB1R) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) up-regulated transcription of fibrinogen via induction of ERRγ, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated fibrinogen expression. Deletion analyses of the fibrinogen γ (FGG) gene promoter and ChIP assays revealed binding sites of ERRγ on human fibrinogen γ gene promoter. Moreover, overexpression of ERRγ was sufficient to increase fibrinogen gene expression, whereas treatment with GSK5182, a selective inverse agonist of ERRγ led to its attenuation in cell culture. Finally, fibrinogen and ERRγ gene expression were elevated in liver tissue of obese patients suggesting a conservation of this mechanism. Overall, this study elucidates a molecular mechanism linking CB1R signaling, ERRγ expression and fibrinogen gene transcription. GSK5182 may have therapeutic potential to treat hyperfibrinogenemia. PMID:28750085

  17. Serotonin receptor expression in human prefrontal cortex: balancing excitation and inhibition across postnatal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn K Lambe

    Full Text Available Serotonin and its receptors (HTRs play critical roles in brain development and in the regulation of cognition, mood, and anxiety. HTRs are highly expressed in human prefrontal cortex and exert control over prefrontal excitability. The serotonin system is a key treatment target for several psychiatric disorders; however, the effectiveness of these drugs varies according to age. Despite strong evidence for developmental changes in prefrontal Htrs of rodents, the developmental regulation of HTR expression in human prefrontal cortex has not been examined. Using postmortem human prefrontal brain tissue from across postnatal life, we investigated the expression of key serotonin receptors with distinct inhibitory (HTR1A, HTR5A and excitatory (HTR2A, HTR2C, HTR4, HTR6 effects on cortical neurons, including two receptors which appear to be expressed to a greater degree in inhibitory interneurons of cerebral cortex (HTR2C, HTR6. We found distinct developmental patterns of expression for each of these six HTRs, with profound changes in expression occurring early in postnatal development and also into adulthood. However, a collective look at these HTRs in terms of their likely neurophysiological effects and major cellular localization leads to a model that suggests developmental changes in expression of these individual HTRs may not perturb an overall balance between inhibitory and excitatory effects. Examining and understanding the healthy balance is critical to appreciate how abnormal expression of an individual HTR may create a window of vulnerability for the emergence of psychiatric illness.

  18. Characterization of a novel nonpeptide vasopressin V2-agonist, OPC-51803, in cells transfected human vasopressin receptor subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shigeki; Yamamura, Yoshitaka; Itoh, Shuji; Hirano, Takahiro; Tsujimae, Kenji; Aoyama, Masashi; Kondo, Kazumi; Ogawa, Hidenori; Shinohara, Tomoichi; Kan, Keizo; Tanada, Yoshihisa; Teramoto, Shuji; Sumida, Takumi; Nakayama, Sunao; Sekiguchi, Kazuo; Kambe, Toshimi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Mori, Toyoki; Tominaga, Michiaki

    2000-01-01

    We discovered the first nonpeptide arginine-vasopressin (AVP) V2-receptor agonist, OPC-51803. Pharmacological properties of OPC-51803 were elucidated using HeLa cells expressing human AVP receptor subtypes (V2, V1a and V1b) and compared with those of 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (dDAVP), a peptide V2-receptor agonist.OPC-51803 and dDAVP displaced [3H]-AVP binding to human V2- and V1a-receptors with Ki values of 91.9±10.8 nM (n=6) and 3.12±0.38 nM (n=6) for V2-receptors, and 819±39 nM (n=6) and 41.5±9.9 nM (n=6) for V1a-receptors, indicating that OPC-51803 was about nine times more selective for V2-receptors, similar to the selectivity of dDAVP. OPC-51803 scarcely displaced [3H]-AVP binding to human V1b-receptors even at 10−4 M, while dDAVP showed potent affinity to human V1b-receptors with the Ki value of 13.7±3.2 nM (n=4).OPC-51803 concentration-dependently increased cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) production in HeLa cells expressing human V2-receptors with an EC50 value of 189±14 nM (n=6). The concentration-response curve for cyclic AMP production induced by OPC-51803 was shifted to the right in the presence of a V2-antagonist, OPC-31260.At 10−5 M, OPC-51803 did not increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in HeLa cells expressing human V1a-receptors. On the other hand, dDAVP increased [Ca2+]i in HeLa cells expressing human V1a- and V1b-receptors in a concentration-dependent fashion.From these results, OPC-51803 has been confirmed to be the first nonpeptide agonist for human AVP V2-receptors without agonistic activities for V1a- and V1b-receptors. OPC-51803 may be useful for the treatment of AVP-deficient pathophysiological states and as a tool for AVP researches. PMID:10780976

  19. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda

  20. CADM1 is a key receptor mediating human mast cell adhesion to human lung fibroblasts and airway smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs play a central role in the development of many diseases including asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. Interactions of human lung mast cells (HLMCs with human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs are partially dependent on adhesion mediated by cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1, but the adhesion mechanism through which HLMCs interact with human lung fibroblasts (HLFs is not known. CADM1 is expressed as several isoforms (SP4, SP1, SP6 in HLMCs, with SP4 dominant. These isoforms differentially regulate HLMC homotypic adhesion and survival.In this study we have investigated the role of CADM1 isoforms in the adhesion of HLMCs and HMC-1 cells to primary HASMCs and HLFs.CADM1 overexpression or downregulation was achieved using adenoviral delivery of CADM1 short hairpin RNAs or isoform-specific cDNAs respectively.Downregulation of CADM1 attenuated both HLMC and HMC-1 adhesion to both primary HASMCs and HLFs. Overexpression of either SP1 or SP4 isoforms did not alter MC adhesion to HASMCs, whereas overexpression of SP4, but not SP1, significantly increased both HMC-1 cell and HLMC adhesion to HLFs. The expression level of CADM1 SP4 strongly predicted the extent of MC adhesion; linear regression indicated that CADM1 accounts for up to 67% and 32% of adhesion to HLFs for HMC-1 cells and HLMCs, respectively. HLFs supported HLMC proliferation and survival through a CADM1-dependent mechanism. With respect to CADM1 counter-receptor expression, HLFs expressed both CADM1 and nectin-3, whereas HASMCs expressed only nectin-3.Collectively these data indicate that the CADM1 SP4 isoform is a key receptor mediating human MC adhesion to HASMCs and HLFs. The differential expression of CADM1 counter-receptors on HLFs compared to HASMCs may allow the specific targeting of either HLMC-HLF or HLMC-HASMC interactions in the lung parenchyma and airways.

  1. CADM1 Is a Key Receptor Mediating Human Mast Cell Adhesion to Human Lung Fibroblasts and Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moiseeva, Elena P.; Roach, Katy M.; Leyland, Mark L.; Bradding, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Mast cells (MCs) play a central role in the development of many diseases including asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. Interactions of human lung mast cells (HLMCs) with human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) are partially dependent on adhesion mediated by cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1), but the adhesion mechanism through which HLMCs interact with human lung fibroblasts (HLFs) is not known. CADM1 is expressed as several isoforms (SP4, SP1, SP6) in HLMCs, with SP4 dominant. These isoforms differentially regulate HLMC homotypic adhesion and survival. Objective In this study we have investigated the role of CADM1 isoforms in the adhesion of HLMCs and HMC-1 cells to primary HASMCs and HLFs. Methods CADM1 overexpression or downregulation was achieved using adenoviral delivery of CADM1 short hairpin RNAs or isoform-specific cDNAs respectively. Results Downregulation of CADM1 attenuated both HLMC and HMC-1 adhesion to both primary HASMCs and HLFs. Overexpression of either SP1 or SP4 isoforms did not alter MC adhesion to HASMCs, whereas overexpression of SP4, but not SP1, significantly increased both HMC-1 cell and HLMC adhesion to HLFs. The expression level of CADM1 SP4 strongly predicted the extent of MC adhesion; linear regression indicated that CADM1 accounts for up to 67% and 32% of adhesion to HLFs for HMC-1 cells and HLMCs, respectively. HLFs supported HLMC proliferation and survival through a CADM1-dependent mechanism. With respect to CADM1 counter-receptor expression, HLFs expressed both CADM1 and nectin-3, whereas HASMCs expressed only nectin-3. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance Collectively these data indicate that the CADM1 SP4 isoform is a key receptor mediating human MC adhesion to HASMCs and HLFs. The differential expression of CADM1 counter-receptors on HLFs compared to HASMCs may allow the specific targeting of either HLMC-HLF or HLMC-HASMC interactions in the lung parenchyma and airways. PMID:23620770

  2. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising...... new strategies for combating HIV....

  3. Characterization of p75 neurotrophin receptor expression in human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenru; Kremer, Karlea L; Kaidonis, Xenia; Ludlow, Victoria E; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Xie, Jianling; Proud, Christopher G; Koblar, Simon A

    2016-10-01

    Human adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) are a heterogeneous stem cell population, which are able to differentiate down neural, chondrocyte, osteocyte and adipocyte lineages. We studied the expression pattern of p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75NTR), a marker of neural stem cells, within human DPSC populations from eight donors. p75NTR are expressed at low levels (cell marker), SOX2 (cell pluripotency marker) and nestin (neural stem cell marker) in comparison to p75(-) DPSC. Our results suggest that p75(+) hDPSC may denote a subpopulation with greater neurogenic potential. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adenosine receptors in rat and human pancreatic ducts stimulate chloride transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Hede, Susanne; Hansen, Mette

    2007-01-01

    these could be involved in secretory processes, which involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels or Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels and [Formula: see text] transporters. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis on rat pancreatic ducts and human duct cell......, it was found that 58% of PANC-1 cells responded to adenosine, whereas only 9% of CFPAC-1 cells responded. Adenosine elicited Ca(2+) signals only in a few rat and human duct cells, which did not seem to correlate with Cl(-) signals. A(2A) receptors were localized in the luminal membranes of rat pancreatic ducts...

  5. Chemokine receptors and their crucial role in human immunodeficiency virus infection: major breakthroughs in HIV research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, T B; Knudsen, T B; Eugen-Olsen, J

    1998-01-01

    to a series of breakthroughs in HIV research and knowledge. These include an increased understanding of viral entry, a connection of viral phenotype to specific coreceptor use, and an unequivocal linkage of a single human gene to host susceptibility. All in all these achievements provide a number of promising......Within the last three years, major progress in the understanding of acquired immune deficiency syndrome pathogenesis has been achieved. The discovery that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), in addition to the CD4 receptor, requires the presence of a coreceptor in order to infect cells has led...... new strategies for combating HIV....

  6. MHC class I is functionally associated with antigen receptors in human T and B lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Jacoby, B F; Skov, S

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the antibody-induced effect of cross-linking the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) in human T leukemic cells (Jurkat) and human B lymphoma cells (Solubo, Burkitts lymphoma) on intracellular [Ca2+]i levels. The increase in [Ca2+]i after MHC-I cross-linking in Jurkat...... following cross-linking. Second, threshold levels for activation through antigen receptors in T and B cells are dependent on or determined by the actual numbers of MHC-I complexes present in the cell membrane. Thus the present data strongly point to a new, physiological role for MHC-I molecules in T and B...

  7. Umami-bitter interactions: the suppression of bitterness by umami peptides via human bitter taste receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Son, Hee Jin; Kim, Yiseul; Misaka, Takumi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2015-01-09

    Taste-taste interactions often showed in human psychophysical studies. Considering that each tastant in foodstuffs individually stimulates its responsible gustatory systems to elicit relevant taste modalities, taste-taste interaction should be performed in taste receptor cell-based assay. While umami substances have been proposed to suppress the bitterness of various chemicals in human sensory evaluation, the bitter-umami interaction has not been explored in bitter taste receptors, TAS2Rs. We investigated umami-bitter taste interactions by presenting umami peptides with bitter substance (salicin) on Ca(2+)-flux signaling assay using hTAS2R16-expressing cells. Five representative umami peptides (Glu-Asp, Glu-Glu, Glu-Ser, Asp-Glu-Ser, and Glu-Gly-Ser) derived from soybean markedly attenuated the salicin-induced intracellular calcium influx in a time-dependent manner, respectively, while Gly-Gly, a tasteless peptide did not. The efficacies of Glu-Glu suppressing salicin-induced activation of hTAS2R16 were higher than that of probenecid, a specific antagonist of hTAS2R16. According to Ca(2+)-flux signaling assay using the mixtures of salicin and umami peptides, all five umami peptides suppressed salicin-induced intracellular calcium influx in a noncompetitive manner. These results may provide evidence that umami peptides suppress bitter taste via bitter taste receptor(s). This is the first report which defines the interaction between bitter and umami taste in taste receptor level. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Kinome analysis of receptor-induced phosphorylation in human natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian König

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Natural killer (NK cells contribute to the defense against infected and transformed cells through the engagement of multiple germline-encoded activation receptors. Stimulation of the Fc receptor CD16 alone is sufficient for NK cell activation, whereas other receptors, such as 2B4 (CD244 and DNAM-1 (CD226, act synergistically. After receptor engagement, protein kinases play a major role in signaling networks controlling NK cell effector functions. However, it has not been characterized systematically which of all kinases encoded by the human genome (kinome are involved in NK cell activation. RESULTS: A kinase-selective phosphoproteome approach enabled the determination of 188 kinases expressed in human NK cells. Crosslinking of CD16 as well as 2B4 and DNAM-1 revealed a total of 313 distinct kinase phosphorylation sites on 109 different kinases. Phosphorylation sites on 21 kinases were similarly regulated after engagement of either CD16 or co-engagement of 2B4 and DNAM-1. Among those, increased phosphorylation of FYN, KCC2G (CAMK2, FES, and AAK1, as well as the reduced phosphorylation of MARK2, were reproducibly observed both after engagement of CD16 and co-engagement of 2B4 and DNAM-1. Notably, only one phosphorylation on PAK4 was differentally regulated. CONCLUSIONS: The present study has identified a significant portion of the NK cell kinome and defined novel phosphorylation sites in primary lymphocytes. Regulated phosphorylations observed in the early phase of NK cell activation imply these kinases are involved in NK cell signaling. Taken together, this study suggests a largely shared signaling pathway downstream of distinct activation receptors and constitutes a valuable resource for further elucidating the regulation of NK cell effector responses.

  9. Kinome analysis of receptor-induced phosphorylation in human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Sebastian; Nimtz, Manfred; Scheiter, Maxi; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Bryceson, Yenan T; Jänsch, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the defense against infected and transformed cells through the engagement of multiple germline-encoded activation receptors. Stimulation of the Fc receptor CD16 alone is sufficient for NK cell activation, whereas other receptors, such as 2B4 (CD244) and DNAM-1 (CD226), act synergistically. After receptor engagement, protein kinases play a major role in signaling networks controlling NK cell effector functions. However, it has not been characterized systematically which of all kinases encoded by the human genome (kinome) are involved in NK cell activation. A kinase-selective phosphoproteome approach enabled the determination of 188 kinases expressed in human NK cells. Crosslinking of CD16 as well as 2B4 and DNAM-1 revealed a total of 313 distinct kinase phosphorylation sites on 109 different kinases. Phosphorylation sites on 21 kinases were similarly regulated after engagement of either CD16 or co-engagement of 2B4 and DNAM-1. Among those, increased phosphorylation of FYN, KCC2G (CAMK2), FES, and AAK1, as well as the reduced phosphorylation of MARK2, were reproducibly observed both after engagement of CD16 and co-engagement of 2B4 and DNAM-1. Notably, only one phosphorylation on PAK4 was differentally regulated. The present study has identified a significant portion of the NK cell kinome and defined novel phosphorylation sites in primary lymphocytes. Regulated phosphorylations observed in the early phase of NK cell activation imply these kinases are involved in NK cell signaling. Taken together, this study suggests a largely shared signaling pathway downstream of distinct activation receptors and constitutes a valuable resource for further elucidating the regulation of NK cell effector responses.

  10. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its splice variant are expressed in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G; Aksoy, Mark O; Yang, Yi; Shahabuddin, Syed; Litvin, Judith; Safadi, Fayez; Rogers, Thomas J

    2004-09-01

    Activation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 by its cognate ligands induces several differentiated cellular responses important to the growth and migration of a variety of hematopoietic and structural cells. In the human respiratory tract, human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) release the CXCR3 ligands Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11. Simultaneous expression of CXCR3 by HAEC would have important implications for the processes of airway inflammation and repair. Accordingly, in the present study we sought to determine whether HAEC also express the classic CXCR3 chemokine receptor CXCR3-A and its splice variant CXCR3-B and hence may respond in autocrine fashion to its ligands. We found that cultured HAEC (16-HBE and tracheocytes) constitutively expressed CXCR3 mRNA and protein. CXCR3 mRNA levels assessed by expression array were approximately 35% of beta-actin expression. In contrast, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR8, and CX3CR1 were <5% beta-actin. Both CXCR3-A and -B were expressed. Furthermore, tracheocytes freshly harvested by bronchoscopy stained positively for CXCR3 by immunofluorescence microscopy, and 68% of cytokeratin-positive tracheocytes (i.e., the epithelial cell population) were positive for CXCR3 by flow cytometry. In 16-HBE cells, CXCR3 receptor density was approximately 78,000 receptors/cell when assessed by competitive displacement of 125I-labeled IP-10/CXCL10. Finally, CXCR3 ligands induced chemotactic responses and actin reorganization in 16-HBE cells. These findings indicate constitutive expression by HAEC of a functional CXC chemokine receptor, CXCR3. Our data suggest the possibility that autocrine activation of CXCR3 expressed by HAEC may contribute to airway inflammation and remodeling in obstructive lung disease by regulating HAEC migration.

  11. Cellular expression of growth hormone and prolactin receptors in human breast disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertani, H C; Garcia-Caballero, T; Lambert, A; Gérard, F; Palayer, C; Boutin, J M; Vonderhaar, B K; Waters, M J; Lobie, P E; Morel, G

    1998-04-17

    Growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) exert their regulatory functions in the mammary gland by acting on specific receptors. Using isotopic in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we have localized the expression of hGH receptor (hGHR) and hPRL receptor (hPRLR) in a panel of human breast disorders. Surgical specimens from adult females included normal breast, inflammatory lesions (mastitis) benign proliferative breast disease (fibroadenoma, papilloma, adenosis, epitheliosis), intraductal carcinoma or lobular carcinoma in situ, and invasive ductal, lobular or medullary carcinoma. Cases of male breast enlargement (gynecomastia) were also studied. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated the co-expression of hGHR and hPRLR mRNA in all samples tested. Epithelial cells of both normal and tumor tissues were labelled. Quantitative estimation of receptor mRNA levels was regionally measured in areas corresponding to tumor cells and adipose cells from the same section. It demonstrated large individual variation and no correlation emerged according to the histological type of lesion. Receptor immunoreactivity was detected both in the cytoplasm and nuclei or in the cytoplasm alone. Scattered stromal cells were found positive in some cases, but the labeling intensity was always weaker than for neoplastic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the expression of the hGHR and hPRLR genes and their translation in epithelial cells of normal, proliferative and neoplastic lesions of the breast. They also demonstrate that stromal components express GHR and PRLR genes. Thus the putative role of hGH or hPRL in the progression of proliferative mammary disorders is not due to grossly altered levels of receptor expression.

  12. Transcriptional activity of human brain estrogen receptor-α splice variants: evidence for cell type-specific regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishunina, T. A.; Sluiter, A. A.; Swaab, D. F.; Verwer, R. W. H.

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) isoforms with complex types of alternative splicing are naturally present in the human brain and may affect canonical receptor signaling. In the present study we investigated transcriptional activity of common ERα splice variants from this group with different molecular

  13. Apelin, the natural ligand of the orphan seven-transmembrane receptor APJ, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayabyab, M.; Hinuma, S.; Farzan, M.; Choe, H.; Fukusumi, S.; Kitada, C.; Nishizawa, N.; Hosoya, M.; Nishimura, O.; Messele, T.; Pollakis, G.; Goudsmit, J.; Fujino, M.; Sodroski, J.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to the CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, a subset of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates can also use the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor APJ as a coreceptor. A previously identified ligand of APJ, apelin, specifically inhibited the entry of primary

  14. Androgen receptor expression in human ovarian and uterine tissue of long term androgen-treated transsexual women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; T.D. Pache; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen receptor (AR) modulation in human uteri and ovaries of long term androgen-treated transsexual female patients was investigated. Androgen receptor expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the ovaries of 11 and the endometria and myometria of six androgen-treated

  15. Insulin-like growth factor II receptors in human brain and their absence in astrogliotic plaques in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilczak, N; De Bleser, P; Luiten, P; Geerts, A; Teelken, A; De Keyser, J

    2000-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) II receptors were studied in human adult brain by using autoradiography with [(125)I]IGF-II. Receptors were found to be widely distributed throughout all neuronal regions. The highest densities were found in plexus choroideus, granular layer of the cerebellar cortex,

  16. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3-dependent lung adenocarcinoma with a human monoclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Yin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 have been identified in multiple types of human cancer and in congenital birth defects. In human lung cancer, fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9, a high-affinity ligand for FGFR3, is overexpressed in 10% of primary resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. Furthermore, in a mouse model where FGF9 can be induced in lung epithelial cells, epithelial proliferation and ensuing tumorigenesis is dependent on FGFR3. To develop new customized therapies for cancers that are dependent on FGFR3 activation, we have used this mouse model to evaluate a human monoclonal antibody (D11 with specificity for the extracellular ligand-binding domain of FGFR3, that recognizes both human and mouse forms of the receptor. Here, we show that D11 effectively inhibits signaling through FGFR3 in vitro, inhibits the growth of FGFR3-dependent FGF9-induced lung adenocarcinoma in mice, and reduces tumor-associated morbidity. Given the potency of FGF9 in this mouse model and the absolute requirement for signaling through FGFR3, this study validates the D11 antibody as a potentially useful and effective reagent for treating human cancers or other pathologies that are dependent on activation of FGFR3.

  17. Visfatin is induced by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayi, Thérèse Hèrvée; Duhem, Christian; Copin, Corinne; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Rigamonti, Elena; Pattou, François; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2010-08-01

    Obesity is a low-grade chronic inflammatory disease associated with an increased number of macrophages (adipose tissue macrophages) in adipose tissue. Within the adipose tissue, adipose tissue macrophages are the major source of visfatin/pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor/nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) exerts anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages by inhibiting cytokine production and enhancing alternative differentiation. In this study, we investigated whether PPARgamma modulates visfatin expression in murine (bone marrow-derived macrophage) and human (primary human resting macrophage, classical macrophage, alternative macrophage or adipose tissue macrophage) macrophage models and pre-adipocyte-derived adipocytes. We show that synthetic PPARgamma ligands increase visfatin gene expression in a PPARgamma-dependent manner in primary human resting macrophages and in adipose tissue macrophages, but not in adipocytes. The threefold increase of visfatin mRNA was paralleled by an increase of protein expression (30%) and secretion (30%). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments and transient transfection assays indicated that PPARgamma induces visfatin promoter activity in human macrophages by binding to a DR1-PPARgamma response element. Finally, we show that PPARgamma ligands increase NAD(+) production in primary human macrophages and that this regulation is dampened in the presence of visfatin small interfering RNA or by the visfatin-specific inhibitor FK866. Taken together, our results suggest that PPARgamma regulates the expression of visfatin in macrophages, leading to increased levels of NAD(+).

  18. Regulation of the human SLC25A20 expression by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in human hepatoblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Keisuke, E-mail: nya@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takeuchi, Kentaro; Inada, Hirohiko [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yamasaki, Daisuke [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishimoto, Kenji [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tanaka, Toshiya; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko [Laboratory for System Biology and Medicine, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Doi, Takefumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-11-20

    Solute carrier family 25, member 20 (SLC25A20) is a key molecule that transfers acylcarnitine esters in exchange for free carnitine across the mitochondrial membrane in the mitochondrial {beta}-oxidation. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays an important role in the regulation of {beta}-oxidation. We previously established tetracycline-regulated human cell line that can be induced to express PPAR{alpha} and found that PPAR{alpha} induces the SLC25A20 expression. In this study, we analyzed the promoter region of the human slc25a20 gene and showed that PPAR{alpha} regulates the expression of human SLC25A20 via the peroxisome proliferator responsive element.

  19. Twenty-one hormones fail to inhibit the brain to blood transport system for Tyr-MIF-1 and the enkephalins in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, W A; Kastin, A J

    1988-04-01

    Tyr-MIF-1 (Tyr-Pro-Leu-Gly-amide) and methionine enkephalin are transported intact across the blood-brain barrier by a saturable, stereospecific system. This system has been found to be modulated by a few non-peptide substances and by certain conditions such as ageing and some stresses. We investigated the possibility that hormones structurally unrelated to Tyr-MIF-1 and the enkephalins might also be capable of modulating this transport. Twenty-one hormones were tested including steroids, proteins, glycoproteins, peptides, and thyroid hormones, in doses ranging from 0.01 pmol to 1 nmol/mouse by injecting each hormone directly into the lateral ventricle simultaneously with [125I]Tyr-MIF-1. No clear effect on transport could be established for any of the substances at the doses tested. None of these substances seemed able to act as competitive inhibitors, to share their respective transport systems with Tyr-MIF-1, or to modulate immediately the saturable transport system.

  20. Aim-less translation: loss of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial translation initiation factor mIF3/Aim23 leads to unbalanced protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Derbikova, Ksenia; Salvatori, Roger; Tankov, Stoyan; Atkinson, Gemma C; Tenson, Tanel; Ott, Martin; Kamenski, Piotr; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2016-01-05

    The mitochondrial genome almost exclusively encodes a handful of transmembrane constituents of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Coordinated expression of these genes ensures the correct stoichiometry of the system's components. Translation initiation in mitochondria is assisted by two general initiation factors mIF2 and mIF3, orthologues of which in bacteria are indispensible for protein synthesis and viability. mIF3 was thought to be absent in Saccharomyces cerevisiae until we recently identified mitochondrial protein Aim23 as the missing orthologue. Here we show that, surprisingly, loss of mIF3/Aim23 in S. cerevisiae does not indiscriminately abrogate mitochondrial translation but rather causes an imbalance in protein production: the rate of synthesis of the Atp9 subunit of F1F0 ATP synthase (complex V) is increased, while expression of Cox1, Cox2 and Cox3 subunits of cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) is repressed. Our results provide one more example of deviation of mitochondrial translation from its bacterial origins.

  1. Bradykinin and adenosine receptors mediate desflurane induced postconditioning in human myocardium: role of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Jean-Louis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desflurane during early reperfusion has been shown to postcondition human myocardium, in vitro. We investigated the role of adenosine and bradykinin receptors, and generation of radical oxygen species in desflurane-induced postconditioning in human myocardium. Methods We recorded isometric contraction of human right atrial trabeculae hanged in an oxygenated Tyrode's solution (34 degrees Celsius, stimulation frequency 1 Hz. After a 30-min hypoxic period, desflurane 6% was administered during the first 5 min of reoxygenation. Desflurane was administered alone or with pretreatment of N-mercaptopropionylglycine, a reactive oxygen species scavenger, 8-(p-Sulfophenyltheophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist, HOE140, a selective B2 bradykinin receptor antagonist. In separate groups, adenosine and bradykinin were administered during the first minutes of reoxygenation alone or in presence of N-mercaptopropionylglycine. The force of contraction of trabeculae was recorded continuously. Developed force at the end of a 60-min reoxygenation period was compared (mean ± standard deviation between the groups by a variance analysis and post hoc test. Results Desflurane 6% (84 ± 6% of baseline enhanced the recovery of force after 60-min of reoxygenation as compared to control group (51 ± 8% of baseline, P N-mercaptopropionylglycine (54 ± 3% of baseline, 8-(p-Sulfophenyltheophylline (62 ± 9% of baseline, HOE140 (58 ± 6% of baseline abolished desflurane-induced postconditioning. Adenosine (80 ± 9% of baseline and bradykinin (83 ± 4% of baseline induced postconditioning (P vs control, N-mercaptopropionylglycine abolished the beneficial effects of adenosine and bradykinin (54 ± 8 and 58 ± 5% of baseline, respectively. Conclusions In vitro, desflurane-induced postconditioning depends on reactive oxygen species production, activation of adenosine and bradykinin B2 receptors. And, the cardioprotective effect of adenosine and bradykinin

  2. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  3. Human polymorphisms in nicotinic receptors: a functional analysis in iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflorio, Cristina; Blanchard, Stéphane; Carisì, Maria Carla; Bohl, Delphine; Maskos, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Tobacco smoking is a public health problem, with ∼5 million deaths per year, representing a heavy burden for many countries. No effective therapeutic strategies are currently available for nicotine addiction, and it is therefore crucial to understand the etiological and pathophysiological factors contributing to this addiction. The neuronal α5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit is critically involved in nicotine dependence. In particular, the human polymorphism α5D398N corresponds to the strongest correlation with nicotine dependence risk found to date in occidental populations, according to meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies. To understand the specific contribution of this subunit in the context of nicotine addiction, an efficient screening system for native human nAChRs is needed. We have differentiated human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells into midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons and obtained a comprehensive characterization of these neurons by quantitative RT-PCR. The functional properties of nAChRs expressed in these human DA neurons, with or without the polymorphism in the α5 subunit, were studied with the patch-clamp electrophysiological technique. Our results in human DA neurons carrying the polymorphism in the α5 subunit showed an increase in EC50, indicating that, in the presence of the polymorphism, more nicotine or acetylcholine chloride is necessary to obtain the same effect. This human cell culturing system can now be used in drug discovery approaches to screen for compounds that interact specifically with human native and polymorphic nAChRs.-Deflorio, C., Blanchard, S., Carisì, M. C., Bohl, D., Maskos, U. Human polymorphisms in nicotinic receptors: a functional analysis in iPS-derived dopaminergic neurons. © FASEB.

  4. Selectivity is species-dependent: Characterization of standard agonists and antagonists at human, rat, and mouse adenosine receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alnouri, Mohamad Wessam; Jepards, Stephan; Casari, Alessandro; Schiedel, Anke C; Hinz, Sonja; Müller, Christa E

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) have emerged as new drug targets. The majority of data on affinity/potency and selectivity of AR ligands described in the literature has been obtained for the human species...

  5. SRC-mediated EGF Receptor Activation Regulates Ozone-induced Interleukin 8 Expression in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Human exposure to ozone (03) results in pulmonary function decrements and airway inflammation. The mechanisms underlying these adverse effects remain unclear. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation. ...

  6. Role of protein kinase A in the inhibition of human mast cell histamine release by β-adrenergic receptor agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshinobu Kato

    2002-01-01

    Conclusions: The present results suggest that PKA activation induced by β-adrenergic receptor agonists plays a crucial role in inhibiting IgE-mediated histamine release from human cultured mast cells through suppressing PKC translocation.

  7. [Endothelin-1 receptors of the normal adrenal gland and adrenal tumors in human].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X; Zeng, Z; Zhang, R

    1996-07-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors of normal adrenal gland (ADR, 6 cases), aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA, 5 cases), idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA, 4 cases) and pheochromocytoma (PHE, 6 cases) in human were measured by radioligand binding assay (RBA) of receptors. Binding studies using 125I-ET-1 as a radio ligand showed the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites for ET-1 in all of the above tissues. The values of dissociation constant (Kd) of ET-1 for its receptor were similar in ADR, APA and IHA (28.3 +/- 2.5, 27.9 +/- 6.1, 27.7 +/- 1.9 pmol/L, respectively), but the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of ET receptor tended to be lower in APA tissue (107.2 +/- 13.2 fmol/mg protein) in comparison with ADR (P role of ET-1 in the paracrine-autocrine regulation of aldosterone and catecholamine secretion in the adrenal and adrenal tumors.

  8. Expression of human dopamine receptor in potato (Solanum tuberosum results in altered tuber carbon metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świędrych Anna

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though the catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine have been detected in plants their role is poorly documented. Correlations between norepinephrine, soluble sugars and starch concentration have been recently reported for potato plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase, the enzyme mediating the first step of catecholamine synthesis. More recently norepinephrine level was shown to significantly increase after osmotic stress, abscisic acid treatment and wounding. Therefore, it is possible that catecholamines might play a role in plant stress responses by modulating primary carbon metabolism, possibly by a mechanism similar to that in animal cells. Since to date no catecholamine receptor has been identified in plants we transformed potato plants with a cDNA encoding human dopamine receptor (HD1. Results Tuber analysis of transgenic plants revealed changes in the activities of key enzymes mediating sucrose to starch conversion (ADP-glucose phosphorylase and sucrose synthase and sucrose synthesis (sucrose phosphate synthase leading to altered content of both soluble sugars and starch. Surprisingly the catecholamine level measured in transgenic plants was significantly increased; the reason for this is as yet unknown. However the presence of the receptor affected a broader range of enzyme activities than those affected by the massive accumulation of norepinephrine reported for plants over-expressing tyrosine decarboxylase. Therefore, it is suggested that the presence of the exogenous receptor activates catecholamine cAMP signalling in plants. Conclusions Our data support the possible involvement of catecholamines in regulating plant carbon metabolism via cAMP signalling pathway.

  9. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Accomplices for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that are involved in the regulation of immune cell migration. Multiple functional properties of chemokines, such as pro-inflammation, immune regulation, and promotion of cell growth, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, have been identified in many pathological and physiological contexts. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is characterized by persistent inflammation and immune activation during both acute and chronic phases, and the “cytokine storm” is one of the hallmarks of HIV infection. Along with immune activation after HIV infection, an extensive range of chemokines and other cytokines are elevated, thereby generating the so-called “cytokine storm.” In this review, the effects of the upregulated chemokines and chemokine receptors on the processes of HIV infection are discussed. The objective of this review was to focus on the main chemokines and chemokine receptors that have been found to be associated with HIV infection and latency. Elevated chemokines and chemokine receptors have been shown to play important roles in the HIV life cycle, disease progression, and HIV reservoir establishment. Thus, targeting these chemokines and receptors and the other proteins of related signaling pathways might provide novel therapeutic strategies, and the evidence indicates a promising future regarding the development of a functional cure for HIV.

  10. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Accomplices for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Shang, Hong; Jiang, Yongjun

    2017-01-01

    Chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that are involved in the regulation of immune cell migration. Multiple functional properties of chemokines, such as pro-inflammation, immune regulation, and promotion of cell growth, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, have been identified in many pathological and physiological contexts. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by persistent inflammation and immune activation during both acute and chronic phases, and the "cytokine storm" is one of the hallmarks of HIV infection. Along with immune activation after HIV infection, an extensive range of chemokines and other cytokines are elevated, thereby generating the so-called "cytokine storm." In this review, the effects of the upregulated chemokines and chemokine receptors on the processes of HIV infection are discussed. The objective of this review was to focus on the main chemokines and chemokine receptors that have been found to be associated with HIV infection and latency. Elevated chemokines and chemokine receptors have been shown to play important roles in the HIV life cycle, disease progression, and HIV reservoir establishment. Thus, targeting these chemokines and receptors and the other proteins of related signaling pathways might provide novel therapeutic strategies, and the evidence indicates a promising future regarding the development of a functional cure for HIV.

  11. Human skeletal muscle digitalis glycoside receptors (Na,K-ATPase)--importance during digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T A; Holm-Nielsen, P; Kjeldsen, K

    1993-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate in humans the putative importance of skeletal muscle digitalis glycoside receptors (Na,K-ATPase) in the volume of distribution of digoxin and to assess whether therapeutic digoxin exposure might cause digitalis receptor upregulation in skeletal muscle. Samples of the vastus lateralis were obtained postmortem from 11 long-term (9 months to 9 years) digitalized (125-187.5 micrograms daily) and eight undigitalized subjects. In intact samples from digitalized patients, vanadate-facilitated 3H-ouabain binding increased 15% (p 0.30) before and after washing in specific digoxin antibody fragments, respectively. Thus, the present study indicates a approximately 13% occupancy of skeletal muscle digitalis glycoside receptors with digoxin during digitalization. In light of the large skeletal muscle contribution to body mass, this indicates that the skeletal muscle Na,K-ATPase pool constitutes a major volume of distribution for digoxin during digitalization. The results gave no indication of skeletal muscle digitalis glycoside receptor upregulation in response to digoxin treatment. On the contrary, there was evidence of significantly lower (37%, p digitalized patients, which may be of importance for skeletal muscle incapacity in heart failure.

  12. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvinsson Lars

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1 is a potent vasoactive peptide, which induces vasoconstriction and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through activation of endothelin type A (ETA and type B (ETB receptors. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK are involved in ET-1-induced VSMC contraction and proliferation. This study was designed to investigate the ETA and ETB receptor intracellular signaling in human VSMCs and used phosphorylation (activation of ERK1/2 as a functional signal molecule for endothelin receptor activity. Results Subconfluent human VSMCs were stimulated by ET-1 at different concentrations (1 nM-1 μM. The activation of ERK1/2 was examined by immunofluorescence, Western blot and phosphoELISA using specific antibody against phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. ET-1 induced a concentration- and time- dependent activation of ERK1/2 with a maximal effect at 10 min. It declined to baseline level at 30 min. The ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2 was completely abolished by MEK1/2 inhibitors U0126 and SL327, and partially inhibited by the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059. A dual endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan or the ETA antagonist BQ123 blocked the ET-1 effect, while the ETB antagonist BQ788 had no significant effect. However, a selective ETB receptor agonist, Sarafotoxin 6c (S6c caused a time-dependent ERK1/2 activation with a maximal effect by less than 20% of the ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2. Increase in bosentan concentration up to 10 μM further inhibited ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2 and had a stronger inhibitory effect than BQ123 or the combined use of BQ123 and BQ788. To further explore ET-1 intracellular signaling, PKC inhibitors (staurosporin and GF109203X, PKC-delta inhibitor (rottlerin, PKA inhibitor (H-89, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin were applied. The inhibitors showed significant inhibitory effects on ET-1

  13. Androgen receptor is overexpressed in boys with severe hypospadias, and ZEB1 regulates androgen receptor expression in human foreskin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Tasian, Gregory E.; Zhang, Haiyang; Cao, Mei; Ferretti, Max; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ZEB1 is overexpressed in patients with severe hypospadias. We examined the interaction between ZeB1 and the androgen receptor (AR) in vitro and the expression of AR in boys with hypospadias. RESULTS ZEB1 and AR colocalize to the nucleus. Estrogen upregulated ZEB1 and AR expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that ZEB1 binds to an E-box sequence in the AR gene promoter. AR expression is higher in subjects with severe hypospadias than those with mild hypospadias and control subjects (P hypospadias. Environmental estrogenic compounds may increase the risk of hypospadias by facilitating the interaction between ZEB1 and AR. METHODS Hs68 cells, a fibroblast cell line derived from neonatal human foreskin, were exposed to 0, 10, and 100 nmol/l of estrogen, after which the cellular localization of ZEB1 and AR was assessed using immunocytochemistry. To determine if ZEB1 interacted with the AR gene, ChIP was performed using ZEB1 antibody and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for AR. Second, AR expression was quantified using real-time PcR and western blot in normal subjects (n = 32), and subjects with mild (n = 16) and severe hypospadia (n = 16). PMID:22391641

  14. A common human micro-opioid receptor genetic variant diminishes the receptor signaling efficacy in brain regions processing the sensory information of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Bruno Georg; Kettner, Mattias; Scholich, Klaus; Renné, Christoph; Roskam, Bianca; Geisslinger, Gerd; Schmidt, Peter Harald; Lötsch, Jörn

    2009-03-06

    The single nucleotide polymorphism 118A>G of the human micro-opioid receptor gene OPRM1, which leads to an exchange of the amino acid asparagine (N) to aspartic acid (D) at position 40 of the extracellular receptor region, alters the in vivo effects of opioids to different degrees in pain-processing brain regions. The most pronounced N40D effects were found in brain regions involved in the sensory processing of pain intensity. Using the mu-opioid receptor-specific agonist DAMGO, we analyzed the micro-opioid receptor signaling, expression, and binding affinity in human brain tissue sampled postmortem from the secondary somatosensory area (SII) and from the ventral posterior part of the lateral thalamus, two regions involved in the sensory processing and transmission of nociceptive information. We show that the main effect of the N40D micro-opioid receptor variant is a reduction of the agonist-induced receptor signaling efficacy. In the SII region of homo- and heterozygous carriers of the variant 118G allele (n=18), DAMGO was only 62% as efficient (p=0.002) as in homozygous carriers of the wild-type 118A allele (n=15). In contrast, the number of [3H]DAMGO binding sites was unaffected. Hence, the micro-opioid receptor G-protein coupling efficacy in SII of carriers of the 118G variant was only 58% as efficient as in homozygous carriers of the 118A allele (pG SNP. In conclusion, we provide a molecular basis for the reduced clinical effects of opioid analgesics in carriers of mu-opioid receptor variant N40D.

  15. Identification of Human Junctional Adhesion Molecule 1 as a Functional Receptor for the Hom-1 Calicivirus on Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Parra, Gabriel I; Tin, Christine M; Jones, Ronald W; Soden, Jo; Barnes, Donna; Freeth, Jim; Smith, Alvin W; Green, Kim Y

    2017-02-14

    The Hom-1 vesivirus was reported in 1998 following the inadvertent transmission of the animal calicivirus San Miguel sea lion virus to a human host in a laboratory. We characterized the Hom-1 strain and investigated the mechanism by which human cells could be infected. An expression library of 3,559 human plasma membrane proteins was screened for reactivity with Hom-1 virus-like particles, and a single interacting protein, human junctional adhesion molecule 1 (hJAM1), was identified. Transient expression of hJAM1 conferred susceptibility to Hom-1 infection on nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Virus infection was markedly inhibited when CHO cells stably expressing hJAM were pretreated with anti-hJAM1 monoclonal antibodies. Cell lines of human origin were tested for growth of Hom-1, and efficient replication was observed in HepG2, HuH7, and SK-CO15 cells. The three cell lines (of hepatic or intestinal origin) were confirmed to express hJAM1 on their surface, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-mediated knockout of the hJAM1 gene in each line abolished Hom-1 propagation. Taken together, our data indicate that entry of the Hom-1 vesivirus into these permissive human cell lines is mediated by the plasma membrane protein hJAM1 as a functional receptor.IMPORTANCE Vesiviruses, such as San Miguel sea lion virus and feline calicivirus, are typically associated with infection in animal hosts. Following the accidental infection of a laboratory worker with San Miguel sea lion virus, a related virus was isolated in cell culture and named Hom-1. In this study, we found that Hom-1 could be propagated in a number of human cell lines, making it the first calicivirus to replicate efficiently in cultured human cells. Screening of a library of human cell surface membrane proteins showed that the virus could utilize human junctional adhesion molecule 1 as a receptor to enter cells and initiate replication. The Hom-1 virus presents a new

  16. Immunomodulatory activity of commonly used drugs on Fc-receptor-mediated human natural killer cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theorell, Jakob; Gustavsson, Anna-Lena; Tesi, Bianca; Sigmundsson, Kristmundur; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Lundbäck, Thomas; Bryceson, Yenan T

    2014-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells mediate defense against neoplastic as well as infected cells. Yet, how their effector functions are affected by the large variety of pharmacological compounds commonly in use has not been investigated systematically. Here, we screened 1,200 in-use or previously approved drugs for their biological effect on freshly isolated human peripheral blood-derived NK cells. Mimicking antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), known to be important in antibody-based immunotherapies against, e.g., human malignancies, the cells were stimulated by Fc-receptor (CD16) engagement. Cellular responses were assessed by flow cytometry. Fifty-six compounds that significantly inhibited and twelve that enhanced one or more of the readouts of adhesion, exocytosis, and chemokine production were identified and confirmed as hits. Among the confirmed inhibitors, 80 % could be assigned to one of seven major pharmacological classes. These classes were β2-adrenergic agonists, prostaglandins, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, Ca(2+)-channel blockers, histamine H1-receptor antagonists, serotonin/dopamine receptor antagonists, and topoisomerase inhibitors that displayed distinct inhibitory patterns on NK cell responses. Among observed enhancers, interestingly, two ergosterol synthesis inhibitors were identified that specifically promoted exocytosis. In summary, these results provide a comprehensive knowledge base of the effect known drugs have on NK cells. More specifically, they provide an overview of drugs that may modulate NK cell-mediated ADCC in the context of clinical immunotherapies.

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Efficient silkworm expression of human GPCR (nociceptin receptor) by a Bombyx mori bacmid DNA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Mizuho; Sasaki, Kaori [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Wakimoto, Yoshitaro; Toyooka, Masaru [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Motohashi, Tomoko; Shimojima, Tsukasa [National Institute of Genetics, 1111 Yata, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540 (Japan); Takeda, Shigeki [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Park, Enoch Y. [Laboratory of Biotechnology, Integrated Bioscience Section, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shizuoka University, 836 Oya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Maenaka, Katsumi, E-mail: kmaenaka-umin@umin.net [Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2009-07-31

    Guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein) coupled receptors (GPCRs) are frequently expressed by a baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). We recently established a novel BEVS using the bacmid system of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), which is directly applicable for protein expression in silkworms. Here, we report the first example of GPCR expression in silkworms by the simple injection of BmNPV bacmid DNA. Human nociceptin receptor, an inhibitory GPCR, and its fusion protein with inhibitory G protein alpha subunit (G{sub i}{alpha}) were both successfully expressed in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae as well as in the BmNPV viral fraction. Its yield was much higher than that from Sf9 cells. The microsomal fractions including the nociceptin receptor fusion, which are easily prepared by only centrifugation steps, exhibited [{sup 35}S]GTP{gamma}S-binding activity upon specific stimulation by nociceptin. Therefore, this rapid method is easy-to-use and has a high expression level, and thus will be an important tool for human GPCR production.

  19. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (Novartis); (US-FDA); (Duke)

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  20. Caffeine May Reduce Perceived Sweet Taste in Humans, Supporting Evidence That Adenosine Receptors Modulate Taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Ezen; Picket, Benjamin; Dando, Robin

    2017-09-01

    Multiple recent reports have detailed the presence of adenosine receptors in sweet sensitive taste cells of mice. These receptors are activated by endogenous adenosine in the plasma to enhance sweet signals within the taste bud, before reporting to the primary afferent. As we commonly consume caffeine, a powerful antagonist for such receptors, in our daily lives, an intriguing question we sought to answer was whether the caffeine we habitually consume in coffee can inhibit the perception of sweet taste in humans. 107 panelists were randomly assigned to 2 groups, sampling decaffeinated coffee supplemented with either 200 mg of caffeine, about the level found in a strong cup of coffee, or an equally bitter concentration of quinine. Participants subsequently performed sensory testing, with the session repeated in the alternative condition in a second session on a separate day. Panelists rated both the sweetened coffee itself and subsequent sucrose solutions as less sweet in the caffeine condition, despite the treatment having no effect on bitter, sour, salty, or umami perception. Panelists were also unable to discern whether they had consumed the caffeinated or noncaffeinated coffee, with ratings of alertness increased equally, but no significant improvement in reaction times, highlighting coffee's powerful placebo effect. This work validates earlier observations in rodents in a human population. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. Inhibition of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by cyclic monoterpene carveol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozon, Yosra; Sultan, Ahmed; Lansdell, Stuart J; Prytkova, Tatiana; Sadek, Bassem; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Howarth, Frank Christopher; Millar, Neil S; Oz, Murat

    2016-04-05

    Cyclic monoterpenes are a group of phytochemicals with antinociceptive, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory actions. Effects of cyclic monoterpenes including vanilin, pulegone, eugenole, carvone, carvacrol, carveol, thymol, thymoquinone, menthone, and limonene were investigated on the functional properties of the cloned α7 subunit of the human nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Monoterpenes inhibited the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the order carveol>thymoquinone>carvacrol>menthone>thymol>limonene>eugenole>pulegone≥carvone≥vanilin. Among the monoterpenes, carveol showed the highest potency on acetylcholine-induced responses, with IC50 of 8.3µM. Carveol-induced inhibition was independent of the membrane potential and could not be reversed by increasing the concentration of acetylcholine. In line with functional experiments, docking studies indicated that cyclic monoterpenes such as carveol may interact with an allosteric site located in the α7 transmembrane domain. Our results indicate that cyclic monoterpenes inhibit the function of human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, with varying potencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Co-evolution of NK receptors and HLA ligands in humans is driven by reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Ashley; Colucci, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    Allogeneic individuals co-exist during pregnancy in eutherian mammals. Maternal and fetal cells intermingle at the site of placental attachment in the uterus, where the arteries are remodeled to supply the fetus with oxygen and nutrients. This access by placental cells to the maternal supply line determines the growth and birth weight of the baby and is subject to stabilizing selection. Invading placental trophoblast cells express human leukocyte antigen class I ligands (HLA-E, HLA-G, and HLA-C) for receptors on maternal uterine natural killer (NK) and myelomonocytic cells, CD94/NKG2, leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LILR), and killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR). Of these, only the KIR/HLA-C system is highly polymorphic. Different combinations of maternal KIR and fetal HLA-C variants are correlated with low birth weight and pre-eclampsia or high birth weight and obstructed labor, the two extremes of the obstetric dilemma. This situation has arisen because of the evolution of bipedalism and subsequently, in the last million years, larger brains. At this point, the human system began to reach a balance between KIR A and KIR B haplotypes and C1 and C2 epitopes of HLA-C alleles that reflects a functional compromise between the competing demands of immunity and reproduction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Structure of Human M-type Phospholipase A2 Receptor Revealed by Cryo-Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yue; Cao, Longxing; Tang, Hua; Shi, Xiangyi; He, Yongning

    2017-12-08

    M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (M-PLA2R) is a member of the mannose receptor family and known as the receptor of secretory phospholipase A2s. It has also been identified as the major autoantigen of idiopathic membranous nephropathy, one of the most common causes for nephrotic syndrome in adults. Here we determine the structure of human M-PLA2R ectodomain by cryo-electron microscopy. The results show that the ectodomain has high internal flexibility and forms a compact dual-ring-shaped conformation at acidic pH and adopts extended conformations at basic pH. The inter-domain interactions of human M-PLA2R are explored by the binding studies with individual domains, showing the mechanism of the conformational change. In addition, the biochemical data suggest that mouse M-PLA2R recognizes mouse secretory phospholipase A2-G1B only at physiological or basic pH, rather than at acidic pH. These results suggest that the pH-dependent conformational change might play important roles in the functional activities of M-PLA2R such as ligand binding and release, and may also be relevant to the immunogenicity in membranous nephropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c+, CD141+ and CD16+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141+ DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  5. Identification of Human Junctional Adhesion Molecule 1 as a Functional Receptor for the Hom-1 Calicivirus on Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav V. Sosnovtsev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hom-1 vesivirus was reported in 1998 following the inadvertent transmission of the animal calicivirus San Miguel sea lion virus to a human host in a laboratory. We characterized the Hom-1 strain and investigated the mechanism by which human cells could be infected. An expression library of 3,559 human plasma membrane proteins was screened for reactivity with Hom-1 virus-like particles, and a single interacting protein, human junctional adhesion molecule 1 (hJAM1, was identified. Transient expression of hJAM1 conferred susceptibility to Hom-1 infection on nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. Virus infection was markedly inhibited when CHO cells stably expressing hJAM were pretreated with anti-hJAM1 monoclonal antibodies. Cell lines of human origin were tested for growth of Hom-1, and efficient replication was observed in HepG2, HuH7, and SK-CO15 cells. The three cell lines (of hepatic or intestinal origin were confirmed to express hJAM1 on their surface, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-mediated knockout of the hJAM1 gene in each line abolished Hom-1 propagation. Taken together, our data indicate that entry of the Hom-1 vesivirus into these permissive human cell lines is mediated by the plasma membrane protein hJAM1 as a functional receptor.

  6. In Vitro Effects of the Endocrine Disruptor p,p’-DDT on Human Follitropin Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Mathilde; Grouleff, Julie; Gourdin, Louis; Fauchard, Mathilde; Chantreau, Vanessa; Henrion, Daniel; Coutant, Régis; Schiøtt, Birgit; Chabbert, Marie; Rodien, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Background: 1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene (p,p′-DDT) is a persistent environmental endocrine disruptor (ED). Several studies have shown an association between p,p′-DDT exposure and reproductive abnormalities. Objectives: To investigate the putative effects of p,p′-DDT on the human follitropin receptor (FSHR) function. Methods and Results: We used Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing human FSHR to investigate the impact of p,p′-DDT on FSHR activity and its interaction with the receptor. At a concentration of 5 μM p,p′-DDT increased the maximum response of the FSHR to follitropin by 32 ± 7.45%. However, 5 μM p,p′-DDT decreased the basal activity and did not influence the maximal response of the closely related LH/hCG receptor to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The potentiating effect of p,p′-DDT was specific for the FSHR. Moreover, in cells that did not express FSHR, p,p′-DDT had no effect on cAMP response. Thus, the potentiating effect of p,p′-DDT was dependent on the FSHR. In addition, p,p′-DDT increased the sensitivity of FSHR to hCG and to a low molecular weight agonist of the FSHR, 3-((5methyl)-2-(4-benzyloxy-phenyl)-5-{[2-[3-ethoxy-4-methoxy-phenyl)-ethylcarbamoyl]-methyl}-4-oxo-thiazolidin-3-yl)-benzamide (16a). Basal activity in response to p,p′-DDT and potentiation of the FSHR response to FSH by p,p′-DDT varied among FSHR mutants with altered transmembrane domains (TMDs), consistent with an effect of p,p′-DDT via TMD binding. This finding was corroborated by the results of simultaneously docking p,p′-DDT and 16a into the FSHR transmembrane bundle. Conclusion: p,p′-DDT acted as a positive allosteric modulator of the FSHR in our experimental model. These findings suggest that G protein–coupled receptors are additional targets of endocrine disruptors. Citation: Munier M, Grouleff J, Gourdin L, Fauchard M, Chantreau V, Henrion D, Coutant R, Schiøtt B, Chabbert M, Rodien P. 2016

  7. In Vitro Effects of the Endocrine Disruptor p,p'-DDT on Human Follitropin Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Mathilde; Grouleff, Julie; Gourdin, Louis; Fauchard, Mathilde; Chantreau, Vanessa; Henrion, Daniel; Coutant, Régis; Schiøtt, Birgit; Chabbert, Marie; Rodien, Patrice

    2016-07-01

    1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene (p,p'-DDT) is a persistent environmental endocrine disruptor (ED). Several studies have shown an association between p,p'-DDT exposure and reproductive abnormalities. To investigate the putative effects of p,p'-DDT on the human follitropin receptor (FSHR) function. We used Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing human FSHR to investigate the impact of p,p'-DDT on FSHR activity and its interaction with the receptor. At a concentration of 5 μM p,p'-DDT increased the maximum response of the FSHR to follitropin by 32 ± 7.45%. However, 5 μM p,p'-DDT decreased the basal activity and did not influence the maximal response of the closely related LH/hCG receptor to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The potentiating effect of p,p'-DDT was specific for the FSHR. Moreover, in cells that did not express FSHR, p,p'-DDT had no effect on cAMP response. Thus, the potentiating effect of p,p'-DDT was dependent on the FSHR. In addition, p,p'-DDT increased the sensitivity of FSHR to hCG and to a low molecular weight agonist of the FSHR, 3-((5methyl)-2-(4-benzyloxy-phenyl)-5-{[2-[3-ethoxy-4-methoxy-phenyl)-ethylcarbamoyl]-methyl}-4-oxo-thiazolidin-3-yl)-benzamide (16a). Basal activity in response to p,p'-DDT and potentiation of the FSHR response to FSH by p,p'-DDT varied among FSHR mutants with altered transmembrane domains (TMDs), consistent with an effect of p,p'-DDT via TMD binding. This finding was corroborated by the results of simultaneously docking p,p'-DDT and 16a into the FSHR transmembrane bundle. p,p'-DDT acted as a positive allosteric modulator of the FSHR in our experimental model. These findings suggest that G protein-coupled receptors are additional targets of endocrine disruptors. Munier M, Grouleff J, Gourdin L, Fauchard M, Chantreau V, Henrion D, Coutant R, Schiøtt B, Chabbert M, Rodien P. 2016. In vitro effects of the endocrine disruptor p,p'-DDT on human follitropin receptor. Environ Health

  8. On the role of NR3A in human NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Maria; Nilsson, Anna; Samuelsson, Helena

    2007-01-01

    binding site, with similar affinity as the glycine binding site of NR1 subunits. This suggests that NR3A may replace one of the two NR1 subunits in native NMDA receptors. Cloning of hNR3A showed a human-specific polyproline-sequence in the intracellular C-terminus, that may bind to SH3-domains. We......In the present paper we describe our on-going project investigating the functional roles of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR3A. We find that NR3A mRNA is abundant both in embryonic and adult human brain, in contrast to the almost non-existing expression in adult rodent brain....... Human NR3A (hNR3A) protein expression is particularly abundant in the cerebral cortex, as shown by western blot using NR3A-specific antibodies. Distribution of hNR3A in adult human brain shows a similar pattern as NR3A in post-natal rodent brain. We have previously reported that NR3A contains a glycine...

  9. Human Milk Components Modulate Toll-Like Receptor-Mediated Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, YingYing; Lawlor, Nathan T; Newburg, David S

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is central to innate immunity. Aberrant expression of TLRs is found in neonatal inflammatory diseases. Several bioactive components of human milk modulate TLR expression and signaling pathways, including soluble toll-like receptors (sTLRs), soluble cluster of differentiation (sCD) 14, glycoproteins, small peptides, and oligosaccharides. Some milk components, such as sialyl (α2,3) lactose and lacto-N-fucopentaose III, are reported to increase TLR signaling; under some circumstances this might contribute toward immunologic balance. Human milk on the whole is strongly anti-inflammatory, and contains abundant components that depress TLR signaling pathways: sTLR2 and sCD14 inhibit TLR2 signaling; sCD14, lactadherin, lactoferrin, and 2'-fucosyllactose attenuate TLR4 signaling; 3'-galactosyllactose inhibits TLR3 signaling, and β-defensin 2 inhibits TLR7 signaling. Feeding human milk to neonates decreases their risk of sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis. Thus, the TLR regulatory components found in human milk hold promise as benign oral prophylactic and therapeutic treatments for the many gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders mediated by abnormal TLR signaling. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. In-vitro study of gonadotrophin signaling pathways in human granulosa cells in relation to progesterone receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Soledad; Kohen, Paulina; Muñoz, Alex; Godoy, Ana; Orge, Felipe; Strauss, Jerome F; Devoto, Luigi

    2017-10-01

    In humans, data on gonadotrophin-activated (LH, HCG and FSH) progesterone receptor expression and signalling pathways involved in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) expression presumably linked to the follicle rupture, are limited. Our hypothesis is LH, HCG and FSH increase progesterone receptor expression in granulosa cells through different signalling pathways, leading to an increased expression of ADAMTS-1 and MMP3/10, which may mediate follicular rupture through the transcription factor, HIF1A. Human granulosa cells were isolated from follicular aspirates obtained from 22 healthy women participating in our IVF programme for male-factor infertility. Progesterone receptor and HIF1A expression was assessed by immunofluorescence, and PKA-PKC-PI3K- ERK1/2, ADAMTS-1 and MMP3/10 expression by Western blot in pre-ovulatory and in cultured granulosa cells. Results show that HCG, LH and FSH regulate progesterone receptor expression and activate PKA, PKC, PI3K and ERK1/2 signalling pathways in granulosa cells but progesterone receptor expression is only mediated by PKA, PKC and ERK pathways. HCG, FSH and LH regulated MMPs expression through progesterone receptors. Moreover, HCG-progesterone-receptor-dependent HIF1A expression stimulated MMP3/10 expression but not that of ADAMTS-1. These results suggest differential downstream progesterone receptor signalling, as progesterone receptor regulates MMP3/10 expression via HIF1A, which is not involved in ADAMTS-1 expression. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of 5-HT receptors on human pulmonary artery and vein: functional and binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortijo, Julio; Martí-Cabrera, Miguel; Bernabeu, Eva; Domènech, Teresa; Bou, Josep; Fernández, Andrés G; Beleta, Jorge; Palacios, José M; Morcillo, Esteban J

    1997-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors mediating contraction of ring preparations isolated from human pulmonary arteries and veins. In functional studies, the responses to 5-HT, sumatriptan, ergotamine, serotonin-O-carboxymethyl-glycyl-tyrosinamide (SCMGT), α-methyl 5-HT (α-Me) and 2-methyl 5-HT (2-Me) were studied with WAY100635, GR127935, ritanserin, zacopride and SB204070 as antagonists.All agonists produced concentration-dependent contractions of human pulmonary artery and vein preparations. The order of potency (−log EC50 values) was ergotamine (6.88)>5-HT (6.41)⩾SCMGT (6.20)=sumatriptan (6.19) ⩾α-Me (6.04) in the artery, and ergotamine (7.84)>5-HT (6.96)>sumatriptan (6.60)=α-Me (6.56)>SCMGT (6.09) in the vein. The potency of each agonist, except for SCMGT, was greater in vein than in artery preparations. Contractile responses to 5-HT were similar in intact and endothelium-denuded preparations but responses to sumatriptan were enhanced in artery rings without endothelium.GR127935 (1 nM to 0.5 μM) produced an unsurmountable antagonism of the response to 5-HT, sumatriptan, ergotamine and SCMGT. Ritanserin (1 nM to 1 μM) also reduced the maximum contractile responses to 5-HT, ergotamine and α-Me in artery and vein preparations without affecting those to sumatriptan and SCMGT. In endothelium-denuded preparations, surmountable antagonism of sumatriptan by GR127935 (in the presence of ritanserin) and of α-Me by ritanserin (in the presence of GR127935) allowed for the calculation of the apparent pKB values of GR127935 (9.17±0.11 in artery and 9.11±0.05 in vein) and ritanserin (8.82±0.09 in artery and 8.98±0.12 in vein).WAY100635 (1 nM to 1 μM), zacopride (1 nM to 1 μM), or SB204070 (1 nM) did not significantly alter the concentration-response curves for 5-HT, sumatriptan, ergotamine, SCMGT or 2-Me in human pulmonary artery or vein thus indicating that 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors are

  12. TRA-418, a thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist and prostacyclin receptor agonist, inhibits platelet-leukocyte interaction in human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Ohno, Michihiro; Yamada, Naohiro; Ohtake, Atsushi; Matsushita, Teruo

    2010-10-01

    TRA-418, a compound with both thromboxane A2 receptor (TP receptor) antagonistic and prostacyclin receptor (IP receptor) agonistic activities, was synthesised in our laboratory as a new antithrombotic agent. In this study, we examined the effects of TRA-418 on platelet-leukocyte interactions in human whole blood. Platelet-leukocyte interactions were induced by U-46619 in the presence of epinephrine (U-46619 + epinephrine) or with thrombin receptor agonist peptide 1-6 (TRAP). Platelet-leukocyte interactions were assessed by flow cytometry, with examination of both platelet-neutrophil and platelet-monocyte complexes. In a control experiment, the TP receptor antagonist SQ-29548 significantly inhibited the induction of platelet-leukocyte complexes by the combination of U-46619 and epinephrine, but not TRAP-induced formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes. Conversely, the IP receptor agonist beraprost sodium inhibited platelet-leukocyte complex formation induced by both methods, although the IC50 values of beraprost sodium for U-46619 + epinephrine were at least 10-fold greater than for TRAP. Under such conditions, TRA-418 inhibited both U-46619 + epinephrine-induced and TRAP-induced platelet-leukocyte complex formation in a concentration-dependent manner, in a similar range. These results suggest that TRA-418 exerts its inhibitory effects on platelet-leukocyte interactions by acting as a TP receptor antagonist as well as an IP receptor agonist in an additive or synergistic manner. These inhibitory effects of TRA-418 on formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes suggest the compound is beneficial effects as an antithrombotic agent.

  13. Species-specific action of (Pro3)GIP - an efficacious agonist on human GIP receptor, but partial agonist and competitive antagonist on rat and mouse GIP receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Hansen, Lærke Smidt; Svendsen, B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Specific high potent receptor antagonists are valuable tools when evaluating animal and human physiology. Within the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) system, considerable attention has been given to the presumed GIP receptor antagonist (Pro3)GIP and its...... effect in murine studies. We conducted a pharmacological analysis of this ligand including interspecies differences between the rodent and human GIP system. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Transiently transfected COS-7 cells were assessed for cAMP accumulation upon ligand stimulation and assayed in competition...... binding using (125) I-human GIP. Using isolated perfused rodent pancreata both from wild type and GIPR-deficient animals, insulin-, glucagon-, and somatostatin-releasing properties in response to species-specific GIP and (Pro3)GIP analogues were evaluated. KEY RESULTS: Human (Pro3)GIP is an efficacious...

  14. Kinetic modeling of 11C-SB207145 binding to 5-HT4 receptors in the human brain in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Comley, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT(4) receptor) is known to be involved in learning and memory. We evaluated for the first time the quantification of a novel 5-HT(4) receptor radioligand, (11)C-SB207145, for in vivo brain imaging with PET in humans. METHODS: For evaluation of reproducibility, 6...... region devoid of specific binding, and that nonspecific binding was constant across brain regions. CONCLUSION: In vivo imaging of cerebral 5-HT(4) receptors can be determined reliably using (11)C-207145 PET with arterial input in humans. SRTM showed high reproducibility and reliability but bias...... reference tissue model (SRTM). RESULTS: (11)C-SB207145 readily entered the brain and showed a distribution consistent with the known localization of the 5-HT(4) receptor. Using plasma input models, the time-activity data were well described by the 2-tissue-compartment model in all regions and allowed...

  15. Mutations in the Human Ca{sup 2+}-sensing-receptor gene that cause familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yah-Huei Wu Chou [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China); Pollak, M.R.; Brown, E.M.; Seidman, J.G.; Seidman, C.E. [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Brandi, M.L. [Univ. Florence (Italy); Toss, G.; Arnqvist, H. [Linkoping Univ. (Sweden)

    1995-05-01

    We report five novel mutations in the human Ca{sup 2+}-sensing-receptor gene that cause familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) or neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism. Each gene defect is a missense mutation that encodes a nonconservative amino acid alteration. These mutations are each predicted to be in the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor`s large extracellular domain. In three families with FHH linked to the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing-receptor gene on chromosome 3 and in unrelated individuals probands with FHH, mutations were not detected in protein-coding sequences. On the basis of these data and previous analyses, we suggest that there are a wide range of mutations that cause FHH. Mutations that perturb the structure and function of the extracellular or transmembrane domains of the receptor and those that affect noncoding sequences of the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing-receptor gene can cause FHH. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  17. High-resolution crystal structure of an engineered human beta2-adrenergic G protein-coupled receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherezov, Vadim; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Hanson, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors constitute the largest family of eukaryotic signal transduction proteins that communicate across the membrane. We report the crystal structure of a human beta2-adrenergic receptor-T4 lysozyme fusion protein bound...... to the partial inverse agonist carazolol at 2.4 angstrom resolution. The structure provides a high-resolution view of a human G protein-coupled receptor bound to a diffusible ligand. Ligand-binding site accessibility is enabled by the second extracellular loop, which is held out of the binding cavity by a pair...

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling in human sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Li; Xian, Hua; Cao, Jing-Chen; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Chen, Miao-Miao; Qian, Yi; Jiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of the PPARs, which are transcription factors of the steroid receptor superfamily. PPARγ acts as an important molecule for regulating energy homeostasis, modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and is reciprocally regulated by HPG. In the human, PPARγ protein is highly expressed in ejaculated spermatozoa, implying a possible role of PPARγ signaling in regulating sperm energy dissipation. PPARγ protein is also expressed in Sertoli cells and germ cells (spermatocytes). Its activation can be induced during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. This mini-review will focus on how PPARγ signaling may affect fertility and sperm quality and the potential reversibility of these adverse effects.

  19. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  20. G-Protein Sensitivity of Ligand Binding to Human Dopamine D2 and D3 Receptors Expressed in Escherichia coli : Clues for a Constrained D3 Receptor Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhauwe, Jurgen F.M.; Josson, Katty; Luyten, Walter H.M.L.; Driessen, Arnold J.; Leysen, Josée E.

    2000-01-01

    Human dopamine D2 and D3 receptors were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and Escherichia coli cells to compare their ligand binding properties in the presence or absence of G-proteins and to analyze their ability to interact with Gi/o-proteins. Binding affinities of agonists (dopamine,

  1. Rapid yeast estrogen bioassays stably expressing human estrogen receptors alpha and beta, and green fluorescent protein: a comparison of different compounds on both receptor types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovee, T.F.H.; Helsdingen, J.R.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Keijer, J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2004-01-01

    Previously, we described the construction of a rapid yeast bioassay stably expressing human estrogen receptor (hER) and yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein (yEGFP) in response to estrogens. In the present study, the properties of this assay were further studied by testing a series of estrogenic

  2. α7 and β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits Form Heteromeric Receptor Complexes that Are Expressed in the Human Cortex and Display Distinct Pharmacological Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Zwart, Ruud; Ursu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The existence of α7β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) has recently been demonstrated in both the rodent and human brain. Since α7-containing nAChRs are promising drug targets for schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, it is critical to determine whether α7β2 nAChRs are present...

  3. Thalidomide Increases Human Hepatic Cytochrome P450 3A Enzymes by Direct Activation of Pregnane X Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Guillouzo, Christiane Guguen; Shibata, Norio; Yajima, Kanako; Utoh, Masahiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Chesné, Christophe; Nakamura, Masato; Guengerich, F. Peter; Houtman, René; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Heterotropic cooperativity of human cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4/3A5 by the teratogen thalidomide was recently demonstrated by H. Yamazaki et al. (2013) using the model substrate midazolam in various in vitro and in vivo models. Chimeric mice with humanized liver also displayed enhanced midazolam clearance upon pre treatment with orally administered thalidomide, presumably because of human P450 3A induction. In the current study, we further investigated the regulation of human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Thalidomide enhanced levels of P450 3A4 and 2B6 mRNA, protein expression, and/or oxidation activity in human hepatocytes, indirectly suggesting activation of upstream transcription factors involved in detoxication, e.g. the nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). A key event after ligand binding is an alteration of nuclear receptor conformation and recruitment of co regulator proteins that alter chromatin accessibility of target genes. To investigate direct engagement and functional alteration of PXR and CAR by thalidomide, we utilized a peptide microarray with 154 co regulator derived nuclear receptor interaction motifs and co regulator and nuclear receptor boxes, which serves as a sensor for nuclear receptor conformation and activity status as a function of ligand. Thalidomide and its human proximate metabolite 5 hydroxythalidomide displayed significant modulation of co regulator interaction with PXR and CAR ligand binding domains, similar to established agonists for these receptors. These results collectively suggest that thalidomide acts as a ligand for PXR and CAR and causes enzyme induction leading to increased P450 enzyme activity. The possibilities of drug interactions during thalidomide therapy in humans require further evaluation. PMID:24460184

  4. Bispyridinium Compounds Inhibit Both Muscle and Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Human Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avi Ring

    Full Text Available Standard treatment of poisoning by organophosphorus anticholinesterases uses atropine to reduce the muscarinic effects of acetylcholine accumulation and oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase (the effectiveness of which depends on the specific anticholinesterase, but does not directly address the nicotinic effects of poisoning. Bispyridinium molecules which act as noncompetitive antagonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been identified as promising compounds and one has been shown to improve survival following organophosphorus poisoning in guinea-pigs. Here, we have investigated the structural requirements for antagonism and compared inhibitory potency of these compounds at muscle and neuronal nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase. A series of compounds was synthesised, in which the length of the polymethylene linker between the two pyridinium moieties was increased sequentially from one to ten carbon atoms. Their effects on nicotinic receptor-mediated calcium responses were tested in muscle-derived (CN21 and neuronal (SH-SY5Y cells. Their ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase activity was tested using human erythrocyte ghosts. In both cell lines, the nicotinic response was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory potency of the compounds increased with greater linker length between the two pyridinium moieties, as did their inhibitory potency for human acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro. These results demonstrate that bispyridinium compounds inhibit both neuronal and muscle nicotinic receptors and that their potency depends on the length of the hydrocarbon chain linking the two pyridinium moieties. Knowledge of structure-activity relationships will aid the optimisation of molecular structures for therapeutic use against the nicotinic effects of organophosphorus poisoning.

  5. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Lentivirus-Delivered Small RNAs in Primary Human Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: RNA interference (RNAi has tremendous potential for investigating gene function and for developing new therapies. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH are the “gold standard” for studying the regulation of hepatic metabolism in vitro. However, application of RNAi in PHH has some technical hurdles. The objective of this study was to develop effective and robust protocol for transduction of PHH with lentiviral vectors. Methods: We used lentiviral vectors to transduce PHH for introduction of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs targeting constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα, and microRNA, miR-143. Infection efficiency was quantitatively analyzed by flow cytometry and microscopy. Target gene expression was assessed using quantitative real-time (qRT-PCR method. Results: Lentiviral vector transduction resulted in ≥95% of infected cells at low multiplicity of infection (MOI of 3, which did not impair cellular viability. We demonstrated the feasibility of this technique in studies on targeting nuclear receptors, PPARα and CAR, with shRNAs as well as in lentivirus-mediated overexpression and knock-down of miRNA-143 experiments. Conclusions: We developed an efficient and robust protocol with standardized procedures for virus production, method of titer determination, and infection procedure for RNAi in primary human hepatocytes based on delivery of shRNAs, microRNAs or anti-microRNAs in different laboratory settings. This approach should be useful to study not only the regulation via nuclear receptors but also other biological, pharmacological, and toxicological aspects of drug metabolism.

  6. Oncogenic K-Ras Turns Death Receptors Into Metastasis-Promoting Receptors in Human and Mouse Colorectal Cancer Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogwater, Frederik J. H.; Nijkamp, Maarten W.; Smakman, Niels; Steller, Ernst J. A.; Emmink, Benjamin L.; Westendorp, B. Florien; Raats, Danielle A. E.; Sprick, Martin R.; Schaefer, Uta; van Houdt, Winan J.; de Bruijn, Menno T.; Schackmann, Ron C. J.; Derksen, Patrick W. B.; Medema, Jan-Paul; Walczak, Henning; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Kranenburg, Onno

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Death receptors expressed on tumor cells can prevent metastasis formation by inducing apoptosis, but they also can promote migration and invasion. The determinants of death receptor signaling output are poorly defined. Here we investigated the role of oncogenic K-Ras in

  7. Induction of farnesoid X receptor signaling in germ-free mice colonized with a human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlström, Annika; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Ståhlman, Marcus; Khan, Muhammad-Tanweer; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich

    2017-02-01

    The gut microbiota influences the development and progression of metabolic diseases partly by metabolism of bile acids (BAs) and modified signaling through the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). In this study, we aimed to determine how the human gut microbiota metabolizes murine BAs and affects FXR signaling in colonized mice. We colonized germ-free mice with cecal content from a mouse donor or feces from a human donor and euthanized the mice after short-term (2 weeks) or long-term (15 weeks) colonization. We analyzed the gut microbiota and BA composition and expression of FXR target genes in ileum and liver. We found that cecal microbiota composition differed between mice colonized with mouse and human microbiota and was stable over time. Human and mouse microbiota reduced total BA levels similarly, but the humanized mice produced less secondary BAs. The human microbiota was able to reduce the levels of tauro-β-muricholic acid and induce expression of FXR target genes Fgf15 and Shp in ileum after long-term colonization. We show that a human microbiota can change BA composition and induce FXR signaling in colonized mice, but the levels of secondary BAs produced are lower than in mice colonized with a mouse microbiota. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Pathological aggression in "fierce" mice corrected by human nuclear receptor 2E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Brett S; Kwok, Melvin C H; Trinh, Eric; Budaghzadeh, Saeed; Hossain, Sazzad M; Simpson, Elizabeth M

    2005-07-06

    "Fierce" mice, homozygous for the deletion of nuclear receptor 2E1 (NR2E1), show abnormal brain-eye development and pathological aggression. To evaluate functional equivalency between mouse and human NR2E1, we generated mice transgenic for a genomic clone spanning the human NR2E1 locus and bred these animals to fierce mice deleted for the corresponding mouse gene. In fierce mutants carrying human NR2E1, structural brain defects were eliminated and eye abnormalities ameliorated. Excitingly, behavior in these "rescue" mice was indistinguishable from controls. Because no artificial promoter was used to drive transgene expression, promoter and regulatory elements within the human NR2E1 clone are functional in mouse. Normal behavior in rescue animals suggests that mechanisms underlying the behavioral abnormalities in fierce mice may also be conserved in humans. Our data support the hypothesis that variation at NR2E1 may contribute to human behavioral disorders. Use of this rescue paradigm with other genes will permit the direct evaluation of human genes hypothesized to play a causal role in psychiatric disease but for which evidence is lacking or equivocal.

  9. The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromoll, J; Pekel, E.; Nieschlag, E. [Institute of Reproductive Medicine of the Univ., Muenster (Germany)

    1996-07-15

    The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene were determined by either screening a phage library of human genomic DNA or applying the long PCR technique to amplify different exon pairs with their corresponding introns. The FSHR gene spans a region of 54 kb and consists of 10 exons and 9 introns. Most of the extracellular domain is encoded by 9 exons, ranging in length between 69 and 251 bp; the C-terminal part of the extracellular domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain are encoded by the large exon 10 (1234 bp). Overall the gene encodes 695 amino acids. The structure of the human FSHR displays a striking similarity to that of the previously characterized rat FSHR gene, with a high degree of conservation in exon sizes and exon/intron junctions. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Taltirelin is a superagonist at the human thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunarayanan, Nanthakumar; Raaka, Bruce M.; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2012-01-01

    Taltirelin (TAL) is a thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analog that is approved for use in humans in Japan. In this study, we characterized TAL binding to and signaling by the human TRH receptor (TRH-R) in a model cell system. We found that TAL exhibited lower binding affinities than TRH and lower signaling potency via the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate/calcium pathway than TRH. However, TAL exhibited higher intrinsic efficacy than TRH in stimulating inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate second messenger generation. This is the first study that elucidates the pharmacology of TAL at TRH-R and shows that TAL is a superagonist at TRH-R. We suggest the superagonism exhibited by TAL may in part explain its higher activity in mediating central nervous system effects in humans compared to TRH. PMID:23087672

  11. Taltirelin is a superagonist at the human thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanthakumar eThirunarayanan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Taltirelin (TAL is a thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH analog that is approved for use in humans in Japan. In this study, we characterized TAL binding to and signaling by the human TRH receptor (TRH-R in a model cell system. We found that TAL exhibited lower binding affinities than TRH and lower signaling potency via the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate/calcium pathway than TRH. However, TAL exhibited higher intrinsic efficacy than TRH in stimulating inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate second messenger generation. This is the first study that elucidates the pharmacology of TAL at TRH-R and shows that TAL is a superagonist at TRH-R. We suggest the superagonism exhibited by TAL may in part explain its higher activity in mediating CNS effects in humans compared to TRH.

  12. Muscarinic receptor subtype mRNA expression in the human prostate: association with age, pathological diagnosis, prostate size, or potentially interfering medications?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Lambertus P. W.; Teitsma, Christine A.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Michel, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    As the prostate abundantly expresses muscarinic receptors and antagonists for such receptors are increasingly used in the treatment of men with voiding function and large prostates, we have explored an association of the mRNA expression of human M1, M2, M3, M4, and M5 receptors in human prostate

  13. Expression and function of TNF and IL-1 receptors on human regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Mercer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress immune activation and are critical in preventing autoimmune diseases. While the ability of Tregs to inhibit proliferation of other T cells is well established, it is not yet clear whether Tregs also modulate inflammatory cytokines during an immune response. Here, we show that the expression of inflammatory cytokine receptors IL-1R1 and TNFR2 were higher on resting mature Tregs compared to naïve or memory T cells. While upon activation through the T cell receptor (TCR, expression of IL-1R1 and TNFR2 were upregulated on all T cell subsets, IL-1R1 maintained significantly higher expression on activated Tregs as compared to other T cell subsets. The decoy receptor for IL-1 (IL-1R2 was not expressed by any of the resting T cells but was rapidly upregulated and preferentially expressed upon TCR-stimulation on Tregs. In addition, we found that Tregs also expressed high levels of mRNA for IL-1 antagonist, IL-1RA. TCR-stimulation of naïve T cells in the presence of TGFbeta, which induces FOXP3 expression, however did not result in upregulation of IL-1R1 or IL-1R2. In addition, ectopic expression of FOXP3 in non-Tregs, while causing significant upregulation of IL-1R1 and IL-1R2, did not achieve the levels seen in bona fide Tregs. We also determined that resting human Tregs expressing IL-1R1 did not have higher suppressive capacity compared to IL-1R1- Tregs, suggesting that IL-1R1 does not discriminate suppressive resting Tregs in healthy individuals. Functionally, activated human Tregs displayed a capacity to neutralize IL-1beta, which suggests a physiological significance for the expression of IL-1 decoy receptor on Tregs. In conclusion, our findings that human Tregs preferentially express receptors for TNF and IL-1 suggest a potential function in sensing and dampening local inflammation.

  14. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  15. Effects of piperine, the pungent component of black pepper, at the human vanilloid receptor (TRPV1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Fergal N; Randall, Andrew; Gunthorpe, Martin J

    2005-01-01

    We have characterised the effects of piperine, a pungent alkaloid found in black pepper, on the human vanilloid receptor TRPV1 using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Piperine produced a clear agonist activity at the human TRPV1 receptor yielding rapidly activating whole-cell currents that were antagonised by the competitive TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine and the non-competitive TRPV1 blocker ruthenium red. The current–voltage relationship of piperine-activated currents showed pronounced outward rectification (25±4-fold between −70 and +70 mV) and a reversal potential of 0.0±0.4 mV, which was indistinguishable from that of the prototypical TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. Although piperine was a less potent agonist (EC50=37.9±1.9 μM) than capsaicin (EC50=0.29±0.05 μM), it demonstrated a much greater efficacy (approximately two-fold) at TRPV1. This difference in efficacy did not appear to be related to the proton-mediated regulation of the receptor since a similar degree of potentiation was observed for responses evoked by piperine (230±20%, n=11) or capsaicin (284±32%, n=8) upon acidification to pH 6.5. The effects of piperine upon receptor desensitisation were also unable to explain this effect since piperine resulted in more pronounced macroscopic desensitisation (t1/2=9.9±0.7 s) than capsaicin (t1/2>20 s) and also caused greater tachyphylaxis in response to repetitive agonist applications. Overall, our data suggest that the effects of piperine at human TRPV1 are similar to those of capsaicin except for its propensity to induce greater receptor desensitisation and, rather remarkably, exhibit a greater efficacy than capsaicin itself. These results may provide insight into the TRPV1-mediated effects of piperine on gastrointestinal function. PMID:15685214

  16. Parabens and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligand Cross-Talk in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shawn; Yuan, Chaoshen; Tagmount, Abderrahmane; Rudel, Ruthann A; Ackerman, Janet M; Yaswen, Paul; Vulpe, Chris D; Leitman, Dale C

    2016-05-01

    Xenoestrogens are synthetic compounds that mimic endogenous estrogens by binding to and activating estrogen receptors. Exposure to estrogens and to some xenoestrogens has been associated with cell proliferation and an increased risk of breast cancer. Despite evidence of estrogenicity, parabens are among the most widely used xenoestrogens in cosmetics and personal-care products and are generally considered safe. However, previous cell-based studies with parabens do not take into account the signaling cross-talk between estrogen receptor α (ERα) and the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family. We investigated the hypothesis that the potency of parabens can be increased with HER ligands, such as heregulin (HRG). The effects of HER ligands on paraben activation of c-Myc expression and cell proliferation were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blots, flow cytometry, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in ERα- and HER2-positive human BT-474 breast cancer cells. Butylparaben (BP) and HRG produced a synergistic increase in c-Myc mRNA and protein levels in BT-474 cells. Estrogen receptor antagonists blocked the synergistic increase in c-Myc protein levels. The combination of BP and HRG also stimulated proliferation of BT-474 cells compared with the effects of BP alone. HRG decreased the dose required for BP-mediated stimulation of c-Myc mRNA expression and cell proliferation. HRG caused the phosphorylation of serine 167 in ERα. BP and HRG produced a synergistic increase in ERα recruitment to the c-Myc gene. Our results show that HER ligands enhanced the potency of BP to stimulate oncogene expression and breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro via ERα, suggesting that parabens might be active at exposure levels not previously considered toxicologically relevant from studies testing their effects in isolation. Pan S, Yuan C, Tagmount A, Rudel RA, Ackerman JM, Yaswen P, Vulpe CD, Leitman DC. 2016. Parabens and human epidermal

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of PPARγ receptors in the human pituitary adenomas: correlation with PCNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Pawlikowski

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARγ was investigated in 51 human pituitary adenomas and in 6 non-tumoral human pituitary tissue samples. Moreover, the correlation between PPARγ and the proliferating cells nuclear antigen (PCNA - immunocytochemical proliferation marker was evaluated. The receptors and PCNA were detected by immunohistochemical methods using the polyclonal anti-PPARγ and the monoclonal anti-PCNA antibodies, respectively. PPARγ were found in all examined tissues. The mean percentage of cells with positive nuclear reaction was 3-fold higher in pituitary adenomas in comparison with non-tumoral pituitary tissues. The strongest expression of PPARγ was observed in somatotropinomas. Besides the nuclear reaction, which is typical for PPARγ, positive immunostaining was also observed in the cytoplasm. It was clearly stronger in pituitary adenomas than in non-tumoral pituitary tissues. A slight, statistically insignificant tendency towards negative correlation between PPARγ and PCNA was found in somatotropinomas, prolactinomas, corticotropinomas and gonadotropinomas. On the other hand, in null cell adenomas and "silent" corticotropinomas, a strong positve correlation between the expression of PPARγ and PCNA was observed. The strong expression of PPARγ in human pituitary adenomas and its possible involvement in control of cell proliferation in these tumors give a good reason for the attempts of their treatment with PPARγ ligands.

  18. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Vardy, Eyal; Liu, Wei; Thompson, Aaron A.; Huang, Xi-Ping; Carroll, F. Ivy; Mascarella, S. Wayne; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (VCU); (Scripps); (UNC); (Res. Tri. Inst.)

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.

  19. Imatinib mesylate radiosensitizes human glioblastoma cells through inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdhoff, Matthias; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Appelt, Christine; Scholz, Regina; Na, Il-Kang; Hildebrandt, Bert; Riess, Hanno; Jordan, Andreas; Schmidt, Christian A; Van Etten, Richard A; Dörken, Bernd; le Coutre, Philipp

    2005-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is a small molecule inhibitor of the c-Abl, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor and c-Kit tyrosine kinases that is approved for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Glioblastoma multiforme is a highly malignant primary brain tumor that is usually treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy. Previous studies implicate an autocrine loop caused by high expression of PDGF and its receptor, PDGFR, in the proliferation of some glioblastomas. Here, we demonstrate that pretreatment of a human glioblastoma cell line, RuSi RS1, with imatinib significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effect of ionizing radiation. This effect was not seen in human breast cancer (BT20) and colon cancer (WiDr) cell lines. Whereas c-Abl and c-Kit were expressed about equally in the three cell lines, RuSi RS1 cells showed significantly higher expression of PDGFR-beta protein in comparison to BT20 and WiDr. Imatinib treatment of RuSi RS1 cells decreased overall levels of cellular tyrosine phosphorylation and specifically inhibited phosphorylation of PDGFR-beta, while c-Abl was not prominently activated in these cells. These results suggest that imatinib may have clinical utility as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of human glioblastoma, possibly through disruption of an autocrine PDGF/PDGFR loop.

  20. Homogeneous expansion of human T-regulatory cells via tumor necrosis factor receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yoshiaki; Mera, Toshiyuki; Wang, Limei; Faustman, Denise L

    2013-11-06

    T-regulatory cells (T(regs)) are a rare lymphocyte subtype that shows promise for treating infectious disease, allergy, graft-versus-host disease, autoimmunity, and asthma. Clinical applications of T(regs) have not been fully realized because standard methods of expansion ex vivo produce heterogeneous progeny consisting of mixed populations of CD4 + T cells. Heterogeneous progeny are risky for human clinical trials and face significant regulatory hurdles. With the goal of producing homogeneous T(regs), we developed a novel expansion protocol targeting tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFR) on T(regs). In in vitro studies, a TNFR2 agonist was found superior to standard methods in proliferating human T(regs) into a phenotypically homogeneous population consisting of 14 cell surface markers. The TNFR2 agonist-expanded T(regs) also were functionally superior in suppressing a key T(reg) target cell, cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Targeting the TNFR2 receptor during ex vivo expansion is a new means for producing homogeneous and potent human T(regs) for clinical opportunities.

  1. Laminin receptor 37/67LR regulates adhesion and proliferation of normal human intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoufik Khalfaoui

    Full Text Available Interactions between the cell basal membrane domain and the basement membrane are involved in several cell functions including proliferation, migration and differentiation. Intestinal epithelial cells can interact with laminin, a major intestinal basement membrane glycoprotein, via several cell-surface laminin-binding proteins including integrin and non-integrin receptors. The 37/67kDa laminin receptor (37/67LR is one of these but its role in normal epithelial cells is still unknown. The aim of this study was to characterise the expression pattern and determine the main function of 37/67LR in the normal human small intestinal epithelium. Immunolocalization studies revealed that 37/67LR was predominantly present in the undifferentiated/proliferative region of the human intestinal crypt in both the immature and adult intestine. Using a human intestinal epithelial crypt (HIEC cell line as experimental model, we determined that 37/67LR was expressed in proliferative cells in both the cytoplasmic and membrane compartments. Small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction of 37/67LR expression led to HIEC cell-cycle reduction and loss of the ability to adhere to laminin-related peptides under conditions not altering ribosomal function. Taken together, these findings indicate that 37/67LR regulates proliferation and adhesion in normal intestinal epithelial cells independently of its known association with ribosomal function.

  2. SIGNIFICANCE OF GENE POLYMORPHISM OF VITAMIN D RECEPTOR IN HUMAN PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bukhalko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature review presents information on the role of gene polymorphism of vitamin D receptor in human pathology. According to  modern data, vitamin D is a hormone which has numerous pleiotropic effects on the human body by binding to its specific receptors  (VDR. These effects can greatly determine the role of vitamin D in the occurence and the course of a number of widespread diseases of a  modern man, including infectious pathology, autoimmune diseases, neuropsychiatric disorders. Special importance is currently attached  to the receptor gene of vitamin D, VDR, which is characterized by a genetic polymorphism that can determine the features of implementation of the biological effects of calcitriol in the human body. The article presents the review data supporting the contribution of certain  single nucleotide polymorphisms of gene VDR in the formation of the pleiotropic effects of vitamin D and their clinical manifestations.

  3. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Shi

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1. TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2 mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6 mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD family of recombinant inbred (RI strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options.

  4. Induction of retinoic acid receptor β mediates growth inhibition in retinoid resistant human colon carcinoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nicke, B; Riecken, E; Rosewicz, S

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The molecular mechanisms underlying the differential sensitivity of human colon carcinoma cells to retinoid mediated growth inhibition are poorly understood.
AIM—To identify the intracellular mechanisms responsible for resistance against retinoid mediated growth inhibition in human colon carcinoma cells.
METHODS—Anchorage independent growth of the human colon carcinoma cell lines HT29 and LoVo was determined by a human tumour clonogenic assay. Retinoid receptor expression was evalu...

  5. How does stress affect human being—a molecular dynamic simulation study on cortisol and its glucocorticoid receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress can be either positive or negative to human beings. Under stressful conditions, the mental and physical conditions of human can be affected. There exists certain relation between stress and illness. The cortisol and other glucocorticoids bind to the same receptor, which is called glucocorticoid receptor. Some evidences indicated that cortisol molecule binding to its glucocorticoid receptor was necessary for the stress response. Up to now, the structure–function relationships between cortisol molecule and its glucocorticoid receptor have not been deliberated from the atomic-level. In order to get a detailed understanding of the structure–function relationships between the cortisol molecule and glucocorticoids receptor, we have carried out molecular dynamic (MD simulations on glucocorticoid receptor (Apo system and cortisol with its glucocorticoid receptor complex (HCY system. On the basis of molecular dynamic simulations, a couple of key residues were identified, which were crucial for the binding of cortisol molecule. The results of binding free energy calculations are in good agreement with the experiment data. Our research gives clear insights from atomic-level into the structural–functional aspects of cortisol molecule and its glucocorticoid receptor, and also provides valuable information for the design of drug which can treat stress related illnesses.

  6. Localization of the gene for the ciliary neutrotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) to human chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, D.H.; Jones, C.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States) Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.E.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to be important for the survival of motor neurons and has shown activity in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNTF therefore holds promise as a treatment for ALS, and it and its receptor (CNTFR) are candidates for a gene involved in familial ALS. The CNTFR gene was mapped to chromosome 9 by PCR on a panel of human/CHO somatic cell hybrids and localized to 9p13 by PCR on a panel of radiation hybrids. 18 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. The 5-HT(4) receptor levels in hippocampus correlates inversely with memory test performance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, Mette Ewers; Fisher, Patrick; Holst, Klaus Kähler

    2013-01-01

    of the 5-HT4R binding in hippocampus in relation to memory acquisition and consolidation in healthy young volunteers. We found significant, negative associations between the immediate recall scores and left and right hippocampal BP(ND) , (p = 0.009 and p = 0.010 respectively) and between the right...... hippocampal BP(ND) and delayed recall (p = 0.014). These findings provide evidence that the 5-HT(4) R is associated with memory functions in the human hippocampus and potentially pharmacological stimulation of the receptor may improve episodic memory. Hum Brain Mapp, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  8. Recombinant human melatonin receptor MT1 isolated in mixed detergents shows pharmacology similar to that in mammalian cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Logez

    Full Text Available The human melatonin MT1 receptor-belonging to the large family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs-plays a key role in circadian rhythm regulation and is notably involved in sleep disorders and depression. Structural and functional information at the molecular level are highly desired for fine characterization of this receptor; however, adequate techniques for isolating soluble MT1 material suitable for biochemical and biophysical studies remain lacking. Here we describe the evaluation of a panel of constructs and host systems for the production of recombinant human MT1 receptors, and the screening of different conditions for their solubilization and purification. Our findings resulted in the establishment of an original strategy using a mixture of Fos14 and CHAPS detergents to extract and purify a recombinant human MT1 from Pichia pastoris membranes. This procedure enabled the recovery of relatively pure, monomeric and ligand-binding active MT1 receptor in the near-milligram range. A comparative study based on extensive ligand-binding characterization highlighted a very close correlation between the pharmacological profiles of MT1 purified from yeast and the same receptor present in mammalian cell membranes. The high quality of the purified MT1 was further confirmed by its ability to activate its cognate Gαi protein partner when reconstituted in lipid discs, thus opening novel paths to investigate this receptor by biochemical and biophysical approaches.

  9. Transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 8 is expressed in freshly isolated native human odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazawa, Kento; Ikeda, Hideharu; Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Okiji, Takashi

    2017-03-01

    Cold-sensitive ion channels, such as transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM) 8 and transient receptor potential ankyrin (TRPA) 1, may play a crucial role in the nociceptive function of odontoblasts, whereas expression of these TRP channels in human native odontoblasts remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to analyze the expression of TRPM8 and TRPA1 in freshly isolated native human odontoblasts. Odontoblasts were isolated from freshly extracted healthy human teeth (n=4); after removing the inner pulp tissues from the pulp chambers, odontoblasts remaining on the dentin surface were washed out with phosphate buffered saline and collected. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was employed to compare the expression levels of TRPM8, TRPA1, and dentin matrix acidic phosphoprotein 1 (DMP1) mRNAs between the isolated odontoblasts and the inner pulp tissues. The isolated cells were subjected to immunolocalization of TRPM8 and nestin. Paraformaldehyde-fixed, EDTA-demineralized frozen sections obtained from freshly extracted healthy human teeth (n=4) were also analyzed immunohistochemically using anti-nestin, TRPM8, and TRPA1 antibodies. Expression levels of TRPM8 and DMP1 in the isolated odontoblasts were significantly higher than those in the inner pulp tissues (podontoblastic layer of the dental pulp tissue and isolated odontoblasts, while expression of TRPA1 was not detected. TRPM8, but not TRPA1, was detected in freshly isolated native human odontoblasts at the protein and mRNA levels, suggesting that odontoblasts play an important role in detecting external cold stimulation via TRPM8 in healthy condition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The human gonadotropin releasing hormone type I receptor is a functional intracellular GPCR expressed on the nuclear membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Re

    Full Text Available The mammalian type I gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R is a structurally unique G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that lacks cytoplasmic tail sequences and displays inefficient plasma membrane expression (PME. Compared to its murine counterparts, the primate type I receptor is inefficiently folded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER leading to a further reduction in PME. The decrease in PME and concomitant increase in intracellular localization of the mammalian GnRH-RI led us to characterize the spatial distribution of the human and mouse GnRH receptors in two human cell lines, HEK 293 and HTR-8/SVneo. In both human cell lines we found the receptors were expressed in the cytoplasm and were associated with the ER and nuclear membrane. A molecular analysis of the receptor protein sequence led us to identify a putative monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS in the first intracellular loop of GnRH-RI. Surprisingly, however, neither the deletion of the NLS nor the addition of the Xenopus GnRH-R cytoplasmic tail sequences to the human receptor altered its spatial distribution. Finally, we demonstrate that GnRH treatment of nuclei isolated from HEK 293 cells expressing exogenous GnRH-RI triggers a significant increase in the acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3, thereby revealing that the nuclear-localized receptor is functional. Based on our findings, we conclude that the mammalian GnRH-RI is an intracellular GPCR that is expressed on the nuclear membrane. This major and novel discovery causes us to reassess the signaling potential of this physiologically and clinically important receptor.

  11. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liutkeviciute, Zita; Keov, Peter; Eder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan; Marek, Ales; Elbert, Tomas; Alewood, Paul F.; Gloriam, David E.; Gruber, Christian W.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) relies on the availability of a toolbox of ligands that selectively modulate different functional states of the receptors. To uncover such molecules, we explored a unique strategy for ligand discovery that takes advantage of the evolutionary conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin/vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold binding selectivity for the human V1aR over the other three subtypes, OTR, V1bR and V2R. The Arg8/D-Arg8 ligand-pair was further investigated to gain novel insights into the oxytocin/vasopressin peptide-receptor interaction, which led to the identification of key residues of the receptors that are important for ligand functionality and selectivity. These observations could play an important role for development of oxytocin/vasopressin receptor modulators that would enable clear distinction of the physiological and pathological responses of the individual receptor subtypes.

  12. Crystal structures of agonist-bound human cannabinoid receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Nikas, Spyros P; Laprairie, Robert B; Wu, Yiran; Qu, Lu; Pu, Mengchen; Korde, Anisha; Jiang, Shan; Ho, Jo-Hao; Han, Gye Won; Ding, Kang; Li, Xuanxuan; Liu, Haiguang; Hanson, Michael A; Zhao, Suwen; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2017-07-27

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of the psychoactive constituent of marijuana, the partial agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC). Here we report two agonist-bound crystal structures of human CB1 in complex with a tetrahydrocannabinol (AM11542) and a hexahydrocannabinol (AM841) at 2.80 Å and 2.95 Å resolution, respectively. The two CB1-agonist complexes reveal important conformational changes in the overall structure, relative to the antagonist-bound state, including a 53% reduction in the volume of the ligand-binding pocket and an increase in the surface area of the G-protein-binding region. In addition, a 'twin toggle switch' of Phe200(3.36) and Trp356(6.48) (superscripts denote Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering) is experimentally observed and appears to be essential for receptor activation. The structures reveal important insights into the activation mechanism of CB1 and provide a molecular basis for predicting the binding modes of Δ(9)-THC, and endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids. The plasticity of the binding pocket of CB1 seems to be a common feature among certain class A G-protein-coupled receptors. These findings should inspire the design of chemically diverse ligands with distinct pharmacological properties.

  13. The neurotensin receptor-1 pathway contributes to human ductal breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Dupouy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neurotensin (NTS and its specific high affinity G protein coupled receptor, the NT1 receptor (NTSR1, are considered to be a good candidate for one of the factors implicated in neoplastic progression. In breast cancer cells, functionally expressed NT1 receptor coordinates a series of transforming functions including cellular migration and invasion. METHODS AND RESULTS: we investigated the expression of NTS and NTSR1 in normal human breast tissue and in invasive ductal breast carcinomas (IDCs by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. NTS is expressed and up-regulated by estrogen in normal epithelial breast cells. NTS is also found expressed in the ductal and invasive components of IDCs. The high expression of NTSR1 is associated with the SBR grade, the size of the tumor, and the number of metastatic lymph nodes. Furthermore, the NTSR1 high expression is an independent factor of prognosis associated with the death of patients. CONCLUSION: these data support the activation of neurotensinergic deleterious pathways in breast cancer progression.

  14. The prolactin receptor as a therapeutic target in human diseases: browsing new potential indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffin, Vincent; Touraine, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) signaling has emerged as a relevant target in breast and prostate cancers. This has encouraged various laboratories to develop compounds targeting the PRL receptor (PRLR). As the latter is widely distributed, it is timely to address whether other conditions could also benefit from such inhibitors. The authors briefly overview the two classes of PRLR blockers, which involve: i) PRL-core based analogs that have been validated as competitive antagonists in various preclinical models, and ii) anti-PRLR neutralizing antibodies that are currently in clinical Phase I for advanced breast and prostate cancers. The main purpose of this review is to discuss the multiple organs/diseases that may be considered as potential targets/indications for such inhibitors. This is done in light of reports suggesting that PRLR expression/signaling is increased in disease, and/or that systemic or locally elevated PRL levels correlate with (or promote) organ pathogenesis. The two immediate challenges in the field are i) to provide the scientific community with potent anti-prolactin receptor antibodies to map prolactin receptor expression in target organs, and ii) to take advantage of the availability of functionally validated PRLR blockers to establish the relevance of these potential indications in humans.

  15. Dopamine D3 receptor-preferring agonist enhances the subjective effects of cocaine in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Thomas F.; Haile, Colin N.; Mahoney, James J.; Shah, Ravi; Verrico, Christopher D.; De La Garza, Richard; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Pramipexole is a D3 dopamine receptor-preferring agonist indicated for the treatment of Parkinson disease. Studies associate pramipexole with pathological gambling and impulse control disorders suggesting a role for D3 receptors in reinforcement processes. Clinical studies showed pramipexole decreased cocaine craving and reversed central deficits in individuals with cocaine use disorder. Preclinical studies have shown acute administration of pramipexole increases cocaine’s reinforcing effects whereas other reports suggest chronic pramipexole produces tolerance to cocaine. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we examined the impact of pramipexole treatment on the subjective effects produced by cocaine in volunteers with cocaine use disorder. Volunteers received pramipexole titrated up to 3.0 mg/d or placebo over 15 days. Participants then received intravenous cocaine (0, 20 and 40 mg) on day 15. Cardiovascular and subjective effects were obtained with visual analog scales at time points across the session. Pramipexole alone increased peak heart rate following saline and diastolic blood pressure following cocaine. Pramipexole produced upwards of two-fold increases in positive subjective effects ratings following cocaine. These results indicate that chronic D3 receptor activation increases the subjective effects of cocaine in humans. Caution should be used when prescribing pramipexole to patients that may also use cocaine. PMID:26239766

  16. Oestrogen inhibits human colonic motility by a non-genomic cell membrane receptor-dependent mechanism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, A M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Classical effects of oestrogen involve activation of target genes after binding nuclear receptors. Oestrogenic effects too rapid for DNA transcription (non-genomic) are known to occur. The effect of oestrogen on colonic motility is unknown despite the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in pregnant and premenopausal women. METHODS: Histologically normal colon was obtained from proximal resection margins of colorectal carcinoma specimens. Circular smooth muscle strips were microdissected and suspended in organ baths under 1 g of tension. After equilibration, they were exposed to 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8) or bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated 17beta-oestradiol (n = 8). Fulvestrant, an oestrogen receptor antagonist, was added to some baths (n = 8). Other strips were exposed to calphostin C or cycloheximide. Carbachol was added in increasing concentrations and contractile activity was recorded isometrically. RESULTS: Oestrogen inhibited colonic contractility (mean difference 19.7 per cent; n = 8, P < 0.001). In keeping with non-genomic, rapid-onset steroid action, the effect was apparent within minutes and reversible. It was observed with both 17beta-oestradiol and BSA-conjugated oestrogen, and was not altered by cycloheximide. Effects were inhibited by fulvestrant, suggesting receptor mediation. CONCLUSION: Oestrogen decreases contractility in human colonic smooth muscle by a non-genomic mechanism involving cell membrane coupling.

  17. Effect of galantamine on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and spontaneous cholinergic synaptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texidó, Laura; Ros, Esteve; Martín-Satué, Mireia; López, Susana; Aleu, Jordi; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2005-01-01

    Various types of anticholinesterasic agents have been used to improve the daily activities of Alzheimer's disease patients. It was recently demonstrated that Galantamine, described as a molecule with anticholinesterasic properties, is also an allosteric enhancer of human α4β2 neuronal nicotinic receptor activity. We explored its effect on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Galantamine, at a concentration of 0.1 μM, increased the amplitude of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced ion currents in the human α7 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes, but caused inhibition at higher concentrations. The maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 22% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, was observed at a concentration of 250 μM Ach. The same enhancing effect was obtained in oocytes transplanted with Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) isolated from the electric organ, but in this case the optimal concentration of galantamine was 1 μM. In this case, the maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 35% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, occurred at a concentration of 50 μM ACh. Galantamine affects not only the activity of post-synaptic receptors but also the activity of nerve terminals. At a concentration of 1 μM, quantal spontaneous events, recorded in a cholinergic synapse, increased their amplitude, an effect which was independent of the anticholinesterasic activity associated with this compound. The anticholinesterasic effect was recorded in preparations treated with a galantamine concentration of 10 μM. In conclusion, our results show that galantamine enhances human α7 neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor activity. It also enhances muscular AChRs and the size of spontaneous cholinergic synaptic events. However, only a very narrow range of galantamine concentrations can be used for enhancing effects. PMID:15834443

  18. Characterization of epidermal growth factor receptor and action on human breast cancer cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, S L; LaChance, M P; Schultz, G S

    1984-08-01

    are similar to those observed for EGF receptors in other human tissues.

  19. Molecular characterization of a novel human hybrid-type receptor that binds the alpha2-macroglobulin receptor-associated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Linda; Madsen, P; Moestrup, S K

    1996-01-01

    The 39-40-kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) binds to the members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family and functions as a specialized endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi chaperone. Using RAP affinity chromatography, we have purified a novel approximately 250-kDa brain protein and isolated...... the corresponding cDNA. The gene, designated SORL1, maps to chromosome 11q 23/24 and encodes a 2214-residue type 1 receptor containing a furin cleavage site immediately preceding the N terminus determined in the purified protein. The receptor, designated sorLA-1, has a short cytoplasmic tail containing a tyrosine......-based internalization signal and a large external part containing (from the N-terminal): 1) a segment homologous to domains in the yeast vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein, Vps10p, that binds carboxypeptidase Y, 2) five tandemly arranged YWTD repeats and a cluster of 11 class A repeats characteristic of the low...

  20. Mutational analysis of the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene in human parathyroid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, Yoshitaka; Arnold, A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Pollak, M.R.; Brown, E.M. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Despite recent progress, such as the identification of PRAD1/cyclin D1 as a parathyroid oncogene, it is likely that many genes involved in the molecular pathogenesis of parathyroid tumors remain unknown. Individuals heterozygous for inherited mutations in the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene that reduce its biological activity exhibit a disorder termed familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia or familial benign hypercalcemia, which is characterized by reduced responsiveness of parathyroid and kidney to calcium and by PTH-dependent hypercalcemia. Those who are homozygous for such mutations present with neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism and have marked parathroid hypercellularity. Thus, the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene is a candidate parathyroid tumor suppressor gene, with inactivating mutations plausibly explaining set-point abnormalities in the regulation of both parathyroid cellular proliferation and PTH secretion by extracellular Ca{sup 2+} similar to those seen in hyperparathyroidism. Using a ribonuclease A protection assay that has detected multiple mutations in the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and covers more than 90% of its coding region, we sought somatic mutations in this gene in a total of 44 human parathyroid tumors (23 adenomas, 4 carcinomas, 5 primary hyperplasias, and 12 secondary hyperplasias). No such mutations were detected in these 44 tumors. Thus, our studies suggest that somatic mutation of the Ca{sup 2+}-sensing receptor gene does not commonly contribute to the pathogenesis of sporadic parathyroid tumors. As such, PTH set-point dysfunction in parathroid tumors may well be secondary to other clonal proliferative defects and/or mutations in other components of the extracellular Ca{sup 2+}-sensing pathway. 29 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Niacin receptor activation improves human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during lipotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Large, Jennifer M; Pang, Dominic K T; Robson, Debra L; Chan, Pak; Toma, Jelena; Borradaile, Nica M

    2014-12-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) as a monotherapy can reduce vascular disease risk, but its mechanism of action remains controversial, and may not be dependent on systemic lipid modifying effects. Niacin has recently been shown to improve endothelial function and vascular regeneration, independent of correcting dyslipidemia, in rodent models of vascular injury and metabolic disease. As a potential biosynthetic precursor for NAD(+), niacin could elicit these vascular benefits through NAD(+)-dependent, sirtuin (SIRT) mediated responses. Alternatively, niacin may act through its receptor, GPR109A, to promote endothelial function, though endothelial cells are not known to express this receptor. We hypothesized that niacin directly improves endothelial cell function during exposure to lipotoxic conditions and sought to determine the potential mechanism(s) involved. Angiogenic function in excess palmitate was assessed by tube formation following treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC) with either a relatively low concentration of niacin (10 μM), or nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) (1 μM), a direct NAD(+) precursor. Although both niacin and NMN improved HMVEC tube formation during palmitate overload, only NMN increased cellular NAD(+) and SIRT1 activity. We further observed that HMVEC express GRP109A. Activation of this receptor with either acifran or MK-1903 recapitulated niacin-induced improvements in HMVEC tube formation, while GPR109A siRNA diminished the effect of niacin. Niacin, at a low concentration, improves HMVEC angiogenic function under lipotoxic conditions, likely independent of NAD(+) biosynthesis and SIRT1 activation, but rather through niacin receptor activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estrogen receptor silencing induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Al Saleh

    Full Text Available We propose the hypothesis that loss of estrogen receptor function which leads to endocrine resistance in breast cancer, also results in trans-differentiation from an epithelial to a mesenchymal phenotype that is responsible for increased aggressiveness and metastatic propensity. siRNA mediated silencing of the estrogen receptor in MCF7 breast cancer cells resulted in estrogen/tamoxifen resistant cells (pII with altered morphology, increased motility with rearrangement and switch from a keratin/actin to a vimentin based cytoskeleton, and ability to invade simulated components of the extracellular matrix. Phenotypic profiling using an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 GeneChip indicated geometric fold changes ≥ 3 in approximately 2500 identifiable unique sequences, with about 1270 of these being up-regulated in pII cells. Changes were associated with genes whose products are involved in cell motility, loss of cellular adhesion and interaction with the extracellular matrix. Selective analysis of the data also showed a shift from luminal to basal cell markers and increased expression of a wide spectrum of genes normally associated with mesenchymal characteristics, with consequent loss of epithelial specific markers. Over-expression of several peptide growth factors and their receptors are indicative of an increased contribution to the higher proliferative rates of pII cells as well as aiding their potential for metastatic activity. Signalling molecules that have been identified as key transcriptional drivers of epithelial to mesenchymal transition were also found to be elevated in pII cells. These data support our hypothesis that induced loss of estrogen receptor in previously estrogen/antiestrogen sensitive cells is a trigger for the concomitant loss of endocrine dependence and onset of a series of possibly parallel events that changes the cell from an epithelial to a mesenchymal type. Inhibition of this transition through targeting of

  3. Nuclear receptors RXRα:RARα are repressors for human MRP3 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wensheng; Cai, Shi-Ying; Xu, Shuhua; Denson, Lee A.; Soroka, Carol J.; Boyer, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein MRP3/Mrp3 (ABCC3) is upregulated in cholestasis, an adaptive response that may protect the liver from accumulation of toxic compounds, such as bile salts and bilirubin conjugates. However, the mechanism of this upregulation is poorly understood. We and others have previously reported that fetoprotein transcription factor/liver receptor homolog-1 is an activator of MRP3/Mrp3 expression. In searching for additional regulatory elements in the human MRP3 promoter, we have now identified nuclear receptor retinoic X receptor-α:retinoic acid receptor-α (RXRα:RARα) as a repressor of MRP3 activation by transcription factor Sp1. A luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that cotransfection of transcription factor Sp1 stimulates the MRP3 promoter activity and that additions of RXRα:RARα abrogated this activation in a dose-dependent manner. Site mutations and gel shift assays have identified a Sp1 binding GC box motif at −113 to −108 nts upstream from the MRP3 translation start site, where RXRα:RARα specifically reduced Sp1 binding to this site. Mutation of the GC box also reduced MRP3 promoter activity. The functional role of RXRα:RARα as a repressor of MRP3 expression was further confirmed by RARα small-interfering RNA knock-down in HepG2 cells, which upregulated endogenous MRP3 expression. In summary, our results indicate that activator Sp1 and repressor RXRα:RARα act in concert to regulate MRP3 expression. Since RXRα:RARα expression is diminished by cholestatic liver injury, loss of RXRα:RARα may lead to upregulation of MRP3/Mrp3 expression in these disorders. PMID:17272513

  4. GABAA receptor subunit deregulation in the hippocampus of human foetuses with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Ivan; Stojanovic, Tamara; Aronica, Eleonora; Fülöp, Livia; Bozsó, Zsolt; Máté, Zoltán; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Lubec, Gert; Szabó, Gábor; Harkany, Tibor; Kovács, Gábor G; Keimpema, Erik

    2017-11-22

    The function, regulation and cellular distribution of GABAA receptor subunits have been extensively documented in the adult rodent brain and are linked to numerous neurological disorders. However, there is a surprising lack of knowledge on the cellular (sub-) distribution of GABAA receptor subunits and of their expressional regulation in developing healthy and diseased foetal human brains. To propose a role for GABAA receptor