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Sample records for human marrow cells

  1. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Abdallah, Basem M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of cells present in bone-marrow stroma and the stroma of various organs with the capacity for mesoderm-like cell differentiation into, for example, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSC are being introduced in the clinic for the treatment...

  2. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. James (Sally); J. Fox (James); F. Afsari (Farinaz); J. Lee (Jennifer); S. Clough (Sally); C. Knight (Charlotte); J. Ashmore (James); P. Ashton (Peter); O. Preham (Olivier); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); R.D.A.R. Ponzoni (Raquel De Almeida Rocha); Y. Hancock; M. Coles (Mark); P.G. Genever (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis

  3. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα stimulates the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rougier

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports that TNF-α is a potent mitogen for human bone marrow sternal cells in vitro (assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell counts. In contrast, cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, LIF, SCF, M-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect. The effect of TNF-α on the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells could be of importance during inflammatory processes which take place in the marrow, for example marrow fibrosis.

  4. Expression of odontogenic genes in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mashhadi Abbas, Fatemeh; Sichani Fallahi, Hamed; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Mahdavi, Nazanin; Bagheri, Seyedeh Sara

    2013-01-01

    .... A challenging problem in tooth regeneration is to find a proper clinically feasible cell to seed.This study was designed to investigate the odontogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs...

  5. Ex vivo expansion of Primate CD34+ Cells isolated from Bone Marrow and Human Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells using a Novel Scaffold

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    Devaprasad D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow derived CD34+ cells have been in clinical application in patients with haematological malignancies. One of the major problems with this treatment is the non-availability of matched donors or the necessity of multiple transfusions depending upon the pathology. Recently evidences have been accumulating to prove the safety and efficacy of autologous CD34+ cells in diseases such as myocardial dysfunction, peripheral vascular diseases and neurological certain conditions. However there are only a few reports in the literature on ex vivo expansion of the bone marrow derived CD34+ cells. We have in two different studies proven that isolated CD34+ cells from baboon bone marrow and non-isolated BMMNCs from human bone marrow could be expanded with increase in percentage of CD34+ cells using a novel scaffold.

  6. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transfected with human insulin genes can secrete insulin stably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuhua; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Mingyan

    2006-01-01

    Beta-cell replacement therapy by pancreatic islet transplantation has become a promising treatment for type 1 diabetes. However, the limited supply of human islet tissue prevents this therapy from being widely used to treat patients with type 1 diabetes. In order to obtain insulin-secreting cells, retrovirus vector pLNCX was used to transfer the human insulin gene into human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The hMSCs were isolated from bone marrow of healthy volunteers and were expanded in vitro. The reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify the insulin DNA fragment from a healthy pancreas sample. The recombinant vector pLNCX-Ins was constructed by cloning the insulin DNA fragment into retrovirus vector pLNCX. After being packaged by BD RetroPack PT67 packaging cells, the virus that contained the insulin gene was used to infect hMSCs. Transcription and expression of the insulin gene in transfected hMSCs were examined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The transfected hMSCs stably secreted insulin into culture media for >3 weeks. Thus, insulin gene-transfected hMSCs can secrete insulin and provide a new way to cope with the shortage of beta cells for therapy of type 1 diabetes.

  7. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h...... and adipocytes on the basis of gene expression and protein production of lineage-specific markers. In vivo, hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cells formed bone and bone marrow organ when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice. Bone was enriched in hMSC-CD146(-) cells (12.6 % versus 8.1 %) and bone......MSC population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high...

  8. Route of delivery influences biodistribution of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells following experimental bone marrow transplantation

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    Wang FJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have shown promise as treatment for graft-versus-host disease (GvHD following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT. Mechanisms mediating in vivo effects of MSCs remain largely unknown, including their biodistribution following infusion. To this end, human bone-marrow derived MSCs (hMSCs were injected via carotid artery (IA or tail vein (TV into allogeneic and syngeneic BMT recipient mice. Following xenogeneic transplantation, MSC biodistribution was measured by bioluminescence imaging (BLI using hMSCs transduced with a reporter gene system containing luciferase and by scintigraphic imaging using hMSCs labeled with [99mTc]-HMPAO. Although hMSCs initially accumulated in the lungs in both transplant groups, more cells migrated to organs in alloBMT recipient as measured by in vivo BLI and scintigraphy and confirmed by ex vivo BLI imaging, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR. IA injection resulted in persistent whole–body hMSC distribution in alloBMT recipients, while hMSCs were rapidly cleared in the syngeneic animals within one week. In contrast, TV-injected hMSCs were mainly seen in the lungs with fewer cells traveling to other organs. Summarily, these results demonstrate the potential use of IA injection to alter hMSC biodistribution in order to more effectively deliver hMSCs to targeted tissues and microenvironments.

  9. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafari Kermani, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L

    2017-01-01

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells...... and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin...

  10. Establishing quiescence in human bone marrow stem cells leads to enhanced osteoblast marker expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Rumman, Mohammad; Kassem, Moustapha

    67 and BRDU, were demonstrated to down regulate within 24hrs of cell suspension and reestablishment of proliferation was observed by 24hrs post G0 as demonstrated by Ki67 and BRDU staining. In addition, no staining was observed for the senescence marker b-Galactosidase during or post G0. Gene......Human bone marrow stromal (skeletal) stem cells (hBMSC) are cells that retain a multi-lineage differentiation potential and are thus increasingly being investigated for use in clinical applications. In vivo BMSC, which comprise approximately 0.1% of the bone marrow compartment, are thought...... to maintain their ‘stemness’ in the niche for prolonged periods of time by inducing a reversible exit of the cell cycle termed quiescence (G0). However, little is known about the induction, regulation or maintenance of this state in hBMSC. Quiescence, which usually occurs during the G1 stage of the cell cycle...

  11. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

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    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  12. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindaye, Samuel T; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R; Alterman, Michail A

    2015-12-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5], [6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  13. Circadian Clock Genes Modulate Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation, Migration and Cell Cycle.

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    Helene Boucher

    Full Text Available Many of the components that regulate the circadian clock have been identified in organisms and humans. The influence of circadian rhythm (CR on the regulation of stem cells biology began to be evaluated. However, little is known on the role of CR on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of CR on the differentiation capacities of bone marrow hMSCs, as well as the regulation of cell cycle and migration capabilities. To that, we used both a chemical approach with a GSK-3β specific inhibitor (2'E,3'Z-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, BIO and a knockdown of CLOCK and PER2, two of the main genes involved in CR regulation. In these experimental conditions, a dramatic inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was observed, while osteoblastic differentiation capacities were not modified. In addition, cell migration was decreased in PER2-/- cells. Lastly, downregulation of circadian clock genes induced a modification of the hMSCs cell cycle phase distribution, which was shown to be related to a change of the cyclin expression profile. Taken together, these data showed that CR plays a role in the regulation of hMSCs differentiation and division, and likely represent key factor in maintaining hMSCs properties.

  14. Circadian Clock Genes Modulate Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation, Migration and Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Helene; Vanneaux, Valerie; Domet, Thomas; Parouchev, Alexandre; Larghero, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Many of the components that regulate the circadian clock have been identified in organisms and humans. The influence of circadian rhythm (CR) on the regulation of stem cells biology began to be evaluated. However, little is known on the role of CR on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of CR on the differentiation capacities of bone marrow hMSCs, as well as the regulation of cell cycle and migration capabilities. To that, we used both a chemical approach with a GSK-3β specific inhibitor (2'E,3'Z-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, BIO) and a knockdown of CLOCK and PER2, two of the main genes involved in CR regulation. In these experimental conditions, a dramatic inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was observed, while osteoblastic differentiation capacities were not modified. In addition, cell migration was decreased in PER2-/- cells. Lastly, downregulation of circadian clock genes induced a modification of the hMSCs cell cycle phase distribution, which was shown to be related to a change of the cyclin expression profile. Taken together, these data showed that CR plays a role in the regulation of hMSCs differentiation and division, and likely represent key factor in maintaining hMSCs properties.

  15. [Immune regulatory effect of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on T lymphocyte].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Xi; Liu, Ting; Meng, Wen-Tong; Zhu, Huan-Ling; Xi, Ya-Ming; Liu, Yong-Mei

    2005-08-01

    To investigate the immune regulatory effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on alloantigen T lymphocyte in vitro, human MSCs were isolated and expanded from bone marrow cells, and identified with cell morphology, and the phenotypes were assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. As the stimulation factor of T lymphocytes proliferation, either PHA or dendritic cells isolated from cord blood were cocultured with CD2(+) T lymphocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by magnetic beads with or without MSC in 96-well plats for seven days. T cell proliferation was assessed by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation using a liquid scintillation counter. T cell subsets, Th1, Th2, Tc1 and Tc2 were analyzed by flow cytometry after co-culture of CD2(+) T cells with MSCs for 10 days. The results showed that a significant decrease of CD2(+) T cell proliferation was evident when MSC were added back to T cells stimulated by DC or PHA, and an increase of Th2 and Tc2 subsets were observed after co-culture of MSC with T lymphocytes. It is suggested that allogeneic MSC can suppress T cell proliferation in vitro and the cause of that was partly depend on interaction of cells and the alteration of T cell subsets.

  16. Multilineage potential of stable human mesenchymal stem cell line derived from fetal marrow.

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    Atsushi Nagai

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow contains two major cell types, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. MSCs possess self-renewal capacity and pluripotency defined by their ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes and muscle cells. MSCs are also known to differentiate into neurons and glial cells in vitro, and in vivo following transplantation into the brain of animal models of neurological disorders including ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH stroke. In order to obtain sufficient number and homogeneous population of human MSCs, we have clonally isolated permanent and stable human MSC lines by transfecting primary cell cultures of fetal human bone marrow MSCs with a retroviral vector encoding v-myc gene. One of the cell lines, HM3.B10 (B10, was found to differentiate into neural cell types including neural stem cells, neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in vitro as shown by expression of genetic markers for neural stem cells (nestin and Musashi1, neurons (neurofilament protein, synapsin and MAP2, astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP and oligodendrocytes (myelin basic protein, MBP as determined by RT-PCR assay. In addition, B10 cells were found to differentiate into neural cell types as shown by immunocytochical demonstration of nestin (for neural stem cells, neurofilament protein and beta-tubulin III (neurons GFAP (astrocytes, and galactocerebroside (oligodendrocytes. Following brain transplantation in mouse ICH stroke model, B10 human MSCs integrate into host brain, survive, differentiate into neurons and astrocytes and induce behavioral improvement in the ICH animals. B10 human MSC cell line is not only a useful tool for the studies of organogenesis and specifically for the neurogenesis, but also provides a valuable source of cells for cell therapy studies in animal models of stroke and other neurological disorders.

  17. Stromal cells from human long-term marrow cultures, but not cultured marrow fibroblasts, phagocytose horse serum constituents: studies with a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a species-specific epitope common to multiple horse serum proteins.

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    Charbord, P; Tippens, D; Wight, T S; Gown, A M; Singer, J W

    1987-01-01

    This report describes an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody derived after immunization of mice with washed stromal cells from human, long-term bone marrow cultures. The antigen recognized by the antibody (BMS-1) is a carbohydrate-containing prosthetic group that is common to and specific for multiple horse serum proteins. These proteins are avidly ingested by stromal cells and concentrated in endocytic vesicles. Cultured smooth muscle cells took up the horse proteins in a similar manner to marrow stromal cells while cultured marrow fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and hepatoma cells did not. These data indicate that marrow stromal cells specifically accumulate horse serum proteins which might partially explain the horse serum requirement for long-term marrow culture maintenance. The data also suggest further similarities between marrow stromal and smooth muscle cells and additional differences between marrow fibroblasts and marrow stromal cells.

  18. Effect of nitrous oxide on folate coenzyme distribution and de novo synthesis of thymidylate in human bone marrow cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.M. Ermens (Anton); M. Schoester (Martijn); J. Lindemans (Jan); J. Abels

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The effect of nitrous oxide on intracellular folate metabolism of the human bone marrow was studied in vitro. Bone marrow cells, obtained from healthy volunteers, were incubated with 5 × 10−8m-[3H]5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-formylTHF) for 18 hr to label intracellular

  19. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells | Nasef ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have elicited a great clinical interest, particularly in the areas of regenerative medicine and induction of tolerance in allogeneic transplantation. Previous reports demonstrated the feasibility of transplanting MSCs, which generates new prospects in cellular therapy. Recently, injection of ...

  20. Amelioration of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice with cells derived from human marrow stromal cells.

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    Min Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pluri-potent bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs provide an attractive opportunity to generate unlimited glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells for the treatment of diabetes. We explored the potential for human MSCs (hMSCs to be differentiated into glucose-responsive cells through a non-viral genetic reprogramming approach. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two HMSC lines were transfected with three genes: PDX-1, NeuroD1 and Ngn3 without subsequent selection, followed by differentiation induction in vitro and transplantation into diabetic mice. Human MSCs expressed mRNAs of the archetypal stem cell markers: Sox2, Oct4, Nanog and CD34, and the endocrine cell markers: PDX-1, NeuroD1, Ngn3, and Nkx6.1. Following gene transfection and differentiation induction, hMSCs expressed insulin in vitro, but were not glucose regulated. After transplantation, hMSCs differentiated further and approximately 12.5% of the grafted cells expressed insulin. The graft bearing kidneys contained mRNA of insulin and other key genes required for the functions of beta cells. Mice transplanted with manipulated hMSCs showed reduced blood glucose levels (from 18.9+/-0.75 to 7.63+/-1.63 mM. 13 of the 16 mice became normoglycaemic (6.9+/-0.64 mM, despite the failure to detect the expression of SUR1, a K(+-ATP channel component required for regulation of insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS: Our data confirm that hMSCs can be induced to express insulin sufficient to reduce blood glucose in a diabetic mouse model. Our triple gene approach has created cells that seem less glucose responsive in vitro but which become more efficient after transplantation. The maturation process requires further study, particularly the in vivo factors influencing the differentiation, in order to scale up for clinical purposes.

  1. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h......MSC population. Methods Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146+ and hMSC-CD146− cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high-content analysis...... and additionally for their ability to differentiate toward osteogenesis in vitro and form bone in vivo, and their migrational ability in vivo and in vitro was investigated. Results In vitro, the two cell populations exhibited similar growth rate and differentiation capacity to osteoblasts and adipocytes...

  2. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche

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    Zach S. Templeton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014 and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006 and IL-1β (P = .001 in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche.

  3. Expression of CD44 standard form and variant isoforms in human bone marrow stromal cells

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    Xiaofeng Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (hBMSCs can migrate from bone marrow to injured tissues, where they may differentiate into different types of new cells for replacement of dysfunctional cells. CD44 plays an important role in stem cell movement. The expression distribution of CD44 standard form (CD44S and CD44 variants (CD44V is closely related to cell movement and tissue migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expressions of CD44S and CD44V in hBMSCs. The hBMSCs from four human subjects were cultured in vitro. Phenotypic properties were analyzed by flow cytometry, and adipocyte and osteoblast differentiations were evaluated at passage 4. The expressions of CD44S and CD44V were examined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR. Results showed that hBMSCs were successfully cultured, with positive expressions of markers of mesenchymal cells (CD90, CD73, CD105, and negative expressions of markers of hematopoietic cells (CD34, CD45. The cultured hBMSCs can be induced to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. Q-PCR results showed that the expression of CD44S was significantly higher than the expressions of different CD44V isoforms in different samples. These results revealed significant differences in the distributions of CD44S and CD44V gene expressions, demonstrating a dominant CD44S expression in hBMCSs.

  4. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally James

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis of functional markers for BMSC subsets. All clones expressed typical BMSC cell-surface antigens; however, clones with trilineage differentiation capacity exhibited enhanced vascular interaction gene sets, whereas non-differentiating clones were uniquely CD317 positive with significantly enriched immunomodulatory transcriptional networks and high IL-7 production. IL-7 lineage tracing and CD317 immunolocalization confirmed the existence of a rare non-differentiating BMSC subtype, distinct from Cxcl12-DsRed+ perivascular stromal cells in vivo. Colony-forming CD317+ IL-7hi cells, identified at ∼1%–3% frequency in heterogeneous human BMSC fractions, were found to have the same biomolecular profile as non-differentiating BMSC clones using Raman spectroscopy. Distinct functional identities can be assigned to BMSC subpopulations, which are likely to have specific roles in immune control, lymphopoiesis, and bone homeostasis.

  5. [Putrescine Promotes Human Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Differentiate along Osteogenic Pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing-Li; Bi, Xiao-Yun; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Fang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Zi-Kuan

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effects of putrescine on the growth and differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to develop a new inductive medium mixture for their osteogenic differentiation. Human bone marrow MSC were collected from three healthy donors and were used to observe the growth-promoting activity of putrescine with MTT test. Experiments were divided into 3 groups: (1) putrescine group, (2) positive control group (presence of dexamethasone, ascorbate, and glycerol phosphate) and negative group (d-alpha with 5% FCS). The cellular expression level of Runx-2 was detected by PCR assay after the culture was maintained for 1 week. After 2 weeks, the intracellular activity of alkaline phosphatase was revealed by histochemistry staining, the phosphatase activity, and the protein concentration in the cell lysates were also detected. Furthermore, MSC were cultured in the presence of putrescine for 2 weeks and Oil-red O staining was performed to reveal the differentiated adipocytes; the cells induced by the standard agent cocktail were used as the positive control. Putrescine promoted the proliferation of human marrow MSC in a dose-dependent manner. MSC exposed to putrescine at a concentration of 100 µmol/L for 1 week expressed greatly higher level of Runx-2, compared with the negative control. Alkaline phosphatase activity was evidently observed after MSC were maintained in the presence of putrescine for 2 weeks. The phosphatase activity contrasted to the protein content in putrescine-treated MSC was significantly higher than that of the control cells (0.87±0.012 vs 0.52±0.010) (Pputrescine did not differentiate into adipoblasts. Putrescine can promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSC, suggesting the potential application of putrescine as a novel inductive agent for in vitro osteogenesis of MSC.

  6. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

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    Evangelia Papadimou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy.

  7. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

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    J.C. Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF. After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC, MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC, MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001; however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008 and microvessel density (P<0.001. Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  8. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing human basic fibroblast growth factor increase vasculogenesis in ischemic rats

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    Zhang, J.C. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China); Zheng, G.F. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The People' s Hospital of Ganzhou, Ganzhou (China); Wu, L.; Ou Yang, L.Y.; Li, W.X. [Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-08-08

    Administration or expression of growth factors, as well as implantation of autologous bone marrow cells, promote in vivo angiogenesis. This study investigated the angiogenic potential of combining both approaches through the allogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) expressing human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF). After establishing a hind limb ischemia model in Sprague Dawley rats, the animals were randomly divided into four treatment groups: MSCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-MSC), MSCs expressing hbFGF (hbFGF-MSC), MSC controls, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) controls. After 2 weeks, MSC survival and differentiation, hbFGF and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and microvessel density of ischemic muscles were determined. Stable hbFGF expression was observed in the hbFGF-MSC group after 2 weeks. More hbFGF-MSCs than GFP-MSCs survived and differentiated into vascular endothelial cells (P<0.001); however, their differentiation rates were similar. Moreover, allogenic transplantation of hbFGF-MSCs increased VEGF expression (P=0.008) and microvessel density (P<0.001). Transplantation of hbFGF-expressing MSCs promoted angiogenesis in an in vivo hind limb ischemia model by increasing the survival of transplanted cells that subsequently differentiated into vascular endothelial cells. This study showed the therapeutic potential of combining cell-based therapy with gene therapy to treat ischemic disease.

  9. ICAM-3 activation modulates cell-cell contacts of human bone marrow endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buul, J. D.; Mul, F. P. J.; van der Schoot, C. E.; Hordijk, P. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Ig-like cell adhesion molecule ICAM-3 is mainly expressed on human leukocytes and is involved in cell-cell interactions. Its expression on endothelium is observed during disorders such as Crohn's disease and in solid tumors. We found low but detectable expression of ICAM-3 on VE-cadherin-

  10. SERPINB2 is a novel TGFβ-responsive lineage fate determinant of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    TGF-β1, a multifunctional regulator of cell growth and differentiation, is the most abundant bone matrix growth factor. During differentiation of human bone stromal cells (hBMSCs), which constitute bone marrow osteoblast (OS) and adipocyte (AD) progenitor cells, continuous TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) treat...

  11. Sustained human hematopoiesis in sheep transplanted in utero during early gestation with fractionated adult human bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, E F; Zanjani, E D; Brandt, J E; Leemhuis, T; Briddell, R A; Heerema, N A; Hoffman, R

    1992-03-15

    Sheep were transplanted in utero during early gestation with subpopulations of adult human bone marrow (BM) cells enriched for human progenitor and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Chimerism was documented in three of seven transplanted fetuses using monoclonal antibodies against human-specific hematopoietic cell lineages and/or cytogenetic analysis of BM and peripheral blood cells of recipients. Only chimeric sheep BM cells expressing CD45 (6.0% of total BM cells) formed human hematopoietic colonies in response to human recombinant cytokines as determined by cytogenetic analysis. Sorted CD45+ BM cells developed human T-cell colonies containing CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells. DNA from chimeric BM cells obtained 3 months after birth displayed a finger printing pattern identical to that of DNA from the human donor of the HSC graft. These studies indicate that first trimester sheep fetuses are tolerant of adult human HSC grafts, thus permitting the creation of xenogeneic chimera expressing human myeloid and lymphoid lineages. The present findings also suggest that HSC grafts from immunologically competent, HLA-mismatched adult donors may be useful for correcting human genetic diseases in utero during early gestation.

  12. Selection of apoptotic cell specific human antibodies from adult bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Grönwall

    Full Text Available Autoreactive antibodies that recognize neo-determinants on apoptotic cells in mice have been proposed to have protective, homeostatic and immunoregulatory properties, although our knowledge about the equivalent antibodies in humans has been much more limited. In the current study, human monoclonal antibodies with binding specificity for apoptotic cells were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy adults using phage display technology. These antibodies were shown to recognize phosphorylcholine (PC-associated neo-determinants. Interestingly, three of the four identified apoptotic cell-specific antibody clones were encoded by VH3 region rearrangements with germline or nearly germline configuration without evidence of somatic hypermutation. Importantly, the different identified antibody clones had diverse heavy chain CDR3 and deduced binding surfaces as suggested by structure modeling. This may suggest a potentially great heterogeneity in human antibodies recognizing PC-related epitopes on apoptotic cells. To re-construct the postulated structural format of the parental anti-PC antibody, the dominant clone was also expressed as a recombinant human polymeric IgM, which revealed a substantially increased binding reactivity, with dose-dependent and antigen-inhibitable binding of apoptotic cells. Our findings may have implication for improved prognostic testing and therapeutic interventions in human inflammatory disease.

  13. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  14. GRAFTING OF HUMAN BONE MARROW STROMAL CELLS INTO SPINAL CORD INJURY: A COMPARISON OF DELIVERY METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Courtney; Samdani, Amer F.; Betz, Randal R.; Fischer, Itzhak; Neuhuber, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Three groups of 6 rats received subtotal cervical spinal cord hemisections followed with marrow stromal cell (MSC) transplants by lumbar puncture (LP), intravenous delivery (IV) or direct injection into the injury (control). Animals survived for 4 or 21 days. Objective Cell therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). The mode of cell delivery is crucial for the translation to the clinic. Injections directly into the parenchyma may further damage already compromised tissue; therefore, less invasive methods like LP or IV delivery are preferable. Summary of Background Data Human bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent mesenchymal adult stem cells that have a potential for autologous transplantation, obviating the need for immune suppression. While previous studies have established that MSC can be delivered to the injured spinal cord by both LP and IV, the efficacy of cell delivery has not been directly compared with respect to efficacy of delivery and effects on the host. Methods Purified MSC from a human donor were transplanted into the CSF at the lumbar region (LP), into the femoral vein (IV), or directly into the injury (control). After sacrifice, spinal cord sections were analyzed for MSC graft size, tissue sparing, host immune response, and glial scar formation, using specific antibodies as well as Nissl-myelin staining. Results LP delivery of MSC to the injured spinal cord is superior to IV delivery. Cell engraftment and tissue sparing were significantly better after LP delivery and host immune response after LP delivery was reduced compared to IV delivery. Conclusions LP is an ideal minimally-invasive technique to deliver cellular transplants to the injured spinal cord. It is superior to IV delivery and, together with the potential for autologous transplantation, lends itself for clinical application. PMID:19182705

  15. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Li; Postert, Benno; Parsons, Stuart; Ditzel, Nicholas; Khosla, Sundeep; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Abdallah, Basem M; Hesselson, Daniel; Solberg, Rigmor; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-02-14

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Primary cilia are present on human blood and bone marrow cells and mediate Hedgehog signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohan; Chaudhry, Parvesh; Merchant, Akil A

    2016-12-01

    Primary cilia are nonmotile, microtubule-based organelles that are present on the cellular membrane of all eukaryotic cells. Functional cilia are required for the response to developmental signaling pathways such as Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt/β-catenin. Although the Hh pathway has been shown to be active in leukemia and other blood cancers, there have been no reports describing the presence of primary cilia in human blood or leukemia cells. In the present study, we show that nearly all human blood and bone marrow cells have primary cilia (97-99%). In contrast, primary cilia on AML cell lines (KG1, KG1a, and K562) were less frequent (10-36% of cells) and were often shorter and dysmorphic, with less well-defined basal bodies. Finally, we show that treatment of blood cells with the Hh pathway ligand Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) causes translocation of Smoothened (SMO) to the primary cilia and activation of Hh target genes, demonstrating that primary cilia in blood cells are functional and participate in Hh signaling. Loss of primary cilia on leukemia cells may have important implications for aberrant pathway activation and response to SMO inhibitors currently in clinical development. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Culture and differentiation of osteoblasts on coral scaffold from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Cong Toai; Gargiulo, Ciro; Thao, Huynh Duy; Tuan, Huynh Minh; Filgueira, Luis; Michael Strong, D

    2011-11-01

    In this paper we describe an approach that aims to provide fundamental information towards a scientific, biomechanical basis for the use of natural coral scaffolds to initiate mesenchymal stem cells into osteogenic differentiation for transplant purposes. Biomaterial, such as corals, is an osteoconductive material that can be used to home human derived stem cells for clinical regenerative purposes. In bone transplantation, the use of biomaterials may be a solution to bypass two main critical obstacles, the shortage of donor sites for autografts and the risk of rejection with allograft procedures. Bone regeneration is often needed for multiple clinical purposes for instance, in aesthetic reconstruction and regenerative procedures. Coral graft Porites lutea has been used by our team for a decade in clinical applications on over a thousand patients with different bone pathologies including spinal stenosis and mandibular reconstruction. It is well accepted that human bone marrow (hBM) is an exceptional source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which may differentiate into different cell phenotypes such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, myocytes, cardiomyocytes and neurons. Isolated MSCs from human bone marrow were induced into osteoblasts using an osteogenic medium enriched with two specific growth factors, FGF9 and vitamin D2. Part of the cultured MSCs were directly transferred and seeded onto coral scaffolds (Porites Lutea) and induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and part were cultured in flasks for osteocell culture. The data support the concept that hBM is a reliable source of MSCs which may be easily differentiated into osteoblasts and seeded into coral as an optimal device for clinical application. Within this project we have also discussed the biological nature of MSCs, their potential application for clinical transplantation and the prospect of their use in gene therapy.

  18. Aged human bone marrow stromal cells maintaining bone forming capacity in vivo evaluated using an improved method of visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Justesen, J

    2004-01-01

    weeks, the implants were removed and embedded un-decalcified in methyl methacrylate (MMA). Sections were stained histochemically with Goldner's Trichrome stain and immuno-histochemically using human-specific antibodies against known osteogenic markers. Implanted human marrow stromal cells (hMSC) were...

  19. Interferon γ induced compositional changes in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qingdong; Ezzati, Peyman; Spicer, Victor; Krokhin, Oleg; Wall, Donna; Wilkins, John A

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) display a range of immunoregulatory properties which can be enhanced by the exposure to cytokines such interferon γ (IFN-γ). However the compositional changes associated with the 'licensing' of these cells have not been clearly defined. The present study was undertaken to provide a detailed comparative proteomic analysis of the compositional changes that occur in human bone marrow derived MSC following 20 h treatment with IFN-γ. 2D LC MSMS analysis of control and IFN-γ treated cells from 5 different healthy donors provided confident identification of more than 8400 proteins. In total 210 proteins were shown to be significantly altered in their expression levels (≥|2SD|) following IFN-γ treatment. The changes for several of these proteins were confirmed by flow cytometry. STRING analysis determined that approximately 30% of the altered proteins physically interacted in described interferon mediated processes. Comparison of the list of proteins that were identified as changed in the proteomic analysis with data for the same proteins in the Interferome DB indicated that ~35% of these proteins have not been reported to be IFN-γ responsive in a range of cell types. This data provides an in depth analysis of the proteome of basal and IFN-γ treated human mesenchymal stem cells and it identifies a number of novel proteins that may contribute to the immunoregulatory capacity if IFN-γ licensed cells.

  20. From Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Insulin-Producing Cells: Comparison between Bone Marrow- and Adipose Tissue-Derived Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud M. Gabr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs, for their differentiation potentials to form insulin-producing cells. BM-MSCs were obtained during elective orthotopic surgery and AT-MSCs from fatty aspirates during elective cosmetics procedures. Following their expansion, cells were characterized by phenotyping, trilineage differentiation ability, and basal gene expression of pluripotency genes and for their metabolic characteristics. Cells were differentiated according to a Trichostatin-A based protocol. The differentiated cells were evaluated by immunocytochemistry staining for insulin and c-peptide. In addition the expression of relevant pancreatic endocrine genes was determined. The release of insulin and c-peptide in response to a glucose challenge was also quantitated. There were some differences in basal gene expression and metabolic characteristics. After differentiation the proportion of the resulting insulin-producing cells (IPCs, was comparable among both cell sources. Again, there were no differences neither in the levels of gene expression nor in the amounts of insulin and c-peptide release as a function of glucose challenge. The properties, availability, and abundance of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine. Conclusion. BM-MSCs and AT-MSCs are comparable regarding their differential potential to form IPCs. The availability and properties of AT-MSCs render them well-suited for applications in regenerative medicine.

  1. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Teel, George; O'Brien, Christopher M; Zhuang, Taisen; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium's osseointegration involves inducing bio-mimetic nanotopography to enhance cell-implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications.

  2. Effect of nitrous oxide on folate coenzyme distribution and de novo synthesis of thymidylate in human bone marrow cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ermens, Anton; Schoester, Martijn; Lindemans, Jan; Abels, J.

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The effect of nitrous oxide on intracellular folate metabolism of the human bone marrow was studied in vitro. Bone marrow cells, obtained from healthy volunteers, were incubated with 5 × 10−8m-[3H]5-formyltetrahydrofolate (5-formylTHF) for 18 hr to label intracellular folate pools. Subsequently the cells were exposed to nitrous oxide for up to 10 hr, and the intracellular folate coenzyme levels were quantitated by HPLC. The dU suppression test was carried out on part ...

  3. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Wen-Hui [Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yang, Wu-Lin, E-mail: wulinyoung@163.com [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Laboratory of Metabolic Medicine, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR (Singapore)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  4. Human bone marrow-derived cells: an attractive source to populate dermal substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioretti, Florence; Lebreton-DeCoster, Corinne; Gueniche, Farida; Yousfi, Myriam; Humbert, Philippe; Godeau, Gaston; Senni, Karim; Desmoulière, Alexis; Coulomb, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown the importance of dermal fibroblasts within skin substitutes for promoting the emergence of a functional neodermis after grafting in humans. However, the use of fibroblasts from sources other than the dermis needs to be evaluated for patients with extensive skin loss. Here we examined the capacity of human bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs), selected for their ability to adhere to plastic culture dishes, to behave like human dermal fibroblasts when incorporated within a 3D in vitro reconstructed tissue that promotes dermal fibroblast differentiation. Like dermal fibroblasts, BMDCs contracted a collagen matrix and were growth regulated by the matrix environment. They had the same shape and their nuclei had the same form factor as dermal fibroblasts. In addition, both cell types expressed desmin and vimentin but not alpha-smooth muscle actin. BMDCs deposited collagen types I and III, and fibrillin-1 with similar efficiency to dermal fibroblasts. In addition, BMDCs have the potential to regulate this deposition, as they produced metalloproteinases (MMP1, MMP2, and MMP9) and metalloproteinase inhibitors (TIMP1) very similarly to dermal fibroblasts. BMDCs can thus be induced to express functions resembling those of dermal fibroblasts, including those involved in the wound healing process.

  5. Changes in human bone marrow fat content associated with changes in hematopoietic stem cell numbers and cytokine levels with aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuljapurkar, Sonal R; McGuire, Timothy R; Brusnahan, Susan K; Jackson, John D; Garvin, Kevin L; Kessinger, Margaret A; Lane, Judy T; O' Kane, Barbara J; Sharp, John G

    2011-01-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging, including anemias, reduced responses to hematopoietic stress and myelodysplasias. This investigation tested the hypothesis that increased bone marrow (BM) fat content in humans with age was associated with decreased numbers of side population (SP) hematopoietic stem cells, and this decrease correlated with changes in cytokine levels. BM was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur removed at surgery for total hip replacement (N = 100 subjects). In addition, BM from cadavers (N = 36), with no evidence of hip disease, was evaluated for fat content. Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle, and cellularity and lipid content determined. Marrow cells were stained with Hoechst dye and SP profiles were acquired. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1 and interleukin (IL)-6 were measured using ELISA. Fat content in the BM of human subjects and cadavers increased with age. The numbers of SP stem cells in BM as well as plasma IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels decreased in correlation with increased BM fat. IL-6 had no relationship to changes in marrow fat. These data suggest that increased BM fat may be associated with a decreased number of SP stem cells and IGF-1 and SDF-1 levels with aging. These data further raise a more general question as to the role of adipose cells in the regulation of tissue stem cells. PMID:21923862

  6. Bone marrow derived cells in adult skeletal muscle tissue in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Str?mberg, Anna; Jansson, Monika; Fischer, Helene; Rullman, Eric; H?gglund, Hans; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background During the past decade, several animal studies have demonstrated that in addition to local cells, cells from the bone marrow (BM) possess the ability to contribute to regeneration of injured skeletal muscle tissue. In addition, in mice, regular physical activity has been displayed to be a sufficient stimulus for BM-derived cell contribution to the muscle, indicating that this is part of the ongoing physiological remodeling of skeletal muscle. However, whether BM-derived cells parti...

  7. Immunophenotypic Characterization of Human Bone Marrow Mast Cells. A Flow Cytometric Study of Normal and Pathological Bone Marrow Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Escribano

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present paper was to define the immunophenotype of bone marrow mast cells (BMMC from healthy controls and patients with hematologic malignancies (HM based on the use of multiple stainings with monoclonal antibodies analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results show that BMMC from both groups of individuals display a similar but heterogenous immunophenotype. The overall numbers of BMMC are higher in the HM group of individuals (p = 0.08. Three patterns of antigen expression were detected: (1 markers constantly positive in all cases analyzed (CD9, CD29, CD33, CD43, CD44, CD49d, CD49e, CD51, CD71, CD117, and FcεRI, (2 antigens that were constantly negative (CD1a, CD2, CD3, CD5, CD6, CD11a, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD20, CD21, CD23, CD25, CD30, CD34, CD38, CD41a, CD42b, CD65, CD66b, HLA-DR, and CD138, and (3 markers that were positive in a variable proportion of cases – CD11b (50%, CD11c (77%, CD13 (40%, CD18 (20%, CD22 (68%, CD35 (27%, CD40 (67%, CD54 (88% and CD61 (40%. In addition, BMMC from all cases explored were CD45+, and this antigen was expressed at an intensity similar to that of mature granulocytes.

  8. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Fernandes Vianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells. Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics.

  9. Rotating three-dimensional dynamic culture of adult human bone marrow-derived cells for tissue engineering of hyaline cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shinsuke; Mishima, Hajime; Ishii, Tomoo; Akaogi, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Tomokazu; Ohyabu, Yoshimi; Chang, Fei; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2009-04-01

    The method of constructing cartilage tissue from bone marrow-derived cells in vitro is considered a valuable technique for hyaline cartilage regenerative medicine. Using a rotating wall vessel (RWV) bioreactor developed in a NASA space experiment, we attempted to efficiently construct hyaline cartilage tissue from human bone marrow-derived cells without using a scaffold. Bone marrow aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of nine patients during orthopedic operation. After their proliferation in monolayer culture, the adherent cells were cultured in the RWV bioreactor with chondrogenic medium for 2 weeks. Cells from the same source were cultured in pellet culture as controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluations (collagen type I and II) and quantification of glycosaminoglycan were performed on formed tissues and compared. The engineered constructs obtained using the RWV bioreactor showed strong features of hyaline cartilage in terms of their morphology as determined by histological and immunohistological evaluations. The glycosaminoglycan contents per microg DNA of the tissues were 10.01 +/- 3.49 microg/microg DNA in the case of the RWV bioreactor and 6.27 +/- 3.41 microg/microg DNA in the case of the pellet culture, and their difference was significant. The RWV bioreactor could provide an excellent environment for three-dimensional cartilage tissue architecture that can promote the chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived cells.

  10. Growth Factor Content in Human Sera Affects the Isolation of Mesangiogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs from Human Bone Marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Montali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesangiogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs are human bone marrow-derived multipotent cells, isolated in vitro under selective culture conditions and shown to retain both mesengenic and angiogenic potential. MPCs also co-isolated with multipotent stromal cells (MSCs when bone marrow primary cultures were set up for clinical applications, using human serum (HS in place of fetal bovine serum (FBS. MPC culture purity (over 95% is strictly dependent on HS supplementation with significant batch-to-batch variability. In the present paper we screened different sources of commercially available pooled human AB type serum (PhABS for their ability to promote MPC production under selective culture conditions. As the majority of contaminating cells in MPC cultures were represented by MSC-like cells, we hypothesized a role by differentiating agents present in the sera. Therefore, we tested a number of growth factors (hGF and found that higher concentrations of FGF-2, EGF, PDGF-AB, and VEGF-A as well as lower concentration of IGF-1 give sub-optimal MPC recovery. Gene expression analysis of hGF receptors was also carried out both in MSCs and MPCs, suggesting that FGF-2, EGF and PDGF-AB could act promoting MSC proliferation, while VEGF-A contribute to MSC-like cell contamination, triggering MPC differentiation. Here we demonstrated that managing hGF contents, together with applying specific receptors inhibitors (Erlotinib-HCl and Nintedanib, could significantly mitigate the batch-to-batch variability related to serum supplementation. These data represent a fundamental milestone in view of manufacturing MPC-based medicinal products.

  11. RGD and BMP-2 mimetic peptide crosstalk enhances osteogenic commitment of human bone marrow stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilem, I; Chevallier, P; Plawinski, L; Sone, E D; Durrieu, M C; Laroche, G

    2016-05-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) commitment and differentiation are dictated by bioactive molecules sequestered within their Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM). One common approach to mimic the physiological environment is to functionalize biomaterial surfaces with ECM-derived peptides able to recruit stem cells and trigger their linage-specific differentiation. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of RGD and BMP-2 ligands crosstalk and density on the extent of hBMSCs osteogenic commitment, without recourse to differentiation medium. RGD peptide promotes cell adhesion via cell transmembrane integrin receptors, while BMP-2 peptide, corresponding to residues 73-92 of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2, was shown to induce hBMSCs osteoblast differentiation. The immobilization of peptides on aminated glass was ascertained by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), the density of grafted peptides was quantified by fluorescence microscopy and the surface roughness was evaluated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The osteogenic commitment of hBMSCs cultured on RGD and/or BMP-2 surfaces was characterized by immunohistochemistry using STRO-1 as specific stem cells marker and Runx-2 as an earlier osteogenic marker. Biological results showed that the osteogenic commitment of hBMSCs was enhanced on bifunctionalized surfaces as compared to surfaces containing BMP-2, while on RGD surfaces cells mainly preserved their stemness character. These results demonstrated that RGD and BMP-2 mimetic peptides act synergistically to enhance hBMSCs osteogenesis without supplementing the media with osteogenic factors. These findings contribute to the development of biomimetic materials, allowing a deeper understanding of signaling pathways that govern the transition of stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage. For a long time, scientists thought that the differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) into bone cells was dictated by growth factors. This

  12. Human CD34+ HLA-DR- bone marrow cells contain progenitor cells capable of self-renewal, multilineage differentiation, and long-term in vitro hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, E F; Brandt, J E; Briddell, R A; Leemhuis, T; van Besien, K; Hoffman, R

    1991-01-01

    Human bone marrow cells expressing CD34 but not HLA-DR were isolated by immunofluorescence flow cytometric cell sorting. These cells contained a hematopoietic cell (CFU-B1) capable of producing, in an in vitro semisolid culture system, blast-cell-containing colonies, which possessed the capacity for self-renewal and commitment to multipotential differentiation. In addition, CD34+ HLA-DR- marrow cells contained primitive megakaryocyte progenitor cells, the burst-forming unit-megakaryocyte (BFU-MK). A subset of CD34+ HLA-DR- marrow cells lacking the expression of CD15 and CD71 was obtained by flow cytometric cell sorting and was capable of sustaining in vitro hematopoiesis in suspension culture for up to 8 weeks in the absence of a preestablished adherent marrow cell layer. The combination of IL-3 + IL-1 alpha and IL-3 + IL-6 sustained proliferation of these cells for 8 weeks, induced maximal cellular expansion, and increased the numbers of assayable progenitor cells. These studies demonstrate that human CD34+ HLA-DR- marrow cells and their subsets contain primitive multipotential hematopoietic cells capable of self-renewal and of differentiation into multiple hematopoietic lineages.

  13. Human Cord Blood and Bone Marrow CD34+ Cells Generate Macrophages That Support Erythroid Islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyayu Belay

    Full Text Available Recently, we developed a small molecule responsive hyperactive Mpl-based Cell Growth Switch (CGS that drives erythropoiesis associated with macrophages in the absence of exogenous cytokines. Here, we compare the physical, cellular and molecular interaction between the macrophages and erythroid cells in CGS expanded CD34+ cells harvested from cord blood, marrow or G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood. Results indicated that macrophage based erythroid islands could be generated from cord blood and marrow CD34+ cells but not from G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ cells. Additional studies suggest that the deficiency resides with the G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ derived monocytes. Gene expression and proteomics studies of the in vitro generated erythroid islands detected the expression of erythroblast macrophage protein (EMP, intercellular adhesion molecule 4 (ICAM-4, CD163 and DNASE2. 78% of the erythroblasts in contact with macrophages reached the pre reticulocyte orthochromatic stage of differentiation within 14 days of culture. The addition of conditioned medium from cultures of CD146+ marrow fibroblasts resulted in a 700-fold increase in total cell number and a 90-fold increase in erythroid cell number. This novel CD34+ cell derived erythroid island may serve as a platform to explore the molecular basis of red cell maturation and production under normal, stress and pathological conditions.

  14. COMPARISON OF HUMAN ADIPOSE-DERIVED STEM CELLS AND BONE MARROW-DERIVED STEM CELLS IN A MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Holst-Hansen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Background: Treatment of myocardial infarction with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and recently also adipose-derived stem cells has shown promising results. In contrast to clinical trials and their use of autologous bone marrow-derived cells from the ischemic patient, the animal...... myocardial infarction models are often using young donors and young, often immune-compromised, recipient animals. Our objective was to compare bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells from an elderly ischemic patient in the treatment of myocardial infarction, using a fully...... grown non-immunecompromised rat model. Methods: Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissue and bone marrow and compared with respect to surface markers and proliferative capability. To compare the regenerative potential of the two stem cell populations, male Sprague-Dawley rats were...

  15. Circadian mechanisms in murine and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells following dexamethasone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiying; Yu, Gang; Parks, Helen; Hebert, Teddi; Goh, Brian C; Dietrich, Marilyn A; Pelled, Gadi; Izadpanah, Reza; Gazit, Dan; Bunnell, Bruce A; Gimble, Jeffrey M

    2008-05-01

    A core group of regulatory factors control circadian rhythms in mammalian cells. While the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the brain serves as the central core circadian oscillator, circadian clocks also exist within peripheral tissues and cells. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that >20% of expressed mRNAs in bone and adipose tissues oscillate in a circadian manner. The current manuscript reports evidence of the core circadian transcriptional apparatus within primary cultures of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Exposure of confluent, quiescent BMSCs to dexamethasone synchronized the oscillating expression of the mRNAs encoding the albumin D binding protein (dbp), brain-muscle arnt-like 1 (bmal1), period 3 (per3), rev-erb alpha (Rev A), and rev-erb beta (Rev B). The genes displayed a mean oscillatory period of 22.2 to 24.3 h. The acrophase or peak expression of mRNAs encoding "positive" (bmal1) and "negative" (per3) components of the circadian regulatory apparatus were out of phase with each other by approximately 8-12 h, consistent with in vivo observations. In vivo, phosphyrylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) is known to regulate the turnover of per3 and components of the core circadian regulatory apparatus. In vitro addition of lithium chloride, a GSK3beta inhibitor, significantly shifted the acrophase of all genes by 4.2-4.7 h oscillation in BMSCs; however, only the male murine BMSCs displayed a significant increase in the length of the period of oscillation. We conclude that human and murine BMSCs represent a valid in vitro model for the analysis of circadian mechanisms in bone metabolism and stem cell biology.

  16. The Effect of Culture on Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Focus on DNA Methylation Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Bentivegna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs are the best characterized multipotent adult stem cells. Their self-renewal capacity, multilineage differentiation potential, and immunomodulatory properties have indicated that they can be used in many clinical therapies. In a previous work we studied the DNA methylation levels of hBM-MSC genomic DNA in order to delineate a kind of methylation signature specific for early and late passages of culture. In the present work we focused on the modification of the methylation profiles of the X chromosome and imprinted loci, as sites expected to be more stable than whole genome. We propose a model where cultured hBM-MSCs undergo random modifications at the methylation level of most CGIs, nevertheless reflecting the original methylation status. We also pointed out global genome-wide demethylation connected to the long-term culture and senescence. Modification at CGIs promoters of specific genes could be related to the decrease in adipogenic differentiation potential. In conclusion, we showed important changes in CGIs methylation due to long-term in vitro culture that may affect the differentiation potential of hBM-MSCs. Therefore it is necessary to optimize the experimental conditions for in vitro expansion in order to minimize these epigenetic changes and to standardize safer procedures.

  17. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montzka Katrin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as

  18. Transplantation of neuronal-primed human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in hemiparkinsonian rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Melissa L M; Tao, Helen; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Ma, David D F

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have shown promise in in vitro neuronal differentiation and in cellular therapy for neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson' disease. However, the effects of intracerebral transplantation are not well defined, and studies do not agreed on the optimal neuronal differentiation method. Here, we investigated three growth factor-based neuronal differentiation procedures (using FGF-2/EGF/PDGF/SHH/FGF-8/GDNF), and found all to be capable of eliciting an immature neural phenotype, in terms of cell morphology and gene/protein expression. The neuronal-priming (FGF-2/EGF) method induced neurosphere-like formation and the highest NES and NR4A2 expression by hMSCs. Transplantation of undifferentiated and neuronal-primed hMSCs into the striatum and substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rats revealed transient graft survival of 7 days, despite the reported immunosuppressive properties of MSCs and cyclosporine-immunosuppression of rats. Neither differentiation of hMSCs nor induction of host neurogenesis was observed at injection sites, and hMSCs continued producing mesodermal fibronectin. Strategies for improving engraftment and differentiation post-transplantation, such as prior in vitro neuronal-priming, nigral and striatal grafting, and co-transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells that promote neural regeneration, were unable to provide advantages. Innate inflammatory responses (Iba-1-positive microglia/macrophage and GFAP-positive astrocyte activation and accumulation) were detected around grafts within 7 days. Our findings indicate that growth factor-based methods allow hMSC differentiation toward immature neuronal-like cells, and contrary to previous reports, only transient survival and engraftment of hMSCs occurs following transplantation in immunosuppressed hemiparkinsonian rats. In addition, suppression of host innate inflammatory responses may be a key factor for improving hMSC survival

  19. Cytokine-dependent long-term culture of highly enriched precursors of hematopoietic progenitor cells from human bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, J; Srour, E F; van Besien, K; Briddell, R A; Hoffman, R

    1990-09-01

    Human marrow cells positive for the CD34 antigen but not expressing HLA-DR, CD15, or CD71 antigens were isolated. In a liquid culture system supplemented with 48-hourly additions of recombinant interleukins IL-1 alpha, IL-3, IL-6, or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), these cells were capable of sustaining in vitro hematopoiesis for up to eight weeks. The establishment of an adherent cell layer was never observed. Cultures containing no exogenous cytokine produced clonogenic cells for only 1 wk. IL-1 alpha and IL-6 were alone able to support hematopoiesis for 2 or 3 wk. Cells maintained with GM-CSF proliferated and contained assayable colony-forming cells for 3 or 4 wk, while maximal cellular expansion and generation of assayable progenitor cells occurred in the presence of IL-3 for 4-5 wk. When IL-3 was combined with IL-1 alpha or IL-6, hematopoiesis was sustained for 8 wks. Basophil numbers were markedly increased in the presence of IL-3. These studies indicate that marrow subpopulations can sustain hematopoiesis in vitro in the presence of repeated additions of cytokines. We conclude that a major function of marrow adherent cells in long-term cultures is that of providing cytokines which promote the proliferation and differentiation of primitive hematopoietic cells.

  20. Chromosome copy number variation in telomerized human bone marrow stromal cells; insights for monitoring safe ex-vivo expansion of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S.; Harkness, Linda; Aldahmash, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) cultured for cell therapy require evaluation of potency and stability for safe use. Chromosomal aberrations upsetting genomic integrity in such cells have been contrastingly described as "Limited" or "Significant". Previously reported stepwise...

  1. Chromosome copy number variation in telomerized human bone marrow stromal cells; insights for monitoring safe ex-vivo expansion of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S.; Harkness, Linda; Aldahmash, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) cultured for cell therapy require evaluation of potency and stability for safe use. Chromosomal aberrations upsetting genomic integrity in such cells have been contrastingly described as "Limited" or "Significant". Previously reported stepwise acquisi...

  2. Adhesive and mechanical regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in human bone marrow and periosteum-derived progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, Jeroen; Lin, Grace L; Chen, Christopher S

    2012-11-15

    It has previously been demonstrated that cell shape can influence commitment of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMCs) to adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and other lineages. Human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs) exhibit multipotency similar to hBMCs, but hPDCs may offer enhanced potential for osteogenesis and chondrogenesis given their apparent endogenous role in bone and cartilage repair in vivo. Here, we examined whether hPDC differentiation is regulated by adhesive and mechanical cues comparable to that reported for hBMC differentiation. When cultured in the appropriate induction media, hPDCs at high cell seeding density demonstrated enhanced levels of adipogenic or chondrogenic markers as compared with hPDCs at low cell seeding density. Cell seeding density correlated inversely with projected area of cell spreading, and directly limiting cell spreading with micropatterned substrates promoted adipogenesis or chondrogenesis while substrates promoting cell spreading supported osteogenesis. Interestingly, cell seeding density influenced differentiation through both changes in cell shape and non-shape-mediated effects: density-dependent adipogenesis and chondrogenesis were regulated primarily by cell shape whereas non-shape effects strongly influenced osteogenic potential. Inhibition of cytoskeletal contractility by adding the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 further enhanced adipogenic differentiation and discouraged osteogenic differentiation of hPDCs. Together, our results suggest that multipotent lineage decisions of hPDCs are impacted by cell adhesive and mechanical cues, though to different extents than hBMCs. Thus, future studies of hPDCs and other primary stem cell populations with clinical potential should consider varying biophysical metrics for more thorough optimization of stem cell differentiation.

  3. Adhesive and mechanical regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in human bone marrow and periosteum-derived progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Eyckmans

    2012-08-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that cell shape can influence commitment of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMCs to adipogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and other lineages. Human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs exhibit multipotency similar to hBMCs, but hPDCs may offer enhanced potential for osteogenesis and chondrogenesis given their apparent endogenous role in bone and cartilage repair in vivo. Here, we examined whether hPDC differentiation is regulated by adhesive and mechanical cues comparable to that reported for hBMC differentiation. When cultured in the appropriate induction media, hPDCs at high cell seeding density demonstrated enhanced levels of adipogenic or chondrogenic markers as compared with hPDCs at low cell seeding density. Cell seeding density correlated inversely with projected area of cell spreading, and directly limiting cell spreading with micropatterned substrates promoted adipogenesis or chondrogenesis while substrates promoting cell spreading supported osteogenesis. Interestingly, cell seeding density influenced differentiation through both changes in cell shape and non-shape-mediated effects: density-dependent adipogenesis and chondrogenesis were regulated primarily by cell shape whereas non-shape effects strongly influenced osteogenic potential. Inhibition of cytoskeletal contractility by adding the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632 further enhanced adipogenic differentiation and discouraged osteogenic differentiation of hPDCs. Together, our results suggest that multipotent lineage decisions of hPDCs are impacted by cell adhesive and mechanical cues, though to different extents than hBMCs. Thus, future studies of hPDCs and other primary stem cell populations with clinical potential should consider varying biophysical metrics for more thorough optimization of stem cell differentiation.

  4. Hydrocortisone regulates types I and III collagen gene expression and collagen synthesis in human marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M; Minguell, J J

    1997-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is the resultant of the orderly molecular and cellular interactions between progenitor cells and stroma. In vitro studies (Dexter-type cultures) have shown that initiation of hematopoiesis only occurs after establishment of a hydrocortisone-dependent layer of stromal cells. Although the molecular basis for the requirement of hydrocortisone are not well understood, data have shown that synthesis/assembly of extracellular matrix molecules (proteoglycans and fibronectin) is regulated by hydrocortisone. Since interstitial collagens are abundantly expressed in the marrow stroma, we investigated whether hydrocortisone may also modulate the expression of collagen types I and III. For these studies, human bone marrow fibroblast cultures were grown in standard culture medium either in the absence or presence of 10(-7) M hydrocortisone. Under both conditions, bone marrow fibroblasts synthesized collagen types I and III, and expressed the respective genes. However, hydrocortisone produced a decrease in the synthesis of interstitial collagens and also in the relative abundance of pro-alpha 1(I) and pro-alpha 1(III) mRNAs. The results of this study are consistent with the assumption that glucocorticoids regulate the expression of several extracellular matrix molecules in the marrow stroma and thus permit in vitro hematopoiesis to occur.

  5. Telomerase expression extends the proliferative life-span and maintains the osteogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Janne Lytoft; Rosada, Cecilia; Serakinci, Nedime

    2002-01-01

    . The transduced cells have now undergone more than 260 population doublings (PD) and continue to proliferate, whereas control cells underwent senescence-associated proliferation arrest after 26 PD. The cells maintained production of osteoblastic markers and differentiation potential during continuous subculturing......, did not form tumors, and had a normal karyotype. When implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice, the transduced cells formed more bone than did normal cells. These results suggest that ectopic expression of telomerase in hMSCs prevents senescence-associated impairment of osteoblast functions.......Human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were stably transduced by a retroviral vector containing the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT). Transduced cells (hMSC-TERTs) had telomerase activity, and the mean telomere length was increased as compared with that of control cells...

  6. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell reactions to 316L stainless steel : An in vitro study on cell viability and interleukin-6 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anwar, I.B.; Santoso, A.; Saputra, E.; Ismail, R.; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell (hBMC) reactions to 316L stainless steel (316L-SS) have never been evaluated. The objective of this study was to assess cell viability and interleukin-6 expression of hBMC cultures upon treatment with a 316L-SS implant. Methods: A cytotoxicity

  7. Platelet lysate favours in vitro expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for bone and cartilage engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, S H; Ottonello, A; Strada, P; Cancedda, R; Mastrogiacomo, M

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneous population of non-haematopoietic cells residing in the bone marrow (bone marrow stromal cells, BMSCs) and the different fractions and components obtained from platelet-rich plasma provide an invaluable source of autologous cells and growth factors for bone and other connective tissue reconstruction. In this study, we investigated the effect of an allogenic platelet lysate on human BMSCs proliferation and differentiation. Cell proliferation and number of performed cell doublings were enhanced in cultures supplemented with the platelet-derived growth factors (platelet lysate, PL), either with or without the concomitant addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS), compared to cultures performed in the presence of FBS and FGF2. Both in vitro and in vivo osteogenic differentiation were unaltered in cells maintained in medium supplemented with PL and not FBS (Only PL) and in cells maintained in medium containing FBS and FGF2. Interestingly, the in vitro cartilage formation was more effective in the pellet of BMSCs expanded in the Only PL medium. In particular, a chondrogenic differentiation was observed in pellets of some in vitro-expanded BMSCs in the Only PL medium, whereas pellets from parallel cell cultures in medium containing FBS did not respond to the chondrogenic induction. We conclude that the platelet lysate from human source is an effective and even more beneficial substitute for fetal bovine serum to support the in vitro expansion of human BMSCs for subsequent tissue-engineering applications. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells grown in terpolyesters of 3-hydroxyalkanoates scaffolds into nerve cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Shen, Chong-Yang; You, Ming-Liang; Xiao, Jian-Feng; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2010-03-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates, abbreviated as PHA, have been studied for medical applications due to their suitable mechanical properties, blood and tissue tolerance and in vivo biodegradability. As a new member of PHA family, terpolyester of 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-hydroxyvalerate and 3-hydroxyhexanoate, abbreviated as PHBVHHx, was compared with polylactic acid (PLA), copolyester of 3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxyhexanoate (PHBHHx) for their respective functions leading to differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMSC) into nerve cells. Results indicated that 3D scaffolds promoted the differentiation of hBMSC into nerve cells more intensively compared with 2D films. Smaller pore sizes of scaffolds increased differentiation of hBMSC into nerve cells, whereas decreased cell proliferation. PHBVHHx scaffolds with pore sizes of 30-60 microm could be used in nerve tissue engineering for treatment of nerve injury. The above results were supported by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and confocal microscopy observation on attachment and growth of hBMSCs on PLA, PHBHHx and PHBVHHx, and by CCK-8 evaluation of cell proliferation. In addition, expressions of nerve markers nestin, GFAP and beta-III tubulin of nerve cells differentiated from hBMSC grown in PHBVHHx scaffolds were confirmed by real-time PCR. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of human milk on blood and bone marrow cells in a malnourished mice model; comparative study with cow milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Isabel; Salva, Susana; Zelaya, Hortensia; Villena, Julio; Agüero, Graciela

    2013-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that the alterations caused by nutrient deficiency can be reverted by adequate nutritional repletion. To perform comparative studies between human and cow milks in order to evaluate the impact of both milks on the recovery of blood and bone marrow cells affected in malnourished mice. Weaned mice were malnourished after consuming a protein free diet for 21 days. Malnourished mice received cow or human milk (CM or HM) for 7 or 14 consecutive days. During the period of administration of milk, the mice consumed the protein free diet ad libitum. The malnourished control (MNC) group received only protein free diet whereas the wellnourished control (WNC) mice consumed the balanced conventional diet. Both milks normalized serum albumin levels and improved thymus weight. Human milk was less effective than cow milk to increase body weight and serum transferrin levels. In contrast, human milk was more effective than cow milk to increase the number of leukocytes (WNC: 6.90 ± 1.60a; MNC: 2.80 ± 0.90b; CM 7d: 3.74 ± 1.10b; HM 7d: 7.16 ± 1.90a; CM 14d: 4.35 ± 1.20b; HM 14d: 6.75 ± 1.20a (109/L); p milks induced an increment in mitotic pool cells in bone marrow and α-naphthyl butyrate esterase positive cells in peripheral blood. They also normalized phagocytic function in blood neutrophils and oxidative burst in peritoneal cells. Both milks were equally effective to exert favorable effects on the number of the bone marrow cells and the functions of the blood and peritoneal cells involved in immune response. However, only human milk normalized the number of leukocytes and increased the number of neutrophils in peripheral blood. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-term three-dimensional perfusion culture of human adult bone marrow mononuclear cells in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Finoli, Anthony; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2015-04-01

    The construction and long-term maintenance of three-dimensional in vitro bone marrow models is of great interest but still quite challenging. Here we describe the use of a multi-compartment hollow-fiber membrane based three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor for long-term culture of whole human bone marrow mononuclear cells. We also investigated bioreactors with incorporated open-porous foamed hydroxyapatite scaffolds, mimicking the in vivo bone matrix. Cells in bioreactors with and without scaffolds were cultured to 6 weeks and compared to Petri dish controls. Cells were analyzed for gene expression, surface markers by flow cytometry, metabolic activity, hematopoietic potential, viability, and attachment by immunocytochemistry. Cells in bioreactors were metabolic active during long-term culture. The percentages of hematopoietic stem cell and mature endothelial cell fractions were maintained in bioreactors. The expression of most of the analyzed genes stabilized and increased after long-term culture of 6 weeks. Compared to Petri dish culture controls, bioreactor perfusion culture improved in both the short and long-term, the colony formation unit capacity of hematopoietic progenitors. Cells attached to the ample surface area provided by hydroxyapatite scaffolds. The implementation of a hydroxyapatite scaffold did not influence colony formation capacity, percentages of cell type specific fractions, gene expression, cell viability or metabolic turnover when compared to control cells cultured in bioreactors without scaffolds. In conclusion, three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture enables long-term maintenance of primary human bone marrow cells, with hydroxyapatite scaffolds providing an in vivo-like scaffold for three-dimensional culture. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cytokine-dependent long-term culture of highly enriched precursors of hematopoietic progenitor cells from human bone marrow.

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, J.; Srour, E F; van Besien, K.; Briddell, R A; Hoffman, R.

    1990-01-01

    Human marrow cells positive for the CD34 antigen but not expressing HLA-DR, CD15, or CD71 antigens were isolated. In a liquid culture system supplemented with 48-hourly additions of recombinant interleukins IL-1 alpha, IL-3, IL-6, or granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), these cells were capable of sustaining in vitro hematopoiesis for up to eight weeks. The establishment of an adherent cell layer was never observed. Cultures containing no exogenous cytokine produced clon...

  12. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk-Jan Prins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that each time can differ in the potential to form in vivo bone. A parameter that predicts for in vivo bone forming capacity is thus far lacking. We employed single colony-derived BMSC cultures to identify such predictive parameters. Using limiting dilution, we have produced sixteen single CFU-F derived BMSC cultures from human bone marrow and found that only five of these formed bone in vivo. The single colony-derived BMSC strains were tested for proliferation, osteogenic-, adipogenic- and chondrogenic differentiation capacity and the expression of a variety of associated markers. The only robust predictors of in vivo bone forming capacity were the induction of alkaline phosphatase, (ALP mRNA levels and ALP activity during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. The predictive value of in vitro ALP induction was confirmed by analyzing “bulk-cultured” BMSCs from various bone marrow biopsies. Our findings show that in BMSCs, the additional increase in ALP levels over basal levels during in vitro osteogenic differentiation is predictive of in vivo performance.

  13. Are MSCs Angiogenic Cells?New Insights on Human Nestin-positive Bone Marrow-derived Multipotent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePacini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations have made considerable progress in the understanding of tissue regeneration driven by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Data indicate the anatomical location of MSC as residing in the perivascular space of blood vessels dispersed across the whole body. This histological localization suggests that MSCs contribute to the formation of new blood vessels in vivo. Indeed, MSCs can release angiogenic factors and protease to facilitate blood vessel formation and in vitro are able to promote/support angiogenesis. However, the direct differentiation of MCSs into endothelial cells is still matter of debate. Most of the conflicting data might arise from the presence of multiple subtypes of cells with heterogeneous morph-functional features within the MSC cultures. According to this scenario, we hypothesize that the presence of the recently described Mesodermal Progenitor Cells (MPCs within the MSCs cultures is responsible for their variable angiogenic potential. Indeed, MPCs are Nestin-positive CD31-positive cells exhibiting angiogenic potential that differentiate in MSC upon proper stimuli. The ISCT criteria do not account for the presence of MPC within MSC culture generating confusion in the interpretation of MSC angiogenic potential. In conclusion, the discovery of MPC gives new insight in defining MSC ancestors in human bone marrow, and indicates the tunica intima as a further, and previously overlooked, possible additional source of MSC.

  14. Gonadotropins facilitate potential differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into Leydig cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lin; Dong, Qiang; Wu, Yun-Jian; Sun, Yuan-Xing; Guo, Yan-Yu; Huo, Yue-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Infertility due to low testosterone levels has increased in recent years. This has impacted the social well-being of the patients. This study was undertaken to investigate the potential of gonadotropins in facilitating differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into Leydig cells in vitro. BMSCs were isolated, cultured, and their biological characteristics were observed. BMSCs were induced with gonadotropins in vitro and their ability to differentiate into Leydig cells was studied. The level of expression of 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and secretion of testosterone were determined using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, and the results were compared between the experimental and control groups. The cultured BMSCs showed a typical morphology of the fibroblast-like colony. The growth curve of cells formed an S-shape. After inducing the cells for 8-13 days, the cells in the experimental group increased in size and showed typical characteristics of Leydig cells, and the growth occurred in spindle or stellate shapes. Cells from the experimental group highly expressed 3β-HSD, and there was a gradual increase in the number of Leydig cells. The control group did not express 3β-HSD. The level of testosterone in the experimental group was higher than the control group (p group secreted higher levels of testosterone with increased culture time. The expression of Leydig cell-specific markers in the experimental group was significantly higher (p < 0.05). With these findings, BMSCs can be considered a new approach for the treatment of patients with low androgen levels. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  15. Genetically modified human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells for improving the outcome of human islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Mundra

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the potential of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs as gene carriers for improving the outcome of human islet transplantation. hBMSCs were characterized for the expression of phenotypic markers and transduced with Adv-hVEGF-hIL-1Ra to overexpress human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF and human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hIL-1Ra. Human islets were co-cultured with hBMSCs overexpressing hVEGF and hIL-1Ra. Islet viability was determined by membrane fluorescent method and glucose stimulation test. Transduced hBMSCs and human islets were co-transplanted under the kidney capsule of NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid Il2rg(tm1Wjl /SzJ (NSG diabetic mice and blood glucose levels were measured over time to demonstrate the efficacy of genetically modified hBMSCs. At the end of study, immunofluorescent staining of kidney section bearing islets was performed for insulin and von Willebrand Factor (vWF. hBMSCs were positive for the expression of CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146 and Stro-1 surface markers as determined by flow cytometry. Transduction of hBMSCs with adenovirus did not affect their stemness and differentiation potential as confirmed by mRNA levels of stem cell markers and adipogenic differentiation of transduced hBMSCs. hBMSCs were efficiently transduced with Adv-hVEGF-hIL-1Ra to overexpress hVEGF and hIL-1Ra. Live dead cell staining and glucose stimulation test have shown that transduced hBMSCs improved the viability of islets against cytokine cocktail. Co-transplantation of human islets with genetically modified hBMSCs improved the glycemic control of diabetic NSG mice as determined by mean blood glucose levels and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. Immunofluorescent staining of kidney sections was positive for human insulin and vWF. In conclusion, our results have demonstrated that hBMSCs may be used as gene carriers and nursing cells to improve the outcome of islet

  16. Association between in vivo bone formation and ex vivo migratory capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K; Zaher, Walid; Larsen, Kenneth H

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is a clinical need for developing systemic transplantation protocols for use of human skeletal stem cells (also known bone marrow stromal stem cells) (hBMSC) in tissue regeneration. In systemic transplantation studies, only a limited number of hBMSC home to injured tissues...... vivo transwell migration and following intravenous injection, better in vivo homing ability to bone fracture when compared to LBF clones. Comparative microarray analysis of HBF versus LBF clones identified enrichment of gene categories of chemo-attraction, adhesion and migration associated genes. Among...

  17. Manufacturing Differences Affect Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Characteristics and Function: Comparison of Production Methods and Products from Multiple Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shutong; de Castro, Luis F; Jin, Ping; Civini, Sara; Ren, Jiaqiang; Reems, Jo-Anna; Cancelas, Jose; Nayak, Ramesh; Shaw, Georgina; O'Brien, Timothy; McKenna, David H; Armant, Myriam; Silberstein, Leslie; Gee, Adrian P; Hei, Derek J; Hematti, Peiman; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Robey, Pamela G; Stroncek, David F

    2017-04-27

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are manufactured using many different methods, but little is known about the spectrum of manufacturing methods used and their effects on BMSC characteristics and function. Seven centers using, and one developing, Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) processes were surveyed as to their production methods. Among the seven centers, all used marrow aspirates as the starting material, but no two centers used the same manufacturing methods. Two to four BMSC lots from each center were compared using global gene expression. Among the twenty-four BMSC lots from the eight centers intra-center transcriptome variability was low and similar among centers. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis separated all the lots from five centers into five distinct clusters. BMSCs from six of the eight centers were tested for their ability to form bone and support hematopoiesis by in vivo transplantation (defining features of BMSCs). Those from all six centers tested formed bone, but the quantity formed was highly variable and BMSCs from only three centers supported hematopoiesis. These results show that differences in manufacturing resulted in variable BMSC characteristics including their ability to form bone and support hematopoiesis.

  18. Generation of Insulin-Producing Cells from Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Comparison of Three Differentiation Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Mahmoud M.; Zakaria, Mahmoud M.; Refaie, Ayman F.; Khater, Sherry M.; Ashamallah, Sylvia A.; Ismail, Amani M.; El-Badri, Nagwa; Ghoneim, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Many protocols were utilized for directed differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to form insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We compared the relative efficiency of three differentiation protocols. Methods. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs (HBM-MSCs) were obtained from three insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic patients. Differentiation into IPCs was carried out by three protocols: conophylline-based (one-step protocol), trichostatin-A-based (two-step protocol), and β-mercaptoethanol-based (three-step protocol). At the end of differentiation, cells were evaluated by immunolabeling for insulin production, expression of pancreatic endocrine genes, and release of insulin and c-peptide in response to increasing glucose concentrations. Results. By immunolabeling, the proportion of generated IPCs was modest (≃3%) in all the three protocols. All relevant pancreatic endocrine genes, insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, were expressed. There was a stepwise increase in insulin and c-peptide release in response to glucose challenge, but the released amounts were low when compared with those of pancreatic islets. Conclusion. The yield of functional IPCs following directed differentiation of HBM-MSCs was modest and was comparable among the three tested protocols. Protocols for directed differentiation of MSCs need further optimization in order to be clinically meaningful. To this end, addition of an extracellular matrix and/or a suitable template should be attempted. PMID:24818157

  19. Insulin-Producing Cells Differentiated from Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro Ameliorate Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Ying; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Yishu; Su, Xuejin; Sun, Meiyu; Zhang, Lihong; Tan, Yi; Wintergerst, Kupper A; Li, Yan; Li, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    The two major obstacles in the successful transplantation of islets for diabetes treatment are inadequate supply of insulin-producing tissue and immune rejection. Induction of the differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) for autologous transplantation may alleviate those limitations. hMSCs were isolated and induced to differentiate into IPCs through a three-stage differentiation protocol in a defined media with high glucose, nicotinamide, and exendin-4. The physiological characteristics and functions of IPCs were then evaluated. Next, about 3 × 10(6) differentiated cells were transplanted into the renal sub-capsular space of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nude mice. Graft survival and function were assessed by immunohistochemistry, TUNEL staining and measurements of blood glucose levels in the mice. The differentiated IPCs were characterized by Dithizone (DTZ) positive staining, expression of pancreatic β-cell markers, and human insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. Moreover, 43% of the IPCs showed L-type Ca2+ channel activity and similar changes in intracellular Ca2+ in response to glucose stimulation as that seen in pancreatic β-cells in the process of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Transplantation of functional IPCs into the renal subcapsular space of STZ-induced diabetic nude mice ameliorated the hyperglycemia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that transplanted IPCs sustainably expressed insulin, c-peptide, and PDX-1 without apparent apoptosis in vivo. IPCs derived from hMSCs in vitro can ameliorate STZ-induced diabetic hyperglycemia, which indicates that these hMSCs may be a promising approach to overcome the limitations of islet transplantation.

  20. Gangliosides as a potential new class of stem cell markers: the case of GD1a in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells[S

    OpenAIRE

    Bergante, Sonia; Torretta, Enrica; Creo, Pasquale; Sessarego, Nadia; Papini, Nadia; Piccoli, Marco; Fania, Chiara; Cirillo, Federica; Conforti, Erika; Ghiroldi, Andrea; Tringali, Cristina; Venerando, Bruno; Ibatici, Adalberto; Gelfi, Cecilia; Tettamanti, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Owing to their exposure on the cell surface and the possibility of being directly recognized with specific antibodies, glycosphingolipids have aroused great interest in the field of stem cell biology. In the search for specific markers of the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) toward osteoblasts, we studied their glycosphingolipid pattern, with particular attention to gangliosides. After lipid extraction and fractionation, gangliosides, metabolically 3H-label...

  1. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells induce collagen production and tongue cancer invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Salo

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironment (TME is an active player in carcinogenesis and changes in its composition modify cancer growth. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs, and inflammatory cells can all affect the composition of TME leading to changes in proliferation, invasion and metastasis formation of carcinoma cells. In this study, we confirmed an interaction between BMMSCs and oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC cells by analyzing the invasion progression and gene expression pattern. In a 3-dimensional myoma organotypic invasion model the presence of BMMSCs inhibited the proliferation but increased the invasion of OTSCC cells. Furthermore, the signals originating from OTSCC cells up-regulated the expression of inflammatory chemokines by BMMSCs, whereas BMMSC products induced the expression of known invasion linked molecules by carcinoma cells. Particularly, after the cell-cell interactions, the chemokine CCL5 was abundantly secreted from BMMSCs and a function blocking antibody against CCL5 inhibited BMMSC enhanced cancer invasion area. However, CCL5 blocking antibody did not inhibit the depth of invasion. Additionally, after exposure to BMMSCs, the expression of type I collagen mRNA in OTSCC cells was markedly up-regulated. Interestingly, also high expression of type I collagen N-terminal propeptide (PINP in vivo correlated with the cancer-specific mortality of OTSCC patients, whereas there was no association between cancer tissue CCL5 levels and the clinical parameters. In conclusion, our results suggest that the interaction between BMMSC and carcinoma cells induce cytokine and matrix molecule expression, of which high level of type I collagen production correlates with the prognosis of OTSCC patients.

  2. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells induce collagen production and tongue cancer invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, Sirpa; Bitu, Carolina; Merkku, Kalle; Nyberg, Pia; Bello, Ibrahim O; Vuoristo, Jussi; Sutinen, Meeri; Vähänikkilä, Hannu; Costea, Daniela E; Kauppila, Joonas H; Kauppila, Joonas; Lehenkari, Petri; Dayan, Dan; Vered, Marilena; Risteli, Juha; Salo, Tuula

    2013-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment (TME) is an active player in carcinogenesis and changes in its composition modify cancer growth. Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), and inflammatory cells can all affect the composition of TME leading to changes in proliferation, invasion and metastasis formation of carcinoma cells. In this study, we confirmed an interaction between BMMSCs and oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) cells by analyzing the invasion progression and gene expression pattern. In a 3-dimensional myoma organotypic invasion model the presence of BMMSCs inhibited the proliferation but increased the invasion of OTSCC cells. Furthermore, the signals originating from OTSCC cells up-regulated the expression of inflammatory chemokines by BMMSCs, whereas BMMSC products induced the expression of known invasion linked molecules by carcinoma cells. Particularly, after the cell-cell interactions, the chemokine CCL5 was abundantly secreted from BMMSCs and a function blocking antibody against CCL5 inhibited BMMSC enhanced cancer invasion area. However, CCL5 blocking antibody did not inhibit the depth of invasion. Additionally, after exposure to BMMSCs, the expression of type I collagen mRNA in OTSCC cells was markedly up-regulated. Interestingly, also high expression of type I collagen N-terminal propeptide (PINP) in vivo correlated with the cancer-specific mortality of OTSCC patients, whereas there was no association between cancer tissue CCL5 levels and the clinical parameters. In conclusion, our results suggest that the interaction between BMMSC and carcinoma cells induce cytokine and matrix molecule expression, of which high level of type I collagen production correlates with the prognosis of OTSCC patients.

  3. Comparison of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous tooth pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Y; Koyama, N; Nakao, K; Osawa, K; Ikeno, M; Yamanaka, S; Okubo, Y; Fujimura, K; Bessho, K

    2016-01-01

    Populations of pluripotent stem cells were isolated from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous teeth and their multipotentiality properties compared. Osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation potentials were examined. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and synovial fluid-derived cells (SFCs) showed the highest levels of osteogenesis as expressed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (0.54±0.094 U/mg protein and 0.57±0.039 U/mg protein, respectively; P=0.60) and by osteocalcin (BGLAP; determined by real-time RT-PCR). SFCs showed the highest levels of chondrogenesis as expressed by ALP activity (1.75±0.097 U/mg protein) and of COL2A1 and COL10A1 by real-time PCR. In terms of adipogenesis, lipid vesicles were observed in the BMMSCs and SFCs. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) exhibited neurogenesis potential, as shown by increases in expression of class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on RT-PCR. Variability was found in the differentiation potential corresponding to the tendency of the original tissue to differentiate. It is suggested that the cell type should be selected depending on the regenerative treatment regimen. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a rapid culture method to induce adipocyte differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninomiya, Yuichi [Translational Research Center, Saitama International Medical, Saitama Medical University, 1397-1 Yamane, Hidaka, Saitama 350-1298 (Japan); Sugahara-Yamashita, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Tokuzawa, Yoshimi; Okazaki, Yasushi [Division of Functional Genomics and Systems Medicine, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama 350-1241 (Japan); Nishiyama, Masahiko, E-mail: yamacho@saitama-med.ac.jp [Translational Research Center, Saitama International Medical, Saitama Medical University, 1397-1 Yamane, Hidaka, Saitama 350-1298 (Japan)

    2010-04-02

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from bone marrow are multipotent stem cells that can regenerate mesenchymal tissues such as adipose, bone or muscle. It is thought that hMSCs can be utilized as a cell resource for tissue engineering and as human models to study cell differentiation mechanisms, such as adipogenesis, osteoblastogenesis and so on. Since it takes 2-3 weeks for hMSCs to differentiate into adipocytes using conventional culture methods, the development of methods to induce faster differentiation into adipocytes is required. In this study we optimized the culture conditions for adipocyte induction to achieve a shorter cultivation time for the induction of adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow-derived hMSCs. Briefly, we used a cocktail of dexamethasone, insulin, methylisobutylxanthine (DIM) plus a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist, rosiglitazone (DIMRo) as a new adipogenic differentiation medium. We successfully shortened the period of cultivation to 7-8 days from 2-3 weeks. We also found that rosiglitazone alone was unable to induce adipocyte differentiation from hMSCs in vitro. However, rosiglitazone appears to enhance hMSC adipogenesis in the presence of other hormones and/or compounds, such as DIM. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of TGF-{beta}1 on adipogenesis could be investigated using DIMRo-treated hMSCs. We conclude that our rapid new culture method is very useful in measuring the effect of molecules that affect adipogenesis in hMSCs.

  5. The monitoring of gene functions on a cell-defined siRNA microarray in human bone marrow stromal and U2OS cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hi Chul Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, we developed a cell defined siRNA microarray (CDSM for human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs designed to control the culture of cells inside the spot area without reducing the efficiency of siRNA silencing, “Development of a cell-defined siRNA microarray for analysis of gene functionin human bone marrow stromal cells” (Kim et al., 2016 [1]. First, we confirmed that p65 protein inhibition efficiency was maintained when hBMSCs were culture for 7 days on the siRNA spot, and siRNA spot activity remained in spite of long term storage (10 days and 2 months. Additionally, we confirmed p65 protein inhibition in U2OS cells after 48 h reverse transfection.

  6. Survival of human mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue after xenogenic transplantation in immunocompetent mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemeyer, P; Vohrer, J; Schmal, H

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) represent an attractive cell population for tissue engineering purposes. As MSC are described as immunoprivileged, non-autologous applications seem possible. A basic requirement is the survival of MSC after transplantation in the host. The purpose...... of the current paper was to evaluate the survival of undifferentiated and osteogenically induced human MSC from different origins after transplantation in immunocompetent mice. METHODS: Human MSC were isolated from bone marrow (BMSC) and adipose tissue (ASC). After cultivation on mineralized collagen, MSC were...... transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompetent mice (n=12). Undifferentiated MSC (group A) were compared with osteogenic-induced MSC (group B). Human-specific in situ hybridization and anti-vimentin staining was used to follow MSC after transplantation. Quantitative evaluation of lymphocytes and macrophages...

  7. Lithium Chloride Modulates Adipogenesis and Osteogenesis of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Tang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Lithium chloride (LiCl has long been used as a psychiatric medication; however, its role in the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of LiCl on the differentiation of BMSCs. Methods: The roles of LiCl in osteogenic and adipogenic processes were observed using alizarin red staining and oil red O staining, respectively. The effects of LiCl on the Wnt and Hedgehog (Hh pathways were investigated. Results: Our data showed that LiCl effectively promoted osteogenesis and inhibited adipogenesis by simultaneously affecting the Wnt and Hh pathways. Conclusion: These results suggest that LiCl influences the differentiation of BMSCs directly through the Wnt and Hh pathways and thus may be a candidate drug for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  8. Ex vivo differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stem cells into neuronal cell-like lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Zoubi A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adeeb Al-Zoubi,1,2 Feras Altwal,3 Farah Khalifeh,2 Jamil Hermas,4 Ziad Al-Zoubi,5 Emad Jafar,5 Mohammed El-Khateeb,6,7 1Department of Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, IL, USA; 2Stem Cells of Arabia, Amman, Jordan; 3Department of Neuroscience, School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA; 4Stem Cell Division, Al-Yamama Company, 5Jordan Orthopedic and Spinal Center, 6National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics, 7Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan Background: Methods to obtain safe and practical populations of stem cells (SCs at a clinical grade that are able to differentiate into neuronal cell lineages are yet to be developed. In a previous study, we showed that mouse bone marrow-derived SCs (BM-SCs differentiated into neuronal cell-like lineages when put in a neuronal-like environment, which is a special media supplemented with the necessary growth factors needed for the differentiation of SCs into neuronal cell-like lineages. Aim: In this study, we aim to assess the potentials of adult human CD34+ and CD133+ SCs to differentiate into neuronal cell-like lineages ex vivo when placed in a neuronal-like microenvironment. Methods: The neuronal-like microenvironment was created by culturing cells in nonhematopoietic expansion media (NHEM supplemented with growth factors that favor differentiation into neuronal cell lineages (low-affinity nerve growth factor [LNGF], mouse spinal cord extract [mSpE], or both. Cultured cells were assessed for neuronal differentiation by cell morphologies and by expression of GFAP. Results: Our results show that culturing unpurified human BM-derived mononuclear cells (hBM-MNCs in NHEM+LNGF+mSpE did not lead to neuronal differentiation. In contrast, culturing of purified CD34+ hBM-SCs in NHEM+LNGF+mSpE favored their differentiation into astrocyte

  9. Analysis of glycoprotein E-selectin ligANDs on human and mouse marrow cells enriched for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen S.

    2011-06-09

    Although well recognized that expression of E-selectin on marrow microvessels mediates osteotropism of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), our knowledge regarding the cognate E-selectin ligand(s) on HSPCs is incomplete. Flow cytometry using E-selectin-Ig chimera (E-Ig) shows that human marrow cells enriched for HSPCs (CD34+ cells) display greater E-selectin binding than those obtained from mouse (lin-/Sca-1+/c-kit+ [LSK] cells). To define the relevant glycoprotein E-selectin ligands, lysates from human CD34+ and KG1a cells and from mouse LSK cells were immunoprecipitated using E-Ig and resolved byWestern blot using E-Ig. In both human and mouse cells, E-selectin ligand reactivity was observed at ∼ 120- to 130-kDa region, which contained two E-selectin ligands, the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- 1 glycoform "CLA," and CD43. Human, but not mouse, cells displayed a prominent ∼ 100-kDa band, exclusively comprising the CD44 glycoform "HCELL."E-Ig reactivity was most prominent on CLA in mouse cells and on HCELL in human cells. To further assess HCELL\\'s contribution to E-selectin adherence, complementary studies were performed to silence (via CD44 siRNA) or enforce its expression (via exoglycosylation). Under physiologic shear conditions, CD44/HCELL-silenced human cells showed striking decreases (> 50%) in E-selectin binding. Conversely, enforced HCELL expression of LSK cells profoundly increased E-selectin adherence, yielding > 3-fold more marrow homing in vivo. These data define the key glycoprotein E-selectin ligands of human and mouse HSPCs, unveiling critical species-intrinsic differences in both the identity and activity of these structures. © 2011 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Evaluating effects of L-carnitine on human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Takami, Taro; Fukui, Yumi; Quintanilha, Luiz Fernando; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sakaida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells showing potential for use in regenerative medicine. Culture techniques that are more stable and methods for the more efficient production of MSCs with therapeutic efficacy are needed. We evaluate the effects of growing bone marrow (Bm)-derived MSCs in the presence of L-carnitine, which is believed to promote lipid metabolism and to suppress apoptosis. The presence of L-carnitine decreased the degree of drug-induced apoptosis and suppressed adipogenic differentiation. Metabolomic analysis by means of the exhaustive investigation of metabolic products showed that, in addition to increased β-oxidation and the expression of all carnitine derivatives other than deoxycarnitine (an intermediate in carnitine synthesis), polysaturated and polyunsaturated acids were down-regulated. An integrated analysis incorporating both serial analysis of gene expression and metabolomics revealed increases in cell survival, suggesting the utility of carnitine. The addition of carnitine elevated the oxygen consumption rate by BmMSCs that had been cultured for only a few generations and those that had become senescent following repeated replication indicating that mitochondrial activation occurred. Our exhaustive analysis of the effects of various carnitine metabolites thus suggests that the addition of L-carnitine to BmMSCs during expansion enables efficient cell production.

  11. Incidence of human herpes virus-6 and human cytomegalovirus infections in donated bone marrow and umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad-Behbahani A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the incidence of human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections that are potentially transmitted to haematopoietic stem cells (HSC transplant recipients via bone marrow (BM or umbilical cord blood (UCB. Bone marrow progenitor cells were collected from 30 allogenic BM donors. UCB HSC were collected from 34 subjects. The extracted DNA was then processed using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR technique. HCMV and HHV-6 serological status were determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA. Nested PCR identified HCMV in 22 (73% of 30 samples of BM progenitor cells but in only eight (23.5% of 34 samples of UBC HSC ( P = 0.001. HHV-6 DNA was detected in 11 (36.6% of 30 BM progenitor cells and in only one (2.9% of 34 UBC cells ( P = 0.002. Both HHV-6 and HCMV infections were determined in nine (26.5% of 34 bone marrow samples. The results indicate that, the risk of HCMV and HHV-6 via BM progenitor cells is higher than transmission by UCB cells ( P= 0.04.

  12. Transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells reduces liver fibrosis more effectively than Wharton?s jelly?mesenchymal stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rengasamy, Mathiyazhagan; Singh, Gurbind; Fakharuzi, Noor Atiqah; Siddikuzzaman,; Balasubramanian, Sudha; Swamynathan, Priyanka; Thej, Charan; Sasidharan, Gopinath; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Das, Anjan Kumar; Rahman, Ahmad Zuhairi Abd; Fakiruddin, Kamal Shaik; Nian, Lim Moon; Zakaria, Zubaidah; Majumdar, Anish S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from various tissues have shown moderate therapeutic efficacy in reversing liver fibrosis in preclinical models. Here, we compared the relative therapeutic potential of pooled, adult human bone marrow (BM)- and neonatal Wharton?s jelly (WJ)-derived MSCs to treat CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with CCl4 for 8?weeks to induce irreversible liver fibrosis. Ex-vivo expanded, pooled human MSCs obtained from ...

  13. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibits human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell proliferation but enhances their survival in hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Suna, E-mail: wangs3@mail.nih.gov; Zhou, Yifu; Andreyev, Oleg; Hoyt, Robert F.; Singh, Avneesh; Hunt, Timothy; Horvath, Keith A.

    2014-04-15

    Studying the proliferative ability of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in hypoxic conditions can help us achieve the effective regeneration of ischemic injured myocardium. Cardiac-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP3) is a specific biomarker of muscle and heart tissue injury. This protein is purported to be involved in early myocardial development, adult myocardial tissue repair and responsible for the modulation of cell growth and proliferation. We have investigated the role of FABP3 in human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells under ischemic conditions. MSCs from 12 donors were cultured either in standard normoxic or modified hypoxic conditions, and the differential expression of FABP3 was tested by quantitative {sup RT}PCR and western blot. We also established stable FABP3 expression in MSCs and searched for variation in cellular proliferation and differentiation bioprocesses affected by hypoxic conditions. We identified: (1) the FABP3 differential expression pattern in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions; (2) over-expression of FABP3 inhibited the growth and proliferation of the MSCs; however, improved their survival in low oxygen environments; (3) the cell growth factors and positive cell cycle regulation genes, such as PCNA, APC, CCNB1, CCNB2 and CDC6 were all down-regulated; while the key negative cell cycle regulation genes TP53, BRCA1, CASP3 and CDKN1A were significantly up-regulated in the cells with FABP3 overexpression. Our data suggested that FABP3 was up-regulated under hypoxia; also negatively regulated the cell metabolic process and the mitotic cell cycle. Overexpression of FABP3 inhibited cell growth and proliferation via negative regulation of the cell cycle and down-regulation of cell growth factors, but enhances cell survival in hypoxic or ischemic conditions. - Highlights: • FABP3 expression pattern was studied in 12 human hypoxic-MSCs. • FABP3 mRNA and proteins are upregulated in the MSCs under hypoxic conditions.

  14. Adult human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells are capable of adhesion-independent survival and expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksh, Dolores; Davies, John E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2003-08-01

    We show the existence of adult human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMPCs) that can proliferate, in a cytokine-dependent manner, as individual cells in stirred suspension cultures (SSC) while maintaining their ability to form functional differentiated mesenchymal cell types. Ficolled human bone marrow (BM)-derived cells were grown in SSC (and adherent controls) in the presence and absence of exogenously added cytokines. Phenotypic, gene expression, and functional assays for hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell populations were used to kinetically track cell production. Limiting-dilution analysis was used to relate culture-produced cells to input cell populations. Cytokine cocktail influenced total and progenitor cell expansion, as well as the types of cells generated upon plating. Flow cytometric analysis of CD117, CD123, and CD45 expression showed that cytokine supplementation influenced SSC output. The concomitant growth of CD45(+) and CD45(-) cells in the cultures that exhibited the greatest hMPC expansions suggests that the growth of these cells may benefit from interactions with hematopoietic cells. Functional assays demonstrated that the SSC-derived cells (input CFU-O number: 1990+/-377) grown in the presence of SCF+IL-3 resulted, after 21 days, in the generation of a significantly greater number (p<0.05) of bone progenitors (33,700+/-8763 CFU-O) than similarly initiated adherent cultures (214+/-75 CFU-O). RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the SSC-derived cells grown in osteogenic conditions express bone-specific genes (Cbfa1/Runx2, bone sialoprotein, and osteocalcin). Our approach not only provides an alternative strategy to expand adult BM-derived nonhematopoietic progenitor cell numbers in a scalable and controllable bioprocess, but also questions established biological paradigms concerning the properties of connective-tissue stem and progenitor cells.

  15. Maintenance of osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation potential with age and osteoporosis in human marrow stromal cell cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, J; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Eriksen, E F

    2002-01-01

    Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow stroma, termed marrow stromal cell (MSC). As the volume of bone adipose tissue increases in vivo with age, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during aging and in patients with osteoporosis (OP) is the ......Osteoblasts and adipocytes share a common precursor cell in the bone marrow stroma, termed marrow stromal cell (MSC). As the volume of bone adipose tissue increases in vivo with age, we hypothesized that decreased bone formation observed during aging and in patients with osteoporosis (OP...... phosphatase (AP+), and adipocytic colonies containing adipocytes (Ad+) were quantitated. In addition, steady state mRNA levels of gene markers of adipocytic and osteoblastic phenotypes were determined using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The adipogenic and osteogenic media induced...

  16. Maintenance of differentiation potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene despite [corrected] extensive proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Burns, Jorge S

    2005-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) represent a population of stem cells that are capable of differentiation into multiple lineages. However, these cells exhibit senescence-associated growth arrest and phenotypic changes during long-term in vitro culture. We have recently demonstrated...... that overexpression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in hMSC reconstitutes telomerase activity and extends life span of the cells [Nat. Biotechnol. 20 (2002) 592]. In the present study, we have performed extensive characterization of three independent cell lines derived from the parental h......MSC-TERT cell line based on different plating densities during expansion in culture: 1:2 (hMSC-TERT2), 1:4 (hMSC-TERT4), and 1:20 (hMSC-TERT20). The 3 cell lines exhibited differences in morphology and growth rates but they all maintained the characteristics of self-renewing stem cells and the ability...

  17. Rapid expansion of recycling stem cells in cultures of plastic-adherent cells from human bone marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, David C.; Class, Reiner; DiGirolamo, Carla M.; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2000-01-01

    Cultures of plastic-adherent cells from bone marrow have attracted interest because of their ability to support growth of hematopoietic stem cells, their multipotentiality for differentiation, and their possible use for cell and gene therapy. Here we found that the cells grew most rapidly when they were initially plated at low densities (1.5 or 3.0 cells/cm2) to generate single-cell derived colonies. The cultures displayed a lag phase of about 5 days, a log phase of rapid growth of about 5 days, and then a stationary phase. FACS analysis demonstrated that stationary cultures contained a major population of large and moderately granular cells and a minor population of small and agranular cells here referred to as recycling stem cells or RS-1 cells. During the lag phase, the RS-1 cells gave rise to a new population of small and densely granular cells (RS-2 cells). During the late log phase, the RS-2 cells decreased in number and regenerated the pool of RS-1 cells found in stationary cultures. In repeated passages in which the cells were plated at low density, they were amplified about 109-fold in 6 wk. The cells retained their ability to generate single-cell derived colonies and therefore apparently retained their multipotentiality for differentiation. PMID:10725391

  18. Comparing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor secretion of induced neurotrophic factor secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mostafavi, Fatemeh Sadat

    2013-08-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) may be equally beneficial in treating neurodegenerative diseases. However, ADSCs have practical advantages. In this study, we aimed to induce neurotrophic factors secreting cells in human ADSCs. Then, we compared the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) secretion in neurotrophic factors secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells. Isolated human ADSCs and BMSCs were induced to neurotrophic factor (NTF)-secreting cells. The levels of expression and secretion of BDNF and CTNF of induced cells were assessed using immunocytochemical, Real-Time polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The level of BDNF significantly increased in both the induced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) relative to ADSCs and the BMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, ELISA analysis showed that the release of BDNF in the induced BMSCs was almost twofold more than the induced ADSCs. Overall, NTF-secreting factor cells derived BMSCs and ADSCs could secret a range of different growth factors. Therefore, the variation in neurotrophic factors of different induced MSC populations suggest the possible beneficial effect of each specific kind of neurotrophic factor secreting cells for the treatment of a particular neurodegenerative disease. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  19. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, H.J.; Braat, A.K.; Gawlitta, D.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Egan, D.A.; Tijssen-Slump, E.; Yuan, Huipin; Coffer, P.J.; Rozemuller, H.; Martens, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that

  20. In vitro induction of alkaline phosphatase levels predicts in vivo bone forming capacity of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, H.J.; Braat, A.K.; Gawlitta, D.; Dhert, W.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10261847X; Egan, D.A.; Tijssen-Slump, E.; Yuan, H.; Coffer, P.J; Rozemuller, H.; Martens, A.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the applications of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that are produced by ex vivo expansion is for use in in vivo bone tissue engineering. Cultured stromal cells are a mixture of cells at different stages of commitment and expansion capability, leading to a heterogeneous cell population that

  1. The effect of low-frequency electromagnetic field on human bone marrow stem/progenitor cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Christina L.; Siriwardane, Mevan; Almeida-Porada, Graça; Porada, Christopher D.; Brink, Peter; Christ, George J.; Harrison, Benjamin S.

    2015-01-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are a population of progenitor cells that contain a subset of skeletal stem cells (hSSCs), able to recreate cartilage, bone, stroma that supports hematopoiesis and marrow adipocytes. As such, they have become an important resource in developing strategies for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering due to their self-renewal and differentiation capabilities. The differentiation of SSCs/BMSCs is dependent on exposure to biophysical and biochemical stimuli that favor early and rapid activation of the in vivo tissue repair process. Exposure to exogenous stimuli such as an electromagnetic field (EMF) can promote differentiation of SSCs/BMSCs via ion dynamics and small signaling molecules. The plasma membrane is often considered to be the main target for EMF signals and most results point to an effect on the rate of ion or ligand binding due to a receptor site acting as a modulator of signaling cascades. Ion fluxes are closely involved in differentiation control as stem cells move and grow in specific directions to form tissues and organs. EMF affects numerous biological functions such as gene expression, cell fate, and cell differentiation, but will only induce these effects within a certain range of low frequencies as well as low amplitudes. EMF has been reported to be effective in the enhancement of osteogenesis and chondrogenesis of hSSCs/BMSCs with no documented negative effects. Studies show specific EMF frequencies enhance hSSC/BMSC adherence, proliferation, differentiation, and viability, all of which play a key role in the use of hSSCs/BMSCs for tissue engineering. While many EMF studies report significant enhancement of the differentiation process, results differ depending on the experimental and environmental conditions. Here we review how specific EMF parameters (frequency, intensity, and time of exposure) significantly regulate hSSC/BMSC differentiation in

  2. Expression of OCT-4 and SOX-2 in Bone Marrow-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Osteogenic Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Igor; Antunovic, Maja; Brkic, Sime; Josipovic, Pavle; Mihalic, Katarina Caput; Karlak, Ivan; Ivkovic, Alan; Marijanovic, Inga

    2016-03-15

    Determine the levels of expression of pluripotency genes OCT-4 and SOX-2 before and after osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Human MSCs were derived from the bone marrow and differentiated into osteoblasts. The analyses were performed on days 0 and 14 of the cell culture. In vitro differentiation was evaluated due to bone markers - alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of AP and bone sialoprotein (BSP). The OCT-4 and SOX-2 expression was evaluated at mRNA level by real-time qPCR and at protein level by immunocytochemistry. In vitro cultures on day 14 showed an increase in AP activity and upregulation of AP and BSP gene expression. OCT-4 and SOX-2 in undifferentiated hMSCs on day 0 is detectable and very low compared to tumor cell lines as a positive control. Immunocytochemistry detected OCT-4 in the cell nuclei prior (day 0) and post differentiation (day 14). On the same time points, cultures were negative for SOX-2 protein. Messenger RNA for pluripotency markers OCT-4 and SOX-2 isolated from hMSCs was less present, while OCT-4 protein was detected in cell nuclei prior and post differentiation into osteoblast lineage.

  3. A Pan-BCL2 inhibitor renders bone-marrow-resident human leukemia stem cells sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Daniel J; Court Recart, Angela; Sadarangani, Anil; Chun, Hye-Jung; Barrett, Christian L; Krajewska, Maryla; Leu, Heather; Low-Marchelli, Janine; Ma, Wenxue; Shih, Alice Y; Wei, Jun; Zhai, Dayong; Geron, Ifat; Pu, Minya; Bao, Lei; Chuang, Ryan; Balaian, Larisa; Gotlib, Jason; Minden, Mark; Martinelli, Giovanni; Rusert, Jessica; Dao, Kim-Hien; Shazand, Kamran; Wentworth, Peggy; Smith, Kristen M; Jamieson, Christina A M; Morris, Sheldon R; Messer, Karen; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Hudson, Thomas J; Marra, Marco; Frazer, Kelly A; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Reed, John C; Jamieson, Catriona H M

    2013-03-07

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) play a pivotal role in the resistance of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and its progression to blast crisis (BC), in part, through the alternative splicing of self-renewal and survival genes. To elucidate splice-isoform regulators of human BC LSC maintenance, we performed whole-transcriptome RNA sequencing, splice-isoform-specific quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), nanoproteomics, stromal coculture, and BC LSC xenotransplantation analyses. Cumulatively, these studies show that the alternative splicing of multiple prosurvival BCL2 family genes promotes malignant transformation of myeloid progenitors into BC LSCS that are quiescent in the marrow niche and that contribute to therapeutic resistance. Notably, sabutoclax, a pan-BCL2 inhibitor, renders marrow-niche-resident BC LSCs sensitive to TKIs at doses that spare normal progenitors. These findings underscore the importance of alternative BCL2 family splice-isoform expression in BC LSC maintenance and suggest that the combinatorial inhibition of prosurvival BCL2 family proteins and BCR-ABL may eliminate dormant LSCs and obviate resistance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immediate bromodeoxyuridine labelling of unseparated human bone marrow cells ex vivo is superior to labelling after routine laboratory processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P O; Mortensen, B T; Christensen, I J

    1998-01-01

    It is important to evaluate the proliferation of bone marrow cells in several disease conditions and during treatment of patients with for example cytokines. Labelling with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), immunocytochemical staining with anti-BrdUrd antibody and analysis by flow cytometry provides...... a reliable and reproducible technique for estimation of the fraction of cells that incorporated BrdUrd into DNA during S-phase. We have compared immediate BrdUrd labelling of unseparated bone marrow cells with the previously used labelling in the laboratory after routine separation of the mononuclear cells...

  5. Immunomodulative efficacy of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells cultured in human platelet lysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Antoinette; Schallmoser, Katharina; Strunk, Dirk; Stolk, Meaghan; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Seifert, Martina

    2011-12-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are considered to be a promising tool for novel cell-based therapies. Clinical applications in solid organ transplantation were hampered by the dependence on animal serum for hMSCs clinical scale expansion until substitution with human platelet lysate (HPL) became a promising alternative. Therefore we focused on a direct comparison of immunomodulatory properties of hMSCs cultured in HPL or fetal calf serum (FCS). Phenotypic characterization, detection of cytokine secretion and effects on alloantigen- and mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation as well as degranulation of cytomegalovirus-specific cytotoxic T cells were applied in potency assays. We demonstrated that HPL-cultured MSCs have comparable immunomodulatory capacities to their FCS-cultured counterparts. The observed immunomodulatory properties include a beneficial inhibitory effect on immune cell proliferation and an unaffected viral T cell immunity. Thus, culturing hMSCs in HPL generates an efficient and safe expansion combined with intriguing immunomodulatory properties making these cells an attractive cell therapeutic tool.

  6. MicroRNA-4739 regulates osteogenic and adipocytic differentiation of immortalized human bone marrow stromal cells via targeting LRP3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Alajez, Nehad M

    2017-01-01

    3 (LRP3) in regulating the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of immortalized hBMSCs. Gene expression profiling revealed significantly higher LRP3 levels in the highly osteogenic hBMSC clone imCL1 than in the less osteogenic clone imCL2, as well as a significant upregulation of LRP3 during......Understanding the regulatory networks underlying lineage differentiation and fate determination of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) is a prerequisite for their therapeutic use. The goal of the current study was to unravel the novel role of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein...... the osteogenic induction of the imCL1 clone. Data from functional and gene expression assays demonstrated the role of LRP3 as a molecular switch promoting hBMSC lineage differentiation into osteoblasts and inhibiting differentiation into adipocytes. Interestingly, microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling identified...

  7. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human and Ovine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in response to β-Glycerophosphate and Monosodium Phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottagisio, Marta; Lovati, Arianna B; Lopa, Silvia; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-08-01

    Bone defects are severe burdens in clinics, and thus cell therapy offers an alternative strategy exploiting the features of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Sheep are a suitable orthopedic preclinical model for similarities with humans. This study compares the influence of two phosphate sources combined with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) on the osteogenic potential of human and ovine BMSCs. β-Glycerophosphate (β-GlyP) and monosodium phosphate (NaH2PO4) were used as organic and inorganic phosphate sources. Osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs was assessed by calcified matrix, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene expression analysis. A higher calcified matrix deposition was detected in BMSCs cultured with NaH2PO4. Although no significant differences were detected among media for human BMSCs, β-GlyP with or without BMP-2 determined a positive trend in ALP levels compared to NaH2PO4. In contrast, NaH2PO4 had a positive effect on ALP levels in ovine BMSCs. β-GlyP better supported the expression of COL1A1 in human BMSCs, whereas all media enhanced RUNX2 and SPARC expression. Ovine BMSCs responded poorly to any media for RUNX2, COL1A1, and SPARC expression. NaH2PO4 improved calcified matrix deposition without upregulating the transcriptional expression of osteogenic markers. A further optimization of differentiation protocols needs to be performed to translate the procedures from preclinical to clinical models.

  8. A 3D culture system enhances the ability of human bone marrow stromal cells to support the growth of limbal stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Sheyla; Mei, Hua; Nakatsu, Martin N; Baclagon, Elfren R; Deng, Sophie X

    2016-03-01

    The standard method of cultivating limbal epithelial progenitor/stem cells (LSCs) on a monolayer of mouse 3T3 feeder cells possesses the risk of cross-contamination in clinical applications. Human feeder cells have been used to eliminate this risk; however, efficiency from xenobiotic-free cultures on a monolayer appears to be lower than in the standard method using 3T3 cells. We investigated whether bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, could serve as feeder cells for the expansion of LSCs in the 3-dimensional (3D) system. Primary single human LSCs on a monolayer of 3T3s served as the control. Very poor growth was observed when single LSCs were cultured on BMSCs. When LSC clusters were cultured on a BMSC monolayer (CC-BM), 3D culture system (3D CC-BM) and fibrin 3D system (fibrin 3D CC-BM), the 3D CC-BM method supported a greater LSC expansion. The 3D CC-BM system produced a 2.5-fold higher cell growth rate than the control (p0.05), whereas the proportion of K12(+) cells was lower (p3D culture. Copyright © 2016 University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fetal Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Enhance Humanization and Bone Formation of BMP7 Loaded Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiee, Abbas; Baldwin, Jeremy G; Patel, Jatin; Holzapfel, Boris M; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2017-09-01

    Tissue engineered constructs built with human cells capable of generating a bone-like organ within the mouse have attracted considerable interest over the past decade. Here, we aimed to compare the utility of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) isolated from fetal term placenta (fPL-MSC) and fetal first trimester bone marrow (fBM-MSC) in a polycaprolactone scaffold/BMP7-based model in nude mice. Furthermore, fPL-MSC were co-seeded with fetal placenta-derived endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) to assess the impact of ECFC on fPL-MSC osteogenesis. X-ray radiography and micro computed tomography analyses showed enhanced bone formation in all BMP7 groups; however there was no difference after 2 months in bone formation between scaffolds seeded with fPL-MSC alone or combination of ECFC and fPL-MSC. Of interest, fBM-MSC showed the highest level of bone formation. Additionally, endochondral ossification contributed in generation of bone in fBM-MSC. Histological analysis showed the primary role of BMP in generation of cortical and trabecular bone, and the recruitment of hematopoietic cells to the scaffolds. Current in vivo engineered bone organs can potentially be used for drug screening or as models to study bone tissue development in combination with haematopoiesis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Osteogenic induction of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells in novel synthetic polymer-hydrogel matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, M; Hutmacher, D W; Salgado, A J; Kaps, C; Ringe, J; Reis, R L; Sittinger, M; Brandwood, A; Schantz, J T

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate the in vitro osteogenic potential of human mesenchymal progenitor cells in novel matrix architectures built by means of a three-dimensional bioresorbable synthetic framework in combination with a hydrogel. Human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMPCs) were isolated from a human bone marrow aspirate by gradient centrifugation. Before in vitro engineering of scaffold-hMPC constructs, the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential was demonstrated by staining of neutral lipids and induction of bone-specific proteins, respectively. After expansion in monolayer cultures, the cells were enzymatically detached and then seeded in combination with a hydrogel into polycaprolactone (PCL) and polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite (PCL-HA) frameworks. This scaffold design concept is characterized by novel matrix architecture, good mechanical properties, and slow degradation kinetics of the framework and a biomimetic milieu for cell delivery and proliferation. To induce osteogenic differentiation, the specimens were cultured in an osteogenic cell culture medium and were maintained in vitro for 6 weeks. Cellular distribution and viability within three-dimensional hMPC bone grafts were documented by scanning electron microscopy, cell metabolism assays, and confocal laser microscopy. Secretion of the osteogenic marker molecules type I procollagen and osteocalcin was analyzed by semiquantitative immunocytochemistry assays. Alkaline phosphatase activity was visualized by p-nitrophenyl phosphate substrate reaction. During osteogenic stimulation, hMPCs proliferated toward and onto the PCL and PCL-HA scaffold surfaces and metabolic activity increased, reaching a plateau by day 15. The temporal pattern of bone-related marker molecules produced by in vitro tissue-engineered scaffold-cell constructs revealed that hMPCs differentiated better within the biomimetic matrix architecture along the osteogenic lineage.

  11. Microvesicles derived from adult human bone marrow and tissue specific mesenchymal stem cells shuttle selected pattern of miRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Collino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs have been described as a new mechanism of cell-to-cell communication. MVs after internalization within target cells may deliver genetic information. Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and liver resident stem cells (HLSCs were shown to release MVs shuttling functional mRNAs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether MVs derived from MSCs and HLSCs contained selected micro-RNAs (miRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MVs were isolated from MSCs and HLSCs. The presence in MVs of selected ribonucleoproteins involved in the traffic and stabilization of RNA was evaluated. We observed that MVs contained TIA, TIAR and HuR multifunctional proteins expressed in nuclei and stress granules, Stau1 and 2 implicated in the transport and stability of mRNA and Ago2 involved in miRNA transport and processing. RNA extracted from MVs and cells of origin was profiled for 365 known human mature miRNAs by real time PCR. Hierarchical clustering and similarity analysis of miRNAs showed 41 co-expressed miRNAs in MVs and cells. Some miRNAs were accumulated within MVs and absent in the cells after MV release; others were retained within the cells and not secreted in MVs. Gene ontology analysis of predicted and validated targets showed that the high expressed miRNAs in cells and MVs could be involved in multi-organ development, cell survival and differentiation. Few selected miRNAs shuttled by MVs were also associated with the immune system regulation. The highly expressed miRNAs in MVs were transferred to target cells after MV incorporation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that MVs contained ribonucleoproteins involved in the intracellular traffic of RNA and selected pattern of miRNAs, suggesting a dynamic regulation of RNA compartmentalization in MVs. The observation that MV-highly expressed miRNAs were transferred to target cells, rises the possibility that the biological effect of stem

  12. Transplanted Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded onto Peptide Hydrogel Decrease Alveolar Bone Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Tcacencu, Ion; Karlstr?m, Erik; Cedervall, Jessica; Wendel, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Alveolar bone loss can be caused by periodontitis or periodontal trauma. We have evaluated the effects of transplanted undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on alveolar bone reaction and periodontal ligament healing in an experimental periodontal wound model. The hMSCs seeded onto a self-assembling peptide hydrogel in combination with collagen sponge were implanted into the right mandible of 12 rats and followed for 1 (n=6) or 4 weeks (n=6) postoperatively. The other ...

  13. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cementsbismuth on cell proliferation was reduced by the progressive increase of the biocoating thickness on aged cement. In conclusion, the experimental cements have adequate biological properties to be used as root-end/root repair filling materials or pulp capping materials. The alfa-TCP doped cement represents a new potential bioactive material for expanded applications in

  14. Behavior of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Various Titanium-Based Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjuan Qu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and texture of titanium coatings can influence the growth characteristics of the adhered cells. An enhanced proliferation of the human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs would be beneficial. The present study was aimed to investigate whether titanium deposited at different atmospheres would affect the cell growth properties, cellular morphology, and expression of surface markers of hMSCs. Titanium-based coatings were deposited on silicon wafers under oxygen, nitrogen, or argon atmospheres by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition using two different gas pressures followed by heating at 400 °C for 2 h. The characteristics of the coated surfaces were determined via contact angle, zeta potential, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Human MSCs were cultivated on differently coated silicon wafers for 48 h. Subsequently, the cell proliferation rates were analyzed with an MTT assay. The phenotype of hMSCs was checked via immunocytochemical stainings of MSC-associated markers CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the adhesion, spreading, and morphology of hMSCs on coated materials via SEM. The cell proliferation rates of the hMSCs were similar on all coated silicon wafers. The hMSCs retained the MSC phenotype by expressing MSC-associated markers and fibroblast-like morphology with cellular projections. Furthermore, no significant differences could be found in the size of the cells when cultured on all various coated surfaces. In conclusion, despite certain differences in the contact angles and the zeta potentials of various titanium-based coatings, no single coating markedly improved the growth characteristics of hMSCs.

  15. An in vivo model to assess magnesium alloys and their biological effect on human bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Sayuri; Chaya, Amy; Verdelis, Kostas; Bilodeau, Elizabeth A; Sfeir, Charles

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys have many unique qualities which make them ideal candidates for bone fixation devices, including biocompatibility and degradation in vivo. Despite a rise in Mg alloy production and research, there remains no standardized system to assess their degradation or biological effect on human stem cells in vivo. In this study, we developed a novel in vivo model to assess Mg alloys for craniofacial and orthopedic applications. Our model consists of a collagen sponge seeded with human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) around a central Mg alloy rod. These scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously in mice and analyzed after eight weeks. Alloy degradation and biological effect were determined by microcomputed tomography (microCT), histological staining, and immunohistochemistry (IHC). MicroCT showed greater volume loss for pure Mg compared to AZ31 after eight weeks in vivo. Histological analysis showed that hBMSCs were retained around the Mg implants after 8 weeks. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed the expression of dentin matrix protein 1 and osteopontin around both pure Mg and AZ31 with implanted hBMSCs. In addition, histological sections showed a thin mineral layer around all degrading alloys at the alloy-tissue interface. In conclusion, our data show that degrading pure Mg and AZ31 implants are cytocompatible and do not inhibit the osteogenic property of hBMSCs in vivo. These results demonstrate that this model can be used to efficiently assess the biological effect of corroding Mg alloys in vivo. Importantly, this model may be modified to accommodate additional cell types and clinical applications. Magnesium (Mg) alloys have been investigated as ideal candidates for bone fixation devices due to high biocompatibility and degradation in vivo, and there is a growing need of establishing an efficient in vivo material screening system. In this study, we assessed degradation rate and biological effect of Mg alloys by transplanting Mg alloy rod with

  16. Long-Term Safety of Transplanting Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into the Extravascular Spaces of the Choroid of Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Tzameret

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Incurable neuroretinal degeneration diseases cause severe vision loss and blindness in millions of patients worldwide. In previous studies, we demonstrated that transplanting human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs in the extravascular spaces of the choroid (EVSC of the Royal College of Surgeon rats ameliorated retinal degeneration for up to 5 months. Assessing the safety of hBMSC treatment and graft survival in a large animal is a crucial step before initiating clinical trials. Here, we transplanted hBMSCs into the EVSC compartment of New Zealand White rabbits. No immunosuppressants were used. Transplanted cells were spread across the EVSC covering over 80 percent of the subretinal surface. No cells were detected in the sclera. Cells were retained in the EVSC compartment 10 weeks following transplantation. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and histopathology analysis demonstrated no choroidal hemorrhages, retinal detachment, inflammation, or any untoward pathological reactions in any of transplanted eyes or in the control noninjected contralateral eyes. No reduction in retinal function was recorded by electroretinogram up to 10 weeks following transplantation. This study demonstrates the feasibility and safety of transplanting hBMSCs in the EVSC compartment in a large eye model of rabbits.

  17. Evaluation of gene delivery strategies to efficiently overexpress functional HLA-G on human bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana S Boura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC constitutively express low levels of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G, which has been shown to contribute to their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Here, we hypothesized that overexpression of HLA-G on bone marrow-derived MSC would improve their immunomodulatory function, thus increasing their therapeutic potential. Therefore, we investigated which gene transfer system is best suited for delivering this molecule while maintaining its immunomodulatory effects. We performed a side-by-side comparison between three nonviral plasmid-based platforms (pmax-HLA-G1; MC-HLA-G1; pEP-HLA-G1 and a viral system (Lv-HLA-G1 using gene transfer parameters that yielded similar levels of HLA-G1-expressing MSC. Natural killer (NK cell–mediated lysis assays and T cell proliferation assays showed that MSC modified with the HLA-G1 expressing viral vector had significantly lower susceptibility to NK-lysis and significantly reduced T cell proliferation when compared to nonmodified cells or MSC modified with plasmid. We also show that, in plasmid-modified MSC, an increase in Toll-like receptor (TLR9 expression is the mechanism responsible for the abrogation of HLA-G1's immunomodulatory effect. Although MSC can be efficiently modified to overexpress HLA-G1 using viral and nonviral strategies, only viral-based delivery of HLA-G1 is suitable for improvement of MSC's immunomodulatory properties.

  18. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  19. Prospective Isolation of Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Based on Surface Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Mabuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are currently defined as multipotent stromal cells that undergo sustained in vitro growth and can give rise to cells of multiple mesenchymal lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. The regenerative and immunosuppressive properties of MSCs have led to numerous clinical trials exploring their utility for the treatment of a variety of diseases (e.g., acute graft-versus-host disease, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, conventionally cultured MSCs reflect heterogeneous populations that often contain contaminating cells due to the significant variability in isolation methods and the lack of specific MSC markers. This review article focuses on recent developments in the MSC research field, with a special emphasis on the identification of novel surface markers for the in vivo localization and prospective isolation of murine and human MSCs. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological importance of MSC subtypes in vivo with specific reference to data supporting their contribution to HSC niche homeostasis. The isolation of MSCs using selective markers (combination of PDGFRα and Sca-1 is crucial to address the many unanswered questions pertaining to these cells and has the potential to enhance their therapeutic potential enormously.

  20. Xeno-free and shrinkage-free preparation of scaffold-free cartilage-like disc-shaped cell sheet using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasushi; Wakitani, Shigeyuki; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2013-12-01

    Aiming for the clinical application of cartilage regeneration, the xeno-free cultivation method to obtain a scaffold-free cartilage-like disc-shaped cell sheet using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow without the shrinkage of the sheet was investigated. MSCs were inoculated into Cell Culture Insert (0.3 cm(2), pore size; 0.4 μm, pore density; 1.0 × 10(8)/cm(2)) using serum-free chondrogenic differentiation medium containing TGF-β3, IGF-1 and dexamethasone or other modified media, and cultured at 37 °C in 5% CO2 for 3 weeks. Sheet thickness, cartilage specific genes expression, ECM accumulation were determined, and the sections of sheets were stained with alcian blue. A novel mixed medium consisting of a growth medium (10% FCS) with a serum-free chondrogenic differentiation medium could prevent the shrinkage of the sheet and produced a disc-shaped cell sheet. The depth of the sheet was approximately 0.7 mm and the gene expression levels were higher than those in cells in normal human cartilage. The use of human serum instead of FCS did not cause shrinkage and did not decrease the accumulation levels of sGAG and type 2 collagen in the sheet. The cultivation of MSCs grown with completely xeno-free materials using the mixed medium containing human serum in a cell culture insert showed a sheet depth of 1.0 mm and gene expression levels higher than those in normal cartilage. The scaffold-free and xeno-free cartilage-like cell sheet was successfully formed without shrinkage using human bone marrow MSCs and the chondrogenic differentiation medium containing human serum. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. BKCa and hEag1 channels regulate cell proliferation and differentiation in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Yue, Jianbo; Che, Hui; Sun, Hai-Ying; Tse, Hung-Fat; Li, Gui-Rong

    2014-02-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) serve as a reservoir for the continuous renewal of various mesenchymal tissues; however, cellular physiology of ion channels is not fully understood. The present study investigated potential roles of large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated potassium (BKCa ) channels and ether-à-go-go potassium (hEag1 or Kv10.1) channels in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation in human MSCs. We found that inhibition of BKCa with paxilline or hEag1 with astemizole, or knockdown of BKCa with shRNAs targeting KCa1.1 or hEag1 channels with shRNAs targeting KCNH1 arrested the cells at G0/G1 phase. In addition, silencing BKCa or hEag1 channels significantly reduced adipogenic differentiation with decrease of lipid accumulation and expression of the adipocyte marker PPARγ, and decreased osteogenic differentiation with reduction of mineral precipitation and osteocalcin. These effects were accompanied with a reduced cyclin D1, cyclin E, p-ERK1/2, and p-Akt. Our results demonstrate that BKCa and hEag1 channels not only regulate cell proliferation, but also participate in the adipogenic and osteogenic differentiations in human MSCs, which indicates that BKCa and hEag1 channels may be essential in maintaining bone marrow physiological function and bone regeneration. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Attachment and growth of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells on regenerated antheraea pernyi silk fibroin films

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    Luan Xiying [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Wang Yong [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Duan Xiang [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Duan Qiaoyan [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Li Mingzhong [School of Materials Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Lu Shenzhou [School of Materials Engineering, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Zhang Huanxiang [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Zhang Xueguang [Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Stem Cell, Suzhou University, Suzhou 215007 (China)

    2006-12-15

    Silk fibroin of the silkworm Bombyx mori has been studied extensively, while the research on Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin (A. pernyi SF) in biomaterials is only at an early stage. In this study, the attachment, morphology, growth and phenotype of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) cultured on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films were studied in vitro. The results indicated that the attachment of hBMSCs on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films was almost the same as that on the collagen films. MTT and cell counting analyses demonstrated that the growth of hBMSCs on the regenerated A. pernyi SF films was better than that on controls. Moreover, electron scanning microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting assays showed that the regenerated A. pernyi SF supported hBMSCs growth and functional maintenance compared with the controls. These data suggest that the regenerated A. pernyi SF, like Bombyx mori silk fibroin (B. mori SF) and collagen, can support hBMSCs attachment, growth and phenotypic maintenance, and has better biocompatibilities for hBMSCs in vitro culture.

  3. Proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells on hydroxyapatite/bacterial cellulose nanocomposite scaffolds.

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    Fang, Bo; Wan, Yi-Zao; Tang, Ting-Tang; Gao, Chuan; Dai, Ke-Rong

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we prepared hydroxyapatite/bacterial cellulose (HAp/BC) nanocomposite scaffolds utilizing the biomimetic technique, and investigated the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells derived from human bone marrow (hBMSC) on them. Scanning electron microscopy proved that cells could adhere and spread on scaffolds. The hBMSC seeded on the nanocomposites exhibited better adhesion and activity than those seeded upon the pure BC. After 6 days of culture on scaffolds, the cells proliferated faster on the nanocomposites than on the pure BC, as assessed by Alamar Blue assay. Real-time reverse transcription PCR results showed that the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of hBMSC and the expression of osteopontin, osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein, and ALP mRNA were all higher for up to 7 days for hBMSC cultured on the nanocomposites than for those cultured upon the pure BC with and without the presence of osteogenic supplements (L-ascorbic acid, glycerophosphate, and dexamethasone, pproliferation, and differentiation in cultured hBMSC can be modulated by the HAp/BC nanocomposite scaffold properties. In summary, we have developed a scaffold that displays in vitro biocompatibility, which may have potential use for bone tissue engineering.

  4. Multilineage differentiation of adult human bone marrow progenitor cells transduced with human papilloma virus type 16 E6/E7 genes.

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    Osyczka, A M; Nöth, U; O'Connor, J; Caterson, E J; Yoon, K; Danielson, K G; Tuan, R S

    2002-11-01

    We have established a new adult human bone marrow-derived cell line hMPC 32F, stably transduced with human papilloma virus type 16 E6/E7 genes, that displays mesenchymal multilineage differentiation ability in vitro. The hMPC 32F cells exhibited a population doubling time of 22 h and have been maintained in culture for about 20 passages. When cultured in conditions promoting osteogenic, adipogenic, or chondrogenic differentiation, hMPC 32F cells expressed mature differentiated phenotypes. These include (1) osteoblastic phenotype characterized by upregulated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression and extracellular matrix mineralization, (2) adipocytic phenotype with the presence of intracellular lipid droplets, and (3) chondrocytic phenotype of round cells surrounded by a sulfated proteoglycan-rich matrix. In addition, the hMPC 32F cells expressed differentiation lineage-specific genes, as detected by RT-PCR. Furthermore, osteogenic and adipogenic cultures responded to regulatory factors such as transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3). Thus, continuous treatment of osteogenic cultures for 2 weeks with TGF-beta1 decreased ALP activity and mRNA expression and inhibited osteocalcin mRNA expression and matrix mineralization, whereas l,25(OH)2D3 had an additive, stimulatory effect. In adipogenic cultures, treatment with TGF-beta1 for 2 weeks markedly inhibited adipogenesis whereas 1,25(OH)2D3 had no obvious effect. Finally, clonal analysis of hMPC 32F cells revealed a high percentage of multipotent clones, although clones of more restricted differentiation potential were also present. These characteristics of the hMPC 32F cell line suggest their pluripotent, progenitor, and nontransformed nature and indicate their potential application for studying the mechanisms governing developmental potential of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells.

  5. Expression of the human coagulation factor IX in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

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    Azadehsadat Azadbakhsh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are appropriate target for gene and cell-based therapy of hemophilia B patients. MSCs possess several unique properties such as capability of differentiating into multiple lineages and lower immunogenecity in transplant procedure that make them attractive candidates for cell and gene therapy. One of the challenges in the gene therapy is the low expression level of transgene. To improve expression, strong regulatory elements in the context of vectors could contribute to improve efficacy of gene therapy strategies. In this study four human factor IX (hFIX-expressing plasmids equipped with various combination of human -globin (hBG introns and Kozak sequence were transfected into the MSCs and expression of the hFIX was evaluated in vitro. Material and Methods: MSCs were obtained from tibias and the femora of rats and phenotypic characterization of the MSCs was determined by flow cytometry. Four hFIX-expressing plasmids were introduced into the culture-expanded MSCs using transfection agent. 48 hours after transfection, ability of the MSCs for expression of the hFIX and efficacies of the plasmids were evaluated by performing sandwich ELISA on cultured media as well as semi-quantitative RT-PCR. All analyses were performed with One-way ANOVA using SPSS software. Results:The highest expression level of the hFIX was obtained from intron-less and hBG intron-I containing construct. The highest biological activity was obtained from hBG intron-I,II containing construct. Conclusion:Successful expression of the hFIX was obtained from recombinant MSCs. MSCs were able to splice heterologous hBG intron-I from the hFIX-cDNA. Application of thehBG introns reduced the hFIX expression levels, probably due to improper splicing of the hBG introns.

  6. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1-compromised human bone marrow endothelial cells exhibit decreased adhesion molecule expression and CD34+ hematopoietic cell adhesion.

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    Zhou, Hongfei; Dehn, Donna; Kepa, Jadwiga K; Siegel, David; Scott, Devon E; Tan, Wei; Ross, David

    2010-07-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) deficiency resulting from a homozygous NQO1*2 polymorphism has been associated with an increased risk of benzene-induced myeloid toxicity and a variety of de novo and therapy-induced leukemias. Endothelial cells in human bone marrow form one of the two known hematopoietic stem cell microenvironments and are one of the major cell types that express NQO1 in bone marrow. We have used a transformed human bone marrow endothelial cell (TrHBMEC) line to study the potential impact of a lack of NQO1 activity on adhesion molecule [endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (E-selectin), vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1] expression and functional adhesion to bone marrow progenitor cells. We used both 5-methoxy-1,2-dimethyl-3-[(4-nitrophenoxy)methyl]indole-4,7-dione (ES936), a mechanism-based inhibitor of NQO1, and anti-NQO1 small interfering RNA to abrogate NQO1 activity. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated a significant inhibition of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha-induced E-selectin mRNA levels after ES936 pretreatment. Immunoblot assays demonstrated a significant reduction in TNFalpha-stimulated E-selectin, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 proteins after inhibition or knockdown of NQO1. The mechanisms underlying this effect remain undefined, but modulation of nuclear factor-kappaB (p65), c-Jun, and activating transcription factor 2, transcriptional regulators of adhesion molecules, were observed after inhibition or knockdown of NQO1. Decreased level of E-selectin, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 also resulted in a functional deficit in adhesion. A parallel plate flow chamber study demonstrated a marked reduction in CD34(+) cell (KG1a) adhesion to NQO1-deficient TrHBMECs relative to controls. The reduced adhesive ability of TrHBMECs may affect the function of the vascular stem cell niche and also may contribute to the increased susceptibility of polymorphic individuals

  7. Human umbilical cord perivascular cells exhibited enhanced migration capacity towards hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: a role for autocrine motility factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayo, Juan; Fiore, Esteban; Aquino, Jorge B; Malvicini, Mariana; Rizzo, Manglio; Peixoto, Estanislao; Alaniz, Laura; Piccioni, Flavia; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC.

  8. Human Umbilical Cord Perivascular Cells Exhibited Enhanced Migration Capacity towards Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Comparison with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Role for Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Bayo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2 and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC.

  9. The temporal expression of estrogen receptor alpha-36 and runx2 in human bone marrow derived stromal cells during osteogenesis

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    Francis, W.R., E-mail: w.francis@swansea.ac.uk [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University (United Kingdom); Owens, S.E.; Wilde, C. [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University (United Kingdom); Pallister, I. [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University (United Kingdom); Trauma and Orthopaedics, Morriston Hospital, Swansea (United Kingdom); Kanamarlapudi, V. [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University (United Kingdom); Zou, W., E-mail: weizou60@hotmail.com [College of Life Sciences, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian 116081 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratories of Biotechnology and Molecular Drug Research and Development, Dalian 116081 (China); Xia, Z. [Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ERα36 is the predominant ERα isoform involved in bone regulation in human BMSC. • ERα36 mRNA is significantly upregulated during the process of osteogenesis. • The pattern of ERα36 and runx2 mRNA expression is similar during osteogenesis. • ERα36 appears to be co-localised with runx2 during osteogenesis. - Abstract: During bone maintenance in vivo, estrogen signals through estrogen receptor (ER)-α. The objectives of this study were to investigate the temporal expression of ERα36 and ascertain its functional relevance during osteogenesis in human bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSC). This was assessed in relation to runt-related transcription factor-2 (runx2), a main modulatory protein involved in bone formation. ERα36 and runx2 subcellular localisation was assessed using immunocytochemistry, and their mRNA expression levels by real time PCR throughout the process of osteogenesis. The osteogenically induced BMSCs demonstrated a rise in ERα36 mRNA during proliferation followed by a decline in expression at day 10, which represents a change in dynamics within the culture between the proliferative stage and the differentiative stage. The mRNA expression profile of runx2 mirrored that of ERα36 and showed a degree subcellular co-localisation with ERα36. This study suggests that ERα36 is involved in the process of osteogenesis in BMSCs, which has implications in estrogen deficient environments.

  10. Altered microRNA expression profile in exosomes during osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Ji-Feng Xu

    Full Text Available The physiological role of microRNAs (miRNAs in osteoblast differentiation remains elusive. Exosomal miRNAs isolated from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs culture were profiled using miRNA arrays containing probes for 894 human matured miRNAs. Seventy-nine miRNAs (∼8.84% could be detected in exosomes isolated from BMSC culture supernatants when normalized to endogenous control genes RNU44. Among them, nine exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 4 miRNAs were under regulated significantly (Relative fold>2, p<0.05 when compared with the values at 0 day with maximum changes at 1 to 7 days. Five miRNAs (miR-199b, miR-218, miR-148a, miR-135b, and miR-221 were further validated and differentially expressed in the individual exosomal samples from hBMSCs cultured at different time points. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that RNA degradation, mRNA surveillance pathway, Wnt signaling pathway, RNA transport were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with differential exosomal miRNA patterns related to osteogenic differentiation. These data demonstrated exosomal miRNA is a regulator of osteoblast differentiation.

  11. Dexamethasone Regulates EphA5, a Potential Inhibitory Factor with Osteogenic Capability of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

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    Tsuyoshi Yamada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated the importance of quality management procedures for the handling of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs and provided evidence for the existence of osteogenic inhibitor molecules in BMSCs. One candidate inhibitor is the ephrin type-A receptor 5 (EphA5, which is expressed in hBMSCs and upregulated during long-term culture. In this study, forced expression of EphA5 diminished the expression of osteoblast phenotypic markers. Downregulation of endogenous EphA5 by dexamethasone treatment promoted osteoblast marker expression. EphA5 could be involved in the normal growth regulation of BMSCs and could be a potential marker for replicative senescence. Although Eph forward signaling stimulated by ephrin-B-Fc promoted the expression of ALP mRNA in BMSCs, exogenous addition of EphA5-Fc did not affect the ALP level. The mechanism underlying the silencing of EphA5 in early cultures remains unclear. EphA5 promoter was barely methylated in hBMSCs while histone deacetylation could partially suppress EphA5 expression in early-passage cultures. In repeatedly passaged cultures, the upregulation of EphA5 independent of methylation could competitively inhibit osteogenic signal transduction pathways such as EphB forward signaling. Elucidation of the potential inhibitory function of EphA5 in hBMSCs may provide an alternative approach for lineage differentiation in cell therapy strategies and regenerative medicine.

  12. In vitro analysis with human bone marrow stem cells on Ti-15Mo alloy for dental and orthopedic implants application

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    N.T.C. Oliveira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Nowadays, research on orthopedic and dental implants is focused on titanium alloys for their mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in the human body environment. Another important aspect to be investigated is their surface topography, which is very important to osseointegration. With laser beam irradiation for roughening the implants surface an easier control of the microtopography is achieved, and surface contamination is avoided. The aim of this study was to assess human bone marrow stem cells response to a newly developed titanium alloy, Ti-15Mo, with surface topography modified by laser beam irradiation. Materials and methods: A total of 10 Ti machined disks (control, 10 Ti-15Mo machined disks and 10 Ti-15Mo disks treated by laser beam-irradiation were prepared. To study how Ti-15Mo surface topografy can induce osteoblast differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells, the expression levels of bone related genes and mesenchymal stem cells marker were analyzed, using real time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction. Results: In Test 1 (comparison between Ti-15Mo machined disks and Ti-machined disks quantitative real-time RT–PCR showed a significant induction of ALPL, FOSL1 and SPP1, which increase 20% or more. In Test 2 (comparison between Ti-15Mo laser treated disks and Ti-machined disks all investigated genes were up-regulated. By comparing Test 1 and Test 2 it was detected that COL1A1, COL3A1, FOSL1 and ENG sensibly increased their expression whereas RUNX2, ALPL and SPP1 expression remained substantially unchanged. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that laser treated Ti-15Mo alloys are promising materials for implants application.

  13. Extracellular matrix protein mediated regulation of the osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Smitha; Bhonde, Ramesh; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Totey, Satish

    2012-09-01

    The biomimetic approach of tissue engineering exploits the favorable properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), to achieve better scaffold performance and tissue regeneration. ECM proteins regulate cell adhesion and differentiation through integrin mediated signal transduction. In the present study, we have examined the role of ECM proteins such as collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin and vitronectin in regulating the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were grown on selected ECM protein treated tissue culture plates. The growth kinetics was assessed by calculating the doubling time of the cells on different ECM treated plates. The cells were directed to osteoblast lineage by growing them in osteogenic induction media for 21 day. Differentiation was evaluated at different time points by osteoblast differentiation associated gene expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, histochemical staining for mineralized matrix and calcium quantification. The doubling time of hMSCs cultured on collagen type I was significantly low, which was followed by laminin and fibronectin treated plates. However, doubling time of hMSCs cultured on vitronectin treated plate was not significantly different than that of the untreated control. High ALP gene (ALPL) expression and associated enhancement of mineralization were observed on collagen type I, fibronectin and vitronectin treated plates. Collagen type I showed early onset of mineralization with high ALP activity and up-regulation of osteopontin, ALPL, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin genes. Vitronectin also up-regulated these genes and showed the highest amount of calcium in the secreted mineral matrix. Therefore, we conclude that, ECM proteins indeed modified the growth patterns and induced the osteoblast differentiation of hMSCs. Our findings have significant implication for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2012 International

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Regulates High Mobility Group A2 Expression in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

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    Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cicchetto, Andrew C; Lakatos, Kinga; Nolta, Jan A; Fierro, Fernando A

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an excellent source for numerous cellular therapies due to their simple isolation, low immunogenicity, multipotent differentiation potential and regenerative secretion profile. However, over-expanded MSCs show decreased therapeutic efficacy. This shortcoming may be circumvented by identifying methods that promote self-renewal of MSCs in culture. HMGA2 is a DNA-binding protein that regulates self-renewal in multiple types of stem cells through chromatin remodeling, but its impact on human bone marrow-derived MSCs is not known. Using an isolation method to obtain pure MSCs within 9 days in culture, we show that expression of HMGA2 quickly decreases during early expansion of MSCs, while let-7 microRNAs (which repress HMGA2) are simultaneously increased. Remarkably, we demonstrate that FGF-2, a growth factor commonly used to promote self-renewal in MSCs, rapidly induces HMGA2 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The signaling pathway involves FGF-2 receptor 1 (FGFR1) and ERK1/2, but acts independent from let-7. By silencing HMGA2 using shRNAs, we demonstrate that HMGA2 is necessary for MSC proliferation. However, we also show that over-expression of HMGA2 does not increase cell proliferation, but rather abrogates the mitogenic effect of FGF-2, possibly through inhibition of FGFR1. In addition, using different methods to assess in vitro differentiation, we show that modulation of HMGA2 inhibits adipogenesis, but does not affect osteogenesis of MSCs. Altogether, our results show that HMGA2 expression is associated with highly proliferating MSCs, is tightly regulated by FGF-2, and is involved in both proliferation and adipogenesis of MSCs. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2128-2137, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. In vivo induction of the autophagic machinery in human bone marrow cells during Leishmania donovani complex infection.

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    Mitroulis, Ioannis; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Vassileios P; Mimidis, Konstantinos; Speletas, Matthaios; Ritis, Konstantinos

    2009-12-01

    Autophagy is a homeostatic process promoting cell survival in periods of stress. The induction of the autophagic machinery has also been implicated in both innate and adaptive immunity. Leishmania donovani, which is the causative pathogen of visceral leishmaniasis, is an intracellular parasite that invades and multiplies in bone marrow macrophages. We describe the induction of host cell autophagic machinery during acute natural bone marrow infection by L. donovani complex, detected by LC3B immunoblot. The successful treatment with liposomal amphotericin B resulted in the resolution of this phenomenon. Even though the role of autophagy in parasite biology has been previously studied, our findings show for the first time the in vivo host cell LC3B conversion as a marker of the induction of the autophagic machinery during infection with Leishmania parasite in real time conditions.

  16. Electromagnetic fields induce neural differentiation of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells via ROS mediated EGFR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Eun; Seo, Young-Kwon; Yoon, Hee-Hoon; Kim, Chan-Wha; Park, Jung-Keug; Jeon, Songhee

    2013-03-01

    Even though the inducing effect of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the neural differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) is a distinctive, the underlying mechanism of differentiation remains unclear. To find out the signaling pathways involved in the neural differentiation of BM-MSCs by EMF, we examined the CREB phosphorylation and Akt or ERK activation as an upstream of CREB. In hBM-MSCs treated with ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT), the expression of neural markers such as NF-L, MAP2, and NeuroD1 increased at 6 days and phosphorylation of Akt and CREB but not ERK increased at 90 min in BM-MSCs. Moreover, EMF increased phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as an upstream receptor tyrosine kinase of PI3K/Akt at 90 min. It has been well documented that ELF-MF exposure may alter cellular processes by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations. Thus, we examined EMF-induced ROS production in BM-MSCs. Moreover, pretreatment with a ROS scavenger, N-acetylcystein, and an EGFR inhibitor, AG-1478, prevented the phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream molecules. These results suggest that EMF induce neural differentiation through activation of EGFR signaling and mild generation of ROS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells on akermanite-bioactive ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongli; Wu, Chengtie; Dai, Kerong; Chang, Jiang; Tang, Tingting

    2006-11-01

    In the present study, the effects of a calcium magnesium silicate bioactive ceramic (akermanite) on proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) have been investigated and compared with the classical ceramic (beta-tricalcium phosphate, beta-TCP). Akermanite and beta-TCP disks were seeded with hBMSC and kept in growth medium or osteogenic medium for 10 days. Proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation were evaluated on day 1, 4, 7 and 10. The data from the Alamar Blue assay and lactic acid production assay showed that hBMSC proliferated more significantly on akermanite than on beta-TCP. The analysis of osteoblast-related genes, including alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OC), indicated that akermanite ceramics enhanced the expression of osteoblast-related genes, but type I collagen (COL I) showed no noticeable difference among akermanite and beta-TCP ceramics. Furthermore, this stimulatory effect was observed not only in osteogenic medium, but also in normal growth medium without osteogenic reagents such as l-ascorbic acid, glycerophosphate and dexamethasone. This result suggests that akermanite can promote osteoblastic differentiation of hBMSC in vitro even without osteogenic reagents, and may be used as a bioactive material for bone regeneration and tissue engineering applications.

  18. In vitro Culture of Naïve Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Stemness Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Bidisha; Das, Bikul

    2017-01-01

    Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) resides in their niches in close proximity to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These naïve MSCs have tremendous potential in regenerative therapeutics, and may also be exploited by cancer and infectious disease agents. Hence, it is important to study the physiological and pathological roles of naïve MSC. However, our knowledge of naïve MSCs is limited by lack of appropriate isolation and in vitro culture methods. Established culture methods use serum rich media, and serial passaging for retrospective isolation of MSCs. These primed MSCs may not reflect the true physiological and pathological roles of naive MSCs (Figure 1). Therefore, there is a strong need for direct isolation and in vitro culture of naïve MSCs to study their stemness (self-renewal and undifferentiated state) and developmental ontogeny. We have taken a niche-based approach on stemness to better maintain naïve MSCs in vitro. In this approach, stemness is broadly divided as niche dependent (extrinsic), niche independent (intrinsic) and niche modulatory (altruistic or competitive). Using this approach, we were able to maintain naïve CD271+/CD133+ BM-MSCs for 2 weeks. Furthermore, this in vitro culture system helped us to identify naïve MSCs as a protective niche site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative organism of pulmonary tuberculosis. In this review, we discuss the in vitro culture of primed vs. naïve human BM derived MSCs with a special focus on how a stemness based approach could facilitate the study of naïve BM-MSCs. PMID:28884113

  19. In vitro Culture of Naïve Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Stemness Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Bidisha; Das, Bikul

    2017-01-01

    Human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) resides in their niches in close proximity to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These naïve MSCs have tremendous potential in regenerative therapeutics, and may also be exploited by cancer and infectious disease agents. Hence, it is important to study the physiological and pathological roles of naïve MSC. However, our knowledge of naïve MSCs is limited by lack of appropriate isolation and in vitro culture methods. Established culture methods use serum rich media, and serial passaging for retrospective isolation of MSCs. These primed MSCs may not reflect the true physiological and pathological roles of naive MSCs (Figure 1). Therefore, there is a strong need for direct isolation and in vitro culture of naïve MSCs to study their stemness (self-renewal and undifferentiated state) and developmental ontogeny. We have taken a niche-based approach on stemness to better maintain naïve MSCs in vitro. In this approach, stemness is broadly divided as niche dependent (extrinsic), niche independent (intrinsic) and niche modulatory (altruistic or competitive). Using this approach, we were able to maintain naïve CD271+/CD133+ BM-MSCs for 2 weeks. Furthermore, this in vitro culture system helped us to identify naïve MSCs as a protective niche site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative organism of pulmonary tuberculosis. In this review, we discuss the in vitro culture of primed vs. naïve human BM derived MSCs with a special focus on how a stemness based approach could facilitate the study of naïve BM-MSCs.

  20. Specific depletion of mature T lymphocytes from human bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Møller, J; Plesner, T

    1989-01-01

    An effective method for specific depletion of mature T lymphocytes from human bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) with preservation of prethymic T cells and natural killer (NK) cells is presented. The BMMC were incubated with F101.01, a monoclonal antibody recognizing an epitope of the T...

  1. LIPID COMPOSITION OF HUMAN BONE MARROW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WAJDA, M

    1965-04-01

    1. A modified method for the analysis of phospholipid mixtures by selective hydrolysis is described. 2. The phospholipid compositions of normal human bone marrow and of the bone marrows of patients who died with anaemia or various forms of leukaemia were investigated. 3. Phospholipids from normal bone marrow comprised about 44% of lecithin, 4% of choline plasmalogen, 7% of glyceryl ether phospholipid (choline base), 10% of sphingomyelin, 22% of phosphatidylethanolamine plus phosphatidylserine, 8% of ethanolamine plasmalogen and 5% of glyceryl ether phospholipid (ethanolamine base). 4. The proportion of kephalin (i.e. phosphatidylethanolamine plus phosphatidylserine) in the pathological bone marrows tended to be lower than normal. No other consistent differences were observed between the normal and pathological samples. 4. A ceramide dihexoside was isolated from normal bone marrow.

  2. Role of human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells in promoting osteogenic differentiation by influencing p38 MAPK signaling in lipopolysaccharide -induced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

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    Wang, Yuli; Wu, Hongxia; Shen, Ming; Ding, Siyang; Miao, Jing; Chen, Ning, E-mail: 2927410849@qq.com

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease induced by bacterial pathogens, which not only affect connective tissue attachments but also cause alveolar bone loss. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of Human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs) on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs) under lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory conditions. Proliferation levels were measured by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU). Osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization were investigated using chromogenic alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) activity substrate assays, Alizarin red S staining, and RT-PCR analysis of HBMSCs osteogenic marker expression. Oxidative stress induced by LPS was investigated by assaying reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Here, we demonstrated that HAMSCs increased the proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, and SOD activity of LPS-induced HBMSCs, and down-regulated the ROS level. Moreover, our results suggested that the activation of p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway is essential for reversing the LPS-induced bone-destructive processes. SB203580, a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK signaling, significantly suppressed the anti-inflammatory effects in HAMSCs. In conclusion, HAMSCs show a strong potential in treating inflammation-induced bone loss by influencing p38 MAPK signaling. - Highlights: • LPS inhibites osteogenic differentiation in HBMSCs via suppression of p38 MAPK signaling pathway. • HAMSCs promote LPS-induced HBMSCs osteogenic differentiation through p38 MAPK signaling pathway. • HAMSCs reverse LPS-induced oxidative stress in LPS-induced HBMSCs through p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

  3. Enhanced cellular responses of human bone marrow stromal cells cultured on pretreated surface with allogenic platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Han; Yoo, Jeong Joon; Kim, Ha Na; Nam, Jinwoo; Kim, Hee Joong

    2012-01-01

    The principal objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of surface pretreatment with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the cellular functions of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). The surfaces of tissue culture plates (TCPs) were pretreated by adding PRP followed by centrifugation to bring platelets closer to the surface, followed by incubation for 60 min at 37°C. Then, hBMSCs were seeded onto TCP and TCP pretreated with PRP (TCP-PRP), followed by culture in osteogenic medium. Cell attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were evaluated. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM; JSM-7401F, JEOL Ltd., Japan) observations were conducted. The attachment of hBMSCs was significantly lower on TCP-PRP than on TCP. However, when the cell numbers were normalized with those observed on day 1 of culture, cellular proliferation on 5 days was significantly higher on TCP-PRP. Alkaline phosphatase activity, an index of early phase of osteoblastic differentiation, was significantly higher on TCP-PRP on day 14. Calcium deposition amount, an index of terminal osteoblastic differentiation, was also significantly higher on TCP-PRP on days 14 and 21. The results of von Kossa staining confirmed that, on day 21, the area of mineralized nodules was significantly larger on TCP-PRP. FE-SEM observation demonstrated that activated platelets and fibrin network covered the surface after PRP treatment. An increase in the number of hBMSCs and their cellular products was evident on the FE-SEM observation, and the fibrin network remained on day 21. Our results demonstrate that a PRP-treated surface enhanced early proliferation and late osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs.

  4. Biological responses of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to Sr-M-Si (M = Zn, Mg) silicate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meili; Wu, Chengtie; Lin, Kaili; Fan, Wei; Chen, Lei; Xiao, Yin; Chang, Jiang

    2012-11-01

    Strontium (Sr), Zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mg), and silicon (Si) are reported to be essential trace elements for the growth and mineralization of bone. We speculated that the combination of these bioactive elements in bioceramics may be effective to regulate the osteogenic property of bone-forming cells. In this study, two Sr-containing silicate bioceramics, Sr(2)ZnSi(2)O(7) (SZS) and Sr(2)MgSi(2)O(7) (SMS), were prepared. The biological response of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to the two bioceramics (in the forms of powders and dense ceramic bulks) was systematically studied. In powder form, the effect of powder extracts on the viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of BMSCs was investigated. In ceramic disc form, both direct and indirect coculture of BMSCs with ceramic discs were used to investigate their biological response, including attachment, proliferation, ALP activity, and bone-related genes expression. Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and akermanite (Ca(2)MgSi(2)O(7), CMS) were used as control materials. The results showed that the Sr, Zn, and Si (or Sr, Mg, and Si)-containing ionic products from SZS and SMS powders enhanced ALP activity of BMSCs, compared to those from β-TCP. Both SZS and SMS ceramic discs supported the growth of BMSCs, and most importantly, significantly enhanced the ALP activity and bone-related genes expression of BMSCs as compared to β-TCP. The results suggest that the specific combination of bioactive ions (Sr, Zn, Si, e.g.) in bioceramics is a viable way to improve the biological performance of biomaterials, and the form of materials and surface properties were nonnegligible factors to influence cell response. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Apoptotic Resistance of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Human Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökhan Ertas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from human bone marrow (hBM and adipose tissue (hAT are perceived as attractive sources of stem cells for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to compare MSCs from hBM and hAT for their immunocytochemistry staining and resistance to in vitro apoptosis. Methods. In our study, we investigated the antiapoptotic ability of these MSCs toward oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and serum deprivation. Results were assessed by MTT and flow cytometry. All experiments were repeated a minimum of three times. Results. Flow cytometry and MTT analysis revealed that hAT-MSCs exhibited a higher resistance toward H2O2-induced apoptosis (n=3, hBM-hAT viability H2O2  58.43±1.24–73.02±1.44, P<0.02 and to serum-deprivation-induced apoptosis at days 1 and 4 than the hBM-MSCs (n=3, hAT-hBM absorbance, resp., day 1: 0.305±0.027–0.234±0.015, P=0.029, day 4: 0.355±0.003–0.318±0.007, P=0.001, and day 7: 0.400±0.017–0.356±0.008, P=0.672. hAT-MSCs showed superior tolerance to oxidative stress triggered by 2 mmol/L H2O2 and also have superior antiapoptosis capacity toward serum-free culture. Conclusion. In this study we found that hAT-MSCs are more resistant to in vitro apoptosis.

  6. Potential characteristics of stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth compared with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for mineralized tissue-forming cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kenji; Yamada, Yoichi; Nakamura, Sayaka; Umemura, Eri; Ito, Kenji; Ueda, Minoru

    2011-12-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine using stem cell biology has been a promising field for treatment of local and systemic intractable diseases. Recently, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) have been identified as a novel population of stem cells. This study focused on the characterization of SHED as compared with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). We investigated potential characteristics of SHED by using DNA microarray, real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence analysis. Multiple gene expression profiles indicated that the expression of 2753 genes in SHED had changed by ≥2.0-fold as compared with that in BMMSCs. One of the most significant pathways that accelerated in SHED was that of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor signaling, which contains several cascades such as PKA, JNK, and ASK1. When the BMP signaling pathway was stimulated by BMP-2, the expression of BMP-2, BMP-4, Runx2, and DSPP was up-regulated significantly in SHED than that in BMMSCs. Furthermore, the BMP-4 protein was expressed much higher in SHED but not in BMMSCs, as confirmed by immunofluorescence. By using the gene expression profiles, this study indicates that SHED is involved in the BMP signaling pathway and suggests that BMP-4 might play a crucial role in this. These results might be useful for effective cell-based tissue regeneration, including that of bone, pulp, and dentin, by applying the characteristics of SHED. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytoskeletal proteins and stem cell markers gene expression in human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after different periods of simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovich, J. G.; Zhambalova, A. P.; Romanov, Yu. A.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) are present in a variety of tissues during prenatal and postnatal human development. In adult organism, they are prevalent in bone marrow and supposed to be involved in space-flight induced osteopenia. We studied expression of various genes in human bone marrow MSCs after different terms of simulated microgravity (SMG) provided by Random Positioning Machine. Simulated microgravity induced transient changes in expression level of genes associated with actin cytoskeleton, especially after 48 h of SMG. However, after 120 h exposure in SMG partial restoration of gene expression levels (relative to the control) was found. Similar results were obtained with bmMSCs subjected to 24 h readaptation in static state after 24 h in SMG. Analysis of 84 genes related to identification, growth and differentiation of stem cells revealed that expression of nine genes was changed slightly after 48 h in SMG. More pronounced changes in gene expression of "stem cells markers" were observed after 120 h of simulated microgravity. Among 84 investigated genes, 30 were up-regulated and 24 were down-regulated. Finally, MSCs osteogenesis induced by long-term (10-20 days) simulation of microgravity was accompanied by down-regulation of gene expression of the main osteogenic differentiation markers ( ALPL, OMD) and master transcription osteogenic factor of MSCs ( Runx2). Thus, our study demonstrated that changes in expression level of some genes associated with actin cytoskeleton and stem cell markers are supposed to be one of the mechanisms, which contribute to precursor's cellular adaptation to the microgravity conditions. These results can clarify genomic mechanisms through which SMG reduces osteogenic differentiation of bmMSCs.

  8. The susceptive alendronate-treatment timing and dosage for osteogenesis enhancement in human bone marrow-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsiang Chang

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicated that alendronate enhanced osteogenesis in osteoblasts and human bone marrow-derived stem cells. However, the time- and dose-dependent effects of Aln on osteogenic differentiation and cytotoxicity of hBMSCs remain undefined. In present study, we investigated the effective dose range and timing of hBMSCs. hBMSCs were treated with various Aln doses (1, 5 and 10 µM according to the following groups: group A was treated with Aln during the first five days of bone medium, groups B, C and D were treated during the first, second, and final five days of osteo-induction medium and group E was treated throughout the entire experiment. The mineralization level and cytotoxicity were measured by quantified Alizarin Red S staining and MTT assay. In addition, the reversal effects of farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate replenishment in group B were also investigated. The results showed that Aln treatment in groups A, B and E enhanced hBMSC mineralization in a dose-dependent manner, and the most pronounced effects were observed in groups B and E. The higher dose of Aln simultaneously enhanced mineralization and caused cytotoxicity in groups B, C and E. Replenishment of FPP or GGPP resulted in partial or complete reverse of the Aln-induced mineralization respectively. Furthermore, the addition of FPP or GGPP also eliminated the Aln-induced cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that hBMSCs are susceptible to 5 µM Aln during the initiation stage of osteogenic differentiation and that a 10 µM dose is cytotoxic.

  9. Naringin enhances osteogenic differentiation through the activation of ERK signaling in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huichao Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Naringin has been reported to regulate bone metabolism. However, its effect on osteogenesis remains unclear. The aim was to investigate the effect of naringin on osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs through the activation of the ERK signaling pathway in osteogenic differentiation. Materials and Methods: Annexin V-FITC assay and MTT assay were used to measure the effect of naringin on cytotoxicity and proliferation of hBMSCs, respectively. Alkaline phosphatase activity analysis, Alizarin Red S staining, Western blotting, and real-time PCR assay were used to evaluate both the potential effect of naringin on osteogenic differentiation and the role of ERK signaling pathway in osteogenic differentiation. Results: Our results showed that naringin had no obvious toxicity on hBMSCs, and could significantly promote the proliferation of hBMSCs. Naringin also enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs and increased the protein and mRNA expression levels of osteogenic markers such as Runx-2, OXS, OCN, and Col1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that the enhancing effect of naringin on osteogenic differentiation was related to the activation of phosphor-ERK, with an increase in duration of activity from 30 min to 120 min. More importantly, both the enhancing effect of naringin on osteogenic differentiation and the activity effect of naringin on ERK signaling pathway were reversed by U0126 addition. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that naringin promoted proliferation and osteogenesis of hBMSCs by activating the ERK signaling pathway and it might be a potential therapeutic agent for treating or preventing osteoporosis.

  10. Delivery of dimethyloxallyl glycine in mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds to improve angiogenesis and osteogenesis of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengtie; Zhou, Yinghong; Chang, Jiang; Xiao, Yin

    2013-11-01

    Development of hypoxia-mimicking bone tissue engineering scaffolds is of great importance in stimulating angiogenesis for bone regeneration. Dimethyloxallyl glycine (DMOG) is a cell-permeable, competitive inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase (HIF-PH), which can stabilize hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression. The aim of this study was to develop hypoxia-mimicking scaffolds by delivering DMOG in mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds and to investigate whether the delivery of DMOG could induce a hypoxic microenvironment for human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC). MBG scaffolds with varied mesoporous structures (e.g. surface area and mesopore volume) were prepared by controlling the contents of mesopore-template agent. The composition, large-pore microstructure and mesoporous properties of MBG scaffolds were characterized. The effect of mesoporous properties on the loading and release of DMOG in MBG scaffolds was investigated. The effects of DMOG delivery on the cell morphology, cell viability, HIF-1α stabilization, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion and bone-related gene expression (alkaline phosphatase, ALP; osteocalcin, OCN; and osteopontin, OPN) of hBMSC in MBG scaffolds were systematically investigated. The results showed that the loading and release of DMOG in MBG scaffolds can be efficiently controlled by regulating their mesoporous properties via the addition of different contents of mesopore-template agent. DMOG delivery in MBG scaffolds had no cytotoxic effect on the viability of hBMSC. DMOG delivery significantly induced HIF-1α stabilization, VEGF secretion and bone-related gene expression of hBMSC in MBG scaffolds in which DMOG counteracted the effect of HIF-PH and stabilized HIF-1α expression under normoxic condition. Furthermore, it was found that MBG scaffolds with slow DMOG release significantly enhanced the expression of bone-related genes more than those with instant DMOG release. The results

  11. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Injection of Genetically Engineered Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells Expressing the Human Proenkephalin Gene in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to investigate the use of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs genetically engineered with the human proenkephalin (hPPE gene to treat bone cancer pain (BCP in a rat model. Methods. Primary cultured hBMSCs were passaged and modified with hPPE, and the cell suspensions (6 × 106 were then intrathecally injected into a rat model of BCP. Paw mechanical withdrawal threshold (PMWT was measured before and after BCP. The effects of hPPE gene transfer on hBMSC bioactivity were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Results. No changes were observed in the surface phenotypes and differentiation of hBMSCs after gene transfer. The hPPE-hBMSC group showed improved PMWT values on the ipsilateral side of rats with BCP from day 12 postoperatively, and the analgesic effect was reversed by naloxone. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 were ameliorated, and leucine-enkephalin (L-EK secretion was augmented, in the hPPE-engineered hBMSC group. Conclusion. The intrathecal administration of BMSCs modified with the hPPE gene can effectively relieve pain caused by bone cancer in rats and might be a potentially therapeutic tool for cancer-related pain in humans.

  12. Enhanced osteoblastic differentiation and bone formation in co-culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells with exogenous VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, K; Uusitalo, L; Alm, J J; Aro, H T; Hentunen, T A; Heino, T J

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent advances in bone tissue engineering, efficient bone formation and vascularization remains a challenge for clinical applications. The aim of this study was to investigate if the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) can be enhanced by co-culturing them with peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells (MNCs), with and without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a coupling factor of bone formation and angiogenesis. Human bone marrow (BM) derived MSCs were co-cultured with PB-MNCs in osteogenic medium with or without VEGF. Osteoblastic differentiation and mineral deposition were studied by staining for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and von Kossa, respectively, and measurements for ALP activity and calcium concentration (Ca). Cell proliferation was assayed with Alamar blue. The mechanism(s) were further studied by Transwell(®) cell culture experiments. Both ALP and mineralization (von Kossa and Ca) were significantly higher in the MSC-MNC co-cultures compared to plain MSC cultures. VEGF alone had no effect on osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs, but further enhanced differentiation in co-culture settings. The mechanism was shown to require cell-cell contact between MSCs and MNCs and the factors contributing to further differentiation appear to be soluble. No differences were observed in cell proliferation. Our study demonstrates that the in vitro ALP activity and mineralization of human BM-MSCs is more efficient in the presence of PB-MNCs, and exogenously added VEGF further enhances the stimulatory effect. This indicates that PB-MNCs could be a potential cell source in development of co-culture systems for novel tissue engineering applications for enhanced bone healing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Early osteoinductive human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells support an enhanced hematopoietic cell expansion with altered chemotaxis- and adhesion-related gene expression profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugino, Noriko [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Miura, Yasuo, E-mail: ym58f5@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Yao, Hisayuki [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Iwasa, Masaki; Fujishiro, Aya [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan); Fujii, Sumie [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hirai, Hideyo [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi [Department of Hematology/Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ichinohe, Tatsuo [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Maekawa, Taira [Department of Transfusion Medicine and Cell Therapy, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has a crucial role in supporting hematopoiesis. Here, by using a microarray analysis, we demonstrate that human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) are characterized by unique hematopoiesis-associated gene expression with an enhanced hematopoiesis-supportive ability. In comparison to BM-MSCs without osteoinductive treatment, gene expression in e-MSCs was significantly altered in terms of their cell adhesion- and chemotaxis-related profiles, as identified with Gene Ontology and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. Noteworthy, expression of the hematopoiesis-associated molecules CXCL12 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 was remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. e-MSCs supported an enhanced expansion of CD34{sup +} hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and generation of myeloid lineage cells in vitro. In addition, short-term osteoinductive treatment favored in vivo hematopoietic recovery in lethally irradiated mice that underwent BM transplantation. e-MSCs exhibited the absence of decreased stemness-associated gene expression, increased osteogenesis-associated gene expression, and apparent mineralization, thus maintaining the ability to differentiate into adipogenic cells. Our findings demonstrate the unique biological characteristics of e-MSCs as hematopoiesis-regulatory stromal cells at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells and have significant implications in developing new strategy for using pharmacological osteoinductive treatment to support hematopoiesis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell transplantation. - Highlights: • Human BM-MSCs in an early osteoinductive stage (e-MSCs) support hematopoiesis. • Adhesion- and chemotaxis-associated gene signatures are altered in e-MSCs. • Expression of CXCL12 and VCAM1 is remarkably decreased in e-MSCs. • e-MSCs are at differentiation stage between MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells. • Osteoinductive treatment

  14. Feasibility and Efficiency of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Culture with Allogeneic Platelet Lysate-Supplementation for Cell Therapy against Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengbo Tan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there is increasing interest in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs as regeneration therapy against cerebral stroke. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and validity of hBMSC cultures with allogeneic platelet lysates (PLs. Platelet concentrates (PC were harvested from healthy volunteers and made into single donor-derived PL (sPL. The PL mixtures (mPL were made from three different sPL. Some growth factors and platelet cell surface antigens were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The hBMSCs cultured with 10% PL were analyzed for their proliferative potential, surface markers, and karyotypes. The cells were incubated with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO agents and injected into a pig brain. MRI and histological analysis were performed. Consequently, nine lots of sPL and three mPL were prepared. ELISA analysis showed that PL contained adequate growth factors and a particle of platelet surface antigens. Cell proliferation capacity of PLs was equivalent to or higher than that of fetal calf serum (FCS. No contradiction in cell surface markers and no chromosomal aberrations were found. The MRI detected the distribution of SPIO-labeled hBMSCs in the pig brain. In summary, the hBMSCs cultured with allogeneic PL are suitable for cell therapy against stroke.

  15. Transient differentiation of adult human bone marrow cells into neuron-like cells in culture: development of morphological and biochemical traits is mediated by different molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suon, Sokreine; Jin, Hao; Donaldson, Angela E; Caterson, E J; Tuan, Rocky S; Deschennes, Geoffrey; Marshall, Cheryl; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2004-12-01

    Studies on rodent bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have revealed a capacity, for at least a portion of cells, to express neuron-like traits after differentiation in culture. Little, however, is known about the ability of human MSCs in this regard. We show here that incubation with certain differentiation cocktails, particularly those that include reagents that increase cellular cAMP levels, produces a rapid (1-4 h) and transient (24-48 h) transformation of nearly all hMSCs into neuron-like cells displaying a complex network of processes using phase or scanning electron microscopic optics. In addition, differentiated human (h) MSCs express increased quantities of neuron-[beta-tubulin III, neurofilament (NF), neuronal-specific enolase (NSE)] and glial- [glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] specific proteins and mRNAs, which are also expressed in low levels in undifferentiated MSCs. In contrast, the mesenchymal marker, fibronectin, which is highly expressed in the undifferentiated state, is reduced following differentiation. These biochemical changes, but not the acquisition of a neuron-like appearance, are partially inhibited by incubation of hMSCs with protein (cycloheximide) and mRNA (actinomycin D) synthesis inhibitors with differentiating reagents. Only incubation with 100 ng/ml colchicine, which disrupts the microtubular cytoskeleton, prevents the conversion of hMSCs into neuron- like cells. These results demonstrate that hMSCs acquire the morphological appearance and the biochemical makeup typical of neurons by independently regulated mechanisms.

  16. Neutrophil mediated IFN activation in the bone marrow alters B cell development in human and murine SLE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Arumugam; Bauer, Jason W; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Meednu, Nida; Barnard, Jennifer; Owen, Teresa; Cistrone, Christopher; Bird, Anna; Rabinovich, Alfred; Nevarez, Sarah; Knight, Jason S.; Dedrick, Russell; Rosenberg, Alexander; Wei, Chungwen; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Liesveld, Jane; Sanz, Inaki; Baechler, Emily; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Anolik, Jennifer H

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of type I interferon (IFN) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we report the presence of IFN activation in SLE bone marrow (BM), as measured by an IFN gene signature, increased IFN regulated chemokines, and direct production of IFN by BM resident cells, associated with profound changes in B cell development. The majority of SLE patients had an IFN signature in the BM that was more pronounced than the paired peripheral blood (PB) and correlated with both higher autoantibodies and disease activity. Pronounced alterations in B cell development were noted in SLE in the presence of an IFN signature with a reduction in the fraction of pro/pre B cells suggesting an inhibition in early B cell development and an expansion of B cells at the transitional (T2) stage. These B cell changes strongly correlated with an increase in BAFF and APRIL expression in the IFN high BM. Furthermore, we found that BM neutrophils in SLE were prime producers of IFN-α and B cell factors. In NZM lupus-prone mice similar changes in B cell development were observed and mediated by IFN, given abrogation in NZM mice lacking type I IFN receptor. BM neutrophils were abundant, responsive to and producers of IFN, in close proximity to B cells. These results indicate that the BM is an important but previously unrecognized target organ in SLE with neutrophil mediated IFN activation and alterations in B cell ontogeny and selection. PMID:24379124

  17. All-trans-retinoic acid up-regulates CD38 but not c-Kit antigens on human marrow CD34+ cells without recruitment into cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herault, O; Domenech, J; Degenne, M; Bremond, J L; Sensebe, L; Bernard, M C; Binet, C; Colombat, P

    1998-11-01

    Retinoids, especially all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), are well known for their differentiating activity on HL-60 cells. Moreover ATRA induces CD38 antigen overexpression on these cells. In this study we examined the effects of ATRA on purified normal CD34+ cells from adult human marrows incubated with ATRA (1 microM) or stem cell factor (SCF) after 7 d liquid cultures in serum-deprived medium. Before and after the incubation, CD34+ cells were studied by flow cytometry to evaluate the cell-surface expression of CD38 and c-Kit antigens and the cycle status of these cells using high-resolution analysis (DNA content v Ki-67 antigen expression) to clarify the functional meaning of antigenic variations. When compared with control cultures, ATRA-treated cells displayed changes in their immunophenotypic profile. Particularly relevant was the up-regulation of CD38 antigen with a mean (+/-SEM) fold increase of 21 +/- 0.1 (P=0.028) for geometric mean fluorescence intensity (GMFI), without modulation of c-Kit expression. SCF only down-regulated expression of c-Kit with a fold decrease of 4.6 +/- 0.9 for GMFI (P=0.043). Unlike SCF, ATRA did not induce CD34+ cells to entry into cell cycle despite increased levels of surface CD38 antigen. Moreover morphological and functional assays did not argue for an ATRA-induced maturation process. Contrary to steady-state cells, CD34+ cells treated with pharmacological doses of ATRA alone displayed CD38 over-expression without change in c-Kit levels and cycle status, suggesting an absence of maturation pressure.

  18. Production of human platelet lysate by use of ultrasound for ex vivo expansion of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Martina; Albiero, Elena; Alghisi, Alberta; Chieregato, Katia; Lievore, Chiara; Madeo, Domenico; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Astori, Giuseppe

    2013-08-01

    A medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) is of common use for the expansion of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). However, its use is discouraged by regulatory authorities because of the risk of zoonoses and immune reactions. Human platelet lysate (PL) obtained by freezing/thawing disruption of platelets has been proposed as a possible substitute of FBS. The process is time-consuming and not well standardized. A new method for obtaining PL that is based on the use of ultrasound is proposed. Platelet sonication was performed by submerging platelet-containing plastic bags in an ultrasonic bath. To evaluate platelet lysis we measured platelet-derived growth factor-AB release. PL efficiency was tested by expanding bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, measuring population doubling time, differentiation capacity and immunogenic properties. Safety was evaluated by karyotyping expanded cells. After 30 minutes of sonication, 74% of platelet derived growth factor-AB was released. PL enhanced BM-MSC proliferation rate compared with FBS. The mean cumulative population doubling (cPD) of cells growth in PL at 10%, 7.5% and 5% was better compared with cPD obtained with 10% FBS. PD time (hours) of MSCs with PL obtained by sonication was shorter than for cPD with PL obtained by freezing/thawing (18.9 versus 17.4, P < 0.01). BM mononucleated cells expressed MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. When BM-MSCs and T cells were co-cultured in close contact, immunosuppressive activity of BM-MSCs was maintained. Cell karyotype showed no genetic alterations. The proposed method for the production of PL by sonication could be a safe, efficient and fast substitute of FBS, without the potential risks of FBS. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sphingosine-1-phosphate/S1P Receptors Signaling Modulates Cell Migration in Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Yaxian Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs to damaged tissues and sites of inflammation is an essential step for clinical therapy. However, the signals regulating the motility of these cells are still not fully understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, is known to have a variety of biological effects on various cells. Here, we investigated the roles of S1P and S1P receptors (S1PRs in migration of human BMSCs. We found that S1P exerted a powerful migratory action on human BMSCs. Moreover, by employing RNA interference technology and pharmacological tools, we demonstrated that S1PR1 and S1PR3 are responsible for S1P-induced migration of human BMSCs. In contrast, S1PR2 mediates the inhibition of migration. Additionally, we explored the downstream signaling pathway of the S1P/S1PRs axis and found that activation of S1PR1 or S1PR3 increased migration of human BMSCs through a Gi/extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2- (ERK1/2- dependent pathway, whereas activation of S1PR2 decreased migration through the Rho/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK pathway. In conclusion, we reveal that the S1P/S1PRs signaling axis regulates the migration of human BMSCs via a dual-directional mechanism. Thus, selective modulation of S1PR’s activity on human BMSCs may provide an effective approach to immunotherapy or tissue regeneration.

  20. Human platelet lysate supports ex vivo expansion and enhances osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Xia, Wenjie; Li, Hui; Wang, Zhen; Xu, Ru; Fu, Yongshui; Zhang, Xiuming; Ye, Xin; Huang, Yingfeng; Xiang, Andy Peng; Yu, Weihua

    2011-06-01

    MSCs (mesenchymal stem cells) with their versatile growth and differentiation potential are ideal candidates for use in regenerative medicine and are currently making their way into clinical trials, which requires the development of xeno-free protocols for their culture. In this study, MSCs were cultured in 10% FCS or 7.5% HPL (human platelet lysate)-supplemented media. We found that both groups of MSCs showed a comparable morphology, phenotype and proliferation. The percentage of cells in the S- and G2-/M-phases, however, was slightly up-regulated (Pplatelet derived growth factor)-AB and IGF (insulin-like growth factor)-1. In addition, compared with FCS group, MSCs in HPL group showed an increase in osteogenic differentiation and a decrease in adipogenic differentiation. In conclusion, MSCs in HPL-supplemented media maintained similar growing potential and phenotype, while osteogenic potential was enhanced. HPL offers a promising alternative to FCS for MSC expansion for clinical application, especially in bone injury diseases.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the expression of immunosuppressive proteins and enhances the cell growth in a human bone marrow-derived stem cell culture

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    Miettinen, Johanna A., E-mail: johanna.miettinen@oulu.fi [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Pietilae, Mika [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Salonen, Riikka J. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ohlmeier, Steffen [Proteomics Core Facility, Biocenter Oulu, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Ylitalo, Kari; Huikuri, Heikki V. [Institute of Clinical Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2011-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in experimental treatments for various conditions that involve normal tissue regeneration via inflammatory repair. It is known that MSCs can secrete multiple soluble factors and suppress inflammation. Even though the effect of MSCs on inflammation has been extensively studied, the effect of inflammation on MSCs is poorly understood. One of the major cytokines released at the site of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) which is known to induce MSC invasion and proliferation. Therefore, we wanted to test the effects of TNF-{alpha} exposure on MSCs derived from human bone marrow. We found, as expected, that cell proliferation was significantly enhanced during TNF-{alpha} exposure. However, according to the cell surface marker analysis, the intensity of several antigens in the minimum criteria panel for MSCs proposed by International Society of Cellular Therapy (ISCT) was decreased dramatically, and in certain cases, the criteria for MSCs were not fulfilled. In addition, TNF-{alpha} exposure resulted in a significant but transient increase in human leukocyte antigen and CD54 expression. Additional proteomic analysis by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry revealed three proteins whose expression levels decreased and 8 proteins whose expression levels increased significantly during TNF-{alpha} exposure. The majority of these proteins could be linked to immunosuppressive and signalling pathways. These results strongly support reactive and immunosuppressive activation of MSCs during TNF-{alpha} exposure, which might influence MSC differentiation stage and capacity.

  2. Involvement of urokinase receptor in the cross-talk between human hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selleri, Carmine; Montuori, Nunzia; Salvati, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow (BM) and can be induced to mobilize into the circulation for transplantation. Homing and lodgement into BM of transplanted HSCs are the first critical steps in their engraftment and involve multiple interactions between HSCs and the BM...... microenvironment.uPAR is a three domain receptor (DIDIIDIII) which binds urokinase, vitronectin, integrins. uPAR can be cleaved and shed from the cell surface generating full-length and cleaved soluble forms (suPAR and DIIDIII-suPAR). DIIDIII-suPAR can bind fMLF receptors through the SRSRY sequence (residues 88......-92).We previously reported the involvement of soluble uPAR in HSC mobilization. We now investigate its possible role in HSC homing and engraftment.We show similar levels of circulating full-length suPAR in healthy donors and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients before and after the pre...

  3. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Cell Reactions to 316L Stainless Steel: An in Vitro Study on Cell Viability and Interleukin-6 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Santoso, Asep; Saputra, Eko; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J; Van der Heide, Emile

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cell (hBMC) reactions to 316L stainless steel (316L-SS) have never been evaluated. The objective of this study was to assess cell viability and interleukin-6 expression of hBMC cultures upon treatment with a 316L-SS implant. Methods: A cytotoxicity analysis was conducted with a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) assay after a period of 24, 48 and 72 hours of incubation. Expression of interleukin-6 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: Cell viability measurement was performed via IC50 formula. All treatment group showed a > 50 % cell viability with a range of 56,5 - 96,9 % at 24 hours, 51,8-77,3% at 48 hours and 70,1- 120 % at 72 hours. Interleukin-6 expression was downregulated subsequent to treatment with 316L-SS compared to the control group. Conclusion: We found that 316L-SS did not exhibit toxicity towards hBMC culture.

  4. Bone marrow-infiltrating human neuroblastoma cells express high levels of calprotectin and HLA-G proteins.

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    Fabio Morandi

    Full Text Available Metastases in the bone marrow (BM are grim prognostic factors in patients with neuroblastoma (NB. In spite of extensive analysis of primary tumor cells from high- and low-risk NB patients, a characterization of freshly isolated BM-infiltrating metastatic NB cells is still lacking. Our aim was to identify proteins specifically expressed by metastatic NB cells, that may be relevant for prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Sixty-six Italian children over 18 months of age, diagnosed with stage 4 NB, were included in the study. Metastatic NB cells were freshly isolated from patients' BM by positive immunomagnetic bead manipulation using anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody. Gene expression profiles were compared with those obtained from archived NB primary tumors from patients with 5 y-follow-up. After validation by RT-qPCR, expression/secretion of the proteins encoded by the up-regulated genes in the BM-infiltrating NB cells was evaluated by flow cytometry and ELISA. Compared to primary tumor cells, BM-infiltrating NB cells down-modulated the expression of CX3CL1, AGT, ATP1A2 mRNAs, whereas they up-regulated several genes commonly expressed by various lineages of BM resident cells. BM-infiltrating NB cells expressed indeed the proteins encoded by the top-ranked genes, S100A8 and A9 (calprotectin, CD177 and CD3, and secreted the CXCL7 chemokine. BM-infiltrating NB cells also expressed CD271 and HLA-G. We have identified proteins specifically expressed by BM-infiltrating NB cells. Among them, calprotectin, a potent inflammatory protein, and HLA-G, endowed with tolerogenic properties facilitating tumor escape from host immune response, may represent novel biomarkers and/or targets for therapeutic intervention in high-risk NB patients.

  5. Role of human cardiac biopsy derived conditioned media in modulating bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells toward cardiomyocyte-like cells

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    Anupama Kakkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent and can be easily cultured and expanded. Therefore, these are considered to be an attractive therapeutic tool for cardiac repair. These have been found to have tremendous potential to transdifferentiate to cardiac lineage both in vitro and in vivo. A number of chemicals and growth factors have been explored for the same. However, the effect of the paracrine factors released by cardiac tissue has not been studied much. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we have examined the differentiation capacity of conditioned media (CM derived from human cardiac tissue on human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs. BM-MSCs after characterization were induced by culture supernatant collected from human cardiac tissue (21 days. Parallel cultures treated with 5-azacytidine (AZA (30 days, were taken as controls. Results: MSCs treated with CM formed “muscle island” like structure and were found to be positive for cardiac-specific markers - myosin light chain-2v and cardiac troponin I proteins. However, uninduced BM-MSCs did not show positivity for any of these markers and maintained fibroblastic morphology. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that cardiac CM is capable of effective induction of morphological and molecular changes in MSCs toward cardiac features. However, differentiation efficiency is less than that of 5-AZA and the mode of action and the components of CM are still to be known.

  6. Gangliosides as a potential new class of stem cell markers: the case of GD1a in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergante, Sonia; Torretta, Enrica; Creo, Pasquale; Sessarego, Nadia; Papini, Nadia; Piccoli, Marco; Fania, Chiara; Cirillo, Federica; Conforti, Erika; Ghiroldi, Andrea; Tringali, Cristina; Venerando, Bruno; Ibatici, Adalberto; Gelfi, Cecilia; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi

    2014-03-01

    Owing to their exposure on the cell surface and the possibility of being directly recognized with specific antibodies, glycosphingolipids have aroused great interest in the field of stem cell biology. In the search for specific markers of the differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) toward osteoblasts, we studied their glycosphingolipid pattern, with particular attention to gangliosides. After lipid extraction and fractionation, gangliosides, metabolically (3)H-labeled in the sphingosine moiety, were separated by high-performance TLC and chemically characterized by MALDI MS. Upon induction of osteogenic differentiation, a 3-fold increase of ganglioside GD1a was observed. Therefore, the hypothesis of GD1a involvement in hBMSCs commitment toward the osteogenic phenotype was tested by comparison of the osteogenic propensity of GD1a-highly expressing versus GD1a-low expressing hBMSCs and direct addition of GD1a in the differentiation medium. It was found that either the high expression of GD1a in hBMSCs or the addition of GD1a in the differentiation medium favored osteogenesis, providing a remarkable increase of alkaline phosphatase. It was also observed that ganglioside GD2, although detectable in hBMSCs by immunohistochemistry with an anti-GD2 antibody, could not be recognized by chemical analysis, likely reflecting a case, not uncommon, of molecular mimicry.

  7. A method for generation of bone marrow-derived macrophages from cryopreserved mouse bone marrow cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M Marim

    Full Text Available The broad use of transgenic and gene-targeted mice has established bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM as important mammalian host cells for investigation of the macrophages biology. Over the last decade, extensive research has been done to determine how to freeze and store viable hematopoietic human cells; however, there is no information regarding generation of BMDM from frozen murine bone marrow (BM cells. Here, we establish a highly efficient protocol to freeze murine BM cells and further generate BMDM. Cryopreserved murine BM cells maintain their potential for BMDM differentiation for more than 6 years. We compared BMDM obtained from fresh and frozen BM cells and found that both are similarly able to trigger the expression of CD80 and CD86 in response to LPS or infection with the intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila. Additionally, BMDM obtained from fresh or frozen BM cells equally restrict or support the intracellular multiplication of pathogens such as L. pneumophila and the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L. amazonensis. Although further investigation are required to support the use of the method for generation of dendritic cells, preliminary experiments indicate that bone marrow-derived dendritic cells can also be generated from cryopreserved BM cells. Overall, the method described and validated herein represents a technical advance as it allows ready and easy generation of BMDM from a stock of frozen BM cells.

  8. A chitosan/dextran-based hydrogel as a delivery vehicle of human bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Vicky J; Dinnunhan, M F K; Turner, Paul R; Faed, Jim M; Cabral, Jaydee D

    2017-06-07

    A chitosan/dextran-based (CD) injectable, surgical hydrogel has been developed and shown to be an effective post-operative aid in prevention of scar tissue formation in vivo. The CD hydrogel's effectiveness in a surgical setting prompted an investigation into its capacity as a potential delivery vehicle for bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) for regenerative wound healing applications. By housing BM-MSCs within a biocompatible, injectable, hydrogel matrix, viability and protection in cultivation, as well as direct delivery to the damaged site in the host tissue may be achieved. In vitro BM-MSC cell viability in the presence of CD hydrogel was determined by LIVE/DEAD(®) fluoresence staining. Flow cytometry studies revealed expression of a conventional BM-MSC surface marker profile. A colony forming cell assay showed a slight statistically significant decrease in the number of colonies grown in CD hydrogel as compared to control cells. In addition, BM-MSCs in the CD hydrogel were able to successfully differentiate into adipocytes and osteocytes. In summary, the CD hydrogel supports MSC growth and differentiation; and therefore, may be used as a potential stem cell delivery vehicle for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications.

  9. Human marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture: serum-free medium allows better expansion than classical alpha-MEM medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleman, Nathalie; Tondreau, Tatiana; Delforge, Alain; Dejeneffe, Marielle; Massy, Martine; Libertalis, Mark; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence

    2006-04-01

    The expansion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) strongly depends on the culture conditions and requires medium supplemented with 10-20% fetal calf serum (FCS) to generate relevant numbers of cells. However, the presence of FCS is a major obstacle for their clinical use. Therefore, we have evaluated the capacity of expansion of MSC in a commercial serum-free medium (UC) supplemented with a serum substitute (ULTROSER) in comparison with a classical medium alpha-MEM containing 15% FBS. Bone marrow-mononuclear cells collected from 12 volunteer healthy donors were expanded in two different culture media. MSCs isolated in the both media were morphologically similar and expressed identical phenotypic markers. After the primoculture (P0) and one passage, we obtained significantly more MSC and CFU-F progenitors in UC medium than in alphaMEM. Their multipotentiality was preserved during culture, as well as their capacity to support haematopoiesis. In conclusion, our observations strongly suggest that UC is an optimal medium for ex vivo expansion of MSC: it allows a better cell expansion, preserves cell multipotentiality, reduces the culture period and contains low concentration of serum substitute. This medium seems suitable for clinical scale expansion of MSC.

  10. Potential role of 20S proteasome in maintaining stem cell integrity of human bone marrow stromal cells in prolonged culture expansion

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    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Xue-Qin; Zhu, Qian; Cheng, Xiao-Long; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Xiao, Zhi-Cheng, E-mail: zhicheng.xiao@monash.edu [Key Laboratory of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Kunming Medical College, Kunming 650031 (China); Monash Immunology and Stem Cell Laboratories, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne 3800 (Australia)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prolonged culture expansion retards proliferation and induces senescence of hBMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced 20S proteasomal activity and expression potentially contribute to cell aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MG132-mediated 20S proteasomal inhibition induces senescence-like phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA stimulates proteasomal activity and restores replicative senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA retains differentiation without affecting stem cell characterizations. -- Abstract: Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) could be used in clinics as precursors of multiple cell lineages following proper induction. Such application is impeded by their characteristically short lifespan, together with the increasing loss of proliferation capability and progressive reduction of differentiation potential after the prolonged culture expansion. In the current study, we addressed the possible role of 20S proteasomes in this process. Consistent with prior reports, long-term in vitro expansion of hBMSCs decreased cell proliferation and increased replicative senescence, accompanied by reduced activity and expression of the catalytic subunits PSMB5 and PSMB1, and the 20S proteasome overall. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 produced a senescence-like phenotype in early passages, whereas treating late-passage cells with 18{alpha}-glycyrrhetinic acid (18{alpha}-GA), an agonist of 20S proteasomes, delayed the senescence progress, enhancing the proliferation and recovering the capability of differentiation. The data demonstrate that activation of 20S proteasomes assists in counteracting replicative senescence of hBMSCs expanded in vitro.

  11. Analysis of surface protein expression in human bone marrow stromal cells: new aspects of culture-induced changes, inter-donor differences and intracellular expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäck, Luisa Marilena; Noack, Sandra; Weist, Ramona; Jagodzinski, Michael; Krettek, Christian; Buettner, Manuela; Hoffmann, Andrea

    2013-12-15

    The most widely used technique for isolation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) from bone marrow includes density gradient centrifugation, recovery of the mononuclear cell population, and subsequent isolation of hBMSCs by virtue of their plastic adherence. During subsequent in vitro cultivation, they may lose their original characteristics since in vitro the stem cell niche cannot yet be properly mimicked. To further characterize these culture-induced changes in regard to mRNA and extra- and intracellular protein expression, as well as potential differences between hBMSCs from different donors, we investigated a panel of CD antigens for their presence on in vitro cultured hBMSCs. Interestingly, after culture-induced downregulation of their extracellular expression, both CD146 and CD271 persist intracellularly, which hints at the possibility that culture-induced changes may be reversed by appropriate stimuli. Further, CD34-a protein whose expression on hBMSCs is still controversial-is expressed at the intracellular level in hBMSCs of all donors independently of passage number. CD34 mRNA levels are significantly higher in female than in male donors. In summary, we further elucidate phenotypical changes induced by in vitro culture of hBMSCs, highlight interindividual differences in the phenotype of these cells and for the first time show the intracellular expression of CD34.

  12. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells can Differentiate to a Retinal Pigment Epithelial Phenotype when Co-Cultured with Pig Retinal Pigment Epithelium using a Transwell System

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    Ping Duan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increasing interest in generating retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from stem cells for therapy against degenerative eye diseases. Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs can be induced to express retinal neuron-specific markers when co-cultured with retinal neurons, however, whether hBMSCs can differentiate into RPE-like cells in a co-culture system has not been clarified. Methods: The induction of hBMSCs into RPE-like cells was performed by combining hBMSCs and pig RPE cells in a transwell system. The biomarkers of hBMSCs-derived RPE cells were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The function of induced cells was assayed by ELISA for secretion of neurotrophic factors. Results: Intracellular pigment granules and many RPE markers existed in hBMSCs-derived RPE cells after co-culturing with pig RPE cells for 14 days. Typical RPE functions, such as phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments and secretion of the trophic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glia-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, were observed in these induced cells. Conclusion: hBMSCs can be induced toward functional RPE cells simply by transwell-based co-culture with RPE cells.

  13. Regulated expression of lentivirus-mediated GDNF in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and its neuroprotection on dopaminergic cells in vitro.

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    Wei-Hua Yang

    Full Text Available Gene regulation remains one of the major challenges for gene therapy in clinical trials. In the present study, we first generated a binary tetracycline-on (Tet-On system based on two lentivirus vectors, one expressing both human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hGDNF and humanized recombinant green fluorescent protein (hrGFP genes under second-generation tetracycline response element (TRE, and the other expressing the advanced reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator--rtTA2S-M2 under a human minimal cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE promoter. This system allows simultaneous expression of hGDNF and hrGFP genes in the presence of doxycycline (Dox. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs were transduced with the binary Tet-On lentivirus vectors and characterized in vitro in the presence (On or absence (Off of Dox. The expression of hGDNF and hrGFP transgenes in transduced hMSCs was tightly regulated as determined by flow cytometry (FCM, GDNF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. There was a dose-dependent regulation for hrGFP transgene expression. The levels of hGDNF protein in culture medium were correlated with the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI units of hrGFP. The levels of transgene background expression were very low in the absence of Dox. The treatment of the conditioned medium from cultures of transduced hMSCs in the presence of Dox protected SH-SY5Y cells against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA toxicity as determined by cell viability using 3, [4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. The treatment of the conditioned medium was also found to improve the survival of dopaminergic (DA neurons of ventral mesencephalic (VM tissue in serum-free culture conditions as assessed by cell body area, the number of neurites and dendrite branching points, and proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-immunoreactive (IR cells. Our

  14. Human ciliary neurotrophic factor-overexpressing stable bone marrow stromal cells in the treatment of a rat model of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Hojjat-Allah; Tiraihi, Taki; Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Delshad, Ali Reza; Sadeghizade, Majid; Taheri, Taher

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic injury to the central nervous system (CNS) often causes motor dysfunctions. However, because of the CNS complexity and variability in the clinical presentations, efforts to repair damaged CNS tissue and restoring its functions are particularly demanding. On the other hand, recent progress in the regenerative therapy field have led to novel approaches for the treatment of traumatic CNS injury and renewed hopes to overcome the obstacles. It appears that the balance between neurite re-growth-inhibiting and neurite re-growth-inducing molecules determines the axonal re-growth fate. Neurotrophic factors can tilt this balance and indeed promote cell survival and axonal re-growth over neurodegeneration. One of the promising neurotrophic factors in this field is ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). We transfected rat bone marrow stromal cells with a mammalian expression vector-inserted human CNTF gene through the use of a non-viral method to prepare human CNTF-overexpressing stem cells under ex vivo conditions. We transplanted these modified cells to the rat model of spinal cord traumatic injury to explore functional recovery after contusion induction. Our data from immunocytochemistry and behavioral tests showed that such cells can act as a powerful potential approach to treat traumatic CNS injuries because these modified cells improved the behavioral test scores in the rat model of spinal cord injury. CNTF-overexpressing bone marrow stromal cells can ameliorate spinal cord traumatic injury and can be used in the treatment of traumatic CNS injuries in the near future. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Human Stromal (Mesenchymal) Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue and Skin Exhibit Differences in Molecular Phenotype and Differentiation Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nbaheen, May; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Ali, Dalia

    2013-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem cells with ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells e.g. osteoblasts and adipocytes and thus they are being introduced into clinical trials for tissue regeneration. Traditionally, hMSCs have been isolated from bone marro...

  16. The effect of bone marrow aspiration strategy on the yield and quality of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennema, E.M.; Renard, Auke J.S.; Mentink-Leusink, Anouk; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Large inter-donor differences exist in human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) yield and the response of these cells to osteogenic stimuli. The source of these differences may be clinical differences in stem cell characteristics between individuals or the aspiration procedure itself. Methods

  17. Differential effect of platelet-rich plasma and fetal calf serum on bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells expanded in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedecke, Anja; Wobus, Manja; Krech, Mathias; Münch, Nadine; Richter, Katja; Hölig, Kristina; Bornhauser, Martin

    2011-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from various sources have great potential for use in cell-based therapies. Since the proportion of primary MSCs contained in bone marrow or adipose tissue is low, plastic adherence and in vitro expansion are necessary to expand MSCs prior to clinical application. Human platelet-rich plasma has been introduced as an alternative serum source but functional differences have so far not been described. Here we cultured MSCs derived from human bone marrow in medium supplemented with either 10% fetal calf serum (FCS) or 5% and 10% platelet-rich plasma (PRP) until the first or second passage. Parameters under investigation were cell yield, clonogenicity, phenotype as well as migratory and differentiation potential. In addition, the secretion of SDF-1α and the induced migration of CD34(+) haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were investigated with regard to the different serum source. The use of PRP resulted in a significantly higher expansion rate and yield at passages 0 and 1. In addition, the level of secreted SDF-1α was significantly increased in the supernatant of MSCs cultured with FCS instead of human PRP. Consistent with this, the migration capacity of MSCs cultured with 10% FCS as well as their capability to induce the migration of CD34(+) haematopoietic progenitors in a transwell assay was higher. Our results demonstrate that human PRP can be seen as an alternative serum source to FCS for MSC cultivation. However, the requirements of the specific clinical application must be carefully considered before the respective serum source is selected. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Karyotype of cryopreserved bone marrow cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.L.F. Chauffaille

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of chromosomal abnormalities is important for the study of hematological neoplastic disorders since it facilitates classification of the disease. The ability to perform chromosome analysis of cryopreserved malignant marrow or peripheral blast cells is important for retrospective studies. In the present study, we compared the karyotype of fresh bone marrow cells (20 metaphases to that of cells stored with a simplified cryopreservation method, evaluated the effect of the use of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as an in vitro mitotic index stimulator, and compared the cell viability and chromosome morphology of fresh and cryopreserved cells whenever possible (sufficient metaphases for analysis. Twenty-five bone marrow samples from 24 patients with hematological disorders such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, megaloblastic anemia and lymphoma (8, 3, 3, 8, 1, and 1 patients, respectively were selected at diagnosis, at relapse or during routine follow-up and one sample was obtained from a bone marrow donor after informed consent. Average cell viability before and after freezing was 98.8 and 78.5%, respectively (P < 0.05. Cytogenetic analysis was successful in 76% of fresh cell cultures, as opposed to 52% of cryopreserved samples (P < 0.05. GM-CSF had no proliferative effect before or after freezing. The morphological aspects of the chromosomes in fresh and cryopreserved cells were subjectively the same. The present study shows that cytogenetic analysis of cryopreserved bone marrow cells can be a reliable alternative when fresh cell analysis cannot be done, notwithstanding the reduced viability and lower percent of successful analysis that are associated with freezing.

  19. Differential Clearance of Rat and Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells From the Brain After Intra-arterial Infusion in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabbal, Joonas; Kerkelä, Erja; Mitkari, Bhimashankar; Raki, Mari; Nystedt, Johanna; Mikkonen, Ville; Bergström, Kim; Laitinen, Saara; Korhonen, Matti; Jolkkonen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Intra-arterial (IA) delivery of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) has shown potential as a minimally invasive therapeutic approach for stroke. The aim of the present study was to determine the whole-body biodistribution and clearance of technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-labeled rat and human BM-MSCs after IA delivery in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Our hypothesis was that xenotransplantation has a major impact on the behavior of cells. Male RccHan:Wistar rats were subjected to sham operation or MCAO. Twenty-four hours after surgery, BM-MSCs (2 × 10(6) cells/animal) labeled with (99m)Tc were infused into the external carotid artery. Whole-body SPECT images were acquired 20 min, 3 h, and 6 h postinjection, after which rats were sacrificed, and organs were collected and weighed for measurement of radioactivity. The results showed that the majority of the cells were located in the brain and especially in the ipsilateral hemisphere immediately after cell infusion both in sham-operated and MCAO rats. This was followed by fast disappearance, particularly in the case of human cells. At the same time, the radioactivity signal increased in the spleen, kidney, and liver, the organs responsible for destroying cells. Further studies are needed to demonstrate whether differential cell behavior has any functional impact.

  20. Bone marrow scan evaluation of arthropathy in sickle cell disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, A.; Schumacher, H.R.; Dorwart, B.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1976-04-01

    Twelve patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies and arthropathy were studied, using technetium Tc 99m sulfur colloid bone marrow scans. Eight of 12 had decreased marrow radionuclide activity adjacent to painful joints, suggesting obliteration of vessels supplying bone marrow. Four patients without marrow defects on scanning had causes other than infarction for their joint symptoms, viz, small fractures, postinfectious synovitis, degenerative arthritis, and osteochondromas. Roentgenograms never showed bony abnormalities in five patients with marrow infarctions, and, in three others, showed defects several months later than did the marrow scans. Bone marrow scans offer a sensitive and early diagnostic aid in sickle cell hemoglobinopathies with arthropathy.

  1. Safety and feasibility of cell-based therapy of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells in plate-stabilized proximal humeral fractures in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebach, Caroline; Henrich, Dirk; Meier, Simon; Nau, Christoph; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo

    2016-11-15

    Local implantation of ex vivo concentrated, washed and filtrated human bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMC) seeded onto β-tricalciumphosphate (TCP) significantly enhanced bone healing in a preclinical segmental defect model. Based on these results, we evaluated in a first clinical phase-I trial safety and feasibility of augmentation with preoperatively isolated autologous BMC seeded onto β-TCP in combination with angle stable plate fixation for the therapy of proximal humeral fractures as a potential alternative to autologous bone graft from the iliac crest. 10 patients were enrolled to assess whether cell therapy with 1.3 × 106 autologous BMC/ml/ml β-TCP, collected on the day preceding the definitive surgery, is safe and feasible when seeded onto β-TCP in patients with a proximal humeral fracture. 5 follow-up visits for clinical and radiological controls up to 12 weeks were performed. β-tricalciumphosphate fortification with BMC was feasible and safe; specifically, neither morbidity at the harvest site nor at the surgical wound site were observed. Neither local nor systemic inflammation was noted. All fractures healed within the observation time without secondary dislocation. Three adverse events were reported: one case each of abdominal wall shingles, tendon loosening and initial screw perforation, none of which presumed related to the IND. Cell therapy with autologous BMC for bone regeneration appeared to be safe and feasible with no drug-related adverse reactions being described to date. The impression of efficacy was given, although the study was not powered nor controlled to detect such. A clinical trial phase-II will be forthcoming in order to formally test the clinical benefit of BMC-laden β-TCP for PHF patients. Trial registration The study was registered in the European Clinical Trial Register as EudraCT No. 2012-004037-17. Date of registration 30th of August 2012. Informed consent was signed from all patients enrolled.

  2. A Novel Human TGF-β1 Fusion Protein in Combination with rhBMP-2 Increases Chondro-Osteogenic Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Claros

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β is involved in processes related to the differentiation and maturation of osteoprogenitor cells into osteoblasts. Rat bone marrow (BM cells were cultured in a collagen-gel containing 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS for 10 days in the presence of rhTGF (recombinant human TGF-β1-F2, a fusion protein engineered to include a high-affinity collagen-binding decapeptide derived from von Willebrand factor. Subsequently, cells were moderately expanded in medium with 10% FBS for 4 days and treated with a short pulse of rhBMP (recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 for 4 h. During the last 2 days, dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate were added to potentiate osteoinduction. Concomitant with an up-regulation of cell proliferation, DNA synthesis levels were determined. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to reveal the possible stemness of these cells. Osteogenic differentiation was evaluated in terms of alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized matrix formation as well as by mRNA expression of osteogenic marker genes. Moreover, cells were placed inside diffusion chambers and implanted subcutaneously into the backs of adult rats for 4 weeks. Histological study provided evidence of cartilage and bone-like tissue formation. This experimental procedure is capable of selecting cell populations from BM that, in the presence of rhTGF-β1-F2 and rhBMP-2, achieve skeletogenic potential in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Chondrogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in highly porous alginate-foams supplemented with chondroitin sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhao [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Nooeaid, Patcharakamon [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Kohl, Benjamin [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Roether, Judith A.; Schubert, Dirk W. [Institute of Polymer Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Meier, Carola [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Boccaccini, Aldo R. [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Godkin, Owen; Ertel, Wolfgang; Arens, Stephan [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula, E-mail: gundula.schulze@pmu.ac.at [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To overcome the limited intrinsic cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte or bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) was implanted into cartilage defects. For this purpose suitable biocompatible scaffolds are needed to provide cell retention, chondrogenesis and initial mechanical stability. The present study should indicate whether a recently developed highly porous alginate (Alg) foam scaffold supplemented with chondroitin sulfate (CS) allows the attachment, survival and chondrogenesis of BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes. The foams were prepared using a freeze-drying method; some of them were supplemented with CS and subsequently characterized for porosity, biodegradation and mechanical profile. BM-MSCs were cultured for 1–2 weeks on the scaffold either under chondrogenic or maintenance conditions. Cell vitality assays, histology, glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) assay, and type II and I collagen immunolabelings were performed to monitor cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis in the scaffolds. Scaffolds had a high porosity ~ 93–95% with a mean pore sizes of 237 ± 48 μm (Alg) and 197 ± 61 μm (Alg/CS). Incorporation of CS increased mechanical strength of the foams providing gradually CS release over 7 days. Most of the cells survived in the scaffolds. BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes formed rounded clusters within the scaffold pores. The BM-MSCs, irrespective of whether cultured under non/chondrogenic conditions and chondrocytes produced an ECM containing sGAGs, and types II and I collagen. Total collagen and sGAG contents were higher in differentiated BM-MSC cultures supplemented with CS than in CS-free foams after 14 days. The cell cluster formation induced by the scaffolds might stimulate chondrogenesis via initial intense cell–cell contacts. - Highlights: • Alginate foam scaffolds revealed a high porosity and mean pore size of 197–237 μm. • Chondroitin sulfate was released over 14 days by the scaffolds. • Chondrocytes

  4. Association of oxidative stress with postmenopausal osteoporosis and the effects of hydrogen peroxide on osteoclast formation in human bone marrow cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ki Hyun; Oh, Ki Won; Lee, Won Young; Lee, Seong Su; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Rhee, Eun Jung; Han, Je Ho; Song, Ki Ho; Cha, Bong Yun; Lee, Kwang Woo; Kang, Moo Il

    2010-09-01

    It has been suggested that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to explore the association between a marker of oxidative stress and either bone turnover markers or bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. In addition, the effects of oxidative stress on the formation of osteoclasts in human bone marrow cell culture were examined. We performed a cross-sectional analysis in healthy postmenopausal women aged 60-78 years (n = 135, 68.2 +/- 4.9). Oxidative stress was evaluated in the serum by measuring 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) levels. The biochemical markers of bone turnover and areal BMD were measured in all participants. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed a negative association between 8-OH-dG levels and BMD of the lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, and trochanter and positive association with type I collagen C-telopeptide (ICTP) levels. The odds ratio of 8-OH-dG for osteoporosis was 1.54 (1.14-2.31, P = 0.003). In cultures of primary human marrow cells, H2O2 caused concentration-dependent activation of TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells. H2O2 also increased the area of pits per osteoclast activity assay substrate. RT-PCR showed that H2O2 stimulated the expression of M-CSF and RANKL and increased the RANKL/OPG ratio. The data support the view that oxidative stress is associated with increased bone resorption and low bone mass in otherwise healthy women. In addition, RANKL and M-CSF stimulation induced by oxidative stress may participate in osteoclastogenesis in human bone.

  5. Suppression of MicroRNA-383 Enhances Therapeutic Potential of Human Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Treating Spinal Cord Injury via GDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Jun Wei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Transplantation of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been used to treat spinal cord injury (SCI to enhance tissue repair and neural cell regeneration. Glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF is an identified neural growth and survival factor. Here, we examined whether modification of GDNF levels in MSCs may further increase the potential of MSCs in promoting neural cell regeneration and subsequently the therapeutic outcome. Methods: We examined the mRNA and protein levels of GDNF in human MSCs by RT-qPCR and Western blot, respectively. Bioinformatics analyses were done to predict microRNAs (miRNAs that target GDNF in MSCs. The functional binding of miRNAs to GDNF mRNA was examined by a dual luciferase reporter assay. MSCs were transduced with adeno-associated virus (AAV carrying null or antisense for miR-383 (as-miR-383, which were transplanted into nude rats that underwent SCI. The intact tissue, cavity volume, and recovery of locomotor activity were assessed. Results: MSCs expressed very low GDNF protein, but surprisingly high levels of GDNF mRNA. Bioinformatics analyses showed that miR-383 inhibited protein translation of GDNF, through binding to the 3’-UTR of the GDNF mRNA. MSCs transduced with AAV-as-miR-383 further increased the intact tissue percentage, decreased cavity volume, and enhanced the recovery of locomotor activity in nude rats that underwent SCI, compared to MSCs. Conclusions: Suppression of miR-383 may increase the therapeutic potential of human bone-marrow-derived MSCs in treating SCI via augmentation of GDNF protein levels.

  6. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage......Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone...... and regulation of BM adipocyte formation are not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pertaining to identification and characterization of adipocyte progenitor cells in BM and the regulation of differentiation into mature adipocytes. We have also emphasized the clinical relevance...

  7. Impaired function of bone marrow stromal cells in systemic mastocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztian Nemeth

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM have a wide variety of problems, including skeletal abnormalities. The disease results from a mutation of the stem cell receptor (c-kit in mast cells and we wondered if the function of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs; also known as MSCs or mesenchymal stem cells might be affected by the invasion of bone marrow by mutant mast cells. As expected, BMSCs from SM patients do not have a mutation in c-kit, but they proliferate poorly. In addition, while osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs seems to be deficient, their adipogenic potential appears to be increased. Since the hematopoietic supportive abilities of BMSCs are also important, we also studied the engraftment in NSG mice of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, after being co-cultured with BMSCs of healthy volunteers vs. BMSCs derived from patients with SM. BMSCs derived from the bone marrow of patients with SM could not support hematopoiesis to the extent that healthy BMSCs do. Finally, we performed an expression analysis and found significant differences between healthy and SM derived BMSCs in the expression of genes with a variety of functions, including the WNT signaling, ossification, and bone remodeling. We suggest that some of the symptoms associated with SM might be driven by epigenetic changes in BMSCs caused by dysfunctional mast cells in the bone marrow of the patients.

  8. Distribution and viability of fetal and adult human bone marrow stromal cells in a biaxial rotating vessel bioreactor after seeding on polymeric 3D additive manufactured scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eLeferink

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising candidates for tissue engineering based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix (ECM distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation.

  9. Immunomodulatory effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on pro-inflammatory cytokine-stimulated human corneal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the modulatory effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on human corneal epithelial cells (HCE-T stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon gamma (IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α in an in vitro co-cultured model. METHODS: HCE-T alone and co-cultured with MSC were stimulated with IFN-γ/TNF for 24 and 48 hours or left untreated. The expression of intracellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, human leukocyte antigen ABC, DR and G (HLA-ABC, HLA-DR, HLA-G were investigated by flow cytometry. Subcellular localization of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO were assessed by immunofluorescence staining and western blot. The concentration of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 in the conditioned media from different cultures was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB and TGF-β1 signaling pathway blocking experiments were performed to analyze associations between the expression of cell surface molecules and the NF-κB transcription pathway, and the expression of IDO and TGF-β1 signaling pathway. RESULTS: IFN-γ/TNF treatment significantly up-regulated expression of ICAM-1, HLA-ABC, and induced de novo expression of HLA-DR and IDO on HCE-T cultured alone, while HLA-G expression remained unaffected. Up-regulation was significantly inhibited by co-culture with MSC. Increased TGF-β1 secretion was detected in 48 h IFN-γ/TNF-stimulated MSC monocultures and HCE-T/MSC co-cultures. MSC attenuated the activation of cytokine-induced NF-κB and IDO induction. Blockade of NF-κB transcription pathway by BMS-345541 significantly reduced the up-regulation of ICAM-1, HLA-ABC, HLA-DR and IDO expression, while blockade of TGF-β1 signaling pathways reversed the modulatory effect of MSC on IDO expression. CONCLUSIONS: MSC reduced the expression of adhesion and immunoregulatory molecules on pro-inflammatory cytokine-stimulated HCE-T via the NF

  10. Evaluation of the effects of different culture media on the myogenic differentiation potential of adipose tissue- or bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern-Straeter, Jens; Bonaterra, Gabriel Alejandro; Juritz, Stephanie; Birk, Richard; Goessler, Ulrich Reinhart; Bieback, Karen; Bugert, Peter; Schultz, Johannes; Hörmann, Karl; Kinscherf, Ralf; Faber, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The creation of functional muscles/muscle tissue from human stem cells is a major goal of skeletal muscle tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from fat/adipose tissue (AT-MSCs), as well as bone marrow (BM-MSCs) have been shown to bear myogenic potential, which makes them candidate stem cells for skeletal muscle tissue engineering applications. The aim of this study was to analyse the myogenic differentiation potential of human AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs cultured in six different cell culture media containing different mixtures of growth factors. The following cell culture media were used in our experiments: mesenchymal stem cell growth medium (MSCGM)™ as growth medium, MSCGM + 5-azacytidine (5-Aza), skeletal muscle myoblast cell growth medium (SkGM)-2 BulletKit™, and 5, 30 and 50% conditioned cell culture media, i.e., supernatant of human satellite cell cultures after three days in cell culture mixed with MSCGM. Following the incubation of human AT-MSCs or BM-MSCs for 0, 4, 8, 11, 16 or 21 days with each of the cell culture media, cell proliferation was measured using the alamarBlue® assay. Myogenic differentiation was evaluated by quantitative gene expression analyses, using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunocytochemical staining (ICC), using well-defined skeletal markers, such as desmin (DES), myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), myosin, heavy chain 8, skeletal muscle, perinatal (MYH8), myosin, heavy chain 1, skeletal muscle, adult (MYH1) and skeletal muscle actin-α1 (ACTA1). The highest proliferation rates were observed in the AT-MSCs and BM-MSCs cultured with SkGM-2 BulletKit medium. The average proliferation rate was higher in the AT-MSCs than in the BM-MSCs, taking all six culture media into account. qRT-PCR revealed the expression levels of the myogenic markers, ACTA1, MYH1 and MYH8, in the AT-MSC cell cultures, but not in the BM-MSC cultures. The muscle-specific intermediate filament, DES, was only detected (by ICC) in the AT-MSCs, but not in the BM

  11. A xeno-free microcarrier-based stirred culture system for the scalable expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmelo, Joana G; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Diogo, Maria Margarida; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2015-08-01

    Human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are promising candidates for cell-based therapies and the development of microcarrier-based cultures in scalable bioreactors with well-defined xenogeneic-free components represent important milestones towards the clinical-scale production of these cells. In this work, we optimized our previously developed xeno-free microcarrier-based system for the scalable expansion of human MSC isolated from bone marrow (BM MSC) and adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASC). By adapting the agitation/feeding protocol at the initial cell seeding/cultivation stage in spinner flasks, we were able to maximize cell expansion rate and final cell yield. Maximal cell densities of 3.6 × 10(5) and 1.9 × 10(5) cells/mL were obtained for BM MSC (0.60 ± 0.04 day(-1) ) and ASC (0.9 ± 0.1 day(-1) ) cultures, upon seven and eight days of cultivation, respectively. Ready-to-use microcarriers Synthemax® II and Enhanced Attachment® supported identical expansion performance of BM MSC, turning those effective alternatives to the pre-coated plastic microcarriers used in our xeno-free scalable culture system. Importantly, expanded MSC maintained their immunophenotype and multilineage differentiation potential. Moreover, secretome analysis suggested a priming effect of stirred culture conditions on cytokine production by MSC. This culture system yielded considerable final cell densities that can be scaled-up to controlled large-scale bioreactors allowing a more efficient, safe and cost-effective MSC production for clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Choice of xenogenic-free expansion media significantly influences the myogenic differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Juliane; Abruzzese, Tanja; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Hart, Melanie L

    2016-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential for use in cell-based therapies for restoration of structure and function of many tissue types including smooth muscle. We compared proliferation, immunophenotype, differentiation capability and gene expression of bone marrow-derived MSCs expanded in different media containing human serum, plasma and platelet lysate in combination with commonly used protocols for myogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Moreover, we developed a xenogenic-free protocol for myogenic differentiation of MSCs. Expansion of MSCs in media complemented with serum, serum + platelet lysate or plasma + platelet lysate were multipotent because they differentiated toward four mesenchymal (myogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic) lineages. Addition of platelet lysate to expansion media increased the proliferation of MSCs and their expression of CD146. Incubation of MSCs in medium containing human serum or plasma plus 5% human platelet lysate in combination with smooth muscle cell (SMC)-inducing growth factors TGFβ1, PDGF and ascorbic acid induced high expression of ACTA2, TAGLN, CNN1 and/or MYH11 contractile SMC markers. Osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiations served as controls. Our study provides novel data on the myogenic differentiation potential of human MSCs toward the SMC lineage using different xenogenic-free cell culture expansion media in combination with distinct differentiation medium compositions. We show that the choice of expansion medium significantly influences the differentiation potential of human MSCs toward the smooth muscle cell, as well as osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages. These results can aid in designing studies using MSCs for tissue-specific therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Systemic Administration of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Extracellular Vesicles Ameliorates Aspergillus Hyphal Extract-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in Immunocompetent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fernanda F; Borg, Zachary D; Goodwin, Meagan; Sokocevic, Dino; Wagner, Darcy E; Coffey, Amy; Antunes, Mariana; Robinson, Kristen L; Mitsialis, S Alex; Kourembanas, Stella; Thane, Kristen; Hoffman, Andrew M; McKenna, David H; Rocco, Patricia R M; Weiss, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of studies demonstrate that administration of either conditioned media (CM) or extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow and other sources are as effective as the MSCs themselves in mitigating inflammation and injury. The goal of the current study was to determine whether xenogeneic administration of CM or EVs from human bone marrow-derived MSCs would be effective in a model of mixed Th2/Th17, neutrophilic-mediated allergic airway inflammation, reflective of severe refractory asthma, induced by repeated mucosal exposure to Aspergillus hyphal extract (AHE) in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice. Systemic administration of both CM and EVs isolated from human and murine MSCs, but not human lung fibroblasts, at the onset of antigen challenge in previously sensitized mice significantly ameliorated the AHE-provoked increases in airway hyperreactivity (AHR), lung inflammation, and the antigen-specific CD4 T-cell Th2 and Th17 phenotype. Notably, both CM and EVs from human MSCs (hMSCs) were generally more potent than those from mouse MSCs (mMSCs) in most of the outcome measures. The weak cross-linking agent 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride was found to inhibit release of both soluble mediators and EVs, fully negating effects of systemically administered hMSCs but only partly inhibited the ameliorating effects of mMSCs. These results demonstrate potent xenogeneic effects of CM and EVs from hMSCs in an immunocompetent mouse model of allergic airway inflammation and they also show differences in mechanisms of action of hMSCs versus mMSCs to mitigate AHR and lung inflammation in this model. There is a growing experience demonstrating benefit of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based cell therapies in preclinical models of asthma. In the current study, conditioned media (CM) and, in particular, the extracellular vesicle fraction obtained from the CM were as potent as the MSCs

  14. Pharmacologically active microcarriers delivering BDNF within a hydrogel: Novel strategy for human bone marrow-derived stem cells neural/neuronal differentiation guidance and therapeutic secretome enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandalam, Saikrishna; Sindji, Laurence; Delcroix, Gaëtan J-R; Violet, Fabien; Garric, Xavier; André, Emilie M; Schiller, Paul C; Venier-Julienne, Marie-Claire; des Rieux, Anne; Guicheux, Jérôme; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2017-02-01

    Stem cells combined with biodegradable injectable scaffolds releasing growth factors hold great promises in regenerative medicine, particularly in the treatment of neurological disorders. We here integrated human marrow-isolated adult multilineage-inducible (MIAMI) stem cells and pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) into an injectable non-toxic silanized-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Si-HPMC) hydrogel. The goal is to obtain an injectable non-toxic cell and growth factor delivery device. It should direct the survival and/or neuronal differentiation of the grafted cells, to safely transplant them in the central nervous system, and enhance their tissue repair properties. A model protein was used to optimize the nanoprecipitation conditions of the neuroprotective brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF nanoprecipitate was encapsulated in fibronectin-coated (FN) PAMs and the in vitro release profile evaluated. It showed a prolonged, bi-phasic, release of bioactive BDNF, without burst effect. We demonstrated that PAMs and the Si-HPMC hydrogel increased the expression of neural/neuronal differentiation markers of MIAMI cells after 1week. Moreover, the 3D environment (PAMs or hydrogel) increased MIAMI cells secretion of growth factors (b-NGF, SCF, HGF, LIF, PlGF-1, SDF-1α, VEGF-A & D) and chemokines (MIP-1α & β, RANTES, IL-8). These results show that PAMs delivering BDNF combined with Si-HPMC hydrogel represent a useful novel local delivery tool in the context of neurological disorders. It not only provides neuroprotective BDNF but also bone marrow-derived stem cells that benefit from that environment by displaying neural commitment and an improved neuroprotective/reparative secretome. It provides preliminary evidence of a promising pro-angiogenic, neuroprotective and axonal growth-promoting device for the nervous system. Combinatorial tissue engineering strategies for the central nervous system are scarce. We developed and characterized a novel

  15. Evaluation of GMP-compliant culture media for in vitro expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchter, Patrick; Vetter, Marcel; Saffrich, Rainer; Diehlmann, Anke; Bieback, Karen; Ho, Anthony D; Horn, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from human bone marrow serve as a resource for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Clinical applications require standardized protocols according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) guidelines. Donor variability as well as the intrinsic heterogeneity of MSC populations must be taken into consideration. The composition of the culture medium is a key factor in successful MSC expansion. The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the efficiency of xeno-free human platelet lysate (HPL)-based cell expansion with two commercially available media-StemPro MSC SFM CTS (for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications) and MSCGM (non-GMP-compliant, for research only)-in an academic setting as the first optimization step toward GMP-compliant manufacturing. We report the feasibility of MSC expansion up to the yielded cell number with all three media. MSCs exhibited the typical fibroblastoid morphology, with distinct differences in cell size depending on the medium. The differentiation capacity and characteristic immunophenotype were confirmed for all MSC populations. Proliferation was highest using StemPro MSC SFM CTS, whereas HPL medium was more cost-effective and its composition could be adjusted individually according to the respective needs. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of GMP-compatible culture media for MSC expansion. Both StemPro and HPL medium proved to be suitable for clinical application and allowed sufficient cell proliferation. Specific differences were observed and should be considered according to the intended use. This study provides a detailed cost analysis and tools that may be helpful for the establishment of GMP-compliant MSC expansion. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adhesion and growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on precise-geometry 3D organic–inorganic composite scaffolds for bone repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzinikolaidou, Maria, E-mail: mchatzin@materials.uoc.gr [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Rekstyte, Sima; Danilevicius, Paulius [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Papadaki, Helen [Hematology Laboratory, School of Medicine, University of Crete (Greece); Farsari, Maria [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece); Vamvakaki, Maria [Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH) (Greece)

    2015-03-01

    Engineering biomaterial scaffolds that promote attachment and growth of mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions is a crucial parameter for successful bone tissue engineering. Towards this direction, a lot of research effort has focused recently into the development of three-dimensional porous scaffolds, aiming to elicit positive cellular behavior. However, the fabrication of three-dimensional tissue scaffolds with a precise geometry and complex micro- and nano-features, supporting cell in-growth remains a challenge. In this study we report on a positive cellular response of human bone marrow-derived (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) onto hybrid material scaffolds consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide, and 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA). First, we use Direct fs Laser Writing, a 3D scaffolding technology to fabricate the complex structures. Subsequently, we investigate the morphology, viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid scaffolds and examine the cellular response from different donors. Finally, we explore the effect of the materials' chemical composition on cell proliferation, employing three different material surfaces: (i) a hybrid consisting of methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane, zirconium propoxide and 50 mol% DMAEMA, (ii) a hybrid material comprising methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and zirconium propoxide, and (iii) a purely organic polyDMAEMA. Our results show a strong adhesion of BM-MSCs onto the hybrid material containing 50% DMAEMA from the first 2 h after seeding, and up to several days, and a proliferation increase after 14 and 21 days, similar to the polystyrene control, independent of cell donor. These findings support the potential use of our proposed cell–material combination in bone tissue engineering. - Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy image depicting cell adhesion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into a pore of a hybrid Direct Laser Writing

  17. Safety and feasibility of cell-based therapy of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells in plate-stabilized proximal humeral fractures in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Seebach

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local implantation of ex vivo concentrated, washed and filtrated human bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMC seeded onto β-tricalciumphosphate (TCP significantly enhanced bone healing in a preclinical segmental defect model. Based on these results, we evaluated in a first clinical phase-I trial safety and feasibility of augmentation with preoperatively isolated autologous BMC seeded onto β-TCP in combination with angle stable plate fixation for the therapy of proximal humeral fractures as a potential alternative to autologous bone graft from the iliac crest. Methods 10 patients were enrolled to assess whether cell therapy with 1.3 × 106 autologous BMC/ml/ml β-TCP, collected on the day preceding the definitive surgery, is safe and feasible when seeded onto β-TCP in patients with a proximal humeral fracture. 5 follow-up visits for clinical and radiological controls up to 12 weeks were performed. Results β-tricalciumphosphate fortification with BMC was feasible and safe; specifically, neither morbidity at the harvest site nor at the surgical wound site were observed. Neither local nor systemic inflammation was noted. All fractures healed within the observation time without secondary dislocation. Three adverse events were reported: one case each of abdominal wall shingles, tendon loosening and initial screw perforation, none of which presumed related to the IND. Conclusions Cell therapy with autologous BMC for bone regeneration appeared to be safe and feasible with no drug-related adverse reactions being described to date. The impression of efficacy was given, although the study was not powered nor controlled to detect such. A clinical trial phase-II will be forthcoming in order to formally test the clinical benefit of BMC-laden β-TCP for PHF patients. Trial registration The study was registered in the European Clinical Trial Register as EudraCT No. 2012-004037-17. Date of registration 30th of August 2012. Informed

  18. Epiretinal transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells rescues retinal and vision function in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzameret, Adi; Sher, Ifat; Belkin, Michael; Treves, Avraham J; Meir, Amilia; Nagler, Arnon; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani; Rotenstreich, Ygal; Solomon, Arieh S

    2015-09-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with incurable retinal degeneration affect millions of people worldwide. In this study, 0.25×10(6) human bone marrow stem cells (hBM-MSCs) were transplanted epiretinally in the right eye of Royal College Surgeons (RCS) rats at the age of 28 days. Epiretinally transplanted cells were identified as a thin layer of cells along vitreous cavity, in close proximity to the retina or attached to the lens capsule, up to 6 weeks following transplantation. Epiretinal transplantation delayed photoreceptor degeneration and rescued retinal function up to 20 weeks following cell transplantation. Visual functions remained close to normal levels in epiretinal transplantation rats. No inflammation or any other adverse effects were observed in transplanted eyes. Our findings suggest that transplantation of hBM-MSCs as a thin epiretinal layer is effective for treatment of retinal degeneration in RCS rats, and that transplanting the cells in close proximity to the retina enhances hBM-MSC therapeutic effect compared with intravitreal injection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Early severe impairment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from the bone marrow caused by CLP sepsis and endotoxemia in a humanized mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirecki, Tomasz; Kawiak, Jerzy; Machaj, Eugeniusz; Pojda, Zygmunt; Wasilewska, Danuta; Czubak, Jarosław; Hoser, Grażyna

    2015-08-14

    An effective immune response to severe bacterial infections requires a robust production of the innate immunity cells from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in a process called emergency myelopoiesis. In sepsis, an altered immune response that leads to a failure of bacterial clearance is often observed. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of sepsis on human HSPCs in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment of humanized mice subjected to acute endotoxemia and polymicrobial sepsis. Humanized mice (hu-NSG) were generated by transplanting NOD.Cg-Prkdc/scidIL2rγ (NSG) mice with the human cord blood CD34(+) cells. Eight weeks after the transplantation, hu-NSG mice were subjected to sepsis induced by endotoxemia-Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-or by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Twenty-four hours later, HSPCs from BM were analyzed by flow cytometry and colony-forming unit (CFU) assay. CLP after inhibition of Notch signaling was also performed. The effects of LPS on the in vitro proliferation of CD34(+) cells from human BM were tested by CellTrace Violet dye staining. The expression of Toll-like receptor 4 receptor was present among engrafted human HSPCs. Both CLP and endotoxemia decreased (by 43 % and 37 %) cellularity of the BM. In addition, in both models, accumulation of early CD34(+) CD38(-) HSCs was observed, but the number of CD34(+) CD38(+) progenitors decreased. After CLP, there was a 1.5-fold increase of proliferating CD34(+) CD38(-)Ki-67(+) cells. Moreover, CFU assay revealed a depressed (by 75 % after LPS and by 50 % after CLP) production of human hematopoietic colonies from the BM of septic mice. In contrast, in vitro LPS stimulated differentiation of CD34(+) CD38(-) HSCs but did not induce proliferation of these cells in contrast to the CD34(+) CD38(+) progenitors. CLP sepsis modulated the BM microenvironment by upregulation of Jagged-1 expression on non-hematopoietic cells, and the proliferation of HSCs was Notch

  20. PDX1- and NGN3-mediated in vitro reprogramming of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells into pancreatic endocrine lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limbert, Catarina; Päth, Günter; Ebert, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Reprogramming of multipotent adult bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) (BM-MSC) represents one of several strategies for cell-based therapy of diabetes. However, reprogramming primary BM-MSC into pancreatic endocrine lineages has not yet been consistently demonstrated....

  1. High extracellular magnesium inhibits mineralized matrix deposition and modulates intracellular calcium signaling in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Chunxi; Li, Jiao; Zhu, Yuchang; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2014-08-08

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into several cell types and provide an attractive source of autologous cells for regenerative medicine. However, their cellular biology is not fully understood. Similar to Ca(2+), extracellular Mg(2+) plays an important role in the functions of the skeletal system. Here, we examined the effects of extracellular Mg(2+) on the deposition of calcium phosphate matrix and Ca(2+) signaling with or without ATP stimulation in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). We found that high extracellular Mg(2+) concentration ([Mg(2+)]e) inhibited extracellular matrix mineralization in hBMSCs in vitro. hBMSCs also produced a dose-dependent decrease in the frequency of calcium oscillations during [Mg(2+)]e elevation with a slight suppression on oscillation amplitude. In addition, spontaneous ATP release was inhibited under high [Mg(2+)]e levels and exogenous ATP addition stimulated oscillation reappear. Taken together, our results indicate that high [Mg(2+)]e modulates calcium oscillations via suppression of spontaneous ATP release and inactivates purinergic receptors, resulting in decreased extracellular mineralized matrix deposition in hBMSCs. Therefore, the high magnesium environment created by the rapid corrosion of Mg alloys may result in the dysfunction of calcium-dependent physiology processes and be disadvantageous to hBMSCs physiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Phenotypical and functional characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow: comparison of culture using different media supplemented with human platelet lysate or fetal bovine serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Azouna, Nesrine; Jenhani, Faouzi; Regaya, Zohra; Berraeis, Lamia; Ben Othman, Tarek; Ducrocq, Elfi; Domenech, Jorge

    2012-02-14

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells able to differentiate into several mesenchymal lineages, classically derived from bone marrow (BM) but potentially from umbilical cord blood (UCB). Although they are becoming a good tool for regenerative medicine, they usually need to be expanded in fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented media. Human platelet lysate (HPL) has recently been proposed as substitute for safety reasons, but it is not yet clear how this supplement influences the properties of expanded MSCs. In the present study, we compared the effect of various media combining autologous HPL with or without FBS on phenotypic, proliferative and functional (differentiation, cytokine secretion profile) characteristics of human BM-derived MSCs. Despite less expression of adipogenic and osteogenic markers, MSCs cultured in HPL-supplemented media fully differentiated along osteoblastic, adipogenic, chondrogenic and vascular smooth muscle lineages. The analyses of particular specific proteins expressed during osteogenic differentiation (calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and parathormone receptor (PTHR)) showed their decrease at D0 before any induction for MSC cultured with HPL mostly at high percentage (10%HPL). The cytokine dosage showed a clear increase of proliferation capacity and interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 secretion. This study shows that MSCs can be expanded in media supplemented with HPL that can totally replace FBS. HPL-supplemented media not only preserves their phenotype as well as their differentiation capacity, but also shortens culture time by increasing their growth rate.

  3. Whole genome expression profiling and screening for differentially expressed cytokine genes in human bone marrow endothelial cells treated with humoral inhibitors in liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Sun, Wang; Wang, Xianqi; Jia, Xu; Ma, Biao; Chang, Yu; Zhang, Weihui; Xue, Dongbo

    2013-11-01

    Bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) are important components of the hematopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow, and they can secrete several types of cytokines to regulate the functions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. To date, it is unknown whether BMECs undergo functional changes and lead to hematopoietic abnormalities in cases of liver cirrhosis (LC). In the present study, whole genome microarray analysis was carried out to detect differentially expressed genes in human BMECs treated for 48 h with medium supplemented with 20% pooled sera from 26 patients with LC or 10 healthy volunteers as the control group. A total of 1,106 upregulated genes and 766 downregulated genes were identified. In Gene Ontology analysis, the most significant categories of genes were revealed. A large number of the upregulated genes were involved in processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, apoptosis and cellular response to stimuli and the downregulated genes were involved in the negative regulation of secretion, angiogenesis, blood vessel development and cell growth. Pathway analysis revealed that the upregulated genes were either cell adhesion molecules or parts of the apoptotic signaling pathway and the downregulated genes were involved in the Wnt signaling pathway and MAPK signaling pathway. These were the pathways with the highest enrichment scores. The results of apoptosis assays revealed that the humoral inhibitors in the sera of patients with LC induced the apoptosis of BMECs, which confirmed the accuracy of bioinformatic analysis. Moreover, we screened and verified 21 differentially expressed cytokine genes [transforming growth factor (TGF)B1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)B, TNF receptor superfamily, member 11b (TNFRSF11B), TNF (ligand) superfamily, member 13b (TNFSF13B), interleukin (IL)1A, IL6, IL11, IL17C, IL24, family with sequence similarity 3, member B (FAM3B), Fas ligand (FASLG), matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)3, MMP15, vitronectin (VTN), insulin-like growth factor

  4. Comparing the Gene Expression Profile of Stromal Cells from Human Cord Blood and Bone Marrow: Lack of the Typical “Bone” Signature in Cord Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bosch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With regard to the bone-regenerative capacity, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC can still be termed the “gold standard.” Nevertheless, neonatal stromal cells from cord blood (CB feature advantages concerning availability, immaturity, and proliferation potential. The detailed gene expression analysis and overexpression of genes expressed differentially provide insight into the inherent capacity of stromal cells. Microarray and qRT-PCR analyses revealed closely related gene expression patterns of two stromal cell populations derived from CB. In contrast to the CB-derived cell types, BMSC displayed high expression levels of BSP, OSX, BMP4, OC, and PITX2. Lentiviral overexpression of BSP but not of OSX in CB-cells increased the capacity to form a mineralized matrix. BMP4 induced the secretion of proteoglycans during chondrogenic pellet culture and extended the osteogenic but reduced the adipogenic differentiation potential. BMSC revealed the typical osteogenic gene expression signature. In contrast, the CB-derived cell types exhibited a more immature gene expression profile and no predisposition towards skeletal development. The absence of BSP and BMP4—which were defined as potential key players affecting the differentiation potential—in neonatal stromal cells should be taken into consideration when choosing a cell source for tissue regeneration approaches.

  5. Chromatin remodeling agent trichostatin A: a key-factor in the hepatic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells derived of adult bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinken Mathieu

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC derived of adult bone marrow to undergo in vitro hepatic differentiation was investigated. Results Exposure of hMSC to a cocktail of hepatogenic factors [(fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, insulin-transferrin-sodium-selenite (ITS and dexamethasone] failed to induce hepatic differentiation. Sequential exposure to these factors (FGF-4, followed by HGF, followed by HGF+ITS+dexamethasone, however, resembling the order of secretion during liver embryogenesis, induced both glycogen-storage and cytokeratin (CK18 expression. Additional exposure of the cells to trichostatin A (TSA considerably improved endodermal differentiation, as evidenced by acquisition of an epithelial morphology, chronological expression of hepatic proteins, including hepatocyte-nuclear factor (HNF-3β, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP, CK18, albumin (ALB, HNF1α, multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP2 and CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα, and functional maturation, i.e. upregulated ALB secretion, urea production and inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP-dependent activity. Conclusion hMSC are able to undergo mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. TSA is hereby essential to promote differentiation of hMSC towards functional hepatocyte-like cells.

  6. A novel strontium(II)-modified calcium phosphate bone cement stimulates human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, M; Lode, A; Helth, A; Gelinsky, M

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, the in vitro effects of novel strontium-modified calcium phosphate bone cements (SrCPCs), prepared using two different approaches on human-bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), were evaluated. Strontium ions, known to stimulate bone formation and therefore already used in systemic osteoporosis therapy, were incorporated into a hydroxyapatite-forming calcium phosphate bone cement via two simple approaches: incorporation of strontium carbonate crystals and substitution of Ca(2+) by Sr(2+) ions during cement setting. All modified cements released 0.03-0.07 mM Sr(2+) under in vitro conditions, concentrations that were shown not to impair the proliferation or osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, strontium modification led to a reduced medium acidification and Ca(2+) depletion in comparison to the standard calcium phosphate cement. In indirect and direct cell culture experiments with the novel SrCPCs significantly enhanced cell proliferation and differentiation were observed. In conclusion, the SrCPCs described here could be beneficial for the local treatment of defects, especially in the osteoporotic bone. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Immune humanization of immunodeficient mice using diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Klein, Melanie; Proske, Judith; Werno, Christian; Schneider, Katharina; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan; Rack, Brigitte; Buchholz, Stefan; Ganzer, Roman; Blana, Andreas; Seelbach-Göbel, Birgit; Nitsche, Ulrich; Männel, Daniela N; Klein, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice, while routinely used in cancer research, preclude studying interactions of immune and cancer cells or, if humanized by allogeneic immune cells, are of limited use for tumor-immunological questions. Here, we explore a novel way to generate cancer models with an autologous humanized immune system. We demonstrate that hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow aspirates of non-metastasized carcinoma patients, which are taken at specialized centers for diagnostic purposes, can be used to generate a human immune system in NOD-scid IL2rγ(null) (NSG) and HLA-I expressing NSG mice (NSG-HLA-A2/HHD) comprising both, lymphoid and myeloid cell lineages. Using NSG-HLA-A2/HHD mice, we show that responsive and self-tolerant human T cells develop and human antigen presenting cells can activate human T cells. As critical factors we identified the low potential of bone marrow HSPCs to engraft, generally low HSPC numbers in patient-derived bone marrow samples, cryopreservation and routes of cell administration. We provide here an optimized protocol that uses a minimum number of HSPCs, preselects high-quality bone marrow samples defined by the number of initially isolated leukocytes and intra-femoral or intra-venous injection. In conclusion, the use of diagnostic bone marrow aspirates from non-metastasized carcinoma patients for the immunological humanization of immunodeficient mice is feasible and opens the chance for individualized analyses of anti-tumoral T cell responses.

  8. Immortalized human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell expressing suicide gene for anti-tumor therapy in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wayne Y W; Zhang, Ting; Lau, Carol P Y; Wang, C C; Chan, Kai-Ming; Li, Gang

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is one of the greatest health challenges facing the world today with >10 million new cases of cancer every year. The self-renewal, tumor-homing ability and low immunogenicity of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) make them potential delivery candidates for suicide genes for anti-tumor therapy. However, unstable supply and short life span of adult MSCs in vitro have limited this therapeutic potential. In this study, we aimed to evaluate if immortalization of human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells by simian virus 40 (SV40-hfBMSCs) could be a stable source of MSCs for clinical application of suicide gene therapy. Transduction of SV40 and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase-IRES-green fluorescent protein (TK-GFP) did not cause significant change in the stem cell properties of hfBMSCs. The anti-tumor effect of SV40-TK-hfBMSCs in the presence of the prodrug ganciclovir was demonstrated in vitro and in nude mice bearing human prostate cancer cells, DU145 and PC3, which had been transduced with luciferase and GFP for imaging evaluation by an in vivo live imaging system (IVIS 200 imaging system; Caliper Life Sciences). Repeated injection of low doses (1 × 10(6) cells/kg) of SV40-TK-hfBMSCs was as effective as previously reported and did not cause observable harmful side effects in multiple organs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction showed that SV40-TK-hfBMSCs did not induce significant proliferation of lymphocytes isolated from healthy adults. Taken together, immortalized hfBMSCs represent a reliable and safe source of MSCs for further clinical translational study. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of autologous human multipotent adult stem cells derived from three anatomic areas by marrow aspiration: tibia, anterior ilium, and posterior ilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Robert E; Tursun, Ramzey

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the yields of stromal multipotent stem cells (CD34+ and CD105+) and hematopoetic multipotent stem cells (CD44+) obtained from different areas via bone marrow aspiration (BMA). Sixty 60-mL bone marrow aspirates were taken from the tibial plateau, the anterior ilium, and the posterior ilium using a single point-of-care BMA technique and a single BMA concentration (BMAC) device. A 1-mL portion of each sample was used to determine CD stem cell concentrations and the nucleated cell count. The remaining BMA was centrifuged to separate the more mature red blood cell precursors from the stem cells and then concentrate the latter into a BMAC. The BMAC yield of 10 mL was analyzed with flow cytometry and nucleated cell counts to derive a concentration factor for the BMAC. The yield of total nucleated cells was equal between the anterior and posterior ilium and more than twice that obtained from the tibial plateau. The CD44+ and CD105+ cell yields were also nearly equal between the anterior and posterior ilium but more than twice that of the tibial plateau; however, the ratios between the three different stem cell types in BMAC obtained from the different areas suggest varying potentials for tissue development. The ilium is the preferred donor site for obtaining autologous stem cells at the point of care. The tibial plateau yielded only half as much bone marrow multipotent/progenitor stem cells as did the anterior and posterior ilium. The composition of the BMAC from each site suggests that the potential for differentiation into various cell types changes depending on the source of bone marrow, but that BMAC represents 6.5 ± 1.0 concentration factor from BMA.

  10. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells display anti-cancer activity in SCID mice bearing disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Secchiero

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although multimodality treatment can induce high rate of remission in many subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, significant proportions of patients relapse with incurable disease. The effect of human bone marrow (BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC on tumor cell growth is controversial, and no specific information is available on the effect of BM-MSC on NHL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The effect of BM-MSC was analyzed in two in vivo models of disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with an indolent (EBV(- Burkitt-type BJAB, median survival = 46 days and an aggressive (EBV(+ B lymphoblastoid SKW6.4, median survival = 27 days behavior in nude-SCID mice. Intra-peritoneal (i.p. injection of MSC (4 days after i.p. injection of lymphoma cells significantly increased the overall survival at an optimal MSC:lymphoma ratio of 1:10 in both xenograft models (BJAB+MSC, median survival = 58.5 days; SKW6.4+MSC, median survival = 40 days. Upon MSC injection, i.p. tumor masses developed more slowly and, at the histopathological observation, exhibited a massive stromal infiltration coupled to extensive intra-tumor necrosis. In in vitro experiments, we found that: i MSC/lymphoma co-cultures modestly affected lymphoma cell survival and were characterized by increased release of pro-angiogenic cytokines with respect to the MSC, or lymphoma, cultures; ii MSC induce the migration of endothelial cells in transwell assays, but promoted endothelial cell apoptosis in direct MSC/endothelial cell co-cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that BM-MSC exhibit anti-lymphoma activity in two distinct xenograft SCID mouse models of disseminated NHL.

  11. A proteome study of secreted prostatic factors affecting osteoblastic activity: galectin-1 is involved in differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Jensen, Ole N; Moiseeva, Elena P

    2003-01-01

    /ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). One of these spots was identified as galectin-1. We examined whether PC3 CM, recombinant galectin-1 alone, or combined with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) had any effects on the proliferation or differentiation of human bone marrow stromal (h...

  12. The neural plasticity of early-passage human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and their modulation with chromatin-modifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiying; Alexanian, Arshak R

    2014-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in their immature state express a variety of genes of the three germ layers at relatively low or moderate levels that might explain their phenomenal plasticity. Numerous recent studies have demonstrated that under the appropriate conditions in vitro and in vivo the expression of different sets of these genes can be upregulated, turning MSCs into variety of cell lineages of mesodermal, ectodermal and endodermal origin. While transdifferentiation of MSCs is still controversial, these unique properties make MSCs an ideal autologous source of easily reprogrammable cells. Recently, using the approach of cell reprogramming by biological active compounds that interfere with chromatin structure and function, as well as with specific signalling pathways that promote neural fate commitment, we have been able to generate neural-like cells from human bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs (hMSCs). However, the efficiency of neural transformation of hMSCs induced by this approach gradually declined with passaging. To elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the higher plasticity of early-passage hMSCs, comparative analysis of the expression levels of several pluripotent and neural genes was conducted for early- and late-passage hMSCs. The results demonstrated that early-passage hMSCs expressed the majority of these genes at low and moderate levels that gradually declined at late passages. Neural induction further increased the expression of some of these genes in hMSCs, accompanied by morphological changes into neural-like cells. We concluded that low and moderate expression of several pluripotent and neural genes in early-passage hMSCs could explain their higher plasticity and pliability for neural induction. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Human platelet lysate is an alternative to fetal bovine serum for large-scale expansion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipamula, Sanjay; Sharma, Archana; Krishnamurthy, Sagar; Majumdar, Anish Sen; Seetharam, Raviraja N

    2012-07-01

    Human platelet lysate (HPL) was evaluated as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in large-scale culturing of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) for therapeutic applications. Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM)of low glucose (LG) and Knock Out (KO) were used with human platelet lysate (HPL) as LG-HPL and KO-HPL, and with FBS as LG-FBS and KO-FBS to culture the BM-MSCs. HPL at 10 % (v/v) supported BM-MSCs growth and subsequent isolation efficiency generated >90 × 10(6) MSCs in LG-HPL. Population doublings (PDs) and population doubling times of LG-HPL and KO-HPL (PDT) were not significantly different but LG-HPL showed a significant clonogenic potential and HPL cultures had an average PDT of 36.5 ± 6.5 h and an average PDs of 5 ± 0.7/passage. BM-MSCs cultured with LG-HPL had significantly higher immunosuppression compared to LG-FBS, but KO-HPL and KO-FBS-grown cultures were not significantly different. HPL is therefore alternative to FBS for large-scale production of BM-MSCs for therapeutic applications.

  14. Biological Response of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Commercial Tantalum Coatings with Microscale and Nanoscale Surface Topographies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A.; Kumar, Girish; Goering, Peter L.; Williams, Brian; Stiglich, Jack; Narayan, Roger J.

    2016-06-01

    Tantalum is a promising orthopaedic implant coating material due to its robust mechanical properties, corrosion resistance, and excellent biocompatibility. Previous studies have demonstrated improved biocompatibility and tissue integration of surface-treated tantalum coatings compared to untreated tantalum. Surface modification of tantalum coatings with biologically inspired microscale and nanoscale features may be used to evoke optimal tissue responses. The goal of this study was to evaluate commercial tantalum coatings with nanoscale, sub-microscale, and microscale surface topographies for orthopaedic and dental applications using human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). Tantalum coatings with different microscale and nanoscale surface topographies were fabricated using a diffusion process or chemical vapor deposition. Biological evaluation of the tantalum coatings using hBMSCs showed that tantalum coatings promote cellular adhesion and growth. Furthermore, hBMSC adhesion to the tantalum coatings was dependent on surface feature characteristics, with enhanced cell adhesion on sub-micrometer- and micrometer-sized surface topographies compared to hybrid nano-/microstructures. Nanostructured and microstructured tantalum coatings should be further evaluated to optimize the surface coating features to promote osteogenesis and enhance osseointegration of tantalum-based orthopaedic implants.

  15. [PDGFRα Participates in Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-mediated Recovery of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Osteogenic Differentiation after Irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kai; Yang, Zhi; Xu, Shuang-Nian; Zhang, Jian-Min; Chen, Jie-Ping

    2015-12-01

    To explore the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (hBMMSC) damaged by irradiation and its underlying mechanisms. hBMMSC was irradiated with 0, 6, 12 Gy X ray, then flow cytometry, cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), Western blot and alizarin red staining were used to detect the effects of X ray on apoptosis, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMMSC; 0, 1, 5, 10, 20 ng/ml bFGF was added to hBMMSC irradiated with X ray for selecting the suitable bFGF reaction concentration; then the Western blot was used to detect the expression of PDGFRα so as to evaluate whether the expression of PDGFRα participated in bFGF-mediated recovery of hBMMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation after irradiation. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMMSC decreased remarkably after irradiation. bFGF promoted the recovery of proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of irradiated hBMMSC compared with untreated irradiated hBMMSC (P recovery of hBMMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. The damage of hBMMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation associates with downregulation of PDGFRα expression induced by irrediation. PDGFRα involves in repairing effect of bFGF on irradiation damage of hBMMSC.

  16. Comparative miRNA-Based Fingerprinting Reveals Biological Differences in Human Olfactory Mucosa- and Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

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    Susan Louise Lindsay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously we reported that nestin-positive human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs derived from the olfactory mucosa (OM enhanced CNS myelination in vitro to a greater extent than bone-marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs. miRNA-based fingerprinting revealed the two MSCs were 64% homologous, with 26 miRNAs differentially expressed. We focused on miR-146a-5p and miR-140-5p due to their reported role in the regulation of chemokine production and myelination. The lower expression of miR-140-5p in OM-MSCs correlated with higher secretion of CXCL12 compared with BM-MSCs. Addition of CXCL12 and its pharmacological inhibitors to neural co-cultures supported these data. Studies on related miR-146a-5p targets demonstrated that OM-MSCs had lower levels of Toll-like receptors and secreted less pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and CCL2. OM-MSCs polarized microglia to an anti-inflammatory phenotype, illustrating potential differences in their inflammatory response. Nestin-positive OM-MSCs could therefore offer a cell transplantation alternative for CNS repair, should these biological behaviors be translated in vivo.

  17. MicroRNA-320a Regulates the Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Targeting HOXA10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhou Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are a promising cell source for bone engineering owing to their high potential to differentiate into osteoblasts. The bone morphogenetic protein-inducible gene homeobox a10 (HOXA10 is a critical regulator of osteogenesis. The objective of the present study was to identify microR-NAs (miRNAs targeting HOXA10 and examine the effects on the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Methods: Based on in silico analysis, HOXA10-targeting miRNAs were selected and their regulatory roles in osteoblast differentiation were investigated. Results: Six HOXA10-targeting miRNAs were identifIed by computational analysis, of which miR-320a was selected for further analysis because it was downregulated during osteogenic induction. Overexpression of miR-320a downregulated HOXA10 and significantly inhibited osteogenesis in hMSCs, as determined by the downregulation of the osteogenic markers Runx2, ALP, and OC and the inhibition of ALP activity and matrix mineralization, whereas miR-320a inhibition had the opposite effects. Furthermore, ectopic expression of HOXA10 (not including 3′-UTR rescued the effects of miR-320a on osteogenic differentiation. Conclusion: These results suggest that miR-320a acts as a critical regulator of osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs by repressing its target HOXA10.

  18. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Regulates MicroRNA 21 Expression to Activate TGF-β Signaling in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Enhance Osteoblast Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Selvamurugan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs have been documented to promote bone fracture healing in nonunions and increase lumbar spinal fusion rates. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PEMF stimulates differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs into osteoblasts are not well understood. In this study the PEMF effects on hBMSCs were studied by microarray analysis. PEMF stimulation of hBMSCs’ cell numbers mainly affected genes of cell cycle regulation, cell structure, and growth receptors or kinase pathways. In the differentiation and mineralization stages, PEMF regulated preosteoblast gene expression and notably, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling pathway and microRNA 21 (miR21 were most highly regulated. PEMF stimulated activation of Smad2 and miR21-5p expression in differentiated osteoblasts, and TGF-β signaling was essential for PEMF stimulation of alkaline phosphatase mRNA expression. Smad7, an antagonist of the TGF-β signaling pathway, was found to be miR21-5p’s putative target gene and PEMF caused a decrease in Smad7 expression. Expression of Runx2 was increased by PEMF treatment and the miR21-5p inhibitor prevented the PEMF stimulation of Runx2 expression in differentiating cells. Thus, PEMF could mediate its effects on bone metabolism by activation of the TGF-β signaling pathway and stimulation of expression of miR21-5p in hBMSCs.

  19. Periprostatic implantation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells potentiates recovery of erectile function by intracavernosal injection in a rat model of cavernous nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dalsan; Jang, Myoung Jin; Lee, Jiyeon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Hyun Soo; Moon, Kyung Hyun; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether periprostatic implantation (PPI) of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) potentiates recovery of erectile function after intracavernosal injection (ICI) of hBMSCs in a rat model of cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Sprague-Dawley rats that had undergone bilateral CN injury were treated by ICI with or without PPI of hBMSCs (10 rats per group). hBMSCs were harvested from healthy human donors. Fibrin scaffolds were used for PPI of hBMSCs. After 4 weeks, erectile responses to electric pelvic ganglion stimulation were studied. The expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive nerve fibers and smooth muscle/collagen ratio was evaluated in each penis. ICI of hBMSCs slightly improved erectile function compared with the control group (maximal intracavernosal pressure/mean arterial pressure, 39.1% vs 21.7%; P=.060), but a combination of PPI and ICI significantly improved erectile function (45.0%, P=.007). After stem cell therapy, the number of nNOS-positive nerve fibers increased significantly in the PPI+ICI group (P=.017). The smooth muscle/collagen ratio increased significantly after stem cell therapy in the ICI and PPI+ICI groups (both P<.001). ICI of hBMSCs in a rat model of CN injury results in recovery of penile erection by decreasing corporeal smooth muscle deterioration and collagen deposition. PPI of hBMSCs potentiates recovery of erectile function by ICI of hBMSCs via regeneration of nNOS-containing nerve fibers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cytokines inducing bone marrow SCA+ cells migration into pancreatic islet and conversion into insulin-positive cells in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LuGuang Luo

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that specific bone marrow lineages and cytokine treatment may facilitate bone marrow migration into islets, leading to a conversion into insulin producing cells in vivo. In this study we focused on identifying which bone marrow subpopulations and cytokine treatments play a role in bone marrow supporting islet function in vivo by evaluating whether bone marrow is capable of migrating into islets as well as converting into insulin positive cells. We approached this aim by utilizing several bone marrow lineages and cytokine-treated bone marrow from green fluorescent protein (GFP positive bone marrow donors. Sorted lineages of Mac-1(+, Mac-1(-, Sca(+, Sca(-, Sca(-/Mac-1(+ and Sca(+/Mac-1(- from GFP positive mice were transplanted to irradiated C57BL6 GFP negative mice. Bone marrow from transgenic human ubiquitin C promoter GFP (uGFP, with strong signal C57BL6 mice was transplanted into GFP negative C57BL6 recipients. After eight weeks, migration of GFP positive donor' bone marrow to the recipient's pancreatic islets was evaluated as the percentage of positive GFP islets/total islets. The results show that the most effective migration comes from the Sca(+/Mac(- lineage and these cells, treated with cytokines for 48 hours, were found to have converted into insulin positive cells in pancreatic islets in vivo. This study suggests that bone marrow lineage positive cells and cytokine treatments are critical factors in determining whether bone marrow is able to migrate and form insulin producing cells in vivo. The mechanisms causing this facilitation as well as bone marrow converting to pancreatic beta cells still need to be investigated.

  1. Platelet-rich concentrate in serum free medium enhances osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shani Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that platelet concentrates used in conjunction with appropriate growth media enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs. However, their potential in inducing osteogenesis of hMSCs when cultured in serum free medium has not been explored. Furthermore, the resulting osteogenic molecular signatures of the hMSCs have not been compared to standard osteogenic medium. We studied the effect of infrequent supplementation (8-day interval of 15% non-activated platelet-rich concentrate (PRC in serum free medium on hMSCs proliferation and differentiation throughout a course of 24 days, and compared the effect with those cultured in a standard osteogenic medium (OM. Cell proliferation was analyzed by alamar blue assay. Gene expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2, Collagen1, Alkaline Phosphatase, Bone morphogenetic protein 2, Osteopontin, Osteocalcin, Osteonectin were analyzed using Q-PCR. Immunocytochemical staining for osteocalcin, osteopontin and transcription factor Runx2 were done at 8, 16 and 24 days. Biochemical assays for the expression of ALP and osteocalcin were also performed at these time-points. Osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed qualitatively by Alizarin Red S staining that was quantified using cetylpyridinium chloride. Results showed that PRC supplemented in serum free medium enhanced hMSC proliferation, which peaked at day 16. The temporal pattern of gene expression of hMSCs under the influence of PRC was comparable to that of the osteogenic media, but at a greater extent at specific time points. Immunocytochemical staining revealed stronger staining for Runx2 in the PRC-treated group compared to OM, while the staining for Osteocalcin and Osteopontin were comparable in both groups. ALP activity and Osteocalcin/DNA level were higher in the PRC group. Cells in the PRC group had similar level of bone mineralization as those cultured in OM, as reflected by the intensity of

  2. Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Regenerate Urethral Sphincters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2012-03-01

    Regenerative medicine based on tissue engineering and/or stem cell therapy techniques has the potential to improve irreversibly damaged tissues. Surgical injury to the lower urinary tract can occur as a result of radical prostatectomy or bladder neck surgery. Regeneration of urethral sphincters could be an effective treatment for post-surgical intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD)-related urinary incontinence. The replacement, enhancement, and/or recovery the urethral sphincter striated and smooth muscles could increase urethral closure pressure to help patients regain continence. Stem cells from muscle-derived satellite or adipose-derived mesenchymal cells provide temporary improvement in urethral closure pressure but do not reconstruct the muscle layer structures. Our strategy to accomplish regeneration of urethral sphincters is the utilization of autologous bone marrow-derived cells. We have developed a freeze injury model of ISD in rabbits. Freezing of the urinary sphincter causes loss of the majority of striated and smooth muscle cells, and causes a significant decrease in leak point pressure. In this review, we show that the autologous bone marrow-derived cells implanted within the freeze-injured sphincters differentiate into striated or smooth muscle cells. These cells then develop to reconstitute muscle layer structures within the sphincter. Furthermore, the leak point pressure of cell-implanted rabbits is significantly higher than that of cell-free injected controls. We conclude that implantation of autologous bone marrow-derived cells could be an effective treatment for human post-surgical ISD-related urinary incontinence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Platelet lysate and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor serve safe and accelerated expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for stroke therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Saito, Hisayasu; Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Autologous human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) should be expanded in the animal serum-free condition within clinically relevant periods in order to secure safe and effective cell therapy for ischemic stroke. This study was aimed to assess whether the hBMSCs enhance their proliferation capacity and provide beneficial effect in the infarct brain when cultured with platelet lysate (PL) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The hBMSCs were cultured in the fetal calf serum (FCS)-, PL-, or PL/G-CSF-containing medium. Cell growth kinetics was analyzed. The hBMSCs-PL, hBMSC-PL/G-CSF, or vehicle was stereotactically transplanted into the ipsilateral striatum of the rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion 7 days after the insult. Motor function was assessed for 8 weeks, and the fate of transplanted hBMSCs was examined using immunohistochemistry. As the results, the hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF showed more enhanced proliferation than the hBMSCs-FCS and hBMSCs-PL. Transplantation of hBMSCs expanded with the PL- or PL/G-CSF-containing medium equally promoted functional recovery compared with the vehicle group. Histological analysis revealed that there were no significant differences in their migration, survival, and neural differentiation in the infarct brain between the hBMSCs-PL and hBMSCs-PL/G-CSF. These findings strongly suggest that the combination of PL and G-CSF may accelerate hBMSC expansion and serve safe cell therapy for patients with ischemic stroke at clinically relevant timing.

  4. Retinoids Regulate Adipogenesis Involving the TGFβ/SMAD and Wnt/β-Catenin Pathways in Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun; Ma, Yuhong; Yao, Weiqi; Zhang, Xiaoye; Wu, Dongcheng

    2017-04-15

    Retinoids may regulate cell differentiation as ligands of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and/or retinoid X receptors (RXRs). We showed that RAR agonists promoted adipogenesis by upregulating the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) in the early stages, but blocked adipogenesis at a later stage in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). RXR agonists promoted adipogenesis at all time points in hBMSCs. The effect of RAR agonists was mediated mainly by the RARβ subtype. RAR agonists, in contrast to RXR agonists, significantly promoted the expression of RARβ. Knockdown of the RARβ gene via small hairpin RNA (shRNA) attenuated the inhibition of RAR agonists toward adipogenesis. Furthermore, we found that RAR agonists upregulated the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/SMAD pathway and Wnt/β-catenin pathway on adipogenesis in hBMSCs, and the stimulating effects were noticeably decreased with the RARβ gene knockdown. Both RAR agonists and RXR agonists inhibited adipogenesis and blocked the promoter activity of C/EBPβ and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in SW872 cell. These results indicated the RAR agonists perform dual roles in adipogenesis in hBMSCs, and the TGFβ/SMAD pathway and Wnt/β-catenin pathway may involve the inhibitory effect of RAR agonists. RARβ is the main receptor subtype mediating the effect. The roles of RXR agonists in adipogenesis exhibited cell type-specific differences, and may be based on the integration of signals from different RXR dimers.

  5. Low Molecular Weight Fraction of Commercial Human Serum Albumin Induces Morphologic and Transcriptional Changes of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Or, David; Thomas, Gregory W; Rael, Leonard T; Gersch, Elizabeth D; Rubinstein, Pablo; Brody, Edward

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common chronic disease of the joint; however, the therapeutic options for severe OA are limited. The low molecular weight fraction of commercial 5% human serum albumin (LMWF5A) has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties that are mediated, in part, by a diketopiperazine that is present in the albumin preparation and that was demonstrated to be safe and effective in reducing pain and improving function when administered intra-articularly in a phase III clinical trial. In the present study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) exposed to LMWF5A exhibited an elongated phenotype with diffuse intracellular F-actin, pronounced migratory leading edges, and filopodia-like projections. In addition, LMWF5A promoted chondrogenic condensation in "micromass" culture, concurrent with the upregulation of collagen 2α1 mRNA. Furthermore, the transcription of the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis was significantly regulated in a manner conducive to migration and homing. Several transcription factors involved in stem cell differentiation were also found to bind oligonucleotide response element probes following exposure to LMWF5A. Finally, a rapid increase in PRAS40 phosphorylation was observed following treatment, potentially resulting in the activation mTORC1. Proteomic analysis of synovial fluid taken from a preliminary set of patients indicated that at 12 weeks following administration of LMWF5A, a microenvironment exists in the knee conducive to stem cell infiltration, self-renewal, and differentiation, in addition to indications of remodeling with a reduction in inflammation. Taken together, these findings imply that LMWF5A treatment may prime stem cells for both mobilization and chondrogenic differentiation, potentially explaining some of the beneficial effects achieved in clinical trials. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. Conditioned medium from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promotes skin moisturization and effacement of wrinkles in UVB-irradiated SKH-1 hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Oh, Chang Taek; Choi, Eun Ja; Kim, Soon Re; Jang, Yu-Jin; Ko, Eun Jung; Yoo, Kwang Ho; Kim, Beom Joon

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising therapeutic agents for various diseases. To investigate the effects of conditioned medium from human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC-CdM) on pro-collagen production and wrinkle formation, we performed in vitro and in vivo experiments. We assessed the effects of MSC-CdM on proliferation and photo-aging in human dermal fibroblasts after UVB exposure using enzyme activity assays for collagen type I secretion and MMP-1. To determine the effect of topically applied MSC-CdM on wrinkle formation, MSC-CdM (1% and 10%) and vehicle (propylene glycol: ethanol, 7 : 3) were applied to the dorsal skin of UVB-irradiated hairless mice for 8 weeks. We examined the effects on wrinkle formation by assessing visual skin grading, replica, tape stripping, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and skin hydration measurement. We also examined histology of the lesions using hematoxylin-eosin, Masson's trichrome, and immunohistochemical staining. MSC-CdM markedly reduced UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression and increased pro-collagen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that MSC-CdM induces repair of dermal damage and effacement of wrinkles on UVB-irradiated hairless mice through protective effect of hydration. These results support an anti-wrinkle effect of MSC-CdM that involves increased collagen synthesis and suggest that MSC-CdM might be a potential candidate for preventing UV-induced skin damage. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Sound Waves Induce Neural Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ryanodine Receptor-Induced Calcium Release and Pyk2 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yura; Park, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Jong Seob; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil; Jeon, Songhee

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown considerable promise as an adaptable cell source for use in tissue engineering and other therapeutic applications. The aims of this study were to develop methods to test the hypothesis that human MSCs could be differentiated using sound wave stimulation alone and to find the underlying mechanism. Human bone marrow (hBM)-MSCs were stimulated with sound waves (1 kHz, 81 dB) for 7 days and the expression of neural markers were analyzed. Sound waves induced neural differentiation of hBM-MSC at 1 kHz and 81 dB but not at 1 kHz and 100 dB. To determine the signaling pathways involved in the neural differentiation of hBM-MSCs by sound wave stimulation, we examined the Pyk2 and CREB phosphorylation. Sound wave induced an increase in the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and CREB at 45 min and 90 min, respectively, in hBM-MSCs. To find out the upstream activator of Pyk2, we examined the intracellular calcium source that was released by sound wave stimulation. When we used ryanodine as a ryanodine receptor antagonist, sound wave-induced calcium release was suppressed. Moreover, pre-treatment with a Pyk2 inhibitor, PF431396, prevented the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and suppressed sound wave-induced neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs. These results suggest that specific sound wave stimulation could be used as a neural differentiation inducer of hBM-MSCs.

  8. Effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangzhi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Chaoyong; Sun, Yu; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Yuebei; Bao, Rongni; Zhao, Ningjian

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are suffering from osteoarthritis every year, and the directed intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells has provided a promising treatment strategy for osteoarthritis. Although a number of studies have demonstrated that intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells produced desirable results, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. In the current study, the effect of bone marrow stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis was observed in a co-culture system. Human chondrocytes were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent surgical procedures and bone marrow stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspirates, and then the chondrocytes were then cultured alone or cocultured with bone marrow stem cells in 0.4-µm Transwell inserts. The differentiation and biological activity of chondrocytes in the culture system were measured, and the inflammatory factors and OA-associated markers were also measured. The results indicated that coculture with human bone marrow stem cells increases cell proliferation of chondrocytes and inhibits inflammatory activity in osteoarthritis.

  9. Evaluation of Biocompatibility and Osteogenic Potential of Tricalcium Silicate-based Cements Using Human Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Neha; Singh, Manisha; Nawal, Ruchika Roongta; Chaudhry, Sarika; Yadav, Seema; Mohanty, Sujata; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2018-03-01

    The success of endodontic regeneration lies in the appropriate combination of stem cells and bioactive materials. Several novel dental materials are available on the market in this regard. Hence, the current study aimed to evaluate the proliferation, differentiation, and osteogenic potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) onto biomaterials like ProRoot MTA (MTA; Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK), Biodentine (BD; Septodont, Saint Maur de Fosses, France), and EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM; Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA). Dental cements were formulated into discs and assessed for their biocompatibility. hBMSCs were used to study biocompatitibility and the proliferative and osteogenic potential of these dental cements. A live dead assay was performed using confocal microscopy to study the biocompatibility, proliferation, and cell attachment property of the cements. An 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was also performed on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 to study growth kinetics. The osteogenic potential of these cements was studied by inducing hBMSCs over them using osteogenic differentiation medium (assessed by alkaline phosphatase assay). ERRM and MTA have shown the best biocompatibility among the tricalcium silicate materials used with no significant difference between them. Both have shown significantly higher osteogenic bioactivity than BD. All 3 tricalcium silicate cements support good adherence of hBMSCs. All of the dental cements used in this study are biocompatible with the potential to induce proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Therefore, the newly introduced ERRM can be the material of choice in various endodontic applications. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Natural killer cells generated from cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells efficiently target bone marrow-residing human leukemia cells in NOD/SCID/IL2Rg(null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Cany

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell-based adoptive immunotherapy is an attractive adjuvant treatment option for patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Recently, we reported a clinical-grade, cytokine-based culture method for the generation of NK cells from umbilical cord blood (UCB CD34⁺ hematopoietic progenitor cells with high yield, purity and in vitro functionality. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vivo anti-leukemic potential of UCB-NK cells generated with our GMP-compliant culture system in terms of biodistribution, survival and cytolytic activity following adoptive transfer in immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL2Rg(null mice. Using single photon emission computed tomography, we first demonstrated active migration of UCB-NK cells to bone marrow, spleen and liver within 24 h after infusion. Analysis of the chemokine receptor expression profile of UCB-NK cells matched in vivo findings. Particularly, a firm proportion of UCB-NK cells functionally expressed CXCR4, what could trigger BM homing in response to its ligand CXCL12. In addition, high expression of CXCR3 and CCR6 supported the capacity of UCB-NK cells to migrate to inflamed tissues via the CXCR3/CXCL10-11 and CCR6/CCL20 axis. Thereafter, we showed that low dose IL-15 mediates efficient survival, expansion and maturation of UCB-NK cells in vivo. Most importantly, we demonstrate that a single UCB-NK cell infusion combined with supportive IL-15 administration efficiently inhibited growth of human leukemia cells implanted in the femur of mice, resulting in significant prolongation of mice survival. These preclinical studies strongly support the therapeutic potential of ex vivo-generated UCB-NK cells in the treatment of myeloid leukemia after immunosuppressive chemotherapy.

  11. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic

  12. Electromagnetic fields and nanomagnetic particles increase the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KIM, MIN-OK; JUNG, HYUN; KIM, SOO-CHAN; PARK, JUNG-KEUG; SEO, YOUNG-KWON

    .... Nanomagnetic particles (MPs) also promote the differentiation potential of stem cells. In the present study, we investigated the effects of EMFs and MPs on the osteogenic differentiation of hBM-MSCs...

  13. In Vitro Evaluation of ProRoot MTA, Biodentine, and MM-MTA on Human Alveolar Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Terms of Biocompatibility and Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margunato, Suzan; Taşlı, Pakize Neslihan; Aydın, Safa; Karapınar Kazandağ, Meriç; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2015-10-01

    Stem cell technology has been a great hope for the regeneration of cells of pulp-dentin complex and dental structures together with surrounding bone and periodontium. The main challenge in the regeneration process is a successful combination of stem cells and efficient inductors such as inductive biomaterials. In this regard, today, manufacturers propose novel tooth filling materials. The current study was aimed to compare the effect of ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK), Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fossés, France), and MM-MTA (Micro-Mega, Besançon Cedex, France) on the cell viability, hard tissue deposition capacity, and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) derived from mandibular bone. Dental materials were packed into Teflon rings (Grover Corp, Milwaukee, WI) and placed on Transwell inserts (Corning, Corning, NY) to determine the toxicity of tooth filling materials by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxy-methoxy-phenyl)-2-(4-sulfo-phenyl)-2H tetrazolium assay on days 1, 3, 7, and 14; 20% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was used as a positive control for the toxicity assay. hBMSCs were characterized by their surface markers with mesenchymal stem cell antibodies. Teflon rings were cocultured with hBMSCs followed by the induction of osteogenic differentiation. The osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs and hard tissue formation of the materials were evaluated by analyzing the messenger RNA expression levels of osteonectin, Runt-related transcription factor 2, and collagen type 1A by real-time polymerase chain reaction expression analysis, measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity, and visualization of calcium deposits by alizarin red staining. MTA, Biodentine, and MM-MTA did not exhibit a cytotoxic effect on hBMSCs after 14 days in culture. Even though all the materials significantly stimulate (P Biodentine or MM-MTA according to the messenger RNA expression, alkaline phosphatase, immunocytochemistry

  14. Controlled Dual Growth Factor Delivery From Microparticles Incorporated Within Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Aggregates for Enhanced Bone Tissue Engineering via Endochondral Ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Phuong N; Dwivedi, Neha; Phillips, Lauren M; Yu, Xiaohua; Herberg, Samuel; Bowerman, Caitlin; Solorio, Loran D; Murphy, William L; Alsberg, Eben

    2016-02-01

    Bone tissue engineering via endochondral ossification has been explored by chondrogenically priming cells using soluble mediators for at least 3 weeks to produce a hypertrophic cartilage template. Although recapitulation of endochondral ossification has been achieved, long-term in vitro culture is required for priming cells through repeated supplementation of inductive factors in the media. To address this challenge, a microparticle-based growth factor delivery system was engineered to drive endochondral ossification within human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) aggregates. Sequential exogenous presentation of soluble transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) at various defined time courses resulted in varying degrees of chondrogenesis and osteogenesis as demonstrated by glycosaminoglycan and calcium content. The time course that best induced endochondral ossification was used to guide the development of the microparticle-based controlled delivery system for TGF-β1 and BMP-2. Gelatin microparticles capable of relatively rapid release of TGF-β1 and mineral-coated hydroxyapatite microparticles permitting more sustained release of BMP-2 were then incorporated within hMSC aggregates and cultured for 5 weeks following the predetermined time course for sequential presentation of bioactive signals. Compared with cell-only aggregates treated with exogenous growth factors, aggregates with incorporated TGF-β1- and BMP-2-loaded microparticles exhibited enhanced chondrogenesis and alkaline phosphatase activity at week 2 and a greater degree of mineralization by week 5. Staining for types I and II collagen, osteopontin, and osteocalcin revealed the presence of cartilage and bone. This microparticle-incorporated system has potential as a readily implantable therapy for healing bone defects without the need for long-term in vitro chondrogenic priming. Significance: This study demonstrates the regulation of chondrogenesis

  15. Nurse's A-Phase Material Enhance Adhesion, Growth and Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadan-Ros, Ruben; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador; Mazón, Patricia; Ros-Tarraga, Patricia; De Aza, Piedad N; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis

    2017-03-27

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bioactivity and cell response of a well-characterized Nurse's A-phase (7CaO·P₂O₅·2SiO₂) ceramic and its effect compared to a control (tissue culture polystyrene-TCPS) on the adhesion, viability, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of ahMSCs in vitro. Cell proliferation (Alamar Blue Assay), Alizarin Red-S (AR-s) staining, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin (OCN), and collagen I (Col I) were evaluated. Also, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images were acquired in order to visualise the cells and the topography of the material. The proliferation of cells growing in a direct contact with the material was slower at early stages of the study because of the new environmental conditions. However, the entire surface was colonized after 28 days of culture in growth medium (GM). Osteoblastic differentiation markers were significantly enhanced in cells growing on Nurse's A phase ceramic and cultured with osteogenic medium (OM), probably due to the role of silica to stimulate the differentiation of ahMSCs. Moreover, calcium nodules were formed under the influence of ceramic material. Therefore, it is predicted that Nurse's A-phase ceramic would present high biocompatibility and osteoinductive properties and would be a good candidate to be used as a biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  16. Osteogenic potency of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from femoral atrophic non-union fracture site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Hadisoebroto Dilogo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs exist in the site of atrophic non-union fracture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic potency of MSCs in order to have a better understanding of the unclear pathophysiology of atrophic non-union fracture Methods: This is an in vitro experimental study. Sample was obtained from the non-union site of a patient with a 6-years-history of atrophic non-union fracture of right femur. The MSCs was isolated from the fracture site and was cultured in the growth medium. Confirmation of the MSCs was performed and then osteogenic differentiation was performed in mono-layered MSC grown in both home-made and commercial osteogenic media. To evaluate the osteogenic differentiation, we performed Alizarin red staining and colorimetric assay for alkaline phosphatase (ALP. Results: From Alizarin red staining, most cells in the osteoblast medium were stained red by the staining. The result of colorimetric assessment of ALP shows that peak concentration was reached after 4 minutes in osteogenic group and control group. Conclusion: The presence of ALP activity and positive Alizarin red staining in our study showed that MSCs stem cells obtained from site of atrophic non-union is capable to be differentiated into osteogenic cells. . J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 159-163

  17. Comparison of clinical grade human platelet lysates for cultivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Morten; Tratwal, Josefine; Follin, Bjarke

    2016-01-01

    different commercially available hPL fulfilling good manufacturing practice criteria for clinical use. BMSCs and ASCs cultured in Minimum Essential Medium Eagle-alpha supplemented with 5% PLT-Max (Mill Creek), Stemulate™ PL-S and Stemulate™ PL-SP (COOK General Biotechnology) were compared to standard...... culture conditions with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Cell morphology, proliferation, phenotype, genomic stability, and differentiation potential were analyzed. RESULTS: Regardless of manufacturer, BMSCs and ASCs cultured in hPL media showed a significant increase in proliferation capacity compared to FBS...

  18. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell delivery to dilated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    Feb 5, 2008 ... therapeutic procedures, such as the intracoronary or intramyocardial implant of stem cells (mononuclear and mesenchymal) derived from bone-marrow aspirate from the individual's own bone marrow (autologous), consti- tutes a promising therapeutic option for these advanced cases (Helena et al., 2006).

  19. Endotoxins affect bioactivity of chitosan derivatives in cultures of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Ramona; Gaware, Vivek S; Thormodsson, Finnbogi; Einarsson, Jon M; Ng, Chuen-How; Gislason, Johannes; Masson, Mar; Petersen, Petur H; Sigurjonsson, Olafur E

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials research has been expanding over the last decade, in part to provide improved medical devices for the treatment of orthopedic tissue injuries. In the quest to provide the best performance combined with low cost for medical implants, an increasing number of non-chemists have entered the field of biomaterials research without the profound knowledge of chemistry needed to understand the complex interaction mechanisms and characteristics of natural substances. Likewise, non-biologists often lack understanding when it comes to the presence of the contaminating biota frequently found in natural substances. This lack of knowledge by researchers in the field, combined with sensitive in vitro cell-based assays, can lead to inaccurate evaluation of biomaterials. Hence, there should be both an active effort to assemble multi-disciplinary teams and a genuine concern for the possible effects of contamination on in vitro assays. Here, we show that the presence of bacterial endotoxins in chitosan derivatives can result in false-positive results, profoundly altering product performance in in vitro assays. False-positive results through uncritical use of natural substances in vitro can be avoided by proper endotoxin testing and careful evaluation of cytokine secretion patterns. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Engineering new bone via a minimally invasive route using human bone marrow-derived stromal cell aggregates, microceramic particles, and human platelet-rich plasma gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjea, Anindita; Yuan, Huipin; Fennema, Eelco; Burer, Ruben; Chatterjea, Supriyo; Garritsen, Henk; Renard, Auke; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; de Boer, Jan

    2013-02-01

    There is a rise in the popularity of arthroscopic procedures in orthopedics. However, the majority of cell-based bone tissue-engineered constructs (TECs) rely on solid preformed scaffolding materials, which require large incisions and extensive dissections for placement at the defect site. Thus, they are not suitable for minimally invasive techniques. The aim of this study was to develop a clinically relevant, easily moldable, bone TEC, amenable to minimally invasive techniques, using human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and calcium phosphate microparticles in combination with an in situ forming platelet-rich plasma gel obtained from human platelets. Most conventional TECs rely on seeding and culturing single-cell suspensions of hMSCs on scaffolds. However, for generating TECs amenable to the minimally invasive approach, it was essential to aggregate the hMSCs in vitro before seeding them on the scaffolds as unaggregated MSCs did not generate any bone. Twenty four hours of in vitro aggregation was determined to be optimal for maintaining cell viability in vitro and bone formation in vivo. Moreover, no statistically significant difference was observed in the amount of bone formed when the TECs were implanted via an open approach or a minimally invasive route. TECs generated using MSCs from three different human donors generated new bone through the minimally invasive route in a reproducible manner, suggesting that these TECs could be a viable alternative to preformed scaffolds employed through an open surgery for treating bone defects.

  1. Survival of free and encapsulated human and rat islet xenografts transplanted into the mouse bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael P H Meier

    Full Text Available Bone marrow was recently proposed as an alternative and potentially immune-privileged site for pancreatic islet transplantation. The aim of the present study was to assess the survival and rejection mechanisms of free and encapsulated xenogeneic islets transplanted into the medullary cavity of the femur, or under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The median survival of free rat islets transplanted into the bone marrow or under the kidney capsule was 9 and 14 days, respectively, whereas that of free human islets was shorter, 7 days (bone marrow and 10 days (kidney capsule. Infiltrating CD8+ T cells and redistributed CD4+ T cells, and macrophages were detected around the transplanted islets in bone sections. Recipient mouse splenocytes proliferated in response to donor rat stimulator cells. One month after transplantation under both kidney capsule or into bone marrow, encapsulated rat islets had induced a similar degree of fibrotic reaction and still contained insulin positive cells. In conclusion, we successfully established a small animal model for xenogeneic islet transplantation into the bone marrow. The rejection of xenogeneic islets was associated with local and systemic T cell responses and macrophage recruitment. Although there was no evidence for immune-privilege, the bone marrow may represent a feasible site for encapsulated xenogeneic islet transplantation.

  2. Global MicroRNA Profiling in Human Bone Marrow Skeletal—Stromal or Mesenchymal–Stem Cells Identified Candidates for Bone Regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Chi Chih; Venø, Morten T.; Chen, Li

    2018-01-01

    Bone remodeling and regeneration are highly regulated multistep processes involving posttranscriptional regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs). Here, we performed a global profiling of differentially expressed miRNAs in bone-marrow-derived skeletal cells (BMSCs; also known as stromal or mesenchymal ste...... (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B). A number of additional miRNAs exerted additive osteoinductive effects on BMSC differentiation, suggesting that pools of miRNAs delivered locally from an implanted scaffold can provide a promising approach for enhanced bone regeneration....

  3. Comparing the immunosuppressive potency of naïve marrow stromal cells and Notch-transfected marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Mo A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SB623 cells are expanded from marrow stromal cells (MSCs transfected with a Notch intracellular domain (NICD-expressing plasmid. In stroke-induced animals, these cells reduce infarct size and promote functional recovery. SB623 cells resemble the parental MSCs with respect to morphology and cell surface markers despite having been in extended culture. MSCs are known to have immunosuppressive properties; whether long-term culture of MSCs impact their immunomodulatory activity has not been addressed. Methods To assess the possible senescent properties of SB623 cells, we performed cell cycle related assays and beta-galactosidase staining. To assess the immunomodulatory activity of these expanded NICD-transfected MSCs, we performed co-cultures of SB623 cells or MSCs with either enriched human T cells or monocytes and assessed cytokine production by flow cytometry. In addition, we monitored the immunosuppressive activity of SB623 cells in both allogenic and xenogenic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Results Compared to MSCs, we showed that a small number of senescent-like cells appear in each lot of SB623 cells. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that these cells suppress human T cell proliferation in both the allogeneic and xenogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR in a manner comparable to MSCs. IL-10 producing T cells were generated and monocyte-dendritic cell differentiation was dampened by co-culture with SB623 cells. Compared to the parental MSCs, SB623 cells appear to exert a greater inhibitory impact on the maturation of dendritic cells as demonstrated by a greater reduction in the surface expression of the co-stimulatory molecule, CD86. Conclusion The results demonstrated that the immunosuppressive activity of the expanded NICD-transfected MSCs is comparable to the parental MSCs, in spite of the appearance of a small number of senescent-like cells.

  4. Retrovirus-mediated gene transduction into long-term repopulating marrow cells of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuening, F G; Kawahara, K; Miller, A D; To, R; Goehle, S; Stewart, D; Mullally, K; Fisher, L; Graham, T C; Appelbaum, F R

    1991-11-15

    Amphotropic helper-free retrovirus vectors containing the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) and the human adenosine deaminase gene (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4; ADA) were used to transduce canine marrow cells. In one approach, dogs were treated for 7 days with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor to stimulate hematopoietic cell division. Bone marrow cells were collected and transduced by 24 hours of cocultivation on vector-producing cells followed by incubation in a vector-containing long-term marrow culture system for 4 days. Transduced autologous marrow (0.4 to 1.0 x 10(8) cells/kg) was infused into dogs administered otherwise lethal total body irradiation (TBI) of 920 cGy. Two of four dogs engrafted, and their marrows showed intermittently between 1% and 11% G418-resistant colony-forming unit granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) colonies for up to 2 years after transplantation. In a different experimental approach, autologous marrow, obtained at the time of the PB neutrophil nadir 7 days after a single cyclophosphamide injection (40 mg/kg intravenously), was cocultivated for 24 hours on vector-producing cells and infused at doses of 0.06 to 0.18 x 10(8) cells/kg into dogs administered 920 cGy TBI. One of three dogs engrafted, and the marrow showed intermittently 1% to 10% G418-resistant CFU-GM colonies for at least 2 years. Culture results were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showing the presence of the neo gene in marrow cells, peripheral blood (PB) granulocytes, and PB and lymph node lymphocytes. Dilution experiments indicated that up to 10% of marrow, lymph node, and PB cells contained the neo gene, consistent with the culture results. Samples harboring the neo gene also contained the gene for human ADA. However, repeated analyses of PB and marrow cells for human ADA gene expression by starch gel electrophoresis were negative. PB samples of all dogs were free of helper virus, and no long-term side effects

  5. Modulation of Osteoblastic Cell Efferocytosis by Bone Marrow Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Megan N; Koh, Amy J; Weidner, Savannah; Roca, Hernan; McCauley, Laurie K

    2016-12-01

    Apoptosis occurs at an extraordinary rate in the human body and the effective clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis) is necessary to maintain homeostasis and promote healing, yet the contribution and impact of this process in bone is unclear. Bone formation requires that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) differentiate into osteoblasts which direct matrix formation and either become osteocytes, bone lining cells, or undergo apoptosis. A series of experiments were performed to identify the regulators and consequences of macrophage efferocytosis of apoptotic BMSCs (apBMSCs). Bone marrow derived macrophages treated with the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) exhibited increased efferocytosis of apBMSCs compared to vehicle treated macrophages. Additionally, IL-10 increased anti-inflammatory M2-like macrophages (CD206(+) ), and further enhanced efferocytosis within the CD206(+) population. Stattic, an inhibitor of STAT3 phosphorylation, reduced the IL-10-mediated shift in M2 macrophage polarization and diminished IL-10-directed efferocytosis of apBMSCs by macrophages implicating the STAT3 signaling pathway. Cell culture supernatants and RNA from macrophages co-cultured with apoptotic bone cells showed increased secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein 1/chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (MCP-1/CCL2) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and increased ccl2 gene expression. In conclusion, IL-10 increases M2 macrophage polarization and enhances macrophage-mediated engulfment of apBMSCs in a STAT3 phosphorylation-dependent manner. After engulfment of apoptotic bone cells, macrophages secrete TGF-β1 and MCP-1/CCL2, factors which fuel the remodeling process. A better understanding of the role of macrophage efferocytosis as it relates to normal and abnormal bone turnover will provide vital information for future therapeutic approaches to treat bone related diseases. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2697-2706, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley

  6. Intrinsic properties of mesemchymal stem cells from human bone marrow, umbilical cord and umbilical cord blood comparing the different sources of MSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Fengjuan; Lu, Minmin; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Leung, Victor Y L; Zhou, Guangqian

    2012-11-01

    The past decade has witnessed numerous publications on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which have great potential in regenerative medicine. MSC from various types of origins exhibit different characteristics, which may relate to the maintenance role of MSC in that specific source. Reports have emerged that among the most widely investigated sources, umbilical cord (UC) or umbilical cord blood (UCB) derived MSC throw advantages over bone marrow (BM) derived MSC due to their close to fetal origin. Here the methodologies used to separate MSC from UC or UCB, and the intrinsic properties, including proliferation capacity, multipotency, cytokine profile, cell surface protein expression and gene expression, between UC, UCB and BM derived MSC, are discussed in details, though may not in a full picture, for the first time.

  7. The Protein Content of Extracellular Vesicles Derived from Expanded Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived CD133+and Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Partially Explains Why both Sources are Advantageous for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulski, Addeli B B; Capriglione, Luiz G; Batista, Michel; Marcon, Bruna H; Senegaglia, Alexandra C; Stimamiglio, Marco A; Correa, Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    Adult stem cells have beneficial effects when exposed to damaged tissue due, at least in part, to their paracrine activity, which includes soluble factors and extracellular vesicles (EVs). Given the multiplicity of signals carried by these vesicles through the horizontal transfer of functional molecules, human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) and CD133 + cell-derived EVs have been tested in various disease models and shown to recover damaged tissues. In this study, we profiled the protein content of EVs derived from expanded human CD133 + cells and bone marrow-derived hMSCs with the intention of better understanding the functions performed by these vesicles/cells and delineating the most appropriate use of each EV in future therapeutic procedures. Using LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified 623 proteins for expanded CD133 + -EVs and 797 proteins for hMSCs-EVs. Although the EVs from both origins were qualitatively similar, when protein abundance was considered, hMSCs-EVs and CD133 + -EVs were different. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis in CD133 + -EVs revealed proteins involved in a variety of angiogenesis-related functions as well proteins related to the cytoskeleton and highly implicated in cell motility and cellular activation. In contrast, when overrepresented proteins in hMSCs-EVs were analyzed, a GO cluster of immune response-related genes involved with immune response-regulating factors acting on phagocytosis and innate immunity was identified. Together our data demonstrate that from the point of view of protein content, expanded CD133 + -EVs and hMSCs-EVs are in part similar but also sufficiently different to reflect the main beneficial paracrine effects widely reported in pre-clinical studies using expanded CD133 + cells and/or hBM-MSCs.

  8. Role of clozapine in the occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in human bone-marrow cells in vivo and in cultured lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuutila, S; Helminen, E; Knuutila, L; Leisti, S; Siimes, M; Tammisto, P; Westermarck, T

    1977-08-31

    Bone-marrow chromosomes were examined from 38 mentally and physically retarded and two psychiatric patients who were being treated with a variety of neuropharmacologic drugs. Twenty of these patients used clozapine (Leponex). The clastogenic effects of clozapine in vitro were studied in the lymphocyte cultures of three patients--one free of hematologic disease and two who 6 months earlier had had agranulocytosis attributed to the use of clozapine. The mean frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities in the bone-marrow cells of patients who used clozapine was significantly increased (P less than 0.05). The two patients who had had agranulocytosis had a greater frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities in their cultured lymphocytes in vivo and in vitro than the patient free of hematologic disease. A clone with a 13/14 chromosome translocation was detected in one of the patients. As all patients received a number of drugs during the in vivo and in vitro studies no definite conclusions could be drawn regarding the role played by clozapine in the occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities.

  9. Graft-Versus-Host Disease Amelioration by Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Is Associated with Peripheral Preservation of Naive T Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Sumie; Miura, Yasuo; Fujishiro, Aya; Shindo, Takero; Shimazu, Yutaka; Hirai, Hideyo; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Maekawa, Taira

    2018-03-01

    A substantial proportion of patients with acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) respond to cell therapy with culture-expanded human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (BM-MSCs). However, the mechanisms by which these cells can ameliorate aGVHD-associated complications remain to be clarified. We show here that BM-MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) recapitulated the therapeutic effects of BM-MSCs against aGVHD. Systemic infusion of human BM-MSC-derived EVs prolonged the survival of mice with aGVHD and reduced the pathologic damage in multiple GVHD-targeted organs. In EV-treated GVHD mice, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were suppressed. Importantly, the ratio of CD62L-CD44+ to CD62L + CD44- T cells was decreased, suggesting that BM-MSC-derived EVs suppressed the functional differentiation of T cells from a naive to an effector phenotype. BM-MSC-derived EVs also preserved CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3+ regulatory T cell populations. In a culture of CD3/CD28-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with BM-MSC-derived EVs, CD3+ T cell activation was suppressed. However, these cells were not suppressed in cultures with EVs derived from normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). NHDF-derived EVs did not ameliorate the clinical or pathological characteristics of aGVHD in mice, suggesting an immunoregulatory function unique to BM-MSC-derived EVs. Microarray analysis of microRNAs in BM-MSC-derived EVs versus NHDF-derived EVs showed upregulation of miR-125a-3p and downregulation of cell proliferative processes, as identified by Gene Ontology enrichment analysis. Collectively, our findings provide the first evidence that amelioration of aGVHD by therapeutic infusion of BM-MSC-derived EVs is associated with the preservation of circulating naive T cells, possibly due to the unique microRNA profiles of BM-MSC-derived EVs. Stem Cells 2018;36:434-445. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  10. TNF-α enhances vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the NF-κB, ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zi-Yuan; Chen, Wan-Cheng; Li, Yong-Hua; Li, Li; Zhang, Hang; Pang, Yan; Xiao, Zhi-Fang; Xiao, Hao-Wen; Xiao, Yang

    2016-07-01

    The migration of circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to injured tissue is an important step in tissue regeneration and requires adhesion to the microvascular endothelium. The current study investigated the underlying mechanism of MSC adhesion to endothelial cells during inflammation. In in vitro MSC culture, tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) increased the level of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) expression in a dose‑dependent manner. The nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway inhibitors, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), U0126 and SP600125, respectively, suppressed VCAM‑1 expression induced by TNF‑α at the mRNA and protein levels (Padhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells; however, the inhibitors of NF‑κB, ERK and JNK did not affect this process in these cells. The results of the current study indicate that adhesion of circulating MSCs to the endothelium is regulated by TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression, which is potentially mediated by the NF‑κB, ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  11. Full GMP-Compliant Validation of Bone Marrow-Derived Human CD133+ Cells as Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product for Refractory Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Belotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the European Medicine Agency (EMA regulatory frameworks, Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP represent a new category of drugs in which the active ingredient consists of cells, genes, or tissues. ATMP-CD133 has been widely investigated in controlled clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases, making CD133+ cells one of the most well characterized cell-derived drugs in this field. To ensure high quality and safety standards for clinical use, the manufacturing process must be accomplished in certified facilities following standard operative procedures (SOPs. In the present work, we report the fully compliant GMP-grade production of ATMP-CD133 which aims to address the treatment of chronic refractory ischemic heart failure. Starting from bone marrow (BM, ATMP-CD133 manufacturing output yielded a median of 6.66 × 106 of CD133+ cells (range 2.85 × 106–30.84 × 106, with a viability ranged between 96,03% and 99,97% (median 99,87% and a median purity of CD133+ cells of 90,60% (range 81,40%–96,20%. Based on these results we defined our final release criteria for ATMP-CD133: purity ≥ 70%, viability ≥ 80%, cellularity between 1 and 12 × 106 cells, sterile, and endotoxin-free. The abovementioned criteria are currently applied in our Phase I clinical trial (RECARDIO Trial.

  12. Maxillary sinus marrow hyperplasia in sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, M. [Dept. of Imaging, Children`s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States); Slovis, T.L. [Dept. of Imaging, Children`s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States); Whitten-Shurney, W. [Dept. of Pediatrics, Children`s Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Marrow hyperplasia is a sequela of sickle cell anemia (SCA) and may be seen in the skull in children after 5 years of age. The facial bones, except for the mandible and orbits, are usually not involved. We report an unusual case of a 28-month-old black boy with SCA who presented with extensive marrow hyperplasia of the maxillary sinuses in addition to severe calvarial and mandibular changes. The imaging characteristics on CT (similar to other sites of marrow hyperplasia) and MR (low signal on both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} sequences) should aid in making the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: historical overview and concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbord, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    This review describes the historical emergence of the concept of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), summarizing data on Wolf and Trentin's hematopoietic inductive microenvironment; Dexter's hematopoiesis-supportive stromal cells; Friedenstein's osteogenic cells; and Pittenger's trilineal osteoblastic, chondrocytic, and adipocytic precursors; to finally introduce the specific bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with differentiation potential to four lineages (mesenchymal and vascular smooth muscle lineages), and stromal and immunomodulatory capacities. Two points are the object of detailed discussion. The first point envisions the stem cell attributes (multipotentiality, self-renewal, tissue regeneration, population heterogeneity, plasticity, and lineage priming) compared with that of the paradigmatic hematopoietic stem cell. In the second point, we discuss the possible existence of bone marrow cells with greater differentiation potential, eventually pluripotential cells. The latter point raises the issues of cell fusion, reprogramming, or selection under nonstandardized conditions of rare populations of neuroectodermal origin, or of cells that had undergone mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. In the last section, we review data on MSC senescence and possible malignant transformation secondary to extensive culture, gene transfer of telomerase, or mutations such as leading to Ewing's sarcoma. The set of data leads to the conclusion that bone marrow MSCs constitute a specific adult tissue stem cell population. The multiple characteristics of this stem cell type account for the versatility of the mechanisms of injured tissue repair. Although MSC administration may be extremely useful in a number of clinical applications, their transplantation is not without risks that must not be overlooked when developing cell therapy protocols.

  14. Are bone marrow regenerative cells ideal seed cells for the treatment of cerebral ischemia?★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Hua, Xuming; Hua, Fang; Mao, Wenwei; Wan, Liang; Li, Shiting

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow cells for the treatment of ischemic brain injury may depend on the secretion of a large number of neurotrophic factors. Bone marrow regenerative cells are capable of increasing the secretion of neurotrophic factors. In this study, after tail vein injection of 5-fluorouracil for 7 days, bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells were isolated from the tibias and femurs of rats, and then administered intravenously via the tail vein after focal cerebral ischemia. Immunohistological staining and reverse transcription-PCR detection showed that transplanted bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells could migrate and survive in the ischemic regions, such as the cortical and striatal infarction zone. These cells promote vascular endothelial cell growth factor mRNA expression in the ischemic marginal zone surrounding the ischemic penumbra of the cortical and striatal infarction zone, and have great advantages in promoting the recovery of neurological function, reducing infarct size and promoting angiogenesis. Bone marrow regenerative cells exhibited stronger neuroprotective effects than bone marrow cells. Our experimental findings indicate that bone marrow regenerative cells are preferable over bone marrow cells for cell therapy for neural regeneration after cerebral ischemia. Their neuroprotective effect is largely due to their ability to induce the secretion of factors that promote vascular regeneration, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:25206414

  15. PS1/γ-Secretase-Mediated Cadherin Cleavage Induces β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Rhayra B.; Fortuna-Costa, Anneliese; Chicaybam, Leonardo; Lopes, Daiana V.; Dutra, Hélio S.; Borojevic, Radovan; Bonamino, Martin; Mermelstein, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are considered a promising tool for bone bioengineering. However, the mechanisms controlling osteoblastic commitment are still unclear. Osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs requires the activation of β-catenin signaling, classically known to be regulated by the canonical Wnt pathway. However, BMSCs treatment with canonical Wnts in vitro does not always result in osteogenic differentiation and evidence indicates that a more complex signaling pathway, involving cadherins, would be required to induce β-catenin signaling in these cells. Here we showed that Wnt3a alone did not induce TCF activation in BMSCs, maintaining the cells at a proliferative state. On the other hand, we verified that, upon BMSCs osteoinduction with dexamethasone, cadherins were cleaved by the PS1/γ-secretase complex at the plasma membrane, and this event was associated with an enhanced β-catenin translocation to the nucleus and signaling. When PS1/γ-secretase activity was inhibited, the osteogenic process was impaired. Altogether, we provide evidence that PS1/γ-secretase-mediated cadherin cleavage has as an important role in controlling β-catenin signaling during the onset of BMSCs osteogenic differentiation, as part of a complex signaling pathway responsible for cell fate decision. A comprehensive map of these pathways might contribute to the development of strategies to improve bone repair. PMID:28053606

  16. PS1/γ-Secretase-Mediated Cadherin Cleavage Induces β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle C. Bonfim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are considered a promising tool for bone bioengineering. However, the mechanisms controlling osteoblastic commitment are still unclear. Osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs requires the activation of β-catenin signaling, classically known to be regulated by the canonical Wnt pathway. However, BMSCs treatment with canonical Wnts in vitro does not always result in osteogenic differentiation and evidence indicates that a more complex signaling pathway, involving cadherins, would be required to induce β-catenin signaling in these cells. Here we showed that Wnt3a alone did not induce TCF activation in BMSCs, maintaining the cells at a proliferative state. On the other hand, we verified that, upon BMSCs osteoinduction with dexamethasone, cadherins were cleaved by the PS1/γ-secretase complex at the plasma membrane, and this event was associated with an enhanced β-catenin translocation to the nucleus and signaling. When PS1/γ-secretase activity was inhibited, the osteogenic process was impaired. Altogether, we provide evidence that PS1/γ-secretase-mediated cadherin cleavage has as an important role in controlling β-catenin signaling during the onset of BMSCs osteogenic differentiation, as part of a complex signaling pathway responsible for cell fate decision. A comprehensive map of these pathways might contribute to the development of strategies to improve bone repair.

  17. Schwann cells promote neuronal differentiation of bone marrow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), a type of multipotent stem cell, can differentiate into various types of cells. It has been suggested that the BMSCs have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. In this study, we showed that BMSCs can be induced to ...

  18. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  19. Enhanced Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Progenitors on Native and Spin Coated Acellular Matrices Prepared from Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasnik, Samiksha; Kantipudi, Suma; Kirkland, Mark A; Pande, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular microenvironment in bone marrow (BM) is known to regulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We have developed cell-free matrices from a BM stromal cell line (HS-5), which can be used as substrates either in native form or as tissue engineered coatings, for the enhanced ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood (UCB) derived HSPC. The physicochemical properties (surface roughness, thickness, and uniformity) of native and spin coated acellular matrices (ACM) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM). Lineage-specific expansion of HSPC, grown on these substrates, was evaluated by immunophenotypic (flow cytometry) and functional (colony forming) assays. Our results show that the most efficient expansion of lineage-specific HSPC occurred on spin coated ACM. Our method provides an improved protocol for ex vivo HSPC expansion and it offers a system to study the in vivo roles of specific molecules in the hematopoietic niche that influence HSPC expansion.

  20. Effects of Spaceflight on Cells of Bone Marrow Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Özçivici

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Once only a subject for science fiction novels, plans for establishing habitation on space stations, the Moon, and distant planets now appear among the short-term goals of space agencies. This article reviews studies that present biomedical issues that appear to challenge humankind for long-term spaceflights. With particularly focus on cells of bone marrow origin, studies involving changes in bone, immune, and red blood cell populations and their functions due to extended weightlessness were reviewed. Furthermore, effects of mechanical disuse on primitive stem cells that reside in the bone marrow were also included in this review. Novel biomedical solutions using space biotechnology will be required in order to achieve the goal of space exploration without compromising the functions of bone marrow, as spaceflight appears to disrupt homeostasis for all given cell types.

  1. Leukemic cells create bone marrow niches that disrupt the behavior of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmone, Angela; Amorim, Maria; Pontier, Andrea L; Wang, Sheng; Jablonski, Elizabeth; Sipkins, Dorothy A

    2008-12-19

    The host tissue microenvironment influences malignant cell proliferation and metastasis, but little is known about how tumor-induced changes in the microenvironment affect benign cellular ecosystems. Applying dynamic in vivo imaging to a mouse model, we show that leukemic cell growth disrupts normal hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) bone marrow niches and creates abnormal microenvironments that sequester transplanted human CD34+ (HPC-enriched) cells. CD34+ cells in leukemic mice declined in number over time and failed to mobilize into the peripheral circulation in response to cytokine stimulation. Neutralization of stem cell factor (SCF) secreted by leukemic cells inhibited CD34+ cell migration into malignant niches, normalized CD34+ cell numbers, and restored CD34+ cell mobilization in leukemic mice. These data suggest that the tumor microenvironment causes HPC dysfunction by usurping normal HPC niches and that therapeutic inhibition of HPC interaction with tumor niches may help maintain normal progenitor cell function in the setting of malignancy.

  2. DNA synthesis in human bone marrow is circadian stage dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaaland, R; Laerum, O D; Lote, K; Sletvold, O; Sothern, R B; Bjerknes, R

    1991-06-15

    Fraction of human bone marrow (BM) cells in DNA synthesis has been studied by sampling BM from the sternum or the iliac crests every 4 hours during one 24-hour period in 16 healthy male volunteers. Three of the subjects underwent the sampling procedure twice, resulting in 19 24-hour profiles. The percentage of cells in DNA synthesis measured by flow cytometry demonstrated a large variation along the circadian time scale for each 24-hour profile, with a range of variation from 29% to 339% from lowest to highest value. Seventeen profiles (89.5%) had the highest DNA synthesis during waking hours between 08:00 hours and 20:00 hours, and the lowest percentage of cells in DNA synthesis between 00:00 hours and 04:00 hours. The mean value of the lowest DNA synthesis for each 19 24-hour period was 8.7% +/- 0.6%, while the mean value of the highest DNA synthesis was 17.6% +/- 0.6%, ie, a twofold difference. There was no difference in DNA synthesis between winter and summer. A significantly higher DNA synthesis was demonstrated for samples obtained from sternum as compared with the iliac crests, but the same circadian pattern was demonstrated for both localizations. By taking circadian stage-dependent variations in DNA synthesis into account it may be possible to reduce BM sensitivity to cytotoxic chemotherapy, to increase the effect of hematopoietic growth factors as well as increase the fraction of proliferating cells with careful selection of time of day for harvesting BM cells for auto- or allografting.

  3. Acoustic-Frequency Vibratory Stimulation Regulates the Balance between Osteogenesis and Adipogenesis of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis can be associated with the disordered balance between osteogenesis and adipogenesis of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. Although low-frequency mechanical vibration has been demonstrated to promote osteogenesis, little is known about the influence of acoustic-frequency vibratory stimulation (AFVS. BM-MSCs were subjected to AFVS at frequencies of 0, 30, 400, and 800 Hz and induced toward osteogenic or adipogenic-specific lineage. Extracellular matrix mineralization was determined by Alizarin Red S staining and lipid accumulation was assessed by Oil Red O staining. Transcript levels of osteogenic and adipogenic marker genes were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cell proliferation of BM-MSCs was promoted following exposure to AFVS at 800 Hz. Vibration at 800 Hz induced the highest level of calcium deposition and significantly increased mRNA expression of COL1A1, ALP, RUNX2, and SPP1. The 800 Hz group downregulated lipid accumulation and levels of adipogenic genes, including FABP4, CEBPA, PPARG, and LEP, while vibration at 30 Hz supported adipogenesis. BM-MSCs showed a frequency-dependent response to acoustic vibration. AFVS at 800 Hz was the most favorable for osteogenic differentiation and simultaneously suppressed adipogenesis. Thus, acoustic vibration could potentially become a novel means to prevent and treat osteoporosis.

  4. The role of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in induced stroke. ... MSCs showed positive response for CD105+ (the specific marker for MSCs detection) and negative response for surface marker (CD34¯), characteristic for the hematopoietic cells. The immunohistochemistry study of intravenous administration ...

  5. Depletion of cells of the B lineage in the bone marrow of zinc-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L E; Osati-Ashtiani, F; Fraker, P J

    1995-05-01

    Though lymphopenia is often noted in malnourished humans and rodents, little is known about the effects of suboptimal nutriture on lymphopoietic processes. Focusing primarily on cells of the B lineage in the marrow of young adult mice, a moderate degree of zinc deficiency (MZD) caused a 43% decline in the proportion of nucleated cells bearing B220 with a 91% decline noted among more severely zinc deficient mice (SZD). Early B cells (B220+Ig-) were highly sensitive to the deficiency, being barely detectable in SZD mice and reduced by almost 60% in MZD mice. Immature B cells (B220+IgM+IgD-) were similarly affected, declining 35% to 80% depending on the degree of the deficiency. In MZD mice, mature B cells (IgM+IgD+) exhibited moderate losses, being somewhat resistant. A more profound loss in this population was noted for SZD mice. Flow cytometric (FACS) scatter profiles indicated that zinc deficiency caused a sharp decline in the proportion of small nucleated cells which in the marrow are thought to contain a high proportion of developing lymphoid cells. There was a concomitant increase in large granular cells that paralleled a substantial increase in the proportion of nucleated cells bearing Mac-1 for both MZD and SZD mice. Given the dramatic depletion of cells of the B lineage in the marrow created by a deficiency in zinc, it is probable that disruptions in lymphopoietic processes in the marrow play a key role in the resulting lymphopenia observed in many types of malnutrition.

  6. Chemosensitizing AML cells by targeting bone marrow endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Raphael C; Wasserstrom, Briana; Meacham, Amy; Wise, Elizabeth; Drusbosky, Leylah; Walter, Glenn A; Chaplin, David J; Siemann, Dietmar W; Purich, Daniel L; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Refractory disease is the greatest challenge in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Blood vessels may serve as sanctuary sites for AML. When AML cells were co-cultured with bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs), a greater proportion of leukemia cells were in G0/G1. This led us to a strategy of targeting BMECs with tubulin-binding combretastatins, causing BMECs to lose their flat phenotype, degrade their cytoskeleton, cease growth, and impair migration despite unchanged BMEC viability and metabolism. Combretastatins also caused downregulation of BMEC adhesion molecules known to tether AML cells, including vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. When AML-BMEC co-cultures were treated with combretastatins, a significantly greater proportion of AML cells dislodged from BMECs and entered the G2/M cell cycle, suggesting enhanced susceptibility to cell cycle agents. Indeed, the combination of combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy enhanced additive AML cell death. In vivo mice xenograft studies confirmed this finding by revealing complete AML regression after treatment with combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Beyond highlighting the pathologic role of BMECs in the leukemia microenvironment as a protective reservoir of disease, these results support a new strategy for using vascular-targeting combretastatins in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy to treat AML. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of vascular endothelial progenitor cells from chicken bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Chunyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are a type of stem cell used in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and regeneration. At present, most of the EPCs studied are from human and mouse, whereas the study of poultry-derived EPCs has rarely been reported. In the present study, chicken bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated and studied at the cellular level using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Results We found that the majority of chicken EPCs were spindle shaped. The growth-curves of chicken EPCs at passages (P 1, -5 and -9 were typically “S”-shaped. The viability of chicken EPCs, before and after cryopreservation was 92.2% and 81.1%, respectively. Thus, cryopreservation had no obvious effects on the viability of chicken EPCs. Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UAE-1 uptake assays and immunofluorescent detection of the cell surface markers CD34, CD133, VEGFR-2 confirmed that the cells obtained in vitro were EPCs. Observation of endothelial-specific Weibel-Palade bodies using transmission electron microscopy further confirmed that the cells were of endothelial lineage. In addition, chicken EPCs differentiated into endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells upon induction with VEGF and PDGF-BB, respectively, suggesting that the chicken EPCs retained multipotency in vitro. Conclusions These results suggest that chicken EPCs not only have strong self-renewal capacity, but also the potential to differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This research provides theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application of endothelial progenitor cells in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and diabetic complications.

  8. Stimulation of porcine bone marrow stromal cells by hyaluronan, dexamethasone and rhBMP-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Xuenong; Li, Haisheng; Chen, Li

    2004-01-01

    In the interest of optimizing osteogenesis in in vitro, the present study sought to determine how porcine bone marrow stromal cell (BMSc) would respond to different concentrations of hyaluronan (HY) and its different combinations with dexamethasone (Dex) and recombinant human bone morphogenic pro...

  9. Rampant infections of bone marrow stem cell niches as triggers for spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Tropheryma Whipplei can induce rheumatism mimicking SpA or RA, but even more rampant bacterial/viral infections in epiphyseal bones could also contribute to the onset of RA and SpA. Indeed, as bone marrow stem cell niches are enriched in Tregs and myeloid derived suppressor cells, these areas are favourable for the persistence of quiescent viruses and/or dormant bacteria. This review focuses on the possibility that such silent infections of bone marrow stem cell niches might contribute to the pathogenesis of SpA and RA, at least during their onset. Some infections can affect the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which can transmit these pathogens to their progeny. Transient but repeated revivals of viruses or dormant bacteria could promote the conversion of marrow regulatory T cells into effector phenotypes, leading to autoimmunity in the epiphyseal bone marrow, entheses and adjacent synovium. This scenario would also fit the flares of rheumatic disorders and explain why some joints or enthuses can be severely involved whereas their neighbours remain intact. The efficiency of anti-TNF drugs does not rule out a role of persistent infections in SpA and RA. These drugs do not affect chlamydial clearance, or the reactivation of latent Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in mice or Epstein-Barr virus in humans. Anti-TNF might even prevent, rather than foster, the revival of dormant bacteria and viruses in marrow stem cell niches. Indeed, anti-TNF enhance the maturation of the immunosuppressive immature myeloid cells around stem cells into dendritic cells and macrophages, thus restoring immune responses in these areas.

  10. Hard tissue formation in a porous HA/TCP ceramic scaffold loaded with stromal cells derived from dental pulp and bone marrow.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Walboomers, X.F.; Osch, G.J.V.M. van; Dolder, J. van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of hard tissue regeneration of four types of stem cells or precursors under both in vitro and in vivo situations. Primary cultures of rat bone marrow, rat dental pulp, human bone marrow, and human dental pulp cells were seeded onto a porous ceramic

  11. Gene expression profiles of cryopreserved CD34{sup +} human umbilical cord blood cells are related to their bone marrow reconstitution abilities in mouse xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudo, Kazuhiro [Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba (Japan); Yasuda, Jun, E-mail: yasuda-jun@umin.ac.jp [Omics Science Center, RIKEN, Yokohama (Japan); Department of Cell Biology, The JFCR-Cancer Institute (Japan); Nakamura, Yukio, E-mail: yukionak@brc.riken.jp [Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2010-07-09

    Human umbilical cord blood (UCB) cells are an alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells for treatment of leukemia and other diseases. It is very difficult to assess the quality of UCB cells in the clinical situation. Here, we sought to assess the quality of UCB cells by transplantation to immunodeficient mice. Cryopreserved CD34{sup +} UCB cells from twelve different human donors were transplanted into sublethally irradiated NOD/shi-scid Jic mice. In parallel, the gene expression profiles of the UCB cells were determined from oligonucleotide microarrays. UCB cells from three donors failed to establish an engraftment in the host mice, while the other nine succeeded to various extents. Gene expression profiling indicated that 71 genes, including HOXB4, C/EBP-{beta}, and ETS2, were specifically overexpressed and 23 genes were suppressed more than 2-fold in the successful UCB cells compared to those that failed. Functional annotation revealed that cell growth and cell cycle regulators were more abundant in the successful UCB cells. Our results suggest that hematopoietic ability may vary among cryopreserved UCB cells and that this ability can be distinguished by profiling expression of certain sets of genes.

  12. HGF Expressing Stem Cells in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Originate from the Bone Marrow and Are Antifibrotic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiq Gazdhar

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis may result from abnormal alveolar wound repair after injury. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF improves alveolar epithelial wound repair in the lung. Stem cells were shown to play a major role in lung injury, repair and fibrosis. We studied the presence, origin and antifibrotic properties of HGF-expressing stem cells in usual interstitial pneumonia.Immunohistochemistry was performed in lung tissue sections and primary alveolar epithelial cells obtained from patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, n = 7. Bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSC from adult male rats were transfected with HGF, instilled intratracheally into bleomycin injured rat lungs and analyzed 7 and 14 days later.In UIP, HGF was expressed in specific cells mainly located in fibrotic areas close to the hyperplastic alveolar epithelium. HGF-positive cells showed strong co-staining for the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD44, CD29, CD105 and CD90, indicating stem cell origin. HGF-positive cells also co-stained for CXCR4 (HGF+/CXCR4+ indicating that they originate from the bone marrow. The stem cell characteristics were confirmed in HGF secreting cells isolated from UIP lung biopsies. In vivo experiments showed that HGF-expressing BMSC attenuated bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis in the rat, indicating a beneficial role of bone marrow derived, HGF secreting stem cells in lung fibrosis.HGF-positive stem cells are present in human fibrotic lung tissue (UIP and originate from the bone marrow. Since HGF-transfected BMSC reduce bleomycin induced lung fibrosis in the bleomycin lung injury and fibrosis model, we assume that HGF-expressing, bone-marrow derived stem cells in UIP have antifibrotic properties.

  13. Lysophosphatidic acid mediates myeloid differentiation within the human bone marrow microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Evseenko

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA is a pleiotropic phospholipid present in the blood and certain tissues at high concentrations; its diverse effects are mediated through differential, tissue specific expression of LPA receptors. Our goal was to determine if LPA exerts lineage-specific effects during normal human hematopoiesis. In vitro stimulation of CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitors by LPA induced myeloid differentiation but had no effect on lymphoid differentiation. LPA receptors were expressed at significantly higher levels on Common Myeloid Progenitors (CMP than either multipotent Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPC or Common Lymphoid Progenitors (CLP suggesting that LPA acts on committed myeloid progenitors. Functional studies demonstrated that LPA enhanced migration, induced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of isolated CMP, but had no effect on either HSPC or CLP. Analysis of adult and fetal human bone marrow sections showed that PPAP2A, (the enzyme which degrades LPA was highly expressed in the osteoblastic niche but not in the perivascular regions, whereas Autotaxin (the enzyme that synthesizes LPA was expressed in perivascular regions of the marrow. We propose that a gradient of LPA with the highest levels in peri-sinusoidal regions and lowest near the endosteal zone, regulates the localization, proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors within the bone marrow marrow.

  14. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparsion between Intravenous Delivered Human Fetal Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Mononuclear Cells in the Treatment of Rat Cerebral Infarct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Bin; Ma, Bu-Qing; Guan, Yun-Qian; Zhou, Yi-Dan

    2016-10-10

    Objective To compare the effecacy of human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) with human mononuclear cell (hMNC) in treating rat cerebral infarct.Methods The SD rat models of cerebral infarct were established by distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO). Rats were divided into four groups: sham,ischemia vehicle,MSC,and MNC transplantation groups. For the transplantation group,1×10(6) hMSCs or hMNCs were intravascularly transplanted into the tail vein 1 hour after the ischemia onset. The ischemia vehicle group received dMCAO surgery and intravascular saline injection 1,3,5,and 7 days after the ischemia onset,and then behavioral tests were performed. At 48 h after the ischemia onset,the abundance of Iba- 1,the symbol of activated microglia,was evaluated in the peri-ischemia striatum area; meanwhile,the neurotrophic factors such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in ipsilateral peri-ischemia striatum area were also measured. Results The relative infarct volume in ischemia vehicle group,hMSC group,and hMNC transplantation group were (37.85±4.40)%,(33.41±3.82)%,and (30.23±3.63)%,respectively. The infarct volumes of MSC group (t=2.100,P=0.034) and MNC group (t=2.109,P=0.0009) were significantly smaller than that of ischemia vehicle group,and that of MNC group was significantly smaller than that of MSC group (t=1.743,P=0.043). One day after transplantation,the score of ischemia vehicle group in limb placing test was (4.32±0.71)%,which was significantly lower than that in sham group (9.73±0.36)% (t=2.178,P=8.61×10(-11)). The scores of MSC and MNC group,which were (5.09±0.62)% (t=2.1009,P=0.024) and (5.90±0.68)% (t=2.1008,P=0.0001),respectively,were significantly higher than that of ischemia vehicle group; also,the score of MNC group was significantly higher than that of MSC group(t=2.1009,P=0.0165). The contralateral forelimb scores of MSC and MNC groups in beam walking test were (5.56±0.86)% (t=2

  16. Evaluation of early stage human bone marrow stromal proliferation, cell migration and osteogenic differentiation on μ-MIM structured stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Malak; Benini, Fausta; Brose, Claudia; Friederici, Vera; Imgrund, Philipp; Bruinink, Arie

    2013-05-01

    It is well established that surface topography greatly affect cell-surface interactions. In a recent study we showed that microstructured stainless steel surfaces characterized by the presence of defined hexagonally arranged hemisphere-like structures significantly affected cell architecture (shape and focal adhesion size) of primary human bone mesenchymal stromal cells. This study aimed at further investigating the influence these microstructures (microcline protruding hemispheres) on critical aspects of cell behaviour namely; proliferation, migration and osteogenic differentiation. As with previously reported data, we used primary human bone mesenchymal stromal cells to investigate such effects at an early stage in vitro. Cells of different patients were utilised for cell migration studies. Our data showed that an increase in cell proliferation was exhibited as a function of surface topography (hemispheres). Cell migration velocity also varied as a function of surface topography on patient specific basis and seems to relate to the differentiated state of the seeded cell population (as demonstrated by bALP positivity). Osteogenic differentiation, however, did not exhibit significant variations (both up and down-regulation) as a function of both surface topography and time in culture.

  17. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  18. Enrichment of osteogenic cell populations from rat bone marrow stroma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolder, J. van den; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of multiple cell types in bone marrow and their varying proportions from isolation to isolation may count for the considerable variation in the outcome of different experiments. The presence of these multiple subpopulations suggests a need for a method that can purify the osteogenic

  19. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell delivery to dilated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-02-05

    Feb 5, 2008 ... Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell delivery to dilated cardiomyopathy patients: A clinical trial. P. L. N Kaparthi1*, Gupta Namita2, Lakshmi K. Chelluri2, .... Severe Co-morbid medical condition. 2. Severe LV systolic dysfunction with EF ≤ 30%. 2. LVEF ≥ 31%. 3. Stroke with significant sequel. 4.

  20. Can yoga therapy stimulate stem cell trafficking from bone marrow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitya Shree

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs from bone marrow enter the peripheral circulation intermittently for possible tissue regeneration, repair and to take care of daily wear and tear. This is evident from the detection of MSCs from peripheral blood. The factors governing this migration remain elusive. These MSCs carry out the work of policing and are supposed to repair the injured tissues. Thus, these cells help in maintaining the tissue and organ homeostasis. Yoga and pranayama originated in India and is now being practiced all over the world for positive health. So far, the chemical stimulation of bone marrow has been widely used employing injection of colony stimulating factor. However, the role of physical factors such as mechanical stimulation and stretching has not been substantiated. It is claimed that practicing yoga delays senescence, improves the physiological functions of heart and lung and yoga postures make the body elastic. It remains to be seen whether the yoga therapy promotes trafficking of the stem cells from bone marrow for possible repair and regeneration of worn out and degenerating tissues. We cover in this short review, mainly the role of physical factors especially the yoga therapy on stem cells trafficking from bone marrow.

  1. Can yoga therapy stimulate stem cell trafficking from bone marrow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shree, Nitya; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    It has been established that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow enter the peripheral circulation intermittently for possible tissue regeneration, repair and to take care of daily wear and tear. This is evident from the detection of MSCs from peripheral blood. The factors governing this migration remain elusive. These MSCs carry out the work of policing and are supposed to repair the injured tissues. Thus, these cells help in maintaining the tissue and organ homeostasis. Yoga and pranayama originated in India and is now being practiced all over the world for positive health. So far, the chemical stimulation of bone marrow has been widely used employing injection of colony stimulating factor. However, the role of physical factors such as mechanical stimulation and stretching has not been substantiated. It is claimed that practicing yoga delays senescence, improves the physiological functions of heart and lung and yoga postures make the body elastic. It remains to be seen whether the yoga therapy promotes trafficking of the stem cells from bone marrow for possible repair and regeneration of worn out and degenerating tissues. We cover in this short review, mainly the role of physical factors especially the yoga therapy on stem cells trafficking from bone marrow. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathogen reduction through additive-free short-wave UV light irradiation retains the optimal efficacy of human platelet lysate for the expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Viau

    Full Text Available We recently developed and characterized a standardized and clinical grade human Platelet Lysate (hPL that constitutes an advantageous substitute for fetal bovine serum (FBS for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC expansion required in cell therapy procedures, avoiding xenogenic risks (virological and immunological and ethical issues. Because of the progressive use of pathogen-reduced (PR labile blood components, and the requirement of ensuring the viral safety of raw materials for cell therapy products, we evaluated the impact of the novel procedure known as THERAFLEX UV-Platelets for pathogen reduction on hPL quality (growth factors content and efficacy (as a medium supplement for hMSC expansion. This technology is based on short-wave ultraviolet light (UV-C that induces non-reversible damages in DNA and RNA of pathogens while preserving protein structures and functions, and has the main advantage of not needing the addition of any photosensitizing additives (that might secondarily interfere with hMSCs.We applied the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets procedure on fresh platelet concentrates (PCs suspended in platelet additive solution and prepared hPL from these treated PCs. We compared the quality and efficacy of PR-hPL with the corresponding non-PR ones. We found no impact on the content of five cytokines tested (EGF, bFGF, PDGF-AB, VEGF and IGF-1 but a significant decrease in TGF-ß1 (-21%, n = 11, p<0.01. We performed large-scale culture of hMSCs from bone marrow (BM during three passages and showed that hPL or PR-hPL at 8% triggered comparable BM-hMSC proliferation as FBS at 10% plus bFGF. Moreover, after proliferation of hMSCs in an hPL- or PR-hPL-containing medium, their profile of membrane marker expression, their clonogenic potential and immunosuppressive properties were maintained, in comparison with BM-hMSCs cultured under FBS conditions. The potential to differentiate towards the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages of hMSCs cultured in parallel

  3. Growth factors/chemokines in diabetic vitreous and aqueous alter the function of bone marrow-derived progenitor (CD34+) cells in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaiya, Sankarathi; Grant, Maria B.; Priluck, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Ocular ischemic microenvironment plays a critical role in the progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR). In this study, we investigated the effect of vitreous and aqueous obtained from proliferative DR patients on the function of CD34+ cells derived from healthy humans. Human CD34+ cells were incubated with vitreous or aqueous of subjects with PDR. After incubation, cell migration of CD34+ was evaluated with CXCL12. Intracellular levels of nitric oxide (NO) were measured with DAF-FM. Tube formation assay was used to evaluate the effect of treated CD34+ cells on in vitro angiogenesis. Angiogenic protein array and mass spectrometry (MS) were performed to ascertain the factors secreted by healthy nondiabetic CD34+ cells exposed to diabetic vitreous or aqueous. PDR vitreous/aqueous reduced migration of CD34+ cells (672.45 ± 42.1/736.75 ± 101.7 AFU; P vitreous suppressed tube formation of human retinal endothelial cells (64 ± 1.6 vs. 80 ± 2.5). CD34+ exposed to PDR vitreous resulted in the increased expression of CXCL4 and serpin F1, whereas CD34+ exposed to PDR aqueous showed increased expression of CXCL4, serpin F1, and endothelin-1 (ET-1). MS analysis of CD34+ (exposed to PDR vitreous) expressed J56 gene segment, isoform 2 of SPARC-related modular calcium-binding protein 2, isoform 1 of uncharacterized protein c1 orf167, integrin α-M, and 40s ribosomal protein s21. Exposure of healthy nondiabetic CD34+ cells to PDR vitreous and aqueous resulted in decreased migration, reduced generation of NO, and altered paracrine secretory function. Our results suggest that the contribution of CD34+ cells to the aberrant neovascularization observed in PDR is driven more by the proangiogenic effects of the retinal cells rather than the influence of the vitreous. PMID:25159325

  4. Chromosome copy number variation in telomerized human bone marrow stromal cells; insights for monitoring safe ex-vivo expansion of adult stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S.; Harkness, Linda; Aldahmash, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    acquisition of a spontaneous neoplastic phenotype during three-year continuous culture of telomerized cells (hBMSC-TERT20) didn't alter a diploid karyotype measured by spectral karyotype analysis (SKY). Such screening may not adequately monitor abnormal and potentially tumorigenic hBMSC in clinical scenarios...

  5. Bone marrow stem cells: current and emerging concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Ferrer, Simón; Scadden, David T; Sánchez-Aguilera, Abel

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of stromal cells with hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow have long been a subject of research, but only recently have technologies allowed us to dissect them at the stem cell level. On the other hand, limitations of these technical tools might explain numerous discrepancies in this field. It is becoming increasingly clear that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent an important component of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche in the bone marrow. However, there is heterogeneity among HSCs, and many putatively different mesenchymal progenitors identified in the bone marrow using Cre recombinase-driven mouse lines seem to exhibit HSC niche properties. Development of better reporter lines has demonstrated that some of these Cre lines do not always specifically mark the expected cells. Also, characterization of different cell populations has often been partial, and issues of redundancy and compensation might explain apparently contradictory results. Recognizing and overcoming these limitations, while also clearly defining the distinctions between subgroups of mesenchymal cells, will be essential to advance the field. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Bone marrow stem cell imaging after intracoronary administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpisz, M; Czepczyński, R; Grygielska, B; Majewski, M; Fiszer, D; Jerzykowska, O; Sowiński, J; Siminiak, T

    2007-10-01

    Although feasibility and safety of autologous stem cells administration to the post-infarction heart has been proven it is not known what proportion of cells effectively do home at the damaged site. Therefore, we have labeled autologous bone marrow cells (ABMC's) by radioactive Indium and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tissue distribution has been analyzed. It was detected that up to 10% of the cells were retained within the myocardium while their majority migrated or has been anchored at the spleen and liver. Comparing the number of homed cells to the total number of cells delivered one may postulate the indirect role for few hundred thousands ABMC's at heart regeneration.

  7. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gordon

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV, a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases

  8. Can yoga therapy stimulate stem cell trafficking from bone marrow?

    OpenAIRE

    Shree, Nitya; Bhonde, Ramesh R.

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow enter the peripheral circulation intermittently for possible tissue regeneration, repair and to take care of daily wear and tear. This is evident from the detection of MSCs from peripheral blood. The factors governing this migration remain elusive. These MSCs carry out the work of policing and are supposed to repair the injured tissues. Thus, these cells help in maintaining the tissue and organ homeostasis. Yoga an...

  9. Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal stromal cell derived Osteoblasts Promote the Expansion of Hematopoietic Progenitors through Beta-Catenin and Notch Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalicka, Matthew; Boisjoli, Gavin; Jahan, Suria; Hovey, Owen; Doxtator, Emily; Abu-Khader, Ahmad; Pasha, Roya; Pineault, Nicolas

    2017-10-19

    Coculture of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) with primary stromal cells from HSC niches supports the maintenance and expansion of HSC and progenitors ex vivo. However, a major drawback is the availability of primary human samples for research and clinical applications. We investigated the use of in vitro derived osteoblasts as a new source of feeder cells and characterized the molecular pathways that mediate their growth promoting activities. First, we compared the growth and differentiation modulating activities of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC)-derived osteoblasts (M-OST) to that of their undifferentiated precursor on umbilical cord blood (UCB) progenitors. Feeder-free cultures were also included as baseline control. Cell growth and expansion of hematopoietic progenitors were significantly enhanced by both feeder cell types. However, progenitor cell growth was considerably greater with M-OST. Coculture also promoted the maintenance of immature CD34+ progenitor subsets and modulated in a positive fashion the expression of several homing-related cell surface receptors, in a feeder-specific fashion. Serial transplantation experiments revealed that M-OST coculture supported the maintenance of long-term lympho-myeloid reconstituting HSC that provided engraftment levels generally superior to that from MSC cocultures. Mechanistically, we found that coculture with M-OST was associated with enhanced -catenin (-Cat) activity in UCB cells and that abrogation of -Cat/TCF activity blunted the growth promoting activity of the M-OST coculture. Conversely, Notch inhibition reduced UCB cell expansion but to a much lesser extent. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that M-OST are excellent feeder cells for HSC and progenitors, and identify key molecular pathways responsible for the growth enhancing activities of osteoblasts on UCB progenitors.

  10. Persistence of donor-derived protein in host myeloid cells after induced rejection of engrafted allogeneic bone marrow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toshiki I.; Fujisaki, Joji; Carlson, Alicia L.; Lin, Charles P.; Sykes, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Objective In recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to treat hematologic malignancies, we have unexpectedly observed anti-tumor effects in association with donor cell rejection in both mice and humans. Host-type CD8 T cells were shown to be required for these anti-tumor effects in the murine model. Since sustained host CD8 T cell activation was observed in the murine bone marrow following the disappearance of donor chimerism in the peripheral blood, we hypothesized that donor antigen presentation in the bone marrow might be prolonged. Materials and Methods To assess this hypothesis, we established mixed chimerism with green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive allogeneic bone marrow cells, induced rejection of the donor cells by giving recipient leukocyte infusions (RLI), and utilized in vivo microscopy to follow GFP-positive cells. Results After peripheral donor leukocytes disappeared, GFP persisted within host myeloid cells surrounding the blood vessels in the bone marrow, suggesting that the host myeloid cells captured donor-derived GFP protein. Conclusions Since the host-versus-graft reaction promotes the induction of anti-tumor responses in this model, this retention of donor-derived protein may play a role in the efficacy of RLI as an anti-tumor therapy. PMID:20167247

  11. Bone-marrow densitometry: Assessment of marrow space of human vertebrae by single energy high resolution-quantitative computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jaime A; Thomsen, Felix; Damm, Timo; Campbell, Graeme M; Bastgen, Jan; Barkmann, Reinhard; Glüer, Claus C

    2016-07-01

    Accurate noninvasive assessment of vertebral bone marrow fat fraction is important for diagnostic assessment of a variety of disorders and therapies known to affect marrow composition. Moreover, it provides a means to correct fat-induced bias of single energy quantitative computed tomography (QCT) based bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. The authors developed new segmentation and calibration methods to obtain quantitative surrogate measures of marrow-fat density in the axial skeleton. The authors developed and tested two high resolution-QCT (HR-QCT) based methods which permit segmentation of bone voids in between trabeculae hypothesizing that they are representative of bone marrow space. The methods permit calculation of marrow content in units of mineral equivalent marrow density (MeMD). The first method is based on global thresholding and peeling (GTP) to define a volume of interest away from the transition between trabecular bone and marrow. The second method, morphological filtering (MF), uses spherical elements of different radii (0.1-1.2 mm) and automatically places them in between trabeculae to identify regions with large trabecular interspace, the bone-void space. To determine their performance, data were compared ex vivo to high-resolution peripheral CT (HR-pQCT) images as the gold-standard. The performance of the methods was tested on a set of excised human vertebrae with intact bone marrow tissue representative of an elderly population with low BMD. 86% (GTP) and 87% (MF) of the voxels identified as true marrow space on HR-pQCT images were correctly identified on HR-QCT images and thus these volumes of interest can be considered to be representative of true marrow space. Within this volume, MeMD was estimated with residual errors of 4.8 mg/cm(3) corresponding to accuracy errors in fat fraction on the order of 5% both for GTP and MF methods. The GTP and MF methods on HR-QCT images permit noninvasive localization and densitometric assessment of

  12. Improved histochemical methods for the examination of plastic-embedded human marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moosavi, H.; Lichtman, M. A.; Donnelly, J. A.; Churukian, C. J.

    1979-01-01

    Improved methods for processing, sectioning, and staining plastic (glycol methacrylate) embedded human marrow biopsies are described. Marrow biopsies processed by this technique were compared with biopsies processed by the conventional paraffin embedding method. The plastic-embedded marrows provide better morphology enhancing diagnostic accuracy, permit assessment of bone as well as marrow, and allow histochemical analysis of biopsy specimen. Special stains including naphtol AS-D chloroacetate esterase, periodic acid Schiff (PAS), reticulin, and iron have been modified so that they are suitable for undecalcified, two microns thick, plastic-embedded human marrow biopsies.

  13. In vivo osteoinductive effect and in vitro isolation and cultivation bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzić, Amira; Smajilagić, Amer; Aljicević, Mufida; Berberović, Ljubomir

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow contains cell type termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), first recognized in bone marrow by a German pathologist, Julius Cohnheim in 1867. That MSCs have potential to differentiate in vitro in to the various cells lines as osteoblast, chondroblast, myoblast and adipoblast cells lines. Aims of our study were to show in vivo capacity of bone marrow MSC to produce bone in surgically created non critical size mandible defects New Zeland Rabbits, and then in second part of study to isolate in vitro MSC from bone marrow, as potential cell transplantation model in bone regeneration. In vivo study showed new bone detected on 3D CT reconstruction day 30, on all 3 animals non critical size defects, treated with bone marrow MSC exposed to the human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 (rhBMP-7). Average values of bone mineral density (BMD), was 530 mg/cm3, on MSC treated animals, and 553 mg/cm3 on control group of 3 animals where non critical size defects were treated with iliac crest autologue bone graft. Activity of the Alkaline Phosphatase enzyme were measurement on 0.5, 14, 21, 30 day and increased activity were detected day 14 on animals treated with bone marrow MSCs compared with day 30 on iliac crest treated animals. That results indicates strong osteoinduction activity of the experimental bone marrow MSCs models exposed to the rhBMP-7 factor Comparing ALP activity, that model showed superiorly results than control group. That result initiates us in opinion that MSCs alone should be alternative for the autolologue bone transplantation and in vitro study we isolated singles MSCs from the bone marrow of rat's tibia and femora and cultivated according to the method of Maniatopoulos et all. The small initial colonies of fibroblast like cells were photo-documented after 2 days of primary culture. Such isolated and cultivated MSCs in future studies will be exposed to the growth factors to differentiate in osteoblast and indicate their clinically potential as alternative

  14. Safety of bone marrow stem cell donation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, A; Bartolozzi, B

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the first choice of treatment or an important therapeutic option for several diseases, but it is still marked by morbidity and mortality. In contrast, the donation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is considered to be a safe procedure. The invaluable ethical source of donation and its central role in transplantation implies that the greatest attention be due to the donor and to the donation process through a serious monitoring protocol for donor safety. Both the Joint Accreditation Committee and the European Committee pay particular attention to the notification of adverse events and adverse reactions. Bone marrow donation is a well established procedure, that has now been performed for >30 years. Although it does not require drug administration, there is hospital admission for 1-3 days with 7-10 days off work. The main risk is related to the anesthesia. Pain in the aspiration area, together with astenia are considered to be the most frequent side effects, as shown by the USA National Marrow Donor Program experience in 1,193 donations. In the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation analysis performed between 1993 and 2005 on 27,770 first HSCTs from bone marrow, only 1 fatal event (pulmonary embolism) and 12 serious adverse events were observed. The most frequent adverse events were cardiac. The incidence of adverse events was significantly lower (P donors, which confirms the necessity of accurate attention to donor selection and evaluation in bone marrow donation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Robert Feulgen Prize Lecture. Grenzgänger: adult bone marrow cells populate the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priller, Josef

    2003-08-01

    While the brain has traditionally been considered a rather secluded site, recent studies suggest that adult bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells can generate glia and neurons in rodents and humans. Macrophages and microglia are the first to appear in the murine brain after transplantation of genetically marked BM cells. Within weeks after transplantation, some authors have found astrocytes and cells expressing neuronal antigens. We detected cerebellar Purkinje neurons and interneurons, such as basket cells, expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) 10-15 months after transplantation of GFP-labeled BM cells. The results push the boundaries of our classic view of lineage restriction.

  16. Increased survival of normal cells during laser photodynamic therapy: implications for ex vivo autologous bone marrow purging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliya, K.S.; Matthews, J.L.; Fay, J.W.; Dowben, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Laser light-induced, dye-mediated photolysis of leukemic cells was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in eliminating occult tumor cells for ex vivo autologous bone marrow purging. Merocyanine 540 (MC540) was mixed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells in the presence of human albumin. This cell-dye mixture was irradiated with 514 nm argon laser light. Results show that in the presence of 0.1%, 0.25% and 0.5% albumin, laser light doses of 62.4 J/cm/sup 2/, 93.6 J/cm/sup 2/ and 109.2 J/cm/sup 2/, respectively, were required for a 5 log reduction in the survival of leukemic cells. Under identical conditions, 80% to 84% of the normal bone marrow cells and 41% of the granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells survived. The number of surviving stromal cells was reduced (1+) compared to the untreated control (4+). Mixing of irradiated bone marrow cells with equal number of HL-60 cells did not interfere with the killing of HL-60 cells treated with MC540 and laser light. The non-specific cytotoxicity of laser light alone was less than 6% for normal bone marrow cells. These results suggest that the concentration of human albumin plays an important role in laser light-induced phototoxicity. This laser light-induced selective photolysis of leukemic cells can be used in ex vivo purging of tumor cell-contaminated bone marrow grafts to achieve very high survival rates of normal bone marrow cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells.

  17. Lithium attenuates lead induced toxicity on mouse non-adherent bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banijamali, Mahsan; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Shahhoseini, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Lead is a poisonous heavy metal that occurs in all parts of environment and causes serious health problems in humans. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effect of lithium against lead nitrate induced toxicity in non-adherent bone marrow stem cells. Trypan blue and MTT assays represented that exposure of the cells to different concentrations of lead nitrate decreased viability in a dose dependent manner, whereas, pretreatment of the cells with lithium protected the cells against lead toxicity. Lead reduced the number and differentiation status of bone marrow-derived precursors when cultured in the presence of colony stimulating factor (CSF), while the effect was attenuated by lithium. The cells treated with lead nitrate exhibited cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation, anion superoxide production, but lithium prevented lead action. Moreover, apoptotic indexes such as PARP cleavage and release of HMGB1 induced by lead, were protected by lithium, suggesting anti-apoptotic effect of lithium. Immunoblot analysis of histone H3K9 acetylation indicated that lithium overcame lead effect on acetylation. In conclusion, lithium efficiently reduces lead toxicity suggesting new insight into lithium action which may contribute to increased cell survival. It also provides a potentially new therapeutic strategy for lithium and a cost-effective approach to minimize destructive effects of lead on bone marrow stem cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Adult human bone marrow stromal spheres express neuronal traits in vitro and in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Suon, Sokreine; Yang, Ming; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2006-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) grown in suspension culture gave rise to spheres of neural progenitor (NP) cells, capable of expressing both dopaminergic (DA) and GABAergic (GABA) traits. After transplantation into the Parkinsonian rat, human NPs and neurons were present at 2 weeks. Although no DA neurons appeared to survive transplantation, there were abundant GABA neurons present in the graft. By 4 weeks, however, all cells had died. Finding ways to prolong survival and promot...

  19. Quantification of bone marrow plasma cell infiltration in multiple myeloma : Usefulness of bone marrow aspirate clot with CD138 immunohistochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsue, Kosei; Matsue, Yuya; Kumata, Kaoru; Usui, Yoshiaki; Suehara, Yasuhito; Fukumoto, Kota; Fujisawa, Manabu; Narita, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Masami

    Accurate quantification of plasma cells (PCs) in bone marrow (BM) is critical for diagnosis and assessment of treatment response in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). We compared the % of BM PC quantified by 250 cell differential count on May–Giemsa-stained BM smears, by counting 500 – 2500 cells

  20. Fate of tenogenic differentiation potential of human bone marrow stromal cells by uniaxial stretching affected by stretch-activated calcium channel agonist gadolinium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yin Nam

    Full Text Available The role for mechanical stimulation in the control of cell fate has been previously proposed, suggesting that there may be a role of mechanical conditioning in directing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs towards specific lineage for tissue engineering applications. Although previous studies have reported that calcium signalling is involved in regulating many cellular processes in many cell types, its role in managing cellular responses to tensile loading (mechanotransduction of MSCs has not been fully elucidated. In order to establish this, we disrupted calcium signalling by blocking stretch-activated calcium channel (SACC in human MSCs (hMSCs in vitro. Passaged-2 hMSCs were exposed to cyclic tensile loading (1 Hz + 8% for 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours in the presence of the SACC blocker, gadolinium. Analyses include image observations of immunochemistry and immunofluorescence staining from extracellular matrix (ECM production, and measuring related tenogenic and apoptosis gene marker expression. Uniaxial tensile loading increased the expression of tenogenic markers and ECM production. However, exposure to strain in the presence of 20 μM gadolinium reduced the induction of almost all tenogenic markers and ECM staining, suggesting that SACC acts as a mechanosensor in strain-induced hMSC tenogenic differentiation process. Although cell death was observed in prolonged stretching, it did not appear to be apoptosis mediated. In conclusion, the knowledge gained in this study by elucidating the role of calcium in MSC mechanotransduction processes, and that in prolonged stretching results in non-apoptosis mediated cell death may be potential useful for regenerative medicine applications.

  1. BMP7 promotes adipogenic but not osteo-/chondrogenic differentiation of adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells in high-density micro-mass culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Katja; Endres, Michaela; Ringe, Jochen; Flath, Bernd; Manz, Rudi; Häupl, Thomas; Sittinger, Michael; Kaps, Christian

    2007-10-15

    The objective of our study was to elucidate the potential of bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) to initiate distinct mesenchymal lineage development of human adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in three-dimensional micro-mass culture. Expanded MSC were cultured in high-density micro-masses under serum-free conditions that favor chondrogenic differentiation and were stimulated with 50-200 ng/ml BMP7 or 10 ng/ml transforming growth factor-beta3 (TGFbeta3) as control. Histological staining of proteoglycan with alcian blue, mineralized matrix according to von Kossa, and lipids with Oil Red O, immunostaining of type II collagen as well as real-time gene expression analysis of typical chondrogenic, adipogenic, and osteogenic marker genes showed that BMP7 promoted adipogenic differentiation of MSC. Micro-masses stimulated with BMP7 developed adipocytic cells filled with lipid droplets and showed an enhanced expression of the adipocyte marker genes fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and the adipose most abundant transcript 1 (apM1). Development along the chondrogenic lineage or stimulation of osteogenic differentiation were not evident upon stimulation with BMP7 in different concentrations. In contrast, TGFbeta3 directed MSC to form a cartilaginous matrix that is rich in proteoglycan and type II collagen. Gene expression analysis of typical chondrocyte marker genes like cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), link protein, aggrecan, and types IIalpha1 and IXalpha3 collagen confirmed chondrogenic differentiation of MSC treated with TGFbeta3. These results suggest that BMP7 promotes the adipogenic and not the osteogenic or chondrogenic lineage development of human stem cells when assembled three-dimensionally in micro-masses. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Incorporation of bone marrow cells in pancreatic pseudoislets improves posttransplant vascularization and endocrine function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Wittig

    Full Text Available Failure of revascularization is known to be the major reason for the poor outcome of pancreatic islet transplantation. In this study, we analyzed whether pseudoislets composed of islet cells and bone marrow cells can improve vascularization and function of islet transplants. Pancreatic islets isolated from Syrian golden hamsters were dispersed into single cells for the generation of pseudoislets containing 4×10(3 cells. To create bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets 2×10(3 islet cells were co-cultured with 2×10(3 bone marrow cells. Pseudoislets and bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets were transplanted syngeneically into skinfold chambers to study graft vascularization by intravital fluorescence microscopy. Native islet transplants served as controls. Bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets showed a significantly improved vascularization compared to native islets and pseudoislets. Moreover, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets but not pseudoislets normalized blood glucose levels after transplantation of 1000 islet equivalents under the kidney capsule of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals, although the bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets contained only 50% of islet cells compared to pseudoislets and native islets. Fluorescence microscopy of bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets composed of bone marrow cells from GFP-expressing mice showed a distinct fraction of cells expressing both GFP and insulin, indicating a differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells to an insulin-producing cell-type. Thus, enrichment of pseudoislets by bone marrow cells enhances vascularization after transplantation and increases the amount of insulin-producing tissue. Accordingly, bone marrow cell-enriched pseudoislets may represent a novel approach to increase the success rate of islet transplantation.

  3. Influence of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) on growth and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xing; Hu, Ya-Jun; Xie, Wen-Peng; Lin, Ruo-Ling; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2009-09-01

    As a new member of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) family, the novel polyester poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (P(3HB-4HB-3HHx)) was produced by recombinant Aeromonas hydrophila 4AK4 and used for the first time to test its biocompatibility. It was shown that P(3HB-4HB-3HHx) had higher hydrophobicity, surface energy, and rougher surface than the well-studied polymers poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate) (PHBHHx). Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attached better on P(3HB-4HB-3HHx) film than on tissue culture plates (TCPs), PLA film, and PHBHHx film. MSC proliferation on P(3HB-4HB-3HHx) film was 126% higher than that on TCPs, 84% higher than that on PHBHHx film, and 312% higher than that on PLA film (p < 0.01). P(3HB-4HB-3HHx) also supported osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Previous studies found that all PHA materials tested were either less than or equal to TCPs for supporting cell growth. Among all PHA materials tested, P(3HB-4HB-3HHx) was the only PHA material to significantly promote cell proliferation compared with TCPs. P(3HB-4HB-3HHx) could be exploited for applications in bone tissue engineering.

  4. CD146 expression on primary nonhematopoietic bone marrow stem cells is correlated with in situ localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tormin, Ariane; Li, Ou; Brune, Jan Claas

    2011-01-01

    Nonhematopoietic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are of central importance for bone marrow stroma and the hematopoietic environment. However, the exact phenotype and anatomical distribution of specified MSC populations in the marrow are unknown. We characterized the phenotype of prim...

  5. Differential bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells mobilization in hepatectomized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herencia, Carmen; Rodríguez-Ariza, Antonio; Canalejo, Antonio; Naranjo, Alvaro; Briceño, F Javier; López-Cillero, Pedro; De la Mata, Manuel; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R

    2011-08-01

    The involvement of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (BMHSC) mobilization during liver regeneration from hepatectomized patients is under debate. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of BMHSC mobilization after hepatic resection in 33 patients with liver disease. Mobilization of CD34(+) BMHSC after 72 h of surgery was found in peripheral blood of some, but not all, of the hepatectomized patients. These CD34(+) cells co-expressed other stem cells markers. The patients without BMHSC mobilization showed high levels of circulating and liver tissue BMHSC (CD34(+) cells) previous to surgery. Therefore, two types of patients: "mobilizers" and "non-mobilizers" were distinguished based on the values of CD34(+) cells before and after surgery. Changes in cytokines involved in the hepatic regeneration (HGF and TGF-β), and in BMHSC mobilization process (SCF, SDF-1, IL-12, or MMP-2), were detected in both groups. In addition, a higher activation previous to surgery of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in liver tissue was observed in non mobilizers patients compared to mobilizer patients. BMHSC mobilization seems to be associated with variations in the levels of cytokines and proteolytic enzymes involved in hepatic regeneration and bone marrow matrix degradation. Hepatectomy may be an insufficient stimulus for BMSHC mobilization. The pre-hepatectomy higher levels CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood and liver, associated to the activation of hepatic SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, suggest a BMHSC mobilization process previous to surgery in non mobilizer patients.

  6. Bystander effect in glioma suicide gene therapy using bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaoyi; Gu, Chunyu; Gao, Yun; Amano, Shinji; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    An established rat intracranial glioma was successfully treated through the tumoricidal bystander effect generated by intratumoral injection of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (BMSCtk cells) followed by systemic ganciclovir administration. In the present study, we tested the bystander effect of this treatment strategy when using human BMSCs as the vector cells. Human BMSCtk cells were mixed with various kinds of brain tumor cell lines (human and rat glioma cells) and examined in vitro and in vivo tumoricidal bystander effects, by co-culture study and co-implantation study in the nude mouse, respectively. A significant in vitro bystander effect was observed between human BMSCtk cells and any of the tumor cells examined in the ganciclovir-containing medium. A potent in vivo bystander effect against human and rat glioma cells was also demonstrated when ganciclovir was administered. Migratory activity of the human BMSCs toward the tumor cells was enhanced by the conditioned media obtained from both human and rat glioma cells compared to the fresh media. The results of this study have demonstrated that the bystander effect generated by BMSCtk cells and ganciclovir is not cell type-specific, suggesting that the strategy would be quite feasible for clinical use. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Artemisinin-derived sesquiterpene lactones as potential antitumour compounds : Cytotoxic action against bone marrow and tumour cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, AC; Wierenga, PK; Woerdenbag, HJ; Van Uden, W; Pras, N; Konings, AWT; El-Feraly, FS; Galal, AM; Wikstrom, HV

    1998-01-01

    We determined the in vitro cytotoxic activity of the sesquiterpene lactone endoperoxide artemisinin (1) and some chemically prepared derivatives, which have been found to display cytotoxicity to cloned murine Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells and human HeLa cells and against murine bone marrow

  8. MRI of Auto-Transplantation of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem-Progenitor Cells for potential Repair of Injured Arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, Y.; Zhang, F.; Blair, T.; Gu, H.; Feng, H.; Wang, J.; Yuan, C.; Zhang, Z.; Qiu, B.; Yang, X.

    2012-01-01

    Backgroud: This study was to validate the feasibility of using clinical 3.0T MRI to monitor the migration of autotransplanted bone marrow (BM)-derived stem-progenitor cells (SPC) to the injured arteries of near-human sized swine for potential cell-based arterial repair.Methodology: The study was

  9. Bone marrow-derived cells and tumor growth : Contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to tumor micro-environments with special focus on mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berber D.; ter Elst, Arja; Kamps, Willem A.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    Research has provided evidence that tumor growth depends on the interaction of tumor cells with stromal cells, as already suggested in 1889 by Paget. Experimental and clinical studies have revealed that tumor stromal cells can be derived from bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells, such as

  10. Production of functional dendritic cells from mouse bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viet Quoc Pham

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, immune cell-based therapies, particularly those that utilize dendritic cells (DCs, are a promising therapy approach for cancer treatment. Therefore, DC therapy is the focus of many studies in many laboratories worldwide that are developing novel cancer therapies. This study aimed to develop a reproducible procedure to produce functional DCs from mouse bone marrow for DC therapy research. Bone marrow was collected from mouse femur bones by flushing with buffered saline. These cells were used to isolate mononuclear cells (MNCs by Ficoll gradient centrifugation. MNCs were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20 ng/mL of IL-4 and 20 ng/mL of GMCSF to induce maturation of immature DCs. The results showed that this procedure induced cells exhibiting the DC phenotypes, such as the expression of CD40, CD80, and CD86, high phagocytic capacity, strong production of IL-12, and efficient stimulation of T-CD4 lymphocytes. These results suggest that this procedure can be used to produce functional DCs in future studies that use DCs for immune therapy. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(4.000: 126-132

  11. Using Proteomics to 1) Identify the Bone Marrow Homing Receptors Expressed on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and 2) Elucidate Critical Signaling Pathways Responsible for the Blockage of Hematopoietic Differentiation in Leukemia

    KAUST Repository

    Chin, Chee J.

    2011-05-22

    Successful hematopoiesis requires the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow (BM) niche, where they can differentiate to produce all blood lineages. Leukemia arises when there is a blockage of differentiation and uncontrolled proliferation in the hematopoietic cells during their development. To refine therapies for leukemia, this study sought to improve the homing of healthy donor HSPCs for better transplantation and to find new candidates for differentiating and blocking proliferation in leukemic cells. Characterizing the molecular effectors mediating cell migration forms the basis for improving clinical transplantation of HSPCs. E-selectin/ligand interactions play a critical role in the homing of HSPCs to the BM, however, the identity of E-selectin ligands remains elusive. We aimed to use mass spectrometry (MS) to fully analyze the E-selectin ligands expressed on HSPCs. Immunoprecipitation studies coupled with MS confirmed the expression of three known E-selectin ligands, the hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and CD43, and revealed the presence of many interesting candidates on HSPCs-like cell line and on primary human BM CD34+ cells. The MS dataset represents a rich resource for further characterization of E-selectin ligands, which will lead to improvement of HSPCs transplantation. 4 Understanding the critical pathways underlying the initiation and maintenance of leukemia plays a key role in treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Ligation of the glycoprotein, CD44, using monoclonal antibodies or its natural ligand, hyaluronic acid, drives the differentiation of immature leukemic cells towards mature terminally differentiated cells, inhibits their proliferation and in some case induces their apoptosis. The aim of this study is to characterize the phosphoproteome of AML cells in response to CD44-induced differentiation. This will afford novel insights into the

  12. HSP10 selective preference for myeloid and megakaryocytic precursors in normal human bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Cappello

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs constitute a heterogeneous family of proteins involved in cell homeostasis. During cell life they are involved in harmful insults, as well as in immune and inflammatory reactions. It is known that they regulate gene expression, and cell proliferation, differentiation and death. HSP60 is a mitochondrial chaperonin, highly preserved during evolution, responsible of protein folding. Its function is strictly dependent on HSP10 in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic elements. We investigated the presence and the expression of HSP60 and HSP10 in a series of 20 normal human bone marrow specimens (NHBM by the means of immunohistochemistry. NHBM showed no expression of HSP60, probably due to its being below the detectable threshold, as already demonstrated in other normal human tissues. By contrast, HSP10 showed a selective positivity for myeloid and megakaryocytic lineages. The positivity was restricted to precursor cells, while mature elements were constantly negative.We postulate that HSP10 plays a role in bone marrow cell differentiation other than being a mitochondrial co-chaperonin. The present data emphasize the role of HSP10 during cellular homeostasis and encourage further investigations in this field.

  13. Bilateral Transplantation of Allogenic Adult Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Subventricular Zone of Parkinson’s Disease: A Pilot Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Venkataramana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The progress of PD and its related disorders cannot be prevented with the medications available. In this study, we recruited 8 PD and 4 PD plus patients between 5 to 15 years after diagnosis. All patients received BM-MSCs bilaterally into the SVZ and were followed up for 12 months. PD patients after therapy reported a mean improvement of 17.92% during “on” and 31.21% during “off” period on the UPDRS scoring system. None of the patients increased their medication during the follow-up period. Subjectively, the patients reported clarity in speech, reduction in tremors, rigidity, and freezing attacks. The results correlated with the duration of the disease. Those patients transplanted in the early stages of the disease (less than 5 years showed more improvement and no further disease progression than the later stages (11–15 years. However, the PD plus patients did not show any change in their clinical status after stem cell transplantation. This study demonstrates the safety of adult allogenic human BM-MSCs transplanted into the SVZ of the brain and its efficacy in early-stage PD patients.

  14. Expansion of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in High Density Dot Culture of Rat Bone Marrow Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Kretlow, James D.; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2014-01-01

    In vitro expansion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) remains a challenge in stem cell research and its application. We hypothesize that high density culture is able to expand EPCs from bone marrow by mimicking cell-cell interactions of the bone marrow niche. To test the hypothesis, rat bone marrow cells were either cultured in high density (2×105 cells/cm2) by seeding total 9×105 cells into six high density dots or cultured in regular density (1.6×104 cells/cm2) with the same total number of cells. Flow cytometric analyses of the cells cultured for 15 days showed that high density cells exhibited smaller cell size and higher levels of marker expression related to EPCs when compared to regular density cultured cells. Functionally, these cells exhibited strong angiogenic potentials with better tubal formation in vitro and potent rescue of mouse ischemic limbs in vivo with their integration into neo-capillary structure. Global gene chip and ELISA analyses revealed up-regulated gene expression of adhesion molecules and enhanced protein release of pro-angiogenic growth factors in high density cultured cells. In summary, high density cell culture promotes expansion of bone marrow contained EPCs that are able to enhance tissue angiogenesis via paracrine growth factors and direct differentiation into endothelial cells. PMID:25254487

  15. Role of intracellular freezing in the death of cells cooled at supraoptimal rates. [Preservation of erythrocytes, bone marrow cells, and yeasts by freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, P.

    1976-01-01

    Cooling velocity is one of the major factors that determines whether viable cells can be frozen to temperatures that permit indefinite storage. Cooling either too slowly or too rapidly tends to be damaging. Optimum cooling rates are reported for mouse marrow stem cells, yeast, and human red cells.

  16. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research.

  17. Bone marrow cell extract promotes the regeneration of irradiated bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Michel

    Full Text Available Mandibular osteoradionecrosis is a severe side effect of radiotherapy after the treatment of squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract. As an alternative to its treatment by micro-anastomosed free-flaps, preclinical tissular engineering studies have been developed. Total bone marrow (TBM associated with biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP significantly enhanced bone formation in irradiated bone. One mechanism, explaining how bone marrow cells can help regenerate tissues like this, is the paracrine effect. The bone marrow cell extract (BMCE makes use of this paracrine mechanism by keeping only the soluble factors such as growth factors and cytokines. It has provided significant results in repairing various tissues, but has not yet been studied in irradiated bone reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of BMCE via an intraosseous or intravenous delivery, with a calcium phosphate scaffold, in irradiated bone reconstruction. Twenty rats were irradiated on their hind limbs with a single 80-Gy dose. Three weeks later, surgery was performed to create osseous defects. The intraosseous group (n = 12 studied the effect of BMCE in situ, with six combinations (empty defect, BCP, TBM, BCP-TBM, lysate only, BCP-lysate. After four different combinations of implantation (empty defect, BCP, TBM, BCP-TBM, the intravenous group (n = 8 received four intravenous injections of BMCE for 2 weeks. Five weeks after implantation, samples were explanted for histological and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Lysate immunogenicity was studied with various mixed lymphocyte reactions. Intravenous injections of BMCE led to a significant new bone formation compared to the intraosseous group. The BCP-TBM mixture remained the most effective in the intraosseous group. However, intravenous injections were more effective, with TBM placed in the defect, with or without biomaterials. Histologically, highly cellularized bone marrow was

  18. In vitro osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow cells subcultured with and without dexamethasone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugge, P.J. ter; Jansen, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the osteogenic potential of subcultured rat bone marrow cells. Rat bone marrow (RBM) cells were cultured with or without dexamethasone. Subsequently, osteogenic differentiation and expression was studied. When cells were cultured continuously in the presence

  19. LIVER AND BONE MARROW STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS AS REGULATORS OF REPARATIVE REGENERATION OF DAMAGED LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. V. Lundup

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review the modern information about effectiveness of liver insufficiency treatment by stem/ progenitor cells of liver (oval cells and bone marrow (hemopoietic cells and mesenchymal cells was presented. It is shown that medical action of these cells is referred on normalization of liver cell interaction and reorganization of processes of a reparative regeneration in damaged liver. It is believed that application of mesenchymal stromal cells from an autological bone marrow is the most perspective strategy. However, for definitive judgement about regenerative possibilities of the autological bone marrow cells it is necessary to carry out large-scale double blind clinical researches. 

  20. Abnormal bone marrow distribution following unsuccessful hip replacement: A potential confusion on white cell scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, D.A. (Saint Mary' s Hospital, London (UK). Dept. of Clinical Physics and Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    The use of indium 111 white blood cell imaging for the detection of bony sepsis is now well established. Labelled white cells are seen normally in the liver, spleen and bone marrow, and recent reports have stressed the need for concomitant bone marrow imaging to reduce the incidence of false-positive results. In the case described, a grossly abnormal distribution of bone marrow following failed hip replacement would have led to a false diagnosis of osteomyelitis. (orig.).

  1. Neuroinflammation, Bone Marrow Stem Cells, and Chronic Pain

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    Yul Huh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Current treatments for chronic pain, such as inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, and cancer pain are insufficient and cause severe side effects. Mounting evidence suggests that neuroinflammation in the peripheral and central nervous system (PNS and CNS plays a pivotal role in the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain. Characteristic features of neuroinflammation in chronic pain conditions include infiltration of immune cells into the PNS [e.g., the sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion (DRG], activation of glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes in the CNS (spinal cord and brain, and production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines [TNF, interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, CCL2, and CXCL1]. Recent studies suggest that bone marrow stem cells or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs produce powerful analgesic effects in animal models of inflammatory pain, neuropathic pain, and cancer pain. We recently demonstrated that intrathecal injection of BMSCs resulted in a long-term relief of neuropathic pain for several weeks after peripheral nerve injury. Strikingly, this analgesic effect is mediated by the anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor beta secreted from BMSCs. Additionally, BMSCs exhibit potent modulation of neuroinflammation, by inhibiting monocyte infiltration, glial activation, and cytokine/chemokine production in the DRG and spinal cord. Thus, BMSCs control chronic pain by regulation of neuroinflammation in the PNS and CNS via paracrine signaling. In this review, we discuss the similar results from different laboratories of remarkable anti-nociceptive efficacy of BMSCs in animal and clinical studies. We also discuss the mechanisms by which BMSCs control neuroinflammation and chronic pain and how these cells specifically migrate to damaged tissues.

  2. Multi-lineage potential research of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from Bama miniature pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chunyu; Chen, Shuming; Gao, Yuhua; Shan, Zhiqiang; Guan, Weijun; Ma, Yuehui

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are easy to obtain and thought to be ideal candidate cells for reconstruction of tissues and organs. Pigs are an appropriate animal model because their physiological structure, organ size, nutritional metabolism, and pathological reactions are similar to those of humans. In this study, bone marrow was collection from Bama miniature pigs to isolate BMSCs (B-BMSCs) by whole bone marrow culture method. We then examined their biological characteristics such as growth kinetics, surface antigen, and multi-lineage potential. B-BMSCs could be cultured for 36 passages in vitro. Growth kinetics and colony forming assay analyses indicated that B-BMSCs had a strong capacity for self-renewal in vitro and their proliferation rate appeared to decrease with passaging. These findings were supported by the animal cytophysiology in vitro. Surface antigen detection showed that B-BMSCs expressed CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, and CD90, but not the endothelial cell marker CD31 or hematopoietic cell-specific marker CD34. This result was consistent with the characteristics of B-BMSCs. Furthermore, under appropriate conditions for multidirectional differentiation, B-BMSCs were induced to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, neuron-like cells, islet cells, liver-like cells, and endothelial cells as indicated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence. These results verified the differentiation potential of B-BMSCs. In this study, B-BMSCs were isolated from Bama miniature pigs, and the self-renewal ability and differential potential was evaluated in vitro. The present study has important bearing on the potential application of B-BMSCs as a stem cell source for regenerative therapies. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 671-685, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Antimutagenic effect of Origanum majorana L. essential oil against prallethrin-induced genotoxic damage in rat bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossa, Abdel-Tawab H; Refaie, Amel A; Ramadan, Amal; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the genotoxic and cytotoxic potential of prallethrin in rat bone marrow cells and the protective effect of Origanum majorana L. essential oil (EO). Our results demonstrated that prallethrin at dose 64.0 mg/kg body weight (b.wt.) (1/10 LD50), has a clastogenic/genotoxic potential as shown by the high percentage of chromosomal aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) in the bone marrow cells of male rats, whereas the combined treatment of prallethrin and O. majorana EO resulted in the reduction of the CA (54.54%). The combined treatment also reduced the micronuclei formation significantly. In conclusion, prallethrin can be considered clastogenic/genotoxic and may carry a risk to human health. The study revealed the antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic potential of O. majorana EO against prallethrin-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in rat bone marrow cells.

  4. Role of bone marrow-derived stem cells, renal progenitor cells and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone marrow derived stem cells are undifferentiated cells typically characterized by their capacity for self renewal, ability to give rise to multiple differentiated cellular population, including hematopoietic (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Characterization of HSCs includes their multipotency, expression of typical ...

  5. The effect of medium composition on deposition of collagen type 1 and expression of osteogenic genes in mesenchymal stem cells derived from human adipose tissue and bone marrow

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Szöke, K.; Daňková, Jana; Buzgo, Matej; Amler, Evžen; Brinchmann, J.E.; Ostrup, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, B (2017), s. 321-328 ISSN 1359-5113 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : mesenchymal stem cells * polycaprolactone * osteogenic differentiation Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines Impact factor: 2.497, year: 2016

  6. Cell therapy of hip osteonecrosis with autologous bone marrow grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernigou Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the reasons for bone remodeling leading to an insufficient creeping substitution after osteonecrosis in the femoral head may be the small number of progenitor cells in the proximal femur and the trochanteric region. Because of this lack of progenitor cells, treatment modalities should stimulate and guide bone remodeling to sufficient creeping substitution to preserve the integrity of the femoral head. Core decompression with bone graft is used frequently in the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head. In the current series, grafting was done with autologous bone marrow obtained from the iliac crest of patients operated on for early stages of osteonecrosis of the hip before collapse with the hypothesis that before stage of subchondral collapse, increasing the number of progenitor cells in the proximal femur will stimulate bone remodeling and creeping substitution and thereby improve functional outcome. Materials and Methods: Between 1990 and 2000, 342 patients (534 hips with avascular osteonecrosis at early stages (Stages I and II were treated with core decompression and autologous bone marrow grafting obtained from the iliac crest of patients operated on for osteonecrosis of the hip. The percentage of hips affected by osteonecrosis in this series of 534 hips was 19% in patients taking corticosteroids, 28% in patients with excessive alcohol intake, and 31% in patients with sickle cell disease. The mean age of the patients at the time of decompression and autologous bone marrow grafting was 39 years (range: 16-61 years. The aspirated marrow was reduced in volume by concentration and injected into the femoral head after core decompression with a small trocar. To measure the number of progenitor cells transplanted, the fibroblast colony forming unit was used as an indicator of the stroma cell activity. Results: Patients were followed up from 8 to 18 years. The outcome was determined by the changes in the Harris hip score

  7. Autophagy-Modulated Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Accelerate Liver Restoration in Mouse Models of Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Molaei, Sedigheh; Bahadori, Marzie; Nasiri, Fatemeh; Deyhim, Mohammad Reza; Jalili, Mohammad Ali; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recently received increasing attention for cell-based therapy, especially in regenerative medicine. However, the low survival rate of these cells restricts their therapeutic applications. It is hypothesized that autophagy might play an important role in cellular homeostasis and survival. This study aims to investigate the regenerative potentials of autophagy-modulated MSCs for the treatment of acute liver failure (ALF) in mice. ALF was induced in mice by intraperitoneal injection of 1.5 ml/kg carbon tetrachloride. Mice were intravenously infused with MSCs, which were suppressed in their autophagy pathway. Blood and liver samples were collected at different intervals (24, 48 and 72 h) after the transplantation of MSCs. Both the liver enzymes and tissue necrosis levels were evaluated using biochemical and histopathological assessments. The survival rate of the transplanted mice was also recorded during one week. Biochemical and pathological results indicated that 1.5 ml/kg carbon tetrachloride induces ALF in mice. A significant reduction of liver enzymes and necrosis score were observed in autophagy-modulated MSC-transplanted mice compared to sham (with no cell therapy) after 24 h. After 72 h, liver enzymes reached their normal levels in mice transplanted with autophagy-suppressed MSCs. Interestingly, normal histology without necrosis was also observed. Autophagy suppression in MSCs ameliorates their liver regeneration potentials due to paracrine effects and might be suggested as a new strategy for the improvement of cell therapy in ALF.

  8. Nurse’s A-Phase Material Enhance Adhesion, Growth and Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadan-Ros, Ruben; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador; Mazón, Patricia; Ros-Tarraga, Patricia; De Aza, Piedad N.; Meseguer-Olmo, Luis

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bioactivity and cell response of a well-characterized Nurse’s A-phase (7CaO·P2O5·2SiO2) ceramic and its effect compared to a control (tissue culture polystyrene-TCPS) on the adhesion, viability, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of ahMSCs in vitro. Cell proliferation (Alamar Blue Assay), Alizarin Red-S (AR-s) staining, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin (OCN), and collagen I (Col I) were evaluated. Also, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images were acquired in order to visualise the cells and the topography of the material. The proliferation of cells growing in a direct contact with the material was slower at early stages of the study because of the new environmental conditions. However, the entire surface was colonized after 28 days of culture in growth medium (GM). Osteoblastic differentiation markers were significantly enhanced in cells growing on Nurse’s A phase ceramic and cultured with osteogenic medium (OM), probably due to the role of silica to stimulate the differentiation of ahMSCs. Moreover, calcium nodules were formed under the influence of ceramic material. Therefore, it is predicted that Nurse’s A-phase ceramic would present high biocompatibility and osteoinductive properties and would be a good candidate to be used as a biomaterial for bone tissue engineering. PMID:28772708

  9. Nurse’s A-Phase Material Enhance Adhesion, Growth and Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Rabadan-Ros

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bioactivity and cell response of a well-characterized Nurse’s A-phase (7CaO·P2O5·2SiO2 ceramic and its effect compared to a control (tissue culture polystyrene-TCPS on the adhesion, viability, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of ahMSCs in vitro. Cell proliferation (Alamar Blue Assay, Alizarin Red-S (AR-s staining, alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, osteocalcin (OCN, and collagen I (Col I were evaluated. Also, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM images were acquired in order to visualise the cells and the topography of the material. The proliferation of cells growing in a direct contact with the material was slower at early stages of the study because of the new environmental conditions. However, the entire surface was colonized after 28 days of culture in growth medium (GM. Osteoblastic differentiation markers were significantly enhanced in cells growing on Nurse’s A phase ceramic and cultured with osteogenic medium (OM, probably due to the role of silica to stimulate the differentiation of ahMSCs. Moreover, calcium nodules were formed under the influence of ceramic material. Therefore, it is predicted that Nurse’s A-phase ceramic would present high biocompatibility and osteoinductive properties and would be a good candidate to be used as a biomaterial for bone tissue engineering.

  10. Distribution and viability of fetal and adult human bone marrow stromal cells in a biaxial rotating vessel bioreactor after seeding on polymeric 3D additive manufactured scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Anne Marijke; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with

  11. Distribution and Viability of Fetal and Adult Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Biaxial Rotating Vessel Bioreactor after Seeding on Polymeric 3D Additive Manufactured Scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Anne M; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with

  12. Epiretinal transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells rescues retinal and vision function in a rat model of retinal degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Tzameret

    2015-09-01

    Our findings suggest that transplantation of hBM-MSCs as a thin epiretinal layer is effective for treatment of retinal degeneration in RCS rats, and that transplanting the cells in close proximity to the retina enhances hBM-MSC therapeutic effect compared with intravitreal injection.

  13. Effect of human scavenger receptor class A overexpression in bone marrow-derived cells on lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herijgers, N.; Winther, M.P.J. de; Eck, M. van; Havekes, L.M.; Hofker, M.H.; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Berkel, T.J.C. van

    2000-01-01

    Scavenger receptors, which include various classes, play an important role in atherogenesis by mediating the unrestricted uptake of modified lipoproteins, resulting in the massive accumulation of cholesteryl esters. Because macrophage-derived foam cells are considered to be an important feature in

  14. The impact of cell source, culture methodology, culture location, and individual donors on gene expression profiles of bone marrow-derived and adipose-derived stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torensma, R.; Prins, H.J.; Schrama, E.; Verwiel, E.T.P.; Martens, A.C.M.; Roelofs, H.; Jansen, B.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stromal cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, display a high degree of heterogeneity. To shed light on the causes of this heterogeneity, MSCs were collected from either human BM (n=5) or adipose tissue (AT) (n=5), and expanded using 2 different culture methods: one

  15. Soluble Factors from Biofilms of Wound Pathogens Modulate Human Bone Marrow-derived Stromal Cell Differentiation, Migration, Angiogenesis, and Cytokine Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-28

    wounds. Recent studies evaluating the biodiversity within various types of chronic wounds demonstrated the presence of multiple species of bacteria...derived factor 1 (SDF-1) [11,12] and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) [13]. Additionally, MSCs have also been shown to have anti- microbial ... microbial cell wall components (e.g., Gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Gram-positive lipoteichoic acid, (LTA)) [17,18], inflammatory

  16. Activation of non-canonical Wnt/JNK pathway by Wnt3a is associated with differentiation fate determination of human bone marrow stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Weimin; Chen, Li; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    patterns induced by Wnt3a treatment in two hMSC lines: hMSC-LRP5(T253) and hMSC-LRP5(T244) cells carrying known mutations of Wnt co-receptor LRP5 (T253I or T244M) that either enhances or represses canonical Wnt signaling, respectively. Wnt3a treatment of hMSC activated not only canonical Wnt signaling...

  17. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ya-Jing; Liu, Jian-Min; Wei, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Yun-Hao; Qu, Zhen-Hua; Chen, Shu-Bo

    2015-08-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats.

  18. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-jing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats.

  19. Bone Marrow Vascular Niche: Home for Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though discovered later than osteoblastic niche, vascular niche has been regarded as an alternative indispensable niche operating regulation on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. As significant progresses gained on this type niche, it is gradually clear that the main work of vascular niche is undertaking to support hematopoiesis. However, compared to what have been defined in the mechanisms through which the osteoblastic niche regulates hematopoiesis, we know less in vascular niche. In this review, based on research data hitherto we will focus on component foundation and various functions of vascular niche that guarantee the normal hematopoiesis process within bone marrow microenvironments. And the possible pathways raised by various research results through which this environment undergoes its function will be discussed as well.

  20. The Effect of Combined Pulsed Wave Low-Level Laser Therapy and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Conditioned Medium on Open Skin Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouriran, Ramin; Piryaei, Abbas; Mostafavinia, Ataroalsadat; Zandpazandi, Sara; Hendudari, Farzane; Amini, Abdollah; Bayat, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    The nobility of this scientific study was to investigate the combined effects of pulsed wave low-level laser therapy (PWLLLT) and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium (hBM-MSC-CM) on the biomechanical parameters of wounds in an experimental model for diabetes mellitus (DM). PWLLLT exhibited biostimulatory effects on wounds in diabetic animals. Secretomes can be administered into wounds by the use of BM-MSC-CM. Type I DM was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ). Two wounds were made on proximal and distal parts in the dorsal region of each rat. Rats were divided into four groups. The first group was considered as the control group. The second group received hBM-MSC-CM. The third group received PWLLLT. The fourth group received hBM-MSC-CM+LASER. hBM-MSC-CM was administrated twice intraperitoneally. The proximal wounds in the third and fourth groups were treated with a pulsed laser by 890 nm wavelength, 80 Hz frequency, and 0.2 J/cm(2) energy densities. On the 15th day, a standard sample from each healing wound was submitted for biomechanical examination. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance test. PWLLLT and hBM-MSC-CM, alone or in combination, significantly increased biomechanical parameters within the healing wounds. However, PWLLLT was statistically more effective compared with the hBM-MSC-CM. In the third and fourth groups, the numbers of wound closures were significantly enhanced in proximal part, contrary to the control ones. It was magnificently attained that PWLLLT significantly accelerated the wound healing process in the experimental model for STZ-induced type I DM rats.

  1. Osteoblasts and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells control hematopoietic stem cell migration and proliferation in 3D in vitro model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula D N de Barros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34(+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34(+ cells was decreased. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation.

  2. Fusion of intestinal epithelial cells with bone marrow derived cells is dispensable for tissue homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Joan H.; Rodermond, Hans M.; Zimberlin, Cheryl D.; Lascano, Valeria; de Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Richel, Dick J.; Medema, Jan Paul; Vermeulen, Louis

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial lining of the intestine is characterized by an immense cellular turn-over ascertaining an extensive regenerative capacity. Multiple reports suggest that besides the local intestinal stem cell pool, circulating cells of bone marrow origin (BMDCs) contribute to this process by fusing

  3. Isolation, expansion and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells from rabbits' bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato B. Eleotério

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Tissue engineering has been a fundamental technique in the regenerative medicine field, once it permits to build tri-dimensional tissue constructs associating undifferentiated mesenchymal cells (or mesenchymal stromal cells - MSCs and scaffolds in vitro. Therefore, many studies have been carried out using these cells from different animal species, and rabbits are often used as animal model for in vivo tissue repair studies. However, most of the information available about MSCs harvesting and characterization is about human and murine cells, which brings some doubts to researchers who desire to work with a rabbit model in tissue repair studies based on MSCs. In this context, this study aimed to add and improve the information available in the scientific literature providing a complete technique for isolation, expansion and differentiation of MSCs from rabbits. Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs from humerus and femur of rabbits were obtained and to evaluate their proliferation rate, three different culture media were tested, here referred as DMEM-P, DMEM´S and α-MEM. The BMMCs were also cultured in osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic induction media to prove their multipotentiality. It was concluded that the techniques suggested in this study can provide a guideline to harvest and isolate MSCs from bone marrow of rabbits in enough amount to allow their expansion and, based on the laboratory experience where the study was developed, it is also suggested a culture media formulation to provide a better cell proliferation rate with multipotentiality preservation.

  4. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Intrathecal Transplantation in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy is being widely explored in the management of stroke and has demonstrated great potential. It has been shown to assist in the remodeling of the central nervous system by inducing neurorestorative effect through the process of angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and reduction of glial scar formation. In this study, the effect of intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs is analyzed on the recovery process of patients with chronic stroke. 24 patients diagnosed with chronic stroke were administered cell therapy, followed by multidisciplinary neurorehabilitation. They were assessed on functional independence measure (FIM objectively, along with assessment of standing and walking balance, ambulation, and hand functions. Out of 24 patients, 12 improved in ambulation, 10 in hand functions, 6 in standing balance, and 9 in walking balance. Further factor analysis was done. Patients of the younger groups showed higher percentage of improvement in all the areas. Patients who underwent cell therapy within 2 years after the stroke showed better changes. Ischemic type of stroke had better recovery than the hemorrhagic stroke. This study demonstrates the potential of autologous BMMNCs intrathecal transplantation in improving the prognosis of functional recovery in chronic stage of stroke. Further clinical trials are recommended. This trial is registered with NCT02065778.

  5. Marrow-derived cells regulate the development of early diabetic retinopathy and tactile allodynia in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Guangyuan; Veenstra, Alexander A; Talahalli, Ramaprasad R; Wang, Xiaoqi; Gubitosi-Klug, Rose A; Sheibani, Nader; Kern, Timothy S

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis that marrow-derived cells, and specifically proinflammatory proteins in those cells, play a critical role in the development of diabetes-induced retinopathy and tactile allodynia was investigated...

  6. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells from Male Donors Do Not Contribute to the Endometrial Side Population of the Recipient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervelló, Irene; Gil-Sanchis, Claudia; Mas, Aymara; Faus, Amparo; Sanz, Jaime; Moscardó, Federico; Higueras, Gema; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Pellicer, Antonio; Simón, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Accumulated evidence demonstrates the existence of bone marrow-derived cells origin in the endometria of women undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In these reports, cells of a bone marrow (BM) origin are able to differentiate into endometrial cells, although their contribution to endometrial regeneration is not yet clear. We have previously demonstrated the functional relevance of side population (SP) cells as the endogenous source of somatic stem cells (SSC) in the human endometrium. The present work aims to understand the presence and contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to the endometrium and the endometrial SP population of women who received BMT from male donors. Five female recipients with spontaneous or induced menstruations were selected and their endometrium was examined for the contribution of XY donor-derived cells using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), telomapping and SP method investigation. We confirm the presence of XY donor-derived cells in the recipient endometrium ranging from 1.7% to 2.62%. We also identify 0.45–0.85% of the donor-derived cells in the epithelial compartment displaying CD9 marker, and 1.0–1.83% of the Vimentin-positive XY donor-derived cells in the stromal compartment. Although the percentage of endometrial SP cells decreased, possibly being due to chemotherapy applied to these patients, they were not formed by XY donor-derived cells, donor BM cells were not associated with the stem cell (SC) niches assessed by telomapping technique, and engraftment percentages were very low with no correlation between time from transplant and engraftment efficiency, suggesting random terminal differentiation. In conclusion, XY donor-derived cells of a BM origin may be considered a limited exogenous source of transdifferentiated endometrial cells rather than a cyclic source of BM donor-derived stem cells. PMID:22276168

  7. Bone marrow-derived cells from male donors do not contribute to the endometrial side population of the recipient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Cervelló

    Full Text Available Accumulated evidence demonstrates the existence of bone marrow-derived cells origin in the endometria of women undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT. In these reports, cells of a bone marrow (BM origin are able to differentiate into endometrial cells, although their contribution to endometrial regeneration is not yet clear. We have previously demonstrated the functional relevance of side population (SP cells as the endogenous source of somatic stem cells (SSC in the human endometrium. The present work aims to understand the presence and contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to the endometrium and the endometrial SP population of women who received BMT from male donors. Five female recipients with spontaneous or induced menstruations were selected and their endometrium was examined for the contribution of XY donor-derived cells using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, telomapping and SP method investigation. We confirm the presence of XY donor-derived cells in the recipient endometrium ranging from 1.7% to 2.62%. We also identify 0.45-0.85% of the donor-derived cells in the epithelial compartment displaying CD9 marker, and 1.0-1.83% of the Vimentin-positive XY donor-derived cells in the stromal compartment. Although the percentage of endometrial SP cells decreased, possibly being due to chemotherapy applied to these patients, they were not formed by XY donor-derived cells, donor BM cells were not associated with the stem cell (SC niches assessed by telomapping technique, and engraftment percentages were very low with no correlation between time from transplant and engraftment efficiency, suggesting random terminal differentiation. In conclusion, XY donor-derived cells of a BM origin may be considered a limited exogenous source of transdifferentiated endometrial cells rather than a cyclic source of BM donor-derived stem cells.

  8. Adult human bone marrow stromal spheres express neuronal traits in vitro and in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suon, Sokreine; Yang, Ming; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2006-08-23

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) grown in suspension culture gave rise to spheres of neural progenitor (NP) cells, capable of expressing both dopaminergic (DA) and GABAergic (GABA) traits. After transplantation into the Parkinsonian rat, human NPs and neurons were present at 2 weeks. Although no DA neurons appeared to survive transplantation, there were abundant GABA neurons present in the graft. By 4 weeks, however, all cells had died. Finding ways to prolong survival and promote the appropriate neurotransmitter phenotype is essential if hMSCs are to be clinically useful.

  9. Clastogenic Effects of Glyphosate in Bone Marrow Cells of Swiss Albino Mice

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    Sahdeo Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl glycine, C3H8NO5P, a herbicide, used to control unwanted annual and perennial plants all over the world. Nevertheless, occupational and environmental exposure to pesticides can pose a threat to nontarget species including human beings. Therefore, in the present study, genotoxic effects of the herbicide glyphosate were analyzed by measuring chromosomal aberrations (CAs and micronuclei (MN in bone marrow cells of Swiss albino mice. A single dose of glyphosate was given intraperitoneally (i.p to the animals at a concentration of 25 and 50 mg/kg b.wt. Animals of positive control group were injected i.p. benzo(apyrene (100 mg/kg b.wt., once only, whereas, animals of control (vehicle group were injected i.p. dimethyl sulfoxide (0.2 mL. Animals from all the groups were sacrificed at sampling times of 24, 48, and 72 hours and their bone marrow was analyzed for cytogenetic and chromosomal damage. Glyphosate treatment significantly increases CAs and MN induction at both treatments and time compared with the vehicle control (P<.05. The cytotoxic effects of glyphosate were also evident, as observed by significant decrease in mitotic index (MI. The present results indicate that glyphosate is clastogenic and cytotoxic to mouse bone marrow.

  10. MR marrow signs of iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Sheth, S.S. [Department of Pediatrics, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, 3959 Broadway, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Hurlet, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, 3959 Broadway, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Comerci, S.C. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Piomelli, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, 3959 Broadway, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Pediatric Radiology, Babies and Children`s Hospital, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) marrow signal in the axial and appendicular skeleton of 13 transfusion-dependent and chelated pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia (SSD) was compared with marrow signal in six non-transfusion-dependent patients with SSD. Hepatic, pancreatic, and renal MR signal were also evaluated. Indication for hypertransfusion therapy was primarily prior history of stroke. Transfusion-dependent patients had evidence of iron deposition throughout the imaged marrow and the liver, despite deferoxamine chelation therapy. Non-transfusion-dependent patients did not demonstrate grossly apparent signs of iron overload. Red marrow restoration was present in the spine, pelvis, and long bones and, in some patients, within the epiphyses. Marrow edema secondary to vaso-occlusive crises was evident in the metaphyses and diaphyses of long bones in areas of both red and fatty marrow and was best seen using fat-saturated T2-weighted imaging techniques. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  12. Involvement of bone marrow stem cells in periodontal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li Li; Liu, Hong Wei; Wen, Xin Xin; Xie, Han

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis whether bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) could migrate into the periodontium as the precursor available for the repair of tissue injury. A chimeric mouse model was established by transplanting BMSCs derived from red fluorescent protein mouse into irradiated BALB/c mice. Subsequently, a periodontal defect was created beside the maxillary first molar and filled with ceramic bovine bone. Finally, the chimeric mice were divided into three groups and were observed 3, 14 and 28 days later respectively. The involvement of BMSCs in periodontal defects was analysed using an in vivo imaging system and immunohistochemical staining of CD45, CD105 and CD31. Cell surface marker expression in injured tissue was also compared with that in normal tissue. Increasing numbers of BMSCs migrated into the periodontal defect with time. The distribution was initially limited to ceramic bovine bone and then around blood vessels and near alveolar bone. Furthermore, expression of CD105 and CD31 was much higher in injured periodontal tissue than that in healthy periodontium, although CD45 was not expressed in either of these tissues. BMSCs, but not haemopoietic stem cells, were involved in periodontal defect; they entered the periodontium probably via blood vessels.

  13. Markers for Characterization of Bone Marrow Multipotential Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A. Boxall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the observed efficacy of culture-expanded multipotential stromal cells, also termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, in the treatment of graft-versus host and cardiac disease, it remains surprising that purity and potency characterization of manufactured cell batches remains rather basic. In this paper, we will initially discuss surface and molecular markers that were proposed to serve as the indicators of the MSC potency, in terms of their proliferative potential or the ability to differentiate into desired lineages. The second part of this paper will be dedicated to a critical discussion of surface markers of uncultured (i.e., native bone marrow (BM MSCs. Although no formal consensus has yet been reached on which markers may be best suited for prospective BM MSC isolation, markers that cross-react with MSCs of animal models (such as CD271 and W8-B2/MSCA-1 may have the strongest translational value. Whereas small animal models are needed to discover the in vivo function on these markers, large animal models are required for safety and efficacy testing of isolated MSCs, particularly in the field of bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

  14. Differential Cell Count of Bone Marrow Aspirates in Steady-state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 4.5 ml of blood was obtained from the antecubital vein of each child, for full blood count. Bone marrow was aspirated from the posterior superior iliac spine. Slides were stained with MayGrünwald-Giemsa stain. Proportions of erythroid, myeloid, lymphoid and megakaryocytic cells out of 250 nucleated bone marrow ...

  15. Mechanisms of Immune Suppression Utilized by Canine Adipose and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lyndah; Johnson, Valerie; Coy, Jonathan; Regan, Dan; Dow, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from rodents and humans have been shown to suppress T cells by distinct primary pathways, with nitric oxide (NO)-dependent pathways dominating in rodents and indoleamine 2,3-deoxygenase (IDO)-dependent pathways dominating in humans. However, the immune suppressive pathways utilized by canine MSC have not been thoroughly studied, nor have bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) and adipose-derived MSC (Ad-MSC) been directly compared for their immune modulatory potency or pathway utilization. Therefore, canine BM-MSC and Ad-MSC were generated in vitro and their potency in suppressing T cell proliferation and cytokine production was compared, and differential gene expression. Mechanisms of T cells suppression were also investigated for both MSC types. We found that BM-MSC and Ad-MSC were roughly equivalent in terms of their ability to suppress T cell activation. However, the two MSC types used both shared and distinct biochemical pathways to suppress T cell activation. Ad-MSC utilized TGF-β signaling pathways and adenosine signaling to suppress T cell activation, whereas BM-MSC used cyclooxygenase, TGF-β and adenosine signaling pathways to suppress T cell activation. These results indicate that canine MSC are distinct from human and rodent MSC terms of their immune suppressive pathways, relying primarily on cyclooxygenase and TGF-β pathways for T cell suppression, rather than on NO or IDO-mediated pathways.

  16. [IL-32 mRNA Expression of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Its Correlation with Cell Apoptosis in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Yu; Xu, Li; Li, Da-Qi; Shao, Jian-Hua; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Hong-Yu; Dong, Xue-Bin; Gu, Lin-Ping; Wu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the IL-32 mRNA expression of bone marrow stromal cells and its correlation with apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Bone marrow samples from 26 MDS patients and 10 iron deficiency anemia (IDA, as control) patients were collected, RT-PCR was used to detect the IL-32 mRNA expression of bone marrow stromal cells, and the apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells was detected by flow cytometry with Annexin V-FITC/PI dowble staining. The born marrow lymphocytes and NK cells were detected by means of direct immunofluorescence labeling whole blood hemolysis and flow cytometry. IL-32 mRNA expression of bone marrow stromal cells in the MDS patients was significantly higher than that of control group, the IL-32 mRNA expression of bone marrow stromal cells in patients with RA, RAS and RCMD was significantly higher than that in patients with RAEB. There was no obvious difference between RAEB and the control groups. The apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells in MDS group was significantly higher than that in the control group, the apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells in patients with RA, RAS and RCMD was significantly higher than that in RAEB. There was no significant difference between RAEB group and control group. The IL-32 mRNA expression in bone marrow stromal cells significantly correlated with the apoptosis of bone marrow mononuclear cells in MDS patients. The NK cell number in born marrow of MDS patients and the control group had no significant difference. The expression of IL-32 mRNA in bone marrow stromal cells significantly relates with the apoptosis of MDS cells, and the secretion of IL-32 by bone marrow stromal cells may be one of the reasons for the apoptosis of MDS bone marrow cells. It is speculated that the abnormal MDS bone marrow microenvironment is involved in the apoptosis of bone marrow cells.

  17. Breast cancer cells compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells for intercellular adhesion molecule 1-mediated binding to the bone marrow microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Abhishek; Friedrichs, Jens; Bonin, Malte von; Bejestani, Elham Peshali; Werner, Carsten; Wobus, Manja; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Adhesion-based cellular interactions involved in breast cancer metastasis to the bone marrow remain elusive. We identified that breast cancer cells directly compete with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for retention in the bone marrow microenvironment. To this end, we established two models of competitive cell adhesion-simultaneous and sequential-to study a potential competition for homing to the niche and displacement of the endogenous HSPCs upon invasion by tumor cells. In both models, breast cancer cells but not non-tumorigenic cells competitively reduced adhesion of HSPCs to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in a tumor cell number-dependent manner. Higher adhesive force between breast cancer cells and MSCs, as compared with HSPCs, assessed by quantitative atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy could partially account for tumor cell mediated reduction in HSPC adhesion to MSCs. Genetic inactivation and blockade studies revealed that homophilic interactions between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) expressed on tumor cells and MSCs, respectively, regulate the competition between tumor cells and HSPCs for binding to MSCs. Moreover, tumor cell-secreted soluble ICAM-1(sICAM-1) also impaired HSPC adhesion via blocking CD18-ICAM-1 binding between HSPCs and MSCs. Xenotransplantation studies in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice revealed reduction of human HSPCs in the bone marrow via metastatic breast cancer cells. These findings point to a direct competitive interaction between disseminated breast cancer cells and HSPCs within the bone marrow micro environment. This interaction might also have implications on niche-based tumor support. Therefore, targeting this cross talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Metabolism Regulates Cellular Functions of Bone Marrow-Derived Cells used for Cardiac Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlet, Anja; Rasper, Tina; Roy Choudhury, Aaheli; Bothur, Sabrina; Rieger, Michael A; Namgaladze, Dmitry; Fischer, Ariane; Schürmann, Christoph; Brandes, Ralf P; Tschulena, Ulrich; Steppan, Sonja; Assmus, Birgit; Dimmeler, Stefanie; Zeiher, Andreas M; Seeger, Florian H

    2016-08-01

    Administration of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMC) may increase cardiac function after myocardial ischemia. However, the functional capacity of BMC derived from chronic heart failure (CHF) patients is significantly impaired. As modulation of the energy metabolism allows cells to match the divergent demands of the environment, we examined the regulation of energy metabolism in BMC from patients and healthy controls (HC). The glycolytic capacity of CHF-derived BMC is reduced compared to HC, whereas BMC of metabolically activated bone marrow after acute myocardial infarction reveal increased metabolism. The correlation of metabolic pathways with the functional activity of cells indicates an influence of metabolism on cell function. Reducing glycolysis without profoundly affecting ATP-production reversibly reduces invasion as well as colony forming capacity and abolishes proliferation of CD34(+) CD38(-) lin(-) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). Ex vivo inhibition of glycolysis further reduced the pro-angiogenic activity of transplanted cells in a hind limb ischemia model in vivo. In contrast, inhibition of respiration, without affecting total ATP production, leads to a compensatory increase in glycolytic capacity correlating with increased colony forming capacity. Isolated CD34(+) , CXCR4(+) , and CD14(+) cells showed higher glycolytic activity compared to their negative counterparts. Metabolic activity was profoundly modulated by the composition of media used to store or culture BMC. This study provides first evidence that metabolic alterations influence the functional activity of human HSPC and BMC independent of ATP production. Changing the balance between respiration and glycolysis might be useful to improve patient-derived cells for clinical cardiac cell therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:2236-2248. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  19. Selenium supplementation restores the antioxidative capacity and prevents cell damage in bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, Regina; Ulmer, Matthias; Zeck, Sabine

    2006-01-01

    signaling, cumulative cell damage, senescence, and tumor development. Selenium-dependent (glutathione peroxidases [GPxs] and thioredoxin reductases [TrxRs]) and selenium-independent (superoxide dismutases [SODs] and catalase [CAT]) enzyme systems regulate cellular ROS steady state levels. SODs process......Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and other cell populations derived from mesenchymal precursors are developed for cell-based therapeutic strategies and undergo cellular stress during ex vivo procedures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) of cellular and environmental origin are involved in redox...... superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide, which is subsequently neutralized by GPx and CAT; TrxR neutralizes other ROS, such as peroxinitrite. Primary BMSCs and telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-TERT) express GPx1-3, TrxR1, TrxR2, SOD1, SOD2, and CAT. We show here that in standard cell...

  20. LONG-LIVED BONE MARROW PLASMA CELLS DURING IMMUNE RESPONSE TO ALPHA (1→3 DEXTRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Chernyshova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production kinetics and some functional properties of long-lived marrow plasma cells were studied in mice immunized with T-independent type 2 antigens. Alpha (1→3 dextran was used as an antigen for immunization. The mice were immunized by dextran, and the numbers of IgM antibody producing cells were determined by ELISPOT method. The cell phenotype was determined by cytofluorimetric technique. In the area of normal bone marrow lymphocytes ~4% of T and ~85% of B cells were detected. About 35% of the cells expressed a plasmocyte marker (CD138; 3% were CD138+IgM+, and about 6% of the lymphocytes were double-positive for CD138+IgA+. Among spleen lymphocytes, 50% of T and 47% of B cells were detected. About 1.5% lymphocytes were CD138+, and 0.5% were positive for CD138 and IgM. Time kinetics of antibody-producing cells in bone marrow and spleen was different. In spleen populations, the peak amounts of antibody-secreting cells have been shown on the day 4; the process abated by the day 28. Vice versa, the numbers of the antibody-producing cells in bone marrow started to increase on the day 4. The process reached its maximum on day 14, and after 28th day became stationary. The in vitro experiments have shown that supplementation of bone marrow cells from immune mice with dextran did not influence their functional activity. It was previously shown for cells responding to T-dependent antigens only. A specific marker for the long-lived plasma cells is still unknown. However, these cells possess a common CD138 marker specific for all plasma cells. A method for isolation of bone marrow CD138+ cells was developed. The CD138+ cells were of 87-97% purity, being enriched in long-lived bone marrow cells, and produced monospecific antibodies. 

  1. Evidences of early senescence in multiple myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud André

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In multiple myeloma, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells support myeloma cell growth. Previous studies have suggested that direct and indirect interactions between malignant cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells result in constitutive abnormalities in the bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. DESIGN AND METHODS: The aims of this study were to investigate the constitutive abnormalities in myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells and to evaluate the impact of new treatments. RESULTS: We demonstrated that myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells have an increased expression of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, increased cell size, reduced proliferation capacity and characteristic expression of senescence-associated secretory profile members. We also observed a reduction in osteoblastogenic capacity and immunomodulatory activity and an increase in hematopoietic support capacity. Finally, we determined that current treatments were able to partially reduce some abnormalities in secreted factors, proliferation and osteoblastogenesis. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that myeloma bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells have an early senescent profile with profound alterations in their characteristics. This senescent state most likely participates in disease progression and relapse by altering the tumor microenvironment.

  2. CD34+ cells represent highly functional endothelial progenitor cells in murine bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs were shown to have angiogenic potential contributing to neovascularization. However, a clear definition of mouse EPCs by cell surface markers still remains elusive. We hypothesized that CD34 could be used for identification and isolation of functional EPCs from mouse bone marrow. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD34(+ cells, c-Kit(+/Sca-1(+/Lin(- (KSL cells, c-Kit(+/Lin(- (KL cells and Sca-1(+/Lin(- (SL cells were isolated from mouse bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs using fluorescent activated cell sorting. EPC colony forming capacity and differentiation capacity into endothelial lineage were examined in the cells. Although CD34(+ cells showed the lowest EPC colony forming activity, CD34(+ cells exhibited under endothelial culture conditions a more adherent phenotype compared with the others, demonstrating the highest mRNA expression levels of endothelial markers vWF, VE-cadherin, and Flk-1. Furthermore, a dramatic increase in immediate recruitment of cells to the myocardium following myocardial infarction and systemic cell injection was observed for CD34(+ cells comparing with others, which could be explained by the highest mRNA expression levels of key homing-related molecules Integrin β2 and CXCR4 in CD34(+ cells. Cell retention and incorporation into the vasculature of the ischemic myocardium was also markedly increased in the CD34(+ cell-injected group, giving a possible explanation for significant reduction in fibrosis area, significant increase in neovascularization and the best cardiac functional recovery in this group in comparison with the others. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that mouse CD34(+ cells may represent a functional EPC population in bone marrow, which could benefit the investigation of therapeutic EPC biology.

  3. Beneficial effects of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in naturally occurring tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Kenneth Whealands Smith

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries are a common age-related degenerative condition where current treatment strategies fail to restore functionality and normal quality of life. This disease also occurs naturally in horses, with many similarities to human tendinopathy making it an ideal large animal model for human disease. Regenerative approaches are increasingly used to improve outcome involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, supported by clinical data where injection of autologous bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs suspended in marrow supernatant into injured tendons has halved the re-injury rate in racehorses. We hypothesized that stem cell therapy induces a matrix more closely resembling normal tendon than the fibrous scar tissue formed by natural repair. Twelve horses with career-ending naturally-occurring superficial digital flexor tendon injury were allocated randomly to treatment and control groups. 1X10(7 autologous BM-MSCs suspended in 2 ml of marrow supernatant were implanted into the damaged tendon of the treated group. The control group received the same volume of saline. Following a 6 month exercise programme horses were euthanized and tendons assessed for structural stiffness by non-destructive mechanical testing and for morphological and molecular composition. BM-MSC treated tendons exhibited statistically significant improvements in key parameters compared to saline-injected control tendons towards that of normal tendons and those in the contralateral limbs. Specifically, treated tendons had lower structural stiffness (p<0.05 although no significant difference in calculated modulus of elasticity, lower (improved histological scoring of organisation (p<0.003 and crimp pattern (p<0.05, lower cellularity (p<0.007, DNA content (p<0.05, vascularity (p<0.03, water content (p<0.05, GAG content (p<0.05, and MMP-13 activity (p<0.02. Treatment with autologous MSCs in marrow supernatant therefore provides significant benefits compared to untreated tendon repair

  4. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  5. dlk1/FA1 regulates the function of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by modulating gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and immune response-related factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M.; Boissy, Patrice; Tan, Qihua

    2007-01-01

    HG-U133A microarrays. In response to Dlk1 expression, 128 genes were significantly up-regulated (with >2-fold; p immune response-related factors, including pro-inflammatory cytokines, in addition to factors involved in the complement system......, apoptosis, and cell adhesion. Also, addition of purified FA1 to hMSC up-regulated the same factors in a dose-dependent manner. As biological consequences of up-regulating these immune response-related factors, we showed that the inhibitory effects of dlk1 on osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of h......dlk1/FA1 (delta-like 1/fetal antigen-1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like homeotic protein family whose expression is known to modulate the differentiation signals of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow. We have demonstrated previously that Dlk1 can maintain...

  6. Remodeling of the thoracic aorta after bone marrow cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Alyne; Monteiro, Nemesis; Rocha, Vinícius Novaes; Oliveira, Genilza; Moraes, Alan Cesar; Andrade, Cherley; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; de Carvalho, Laís; Thole, Alessandra; Carvalho, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and display the paracrine effect. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of therapy with bone marrow cells (BMCs) on blood glucose, lipid metabolism and aortic wall remodeling in mice through the administration of a high fat diet and subsequent BMCs transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet (CO group) or an atherogenic diet (AT group). After 16 weeks, the AT group was divided into four groups: an AT 14 days group and AT 21 days group, that were given an injection of vehicle and sacrificed at 14 and 21 days after, respectively; AT-BMC 14 days group and AT-BMC 21 days group that was given an injection of BMCs and sacrificed at 14 and 21 days after. The CO group was sacrificed along with other groups. The BMCs transplant had reduced blood glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol. The Qa (1/mm2) was quantitatively reduced in AT 14 days group, AT 21 days group and was high in AT-BMC 21 days group. The AT 21 days group exhibited increased tunica media and elastic system fibers. The immunolabeling for α-SMA and VEGF showed less immunolabeling in transplanted groups with BMCs. The immunostaining for PCNA seems to be more expressive in the group AT-BMC 21 days group. To conclude, our results support the concept that in mice, the injection of BMCs improve glucose levels, lipid metabolism and remodeling of the aortic wall in animals using atherogenic diet. PMID:25337194

  7. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose.

  8. Mobilization of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in acute coronary syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Wojakowski

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Two hypotheses explain the role of adult progenitor cells in myocardial regeneration. Stem cell plasticity which involves mobilization of stem cells from the bone marrow and other niches, homing to the area of tissue injury and transdifferentiation into functional cardiomyocytes. Alternative hypothesis is based on the observations that bone marrow harbors a heterogenous population of cells positive for CXCR4 - receptor for chemokine SDF-1. This population of non-hematopoietic cells expresses genes specific for early muscle, myocardial and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC. These tissue-committed stem cells circulate in the peripheral blood at low numbers and can be mobilized by hematopoietic cytokines in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Endothelial precursors capable of transforming into mature, functional endothelial cells are present in the pool of peripheral mononuclear cells in circulation. Their number significantly increases in acute myocardial infarction (AMI with subsequent decrease after 1 month, as well as in patients with unstable angina in comparison to stable coronary heart disease (CHD. There are numerous physiological and pathological stimuli which influence the number of circulating EPC such as regular physical activity, medications (statins, PPAR-gamma agonists, estrogens, as well as numerous inflammatory and hematopoietic cytokines. Mobilization of stem cells in AMI involves not only the endothelial progenitors but also hematopoietic, non-hematopoietic stem cells and most probably the mesenchymal cells. In healthy subjects and patients with stable CHD, small number of circulating CD34+, CXCR4+, CD117+, c-met+ and CD34/CD117+ stem cells can be detected. In patients with AMI, a significant increase in CD34+/CXCR4+, CD117+, c-met+ and CD34/CD117+ stem cell number the in peripheral blood was demonstrated with parallel increase in mRNA expression for early cardiac, muscle and endothelial markers in peripheral blood mononuclear

  9. Wnt expression and canonical Wnt signaling in human bone marrow B lymphopoiesis

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    Funderud Steinar

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early B lymphopoiesis in mammals is regulated through close interactions with stromal cells and components of the intracellular matrix in the bone marrow (BM microenvironment. Although B lymphopoiesis has been studied for decades, the factors that are implicated in this process, both autocrine and paracrine, are inadequately explored. Wnt signaling is known to be involved in embryonic development and growth regulation of tissues and cancer. Wnt molecules are produced in the BM, and we here ask whether canonical Wnt signaling has a role in regulating human BM B lymphopoiesis. Results Examination of the mRNA expression pattern of Wnt ligands, Fzd receptors and Wnt antagonists revealed that BM B progenitor cells and stromal cells express a set of ligands and receptors available for induction of Wnt signaling as well as antagonists for fine tuning of this signaling. Furthermore, different B progenitor maturation stages showed differential expression of Wnt receptors and co-receptors, β-catenin, plakoglobin, LEF-1 and TCF-4 mRNAs, suggesting canonical Wnt signaling as a regulator of early B lymphopoiesis. Exogenous Wnt3A induced stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in primary lineage restricted B progenitor cells. Also, Wnt3A inhibited B lymphopoiesis of CD133+CD10- hematopoietic progenitor cells and CD10+ B progenitor cells in coculture assays using a supportive layer of stromal cells. This effect was blocked by the Wnt antagonists sFRP1 or Dkk1. Examination of early events in the coculture showed that Wnt3A inhibits cell division of B progenitor cells. Conclusion These results indicate that canonical Wnt signaling is involved in human BM B lymphopoiesis where it acts as a negative regulator of cell proliferation in a direct or stroma dependent manner.

  10. Ex Vivo Transduction and Transplantation of Bone Marrow Cells for Liver Gene Delivery of α1-Antitrypsin

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hong; Lu, Yuanqing; Witek, Rafal P.; Chang, Lung-Ji; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Jorgensen, Marda,; Petersen, Bryon; Song, Sihong

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cell–based gene therapy holds several unique advantages including avoidance of germline or other undesirable cell transductions. We have previously shown that liver progenitor (oval) cells can be used as a platform for liver gene delivery of human α1-antitrypsin (hAAT). However, this cell source cannot be used in humans for autologous transplantation. In the present study, we tested the feasibility of bone marrow (BM) cell–based liver gene delivery of hAAT. In vitro studies showed ...

  11. Osseous Metaplasia and Bone Marrow Elements in a Case of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Seyma Ozkanli; Asif Yildirim; Ebru Zemheri; Sarp Korcan Keskin; Erem Kaan Basok

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma with osseous metaplasia and bone marrow elements is a relatively rare event in these tumors. We discuss pathological differential diagnosis for this tumor with a review of the literature on this unusual case.

  12. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase overexpression restores the efficiency of bone marrow mononuclear cell-based therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.M.E. Mees (Barend); A. Récalde (Alice); C. Loinard (Céline); D. Tempel (Dennie); M.F. Godinho (Marcia); J. Vilar (Jose Manuel); M.J. van Haperen (Rien); B. Lévy (Bernard); J.S. Silvestre (Jean Sebastien); M.P.G. de Crom (Rini)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) enhance postischemic neovascularization, and their therapeutic use is currently under clinical investigation. However, cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia, lead to the abrogation of BMMNCs

  13. Diabetes irreversibly depletes bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cell subpopulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Januszyk, Michael; Sorkin, Michael; Glotzbach, Jason P; Vial, Ivan N; Maan, Zeshaan N; Rennert, Robert C; Duscher, Dominik; Thangarajah, Hariharan; Longaker, Michael T; Butte, Atul J; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2014-01-01

    .... Here, we examine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (BM-MPCs) that have previously been shown to be important for new blood vessel formation and demonstrate significant deficits in the context of diabetes...

  14. Reducing macrophages to improve bone marrow stromal cell survival in the contused spinal cord.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, G.J.; Nandoe, R.D.S.; Rahiem, S.T.; Hurtado, A.; Roos, R.A.; Grotenhuis, A.; Oudega, M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether reducing macrophage infiltration would improve the survival of allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplanted in the contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord. Treatment with cyclosporine, minocycline, or methylprednisolone all resulted in a significant decrease in

  15. Preimplantation diagnosis: efficient tool for human leukocyte antigen matched bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia

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    Anver Kuliev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is among the most frequent indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD to allow at risk couples reproducing without fear of having an affected child. In addition, those already having the affected child, have also the option to produce an unaffected offspring that may be also a complete human leukocyte antigen (HLA match to affected child to ensure successful bone marrow transplantation. We present here the results of retrospective analysis of 293 PGD cycles for thalassemia, including 144cases of simultaneous HLA typing, resulting in birth of 70 thalassemia-free children and 12 unaffected HLA matched ones, providing their cord blood and/or bone marrow for transplantation treatment of their affected siblings. The present overall experience includes successful cord blood or bone marrow transplantation in more than three dozens of cases with HLA matched stem cells obtained from children born after PGD, demonstrating that PGD is an efficient approach for improving success of bone marrow transplantation treatment for thalassemia.   植入前遗传学诊断(PGD)是地中海贫血(地贫)最常用的疗法,该病患者夫妇无须担心孕儿受到感染。此外,如果已经怀上受到感染的宝宝,他们也可有选择性再生育一个未受感染的后代,提供完全匹配的HLA,来确保骨髓成功移植。本文将提供293个地贫病例的PGD周期诊断结果,包括144例HLA同时配型,有70例宝宝无地贫出生和12例未受感染的HLA配型宝宝出生。将这些健康宝宝的脐带血和/或骨髓取出以完成对他们同胞的移植手术,通过使用经诊断后的,出生宝宝身上取出的HLA配型干细胞,成功完成36例宝宝的脐带或骨髓移植手术。结果表明PGD能有效提高地贫患儿骨髓移植手术的成功率。

  16. B cell development in the bone marrow is regulated by homeostatic feedback exerted by mature B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitit eShahaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis in the B cell compartment is strictly imposed to balance cell production and cell loss. However, it is not clear whether B cell development in the bone marrow (BM is an autonomous process or subjected to regulation by the peripheral B cell compartment. To specifically address this question, we used mice transgenic for human CD20, where effective depletion of B lineage cells is obtained upon administration of mouse-anti-human CD20 antibodies, in the absence of any effect on other cell lineages and/or tissues. We followed the kinetics of B cell return to equilibrium by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry and analyzed the resulting data by mathematical modeling. Labeling was much faster in depleted mice. Compared to control mice, B cell-depleted mice exhibited a higher proliferation rate in the pro-/pre-B compartment, and higher cell death and lower differentiation in the immature B cell compartment. We validated the first result by analysis of the expression of Ki67, the nuclear protein expressed in proliferating cells, and the second using Annexin-V staining. Collectively, our results suggest that B lymphopoiesis is subjected to homeostatic feedback mechanisms imposed by mature B cells in the peripheral compartment.

  17. LacZ and interleukin-3 expression in vivo after retroviral transduction of marrow-derived human osteogenic mesenchymal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allay, J A; Dennis, J E; Haynesworth, S E; Majumdar, M K; Clapp, D W; Shultz, L D; Caplan, A I; Gerson, S L

    1997-08-10

    Human marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (hMPCs), which have the capacity for osteogenic and marrow stromal differentiation, were transduced with the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV)-based retrovirus, vM5LacZ, that contains the LacZ and neo genes. Stable transduction and gene expression occurred in 18% of cells. After culture expansion and selection in G418, approximately 70% of neo(r) hMPCs co-expressed LacZ. G418-selected hMPC retain their osteogenic potential and form bone in vivo when seeded into porous calcium phosphate ceramic cubes implanted subcutaneously into SCID mice. LacZ expression was evident within osteoblasts and osteocytes in bone developing within the ceramics 6 and 9 weeks after implantation. Likewise, hMPCs transduced with human interleukin-3 (hIL-3) cDNA, adhered to ceramic cubes and implanted into SCID mice, formed bone and secreted detectable levels of hIL-3 into the systemic circulation for at least 12 weeks. These data indicate that genetically transduced, culture-expanded bone marrow-derived hMPCs retain a precursor phenotype and maintain similar levels of transgene expression during osteogenic lineage commitment and differentiation in vivo. Because MPCs have been shown to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and tendon, these cells may be a useful target for gene therapy.

  18. Noninvasive optical measurement of bone marrow lesions: a Monte Carlo study on visible human dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu; Li, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow is both the main hematopoietic and important immune organ. Bone marrow lesions (BMLs) may cause a series of severe complications and even myeloma. The traditional diagnosis of BMLs rely on mostly bone marrow biopsy/ puncture, and sometimes MRI, X-ray, and etc., which are either invasive and dangerous, or ionizing and costly. A diagnosis technology with advantages in noninvasive, safe, real-time continuous detection, and low cost is requested. Here we reported our preliminary exploration of feasibility verification of using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in clinical diagnosis of BMLs by Monte Carlo simulation study. We simulated and visualized the light propagation in the bone marrow quantitatively with a Monte Carlo simulation software for 3D voxelized media and Visible Chinese Human data set, which faithfully represents human anatomy. The results indicate that bone marrow actually has significant effects on light propagation. According to a sequence of simulation and data analysis, the optimal source-detector separation was suggested to be narrowed down to 2.8-3.2cm, at which separation the spatial sensitivity distribution of NIRS cover the most region of bone marrow with high signal-to-noise ratio. The display of the sources and detectors were optimized as well. This study investigated the light transport in spine addressing to the BMLs detection issue and reported the feasibility of NIRS detection of BMLs noninvasively in theory. The optimized probe design of the coming NIRS-based BMLs detector is also provided.

  19. [Method for concentrating marrow stem cells using the IBM 2991 washer. Necessary preparation before in vitro treatment of bone marrow by pharmacologic or immunologic means].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, P; Coffe, C; Peters, A

    1983-04-01

    The technique using the IBM 2991 blood cell processor is an effective technique for the concentration of mononuclear cells from large volumes of bone marrow. The marrow cells are layered on to Ficoll Metrizoate using the IBM processing set. The mononuclear cells and CFU-GM recoveries are in close relationship with the hematocrit of the cell suspension processed. Twenty two bone marrows have been collected and purified according to this protocol. The mononuclear cell recovery is an average of 78,3% (range: 44-92%) and the CFU-GM recovery is in average of 67,5% (range: 40-89%). At the end of the procedure the cell viability is satisfying (97,1% +/- 1,7 are trypan blue negatives). When it is necessary to remove from the bone marrow collected either malignant cells prior autologous bone marrow graft or T lymphocytes in an attempt to prevent GVHD in allogeneic BMT, the purity of marrow cell suspension become a fundamental parameter.

  20. Accelerated Functional Recovery after Skeletal Muscle Ischemia-reperfusion Injury using Freshly Isolated Bone Marrow Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-03

    capacity to restore function, neural evoked muscle force or torque (which depends on the integrity of neural, vascular, and muscular elements) is an...Accelerated functional recovery after skeletal muscle ischemiaereperfusion injury using freshly isolated bone marrow cells Benjamin T. Corona, PhD...Available online 3 January 2014 Keywords: Ischemia Reperfusion Stem cell Skeletal muscle Bone marrow Injury a b s t r a c t Background: Relatively little

  1. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Ya-jing Zhou; Jian-min Liu; Shu-ming Wei; Yun-hao Zhang; Zhen-hua Qu; Shu-bo Chen

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-l...

  2. Dendritic cells derived from bone marrow cells fail to acquire and present major histocompatibility complex antigens from other dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Penelope A; Burke, Fiona; Stagg, Andrew J; Knight, Stella C

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells stimulate primary T-cell responses and a major activation route is via presentation of antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. This presentation of pre-processed antigens most likely proceeds through transfer of functional major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens through exosomes, ‘live nibbling’ or apoptotic vesicles. We hypothesized that not all dendritic cell populations may both donate MHC antigen to dendritic cells and present antigens acquired from other dendritic cells. All populations tested, including those derived from bone marrow precursor cells stimulated primary, allogeneic T-cell responses and acted as accessory cells for mitogen stimulation. Populations of responder type, splenic dendritic cells promoted allogeneic responses indirectly but those derived from bone marrow cells blocked rather than promoted T-cell proliferation. To identify mechanisms underlying this difference we studied transfer of I-A antigens between cells. Active, two-way transfer of allogeneic I-A occurred between splenic primary antigen presenting cells including CD8α+ lymphoid dendritic cells, CD8α− myeloid dendritic cells and B220+ cells; all these cell types donated as well as acquired MHC molecules. By contrast, the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells donated I-A antigens but acquired negligible amounts. Thus, dendritic cells derived directly from bone marrow cells may stimulate primary T-cell responses through transferring functional MHC to other dendritic cells but may not be able to acquire and present antigens from other dendritic cells. The evidence suggests that T-cell activation may be blocked by the presence of dendritic cells that have not matured through lymphoid tissues which are unable to acquire and present antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. PMID:18266716

  3. HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELL CONTENT OF VERTEBRAL BODY MARROW USED FOR COMBINED SOLID ORGAN AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Witold B.; Fontes, Paulo A.; Rao, Abdul S.; Winkelstein, Alan; Ricordi, Camillo; Ball, Edward D.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    While cadaveric vertebral bodies (VB) have long been proposed as a suitable source of bone marrow (BM) for transplantation (BMT), they have rarely been used for this purpose. We have infused VB BM immediately following whole organ (WO) transplantation to augment donor cell chimerism. We quantified the hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) content of VB BM as well as BM obtained from the iliac crests (IC) of normal allogeneic donors (ALLO) and from patients with malignancy undergoing autologous marrow harvest (AUTO). Patients undergoing WOIBM transplantation also had AUTO BM harvested in the event that subsequent lymphohematopoietic reconstitution was required. Twenty-four VB BM, 24 IC BM-ALLO, 31 IC AUTO, and 24 IC WO-AUTO were harvested. VB BM was tested 12 to 72 hr after procurement and infused after completion ofWO grafting. IC BM was tested and then used or cryopreserved immediately. HPC were quantified by clonal assay measuring CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-GEMM, and by flow cytometry for CD34+ progenitor cells. On an average, 9 VB were processed during each harvest, and despite an extended processing time the number of viable nucleated cells obtained was significantly higher than that from IC. Furthermore, by HPC content, VB BM was equivalent to IC BM, which is routinely used for BMT. We conclude that VB BM is a clinically valuable source of BM for allogeneic transplantation. PMID:7701582

  4. Blastema from rabbit ear contains progenitor cells comparable to marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabbits have the capacity to regenerate holes in their ears by forming a blastema, a tissue that is made up of a group of undifferentiated cells. The purpose of the present study was to isolate and characterize blastema progenitor cells and compare them with marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Five New Zealand white male rabbits were used in the present study. A 2-mm hole was created in the animal ears. After 4 days, the blastema ring formed in the periphery of the hole was removed and cultivated. The cells were expanded through several subcultures and compared with the MSCs derived from the marrow of same animal in terms of in vitro differentiation capacity, growth kinetics and culture requirements for optimal proliferation. The primary cultures from both cells tended to be heterogeneous. Fibroblastic cells became progressively dominant with advancing passages. Similar to MSCs blastema passaged-3 cells succeeded to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose cell lineages. Even lineage specific genes tended to express in higher level in blastema cells compared to MSCs (p < 0.05. Moreover blastema cells appeared more proliferative; producing more colonies (p < 0.05. While blastema cells showed extensive proliferation in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS, MSCs displayed higher expansion rate at 10% FBS. In conclusion, blastema from rabbit ear contains a population of fibroblastic cells much similar in characteristic to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. However, the two cells were different in the level of lineage-specific gene expression, the growth curve characteristics and the culture requirements.

  5. Vascularization mediated by mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue: a comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Pill

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-engineered constructs are promising to overcome shortage of organ donors and to reconstruct at least parts of injured or diseased tissues or organs. However, oxygen and nutrient supply are limiting factors in many tissues, especially after implantation into the host. Therefore, the development of a vascular system prior to implantation appears crucial. To develop a functional vascular system, different cell types that interact with each other need to be co-cultured to simulate a physiological environment in vitro. This review provides an overview and a comparison of the current knowledge of co-cultures of human endothelial cells (ECs with human adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs or bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs in three dimensional (3D hydrogel matrices. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, BMSCs or ASCs, have been shown to enhance vascular tube formation of ECs and to provide a stabilizing function in addition to growth factor delivery and permeability control for ECs. Although phenotypically similar, MSCs from different tissues promote tubulogenesis through distinct mechanisms. In this report, we describe differences and similarities regarding molecular interactions in order to investigate which of these two cell types displays more favorable characteristics to be used in clinical applications. Our comparative study shows that ASCs as well as BMSCs are both promising cell types to induce vascularization with ECs in vitro and consequently are promising candidates to support in vivo vascularization.

  6. Use of bone marrow derived stem cells in trauma and orthopaedics: A review of current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastides, Philip S; Welck, Matthew J; Khan, Wasim S

    2015-07-18

    There is a considerable amount of interest in the future role of bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMDSCs) and tissue engineering techniques to manage conditions within the musculoskeletal system. Repair of soft tissue and bone defects, in the early stages of injury, may lead to a reduction in progression of symptoms. Furthermore, troublesome soft tissue injuries that are notoriously fraught with problems either in healing or function, could be augmented with such techniques. The aim of this review paper is to look at the advances in such strategies to tackle these problems and assess how BMDSCs, with the aid of growth factors and scaffolds, are being used in vitro, animal and even human models to treat problems within the field of trauma and orthopaedics. There is plenty of evidence that the results are encouraging and thus gaining momentum toward their use in human studies.

  7. Benefits of small volume and small syringe for bone marrow aspirations of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernigou, Philippe; Homma, Yasuhiro; Flouzat Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Poignard, Alexandre; Allain, Jerome; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Helene

    2013-11-01

    Aspirating bone marrow from the iliac crest using small volumes of 1-4 ml with a 10-ml syringe has been historically proposed for harvesting adult mesenchymal stem cells and described as a standard technique to avoid blood dilution. The disadvantage of repeated small aspirations is that there is a significantly increased time to harvest the bone marrow. However, it is not known if a large volume syringe can improve the rate of bone marrow aspiration without increasing blood dilution, thus reducing the quality of the aspirate. We compared the concentrations of mesenchymal stem cells obtained under normal conditions with two different size syringes. Thirty adults (16 men and 14 women with a mean age of 49 ± 14 years) underwent surgery with aspiration of bone marrow from their iliac crest. Bilateral aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of the same patients with a 10-ml syringe and a 50-ml syringe. Cell analysis determined the frequencies of mesenchymal stem cells (as determined by the number of colonies) from each size of syringe. The cell count, progenitor cell concentration (colonies/ml marrow) and progenitor cell frequency (per million nucleated cells) were calculated. All bone marrow aspirates were harvested by the same surgeon. Aspirates of bone marrow demonstrated greater concentrations of mesenchymal stem cells with a 10-ml syringe compared with matched controls using a 50-ml syringe. Progenitor cell concentrations were on average 300 % higher using a 10-ml syringe than matched controls using a 50-ml syringe (p stem cell number in aspirates obtained using a larger volume syringe (50 ml) as compared with a smaller volume syringe (10 ml).

  8. The role of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, B A; Karamsadkar, S S; Khan, Wasim S; Pastides, P

    2010-01-01

    The therapeutic use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) has been applied to many different tissue types that are vulnerable to sports injuries. Avenues of treatment include direct injection of BM-MSCs into the defect, however although minimally invasive, research has highlighted flaws which have been improved upon with the use of scaffolds. BM-MSCs have been applied via many different scaffold types, for example PLGA, collagen gel and coral each with advantages and disadvantages of which can be improved through further research. As a cell source for tissue engineering, BM-MSCs are ideal due to the minimal invasion of aspiration, high in vitro proliferation rate and the ability to maintain their differentiating capacity. The vast majority of these studies are at the small animal stage and therefore further work using larger animal models, and ideally humans is required.

  9. Pathogen reduction through additive-free short-wave UV light irradiation retains the optimal efficacy of human platelet lysate for the expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viau, Sabrina; Chabrand, Lucie; Eap, Sandy; Lorant, Judith; Rouger, Karl; Goudaliez, Francis; Sumian, Chryslain; Delorme, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    We recently developed and characterized a standardized and clinical grade human Platelet Lysate (hPL) that constitutes an advantageous substitute for fetal bovine serum (FBS) for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) expansion required in cell therapy procedures, avoiding xenogenic risks (virological and immunological) and ethical issues. Because of the progressive use of pathogen-reduced (PR) labile blood components, and the requirement of ensuring the viral safety of raw materials for cell therapy products, we evaluated the impact of the novel procedure known as THERAFLEX UV-Platelets for pathogen reduction on hPL quality (growth factors content) and efficacy (as a medium supplement for hMSC expansion). This technology is based on short-wave ultraviolet light (UV-C) that induces non-reversible damages in DNA and RNA of pathogens while preserving protein structures and functions, and has the main advantage of not needing the addition of any photosensitizing additives (that might secondarily interfere with hMSCs). We applied the THERAFLEX UV-Platelets procedure on fresh platelet concentrates (PCs) suspended in platelet additive solution and prepared hPL from these treated PCs. We compared the quality and efficacy of PR-hPL with the corresponding non-PR ones. We found no impact on the content of five cytokines tested (EGF, bFGF, PDGF-AB, VEGF and IGF-1) but a significant decrease in TGF-ß1 (-21%, n = 11, pplatelets to subsequently obtain pathogen-reduced hPL, while preserving its optimal quality and efficacy for hMSC expansion in cell therapy applications.

  10. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells incorporate into the prostate during regrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica R Placencio

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer recurrence involves increased growth of cancer epithelial cells, as androgen dependent prostate cancer progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC following initial therapy. Understanding CRPC prostate regrowth will provide opportunities for new cancer therapies to treat advanced disease.Elevated chemokine expression in the prostate stroma of a castrate resistant mouse model, Tgfbr2(fspKO, prompted us to look at the involvement of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs in prostate regrowth. We identified bone marrow cells recruited to the prostate in GFP-chimeric mice. A dramatic increase in BMDC recruitment for prostate regrowth occurred three days after exogenous testosterone implantation. Recruitment led to incorporation of BMDCs within the prostate epithelia. Immunofluorescence staining suggested BMDCs in the prostate coexpressed androgen receptor; p63, a basal epithelial marker; and cytokeratin 8, a luminal epithelial marker. A subset of the BMDC population, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, were specifically found to be incorporated in the prostate at its greatest time of remodeling. Rosa26 expressing MSCs injected into GFP mice supported MSC fusion with resident prostate epithelial cells through co-localization of β-galactosidase and GFP during regrowth. In a human C4-2B xenograft model of CRPC, MSCs were specifically recruited. Injection of GFP-labeled MSCs supported C4-2B tumor progression by potentiating canonical Wnt signaling. The use of MSCs as a targeted delivery vector for the exogenously expressed Wnt antagonist, secreted frizzled related protein-2 (SFRP2, reduced tumor growth, increased apoptosis and potentiated tumor necrosis.Mesenchymal stem cells fuse with prostate epithelia during the process of prostate regrowth. MSCs recruited to the regrowing prostate can be used as a vehicle for transporting genetic information with potential therapeutic effects on castrate resistant prostate cancer, for instance by

  11. Bone marrow blood vessel ossification and "microvascular dead space" in rat and human long bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisby, Rhonda D

    2014-07-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4-6 month; n=8) and old (22-24 month; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner's Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via μCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from the rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and "normal" vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (possification of bone marrow blood vessels in rats and humans. Ossification presumably results in "microvascular dead space" in regard to loss of patency and vasomotor function as opposed to necrosis. Progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of in vitro biomimicked stem cell 'niche' for regulation of proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to myocardial phenotypes: serum starvation without aid of chemical agents and prevention of spontaneous stem cell transformation enhanced by the matrix environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Hyung; Shin, Sang-Hyun; Li, Tian Zhu; Suh, Hwal

    2016-01-01

    Niche appears important for preventing the spontaneous differentiation or senescence that cells undergo during in vitro expansion. In the present study, it was revealed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) undergo senescence-related differentiation into the myocardial lineage in vitro without any induction treatment. This phenomenon occurred over the whole population of MCSs, much different from conventional differentiation with limited frequency of occurrence, and was accompanied by a change of morphology into large, flat cells with impeded proliferation, which are the representative indications of MSC senescence. By culturing MSCs under several culture conditions, it was determined that induction treatment with 5-azacytidine was not associated with the phenomenon, but the serum-starvation condition, under which proliferation is severely hampered, caused senescence progression and upregulation of cardiac markers. Nevertheless, MSCs gradually developed a myocardial phenotype under normal culture conditions over a prolonged culture period and heterogeneous populations were formed. In perspectives of clinical applications, this must be prevented for fair and consistent outcomes. Hence, the biomimetic 'niche' was constituted for hBM-MSCs by cultivating on a conventionally available extracellular matrix (ECM). Consequently, cells on ECM regained a spindle-shape morphology, increased in proliferation rate by two-fold and showed decreased expression of cardiac markers at both the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, the outcome indicates that progression of MSC senescence may occur via myocardial differentiation during in vitro polystyrene culture, and this can be overcome by employing appropriate ECM culture techniques. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Mouse Genetic Analysis of Bone Marrow Stem Cell Niches: Technological Pitfalls, Challenges, and Translational Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin G; Johnson, Kory R; Robey, Pamela G

    2017-11-14

    The development of mouse genetic tools has made a significant contribution to the understanding of skeletal and hematopoietic stem cell niches in bone marrow (BM). However, many experimental designs (e.g., selections of marker genes, target vector constructions, and choices of reporter murine strains) have unavoidable technological limitations and bias, which lead to experimental discrepancies, data reproducibility issues, and frequent data misinterpretation. Consequently, there are a number of conflicting views relating to fundamental biological questions, including origins and locations of skeletal and hematopoietic stem cells in the BM. In this report, we systematically unravel complicated data interpretations via comprehensive analyses of technological benefits, pitfalls, and challenges in frequently used mouse models and discuss their translational relevance to human stem cell biology. Particularly, we emphasize the important roles of using large human genomic data-informatics in facilitating genetic analyses of mouse models and resolving existing controversies in mouse and human BM stem cell biology. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization, Quantification, and Determination of the Toxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to the Bone Marrow Cells

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    Sae-Yeol-Rim Paik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs have been used to develop iron supplements for improving the bioavailability of iron in patients with iron deficiency, which is one of the most serious nutritional deficiencies in the world. Accurate information about the characteristics, concentration, and cytotoxicity of IONPs to the developmental and reproductive cells enables safe use of IONPs in the supplement industry. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of IONPs in bone marrow cells. We prepared three different types of iron samples (surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs, IONPs, and iron citrate and analyzed their physicochemical properties such as particle size distribution, zeta potential, and morphology. In addition, we examined the cytotoxicity of the IONPs in various kinds of bone marrow cells. We analyzed particle size distribution, zeta potential, iron levels, and subcellular localization of the iron samples in bone marrow cells. Our results showed that the iron samples were not cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells and did not affect the expression of cell surface markers and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced the secretion of cytokines by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs. Our results may be used to investigate the interactions between nanoparticles and cells and tissues and the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  15. Pluripotential marrow cells produce adipocytes when transplanted into steroid-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Q; Wang, G J; Balian, G

    2000-01-01

    The effect of steroids on adipogenesis by D1-BAG, a pluripotent cell cloned from mouse bone marrow and transfected with traceable genes encoding beta-galactosidase and neomycin resistance, was investigated in vitro in culture and in vivo after injection into mice. Treatment of D1-BAG cells in culture with dexamethasone produced an accumulation of lipid vesicles and stimulated expression of the fat cell-specific 422(aP2) mRNA. Fifty-six mice each received 1 x 10(6) D1-BAG cells, either by tail-vein injection or by direct injection into the marrow of the right femur. Another 38 mice received either saline injection or no treatment as controls. Half of the animals in each group were treated with 3 mg/kg of methylprednisolone per week. Analysis of marrow blow-outs by flow cytometry, DNA analysis by PCR, and X-gal stain of histological sections indicated that cells transplanted by either intravenous or intramedullary injection had appeared and persisted in the marrow of host mice. Cell sorting by flow cytometry and staining with Sudan IV demonstrated that steroid treatment produced adipogenesis in 5-9% of transplanted cells. The results indicate that steroid-induced differentiation of potentially osteogenic marrow cells into adipocytes in vivo may contribute to the development of osteoporosis and osteonecrosis.

  16. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Ping; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yin; Li, Jian-Ding; Xie, Jun

    2015-03-01

    An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T7-8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  17. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for improving hematopoietic function: an in vitro and in vivo model. Part 2: Effect on bone marrow microenvironment.

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    Soraya Carrancio

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine how mesenchymal stem cells (MSC could improve bone marrow (BM stroma function after damage, both in vitro and in vivo. Human MSC from 20 healthy donors were isolated and expanded. Mobilized selected CD34(+ progenitor cells were obtained from 20 HSCT donors. For in vitro study, long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC were performed using a etoposide damaged stromal model to test MSC effect in stromal confluence, capability of MSC to lodge in stromal layer as well as some molecules (SDF1, osteopontin, involved in hematopoietic niche maintenance were analyzed. For the in vivo model, 64 NOD/SCID recipients were transplanted with CD34+ cells administered either by intravenous (i.v. or intrabone (i.b. route, with or without BM derived MSC. MSC lodgement within the BM niche was assessed by FISH analysis and the expression of SDF1 and osteopontin by immunohistochemistry. In vivo study showed that when the stromal damage was severe, TP-MSC could lodge in the etoposide-treated BM stroma, as shown by FISH analysis. Osteopontin and SDF1 were differently expressed in damaged stroma and their expression restored after TP-MSC addition. Human in vivo MSC lodgement was observed within BM niche by FISH, but MSC only were detected and not in the contralateral femurs. Human MSC were located around blood vessels in the subendoestal region of femurs and expressed SDF1 and osteopontin. In summary, our data show that MSC can restore BM stromal function and also engraft when a higher stromal damage was done. Interestingly, MSC were detected locally where they were administered but not in the contralateral femur.

  18. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Improving Hematopoietic Function: An In Vitro and In Vivo Model. Part 2: Effect on Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrancio, Soraya; Blanco, Belen; Romo, Carlos; Muntion, Sandra; Lopez-Holgado, Natalia; Blanco, Juan F.; Briñon, Jesus G.; San Miguel, Jesus F.; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin M.; del Cañizo, M. Consuelo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine how mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) could improve bone marrow (BM) stroma function after damage, both in vitro and in vivo. Human MSC from 20 healthy donors were isolated and expanded. Mobilized selected CD34+ progenitor cells were obtained from 20 HSCT donors. For in vitro study, long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) were performed using a etoposide damaged stromal model to test MSC effect in stromal confluence, capability of MSC to lodge in stromal layer as well as some molecules (SDF1, osteopontin,) involved in hematopoietic niche maintenance were analyzed. For the in vivo model, 64 NOD/SCID recipients were transplanted with CD34+ cells administered either by intravenous (IV) or intrabone (IB) route, with or without BM derived MSC. MSC lodgement within the BM niche was assessed by FISH analysis and the expression of SDF1 and osteopontin by immunohistochemistry. In vivo study showed that when the stromal damage was severe, TP-MSC could lodge in the etoposide-treated BM stroma, as shown by FISH analysis. Osteopontin and SDF1 were differently expressed in damaged stroma and their expression restored after TP-MSC addition. Human in vivo MSC lodgement was observed within BM niche by FISH, but MSC only were detected and not in the contralateral femurs. Human MSC were located around blood vessels in the subendoestal region of femurs and expressed SDF1 and osteopontin. In summary, our data show that MSC can restore BM stromal function and also engraft when a higher stromal damage was done. Interestingly, MSC were detected locally where they were administered but not in the contralateral femur. PMID:22028841

  19. The bone marrow stem cell niche grows up: mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages move in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehninger, Armin; Trumpp, Andreas

    2011-03-14

    Stem cell niches are defined as the cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate stem cell function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. This includes control of the balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as the engagement of specific programs in response to stress. In mammals, the best understood niche is that harboring bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Recent studies have expanded the number of cell types contributing to the HSC niche. Perivascular mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages now join the previously identified sinusoidal endothelial cells, sympathetic nerve fibers, and cells of the osteoblastic lineage to form similar, but distinct, niches that harbor dormant and self-renewing HSCs during homeostasis and mediate stem cell mobilization in response to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.

  20. Mast cell repopulation of the peritoneal cavity: contribution of mast cell progenitors versus bone marrow derived committed mast cell precursors

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    Pastor Maria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cells have recently gained new importance as immunoregulatory cells that are involved in numerous pathological processes. One result of these processes is an increase in mast cell numbers at peripheral sites. This study was undertaken to determine the mast cell response in the peritoneal cavity and bone marrow during repopulation of the peritoneal cavity in rats. Results Two mast cell specific antibodies, mAb AA4 and mAb BGD6, were used to distinguish the committed mast cell precursor from more mature mast cells. The peritoneal cavity was depleted of mast cells using distilled water. Twelve hours after distilled water injection, very immature mast cells could be isolated from the blood and by 48 hours were present in the peritoneal cavity. At this same time the percentage of mast cells in mitosis increased fourfold. Mast cell depletion of the peritoneal cavity also reduced the total number of mast cells in the bone marrow, but increased the number of mast cell committed precursors. Conclusions In response to mast cell depletion of the peritoneal cavity, a mast cell progenitor is released into the circulation and participates in repopulation of the peritoneal cavity, while the committed mast cell precursor is retained in the bone marrow.

  1. Encapsulated Whole Bone Marrow Cells Improve Survival in Wistar Rats after 90% Partial Hepatectomy

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    Carolina Uribe-Cruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. The use of bone marrow cells has been suggested as an alternative treatment for acute liver failure. In this study, we investigate the effect of encapsulated whole bone marrow cells in a liver failure model. Methods. Encapsulated cells or empty capsules were implanted in rats submitted to 90% partial hepatectomy. The survival rate was assessed. Another group was euthanized at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after hepatectomy to study expression of cytokines and growth factors. Results. Whole bone marrow group showed a higher than 10 days survival rate compared to empty capsules group. Gene expression related to early phase of liver regeneration at 6 hours after hepatectomy was decreased in encapsulated cells group, whereas genes related to regeneration were increased at 12, 24, and 48 hours. Whole bone marrow group showed lower regeneration rate at 72 hours and higher expression and activity of caspase 3. In contrast, lysosomal-β-glucuronidase activity was elevated in empty capsules group. Conclusions. The results show that encapsulated whole bone marrow cells reduce the expression of genes involved in liver regeneration and increase those responsible for ending hepatocyte division. In addition, these cells favor apoptotic cell death and decrease necrosis, thus increasing survival.

  2. Bone marrow combined with dental bud cells promotes tooth regeneration in miniature pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Lin, Hsin-Chi; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Lin, Feng-Huei; Chen, Min-Huey; Wu, Chang-Chin; Chang, Hao-Hueng

    2011-02-01

    Growth factors and morphogens secreted by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) of bone marrow fluid may promote tooth regeneration. Accordingly, a tissue engineering approach was utilized to develop an economical strategy for obtaining the growth factors and morphogens from BMSCs. Unerupted second molar tooth buds harvested from miniature pigs were cultured in vitro to obtain dental bud cells (DBCs). Bone marrow fluid, which contains BMSCs, was collected from the porcine mandible before operation. DBCs suspended in bone marrow fluid were seeded into a gelatin/chondoitin-6-sulfate/hyaluronan tri-copolymer scaffold (GCHT scaffold). The DBCs/bone marrow fluid/GCHT scaffold was autografted into the original alveolar sockets of the pigs. Radiographic and histological examinations were applied to identify the structure of regenerated tooth at 40 weeks postimplantation. The present results showed that one pig developed a complete tooth with crown, root, pulp, enamel, dentin, odontoblast, cementum, blood vessel, and periodontal ligament in indiscriminate shape. Three animals had an unerupted tooth that expressed dentin matrix protein-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and osteopontin; and two other pigs also had dental-like structure with dentin tubules. This study reveals that DBCs adding bone marrow fluid and a suitable scaffold can promote the tooth regeneration in autogenic cell transplantation. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Use of bone marrow derived stem cells in a fracture non-union

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    Binod C. Raulo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an attempt of using in vitro cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from bone marrow in joining of a fracture non-union. Bone marrow cells were obtained and differentially centrifuged for MSCs that were grown in vitro in mesenchymal stem cell basal medium aseptically, for 10 d. The cell mass was injected around the fracture non-union. Healthy conditions of development of tissue regeneration at the trauma site and due bone joining were recorded. It is concluded that in vitro cultured MSCs had a blithesome effect on the fracture non-union.

  4. Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone marrow necrosis: a case report

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    Khoshnaw Najmaddin SH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bone marrow necrosis is a clinicopathological condition diagnosed most often at postmortem examination, but it is also seen during the course of malignancy and is not always associated with a poor prognosis. The morphological features of bone marrow necrosis are disruption of the normal marrow architecture and necrosis of myeloid tissue and medullary stroma. Non-malignant conditions associated with bone marrow necrosis are sickle cell anemia, infections, drugs (sulfasalazine, interferon α, all-trans retinoic acid, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and fludarabine, disseminated intravascular coagulation, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute graft versus host diseases. The malignant causes are leukemia, lymphoma and metastatic carcinomas. Herein we report the case of a patient with precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow necrosis at initial presentation. Case presentation A 10-year-old Kurdish boy was presented with generalized bone pain and fever of 1 month’s duration which was associated with sweating, easy fatigability, nose bleeding, breathlessness and severe weight loss. On examination, we observed pallor, tachypnea, tachycardia, low blood pressure, fever, petechial hemorrhage, ecchymoses, tortuous dilated veins over the chest and upper part of abdomen, multiple small cervical lymph node enlargements, mildly enlarged spleen, palpable liver and gross abdominal distention. Blood analysis revealed pancytopenia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging results showed mediastinal widening on a planar chest X-ray and diffuse focal infiltration of the axial bone marrow on magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral vertebrae. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy examination showed extensive bone marrow necrosis. Immunophenotyping analysis of the bone marrow biopsy confirmed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as CD3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl

  5. Bone marrow MR imaging as predictors of outcome in hemopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Jun; Cheng, Li-Na; Duan, Xiao-Hui; Liang, Bi-Ling [Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Griffith, James F. [Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR (China); Xu, Hong-Gui [Sun Yat-sen University, Department of Pediatrics, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of femoral marrow MR imaging as predictor of outcome for hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in beta-thalassemia major. MR imaging of the proximal femur, including T1- and T2-weighted spin echo and short-tau inversion recovery and in-phase and out-of-phase fast field echo images, was prospectively performed in 27 thalassemia major patients being prepared for HSCT. The area of red marrow and its percentage of the proximal femur were measured, and the presence of marrow hemosiderosis was assessed. Age-adjusted multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between red marrow area percentage and marrow hemosiderosis and HSCT outcome. Red area percentage were less in patients with successful (90.25{+-}4.14%) compared to unsuccessful transplants (94.54% {+-}2.93%; p=0.01). Red marrow area percentage correlated positively with duration of symptoms(r=0.428, p=0.026) and serum ferritin (r=0.511, p=0.006). In multivariate-adjusted logistic regression analyses, red marrow area percentage was significantly inversely associated with successful HSCT (OR=1.383, 95% CI: 1.059-1.805, p=0.005). Marrow hemosidersosis and duration of sympotms and serum ferritin were not associated with HSCT outcome(p=0.174, 0.974, 0.762, respectively). Red marrow area percentage of proximal femur on MR imaging is a useful predictor of HSCT outcome. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of bone marrow plasma cell infiltrates in multiple myeloma: the added value of CD138 immunohistochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Quran, Samer Z.; Yang, Lijun; Magill, James M.; Braylan, Raul C.; Douglas-Nikitin, Vonda K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Assessment of bone marrow involvement by malignant plasma cells is an important element in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias. Microscope-based differential counts of bone marrow aspirates are used as the primary method to evaluate bone marrow plasma cell percentages. However, multiple myeloma is often a focal process, a fact that impacts the accuracy and reliability of the results of bone marrow plasma cell percentages obtained by differential counts of bone marrow aspirate smears. Moreover, the interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of counting bone marrow plasma cells microscopically has not been adequately tested. CD138 allows excellent assessment of plasma cell numbers and distribution in bone marrow biopsies. We compared estimates of plasma cell percentages in bone marrow aspirates and in hematoxylin-eosin– and CD138-stained bone marrow biopsy sections (CD138 sections) in 79 bone marrows from patients with multiple myeloma. There was a notable discrepancy in bone marrow plasma cell percentages using the different methods of observation. In particular, there was a relatively poor concordance of plasma cell percentage estimation between aspirate smears and CD138 sections. Estimates of plasma cell percentage using CD138 sections demonstrated the highest interobserver concordance. This observation was supported by computer-assisted image analysis. In addition, CD138 expression highlighted patterns of plasma cell infiltration indicative of neoplasia even in the absence of plasmacytosis. We conclude that examination of CD138 sections should be considered for routine use in the estimation of plasma cell load in the bone marrow. PMID:17714757

  7. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal ...

  8. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived Mast Cell Precursors from Mice.

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    Steffen K Meurer

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC or mucosal (MMC type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM. The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC. These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research.

  9. Bone marrow harvest versus peripheral stem cell collection for haemopoietic stem cell donation in healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiq, Samreen; Pamphilon, Derwood; Brunskill, Susan; Doree, Carolyn; Hyde, Chris; Stanworth, Simon

    2009-01-21

    Haemopoietic stem cells can be collected from a donor either as a bone marrow harvest or by peripheral blood collection. Both techniques have risks for the donor. The aim of this review was to identify the adverse effects of haemopoietic stem cell donation and to compare the tolerability and safety of the two methods. We searched bibliographic databases including the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2008, issue 2), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to May 2008. We also searched reference lists of articles and contacted experts in the field. Randomised controlled trials enrolling haemopoietic stem cell donors and evaluating the different methods of donating haemopoietic stem cells were eligible. Two authors independently screened studies for inclusion. We extracted data and evaluated methodological quality. Quantitative analysis was not possible for most outcomes, but where used we preferred random-effects models due to the variability between the included studies. Six trials (807 donors) were eligible: all were substudies, or constituent parts of, larger randomised controlled trials of bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell allogeneic transplantation. No included trial was designed solely to measure and assess the experience of stem cell donors. The donors in all studies were related to the stem cell recipient. Overall, both types of donors experienced pain subsequent to donation, and psychological morbidity. The trend was for bone marrow donors to experience more pain at the donation site, more overall adverse events, and more days of restricted activity. They were also more likely to require hospitalisation than peripheral blood stem cell donors. In contrast, peripheral blood stem cell donors experienced more pain prior to donation, which may be related to the pre-donation administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). The methodological quality of the studies was poor and indicated limitations due to the

  10. Polyamines affect histamine synthesis during early stages of IL-3-induced bone marrow cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Faroldi, Gianni; Correa-Fiz, Florencia; Abrighach, Hicham; Berdasco, María; Fraga, Mario F; Esteller, Manel; Urdiales, José L; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Fajardo, Ignacio

    2009-09-01

    Mast cells synthesize and store histamine, a key immunomodulatory mediator. Polyamines are essential for every living cell. Previously, we detected an antagonistic relationship between the metabolisms of these amines in established mast cell and basophilic cell lines. Here, we used the IL-3-driven mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell (BMMC) culture system to further investigate this antagonism in a mast cell model of deeper physiological significance. Polyamines and histamine levels followed opposite profiles along the bone marrow cell cultures leading to BMMCs. alpha-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO)-induced polyamine depletion resulted in an upregulation of histidine decarboxylase (HDC, the histamine-synthesizing enzyme) expression and activity, accompanied by increased histamine levels, specifically during early stages of these cell cultures, where an active histamine synthesis process occurs. In contrast, DFMO did not induce any effect in either HDC activity or histamine levels of differentiated BMMCs or C57.1 mast cells, that exhibit a nearly inactive histamine synthesis rate. Sequence-specific DNA methylation analysis revealed that the DFMO-induced HDC mRNA upregulation observed in early bone marrow cell cultures is not attributable to a demethylation of the gene promoter caused by the pharmacological polyamine depletion. Taken together, the results support an inverse relationship between histamine and polyamine metabolisms during the bone marrow cell cultures leading to BMMCs and, moreover, suggest that the regulation of the histamine synthesis occurring during the early stages of these cultures depends on the concentrations of polyamines. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Selective inhibition of B lymphocytes in TBTC-treated human bone marrow long-term culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carfi', M.; Bowe, G.; Pieters, R.; Gribaldo, L.

    2010-01-01

    Tributyltin chloride (TBTC) is well known for its immunotoxic effect, in particular towards immature thymocytes. TBTC is also known to induce adipocyte differentiation in primary human bone marrow cultures, which is reflected in the decrease in a number of adipocyte-derived cytokines, chemokines and

  12. The Human Figure Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy L.; Beck, Vanessa L.; VanZutphen, Kelly H.; Long, Janet K.; Spengler, Gisele

    2003-01-01

    There is little research on the psychological impact of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on family members. This study uses the Human Figure Drawing (HFD) to measure siblings' emotional distress toward BMT. Among the siblings, feelings of isolation, anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem emerged as major themes. Findings indicate the…

  13. Primary Bone Marrow Large B-cell Lymphoma Presenting with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

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    Sin-Syue Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary bone marrow lymphoma is an extremely rare disease. Its unusual clinical manifestations, such as hemophagocytic syndrome, frequently delay correct disease diagnosis, thus postponing treatment. Here, we reported a 76-year-old woman presenting with intermittent night fever and jaundice for 2 weeks, accompanied with hepatosplenomegaly and pancytopenia. Despite antibiotics treatment, the patient's fever persisted. Computed tomography showed hepatosplenomegaly without lymphadenopathy, and bone marrow aspiration and biopsy revealed a large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. After chemotherapy with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisolone, both jaundice and pancytopenia recovered to normal. After 6 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient remained in complete remission for 18 months after diagnosis. Our experience indicates that clinicians should consider performing a timely bone marrow examination on patients with unknown fever and pancytopenia, particularly given that delayed diagnosis of primary bone marrow lymphoma can make treatment of this rare disease substantially more challenging.

  14. An improved protocol for isolation and culture of mesenchymal stem cells from mouse bone marrow

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    Shuo Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from bone marrow are main cell source for tissue repair and engineering, and vehicles of cell-based gene therapy. Unlike other species, mouse bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs are difficult to harvest and grow due to the low MSCs yield. We report here a standardised, reliable, and easy-to-perform protocol for isolation and culture of mouse BM-MSCs. There are five main features of this protocol. (1 After flushing bone marrow out of the marrow cavity, we cultured the cells with fat mass without filtering and washing them. Our method is simply keeping the MSCs in their initial niche with minimal disturbance. (2 Our culture medium is not supplemented with any additional growth factor. (3 Our method does not need to separate cells using flow cytometry or immunomagnetic sorting techniques. (4 Our method has been carefully tested in several mouse strains and the results are reproducible. (5 We have optimised this protocol, and list detailed potential problems and trouble-shooting tricks. Using our protocol, the isolated mouse BM-MSCs were strongly positive for CD44 and CD90, negative CD45 and CD31, and exhibited tri-lineage differentiation potentials. Compared with the commonly used protocol, our protocol had higher success rate of establishing the mouse BM-MSCs in culture. Our protocol may be a simple, reliable, and alternative method for culturing MSCs from mouse bone marrow tissues.

  15. Tracking intracavernously injected adipose-derived stem cells to bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, G; Qiu, X; Fandel, T; Banie, L; Wang, G; Lue, T F; Lin, C-S

    2011-01-01

    The intracavernous (i.c.) injection of stem cells (SCs) has been shown to improve erectile function in various erectile dysfunction (ED) animal models. However, the tissue distribution of the injected cells remains unknown. In this study we tracked i.c.-injected adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in various tissues. Rat paratesticular fat was processed for ADSC isolation and culture. The animals were then subject to cavernous nerve (CN) crush injury or sham operation, followed by i.c. injection of 1 million autologous or allogeneic ADSCs that were labeled with 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU). Another group of rats received i.c. injection of EdU-labeled allogeneic penile smooth muscle cells (PSMCs). At 2 and 7 days post injection, penises and femoral bone marrow were processed for histological analyses. Whole femoral bone marrows were also analyzed for EdU-positive cells by flow cytometry. The results show that ADSCs exited the penis within days of i.c. injection and migrated preferentially to bone marrow. Allogenicity did not affect the bone marrow appearance of ADSCs at either 2 or 7 days, whereas CN injury reduced the number of ADSCs in bone marrow significantly at 7 but not 2 days. The significance of these results in relation to SC therapy for ED is discussed.

  16. Tracking Intracavernously Injected Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Bone Marrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guiting; Qiu, Xuefeng; Fandel, Thomas; Banie, Lia; Wang, Guifang; Lue, Tom F.; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2012-01-01

    Intracavernous (IC) injection of stem cells (SCs) has been shown to improve erectile function in various erectile dysfunction (ED) animal models. However, the tissue distribution of the injected cells remains unknown. In this study we tracked IC injected adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in various tissues. Rat paratesticular fat was processed for ADSC isolation and culture. The animals were then subject to cavernous nerve (CN) crush injury or sham operation, followed by IC injection of one million autologous or allogeneic ADSCs that were labeled with 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU). Another group of rats received IC injection of EdU-labeled allogeneic penile smooth muscle cells (PSMCs). At 2 and 7 days post-injection, penises and femoral bone marrow were processed for histological analyses. Whole femoral bone marrows were also analyzed for EdU-positive cells by flow cytometry. The results show that ADSCs exited the penis within days of IC injection and migrated preferentially to bone marrow. Allogenicity did not affect ADSC's bone marrow appearance either at 2 or 7 days, while CN injury reduced the number of ADSCs in bone marrow significantly at 7 but not 2 days. The significance of these results in relation to SC therapy for ED is discussed. PMID:21796145

  17. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

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    Yuka Tanaka

    Full Text Available In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+ cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+ c-Kit(+ hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+ c-Kit(+ cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  18. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuka; Inoue-Yokoo, Tomoko; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+) cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+) c-Kit(+) hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+) c-Kit(+) cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  19. Differentiation of mouse bone marrow derived stem cells toward microglia-like cells

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    Stolzing Alexandra

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglia, the macrophages of the brain, have been implicated in the causes of neurodegenerative diseases and display a loss of function during aging. Throughout life, microglia are replenished by limited proliferation of resident microglial cells. Replenishment by bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is still under debate. In this context, we investigated the differentiation of mouse microglia from bone marrow (BM stem cells. Furthermore, we looked at the effects of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L, astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM and GM-CSF on the differentiation to microglia-like cells. Methods We assessed in vitro-derived microglia differentiation by marker expression (CD11b/CD45, F4/80, but also for the first time for functional performance (phagocytosis, oxidative burst and in situ migration into living brain tissue. Integration, survival and migration were assessed in organotypic brain slices. Results The cells differentiated from mouse BM show function, markers and morphology of primary microglia and migrate into living brain tissue. Flt3L displays a negative effect on differentiation while GM-CSF enhances differentiation. Conclusion We conclude that in vitro-derived microglia are the phenotypic and functional equivalents to primary microglia and could be used in cell therapy.

  20. Preferential recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells to rat palatal wounds but not to skin wounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, J.; Rheden, R.E.M. van; Katsaros, C.; Torensma, R.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to oral mucosa wounds and skin wounds. BACKGROUND: Bone marrow-derived cells are known to contribute to wound healing, and are able to differentiate in many different tissue-specific cell types. As wound healing in oral mucosa

  1. Single-cell analysis of the fate of c-kit-positive bone marrow cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarna, Anna; Sanada, Fumihiro; Matsuda, Alex; Kim, Junghyun; Signore, Sergio; Pereira, João D.; Sorrentino, Andrea; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Cannatà, Antonio; Hosoda, Toru; Rota, Marcello; Crea, Filippo; Anversa, Piero; Leri, Annarosa

    2017-10-01

    The plasticity of c-kit-positive bone marrow cells (c-kit-BMCs) in tissues different from their organ of origin remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that c-kit-BMCs are functionally heterogeneous and only a subgroup of these cells possesses cardiomyogenic potential. Population-based assays fall short of identifying the properties of individual stem cells, imposing on us the introduction of single cell-based approaches to track the fate of c-kit-BMCs in the injured heart; they included viral gene-tagging, multicolor clonal-marking and transcriptional profiling. Based on these strategies, we report that single mouse c-kit-BMCs expand clonally within the infarcted myocardium and differentiate into specialized cardiac cells. Newly-formed cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts and c-kit-BMCs showed in their genome common sites of viral integration, providing strong evidence in favor of the plasticity of a subset of BMCs expressing the c-kit receptor. Similarly, individual c-kit-BMCs, which were infected with multicolor reporters and injected in infarcted hearts, formed cardiomyocytes and vascular cells organized in clusters of similarly colored cells. The uniform distribution of fluorescent proteins in groups of specialized cells documented the polyclonal nature of myocardial regeneration. The transcriptional profile of myogenic c-kit-BMCs and whole c-kit-BMCs was defined by RNA sequencing. Genes relevant for engraftment, survival, migration, and differentiation were enriched in myogenic c-kit-BMCs, a cell subtype which could not be assigned to a specific hematopoietic lineage. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that the bone marrow comprises a category of cardiomyogenic, vasculogenic and/or fibrogenic c-kit-positive cells and a category of c-kit-positive cells that retains an undifferentiated state within the damaged heart.

  2. Physiology of Continuous Bone Marrow Culture Derived Permanent Granulocyte-Macrophage Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    continuous marrow cultures. As shown in the accompAnying figures, there was no effect of Lithium Chloride (Figure 2), Sodium Selenite (Figure 3...tosis, respiratory burst, superoxide generation, degranulation and bactericidal capacity. When injected at 107 cells per day over 5 days these cells

  3. [Proliferation of bone marrow cells upon exposure to constant magnetic fields of ultra-high strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzhizhovskiĭ, A D; Galaktionova, G V

    1978-06-01

    A study was made of the 0.5--24 hour effects of the stable magnetic field (SMF), with 9.9--42.4 kOe strength and 0.2--3.5 kOe/cm strength gradient, on the mitotic activity and bone marrow cell number in mice. Short-term treatments were shown to stimulate, and prolonged ones to inhibit mitotic activity, the degree of inhibition correlating with the strength and strenght gradient of SMF. The rate of mitotic index recovery was the smaller the longer the treatment and the higher the strength of SMF. With the most pronounced inhibition of the mitotic activity, the number of bone marrow cells was seen reduced. No increased frequency of aberrant mitoses in bone marrow cells has been noticed following the effect of SMF.

  4. Different Procoagulant Activity of Therapeutic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Placental Decidua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Guido; Ignatowicz, Lech; Catar, Rusan; Luecht, Christian; Sadeghi, Behnam; Hamad, Osama; Jungebluth, Philipp; Dragun, Duska; Schmidtchen, Artur; Ringdén, Olle

    2015-10-01

    While therapeutic mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have usually been obtained from bone marrow, perinatal tissues have emerged as promising new sources of cells for stromal cell therapy. In this study, we present a first safety follow-up on our clinical experience with placenta-derived decidual stromal cells (DSCs), used as supportive immunomodulatory and regenerative therapy for patients with severe complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that DSCs are smaller, almost half the volume of MSCs, which may favor microvascular passage. DSCs also show different hemocompatibility, with increased triggering of the clotting cascade after exposure to human blood and plasma in vitro. After infusion of DSCs in HSCT patients, we observed a weak activation of the fibrinolytic system, but the other blood activation markers remained stable, excluding major adverse events. Expression profiling identified differential levels of key factors implicated in regulation of hemostasis, such as a lack of prostacyclin synthase and increased tissue factor expression in DSCs, suggesting that these cells have intrinsic blood-activating properties. The stronger triggering of the clotting cascade by DSCs could be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft reconstitution before infusion, for example, by use of low-dose heparin anticoagulant in the cell infusion buffer. We conclude that DSCs are smaller and have stronger hemostatic properties than MSCs, thus triggering stronger activation of the clotting system, which can be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft preparation before infusion. Our results highlight the importance of hemocompatibility safety testing for every novel cell therapy product before clinical use, when applied using systemic delivery.

  5. Differential bone marrow homing capacity of VLA-4 and CD38 high expressing chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

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    Gabriele Brachtl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: VLA-4 and CD38 predict a poor clinical outcome in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. We used CLL samples with discordant VLA-4/CD38 risk to address their individual roles in human bone marrow infiltration (BM, CLL cell homing to murine BM, and in supportive CLL cell-stromal cell interactions. METHODS: VLA-4, CD38, and Ki-67 expression was measured in CLL cells from peripheral blood (PB and bone marrow (BM aspirates. CLL BM infiltration rates, routinely determined by Pathology, were correlated to VLA-4 and CD38 expression. Short-term homing capacity of CLL cells was evaluated by adoptive transfer experiments. CLL cell viability and adhesion in stromal cell co-culture was determined. RESULTS: About 20% of CLL samples in our cohort displayed discordant VLA-4 and CD38 risk, with either high VLA-4 and low CD38 risk or vice versa. Using particularly such samples, we observed that VLA-4, and not CD38, was responsible for recirculation of CLL cells to murine BM. Human BM infiltration was also significantly higher in patients with high VLA-4 risk but not high CD38 risk. However, both molecules acted as independent prognostic markers. While both VLA-4 and CD38 expression were increased in BM-derived CLL cells, and VLA-4+ and CD38+ subpopulations showed enriched Ki-67 expression, VLA-4 did not contribute to CLL cell protection by stromal cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Our data argue for a prominent role of VLA-4 but not CD38 expression in the homing of CLL cells to BM niches and in human BM infiltration, but only a limited role in their protection by stromal cells.

  6. The establishment of a bank of stored clinical bone marrow stromal cell products

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    Sabatino Marianna

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are being used to treat a variety of conditions. For many applications a supply of cryopreserved products that can be used for acute therapy is needed. The establishment of a bank of BMSC products from healthy third party donors is described. Methods The recruitment of healthy subjects willing to donate marrow for BMSC production and the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP used for assessing potential donors, collecting marrow, culturing BMSCs and BMSC cryopreservation are described. Results Seventeen subjects were enrolled in our marrow collection protocol for BMSC production. Six of the 17 subjects were found to be ineligible during the donor screening process and one became ill and their donation was cancelled. Approximately 12 ml of marrow was aspirated from one posterior iliac crest of 10 donors; one donor donated twice. The BMSCs were initially cultured in T-75 flasks and then expanded for three passages in multilayer cell factories. The final BMSC product was packaged into units of 100 × 106 viable cells, cryopreserved and stored in a vapor phase liquid nitrogen tank under continuous monitoring. BMSC products meeting all lot release criteria were obtained from 8 of the 11 marrow collections. The rate of growth of the primary cultures was similar for all products except those generated from the two oldest donors. One lot did not meet the criteria for final release; its CD34 antigen expression was greater than the cut off set at 5%. The mean number of BMSC units obtained from each donor was 17 and ranged from 3 to 40. Conclusions The production of large numbers of BMSCs from bone marrow aspirates of healthy donors is feasible, but is limited by the high number of donors that did not meet eligibility criteria and products that did not meet lot release criteria.

  7. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

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    Basem M. Abdallah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and prospective isolation of BMSCs and committed progenitors are lacking. Here, we compared the transcriptome profile of CD markers expressed at baseline and during the course of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of two well-characterized osteogenic-committed murine BMSCs (mBMSCBone and adipogenic-committed mBMSCs (mBMSCAdipo, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a core set of canonical mBMSC CD markers with comparable expression levels in mBMSCBone and mBMSCAdipo at baseline and during their differentiation. We identified 11 CD markers that are differentially expressed between mBMSCAdipo and mBMSCBone. Among these, we identified osteoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSCBone: CD34, CD54, CD73, CD132, CD200, CD227 and adipoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSCAdipo: CD53, CD80, CD134, CD141 and CD212. FACS analysis confirmed these results. We selected CD34 for further analysis. CD34 was expressed at baseline of mouse stromal cell line ST2, primary mBMSCs, mBMSCBone and its expression decreased during osteoblast differentiation. FACS-sorted CD34+ primary mBMSCs exhibited higher expression of 70% osteoblast-associated genes, and formed significantly higher heterotopic bone in vivo when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice compared with CD34− primary mBMSCs. Our results demonstrate that a set of CD markers can distinguish osteoprogenitor versus adipoprogenitor populations of mBMSCs. CD34 is suitable for prospective isolation of mouse bone marrow osteoprogenitors.

  8. [The cultivation of bone marrow cells and cell lines on polymeric films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgikh, M S; Livak, D N; Krasheninnikov, M E; Onishchenko, N A

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells and cells of A-431, MDCK, Vero, 3T3 and Hep-G2 was performed on polymeric films (PVA) with different hydrophobic fatty acid residues. The cells of different types grew on these films with different intensity, but in the most cases comparable with the cultivation control on usual plastic. The examined films were nontoxic to cells and sufficiently adhesive. They did not changed pH of cultural media, were optically transparent under microscope and comfortable in the experimental work. These films can be used as a model for the artificial organ construction. The covalent binding of different fatty acids to PVA shows possibility of the adaptable changes of films properties (hydrophobity and adhesiveness), and therefore possibility of the creation of optimal conditions for different cell types attachement and growth.

  9. Pathways of retinoid synthesis in mouse macrophages and bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haixia; Hadwiger, Gayla; Fujiwara, Hideji; Welch, John S

    2016-06-01

    In vivo pathways of natural retinoid metabolism and elimination have not been well characterized in primary myeloid cells, even though retinoids and retinoid receptors have been strongly implicated in regulating myeloid maturation. With the use of a upstream activation sequence-GFP reporter transgene and retrovirally expressed Gal4-retinoic acid receptor α in primary mouse bone marrow cells, we identified 2 distinct enzymatic pathways used by mouse myeloid cells ex vivo to synthesize retinoic acid receptor α ligands from free vitamin A metabolites (retinyl acetate, retinol, and retinal). Bulk Kit(+) bone marrow progenitor cells use diethylaminobenzaldehyde-sensitive enzymes, whereas bone marrow-derived macrophages use diethylaminobenzaldehyde-insensitive enzymes to synthesize natural retinoic acid receptor α-activating retinoids (all-trans retinoic acid). Bone marrow-derived macrophages do not express the diethylaminobenzaldehyde-sensitive enzymes Aldh1a1, Aldh1a2, or Aldh1a3 but instead, express Aldh3b1, which we found is capable of diethylaminobenzaldehyde-insensitive synthesis of all trans-retinoic acid. However, under steady-state and stimulated conditions in vivo, diverse bone marrow cells and peritoneal macrophages showed no evidence of intracellular retinoic acid receptor α-activating retinoids, despite expression of these enzymes and a vitamin A-sufficient diet, suggesting that the enzymatic conversion of retinal is not the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of intracellular retinoic acid receptor α-activating retinoids in myeloid bone marrow cells and that retinoic acid receptor α remains in an unliganded configuration during adult hematopoiesis. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  10. Changes of Proliferation and Apoptosis of K562 Cells after Co-culture with Leukemia Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Katja Karjalainen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the changes of proliferation and apoptosis of K562 cells after co-culture with human leukemia bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (LMSC. Methods: The prepared cells were randomly divided into SCG group, SCG + 0%FBS group, SCG + 0%FBS group and CCG + 0%FBS group. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8 analytic approach was adopted to detect the optical density (OD of K562 cells in SCG and CCG groups, and the conditions of K562 cell proliferation under different cultured circumstances were compared. Flow cytometer (FCM was used to detect the changes of K562 cell cycle after co-culture with LMSC, Annexin V/polyimide (PI fluorescence labeling method to detect the changes of K562 cell apoptosis after co-culture with LMSC and serum starvation. Results: After co-culture with LMSC, the proliferation of K562 cells was markedly inhibited, and OD in CCG group was conspicuously lower than that in SCG group. Flow cytometer (FCM detection on cell cycles demonstrated that after co-culture with LMSC, the proportion of cells in gap phases 0 - 1 (G0 - G1 went up notably, whereas that in phase S went down obviously. Besides, the proportion of cells in phases G2 - M was on the rise. K562 cell apoptosis in CCG + 0%FBS group was more than in SCG + 10%FBS group, and less than in SCG + 0%FBS group, indicating LMSC had the function of resisting leukemia cell apoptosis. Conclusion: LMSC exerts the effect of inhibiting the proliferation by blocking K562 cell cycles in phases G0 - G1, and inhibiting K562 cell apoptosis induced by serum starvation.

  11. Early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in mouse bone marrow: Subosteal localization of B220+ cells during postirradiation regeneration

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    Jacobsen, K.; Tepper, J.; Osmond, D.G. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    The localization of early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in the bone marrow of young mice has been studied during recovery from sublethal whole body gamma-irradiation (150 rad). Initial studies by double immunofluorescence labeling of the B-lineage-associated cell surface glycoprotein, B220, and of mu heavy chains