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Sample records for human liver cell

  1. Experimental study of bioartificial liver with cultured human liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AIM To establish an extracorporeal bioartificial liver support system (EBLSS) using cultured human liver cells and to study its support effect for fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).METHODS The liver support experiment of EBLSS consisting of aggregates cultured human liver cells, hollow fiber bioreactor, and circulation unit was carried out in dizhepatic dogs.RESULTS The viability of isolated hepatocytes and nonparenchymal liver cells reached 96%. These cells were successfully cultured as multicellular spheroids with synthetic technique. The typical morphological appearance was retained up to the end of the artificial liver experiment. Compared with the control dogs treated with EBLSS without liver cells, the survival time of artificial liver support dogs was significantly prolonged. The changes of blood pressure, heart rate and ECG were slow. Both serum ammonia and lactate levels were significantly lowered at the 3rd h and 5th h. In addition, a good viability of human liver cells was noted after 5 h experiment.CONCLUSION EBLSS playing a metabolic role of cultured human hepatocytes, is capable of compensating the function of the liver, and could provide effective artificial liver support and therapy for patients with FHF.

  2. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  3. Phenotypic changes of human cells in human-rat liver during partial hepatectomy-induced regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Sun; Dong Xiao; Hong-An Li; Jin-Fang Jiang; Qing Li; Ruo-Shuang Zhang; Xi-Gu Chen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components in rat liver and the phenotypic changes of human cells in liver of human-rat chimera (HRC) generated by in utero transplantation of human cells during partial hepatectomy (PHx)-induced liver regeneration. METHODS: Human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components and phenotypic changes of human cells during liver regeneration were examined by flow cytometry, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: ISH analysis demonstrated human Alupositive cells in hepatic parenchyma and stroma of recipient liver. Functional human hepatocytes generated in this model potentially constituted human hepatic functional units with the presence of donor-derived human endothelial and biliary duct cells in host liver. Alpha fetoprotein (AFP)+, CD34+ and CD45+ cells were observed in the chimeric liver on day 10 after PHxinduced liver regeneration and then disappeared in PHx group, but not in non-PHx group, suggesting that dynamic phenotypic changes of human cells expressing AFP, CD34 and CD45 cells may occur during the chimeric liver regeneration. Additionally, immunostaining for human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) showed that the number of PCNA-positive cells in the chimeric liver of PHx group was markedly increased, as compared to that of control group, indicating that donor-derived human cells are actively proliferated during PHx-induced regeneration of HRC liver.

  4. Methods of Liver Stem Cell Therapy in Rodents as Models of Human Liver Regeneration in Hepatic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Goradel, Nasser; Darabi, Masoud; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Ejtehadifar, Mostafa; Zahedi, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Cell therapy is a promising intervention for treating liver diseases and liver failure. Different animal models of human liver cell therapy have been developed in recent years. Rats and mice are the most commonly used liver failure models. In fact, rodent models of hepatic failure have shown significant improvement in liver function after cell infusion. With the advent of stem-cell technologies, it is now possible to re-programme adult somatic cells such as skin or hair-follicle cells from individual patients to stem-like cells and differentiate them into liver cells. Such regenerative stem cells are highly promising in the personalization of cell therapy. The present review article will summarize current approaches to liver stem cell therapy with rodent models. In addition, we discuss common cell tracking techniques and how tracking data help to direct liver cell therapy research in animal models of hepatic failure.

  5. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described.

  6. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells improve liver function and ascites in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Hu; Shi, Ming; Xu, Ruonan; Fu, Junliang; Lv, Jiyun; Chen, Liming; Lv, Sa; Li, Yuanyuan; Yu, Shuangjie; Geng, Hua; Jin, Lei; Lau, George K K; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC), a life-threatening complication of chronic liver disease, is one of the major indications for liver transplantation. Recently, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transfusion has been shown to lead to the regression of liver fibrosis in mice and humans. This study examined the safety and efficacy of umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) in patients with decompensated LC. A total of 45 chronic hepatitis B patients with decompensated LC, including 30 patients receiving UC-MSC transfusion, and 15 patients receiving saline as the control, were recruited; clinical parameters were detected during a 1-year follow-up period. No significant side-effects and complications were observed in either group. There was a significant reduction in the volume of ascites in patients treated with UC-MSC transfusion compared with controls (P decompensated LC. UC-MSC transfusion, therefore, might present a novel therapeutic approach for patients with decompensated LC.

  7. Hepatic progenitor cells in human liver tumor development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Louis Libbrecht

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the results of several studies suggest that human liver tumors can be derived from hepatic progenitor cells rather than from mature cell types.The available data indeed strongly suggest that most combined hepatocellular-cholangiocarcinomas arise from hepatic progenitor cells that retained their potential to differentiate into the hepatocytic and biliary lineages.Hepatic progenitor cells could also be the basis for some hepatocellular carcinomas and hepatocellular adenomas, although it is very difficult to determine the origin of an individual hepatocellular carcinoma. There is currently not enough data to make statements regarding a hepatic progenitor cell origin of cholangiocarcinoma.The presence of hepatic progenitor cell markers and the presence and extent of the cholangiocellular component are factors that are related to the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinomas and combined hepatocellularcholangiocarcinomas, respectively.

  8. Adult human liver mesenchymal progenitor cells express phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruteau, Julien; Nyabi, Omar; Najimi, Mustapha; Fauvart, Maarten; Sokal, Etienne

    2014-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases and is accountable for a severe encephalopathy by progressive intoxication of the brain by phenylalanine. This results from an ineffective L-phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) due to a mutated phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Neonatal screening programs allow an early dietetic treatment with restrictive phenylalanine intake. This diet prevents most of the neuropsychological disabilities but remains challenging for lifelong compliance. Adult-derived human liver progenitor cells (ADHLPC) are a pool of precursors that can differentiate into hepatocytes. We aim to study PAH expression and PAH activity in a differenciated ADHLPC. ADHLPC were isolated from human hepatocyte primary culture of two different donors and differenciated under specific culture conditions. We demonstrated the high expression of PAH and a large increase of PAH activity in differenciated LPC. The age of the donor, the cellular viability after liver digestion and cryopreservation affects PAH activity. ADHLPC might therefore be considered as a suitable source for cell therapy in PKU.

  9. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  10. In vivo liver regeneration potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells from diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Kim, Yonghak; Sharkis, Saul; Marchionni, Luigi; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2011-05-11

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a potential source of hepatocytes for liver transplantation to treat end-stage liver disease. In vitro differentiation of human iPSCs into hepatic cells has been achieved using a multistage differentiation protocol, but whether these cells are functional and capable of engrafting and regenerating diseased liver tissue is not clear. We show that human iPSC-derived hepatic cells at various differentiation stages can engraft the liver in a mouse transplantation model. Using the same differentiation and transplantation protocols, we also assessed the ability of human iPSCs derived from each of the three developmental germ layer tissues (that is, ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) to regenerate mouse liver. These iPSC lines, with similar but distinct global DNA methylation patterns, differentiated into multistage hepatic cells with an efficiency similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Human hepatic cells at various differentiation stages derived from iPSC lines of different origins successfully repopulated the liver tissue of mice with liver cirrhosis. They also secreted human-specific liver proteins into mouse blood at concentrations comparable to that of proteins secreted by human primary hepatocytes. Our results demonstrate the engraftment and liver regenerative capabilities of human iPSC-derived multistage hepatic cells in vivo and suggest that human iPSCs of distinct origins and regardless of their parental epigenetic memory can efficiently differentiate along the hepatic lineage.

  11. Human Liver Cells Expressing Albumin and Mesenchymal Characteristics Give Rise to Insulin-Producing Cells

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    Irit Meivar-Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the pancreatic lineage in the liver has been suggested as a potential autologous cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients. Transcription factors-induced liver-to-pancreas reprogramming has been demonstrated in numerous species both in vivo and in vitro. However, human-derived liver cells capable of acquiring the alternate pancreatic repertoire have never been characterized. It is yet unknown whether hepatic-like stem cells or rather adult liver cells give rise to insulin-producing cells. Using an in vitro experimental system, we demonstrate that proliferating adherent human liver cells acquire mesenchymal-like characteristics and a considerable level of cellular plasticity. However, using a lineage-tracing approach, we demonstrate that insulin-producing cells are primarily generated in cells enriched for adult hepatic markers that coexpress both albumin and mesenchymal markers. Taken together, our data suggest that adult human hepatic tissue retains a substantial level of developmental plasticity, which could be exploited in regenerative medicine approaches.

  12. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation

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    Stefania Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human liver stem cells (HLSCs are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs, and dendritic cells (DCs in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  13. Human Liver Stem Cells Suppress T-Cell Proliferation, NK Activity, and Dendritic Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Stefania; Grange, Cristina; Tapparo, Marta; Pasquino, Chiara; Romagnoli, Renato; Dametto, Ennia; Amoroso, Antonio; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Human liver stem cells (HLSCs) are a mesenchymal stromal cell-like population resident in the adult liver. Preclinical studies indicate that HLSCs could be a good candidate for cell therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and the immunomodulatory properties of HLSCs on T-lymphocytes, natural killer cells (NKs), and dendritic cells (DCs) in allogeneic experimental settings. We found that HLSCs inhibited T-cell proliferation by a mechanism independent of cell contact and dependent on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. When compared with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), HLSCs were more efficient in inhibiting T-cell proliferation. At variance with MSCs, HLSCs did not elicit NK degranulation. Moreover, HLSCs inhibited NK degranulation against K562, a NK-sensitive target, by a mechanism dependent on HLA-G release. When tested on DC generation from monocytes, HLSCs were found to impair DC differentiation and DCs ability to induce T-cell proliferation through PGE2. This study shows that HLSCs have immunomodulatory properties similar to MSCs, but, at variance with MSCs, they do not elicit a NK response.

  14. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Xuejiang [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Hu, Jiayue [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Dai, Jiayin, E-mail: daijy@ioz.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Ecology and Conservation Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Differential expression of proteins induced by PFOA in HL-7702 was identified. • Most of the differentially expressed proteins are related to cell proliferation. • A low dose of PFOA stimulates HL-7702 cell proliferation. • A high dose of PFOA inhibits HL-7702 cell proliferation. - Abstract: Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50 μM PFOA for 48 h and 96 h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50–100 μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200–400 μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure.

  15. In Vitro Generation of Functional Liver Organoid-Like Structures Using Adult Human Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramachandran, S.D.; Schirmer, K.; Munst, B.; Heinz, S.; Ghafoory, S.; Wolfl, S.; Simon-Keller, K.; Marx, A.; Oie, C.I.; Ebert, M.P.; Walles, H.; Braspenning, J.C.; Breitkopf-Heinlein, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we used differentiated adult human upcyte(R) cells for the in vitro generation of liver organoids. Upcyte(R) cells are genetically engineered cell strains derived from primary human cells by lenti-viral transduction of genes or gene combinations inducing transient proliferation capacit

  16. The insecticide DDT decreases membrane potential and cell input resistance of cultured human liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefczik, K; Buff, K

    1984-10-03

    The resting membrane potential, Em, and the cell input resistance, Rinp, of cultured human Chang liver cells were measured using the single electrode 'double-pulse' current clamp technique, following exposure of the cells to the insecticide DDT (20 microM). In control (unexposed) cells, the mean Em was -24 mV, and the mean Rinp was 30 M omega. Neither parameter was significantly impaired after 1 h of cell exposure to DDT. But after 7 and 48 h, the Em was depolarized by 15 and 25 mV, respectively, in parallel with a decrease of the cell input resistance. The strongly time-delayed effect of DDT on Chang liver cell membranes may indicate a mode of interaction different from excitable membranes.

  17. In Vitro Generation of Functional Liver Organoid-Like Structures Using Adult Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarada Devi Ramachandran

    Full Text Available In this study we used differentiated adult human upcyte® cells for the in vitro generation of liver organoids. Upcyte® cells are genetically engineered cell strains derived from primary human cells by lenti-viral transduction of genes or gene combinations inducing transient proliferation capacity (upcyte® process. Proliferating upcyte® cells undergo a finite number of cell divisions, i.e., 20 to 40 population doublings, but upon withdrawal of proliferation stimulating factors, they regain most of the cell specific characteristics of primary cells. When a defined mixture of differentiated human upcyte® cells (hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs was cultured in vitro on a thick layer of Matrigel™, they self-organized to form liver organoid-like structures within 24 hours. When further cultured for 10 days in a bioreactor, these liver organoids show typical functional characteristics of liver parenchyma including activity of cytochromes P450, CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and CYP2C9 as well as mRNA expression of several marker genes and other enzymes. In summary, we hereby describe that 3D functional hepatic structures composed of primary human cell strains can be generated in vitro. They can be cultured for a prolonged period of time and are potentially useful ex vivo models to study liver functions.

  18. Expression kinetics of hepatic progenitor markers in cellular models of human liver development recapitulating hepatocyte and biliary cell fate commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Pooja; Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-09-01

    Due to the limitations of research using human embryos and the lack of a biological model of human liver development, the roles of the various markers associated with liver stem or progenitor cell potential in humans are largely speculative, and based on studies utilizing animal models and certain patient tissues. Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro multistage hepatic differentiation systems may serve as good surrogate models for mimicking normal human liver development, pathogenesis and injury/regeneration studies. Here, we describe the implications of various liver stem or progenitor cell markers and their bipotency (i.e. hepatocytic- and biliary-epithelial cell differentiation), based on the pluripotent stem cell-derived model of human liver development. Future studies using the human cellular model(s) of liver and biliary development will provide more human relevant biological and/or pathological roles of distinct markers expressed in heterogeneous liver stem/progenitor cell populations.

  19. Immunohistochemical characterization of hepatic stem cell-related cells in developing human liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; HU Yong; WANG Jian; ZHOU Ji; ZHANG Taiping; YU Hongyu

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the expression characteristics of the various kinds of possible markers in hepatic stem cells(HSCs)and other HSC-related cells in human fetal liver in various developmental stages.It is significant to investigate the immunohistochemical expression for better understanding of the origin,difierentiation and migration of HSCs in the developing human liver.H-E staining and immunohistochemical methods were used to observe the expression of hepatic/cholangiocellular differentiation markers(AFF,GST-π,CK7,CK19)and hematopoietic stem cell markers(CD34 and c-kit)in several kinds of HSC-related cells in thirty cases of fetal liver samples (4-35 weeks after pregnancy).AFP expression appears in fetal hepatocytes at four weeks'gestation.It Deaks at 16-24 weeks'gestation and decreases gradually afterwards.Finally,weak signals were only found in some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells.GST-π was detected in hepatic cord cells from the sixth week and in the ductal plate cells from the eighth week.Twenty-six weeks later,only some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells show positive signals.CK19 expression peaks during the 6th-11th weeks in hepatic cord cells and decreases gradually afterwards,except for the ductal plates.CK7 expression was limited in the ductal plate cells and bile ducts cells from the 14th week.CD34 and c-kit were detected at the eighth week in some ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic cords/mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.After 21 weeks.CD34 and c-kit were found only in ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.Fetal hepatocytes at 4-16 weeks'gestation are mainly constituted by HSCs characterized with bi-potential differentiation capacity.At 16 weeks'gestation,most hepatic cord cells begin to differentiate into hepatocytes and abundant HSCs remain in ductal plate(the origin site of Hering canals).It is also indicated mat the

  20. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehua Xu

    Full Text Available Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers.

  1. Molecular Recognition of Human Liver Cancer Cells Using DNA Aptamers Generated via Cell-SELEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiehua; Teng, I-Ting; Zhang, Liqin; Delgado, Stefanie; Champanhac, Carole; Cansiz, Sena; Wu, Cuichen; Shan, Hong; Tan, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Most clinical cases of liver cancer cannot be diagnosed until they have evolved to an advanced stage, thus resulting in high mortality. It is well recognized that the implementation of early detection methods and the development of targeted therapies for liver cancer are essential to reducing the high mortality rates associated with this disease. To achieve these goals, molecular probes capable of recognizing liver cancer cell-specific targets are needed. Here we describe a panel of aptamers able to distinguish hepatocarcinoma from normal liver cells. The aptamers, which were selected by cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), have Kd values in the range of 64-349 nM toward the target human hepatoma cell HepG2, and also recognize ovarian cancer cells and lung adenocarcinoma. The proteinase treatment experiment indicated that all aptamers could recognize target HepG2 cells through surface proteins. This outcome suggested that these aptamers could be used as potential probes for further research in cancer studies, such as developing early detection assays, targeted therapies, and imaging agents, as well as for the investigation of common membrane proteins in these distinguishable cancers.

  2. Long-term culture of genome-stable bipotent stem cells from adult human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M A; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R G; van der Laan, Luc J W; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be

  3. Long-term culture of genome-stable bipotent stem cells from adult human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Huch (Meritxell); H. Gehart (Helmuth); R. Van Boxtel (Ruben); K. Hamer (Karien); F. Blokzijl (Francis); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); E. Ellis (Ewa); M. Van Wenum (Martien); S.A. Fuchs (Sabine A.); J. de Ligt (Joep); M. van de Wetering (M.); N. Sasaki (Nobuo); S.J. Boers (Susanne J.); H. Kemperman (Hans); J. de Jonge (Jeroen); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); E.E.S. Nieuwenhuis (Edward); R. Hoekstra (Ruurdtje); S. Strom (Stephen); R.R.G. Vries (Robert R.G.); L.J.W. van der Laan (Luc); E. Cuppen (Edwin); H.C. Clevers (Hans)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDespite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro

  4. Long-Term Culture of Genome-Stable Bipotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A.; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J.; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R. G.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be

  5. Successful transplantation of human hepatic stem cells with restricted localization to liver using hyaluronan grafts.

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    Turner, Rachael A; Wauthier, Eliane; Lozoya, Oswaldo; McClelland, Randall; Bowsher, James E; Barbier, Claire; Prestwich, Glenn; Hsu, Edward; Gerber, David A; Reid, Lola M

    2013-02-01

    Cell therapies are potential alternatives to organ transplantation for liver failure or dysfunction but are compromised by inefficient engraftment, cell dispersal to ectopic sites, and emboli formation. Grafting strategies have been devised for transplantation of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) embedded into a mix of soluble signals and extracellular matrix biomaterials (hyaluronans, type III collagen, laminin) found in stem cell niches. The hHpSCs maintain a stable stem cell phenotype under the graft conditions. The grafts were transplanted into the livers of immunocompromised murine hosts with and without carbon tetrachloride treatment to assess the effects of quiescent versus injured liver conditions. Grafted cells remained localized to the livers, resulting in a larger bolus of engrafted cells in the host livers under quiescent conditions and with potential for more rapid expansion under injured liver conditions. By contrast, transplantation by direct injection or via a vascular route resulted in inefficient engraftment and cell dispersal to ectopic sites. Transplantation by grafting is proposed as a preferred strategy for cell therapies for solid organs such as the liver.

  6. Detection of anti-liver cell membrane antibody using a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line

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    Lobo-Yeo, A.; McSorley, C.; McFarlane, B.M.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Mowat, A.P.; Vergani, D.

    1989-02-01

    A radioimmunometric technique for the detection of autoantibodies to liver membrane antigens has been developed using Alexander cells, a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. After incubation of Alexander cells with serum, antimembrane antibodies were detected by addition of /sup 125/I-labeled Protein A. Binding ratios in 15 children with uncontrolled autoimmune chronic active hepatitis and in seven children with primary sclerosing cholangitis were significantly higher than in 18 age-matched normal controls. Nine patients with inactive autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, 13 with alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and five with fulminant hepatic failure had ratios similar to controls. In nine patients with Wilson's disease, there was a modest but significant increase in binding ratio. In four children with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis, binding ratios fell during effective immunosuppressive therapy. Sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis gave normal results, excluding that binding derives from Fc-mediated immune complex capture. A positive correlation was found between Alexander cell binding values and anti-liver-specific protein antibody titers, suggesting that the two assays detect antibodies against shared antigenic determinants. The Alexander cell assay is a simple, rapid and sensitive technique to detect antibody to liver cell membrane antigens.

  7. Effect of New Water-Soluble Dendritic Phthalocyanines on Human Colorectal and Liver Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru YABAŞ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells and colorectal adenocarcinoma (DLD-1 cells were treated with the synthesized water soluble phthalocyanine derivatives to understand the effect of the compounds both on colorectal and liver cancer cells. The compounds inhibited cell proliferation and displayed cytotoxic effect on these cancer cell lines however; the effect of the compounds on healthy control fibroblast cell line was comparatively lower. The compounds can be employed for cancer treatment as anticancer agents.

  8. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Finoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  9. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finoli, Anthony; Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  10. An attempt to eliminate fibroblast-like cells from primary cultures of fetal human livers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiwa,Takayoshi

    1986-04-01

    Full Text Available The elimination of fibroblast-like cells from primary cultures of fetal human livers was studied. A fibroblast-like cell line (HuF, which was obtained by subculturing fetal human liver cells 4 or more times, was briefly treated with hydrocortisone (HC or putrescine (PUT. The growth of HuF cells was inhibited by HC at a concentration of 10(-2 M and by PUT at a concentration higher than 10(-3 M. Long-term treatment of HuF cells with 10(-3 M HC inhibited the growth of the cells. Primary cultures of fetal human livers were made in medium containing HC or PUT, and morphological and functional examinations were made. The cultures were predominantly composed of epithelial-like cells, with few fibroblast-like cells, when the HC concentration was 10(-5M to 10(-3 M. A high amount of albumin was secreted at these concentrations of HC. On the other hand, at 10(-3 M PUT, many epithelial-like cells were seen, but albumin was undetectable. The present results indicate that albumin-producing epithelial-like cells can be selectively maintained in medium containing HC, in primary cultures of fetal human livers.

  11. Three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture supports differentiation of human fetal liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Triolo, Fabio; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Zeilinger, Katrin; Reid, Lola M; Gridelli, Bruno; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2010-06-01

    The ability of human fetal liver cells to survive, expand, and form functional tissue in vitro is of high interest for the development of bioartificial extracorporeal liver support systems, liver cell transplantation therapies, and pharmacologic models. Conventional static two-dimensional culture models seem to be inadequate tools. We focus on dynamic three-dimensional perfusion technologies and developed a scaled-down bioreactor, providing decentralized mass exchange with integral oxygenation. Human fetal liver cells were embedded in a hyaluronan hydrogel within the capillary system to mimic an in vivo matrix and perfusion environment. Metabolic performance was monitored daily, including glucose consumption, lactate dehydrogenase activity, and secretion of alpha-fetoprotein and albumin. At culture termination cells were analyzed for proliferation and liver-specific lineage-dependent cytochrome P450 (CYP3A4/3A7) gene expression. Occurrence of hepatic differentiation in bioreactor cultures was demonstrated by a strong increase in CYP3A4/3A7 gene expression ratio, lower alpha-fetoprotein, and higher albumin secretion than in conventional Petri dish controls. Cells in bioreactors formed three-dimensional structures. Viability of cells was higher in bioreactors than in control cultures. In conclusion, the culture model implementing three-dimensionality, constant perfusion, and integral oxygenation in combination with a hyaluronan hydrogel provides superior conditions for liver cell survival and differentiation compared to conventional culture.

  12. Transplantation of human stem cell-derived hepatocytes in an animal model of acute liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Pettinato, Giuseppe; Beeston, John T; Lee, David D; Wen, Xuejun; Mangino, Martin J; Fisher, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocyte cell transplantation can be life-saving in patients with acute liver failure (ALF); however, primary human hepatocyte transplantation is limited by the scarcity of donor hepatocytes. We investigated the effect of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells in an animal xenotransplant model of ALF. Intraperitoneal d-galactosamine was used to develop a lethal model of ALF in the rat. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), human mesenchymal stem cells, and human iPSC combined with human endothelial cells (iPSC + EC) were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells and transplanted into the spleens of athymic nude rats with ALF. A reproducible lethal model of ALF was achieved with nearly 90% death within 3 days. Compared with negative controls, rats transplanted with stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells were associated with increased survival. Human albumin was detected in the rat serum 3 days after transplantation in more than one-half the animals transplanted with hepatocyte-like cells. Only animals transplanted with iPSC + EC-derived hepatocytes had serum human albumin at 14 days posttransplant. Transplanted hepatocyte-like cells homed to the injured rat liver, whereas the ECs were only detected in the spleen. Transplantation of stem cell-derived, hepatocyte-like cells improved survival with evidence of in vivo human albumin production. Combining ECs may prolong cell function after transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Adipose Tissue Derived Stem Cells Promote Liver Regeneration in a Rat Model of Toxic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Koellensperger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the light of the persisting lack of donor organs and the risks of allotransplantations, the possibility of liver regeneration with autologous stem cells from adipose tissue (ADSC is an intriguing alternative. Using a model of a toxic liver damage in Sprague Dawley rats, generated by repetitive intraperitoneal application of retrorsine and allyl alcohol, the ability of human ADSC to support the restoration of liver function was investigated. A two-thirds hepatectomy was performed, and human ADSC were injected into one remaining liver lobe in group 1 (n = 20. Injection of cell culture medium performed in group 2 (n = 20 served as control. Cyclosporine was applied to achieve immunotolerance. Blood samples were drawn weekly after surgery to determine liver-correlated blood values. Six and twelve weeks after surgery, animals were sacrificed and histological sections were analyzed. ADSC significantly raised postoperative albumin (P < 0.017, total protein (P < 0.031, glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (P < 0.001, and lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.04 levels compared to injection of cell culture medium alone. Transplanted cells could be found up to twelve weeks after surgery in histological sections. This study points towards ADSC being a promising alternative to hepatocyte or liver organ transplantation in patients with severe liver failure.

  14. Human fetal liver stromal cells that overexpress bFGF support growth and maintenance of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafei Xi

    Full Text Available In guiding hES cell technology toward the clinic, one key issue to be addressed is to culture and maintain hES cells much more safely and economically in large scale. In order to avoid using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs we isolated human fetal liver stromal cells (hFLSCs from 14 weeks human fetal liver as new human feeder cells. hFLSCs feeders could maintain hES cells for 15 passages (about 100 days. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is known to play an important role in promoting self-renewal of human embryonic stem (hES cells. So, we established transgenic hFLSCs that stably express bFGF by lentiviral vectors. These transgenic human feeder cells--bFGF-hFLSCs maintained the properties of H9 hES cells without supplementing with any exogenous growth factors. H9 hES cells culturing under these conditions maintained all hES cell features after prolonged culture, including the developmental potential to differentiate into representative tissues of all three embryonic germ layers, unlimited and undifferentiated proliferative ability, and maintenance of normal karyotype. Our results demonstrated that bFGF-hFLSCs feeder cells were central to establishing the signaling network among bFGF, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2, and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, thereby providing the framework in which hES cells were instructed to self-renew or to differentiate. We also found that the conditioned medium of bFGF-hFLSCs could maintain the H9 hES cells under feeder-free conditions without supplementing with bFGF. Taken together, bFGF-hFLSCs had great potential as feeders for maintaining pluripotent hES cell lines more safely and economically.

  15. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells along a hepatocyte lineage and its application in liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial liver(BAL)as alternatives to liver transplantation offer the possibility of effective treatment for many inherited and acquired hepatic disorders.Unfortunately,the limited availability of donated livers and the variability of their derived hepatocytes make it difficult to obtain enough viable human hepatocytes for the hepatocyte-based therapies.Embryonic stem cells (ESCs),which could be isolated directly from the blastocyst inner cell mass,have permanent self-renewal capability and developmental pluripotency and therefore might be an ideal cell source in the treatment of hepatic discords.However,differentiation of hESCS into hepatocytes with significant numbers remains a challenge.This review updates our current understanding of differentiation of ESCs into hepatic lineage cells,their future therapeutic uses and problems in liver regeneration.

  16. Human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF-modified hepatic oval cells improve liver transplant survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Li

    Full Text Available Despite progress in the field of immunosuppression, acute rejection is still a common postoperative complication following liver transplantation. This study aims to investigate the capacity of the human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF in modifying hepatic oval cells (HOCs administered simultaneously with orthotopic liver transplantation as a means of improving graft survival. HOCs were activated and isolated using a modified 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH model in male Lewis rats. A HOC line stably expressing the HGF gene was established following stable transfection of the pBLAST2-hHGF plasmid. Our results demonstrated that hHGF-modified HOCs could efficiently differentiate into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells in vitro. Administration of HOCs at the time of liver transplantation induced a wider distribution of SRY-positive donor cells in liver tissues. Administration of hHGF-HOC at the time of transplantation remarkably prolonged the median survival time and improved liver function for recipients compared to these parameters in the other treatment groups (P<0.05. Moreover, hHGF-HOC administration at the time of liver transplantation significantly suppressed elevation of interleukin-2 (IL-2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ levels while increasing the production of IL-10 and TGF-β1 (P<0.05. HOC or hHGF-HOC administration promoted cell proliferation, reduced cell apoptosis, and decreased liver allograft rejection rates. Furthermore, hHGF-modified HOCs more efficiently reduced acute allograft rejection (P<0.05 versus HOC transplantation only. Our results indicate that the combination of hHGF-modified HOCs with liver transplantation decreased host anti-graft immune responses resulting in a reduction of allograft rejection rates and prolonging graft survival in recipient rats. This suggests that HOC-based cell transplantation therapies can be developed as a means of treating severe liver

  17. Ultrastructural characteristics of novel epithelial cell types identified in human pathologic liver specimens with chronic ductular reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    De Vos, R; Desmet, V

    1992-01-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies on human liver biopsies with chronic ductular reaction revealed the presence of "small cells" with bile-duct type cytokeratin profile in the periportal area. This study identified similar cells by electron microscopy. The authors studied 13 human liver specimens with various liver diseases, but all characterized by chronic ductular reaction. In all specimens, variable numbers of "small cells" with common epithelial characteristics were identified in the pe...

  18. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J.; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C.; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J.

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization. PMID:28134251

  19. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J

    2017-01-30

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization.

  20. Hepatic progenitor cells in human liver cirrhosis:Immunohistochemical,electron microscopic and immunofluorencence confocal microscopic findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-Cheng Xiao; Xiao-Long Jin; Peter Ruck; Anne Adam; Edwin Kaiserling

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether hepatic progenitor cells (HPC),that reveal the features of oval cells in rodents and small epithelial cells (SEC) in certain human liver disease, were also found in human liver cirrhosis (HLC).METHODS: Surgical liver specimens from 20 cases of hepatitis B virus-positive HLC (15 cases containing hepatocellular carcinoma) were investigated by light microscopic immunohistochemistry (LM-IHC). Among them specimens from 15 cases were investigated by electron microscopy (EM)and those from 5 cases by immunofluorencence confocal laser scanning microscopy (ICLSM). Antibodies against cytokeratin 7 and albumin were used and single and/or double labelling were performed respectively.RESULTS: LM-IHC showed that at the margins of regenerating nodules and in the fibrous septae, a small number of cells in the proliferating bile ductules were positive for CK7 and albumin. At the EM level these HPC were morphologically similar to the SEC described previously, and also similar to the oval cells seen in experimental hepatocarcinogenesis.They were characterized by their small size, oval shape, a high nucleus/cytoplasm ratio, a low organelle content in cytoplasm, and existence of tonofilaments and intercellular junctions. ICLSM revealed that HPC expressed both cytokeratin 7 and albumin.CONCLUSION: HPC with ultrastructural and immunophenotypical features of oval cells, i.e., hepatic stem cell-like cells as noted in other liver diseases, were found in HLC. These findings further support the hypothesis that bipotent hepatic stem cells, that may give rise to biliary epithelial cells and hepatocytes, exist in human livers.

  1. GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells for clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Aghayan, Hamid-Reza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Arjmand, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy seems a promising avenue in regenerative medicine. Within various stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells have progressively used for cellular therapy. Because of the age-related decreasing in the frequency and differentiating capacity of adult MSCs, fetal tissues such as fetal liver, lung, pancreas, spleen, etc. have been introduced as an alternative source of MSCs for cellular therapy. On the other hand, using stem cells as advanced therapy medicinal products, must be performed in compliance with cGMP as a quality assurance system to ensure the safety, quality, and identity of cell products during translation from the basic stem cell sciences into clinical cell transplantation. In this chapter the authors have demonstrated the manufacturing of GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  2. Differential genomic effects of six different TiO2 nanomaterials on human liver HepG2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanoparticles are reported to cause liver toxicity in vivo. To better assess the mechanism of the in vivo liver toxicity, we used the human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2) as a model system. Human HepG2 cells were exposed to 6 TiO2 nanomaterials (with dry primary partic...

  3. Production of human liver prolidase by Saccharomyces cerevisiae as host cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-hao WANG; Min LIU; Mu-gen CHI; Qing-ding WANG; Man-ji SUN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and express the recombinant human liver prolidase in yeast and explore the activities of both dipeptidase and organophosphoric acid anhydrolase (OPAA). METHODS: The cDNA encoding human liver prolidase derived from healthy adult liver was cloned into the pYES2, an expression vector of S cerevisiae, and then transformed into S cerevisiae INVScl by electroporation. The transformant with the highest enzymatic activity was induced by galactose for expression. The optimal induction conditions (temperature, induction time, and the initial amount of inoculation cells) were estimated by orthogonal experimental design. The recombinant prolidase and OPAA activities were assayed by spectrocolorimetric methods. RESULTS: The recombinant enzyme catalyzed the hydrolysis of organophosphorous compound soman as well as the hydrolysis of dipeptide Gly-Pro. Under the optimal induction conditions (20 h, 25 ℃, initial OD600=0.4), the maximum activities of prolidase and OPAA came to enzyme in disrupted cell supernatants showed a molecular weight of 56 kDa. Intensity scanning of the SDS-PAGE gel revealed that the enzyme accounted for 3.16 % of the total protein in the supernatant. One liter incubation medium produced 7 g of wet yeast cell containing 4.56 mg of the recombination protein. CONCLUSION: The recombinant human liver prolidase produced by yeast cell (S cerevisiae) exhibited both dipeptidase and OPAA activities.

  4. Mechanism of action of novel piperazine containing a toxicant against human liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthimathi, MS; Haerian, Batoul Sadat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cytotoxic potential of a novel piperazine derivative (PCC) against human liver cancer cells. SNU-475 and 423 human liver cancer cell lines were used to determine the IC50 of PCC using the standard MTT assay. PCC displayed a strong suppressive effect on liver cancer cells with an IC50 value of 6.98 ± 0.11 µM and 7.76 ± 0.45 µM against SNU-475 and SNU-423 respectively after 24 h of treatment. Significant dipping in the mitochondrial membrane potential and elevation in the released of cytochrome c from the mitochondria indicated the induction of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway by PCC. Activation of this pathway was further evidenced by significant activation of caspase 3/7 and 9. PCC was also shown to activate the extrinsic pathways of apoptosis via activation of caspase-8 which is linked to the suppression of NF-κB translocation to the nucleus. Cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase was confirmed by flow cytometry and up-regulation of glutathione reductase expression was quantified by qPCR. Results of this study suggest that PCC is a potent anti-cancer agent inducing both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis in liver cancer cell lines. PMID:27019772

  5. Anticarcinogenic effects of glycoalkaloids from potatoes against human cervical, liver, lymphoma, and stomach cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Mendel; Lee, Kap-Rang; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Lee, In-Seon; Kozukue, Nobuyuke

    2005-07-27

    Methods were devised for the isolation of large amounts of pure alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine from Dejima potatoes and for the extraction and analysis of total glycoalkaloids from five fresh potato varieties (Dejima, Jowon, Sumi, Toya, and Vora Valley). These compounds were then evaluated in experiments using a tetrazolium microculture (MTT) assay to assess the anticarcinogenic effects of (a) the isolated pure glycoalkaloids separately, (b) artificial mixtures of the two glycoalkaloids, and (c) the total glycoalkaloids isolated from each of the five potato varieties. All samples tested reduced the numbers of the following human cell lines: cervical (HeLa), liver (HepG2), lymphoma (U937), stomach (AGS and KATO III) cancer cells and normal liver (Chang) cells. The results show that (a) the effects of the glycoalkaloids were concentration dependent in the range of 0.1-10 mug/mL (0.117-11.7 nmol/mL); (b) alpha-chaconine was more active than was alpha-solanine; (c) some mixtures exhibited synergistic effects, whereas other produced additive ones; (d) the different cancer cells varied in their susceptibilities to destruction; and (e) the destruction of normal liver cells was generally lower than that of cancer liver cells. The decreases in cell populations were also observed visually by reversed-phase microscopy. The results complement related observations on the anticarcinogenic potential of food ingredients.

  6. Prediction of Drug-Induced Liver Injury in HepG2 Cells Cultured with Human Liver Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Min; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Jeon, Jang Su; Ryu, Chang Seon; Kim, Young-Mi; Lee, Kiho; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2015-05-18

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) via metabolic activation by drug-metabolizing enzymes, especially cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a major cause of drug failure and drug withdrawal. In this study, an in vitro model using HepG2 cells in combination with human liver microsomes was developed for the prediction of DILI. The cytotoxicity of cyclophosphamide, a model drug for bioactivation, was augmented in HepG2 cells cultured with microsomes in a manner dependent on exposure time, microsomal protein concentration, and NADPH. Experiments using pan- or isoform-selective CYP inhibitors showed that CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 are responsible for the bioactivation of cyclophosphamide. In a metabolite identification study employing LC-ESI-QTrap and LC-ESI-QTOF, cyclophosphamide metabolites including phosphoramide mustard, a toxic metabolite, were detected in HepG2 cells cultured with microsomes, but not without microsomes. The cytotoxic effects of acetaminophen and diclofenac were also potentiated by microsomes. The potentiation of acetaminophen cytotoxicity was dependent on CYP-dependent metabolism, and the augmentation of diclofenac cytotoxicity was not mediated by either CYP- or UDP-glucuronosyltransferase-dependent metabolism. The cytotoxic effects of leflunomide, nefazodone, and bakuchiol were attenuated by microsomes. The detoxication of leflunomide by microsomes was attributed to mainly CYP3A4-dependent metabolism. The protective effect of microsomes against nefazodone cytotoxicity was dependent on both CYP-mediated metabolism and nonspecific protein binding. Nonspecific protein binding but not CYP-dependent metabolism played a critical role in the attenuation of bakuchiol cytotoxicity. The present study suggests that HepG2 cells cultured with human liver microsomes can be a reliable model in which to predict DILI via bioactivation by drug metabolizing enzymes.

  7. Definition of the transcription initiation site of human plasminogen gene in liver and non hepatic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgaretti, N; Bruno, L; Pontoglio, M; Candiani, G; Meroni, G; Ottolenghi, S; Taramelli, R

    1990-12-31

    We have mapped the cap site of the human plasminogen mRNA by primer extension and PCR techniques and found that it is located at position -161 relative to the first ATG, 97 bases upstream to the 5' end of the previously isolated cDNA clone. Seven human hepatic and non hepatic cell lines and fresh liver cells were tested for human plasminogen mRNA expression: the liver and the liver derived HepG2 cell line represent the major site of plasminogen RNA synthesis while the other cell lines (Hep3B, HeLa, IMR, 293 CaCo and SW626) show much lower levels.

  8. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-03-30

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models.

  9. The microcell mediated transfer of human chromosome 8 into highly metastatic rat liver cancer cell line C5F

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Liu; Sheng-Long Ye; Jiong Yang; Zhao-You Tang; Yin-Kun Liu; Lun-Xiu Qin; Shuang-Jian Qiu; Rui-Xia Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Our previous research on the surgical samples of primary liver cancer with CGH showed that the loss of human chromosome 8p had correlation with the metastatic phenotype of liver cancer. In order to seek the functional evidence that there could be a metastatsis suppressor gene (s) for liver cancer on human chromosome 8, we tried to transfer normal human chromosome 8 into rat liver cancer cell line C5F, which had high metastatic potential to lung.METHODS: Human chromosome 8 randomly marked with neo gene was introduced into C5F cell line by MMCT and positive microcell hybrids were screened by double selections of G418 and HAT. Single cell isolation cloning was applied to clone microcell hybrids. Finally, STS-PCR and WCP-FISH were used to confirm the introduction.RESULTS: Microcell hybrids resistant to HAT and G418 were obtained and 15 clones were obtained by single-cell isolation cloning. STS-PCR and WCP-FISH proved that human chromosome 8 had been successfully introduced into rat liver cancer cell line C5F. STS-PCR detected a random loss in the chromosome introduced and WCP-FISH found a consistent recombination of the introduced human chromosome with the rat chromosome.CONCLUSION: The successful introduction of human chromosome 8 into highly metastatic rat liver cancer cell line builds the basis for seeking functional evidence of a metastasis suppressor gene for liver cancer harboring on human chromosome 8 and its subsequent cloning.

  10. ADAM12 in human liver cancers: TGF-beta-regulated expression in stellate cells is associated with matrix remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Pabic, Hélène; Bonnier, Dominique; Wewer, Ulla M

    2003-01-01

    "A disintegrin and metalloproteinases" (ADAMs) form a family of cell-surface glycoproteins with potential protease and cell-adhesion activities. We have investigated ADAM expression in human liver cancers and their regulation by several cytokines involved in liver injury. Using degenerative RT-PC...

  11. Nicotine induces fibrogenic changes in human liver via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on hepatic stellate cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Junpei; Morgan, Maelle; McKee, Chad; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Lin, ChingI [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Roskams, Tania [Department of Morphology and Molecular Pathology, University of Leuven (Belgium); Oben, Jude A., E-mail: j.oben@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, Centre for Hepatology, Royal Free Hospital, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cigarette smoke may induce liver fibrosis via nicotine receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine induces proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine activates hepatic fibrogenic pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine receptor antagonists attenuate HSC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotinic receptor antagonists may have utility as novel anti-fibrotic agents. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Cigarette smoke (CS) may cause liver fibrosis but possible involved mechanisms are unclear. Among the many chemicals in CS is nicotine - which affects cells through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). We studied the effects of nicotine, and involved pathways, on human primary hepatic stellate cells (hHSCs), the principal fibrogenic cells in the liver. We then determined possible disease relevance by assaying nAChR in liver samples from human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Methods: hHSC were isolated from healthy human livers and nAChR expression analyzed - RT-PCR and Western blotting. Nicotine induction of hHSC proliferation, upregulation of collagen1-{alpha}2 and the pro-fibrogenic cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) was determined along with involved intracellular signaling pathways. nAChR mRNA expression was finally analyzed in whole liver biopsies obtained from patients diagnosed with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Results: hHSCs express muscle type ({alpha}1, {beta}1, delta and epsilon) and neuronal type ({alpha}3, {alpha}6, {alpha}7, {beta}2 and {beta}4) nAChR subunits at the mRNA level. Among these subunits, {alpha}3, {alpha}7, {beta}1 and {epsilon} were predominantly expressed as confirmed by Western blotting. Nicotine induced hHSC proliferation was attenuated by mecamylamine (p < 0.05). Additionally, collagen1-{alpha}2 and TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were significantly upregulated by nicotine and inhibited by

  12. A Convenient and Efficient Method to Enrich and Maintain Highly Proliferative Human Fetal Liver Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuan; Wang, Shu; Dou, Ya-ling; Guo, Xiang-fei; Chen, Zhao-li; Wang, Xin-wei; Shen, Zhi-qiang; Qiu, Zhi-gang; Jin, Min; Li, Jun-wen

    2015-06-01

    Pluripotent human hepatic stem cells have broad research and clinical applications, which are, however, restricted by both limited resources and technical difficulties with respect to isolation of stem cells from the adult or fetal liver. In this study, we developed a convenient and efficient method involving a two-step in situ collagenase perfusion, gravity sedimentation, and Percoll density gradient centrifugation to enrich and maintain highly proliferative human fetal liver stem cells (hFLSCs). Using this method, the isolated hFLSCs entered into the exponential growth phase within 10 days and maintained sufficient proliferative activity to permit subculture for at least 20 passages without differentiation. Immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry results showed that these cells expressed stem cell markers, such as c-kit, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), oval cell marker-6 (OV-6), epithelial marker cytokeratin 18 (CK18), biliary ductal marker CK19, and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Gene expression analysis showed that these cells had stable mRNA expression of c-Kit, EpCAM, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), CK19, CK18, AFP, and claudin 3 (CLDN-3) throughout each passage while maintaining low levels of ALB, but with complete absence of cytochrome P450 3A4 (C3A4), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), telomeric repeat binding factor (TRF), and connexin 26 (CX26) expression. When grown in appropriate medium, these isolated liver stem cells could differentiate into hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, osteoblasts, adipocytes, or endothelial cells. Thus, we have demonstrated a more economical and efficient method to isolate hFLSCs than magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). This novel approach may provide an excellent tool to isolate highly proliferative hFLSCs for tissue engineering and regenerative therapies.

  13. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O;

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal...

  14. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal ...

  15. Comparative studies of different cryopreservation methods for mesenchymal stem cells derived from human fetal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Plamen; Hristova, Elena; Konakchieva, Rossitza; Michova, Antoaneta; Dimitrov, Josif

    2010-03-29

    Fetal stem cells possess some intriguing characteristics, which delineate them as promising cellular therapeutics. They are less immunogenic, at lower stage of differentiation and have higher potential for repopulation and migration. Furthermore, the fetal stem cells secrete a set of cytokines and growth factors, which stimulate the regeneration of the recipient tissue. The present study indicated that the adhesive fraction of human fetal liver cells possessed the morphological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells, as well as potential to differentiate into adipocyte and osteoblast lineages. The immunophenotypic analysis showed that the cells expressed CD13, CD73, CD90 and CD105 (typical for mesenchymal stem cells) and lacked the haematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Addressing the issue of the low-temperature storage of the human fetal liver cells, four different methods for cryopreservation were assessed: conventional slow freezing, program freezing and two vitrification protocols. The obtained results demonstrated that the cells were cryotolerant and maintained their properties and differentiation potential after thawing. Program freezing showed to be the most efficient method for cryopreservation of the investigated cells.

  16. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due...... to limitations of primary hepatocytes regarding availability and maintenance of functionality, stem cells and especially human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPS cells) are an attractive cell source for liver tissue engineering. The aim of this part of NanoBio4Trans is to optimize culture and hepatic...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  17. Unique cell type-specific junctional complexes in vascular endothelium of human and rat liver sinusoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrill Géraud

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelium is strategically positioned to control access of fluids, macromolecules and cells to the liver parenchyma and to serve clearance functions upstream of the hepatocytes. While clearance of macromolecular debris from the peripheral blood is performed by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs using a delicate endocytic receptor system featuring stabilin-1 and -2, the mannose receptor and CD32b, vascular permeability and cell trafficking are controlled by transcellular pores, i.e. the fenestrae, and by intercellular junctional complexes. In contrast to blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells in other organs, the junctional complexes of LSECs have not yet been consistently characterized in molecular terms. In a comprehensive analysis, we here show that LSECs express the typical proteins found in endothelial adherens junctions (AJ, i.e. VE-cadherin as well as α-, β-, p120-catenin and plakoglobin. Tight junction (TJ transmembrane proteins typical of endothelial cells, i.e. claudin-5 and occludin, were not expressed by rat LSECs while heterogenous immunreactivity for claudin-5 was detected in human LSECs. In contrast, junctional molecules preferentially associating with TJ such as JAM-A, B and C and zonula occludens proteins ZO-1 and ZO-2 were readily detected in LSECs. Remarkably, among the JAMs JAM-C was considerably over-expressed in LSECs as compared to lung microvascular endothelial cells. In conclusion, we show here that LSECs form a special kind of mixed-type intercellular junctions characterized by co-occurrence of endothelial AJ proteins, and of ZO-1 and -2, and JAMs. The distinct molecular architecture of the intercellular junctional complexes of LSECs corroborates previous ultrastructural findings and provides the molecular basis for further analyses of the endothelial barrier function of liver sinusoids under pathologic conditions ranging from hepatic inflammation to formation of liver metastasis.

  18. Cytoglobin is expressed in hepatic stellate cells, but not in myofibroblasts, in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Hiroyuki; Komiya, Tohru; Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Tamori, Akihiro; Enomoto, Masaru; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Iwai, Shuji; Uchida-Kobayashi, Sawako; Fujii, Hideki; Hagihara, Atsushi; Kawamura, Etsushi; Murakami, Yoshiki; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2014-02-01

    Cytoglobin (CYGB) is ubiquitously expressed in the cytoplasm of fibroblastic cells in many organs, including hepatic stellate cells. As yet, there is no specific marker with which to distinguish stellate cells from myofibroblasts in the human liver. To investigate whether CYGB can be utilized to distinguish hepatic stellate cells from myofibroblasts in normal and fibrotic human liver, human liver tissues damaged by infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and at different stages of fibrosis were obtained by liver biopsy. Immunohistochemistry was performed on histological sections of liver tissues using antibodies against CYGB, cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), thymocyte differentiation antigen 1 (Thy-1), and fibulin-2 (FBLN2). CYGB- and CRBP-1-positive cells were counted around fibrotic portal tracts in histological sections of the samples. The expression of several of the proteins listed above was examined in cultured mouse stellate cells. Quiescent stellate cells, but not portal myofibroblasts, expressed both CYGB and CRBP-1 in normal livers. In fibrotic and cirrhotic livers, stellate cells expressed both CYGB and α-SMA, whereas myofibroblasts around the portal vein expressed α-SMA, Thy-1, and FBLN2, but not CYGB. Development of the fibrotic stage was positively correlated with increases in Sirius red-stained, α-SMA-positive, and Thy-1-positive areas, whereas the number of CYGB- and CRBP-1-positive cells decreased with fibrosis development. Primary cultured mouse stellate cells expressed cytoplasmic CYGB at day 1, whereas they began to express α-SMA at the cellular margins at day 4. Thy-1 was undetectable throughout the culture period. In human liver tissues, quiescent stellate cells are CYGB positive. When activated, they also become α-SMA positive; however, they are negative for Thy-1 and FBLN2. Thus, CYGB is a useful marker with which to distinguish stellate cells from portal myofibroblasts in the damaged human

  19. Isolation of Human Fetal Liver Progenitors and Their Enhanced Proliferation by Three-Dimensional Coculture with Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Anming; Austin, Timothy W.; Lagasse, Eric; Uchida, Nobuko; Tamaki, Stanley; Bordier, Bruno B.; Weissman, Irving L.; Glenn, Jeffrey S.; Millan, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells, characterized by the coexpression of biliary and hepatocyte lineage markers and the ability to form colonies in culture, were isolated by flow cytometry from primary human fetal livers. These prospectively isolated liver progenitor cells supported hepatitis D virus infection, expressed, and produced albumin and α-fetoprotein, as tracked by albumin-and α-fetoprotein–driven lentiviral promoter reporter constructs and measured by ELISA, respectively. Coculture in three-dimensional (3D) fibrin gel with endothelial cells resulted in the formation of vascular structures by the endothelial cells and increased proliferation of liver progenitors. The enhanced proliferation of liver progenitors that was observed when liver progenitors and endothelial cells were cultured in direct contact was not achieved when liver progenitors and endothelial cells were cultured on adjacent but separate matrices and when they were cultured across transwell membranes. In conclusion, coculture of liver progenitors and endothelial cells in three-dimensional matrix resulted in enhanced liver progenitor proliferation and function. This coculture methodology offers a novel coculture system that could be applied for the development of engineered liver tissues. PMID:19230124

  20. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  1. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  2. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Colpitts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (reemerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  3. Transformation of human liver L-02 cells mediated by stable HBx transfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ying ZHANG; Na CAI; Li-hong YE; Xiao-dong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To explore the mechanism of hepatocarcinogenesis associated with the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx), we investigated the role of HBx in transformation using human liver L-02 cells stably transfected with HBx as a model.Methods: Plasmids encoding HBx were stably transfected into immortalized human liver L-02 cells and rodent fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells. The expression of alfa-fetoprotein (AFP), c-Myc, HBx, and survivin in the engineered cells was examined by Western blotting. The malignant phenotype of the cells was demonstrated by anchorage-independent colony formation and tumor formation in nude mice. RNA interference assays, Western blotting, luciferase reporter gene assays and flow cytometry analysis were performed. The number of centrosomes in the L-O2-X cells was determined by Y-tubulin immunostaining. The effect of HBx on the transcriptional activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and hTERT activity in L-02-X cells and/or 3T3-X cells was detected by the luciferase reporter gene assay and telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP).Results: Stable HBx transfection resulted in a malignant phenotype in the engineered cells in vivo and in vitro. Meanwhile, HBx was able to increase the transcription of the NF-κB, AP-1, and survivin genes and to upregulate the expression levels of c-Myc and survivin.Abnormal centrosome duplication and activated hTERT were responsible for the transformation.Conclusion: Stable HBx transfection leads to genomic instability of host cells, which is responsible for hepatocarcinogenesis; mean-while, transactivation by the HBx protein contributes to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The L-02-X cell line is an ideal model for investigating the mechanism of HBx-mediated transformation.

  4. Dietary administration of Nexrutine inhibits rat liver tumorigenesis and induces apoptotic cell death in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshad Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggested that plant-based dietary supplements can reduce the risk of liver cancer. Nexrutine (NX, an herbal extract from Phellodendronamurense, has been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activities. In the present study, we have shown the anti-tumor potential of NX against Solt-Farber model with elimination of PH, rat liver tumor induced by diethylnitrosoamine (DEN as carcinogen and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF as co-carcinogen. The elucidation of mechanistic pathways was explored in human liver cancer cells. Dietary intake of NX significantly decreased the cell proliferation and inflammation, as well as increased apoptosis in the liver sections of DEN/2-AAF-treated rats. Moreover, NX (2.5–10 μg/ml exposure significantly decreased the viability of liver cancer cells and modulated the levels of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins levels. NX treatment resulted in increased cytochrome-c release and cleavage of caspases 3 and 9. In addition, NX decreased the expression of CDK2, CDK4 and associated cyclins E1 and D1, while up-regulated the expression of p21, p27 and p53 expression. NX also enhanced phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs ERK1/2, p38 and JNK1/2. Collectively, these findings suggested that NX-mediated protection against DEN/2-AAF-induced liver tumorigenesis involves decrease in cell proliferation and enhancement in apoptotic cell death of liver cancer cells.

  5. Biochemical and phenotypic characterization of human basophilic cells derived from dispersed fetal liver with murine T cell factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seldin, D.C.; Caulfield, J.P.; Hein, A.; Osathanondh, R.; Nabel, G.; Schlossman, S.F.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.

    1986-03-15

    Metachromatically granulated cells were generated from human fetal liver stem cells cultured in heterologous mouse conditioned medium rich in interleukin 3. After 2 to 3 wk of culture with biweekly changes of medium and selection of nonadherent cells, all cells present in five cultures had cytoplasmic granules. Ultrastructurally, many granules contained fibrillar material or electron-dense cores with fibrils and vesicular fragments. In addition, the granules of many cells were filled with electron-dense material, which in some cases had a fine structure consisting of concentric whorls or a reticular pattern. Analysis of high-affinity IgE receptors on the cultured cells by flow cytometry demonstrated a unimodel fluorescence pattern, suggesting that most cells were in the basophil or mast cell lineage. The cells contained 52 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of histamine and incorporated (/sup 35/S)sulfate at an average rate of 31,300 cpm/10/sup 6/ cells/4 hr into 175,000 m.w. chondroitin sulfate A proteoglycans. Upon activation with 1 ..mu..M calcium ionophore A23187, the cultured cells released 53% of their cell-associated histamine and metabolized arachidonic acid to 15.0 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of immunoreactive leukotriene C/sub 4/ equivalents, 0.5 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of leukotriene B/sub 4/, and 3.1 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of prostaglandin D/sub 2/ (means, n = 3). Thus, stem cells present in human fetal liver give rise, as do stem cells in mouse fetal liver, to metachromatically granulated cells when cultured in the presence of mouse interleukin 3.

  6. Role of transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha in human fetal liver cell types in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Foka, Hubert G; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2015-08-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) has been shown to play an important role in liver development, cell proliferation and differentiation. It is, however, largely unknown if C/EBPα regulates cell differentiation and proliferation differently in the diverse cell types of the human liver. We investigated the role of C/EBPα in primary human fetal liver cells and liver cell subpopulations in vitro using a 3-D perfusion bioreactor as an advanced in vivo-like human organ culture model. Human fetal liver cells were investigated in vitro. C/EBPα gene expression was knocked down using siRNA or overexpressed by plasmid transfection. Cell type-specific gene expression was studied, cell populations and their proliferation were investigated, and metabolic parameters were analyzed. When C/EBPα gene expression was knocked down, we observed a significantly reduced expression of typical endothelial, hematopoietic and mesenchymal genes such as CD31, vWF, CD90, CD45 and α-smooth muscle actin in fetal cells. The intracellular expression of hepatic proteins and genes for liver-specific serum proteins α-fetoprotein and albumin were reduced, their protein secretion was increased. Fetal endothelial cell numbers were reduced and hepatoblast numbers were increased. C/EBPα overexpression in fetal cells resulted in increased endothelial numbers, but did not affect mesenchymal cell types or hepatoblasts. We demonstrated that the effects of C/EBPα are specific for the different human fetal liver cell types, using an advanced 3-D perfusion bioreactor as a human in vivo-like model. © 2014 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  7. Gene expression profiling and secretome analysis differentiate adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells and human hepatic stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Berardis

    Full Text Available Adult-derived human liver stem/progenitor cells (ADHLSC are obtained after primary culture of the liver parenchymal fraction. The cells are of fibroblastic morphology and exhibit a hepato-mesenchymal phenotype. Hepatic stellate cells (HSC derived from the liver non-parenchymal fraction, present a comparable morphology as ADHLSC. Because both ADHLSC and HSC are described as liver stem/progenitor cells, we strived to extensively compare both cell populations at different levels and to propose tools demonstrating their singularity. ADHLSC and HSC were isolated from the liver of four different donors, expanded in vitro and followed from passage 5 until passage 11. Cell characterization was performed using immunocytochemistry, western blotting, flow cytometry, and gene microarray analyses. The secretion profile of the cells was evaluated using Elisa and multiplex Luminex assays. Both cell types expressed α-smooth muscle actin, vimentin, fibronectin, CD73 and CD90 in accordance with their mesenchymal origin. Microarray analysis revealed significant differences in gene expression profiles. HSC present high expression levels of neuronal markers as well as cytokeratins. Such differences were confirmed using immunocytochemistry and western blotting assays. Furthermore, both cell types displayed distinct secretion profiles as ADHLSC highly secreted cytokines of therapeutic and immuno-modulatory importance, like HGF, interferon-γ and IL-10. Our study demonstrates that ADHLSC and HSC are distinct liver fibroblastic cell populations exhibiting significant different expression and secretion profiles.

  8. Characteristics of HCV replication and expression in a cultured human liver carcinoma cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhi-qing; HAO Fei; MIN Feng; LIU Dao-jian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To establish a cell culture system to support HCV long-term replication in vitro. Methods: A human hepatoma cell line 7721 was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubating with a serum from chronic hepatitis C patient. Cells and supernatant of the culture medium were harvested at various time-phases during the culturing periods. The presence of HCV RNA, the expression of HCV antigens in cells and/or supematant were examined with RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. Results: It was found that the intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on the 2nd day after culture, and then could be intermittently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least 3 months after culture. HCV NS3, CP10 antigens were expressed in the cells. The fresh cells could be infected with the supernatant from cultured infected cells and the transmission of viral genome from HCV-infected 7721 cells to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was also observed. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the human liver carcinoma cell line7721 is not only susceptible to HCV but also can support its long replication in vitro. This cell line with HCV infection in vitro can serve as a useful tool for the study of the mechanism of HCV infection and replication, the evaluation of antiviral agents, and the primary selection of neutralization assays and HCV vaccine development.

  9. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Skipper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a heavy metal that has been shown to cause its toxicity in humans and animals. Many documented studies have shown that cadmium produces various genotoxic effects such as DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Ailments such as bone disease, renal damage, and several forms of cancer are attributed to overexposure to cadmium.  Although there have been numerous studies examining the effects of cadmium in animal models and a few case studies involving communities where cadmium contamination has occurred, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells. To test our hypothesis, cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Lipid hydroperoxide content stress was estimated by lipid peroxidation assay. Genotoxic damage was tested by the means of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment (Annexin-V/PI assay. The result of MTT assay indicated that cadmium chloride induces toxicity to HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, showing a 48 hr-LD50 of 3.6 µg/mL. Data generated from lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant (p < 0.05 increase of hydroperoxide production, specifically at the highest concentration tested. Data obtained from the Comet assay indicated that cadmium chloride causes DNA damage in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A strong concentration-response relationship (p < 0.05 was recorded between annexin V positive cells and cadmium chloride exposure. In summary, these in vitro studies provide clear evidence that cadmium chloride induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and programmed cell death in human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells.

  10. Cryopreserved hepatic progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells can arrest progression of liver fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Arundhati; Raju, Sheena; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocytes generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are considered to be an excellent candidate for restoring the liver function deficiencies. We have earlier standardized a three-step differentiation protocol to generate functional hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) from hESCs, which expressed the major hepatic markers. We have also found that the HLCs remain stable and functional even after extended period of in vitro culture and cryopreservation. In the present study, we have aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of cryopreserved-thawed hESC-derived hepatic progenitor cells following transplantation in carbon tetrachloride-induced fibrotic rat livers. Significant therapeutic effects, including improved hepatic histology and normal serum biochemistry of hepatic enzymes along with increased survival rate, were observed in the cell transplanted rats. This result is an encouraging indication to develop methods for clinical application of hESC-derived hepatic lineage cells.

  11. The interaction of bacterial magnetosomes and human liver cancer cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pingping; Chen, Chuanfang; Chen, Changyou; Li, Yue; Pan, Weidong; Song, Tao

    2017-04-01

    As the biogenic magnetic nanomaterial, bacterial magnetic nanoparticles, namely magnetosomes, provide many advantages for potential biomedical applications. As such, interactions among magnetosomes and target cells should be elucidated to develop their bioapplications and evaluate their biocompatibilities. In this study, the interaction of magnetosomes and human liver cancer HepG2 cells was examined. Prussian blue staining revealed numerous stained particles in or on the cells. Intracellular iron concentrations, measured through inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, increased with the increasing concentration of the magnetosomes. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that magnetosomes could be internalized in cells, mainly encapsulated in membrane vesicles, such as endosomes and lysosomes, and partly found as free particles in the cytosol. Some of the magnetosomes on cellular surfaces were encapsulated through cell membrane ruffling, which is the initiating process of endocytosis. Applying low temperature treatment and using specific endocytic inhibitors, we validated that macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis were involved in magnetosome uptake by HepG2 cells. Consequently, we revealed the interaction and intrinsic endocytic mechanisms of magnetosomes and HepG2 cells. This study provides a basis for the further research on bacterial magnetosome applications in liver diseases.

  12. Completion of hepatitis C virus replication cycle in heterokaryons excludes dominant restrictions in human non-liver and mouse liver cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Frentzen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is hepatotropic and only infects humans and chimpanzees. Consequently, an immunocompetent small animal model is lacking. The restricted tropism of HCV likely reflects specific host factor requirements. We investigated if dominant restriction factors expressed in non-liver or non-human cell lines inhibit HCV propagation thus rendering these cells non-permissive. To this end we explored if HCV completes its replication cycle in heterokaryons between human liver cell lines and non-permissive cell lines from human non-liver or mouse liver origin. Despite functional viral pattern recognition pathways and responsiveness to interferon, virus production was observed in all fused cells and was only ablated when cells were treated with exogenous interferon. These results exclude that constitutive or virus-induced expression of dominant restriction factors prevents propagation of HCV in these cell types, which has important implications for HCV tissue and species tropism. In turn, these data strongly advocate transgenic approaches of crucial human HCV cofactors to establish an immunocompetent small animal model.

  13. Triple Staining Including FOXA2 Identifies Stem Cell Lineages Undergoing Hepatic and Biliary Differentiation in Cirrhotic Human Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogler, Charles E; Bebawee, Remon; Matarlo, Joe; Locker, Joseph; Pattamanuch, Nicole; Gupta, Sanjeev; Rogler, Leslie E

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigations have reported many markers associated with human liver stem/progenitor cells, "oval cells," and identified "niches" in diseased livers where stem cells occur. However, there has remained a need to identify entire lineages of stem cells as they differentiate into bile ducts or hepatocytes. We have used combined immunohistochemical staining for a marker of hepatic commitment and specification (FOXA2 [Forkhead box A2]), hepatocyte maturation (Albumin and HepPar1), and features of bile ducts (CK19 [cytokeratin 19]) to identify lineages of stem cells differentiating toward the hepatocytic or bile ductular compartments of end-stage cirrhotic human liver. We identified large clusters of disorganized, FOXA2 expressing, oval cells in localized liver regions surrounded by fibrotic matrix, designated as "micro-niches." Specific FOXA2-positive cells within the micro-niches organize into primitive duct structures that support both hepatocytic and bile ductular differentiation enabling identification of entire lineages of cells forming the two types of structures. We also detected expression of hsa-miR-122 in primitive ductular reactions expected for hepatocytic differentiation and hsa-miR-23b cluster expression that drives liver cell fate decisions in cells undergoing lineage commitment. Our data establish the foundation for a mechanistic hypothesis on how stem cell lineages progress in specialized micro-niches in cirrhotic end-stage liver disease.

  14. Ultrastructural characteristics of novel epithelial cell types identified in human pathologic liver specimens with chronic ductular reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, R; Desmet, V

    1992-06-01

    Previous immunohistochemical studies on human liver biopsies with chronic ductular reaction revealed the presence of "small cells" with bile-duct type cytokeratin profile in the periportal area. This study identified similar cells by electron microscopy. The authors studied 13 human liver specimens with various liver diseases, but all characterized by chronic ductular reaction. In all specimens, variable numbers of "small cells" with common epithelial characteristics were identified in the periportal area. They could be classified into three types. Type I cells showed an oval cell shape and oval nucleus, early or established formation of junctional complexes with adjacent cells, a full assortment of cytoplasmic organelles, and bundles of tonofilaments. Type II cells showed features of bile-duct cell differentiation, including lateral interdigitations, apical microvilli, basal pinocytotic vacuoles, and basement membrane formation. In contrast, type III cells displayed additional features indicating hepatocellular differentiation, such as a more prominent nucleus, formation of a hemicanaliculus, and glycogen rosettes. It is concluded that these small cells of epithelial nature display variable differentiation characteristics of either bile-duct type cells or hepatocytes. These findings support the existence of bipotential progenitor epithelial cells in human liver. They may have implications for liver regeneration and carcinogenesis.

  15. A study of structural differences between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Daping; Xu, Fangcheng; Yu, Qiang; Fang, Tingting; Xia, Junjun; Li, Seruo; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Since liver cancer seriously threatens human health, it is very urgent to explore an effective method for diagnosing liver cancer early. In this study, we investigated the structure differences of IR spectra between neoplastic liver cells and normal liver cells. The major differences of absorption bands were observed between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, the values of A2955/A2921, A1744/A1082, A1640/A1535, H1121/H1020 might be potentially useful factors for distinguishing liver cancer cells from normal liver cells. Curve fitting also provided some important information on structural differences between malignant and normal liver cancer cells. Furthermore, IR spectra combined with hierarchical cluster analysis could make a distinction between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells. The present results provided enough cell basis for diagnosis of liver cancer by FTIR spectroscopy, suggesting FTIR spectroscopy may be a potentially useful tool for liver cancer diagnosis.

  16. Cytotoxicity of Marchantia convoluta leaf extracts to human liver and lung cancer cells

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    Xiao J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of three extracts (petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol from a plant used in folk medicine, Marchantia convoluta, to human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H1299 and liver carcinoma (HepG2 cell lines was tested. After 72-h incubation of lung and liver cancer cell cultures with varying concentrations of extracts (15 to 200 µg/mL, cytotoxicity was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and reported in terms of cell viability. The extracts that showed a significant cytotoxicity were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to identify the components. The ethyl acetate, but not the petroleum ether or n-butanol extract, had a significant cytotoxicity against lung and liver carcinoma cells with IC50 values of 100 and 30 µg/mL, respectively. A high concentration of ethyl acetate extract (100 µg/mL rapidly reduced the number of H1299 cells. At lower concentrations of ethyl acetate extract (15, 30, and 40 µg/mL, the numbers of HepG2 cells started to decrease markedly. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the ethyl acetate extract revealed the presence of several compounds such as phytol (23.42%, 1,2,4-tripropylbenzene (13.09%, 9-cedranone (12.75%, ledene oxide (7.22%, caryophyllene (1.82%, and caryophyllene oxide (1.15%. HPLC analysis result showed that there were no flavonoids in ethyl acetate extract, but flavonoids are abundant in n-butanol extract. Further studies are needed regarding the identification, toxicity, and mechanism of action of active compounds.

  17. Human telomerase activity, telomerase and telomeric template expression in hepatic stem cells and in livers from fetal and postnatal donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Reid, Lola M

    2009-10-01

    Although telomerase activity has been analyzed in various normal and malignant tissues, including liver, it is still unknown to what extent telomerase can be associated with specific maturational lineage stages. We assessed human telomerase activity, protein and gene expression for the telomerase reverse transcriptase, as well as expression of the telomeric template RNA hTER in hepatic stem cells and in various developmental stages of the liver from fetal to adult. In addition, the effect of growth factors on telomerase activity was analyzed in hepatic stem cells in vitro. Telomerase was found to be highly active in fetal liver cells and was significantly higher than in hepatic stem cells, correlating with gene and protein expression levels. Activity in postnatal livers from all donor ages varied considerably and did not correlate with age or gene expression levels. The hter expression could be detected throughout the development. A short stimulation by growth factors of cultured hepatic stem cells did not increase telomerase activity. Telomerase is considerably active in fetal liver and variably in postnatal livers. Although telomerase protein is present at varying levels in liver cells of all donor ages, gene expression is solely associated with fetal liver cells.

  18. Carboxylated nanodiamonds are neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic on liver, kidney, intestine and lung human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, V; Sergent, J A; Grall, R; Altmeyer-Morel, S; Girard, H A; Petit, T; Gesset, C; Mermoux, M; Bergonzo, P; Arnault, J C; Chevillard, S

    2014-08-01

    Although nanodiamonds (NDs) appear as one of the most promising nanocarbon materials available so far for biomedical applications, their risk for human health remains unknown. Our work was aimed at defining the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of two sets of commercial carboxylated NDs with diameters below 20 and 100 nm, on six human cell lines chosen as representative of potential target organs: HepG2 and Hep3B (liver), Caki-1 and Hek-293 (kidney), HT29 (intestine) and A549 (lung). Cytotoxicity of NDs was assessed by measuring cell impedance (xCELLigence® system) and cell survival/death by flow cytometry while genotoxicity was assessed by γ-H2Ax foci detection, which is considered the most sensitive technique for studying DNA double-strand breaks. To validate and check the sensitivity of the techniques, aminated polystyrene nanobeads were used as positive control in all assays. Cell incorporation of NDs was also studied by flow cytometry and luminescent N-V center photoluminescence (confirmed by Raman microscopy), to ensure that nanoparticles entered the cells. Overall, we show that NDs effectively entered the cells but NDs do not induce any significant cytotoxic or genotoxic effects on the six cell lines up to an exposure dose of 250 µg/mL. Taken together these results strongly support the huge potential of NDs for human nanomedicine but also their potential as negative control in nanotoxicology studies.

  19. Phenotypic and functional analysis of human fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollini, Pierre; Faes-Van't Hull, Eveline; Kaiser, Stefan; Kapp, Ursula; Leyvraz, Serge

    2007-04-01

    Steady-state hematopoiesis and hematopoietic transplantation rely on the unique potential of stem cells to undergo both self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. Fetal liver (FL) represents a promising alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but limited by the total cell number obtained in a typical harvest. We reported that human FL nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) repopulating cells (SRCs) could be expanded under simple stroma-free culture conditions. Here, we sought to further characterize FL HSC/SRCs phenotypically and functionally before and following culture. Unexpanded or cultured FL cell suspensions were separated into various subpopulations. These were tested for long-term culture potential and for in vivo repopulating function following transplantation into NOD/SCID mice. We found that upon culture of human FL cells, a tight association between classical stem cell phenotypes, such as CD34(+) /CD38(-) and/or side population, and NOD/SCID repopulating function was lost, as observed with other sources. Although SRC activity before and following culture consistently correlated with the presence of a CD34(+) cell population, we provide evidence that, contrary to umbilical cord blood and adult sources, stem cells present in both CD34(+) and CD34(-) FL populations can sustain long-term hematopoietic cultures. Furthermore, upon additional culture, CD34-depleted cell suspensions, devoid of SRCs, regenerated a population of CD34(+) cells possessing SRC function. Our studies suggest that compared to neonatal and adult sources, the phenotypical characteristics of putative human FL HSCs may be less strictly defined, and reinforce the accumulated evidence that human FL represents a unique, valuable alternative and highly proliferative source of HSCs for clinical applications.

  20. Stem cell-derived models to improve mechanistic understanding and prediction of human drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Christopher; Antoine, Daniel J; Bonner, Frank; Crozier, Jonathan; Denning, Chris; Fontana, Robert J; Hanley, Neil A; Hay, David C; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Juhila, Satu; Kitteringham, Neil; Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Norris, Alan; Pridgeon, Chris; Ross, James A; Young, Rowena Sison; Tagle, Danilo; Tornesi, Belen; van de Water, Bob; Weaver, Richard J; Zhang, Fang; Park, B Kevin

    2017-02-01

    Current preclinical drug testing does not predict some forms of adverse drug reactions in humans. Efforts at improving predictability of drug-induced tissue injury in humans include using stem cell technology to generate human cells for screening for adverse effects of drugs in humans. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells means that it may ultimately be possible to develop personalized toxicology to determine interindividual susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the complexity of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury means that no current single-cell model, whether of primary liver tissue origin, from liver cell lines, or derived from stem cells, adequately emulates what is believed to occur during human drug-induced liver injury. Nevertheless, a single-cell model of a human hepatocyte which emulates key features of a hepatocyte is likely to be valuable in assessing potential chemical risk; furthermore, understanding how to generate a relevant hepatocyte will also be critical to efforts to build complex multicellular models of the liver. Currently, hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from stem cells still fall short of recapitulating the full mature hepatocellular phenotype. Therefore, we convened a number of experts from the areas of preclinical and clinical hepatotoxicity and safety assessment, from industry, academia, and regulatory bodies, to specifically explore the application of stem cells in hepatotoxicity safety assessment and to make recommendations for the way forward. In this short review, we particularly discuss the importance of benchmarking stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells to their terminally differentiated human counterparts using defined phenotyping, to make sure the cells are relevant and comparable between labs, and outline why this process is essential before the cells are introduced into chemical safety assessment. (Hepatology 2017;65:710-721).

  1. Fibrogenic potential of human multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in injured liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto M Baertschiger

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are currently investigated clinically as cellular therapy for a variety of diseases. Differentiation of MSC toward endodermal lineages, including hepatocytes and their therapeutic effect on fibrosis has been described but remains controversial. Recent evidence attributed a fibrotic potential to MSC. As differentiation potential might be dependent of donor age, we studied MSC derived from adult and pediatric human bone marrow and their potential to differentiate into hepatocytes or myofibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. Following characterization, expanded adult and pediatric MSC were co-cultured with a human hepatoma cell line, Huh-7, in a hepatogenic differentiation medium containing Hepatocyte growth factor, Fibroblast growth factor 4 and oncostatin M. In vivo, MSC were transplanted into spleen or liver of NOD/SCID mice undergoing partial hepatectomy and retrorsine treatment. Expression of mesenchymal and hepatic markers was analyzed by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. In vitro, adult and pediatric MSC expressed characteristic surface antigens of MSC. Expansion capacity of pediatric MSC was significantly higher when compared to adult MSC. In co-culture with Huh-7 cells in hepatogenic differentiation medium, albumin expression was more frequently detected in pediatric MSC (5/8 experiments when compared to adult MSC (2/10 experiments. However, in such condition pediatric MSC expressed alpha smooth muscle more strongly than adult MSC. Stable engraftment in the liver was not achieved after intrasplenic injection of pediatric or adult MSC. After intrahepatic injection, MSC permanently remained in liver tissue, kept a mesenchymal morphology and expressed vimentin and alpha smooth muscle actin, but no hepatic markers. Further, MSC localization merges with collagen deposition in transplanted liver and no difference was observed using adult or pediatric MSC. In conclusion, when transplanted into an

  2. Effect of human patient plasma ex vivo treatment on gene expression and progenitor cell activation of primary human liver cells in multi-compartment 3D perfusion bioreactors for extra-corporeal liver support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Mutig, Kerim; Schrade, Petra; Bachmann, Sebastian; Gerlach, Jörg C; Zeilinger, Katrin

    2009-07-01

    Cultivation of primary human liver cells in innovative 3D perfusion multi-compartment capillary membrane bioreactors using decentralized mass exchange and integral oxygenation provides in vitro conditions close to the physiologic environment in vivo. While a few scale-up bioreactors were used clinically, inoculated liver progenitors in these bioreactors were not investigated. Therefore, we characterized regenerative processes and expression patterns of auto- and paracrine mediators involved in liver regeneration in bioreactors after patient treatment. Primary human liver cells containing parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells co-cultivated in bioreactors were used for clinical extra-corporeal liver support to bridge to liver transplantation. 3D tissue re-structuring in bioreactors was studied; expression of proteins and genes related to regenerative processes and hepatic progenitors was analyzed. Formation of multiple bile ductular networks and colonies of putative progenitors were observed within parenchymal cell aggregates. HGF was detected in scattered cells located close to vascular-like structures, expression of HGFA and c-Met was assigned to biliary cells and hepatocytes. Increased expression of genes associated to hepatic progenitors was detected following clinical application. The results confirm auto- and paracrine interactions between co-cultured cells in the bioreactor. The 3D bioreactor provides a valuable tool to study mechanisms of progenitor activation and hepatic regeneration ex vivo under patient plasma treatment. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays.

  4. Reversal of hyperglycemia in mice by using human expandable insulin-producing cells differentiated from fetal liver progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalzman, Michal; Gupta, Sanjeev; Giri, Ranjit K.; Berkovich, Irina; Sappal, Baljit S.; Karnieli, Ohad; Zern, Mark A.; Fleischer, Norman; Efrat, Shimon

    2003-06-01

    Beta-cell replacement is considered to be the most promising approach for treatment of type 1 diabetes. Its application on a large scale is hindered by a shortage of cells for transplantation. Activation of insulin expression, storage, and regulated secretion in stem/progenitor cells offers novel ways to overcome this shortage. We explored whether fetal human progenitor liver cells (FH) could be induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells after expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) gene, which is a key regulator of pancreatic development and insulin expression in beta cells. FH cells possess a considerable replication capacity, and this was further extended by introduction of the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase. Immortalized FH cells expressing Pdx1 activated multiple beta-cell genes, produced and stored considerable amounts of insulin, and released insulin in a regulated manner in response to glucose. When transplanted into hyperglycemic immunodeficient mice, the cells restored and maintained euglycemia for prolonged periods. Quantitation of human C-peptide in the mouse serum confirmed that the glycemia was normalized by the transplanted human cells. This approach offers the potential of a novel source of cells for transplantation into patients with type 1 diabetes.

  5. Effect of extracellular vesicles of human adipose tissue on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranendonk, Mariëtte E G; Visseren, Frank L J; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; de Jager, Wilco; Wauben, Marca H M; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2014-10-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a key mechanism in obesity-induced cardiovascular disease. To unravel mechanisms whereby human adipose tissue (AT) contributes to systemic IR, the effect of human AT-extracellular vesicles (EVs) on insulin signaling in liver and muscle cells was determined. EVs released from human subcutaneous (SAT) and omental AT (OAT)-explants ex vivo were used for stimulation of hepatocytes and myotubes in vitro. Subsequently, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and expression of gluconeogenic genes (G6P, PEPCK) was determined. AT-EV adipokine levels were measured by multiplex immunoassay, and AT-EVs were quantified by high-resolution flow cytometry. In hepatocytes, AT-EVs from the majority of patients inhibited insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation, while EVs from some patients stimulated insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. In myotubes AT-EVs exerted an ambiguous effect on insulin signaling. Hepatic Akt phosphorylation related negatively to G6P-expression by both SAT-EVs (r = -0.60, P = 0.01) and OAT-EVs (r = -0.74, P = 0.001). MCP-1, IL-6, and MIF concentrations were higher in OAT-EVs compared to SAT-EVs and differently related to lower Akt phosphorylation in hepatocytes. Finally, the number of OAT-EVs correlated positively with liver enzymes indicative for liver dysfunction. Human AT-EVs can stimulate or inhibit insulin signaling in hepatocytes- possibly depending on their adipokine content- and may thereby contribute to systemic IR. Copyright © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  6. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-05-23

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity.

  7. Gene expression profiles of human liver cells mediated by hepatitis B virus X protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ying ZHANG; Fu-qing XU; Chang-liang SHAN; Rong XIANG; Li-hong YE; Xiao-dong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the gene expression profiles mediated by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx), we characterized the molecular features of pathogenesis associated with HBx in a human liver cell model.Methods: We examined gene expression profiles in L-O2-X cells, an engineered L-O2 cell line that constitutively expresses HBx, relative to L-O2 cells using an Agilent 22 K human 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing more than 21,329 unique, well-characterized Homo sapiens genes, Western blot analysis and RNA interference (RNAi) targeting HBx mRNA validated the overexpression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Bcl-2 in L-O2-X cells. Meanwhile, the BrdU incorporation assay was used to test cell proliferation mediated by upregulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).Results: The microarray showed that the expression levels of 152 genes were remarkably altered; 82 of the genes were upregulated and 70 genes were downregulated in L-O2-X cells. The altered genes were associated with signal transduction pathways, cell cycle, metastasis, transcriptional regulation, immune response, metabolism, and other processes. PCNA and Bcl-2 were upregulated in L-O2-X cells. Furthermore, we found that COX-2 upregulation in L-O2-X cells enhanced proliferation using the BrdU incorporation assay, whereas indomethacin (an inhibitor of COX-2) abolished the promotion.Conclusion: Our findings provide new evidence that HBx is able to regulate many genes that may be involved in the car-cinogenesis. These regulated genes mediated by HBx may serve as molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. Bone marrow stem cells contribute to alcohol liver fibrosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Evangelos; Newsome, Philip N; Boyle, Shelagh; Brown, Rachael; Pryde, Anne; McCall, Shonna; Hayes, Peter C; Bickmore, Wendy A; Harrison, David J; Plevris, John N

    2010-09-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC) contribution to liver repair varies considerably and recent evidence suggests these cells may contribute to liver fibrosis. We investigated the mobilization and hepatic recruitment of bone marrow (BM) stem cells in patients with alcohol liver injury and their contribution to parenchymal/non-parenchymal liver cell lineages. Liver biopsies from alcoholic hepatitis (AH) patients and male patients, who received a female liver transplant and developed AH, were analyzed for BM stem cell content by fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunostaining. Y chromosome analysis was performed, along with co-staining for hepatocyte, biliary, myofibroblast, and Ki-67 markers. Blood CD34(+) levels were quantified in AH patients by flow cytometry. AH patients had increased CD34(+) cell counts in liver tissue (1.834% +/- 0.605%; P < 0.05) and in blood (0.195% +/- 0.063%; P < 0.05) as compared with matched controls (0.299% + 0.208% and 0.067% +/- 0.01%). A proportion of hepatic myofibroblasts were BM-derived (7.9%-26.8%) as deemed by the co-localization of Y chromosome/alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) staining. In the cross-sex liver grafts with AH, 5.025% of the myofibroblasts were co-staining for CD34, suggesting that a population of CD34(+) cells were contributing to the hepatic myofibroblast population. There was no evidence of BM contribution to hepatocyte or biliary cell differentiation, nor evidence of increased hepatocyte regeneration. Alcohol liver injury mobilizes CD34(+) stem cells into the circulation and recruits them into the liver. These BMSCs contribute to the hepatic myofibroblast population but not to parenchymal lineages and do not promote hepatocyte repair.

  9. Stem cell-derived models to improve mechanistic understanding and prediction of human drug induced liver injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldring, Christopher; Antoine, Daniel J.; Bonner, Frank; Crozier, Jonathan; Denning, Chris; Fontana, Robert J.; Hanley, Neil A.; Hay, David C.; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Juhila, Satu; Kitteringham, Neil; Silva-Lima, Beatriz; Norris, Alan; Pridgeon, Chris; Ross, James A.; Sison Young, Rowena; Tagle, Danilo; Tornesi, Belen; van de Water, Bob; Weaver, Richard J.; Zhang, Fang; Park, B. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Current preclinical drug testing does not predict some forms of adverse drug reactions in humans. Efforts at improving predictability of drug-induced tissue injury in humans include using stem cell technology to generate human cells for screening for adverse effects of drugs in humans. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells means that it may ultimately be possible to develop personalised toxicology to determine inter-individual susceptibility to adverse drug reactions. However, the complexity of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) means that no current single cell model, whether of primary liver tissue origin, from liver cell lines, or derived from stem cells, adequately emulates what is believed to occur during human DILI. Nevertheless, a single cell model of a human hepatocyte which emulates key features of a hepatocyte is likely to be valuable in assessing potential chemical risk; furthermore understanding how to generate a relevant hepatocyte will also be critical to efforts to build complex multicellular models of the liver. Currently, hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from stem cells still fall short of recapitulating the full mature hepatocellular phenotype. Therefore, we convened a number of experts from the areas of preclinical and clinical hepatotoxicity and safety assessment, from industry, academia and regulatory bodies, to specifically explore the application of stem cells in hepatotoxicity safety assessment, and to make recommendations for the way forward. In this short review, we particularly discuss the importance of benchmarking stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells to their terminally-differentiated human counterparts using defined phenotyping, to make sure the cells are relevant and comparable between labs, and outline why this process is essential before the cells are introduced into chemical safety assessment. PMID:27775817

  10. Estabishment of A Human Liver Cancer Cell Line Transfected with IL-2 cDNA and Its Biologic Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙跃明; 王学浩; 杜竞辉

    2001-01-01

    Objective To obtain IL-2 gene transfected human liver cancer cells and study IL-2 expression and its biologic activity in vivo. Methods Human liver cancer cells SMMC-7721 were cocultured with recombinant retroviral vector LNC-IL-2,and screening was performed in G418 medium.The exogenous IL-2 cDNA at the DNA,RNA,and protein levels were determined by using dot hybridization,PR-PCR and MTT methods respectively.The tumorigenesis and antitumorigenesis of the screened liver cancer cell with subcutaneous injection in nude mice were observed. Results and Conclusion The IL-2 cDNA was successfully integrated into SMMC-7721 cell genomic DNA and continuously expressed for more than 88 days.Subcutaneous vaccination of the nude mice with transfected cells revealed an obvious suppression of its tumorigenicity,and could induce antitumor activity in vivo.

  11. Production of factor VIII by human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells transplanted in immunodeficient uPA mice.

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    Marina E Fomin

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs form a semi-permeable barrier between parenchymal hepatocytes and the blood. LSECs participate in liver metabolism, clearance of pathological agents, immunological responses, architectural maintenance of the liver and synthesis of growth factors and cytokines. LSECs also play an important role in coagulation through the synthesis of Factor VIII (FVIII. Herein, we phenotypically define human LSECs isolated from fetal liver using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Isolated LSECs were cultured and shown to express endothelial markers and markers specific for the LSEC lineage. LSECs were also shown to engraft the liver when human fetal liver cells were transplanted into immunodeficient mice with liver specific expression of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA transgene (uPA-NOG mice. Engrafted cells expressed human Factor VIII at levels approaching those found in human plasma. We also demonstrate engraftment of adult LSECs, as well as hepatocytes, transplanted into uPA-NOG mice. We propose that overexpression of uPA provides beneficial conditions for LSEC engraftment due to elevated expression of the angiogenic cytokine, vascular endothelial growth factor. This work provides a detailed characterization of human midgestation LSECs, thereby providing the means for their purification and culture based on their expression of CD14 and CD32 as well as a lack of CD45 expression. The uPA-NOG mouse is shown to be a permissive host for human LSECs and adult hepatocytes, but not fetal hepatoblasts. Thus, these mice provide a useful model system to study these cell types in vivo. Demonstration of human FVIII production by transplanted LSECs encourages further pursuit of LSEC transplantation as a cellular therapy for the treatment of hemophilia A.

  12. Antisense EGFR sequence reverses the growth properties of human liver carcinoma cell line BEL-7404 in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUYONGHUA; WANLIJIANG; SUFENGPENG; YINGHUACHEN

    1993-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing a full length human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cDNA sequence in antisense orientation was transferred into cells of a human liver carcinoma cell line BEL-7404. Compared with the control cell clone JX-0 transferred with the vector plasmid and the parent BEL-7404 cells, the antisense EGFR transferred cell clone JX-1 showed a decreased EGFR gene expression and reduced significantly the growth potential either in anchorage-dependent or anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore. JX-1 cells appeared to be distinctly dependent on serum concentration for monolayer growth. The results suggested that antisense EGFR could partly block the EGFR gene ex-pression and reverse the malignant growth properties of human liver carcinoma cells in vitro.

  13. Toll-like receptor 8 agonist and bacteria trigger potent activation of innate immune cells in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juandy Jo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of innate immune cells to sense and respond to impending danger varies by anatomical location. The liver is considered tolerogenic but is still capable of mounting a successful immune response to clear various infections. To understand whether hepatic immune cells tune their response to different infectious challenges, we probed mononuclear cells purified from human healthy and diseased livers with distinct pathogen-associated molecules. We discovered that only the TLR8 agonist ssRNA40 selectively activated liver-resident innate immune cells to produce substantial quantities of IFN-γ. We identified CD161(Bright mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT and CD56(Bright NK cells as the responding liver-resident innate immune cells. Their activation was not directly induced by the TLR8 agonist but was dependent on IL-12 and IL-18 production by ssRNA40-activated intrahepatic monocytes. Importantly, the ssRNA40-induced cytokine-dependent activation of MAIT cells mirrored responses induced by bacteria, i.e., generating a selective production of high levels of IFN-γ, without the concomitant production of TNF-α or IL-17A. The intrahepatic IFN-γ production could be detected not only in healthy livers, but also in HBV- or HCV-infected livers. In conclusion, the human liver harbors a network of immune cells able to modulate their immunological responses to different pathogen-associated molecules. Their ability to generate a strong production of IFN-γ upon stimulation with TLR8 agonist opens new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of diverse liver pathologies.

  14. Stiffness of hyaluronic acid gels containing liver extracellular matrix supports human hepatocyte function and alters cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cynthia; Skardal, Aleksander; Atala, Anthony; Shupe, Thomas D

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering and cell based liver therapies have utilized primary hepatocytes with limited success due to the failure of hepatocytes to maintain their phenotype in vitro. In order to overcome this challenge, hyaluronic acid (HA) cell culture substrates were formulated to closely mimic the composition and stiffness of the normal liver cellular microenvironment. The stiffness of the substrate was modulated by adjusting HA hydrogel crosslinking. Additionally, the repertoire of bioactive molecules within the HA substrate was bolstered by supplementation with normal liver extracellular matrix (ECM). Primary human hepatocyte viability and phenotype were determined over a narrow physiologically relevant range of substrate stiffnesses from 600 to 4600Pa in both the presence and absence of liver ECM. Cell attachment, viability, and organization of the actin cytoskeleton improved with increased stiffness up to 4600Pa. These differences were not evident in earlier time points or substrates containing only HA. However, gene expression for the hepatocyte markers hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and albumin significantly decreased on the 4600Pa stiffness at day 7 indicating that cells may not have maintained their phenotype long-term at this stiffness. Function, as measured by albumin secretion, varied with both stiffness and time in culture and peaked at day 7 at the 1200Pa stiffness, slightly below the stiffness of normal liver ECM at 3000Pa. Overall, gel stiffness affected primary human hepatocyte cell adhesion, functional marker expression, and morphological characteristics dependent on both the presence of liver ECM in gel substrates and time in culture.

  15. The sinusoidal lining cells in "normal" human liver. A scanning electron microscopic investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christoffersen, P

    1986-01-01

    The scanning electron microscopic was used to study the fenestrations of human liver sinusoids. Thirteen biopsies, where light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed normal sinusoidal architecture, were investigated. The number of fenestrae was calculated in acinar zone 3...

  16. Monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal liver share common differentiation pathways and homeostatic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchenko, Olena; Di Stefano, Antonio; Geoerger, Birgit; Hamidi, Sofiane; Opolon, Paule; Robert, Thomas; Routhier, Mélanie; El-Benna, Jamel; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Boukour, Siham; Lescure, Bernadette; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Norol, Françoise

    2011-03-17

    The early emergence of macrophages and their large pattern of tissue distribution during development suggest that they may play a critical role in the initial steps of embryogenesis. In the present study, we show that monocytic cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and from fetal liver follow a differentiation pathway different to that of adult cells, leading to specific functions. Embryonic and fetal monocytic cells differentiated from a CD14(low)CD16(-) precursor to form CD14(high)CD16(+) cells without producing the CD14(high)CD16(-) cell population that predominates in adult peripheral blood. Both demonstrated an enhanced expression of genes encoding tissue-degrading enzymes, chemokines, and scavenger receptors, as was previously reported for M2 macrophages. Compared with adult blood monocytes, embryonic and fetal monocytic cells secreted high amounts of proteins acting on tissue remodeling and angiogenesis, and most of them expressed the Tie2 receptor. Furthermore, they promoted vascular remodeling in xenotransplanted human tumors. These findings suggest that the regulation of human fetal and embryonic monocytic cell differentiation leads to the generation of cells endowed mainly with anti-inflammatory and remodeling functions. Trophic and immunosuppressive functions of M2-polarized macrophages link fetus and tumor development, and hESCs offer a valuable experimental model for in vitro studies of mechanisms sustaining these processes.

  17. Chemoprevention and cytotoxic effect of Bauhinia variegata against N-nitrosodiethylamine induced liver tumors and human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkapoor, B; Jayakar, B; Murugesh, N; Sakthisekaran, D

    2006-04-06

    The chemopreventive and cytotoxic effect of ethanol extract of Bauhinia variegata (EBV) was evaluated in N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN, 200 mg/kg) induced experimental liver tumor in rats and human cancer cell lines. Oral administration of ethanol extract of Bauhinia variegata (250 mg/kg) effectively suppressed liver tumor induced by DEN as revealed by decrease in DEN induced elevated levels of serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin, gamma glutamate transpeptidase (GGTP), lipid peroxidase (LPO), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The extract produced an increase in enzymatic antioxidant (superoxide dismutase and catalase) levels and total proteins when compared to those in liver tumor bearing rats. The histopathological changes of liver samples were compared with respective controls. EBV was found to be cytotoxic against human epithelial larynx cancer (HEp2) and human breast cancer (HBL-100) cells. These results show a significant chemopreventive and cytotoxic effect of ethanol extract of Bauhinia variegata against DEN induced liver tumor and human cancer cell lines.

  18. Human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells promote intracellular crawling of lymphocytes during recruitment: A new step in migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Daniel A; Wilson, Garrick K; Bailey, Dalan; Shaw, Robert K; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko; Rot, Antal; Weston, Chris J; Adams, David H; Shetty, Shishir

    2017-01-01

    The recruitment of lymphocytes via the hepatic sinusoidal channels and positioning within liver tissue is a critical event in the development and persistence of chronic inflammatory liver diseases. The hepatic sinusoid is a unique vascular bed lined by hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSECs), a functionally and phenotypically distinct subpopulation of endothelial cells. Using flow-based adhesion assays to study the migration of lymphocytes across primary human HSECs, we found that lymphocytes enter into HSECs, confirmed by electron microscopy demonstrating clear intracellular localization of lymphocytes in vitro and by studies in human liver tissues. Stimulation by interferon-γ increased intracellular localization of lymphocytes within HSECs. Furthermore, using confocal imaging and time-lapse recordings, we demonstrated "intracellular crawling" of lymphocytes entering into one endothelial cell from another. This required the expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and stabilin-1 and was facilitated by the junctional complexes between HSECs.

  19. In vitro large scale production of human mature red blood cells from hematopoietic stem cells by coculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiafei; Li, Yanhua; Wang, Ruoyong; Wang, Yunfang; Nan, Xue; He, Lijuan; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Pei, Xuetao

    2013-01-01

    In vitro models of human erythropoiesis are useful in studying the mechanisms of erythroid differentiation in normal and pathological conditions. Here we describe an erythroid liquid culture system starting from cord blood derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs were cultured for more than 50 days in erythroid differentiation conditions and resulted in a more than 10(9)-fold expansion within 50 days under optimal conditions. Homogeneous erythroid cells were characterized by cell morphology, flow cytometry, and hematopoietic colony assays. Furthermore, terminal erythroid maturation was improved by cosculturing with human fetal liver stromal cells. Cocultured erythroid cells underwent multiple maturation events, including decrease in size, increase in glycophorin A expression, and nuclear condensation. This process resulted in extrusion of the pycnotic nuclei in up to 80% of the cells. Importantly, they possessed the capacity to express the adult definitive β -globin chain upon further maturation. We also show that the oxygen equilibrium curves of the cord blood-differentiated red blood cells (RBCs) are comparable to normal RBCs. The large number and purity of erythroid cells and RBCs produced from cord blood make this method useful for fundamental research in erythroid development, and they also provide a basis for future production of available RBCs for transfusion.

  20. Dig1 protects against cell death provoked by glyphosate-based herbicides in human liver cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travert Carine

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide used pesticides containing different adjuvants like Roundup formulations, which are glyphosate-based herbicides, can provoke some in vivo toxicity and in human cells. These pesticides are commonly found in the environment, surface waters and as food residues of Roundup tolerant genetically modified plants. In order to know their effects on cells from liver, a major detoxification organ, we have studied their mechanism of action and possible protection by precise medicinal plant extracts called Dig1. Methods The cytotoxicity pathways of four formulations of glyphosate-based herbicides were studied using human hepatic cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B, known models to study xenobiotic effects. We monitored mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity and caspases 3/7 for cell mortality and protection by Dig1, as well as cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2, 3A4 and 2C9 and glutathione-S-transferase to approach the mechanism of actions. Results All the four Roundup formulations provoke liver cell death, with adjuvants having stronger effects than glyphosate alone. Hep3B are 3-5 times more sensitive over 48 h. Caspases 3/7 are greatly activated in HepG2 by Roundup at non-cytotoxic levels, and some apoptosis induction by Roundup is possible together with necrosis. CYP3A4 is specifically enhanced by Roundup at doses 400 times less than used in agriculture (2%. CYP1A2 is increased to a lesser extent together with glutathione-S-transferase (GST down-regulation. Dig 1, non cytotoxic and not inducing caspases by itself, is able to prevent Roundup-induced cell death in a time-dependant manner with an important efficiency of up to 89%, within 48 h. In addition, we evidenced that it prevents Caspases 3/7 activation and CYP3A4 enhancement, and not GST reduction, but in turn it slightly inhibited CYP2C9 when added before Roundup. Conclusion Roundup is able to provoke intracellular disruption in hepatic cell lines at different levels, but a

  1. Regulation of deleted in liver cancer-1 gene domains on the proliferation of human colon cancer HT29 cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴平平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the role of deleted in liver cancer-1(DLC-1) gene main domains on the regulation of hu-man colon cancer HT29 cell proliferation. Methods Subcloning recombinant plasmid vectors with Rho GTPase activating protein(RhoGAP),sterile alpha motif(SAM)

  2. High expression of MDR1, MRP1, and MRP3 in the hepatic progenitor cell compartment and hepatocytes in severe human liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, J.E.; Libbrecht, L; Geuken, M; Jansen, PLM; Roskams, TAD

    An increase in bile ductular structures is observed in diverse human liver diseases. These structures harbour the progenitor cell compartment of the liver. Since ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters may have a cytoprotective role in liver disease, an immunohistochemical study was performed on

  3. Human Muse cells, non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells, have the capacity for liver regeneration by specific homing and replenishment of new hepatocytes in liver fibrosis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Masahiro; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Wakao, Shohei; Akimoto, Takahiro; Mizuma, Masamichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Asada, Ryuta; Shimizu, Shinobu; Unno, Michiaki; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-11-02

    Muse cells, a novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells reside in the bone marrow, skin and adipose tissue, are collectable as cells positive for pluripotent surface marker SSEA-3. They are able to differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers. The capacity of intravenously injected human bone marrow-Muse cells to repair the liver fibrosis model of immunodeficient mice was evaluated in this study. They exhibited the ability for differentiation spontaneously into hepatoblast/hepatocyte-lineage cells and high migration toward the serum and liver tissue of carbon tetrachloride-treated mice in vitro. In vivo, they specifically accumulated into the liver, but not into other organs except the lower rate in the lung at 2 weeks after intravenous injection into the liver fibrosis model. After homing, Muse cells spontaneously differentiated in vivo into HepPar-1 (71.1±15.2%), human albumin (54.3±8.2%) and anti-trypsin (47.9±4.6%)-positive cells without fusing with host hepatocytes, and expressed mature functional markers such as human-CYP1A2, and human-Glc-6-Pase, at 8 weeks. Recovery in serum total bilirubin and albumin, and significant attenuation of fibrosis were recognized with statistical differences between the Muse group and control groups which received the vehicle or the same number of non-Muse cells, namely cells other than Muse cells in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, unlike ES and iPS cells, Muse cells are unique in their efficient migration and integration into damaged liver only by intravenous injection, nontumorigenicity, and spontaneous differentiation into hepatocytes, rendering induction into hepatocytes prior to transplantation unnecessary. They are suggested to repair liver fibrosis in two simple steps; expansion after collection from the bone marrow and intravenous injection. Such feasible strategy might provide impressive regenerative performance to liver disease patients.

  4. Verbesina encelioides: cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest, and oxidative DNA damage in human liver cancer (HepG2) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oqail, Mai M; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Al-Sheddi, Ebtesam S; Saquib, Quaiser; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Farshori, Nida N

    2016-05-10

    Cancer is a major health problem and exploiting natural products have been one of the most successful methods to combat this disease. Verbesina encelioides is a notorious weed with various pharmacological properties. The aim of the present investigation was to screen the anticancer potential of V. encelioides extract against human lung cancer (A-549), breast cancer (MCF-7), and liver cancer (HepG2) cell lines. A-549, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells were exposed to various concentrations of (10-1000 μg/ml) of V. encelioides for 24 h. Further, cytotoxic concentrations (250, 500, and 1000 μg/ml) of V. encelioides induced oxidative stress (GSH and LPO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell cycle arrest, and DNA damage in HepG2 cells were studied. The exposure of cells to 10-1000 μg/ml of extract for 24 h, revealed the concentrations 250-1000 μg/ml was cytotoxic against MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, but not against A-549 cells. Moreover, the extract showed higher decrease in the cell viability against HepG2 cells than MCF-7 cells. Therefore, HepG2 cells were selected for further studies viz. oxidative stress (GSH and LPO), reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell cycle arrest, and DNA damage. The results revealed differential anticancer activity of V. encelioides against A-549, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells. A significant induction of oxidative stress, ROS generation, and MMP levels was observed in HepG2 cells. The cell cycle analysis and comet assay showed that V. encelioides significantly induced G2/M arrests and DNA damage. These results indicate that V. encelioides possess substantial cytotoxic potential and may warrant further investigation to develop potential anticancer agent.

  5. Effect of Rougan Huaqian granules combined with human mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on liver fibrosis in cirrhosis rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Chang Wang; Shan Yang; Jing-Jing Huang; Song-Lin Chen; Quan-Qiang Li; Yuan Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect ofRouganHuaqian granules combined with human mesenchymal stem cell(hMSC) transplantation on the liver fibrosis in carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis rats.Methods:SixtySD rats were randomly divided into five groups.The rats in control group received intraperitoneal injection of saline, while those in model control group, treatment groupA, groupB and groupC received intraperitoneal injection of carbon tetrachloride oily solution to induce liver cirrhosis within8 weeks.Then, the rats in the model control group, treatment groupA, treatment groupB, treatment groupC received vein tail injection of saline, RouganHuaqian granules, hMSC suspension andRouganHuaqian granules combined with hMSC suspension.Results:The treatment groups had significantly different liverfunction(AST levels), liver fibrosis index(laminin andHA), hepatic sinusoidal wallsα-smooth muscle actin,Ⅳ collagen and laminin protein expression andⅠ,Ⅲ collagen from the model group(P<0.05). The transplanted cells showed human hepatocyte-like cells differentiation trend in the liver. Conclusions:TheRouganHuaqian granules combined with hMSC transplantation can alleviate liver fibrosis in cirrhosis rats.

  6. Mice with humanized liver endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Filali, E.

    2014-01-01

    The only curative treatment option for a large proportion of patients suffering from a liver disorder is liver transplantation. The use of ex vivo genetically modified autologous liver cells instead of whole liver transplantation could overcome the problem of donor scarcity. Even though clinical

  7. Mice with humanized liver endothelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Filali, E.

    2014-01-01

    The only curative treatment option for a large proportion of patients suffering from a liver disorder is liver transplantation. The use of ex vivo genetically modified autologous liver cells instead of whole liver transplantation could overcome the problem of donor scarcity. Even though clinical tri

  8. Growth potential of human hepatocarcinoma cells in the liver of neonatal immunocompetent mice and its relation to immunological tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze Wang; Zengliang Bai; Hui Zhang; Tianxiao Huan; Juan Li; Xiumin Du; Jingping Zhang

    2009-01-01

    To determine the pathological behavior of human hepatocarcinoma cells in the liver microenvironment of neonatal non-immunode-ficient mice, three human hepatocarcinoma cell lines (Be7402, HepG2, and SK-Hep-1), traced by Dil, were transplanted into the intrahepatic or subcutaneous tissue of neonatal and adult Kunming mice. Histopathological observations showed that cells in the adult liver induced a severe immune response as early as the second day after the implantation, while the subcutaneous neoplasm underwent extensive necrosis by the end of the study. Only the cells injected into the neonatal liver underwent a delayed immunologic rejection in the organ mieroenvironment. These cells retained recognizable tumor features over the first seven days, and displayed an intrahepatic inva-sive pattern. The expression of tumor markers including alpha-fetoprotein and survivin was maintained. The quantitative ELISA for the expression patterns of IL-2 and IL-10 also confirmed that the intrahepatic immunity was non-susceptive during this period. The high serum alpha-fetoprotein level was inversely correlated with the change in immune response. Our study provided a bio-system for the research of immune responses to xenografts in the liver.

  9. Organotypic functional cultures of human liver cells for long-term maintenance and assessment of drug-induced metabolome effects

    OpenAIRE

    MÜLLER Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this thesis were (i) to establish and improve organotypic liver cell culture techniques for long-term pharmacological studies and (ii) to develop and apply a metabolomics based approach for the assessment of drug-induced effects. As first model, a 3D bioreactor system was characterized in terms of cell physiology and functionality. Primary human hepatocytes could be kept viable and functional for more than 2 weeks in this system. Optimization of the system allowed determination o...

  10. Clinical features of pure red cell aplasia associated with human parvovirus B19 infection after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Dali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features of patients with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA associated with human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19 infection after liver transplantation. MethodsThe clinical data of 420 patients who underwent liver transplantation in 302 Hospital of PLA from July 2007 to July 2016 and were followed up regularly were collected, and among these patients, five had a progressive reduction in hemoglobin (Hb level within a short period of time. Bone marrow cytological examination showed erythropoiesis disorders and positive HPV B19 IgM, and the patients were diagnosed with PRCA after the exclusion of other causes. The patients were given human gamma-globulin, glucocorticoids, and adjustment of immunosuppressants. The patients′ clinical manifestations during treatment and the changes in reticulocyte count (RC, Hb, white blood cell count (WBC, platelet count (PLT, and myelogram findings determined by peripheral blood cell analysis were observed, as well as the changes in liver and renal function parameters. ResultsAfter the multimodality therapy using human gamma-globulin, glucocorticoids, and red blood cell infusion, the five patients had significant alleviation in the symptoms of weakness, short breath, and dizziness, and the peripheral blood cell analysis showed recovery of Hb and RC, suggesting that anemia was corrected. ConclusionAs for patients with PRCA associated with HPV B19 infection, early diagnosis and treatment with human gamma-globulin and glucocorticoids can achieve a good therapeutic effect.

  11. Multi-cellular 3D human primary liver cell culture elevates metabolic activity under fluidic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Mandy B; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Wang, Ying I; Miller, Paula; Llamas-Vidales, Jose Ricardo; Naughton, Brian A; Applegate, Dawn R; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-05-21

    We have developed a low-cost liver cell culture device that creates fluidic flow over a 3D primary liver cell culture that consists of multiple liver cell types, including hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (fibroblasts, stellate cells, and Kupffer cells). We tested the performance of the cell culture under fluidic flow for 14 days, finding that hepatocytes produced albumin and urea at elevated levels compared to static cultures. Hepatocytes also responded with induction of P450 (CYP1A1 and CYP3A4) enzyme activity when challenged with P450 inducers, although we did not find significant differences between static and fluidic cultures. Non-parenchymal cells were similarly responsive, producing interleukin 8 (IL-8) when challenged with 10 μM bacterial lipoprotein (LPS). To create the fluidic flow in an inexpensive manner, we used a rocking platform that tilts the cell culture devices at angles between ±12°, resulting in a periodically changing hydrostatic pressure drop between reservoirs and the accompanying periodically changing fluidic flow (average flow rate of 650 μL min(-1), and a maximum shear stress of 0.64 dyne cm(-2)). The increase in metabolic activity is consistent with the hypothesis that, similar to unidirectional fluidic flow, primary liver cell cultures increase their metabolic activity in response to fluidic flow periodically changes direction. Since fluidic flow that changes direction periodically drastically changes the behavior of other cells types that are shear sensitive, our findings support the theory that the increase in hepatic metabolic activity associated with fluidic flow is either activated by mechanisms other than shear sensing (for example increased opportunities for gas and metabolite exchange), or that it follows a shear sensing mechanism that does not depend on the direction of shear. Our mode of device operation allows us to evaluate drugs under fluidic cell culture conditions and at low device manufacturing and operation

  12. Effect of ethanol on innate antiviral pathways and HCV replication in human liver cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Nelson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcohol abuse reduces response rates to IFN therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C. To model the molecular mechanisms behind this phenotype, we characterized the effects of ethanol on Jak-Stat and MAPK pathways in Huh7 human hepatoma cells, in HCV replicon cell lines, and in primary human hepatocytes. High physiological concentrations of acute ethanol activated the Jak-Stat and p38 MAPK pathways and inhibited HCV replication in several independent replicon cell lines. Moreover, acute ethanol induced Stat1 serine phosphorylation, which was partially mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway. In contrast, when combined with exogenously applied IFN-α, ethanol inhibited the antiviral actions of IFN against HCV replication, involving inhibition of IFN-induced Stat1 tyrosine phosphorylation. These effects of alcohol occurred independently of i alcohol metabolism via ADH and CYP2E1, and ii cytotoxic or cytostatic effects of ethanol. In this model system, ethanol directly perturbs the Jak-Stat pathway, and HCV replication. Infection with Hepatitis C virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. With a propensity to progress to chronic infection, approximately 70% of patients with chronic viremia develop histological evidence of chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The situation is even more dire for patients who abuse ethanol, where the risk of developing end stage liver disease is significantly higher as compared to HCV patients who do not drink 12. Recombinant interferon alpha (IFN-α therapy produces sustained responses (ie clearance of viremia in 8–12% of patients with chronic hepatitis C 3. Significant improvements in response rates can be achieved with IFN plus ribavirin combination 456 and pegylated IFN plus ribavirin 78 therapies. However, over 50% of chronically infected patients still do not clear viremia. Moreover, HCV-infected patients who abuse

  13. SIRT1 and c-Myc Promote Liver Tumor Cell Survival and Predict Poor Survival of Human Hepatocellular Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyu Yun; Noh, Sang Jae; Lehwald, Nadja; Tao, Guo-Zhong; Bellovin, David I.; Park, Ho Sung; Moon, Woo Sung; Felsher, Dean W.; Sylvester, Karl G.

    2012-01-01

    The increased expression of SIRT1 has recently been identified in numerous human tumors and a possible correlation with c-Myc oncogene has been proposed. However, it remains unclear whether SIRT1 functions as an oncogene or tumor suppressor. We sought to elucidate the role of SIRT1 in liver cancer under the influence of c-Myc and to determine the prognostic significance of SIRT1 and c-Myc expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma. The effect of either over-expression or knock down of SIRT1 on cell proliferation and survival was evaluated in both mouse and human liver cancer cells. Nicotinamide, an inhibitor of SIRT1, was also evaluated for its effects on liver tumorigenesis. The prognostic significance of the immunohistochemical detection of SIRT1 and c-Myc was evaluated in 154 hepatocellular carcinoma patients. SIRT1 and c-Myc regulate each other via a positive feedback loop and act synergistically to promote hepatocellular proliferation in both mice and human liver tumor cells. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by nicotinamide in vivo and in vitro. In human hepatocellular carcinoma, SIRT1 expression positively correlated with c-Myc, Ki67 and p53 expression, as well as high á-fetoprotein level. Moreover, the expression of SIRT1, c-Myc and p53 were independent prognostic indicators of hepatocellular carcinoma. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that SIRT1 expression supports liver tumorigenesis and is closely correlated with oncogenic c-MYC expression. In addition, both SIRT1 and c-Myc may be useful prognostic indicators of hepatocellular carcinoma and SIRT1 targeted therapy may be beneficial in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23024800

  14. Identification of potential biomarkers of hepatitis B-induced acute liver failure using hepatic cells derived from human skin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Sachinidis, Agapios; De Boe, Veerle; Rogiers, Vera; Vanhaecke, Tamara; De Kock, Joery

    2015-09-01

    Besides their role in the elucidation of pathogenic processes of medical and pharmacological nature, biomarkers can also be used to document specific toxicological events. Hepatic cells generated from human skin-derived precursors (hSKP-HPC) were previously shown to be a promising in vitro tool for the evaluation of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. In this study, their capacity to identify potential liver-specific biomarkers at the gene expression level was investigated with particular emphasis on acute liver failure (ALF). To this end, a set of potential ALF-specific biomarkers was established using clinically relevant liver samples obtained from patients suffering from hepatitis B-associated ALF. Subsequently, this data was compared to data obtained from primary human hepatocyte cultures and hSKP-HPC, both exposed to the ALF-inducing reference compound acetaminophen. It was found that both in vitro systems revealed a set of molecules that was previously identified in the ALF liver samples. Yet, only a limited number of molecules was common between both in vitro systems and the ALF liver samples. Each of the in vitro systems could be used independently to identify potential toxicity biomarkers related to ALF. It seems therefore more appropriate to combine primary human hepatocyte cultures with complementary in vitro models to efficiently screen out potential hepatotoxic compounds.

  15. Apoptosis induction by silica nanoparticles mediated through reactive oxygen species in human liver cell line HepG2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Javed [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ahamed, Maqusood, E-mail: maqusood@gmail.com [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Akhtar, Mohd Javed [Fibre Toxicology, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow-226001 (India); Alrokayan, Salman A. [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A. [Department of Zoology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-03-01

    Silica nanoparticles are increasingly utilized in various applications including agriculture and medicine. In vivo studies have shown that liver is one of the primary target organ of silica nanoparticles. However, possible mechanisms of hepatotoxicity caused by silica nanoparticles still remain unclear. In this study, we explored the reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated apoptosis induced by well-characterized 14 nm silica nanoparticles in human liver cell line HepG2. Silica nanoparticles (25–200 μg/ml) induced a dose-dependent cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Silica nanoparticles were also found to induce oxidative stress in dose-dependent manner indicated by induction of ROS and lipid peroxidation and depletion of glutathione (GSH). Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting results showed that both the mRNA and protein expressions of cell cycle checkpoint gene p53 and apoptotic genes (bax and caspase-3) were up-regulated while the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated in silica nanoparticles treated cells. Moreover, co-treatment of ROS scavenger vitamin C significantly attenuated the modulation of apoptotic markers along with the preservation of cell viability caused by silica nanoparticles. Our data demonstrated that silica nanoparticles induced apoptosis in human liver cells, which is ROS mediated and regulated through p53, bax/bcl-2 and caspase pathways. This study suggests that toxicity mechanisms of silica nanoparticles should be further investigated at in vivo level. -- Highlights: ► We explored the mechanisms of toxicity caused by silica NPs in human liver HepG2 cells. ► Silica NPs induced a dose-dependent cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ► Silica NPs induced ROS generation and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner. ► Silica NPs were also modulated apoptosis markers both at mRNA and protein levels. ► ROS mediated apoptosis induced by silica NPs was preserved by vitamin C.

  16. Response of Human Fetal Liver Progenitor Cell Types to Temperature and pH Stresses In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Eva; Foka, Hubert G; Thompson, Robert L; Luca, Angelo; Gridelli, Bruno; Gerlach, Jörg C

    2017-09-11

    Prolonged physiological stresses including abnormal pH and temperature are deleterious. Yet, human hepatic progenitors have been shown to be quite tolerant of temporary temperature stress such as in cold ischemia. We aimed to identify how various stresses affect liver progenitors, and to determine whether distinct effects exist on different progenitor cells of the human liver. Total fetal liver cells were exposed to low (25°C), normal (37°C), or high (40°C) temperatures, or low (6.76), normal (7.35), or high (7.88) pH in vitro. Culture at 25°C increased cell numbers and percentages of proliferation marker Ki67 positive total cells. In total cell cultures, percentages of CD326+ hepatic progenitors co-expressing DLK1 (delta-like 1 homolog), SSEA4, or CD90 increased, as well as proliferation of SSEA4+ and CD235a+ progenitors. Analyses of pre-sorted hepatic progenitors revealed that culture at 25°C increased cell numbers of CD326+ hepatic stem/progenitor cells but not DLK+ hepatoblasts. The expressions of several mesenchymal genes were reduced, and distinct hepatic stem/progenitor cell colonies emerged. At 40°C, numbers of adherent hepatic cells decreased but those of hematopoietic non-adherent cells increased. High pH did not cause major effects. Acidic pH resulted in decreased total cell numbers and affected hematopoietic cells. Percentages of DLK1+ hepatoblasts were increased but those of hematopoietic mature CD45+ cells were decreased. In particular, proliferation of adherent hepatic CD326+, SSEA4+ progenitors, and hematopoietic CD45+ cells and CD235a+ erythroblasts were reduced. Conclusively, our data indicate that low-temperature stress stimulates hepatic progenitor and erythroblast proliferation, whereas acidic pH promotes hepatic maturation and reduces hematopoietic cells.

  17. Formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites in human liver microsomes, S9 fraction, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, Toni; Rousu, Timo; Mattila, Sampo; Chesné, Christophe; Pelkonen, Olavi; Turpeinen, Miia; Tolonen, Ari

    2015-11-10

    The objective was to compare several in vitro human liver-derived subcellular and cellular incubation systems for the formation of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites. Incubations of pooled human liver microsomes, human liver S9 fractions, HepaRG-cells, and human hepatocytes were performed with glutathione as a trapping agent. Experiments with liver S9 were performed under two conditions, using only NADPH and using a full set of cofactors enabling also conjugative metabolism. Ten structurally different compounds were used as a test set, chosen as either "positive" (ciprofloxacin, clozapine, diclofenac, ethinyl estradiol, pulegone, and ticlopidine) or "negative" (caffeine, citalopram, losartan, montelukast) compounds, based on their known adverse reactions on liver or bone marrow. GSH conjugates were observed for seven of the ten compounds; while no conjugates were observed for caffeine, citalopram, or ciprofloxacin. Hepatocyte and HepaRG assays produced a clearly lower number and lower relative abundance of GSH conjugates compared to assays with microsomes and S9 fractions. The major GSH conjugates were different for many compounds in cellular subfractions and cell-based systems. Hepatocytes generally produced a higher number of GSH conjugates than HepaRG cells, although the differences were minor. The results show that the hepatic enzyme system used for screening of GSH-trapped reactive metabolites do have a high impact on the results, and results between different systems are comparable only qualitatively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bility, Moses T; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system's contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mouse model engrafted with both human immune and human liver cells is needed to study infection and immunopathogenesis of HBV/HCV infection in vivo. We have recently developed the humanized mouse model with both human immune and human liver cells (AFC8-hu HSC/Hep) to study immunopathogenesis and therapy of HCV infection in vivo. In this review, we summarize the current models of HBV/HCV infection and their limitations in immunopathogenesis. We will then present our recent findings of HCV infection and immunopathogenesis in the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse, which supports HCV infection, human T-cell response and associated liver pathogenesis. Inoculation of humanized mice with primary HCV isolates resulted in long-term HCV infection. HCV infection induced elevated infiltration of human immune cells in the livers of HCV-infected humanized mice. HCV infection also induced HCV-specific T-cell immune response in lymphoid tissues of humanized mice. Additionally, HCV infection induced liver fibrosis in humanized mice. Anti-human alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) staining showed elevated human hepatic stellate cell activation in HCV-infected humanized mice. We discuss the limitation and future improvements of the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse model and its application in evaluating novel therapeutics, as well as studying both HCV and HBV infection, human immune responses, and associated human liver fibrosis and cancer.

  19. Self-renewal and pluripotency is maintained in human embryonic stem cells by co-culture with human fetal liver stromal cells expressing hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lei; Liu, Yu-xiao; Yang, Chao; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-shuang; Bai, Ci-xian; Xi, Jia-fei; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2009-10-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are typically maintained on mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) feeders or with MEF-conditioned medium. However, these xenosupport systems greatly limit the therapeutic applications of hES cells because of the risk of cross-transfer of animal pathogens. The stem cell niche is a unique tissue microenvironment that regulates the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Recent evidence suggests that stem cells are localized in the microenvironment of low oxygen. We hypothesized that hypoxia could maintain the undifferentiated phenotype of embryonic stem cells. We have co-cultured a human embryonic cell line with human fetal liver stromal cells (hFLSCs) feeder cells stably expressing hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1alpha), which is known as the key transcription factor in hypoxia. The results suggested HIF-1alpha was critical for preventing differentiation of hES cells in culture. Consistent with this observation, hypoxia upregulated the expression of Nanog and Oct-4, the key factors expressed in undifferentiated stem cells. We further demonstrated that HIF-1alpha could upregulate the expression of some soluble factors including bFGF and SDF-1alpha, which are released into the microenvironment to maintain the undifferentiated status of hES cells. This suggests that the targets of HIF-1alpha are secreted soluble factors rather than a cell-cell contact mechanism, and defines an important mechanism for the inhibition of hESCs differentiation by hypoxia. Our findings developed a transgene feeder co-culture system and will provide a more reliable alternative for future therapeutic applications of hES cells.

  20. Gadolinium induced apoptosis of human embryo liver L02 cell line by ROS-mediated AIF pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Lihua; SHI Zhe; LIU Huixue; YANG Xiaoda; WANG Kui

    2011-01-01

    Gd3+ complexes have a variety of medical applications. In order to shed light on the mechanism of hepatotoxicity of Gd3+ compounds, we investigated the effects of GdCl3 on human embryo liver cell strand (L02 cells). The experimental results showed that long-time exposure to GdC13 resulted in L02 cell apoptosis. The incubation of L02 cells with GdCl3 first induced increase in cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in mitochondrial inner membrane potential (△Ψm). It later resulted in the activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the release of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). The activation of caspase 3, however, was not observed.Antioxidants could significantly reduce GdCl3-induced decrease of △Ψm, release of AIF, and cell apoptosis. Although GdCl3 caused a significant increase in cell membrane permeability in L02, the change of cell membrane permeability was unlikely to be involved in GdCl3-induced cell apoptosis. Overall, our experimental results suggested that GdCl3 induced apoptosis of human embryo liver L02 cell line by ROS-mediated AIF pathway.

  1. TM4SF1 Promotes Proliferation, Invasion, and Metastasis in Human Liver Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Kun; Fan, Xue-Gong; Qiu, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane 4 superfamily member 1 (TM4SF1) is a member of tetraspanin family, which mediates signal transduction events regulating cell development, activation, growth and motility. Our previous studies showed that TM4SF1 is highly expressed in liver cancer. HepG2 cells were transfected with TM4SFl siRNA and TM4SF1-expressing plasmids and their biological functions were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. HepG2 cells overexpressing TM4SF1 showed reduced apoptosis and increased cell migration in vitro and enhanced tumor growth and metastasis in vivo, whereas siRNA-mediated silencing of TM4SF1 had the opposite effect. TM4SF1 exerts its effect by regulating a few apoptosis- and migration-related genes including caspase-3, caspase-9, MMP-2, MMP-9 and VEGF. These results indicate that TM4SF1 is associated with liver tumor growth and progression, suggesting that TM4SF1 may be a potential target for treatment of liver cancer in future. PMID:27153056

  2. Immunohistochemical Detection of Myeloperoxidase and Its Oxidation Products in Kupffer Cells of Human Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kyle E.; Brunt, Elizabeth M; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative damage to tissue proteins has been implicated in the pathogenesis of liver disease, but the mechanisms that promote oxidation in vivo are unclear. Hydrogen peroxide is transformed into an array of potentially damaging reactants by the heme protein myeloperoxidase. This proinflammatory enzyme is expressed by circulating neutrophils and monocytes but is generally thought to be absent from tissue macrophages. To determine whether myeloperoxidase is present in Kupffer cells, the fixed-t...

  3. Downregulation of discoidin domain receptor 2 in A375 human melanoma cells reduces its experimental liver metastasis ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Iker; Villacé, Patricia; Basaldua, Iratxe; Olaso, Elvira

    2011-10-01

    Discoidin domain receptors (DDR1 and DDR2) are tyrosine kinase receptors for fibrillar collagen implicated in postnatal development, tissue repair, and primary and metastatic cancer progression. While DDR1 has been described in tumor cells, DDR2 has been localized in the tumor stroma, but its presence in the tumor cells remains unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of DDR2 signaling in tumor cells during hepatic metastasis progression. DDR2 expression and phosphorylation in cultured human A375 melanoma cells was documented by Western blot analysis. A375 cells were stably transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against DDR2 and two clones were selected: A375R2-70 and A375R2-40, with 70 and 40% of the DDR2 protein expression respectively, compared to mock-transfected cells (A375R2-100). Development of experimental liver metastasis by intrasplenic inoculation of A375R2-70 and A37R2-40 clones was reduced by 60 and 75%, respectively, measured as tumor volume, compared to livers injected with A375R2-100 cells. Accordingly, A375R2-70 and A37R2-40 clones showed reduced in vitro gelatinase activity and JNK phosphorylation, compared to mock transfected cells, with maximal inhibition in A375R2-40. Additionally, A375 melanoma, SK-HEP hepatoma and HT-29 colon carcinoma human cell lines transiently transfected with siRNA against DDR2 also showed reduced proliferation and migration rates compared to mock-transfected ones. In conclusion, DDR2 promotes A375 melanoma metastasis to the liver and the underlying mechanism implicates regulation of metalloproteinase release, cell growth and chemotactic invasion of the host tissue.

  4. Deregulation of energy metabolism promotes antifibrotic effects in human hepatic stellate cells and prevents liver fibrosis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Swathi; Potter, James J; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Sur, Surojit; Hamilton, James P; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Mezey, Esteban; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-15

    Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis result from uncontrolled secretion and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are activated by liver injury and inflammation. Despite the progress in understanding the biology liver fibrogenesis and the identification of potential targets for treating fibrosis, development of an effective therapy remains elusive. Since an uninterrupted supply of intracellular energy is critical for the activated-HSCs to maintain constant synthesis and secretion of ECM, we hypothesized that interfering with energy metabolism could affect ECM secretion. Here we report that a sublethal dose of the energy blocker, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) facilitates phenotypic alteration of activated LX-2 (a human hepatic stellate cell line), into a less-active form. This treatment-dependent reversal of activated-LX2 cells was evidenced by a reduction in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen secretion, and an increase in activity of matrix metalloproteases. Mechanistically, 3-BrPA-dependent antifibrotic effects involved down-regulation of the mitochondrial metabolic enzyme, ATP5E, and up-regulation of glycolysis, as evident by elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase, lactate production and its transporter, MCT4. Finally, the antifibrotic effects of 3-BrPA were validated in vivo in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Results from histopathology & histochemical staining for collagen and α-SMA substantiated that 3-BrPA promotes antifibrotic effects in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that sublethal, metronomic treatment with 3-BrPA blocks the progression of liver fibrosis suggesting its potential as a novel therapeutic for treating liver fibrosis.

  5. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian; Schmelzer, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion.

  6. Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Improve the Mouse Liver after Acute Acetaminophen Intoxication by Preventing Progress of Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Stock

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells from human bone marrow (hMSC have the potential to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and continue to maintain important hepatocyte functions in vivo after transplantation into host mouse livers. Here, hMSC were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro (hMSC-HC and transplanted into livers of immunodeficient Pfp/Rag2−/− mice treated with a sublethal dose of acetaminophen (APAP to induce acute liver injury. APAP induced a time- and dose-dependent damage of perivenous areas of the liver lobule. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST increased to similar levels irrespective of hMSC-HC transplantation. Yet, hMSC-HC resided in the damaged perivenous areas of the liver lobules short-term preventing apoptosis and thus progress of organ destruction. Disturbance of metabolic protein expression was lower in the livers receiving hMSC-HC. Seven weeks after APAP treatment, hepatic injury had completely recovered in groups both with and without hMSC-HC. Clusters of transplanted cells appeared predominantly in the periportal portion of the liver lobule and secreted human albumin featuring a prominent quality of differentiated hepatocytes. Thus, hMSC-HC attenuated the inflammatory response and supported liver regeneration after acute injury induced by acetaminophen. They hence may serve as a novel source of hepatocyte-like cells suitable for cell therapy of acute liver diseases.

  7. Glycoalkaloids and metabolites inhibit the growth of human colon (HT29) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kap-Rang; Kozukue, Nobuyuki; Han, Jae-Sook; Park, Joon-Hong; Chang, Eun-Young; Baek, Eun-Jung; Chang, Jong-Sun; Friedman, Mendel

    2004-05-19

    As part of an effort to improve plant-derived foods such as potatoes, eggplants, and tomatoes, the antiproliferative activities against human colon (HT29) and liver (HepG2) cancer cells of a series of structurally related individual compounds were examined using a microculture tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The objective was to assess the roles of the carbohydrate side chain and aglycon part of Solanum glycosides in influencing inhibitory activities of these compounds. Evaluations were carried out with four concentrations each (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 microg/mL) of the the potato trisaccharide glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine; the disaccharides beta(1)-chaconine, beta(2)-chaconine, and beta(2)-solanine; the monosaccharide gamma-chaconine and their common aglycon solanidine; the tetrasaccharide potato glycoalkaloid dehydrocommersonine; the potato aglycon demissidine; the tetrasaccharide tomato glycoalkaloid alpha-tomatine, the trisaccharide beta(1)-tomatine, the disaccharide gamma-tomatine, the monosaccharide delta-tomatine, and their common aglycon tomatidine; the eggplant glycoalkaloids solamargine and solasonine and their common aglycon solasodine; and the nonsteroidal alkaloid jervine. All compounds were active in the assay, with the glycoalkaloids being the most active and the hydrolysis products less so. The effectiveness against the liver cells was greater than against the colon cells. Potencies of alpha-tomatine and alpha-chaconine at a concentration of 1 microg/mL against the liver carcinoma cells were higher than those observed with the anticancer drugs doxorubicin and camptothecin. Because alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, and alpha-tomatine also inhibited normal human liver HeLa (Chang) cells, safety considerations should guide the use of these compounds as preventative or therapeutic treatments against carcinomas.

  8. Influence of Sulforaphane Metabolites on Activities of Human Drug-Metabolizing Cytochrome P450 and Determination of Sulforaphane in Human Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanduchova, Alena; Tomankova, Veronika; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Anzenbacherova, Eva

    2016-12-01

    The influence of metabolites of sulforaphane, natural compounds present in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis italica) and in other cruciferous vegetables, on drug-metabolizing cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in human liver microsomes and possible entry of sulforaphane into human hepatic cells were investigated. Metabolites studied are compounds derived from sulforaphane by the mercapturic acid pathway (conjugation with glutathione and by following reactions), namely sulforaphane glutathione and sulforaphane cysteine conjugates and sulforaphane-N-acetylcysteine. Their possible effect on four drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes, CYP3A4 (midazolam 1'-hydroxylation), CYP2D6 (bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation), CYP1A2 (7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation), and CYP2B6 (7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin O-deethylation), was tested. Inhibition of four prototypical CYP activities by sulforaphane metabolites was studied in pooled human liver microsomes. Sulforaphane metabolites did not considerably affect biological function of drug-metabolizing CYPs in human liver microsomes except for CYP2D6, which was found to be inhibited down to 73-78% of the original activity. Analysis of the entry of sulforaphane into human hepatocytes was done by cell disruption by sonication, methylene chloride extraction, and modified high-performance liquid chromatography method. The results have shown penetration of sulforaphane into the human hepatic cells.

  9. Viral infection of human progenitor and liver-derived cells encapsulated in three-dimensional PEG-based hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam-Joon; Elazar, Menashe; Xiong, Anming; Glenn, Jeffrey S [Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CCSR Building Room 3115A, 269 Campus Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Lee, Wonjae [Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Chiao, Eric; Baker, Julie [Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Frank, Curtis W, E-mail: jeffrey.glenn@stanford.ed, E-mail: curt.frank@stanford.ed [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2009-02-15

    We have studied the encapsulation of human progenitor cells into 3D PEG hydrogels. Replication-incompetent lentivirus promoter reporter vectors were found to efficiently detect the in vivo expression of human hepatic genes in hydrogel-encapsulated liver progenitor cells. Similarly, hydrogel-encapsulated cells could be efficiently infected with hepatitis C virus, and progeny infectious virus could be recovered from the media supernatants of the hydrogels. Provocatively, the diameters of these virus particles range from {approx}50 to 100 nm, while the calculated mesh size of the 8 k hydrogel is 44.6 +- 1.7 A. To reconcile how viral particles can penetrate the hydrogels to infect the encapsulated cells, we propose that microfractures/defects of the hydrogel result in a functional pore size of up to 20 fold greater than predicted by theoretical mesh calculations. These results suggest a new model of hydrogel structure, and have exciting implications for tissue engineering and hepatitis virus studies. (communication)

  10. HCV Infection Induces Autocrine Interferon Signaling by Human Liver Endothelial Cell and Release of Exosomes, Which Inhibits Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Silvia; Kriss, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Stone, Amy E.L.; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mitchell, Angela; Khetani, Salman R.; Yamane, Daisuke; Stoddard, Mark; Li, Hui; Shaw, George M.; Edwards, Michael G.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Gale, Michael; Shah, Vijay H.; Rosen, Hugo R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) make up a large proportion of the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. LSECs are involved in induction of immune tolerance, but little is known about their functions during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Methods Primary human LSECs (HLSECs) and immortalized liver endothelial cells (TMNK-1) were exposed to various forms of HCV, including full-length transmitted/founder virus, sucrose-purified Japanese Fulminant Hepatitis-1 (JFH-1), a virus encoding a luciferase reporter, and the HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules. Cells were analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence, immunohistochemical, and PCR assays. Results HLSECs internalized HCV, independent of cell–cell contacts; HCV RNA was translated but not replicated. Through pattern recognition receptors (TLR7 and retinoic acid inducible gene 1), HCV RNA induced consistent and broad transcription of multiple interferons (IFNs); supernatants from primary HLSECs transfected with HCV-specific pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules increased induction of IFNs and IFN-stimulated genes in HLSECs. Recombinant type I and type III IFNs strongly up-regulated HLSEC transcription of interferon λ 3 (IFNL3) and viperin (RSAD2), which inhibit replication of HCV. Compared to CD8+ T cells, HLSECs suppressed HCV replication within Huh7.5.1 cells, also inducing IFN-stimulated genes in co-culture. Conditioned media from IFN-stimulated HLSECs induced expression of antiviral genes by uninfected primary human hepatocytes. Exosomes, derived from HLSECs following stimulation with either type I or type III IFNs, controlled HCV replication in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Cultured HLSECs produce factors that mediate immunity against HCV. HLSECs induce self-amplifying IFN-mediated responses and release of exosomes with antiviral activity. PMID:25447848

  11. Pancreatic Transdifferentiation and Glucose-Regulated Production of Human Insulin in the H4IIE Rat Liver Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binhai Ren

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limitations of current treatment regimes, gene therapy is a promising strategy being explored to correct blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the current study, we used a retroviral vector to deliver either the human insulin gene alone, the rat NeuroD1 gene alone, or the human insulin gene and rat NeuroD1 genes together, to the rat liver cell line, H4IIE, to determine if storage of insulin and pancreatic transdifferentiation occurred. Stable clones were selected and expanded into cell lines: H4IIEins (insulin gene alone, H4IIE/ND (NeuroD1 gene alone, and H4IIEins/ND (insulin and NeuroD1 genes. The H4IIEins cells did not store insulin; however, H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells stored 65.5 ± 5.6 and 1475.4 ± 171.8 pmol/insulin/5 × 106 cells, respectively. Additionally, several β cell transcription factors and pancreatic hormones were expressed in both H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cells. Electron microscopy revealed insulin storage vesicles in the H4IIE/ND and H4IIEins/ND cell lines. Regulated secretion of insulin to glucose (0–20 mmol/L was seen in the H4IIEins/ND cell line. The H4IIEins/ND cells were transplanted into diabetic immunoincompetent mice, resulting in normalization of blood glucose. This data shows that the expression of NeuroD1 and insulin in liver cells may be a useful strategy for inducing islet neogenesis and reversing diabetes.

  12. Adult liver stem cells in hepatic regeneration and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak

    2015-01-01

    An alternative source of livers for transplantation in patients with (genetic) liver diseases and liver failure is needed because liver donors are scarce. HPC-derived hepatocyte-like cells could be one of the options. Because dogs and humans share liver-pathologies and disease-pathways, the dog is c

  13. HNF1α inhibition triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human liver cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignjevic Danijela

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1α (HNF1α is an atypical homeodomain-containing transcription factor that transactivates liver-specific genes including albumin, α-1-antitrypsin and α- and β-fibrinogen. Biallelic inactivating mutations of HNF1A have been frequently identified in hepatocellular adenomas (HCA, rare benign liver tumors usually developed in women under oral contraceptives, and in rare cases of hepatocellular carcinomas developed in non-cirrhotic liver. HNF1α-mutated HCA (H-HCA are characterized by a marked steatosis and show activation of glycolysis, lipogenesis, translational machinery and mTOR pathway. We studied the consequences of HNF1α silencing in hepatic cell lines, HepG2 and Hep3B and we reproduced most of the deregulations identified in H-HCA. Methods We transfected hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B with siRNA targeting HNF1α and obtained a strong inhibition of HNF1α expression. We then looked at the phenotypic changes by microscopy and studied changes in gene expression using qRT-PCR and Western Blot. Results Hepatocytes transfected with HNF1α siRNA underwent severe phenotypic changes with loss of cell-cell contacts and development of migration structures. In HNF1α-inhibited cells, hepatocyte and epithelial markers were diminished and mesenchymal markers were over-expressed. This epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT was related to the up regulation of several EMT transcription factors, in particular SNAIL and SLUG. We also found an overexpression of TGFβ1, an EMT initiator, in both cells transfected with HNF1α siRNA and H-HCA. Moreover, TGFβ1 expression is strongly correlated to HNF1α expression in cell models, suggesting regulation of TGFβ1 expression by HNF1α. Conclusion Our results suggest that HNF1α is not only important for hepatocyte differentiation, but has also a role in the maintenance of epithelial phenotype in hepatocytes.

  14. Inhibiting effect of antisense hTRT on telomerase activity of human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟娇; 李晓冬; 杨庆; 贾凤岐; 卫立辛; 郭亚军; 吴孟超

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To induce changes in biological character of human liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721 by blocking the expression of telomerase genes hTRT and to explore its value in cancer gene therapy. Methods: The vehicle for eukaryotic expression of antisense hTRT was constructed and then transfected into SMMC-7721 cells. The effects of antisense hTRT gene on telomerase activity, cancer cell growth and malignant phenotypes were analyzed. Results: The obtained transfectants that could express antisense hTRT gene stably showed marked decrease in telomerase activity; the shortening of telomere was obvious; cells presented contact growth inhibition; in nude mice transplantation, the rate of tumor induction dramatically decreased. Conclusion: Antisense hTRT gene expression can significantly inhibit telomerase activity of cancer cells and decrease malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, as a telomerase inhibitor, antisense hTRT gene may be a new pathway for cancer therapy.

  15. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and derived hepatocyte-like cells exhibit similar therapeutic effects on an acute liver failure mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiping Zhou

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have exhibited therapeutic effects in multiple animal models so that are promising liver substitute for transplantation treatment of end-stage liver diseases. However, it has been shown that over-manipulation of these cells increased their tumorigenic potential, and that reducing the in vitro culture time could minimize the risk. In this study, we used a D-galactosamine plus lipopolysaccharide (Gal/LPS-induced acute liver failure mouse model, which caused death of about 50% of the mice with necrosis of more than 50% hepatocytes, to compare the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord MSCs (hUCMSCs before and after induction of differentiation into hepatocyte (i-Heps. Induction of hUCMSCs to become i-Heps was achieved by treatment of the cells with a group of growth factors within 4 weeks. The resulted i-Heps exhibited a panel of human hepatocyte biomarkers including cytokeratin (hCK-18, α-fetoprotein (hAFP, albumin (hALB, and hepatocyte-specific functions glycogen storage and urea metabolism. We demonstrated that transplantation of both cell types through tail vein injection rescued almost all of the Gal/LPS-intoxicated mice. Although both cell types exhibited similar ability in homing at the mouse livers, the populations of the hUCMSCs-derived cells, as judged by expressing hAFP, hCK-18 and human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF, were small. These observations let us to conclude that the hUCMSCs was as effective as the i-Heps in treatment of the mouse acute liver failure, and that the therapeutic effects of hUCMSCs were mediated largely via stimulation of host hepatocyte regeneration, and that delivery of the cells through intravenous injection was effective.

  16. Preferential accumulation of T helper cells but not cytotoxic T cells characterizes benign subclinical rejection of human liver allografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Anna K; Schlue, Jerome; Noyan, Fatih; Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias; Lehner, Frank; Barg-Hock, Hannelore; Klempnauer, Juergen; Manns, Michael P; Taubert, Richard; Jaeckel, Elmar

    2016-07-01

    Subclinical rejection (SCR) is a common event in protocol biopsies after liver transplantation (LT). So far the interpretation of the underlying histological changes and clinical significance is limited. Previous studies were restricted to SCR manifestations within the first weeks after transplantation with limited follow-up. We analyzed clinical data from our prospective protocol biopsy program and found late SCR (at least 3 months after transplantation) to be a common event (41/94 patients). SCR manifested much later than acute cellular rejection (ACR). In the second year after transplantation, the SCR incidence in protocol biopsies reached a plateau of approximately 25% and remained at this level until the latest observed manifestations more than 5 years after transplantation. During a median follow-up of 32 months after SCR, no acute or chronic rejection, relevant graft fibrosis, graft loss, or liver-related death occurred even without specific therapy for SCR. Immunophenotyping of liver biopsies during SCR showed that similar to ACR, the composition of intrahepatic T cells depended on the severity of histological rejection. However, SCR showed a different pattern of infiltrating T cells with a stronger accumulation of CD4(+) cells, an increasing CD4(+) /CD8(+) ratio, and an increasing CD4(+) forkhead box P3 (FOXP3)(+) regulatory T cell (Treg)/CD8(+) ratio, which was not seen in ACR. These intrahepatic T cell patterns were not reflected in the peripheral blood. In conclusion, late SCR after LT has a good clinical prognosis, and it seems safe to leave it untreated. This benign clinical course compared to ACR is associated with intrahepatic T cell infiltration patterns showing less cytotoxic T cells and more CD4(+) FOXP3(+) Tregs. Liver Transplantation 22 943-955 2016 AASLD.

  17. Several Human Liver Cell Expressed Apolipoproteins Complement HCV Virus Production with Varying Efficacy Conferring Differential Specific Infectivity to Released Viruses.

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    Kathrin Hueging

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (ApoE, an exchangeable apolipoprotein, is necessary for production of infectious Hepatitis C virus (HCV particles. However, ApoE is not the only liver-expressed apolipoprotein and the role of other apolipoproteins for production of infectious HCV progeny is incompletely defined. Therefore, we quantified mRNA expression of human apolipoproteins in primary human hepatocytes. Subsequently, cDNAs encoding apolipoproteins were expressed in 293T/miR-122 cells to explore if they complement HCV virus production in cells that are non-permissive due to limiting endogenous levels of human apolipoproteins. Primary human hepatocytes expressed high mRNA levels of ApoA1, A2, C1, C3, E, and H. ApoA4, A5, B, D, F, J, L1, L2, L3, L4, L6, M, and O were expressed at intermediate levels, and C2, C4, and L5 were not detected. All members of the ApoA and ApoC family of lipoproteins complemented HCV virus production in HCV transfected 293T/miR-122 cells, albeit with significantly lower efficacy compared with ApoE. In contrast, ApoD expression did not support production of infectious HCV. Specific infectivity of released particles complemented with ApoA family members was significantly lower compared with ApoE. Moreover, the ratio of extracellular to intracellular infectious virus was significantly higher for ApoE compared to ApoA2 and ApoC3. Since apolipoproteins complementing HCV virus production share amphipathic alpha helices as common structural features we altered the two alpha helices of ApoC1. Helix breaking mutations in both ApoC1 helices impaired virus assembly highlighting a critical role of alpha helices in apolipoproteins supporting HCV assembly. In summary, various liver expressed apolipoproteins with amphipathic alpha helices complement HCV virus production in human non liver cells. Differences in the efficiency of virus assembly, the specific infectivity of released particles, and the ratio between extracellular and intracellular

  18. Future of liver transplantation: Non-human primates for patient-specific organs from induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madhusudana Girija Sanal

    2011-01-01

    Strategies to fill the huge gap in supply versus demand of human organs include bioartificial organs, growing humanized organs in animals, cell therapy, and im-plantable bioengineered constructs. Reproducing the complex relations between different cell types, gen-eration of adequate vasculature, and immunological complications are road blocks in generation of bioengi-neered organs, while immunological complications limit the use of humanized organs produced in animals. Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) biology offer a possibility of generating human, patient-specific organs in non-human primates (NHP) using patient-derived iPSC and NHP-derived iPSC lack-ing the critical developmental genes for the organ of interest complementing a NHP tetraploid embryo. The organ derived in this way will have the same human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile as the patient. This ap-proach can be curative in genetic disorders as this of-fers the possibility of gene manipulation and correction of the patient's genome at the iPSC stage before tet-raploid complementation. The process of generation of patient-specific organs such as the liver in this way has the great advantage of making use of the natural sig-naling cascades in the natural milieu probably resulting in organs of great quality for transplantation. However, the inexorable scientific developments in this direction involve several social issues and hence we need to educate and prepare society in advance to accept the revolutionary consequences, good, bad and ugly.

  19. Future of liver transplantation: non-human primates for patient-specific organs from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2011-08-28

    Strategies to fill the huge gap in supply versus demand of human organs include bioartificial organs, growing humanized organs in animals, cell therapy, and implantable bioengineered constructs. Reproducing the complex relations between different cell types, generation of adequate vasculature, and immunological complications are road blocks in generation of bioengineered organs, while immunological complications limit the use of humanized organs produced in animals. Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) biology offer a possibility of generating human, patient-specific organs in non-human primates (NHP) using patient-derived iPSC and NHP-derived iPSC lacking the critical developmental genes for the organ of interest complementing a NHP tetraploid embryo. The organ derived in this way will have the same human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile as the patient. This approach can be curative in genetic disorders as this offers the possibility of gene manipulation and correction of the patient's genome at the iPSC stage before tetraploid complementation. The process of generation of patient-specific organs such as the liver in this way has the great advantage of making use of the natural signaling cascades in the natural milieu probably resulting in organs of great quality for transplantation. However, the inexorable scientific developments in this direction involve several social issues and hence we need to educate and prepare society in advance to accept the revolutionary consequences, good, bad and ugly.

  20. Recombinant production of native human α-1-antitrypsin protein in the liver HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) deficiency is associated with emphysema and liver disease. Only plasma-derived A1AT protein is available for augmentation therapy. Recombinant A1AT (recA1AT) protein expressed in various types of available hosts are either non-glycosylated or aberrantly glycosylated resulting into reduced stability and biological activity. To overcome these limitations, we have used the human liver HepG2 cell line to produce recA1AT protein. HepG2 cells were transfected by A1AT cDNA and cell populations were generated that stably overexpressed A1AT protein. Real-time RT-PCR and rocket immunoelectrophoresis of cell culture supernatants indicated that the transfection resulted more than two-fold increase in A1AT production compared to that of control parental cells. Immunoblot analysis showed that both plasma and HepG2-produced A1AT proteins have identical molecular weight in either glycosylated or deglycosylated form. Partial digestion with PNGase F indicated that the three N-glycosylation sites of recA1AT, like the native A1AT protein in plasma, are occupied. Recombinant A1AT also like the native A1AT was thermostable and could efficiently inhibit trypsin proteolytic activity against BSA and BAPNA chromogenic substrate. The recombinant HepG2 cells cultured in media containing B27 serum free supplement released recA1AT at the same level as in the serum containing media. RecA1AT production in HepG2 cells grown under serum free condition at a large scale could provide a reliable source of the native protein suitable for therapeutic use in human.

  1. The MAPK pathway signals telomerase modulation in response to isothiocyanate-induced DNA damage of human liver cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Lamy

    Full Text Available 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC, an aliphatic, sulphuric compound from Brassica vegetables, possesses in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity. Recently we demonstrated the potent growth inhibitory potential of the DNA damaging agent MTBITC in human liver cancer cells. Here we now show that MTBITC down regulates telomerase which sensitizes cells to apoptosis induction. This is mediated by MAPK activation but independent from production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Within one hour, MTBITC induced DNA damage in cancer cells correlating to a transient increase in hTERT mRNA expression which then turned into telomerase suppression, evident at mRNA as well as enzyme activity level. To clarify the role of MAPK for telomerase regulation, liver cancer cells were pre-treated with MAPK-specific inhibitors prior to MTBITC exposure. This clearly showed that transient elevation of hTERT mRNA expression was predominantly mediated by the MAPK family member JNK. In contrast, activated ERK1/2 and P38, but not JNK, signalled to telomerase abrogation and consequent apoptosis induction. DNA damage by MTBITC was also strongly abolished by MAPK inhibition. Oxidative stress, as analysed by DCF fluorescence assay, electron spin resonance spectroscopy and formation of 4-hydroxynonenal was found as not relevant for this process. Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine pre-treatment did not impact MTBITC-induced telomerase suppression or depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential as marker for apoptosis. Our data therefore imply that upon DNA damage by MTBITC, MAPK are essential for telomerase regulation and consequent growth impairment in liver tumor cells and this detail probably plays an important role in understanding the potential chemotherapeutic efficacy of ITC.

  2. Fatty Acid Esters of Phloridzin Induce Apoptosis of Human Liver Cancer Cells through Altered Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sandhya V. G.; Ziaullah; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Phloridzin (phlorizin or phloretin 2′-O-glucoside) is known for blocking intestinal glucose absorption. We have investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of phloridzin and its novel derivatives using human cancer cell lines. We have synthesised novel acylated derivatives of phloridzin with six different long chain fatty acids by regioselective enzymatic acylation using Candida Antarctica lipase B. The antiproliferative effects of the new compounds were investigated in comparison with the parent compounds, phloridzin, aglycone phloretin, the six free fatty acids and chemotherapeutic drugs (sorafenib, doxorubicin and daunorubicin) using human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells and acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells along with normal human and rat hepatocytes. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited significantly the growth of the two carcinoma and leukemia cells while similar treatment doses were not toxic to normal human or rat hepatocytes. The antiproliferative potency of fatty esters of phloridzin was comparable to the potency of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited DNA topoisomerases IIα activity that might induce G0/G1 phase arrest, induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-3, and decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Based on the high selectivity on cancer cells, decosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ester of phloridzin was selected for gene expression analysis using RT2PCR human cancer drug target array. Antiproliferative effect of DHA ester of phloridzin could be related to the down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (BCL2), growth factor receptors (EBFR family, IGF1R/IGF2, PDGFR) and its downstream signalling partners (PI3k/AKT/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK), cell cycle machinery (CDKs, TERT, TOP2A, TOP2B) as well as epigenetics regulators (HDACs). These results suggest that fatty esters of phloridzin have potential chemotherapeutic effects mediated

  3. Fatty acid esters of phloridzin induce apoptosis of human liver cancer cells through altered gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya V G Nair

    Full Text Available Phloridzin (phlorizin or phloretin 2'-O-glucoside is known for blocking intestinal glucose absorption. We have investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of phloridzin and its novel derivatives using human cancer cell lines. We have synthesised novel acylated derivatives of phloridzin with six different long chain fatty acids by regioselective enzymatic acylation using Candida Antarctica lipase B. The antiproliferative effects of the new compounds were investigated in comparison with the parent compounds, phloridzin, aglycone phloretin, the six free fatty acids and chemotherapeutic drugs (sorafenib, doxorubicin and daunorubicin using human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells, human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells and acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 cells along with normal human and rat hepatocytes. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited significantly the growth of the two carcinoma and leukemia cells while similar treatment doses were not toxic to normal human or rat hepatocytes. The antiproliferative potency of fatty esters of phloridzin was comparable to the potency of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The fatty acid esters of phloridzin inhibited DNA topoisomerases IIα activity that might induce G0/G1 phase arrest, induced apoptosis via activation of caspase-3, and decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells. Based on the high selectivity on cancer cells, decosahexaenoic acid (DHA ester of phloridzin was selected for gene expression analysis using RT2PCR human cancer drug target array. Antiproliferative effect of DHA ester of phloridzin could be related to the down regulation of anti-apoptotic gene (BCL2, growth factor receptors (EBFR family, IGF1R/IGF2, PDGFR and its downstream signalling partners (PI3k/AKT/mTOR, Ras/Raf/MAPK, cell cycle machinery (CDKs, TERT, TOP2A, TOP2B as well as epigenetics regulators (HDACs. These results suggest that fatty esters of phloridzin have potential chemotherapeutic effects

  4. GP73-regulated oncolytic adenoviruses possess potent killing effect on human liver cancer stem-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Ma, Buyun; Liu, Tao; Yang, Yu; Xie, Wenjie; Liu, Xianglei; Huang, Fang; Liu, Tao; Zhou, Xiumei; Liu, Xinyuan; Wang, Yigang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), also known as tumor-initiating cells, are highly metastatic, chemo-resistant and tumorigenic, and are critical for cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. Oncolytic adenovirus could targetedly kill CSCs and has been acted as a promising anticancer agent. Currently, a novel GP73-regulated oncolytic adenovirus GD55 was constructed to specifically treat liver cancer and exhibited obvious cytotoxicity effect. However, there remains to be confirmed that whether GD55 could effectively eliminate liver CSCs. We first utilized the suspension culture to enrich the liver CSCs-like cells, which acquires the properties of liver CSCs in self-renewal, differentiation, quiescence, chemo-resistance and tumorigenicity. The results indicated that GD55 elicited more significant cytotoxicity and stronger oncolytic effect in liver CSC-like cells compared to common oncolytic virus ZD55. Additionally, GD55 possessed the greater efficacy in suppressing the growth of implanted tumors derived from liver CSC-like cells than ZD55. Furthermore, GD55 induced remarkable apoptosis of liver CSC-like cells in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited the propogation of cells and angiogenesis in xenograft tumor tissues. Thus, GD55 may virtually represent an attractive therapeutic agent for targeting liver CSCs to achieve better clinical outcomes for HCC patients. PMID:27121064

  5. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Bility, Moses T.; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system’s contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mous...

  6. AGE WISE HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN HUMAN LIVER

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    Tribeni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC results in between 2.5 lakhs to 1million deaths globally per annum. Liver transplantation nowadays is a well accepted treatment option for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. AIMS: Keeping this concept in view, a study was conducted in the Guwahati Zone of Northeast India, to compare the histomorphological features of the human liver in different age groups. SETTING AND DESIGN: Apparently healthy livers were obtained from 21 subjects on whom medicolegal post-mortems had been performed. Their ages varied from newborn to 90 years. Subjects were divided into 3 groups. 7 specimens were taken from each group. (1 Pediatric (2 Adult (3 Old age. METHODS AND MATERIALS: In all the above age groups, immediately after removal of the livers, they were washed in normal saline, dried with blotting paper and weighed in an electronic weighing machine. Sections of liver were fixed, processed, cut and stained with Harris Haematoxylin and Eosin stain. RESULTS: The liver loses weight from 50 years onwards. There appears to be racial and environmental differences in the change in liver weight in old age. Autopsy studies show a diminution of nearly 46% in liver weight between the 3rd and 10th decades of life. The liver decreases in size with age. The hepatocytes are radially disposed in the liver lobule. They are piled up, forming a layer one cell thick (except in young children in a fashion similar to the bricks of a wall. These plates are directed from the periphery of the lobule to its centre and anastomose freely forming a complex labyrinthine and sponge-like structure. CONCLUSIONS: From the findings in the present study it can be concluded that: 1. Nowadays, the measurement of liver volume has gained practical use in relation to liver transplantation. 2. We have compared the histomorphology of adult liver with a child. The findings in both the groups are very similar. This feature is important, since in

  7. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

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    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  8. Inhibition of Mevalonate Pathway and Synthesis of the Storage Lipids in Human Liver-Derived and Non-liver Cell Lines by Lippia alba Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Villegas, Sandra; Polo, Mónica; Galle, Marianela; Rodenak-Kladniew, Boris; Castro, María; Ves-Losada, Ana; Crespo, Rosana; García de Bravo, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    The essential oils (EOs) of Lippia alba, an herb extensively used as a folk medicine in Latin America, are today promoted as an effective means of eliminating problems caused by hyperlipemia. We hypothesized that L.alba EOs inhibited cholesterol and triacylglycerols synthesis and decreased the intracellular depots of those lipids (lipid droplets), mechanisms involving the induction of a hypolipidemic response. Our aim was, therefore, to evaluate the hypolipogenic capability of the EOs of four L. alba chemotypes on liver-derived (HepG2) and non-liver (A549) human cell lines and to identify the potential biochemical targets of those chemotypes, particularly within the mevalonate pathway (MP). [(14)C]Acetate was used as radioactive precursor for assays. Lipid analyses were performed by thin-layer and capillary gas chromatography, lipid droplets analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, and HMGCR levels determined by Western blot. In both cell lines, all four chemotypes exerted hypocholesterogenic effects within a concentration range of 3.2-32 µg/mL. Nonsaponifiable lipids manifested a decrease in incorporation of [(14)C]acetate into squalene, lanosterol, lathosterol, and cholesterol, but not into ubiquinone, thus suggesting an inhibition of enzymes in the MP downstream from farnesyl pyrophosphate. The tagetenone chemotype, the most efficacious hypocholesterogenic L. alba EO, lowered HMGCR protein levels; inhibited triacylglycerols, cholesteryl esters, and phospholipids synthesis; and diminished lipid droplets in size and volume. These results revealed that L. alba EOs inhibited different lipogenic pathways and such lipid-lowering effects could prove essential to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Comparative cytotoxicity of dolomite nanoparticles in human larynx HEp2 and liver HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Ahmad, Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Khan, Shams T; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A

    2015-06-01

    Dolomite is a natural mineral of great industrial and commercial importance. With the advent of nanotechnology, natural minerals including dolomite in the form of nanoparticles (NPs) are being utilized in various applications to improve the quality of products. However, safety or toxicity information of dolomite NPs is largely lacking. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of dolomite NPs in two widely used in vitro cell culture models: human airway epithelial (HEp2) and human liver (HepG2) cells. Concentration-dependent decreased cell viability and damaged cell membrane integrity revealed the cytotoxicity of dolomite NPs. We further observed that dolomite NPs induce oxidative stress in a concentration-dependent manner, as indicated by depletion of glutathione and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation. Quantitative real-time PCR data demonstrated that the mRNA level of tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic genes (bax, CASP3 and CASP9) were up-regulated whereas the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated in HEp2 and HepG2 cells exposed to dolomite NPs. Moreover, the activity of apoptotic enzymes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) was also higher in both kinds of cells treated with dolomite NPs. It is also worth mentioning that HEp2 cells seem to be marginally more susceptible to dolomite NPs exposure than HepG2 cells. Cytotoxicity induced by dolomite NPs was efficiently prevented by N-acetyl cysteine treatment, which suggests that oxidative stress is primarily responsible for the cytotoxicity of dolomite NPs in both HEp2 and HepG2 cells. Toxicity mechanisms of dolomite NPs warrant further investigations at the in vivo level.

  10. Prokineticin 2/Bv8 is expressed in Kupffer cells in liver and is down regulated in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the implication of prokineticin 1 (PK1/EG VEGF) and prokineticin 2 (PK2/Bv8) in hepatocellular carcinoma angiogenesis. METHODS: The gene induction of PK1/EG-VEGF and PK2/Bv8 was investigated in 10 normal, 28 fibrotic and 28 tumoral livers by using real time PCR. Their expression was compared to the expression of VEGF (an angiogenesis marker), vWF (an endothelial cell marker) and to CD68 (a monocyte/macrophage marker). Furthermore, the mRNA levels of PK1/EG-VEGF, PK2/Bv8, prokineticin receptor 1 and 2 were evaluated by real time PCR in isolated liver cell populations. Finally, PK2/Bv8protein was detected in normal liver paraffin sections and in isolated liver cells by immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry.RESULTS:PK2/Bv8 mRNA but not PK1/EG-VEGF was expressed in all types of normal liver samples examined. In the context of liver tumor development, we reported that PK2/Bv8 correlates only with CD68 and showed a significant decrease in expression as the pathology evolves towards cancer. Whereas, VEGF and vWF mRNA were significantly upregulated in both fibrosis and HCC, as expected. In addition, out of all isolated liver cells examined, only Kupffer cells (liver resident macrophages) express significant levels of PK2/Bv8 and its receptors, prokineticin receptor 1 and 2.CONCLUSION:In normal liver PK2/Bv8 and its receptors were specifically expressed by Kupffer cells. PK2/Bv8 expression decreased as the liver evolves towards cancer and did not correlate with HCC angiogenesis.

  11. Neuropilin-1 promotes cirrhosis of the rodent and human liver by enhancing PDGF/TGF-β signaling in hepatic stellate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Das, Amitava; Shergill, Uday; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Huebert, Robert C.; Routray, Chittaranjan; Abdelmoneim, Soha; Vasdev, Meher; Leof, Edward; Charlton, Michael; Watts, Ryan J.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Shah, Vijay H.

    2010-01-01

    PDGF-dependent hepatic stellate cell (HSC) recruitment is an essential step in liver fibrosis and the sinusoidal vascular changes that accompany this process. However, the mechanisms that regulate PDGF signaling remain incompletely defined. Here, we found that in two rat models of liver fibrosis, the axonal guidance molecule neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) was upregulated in activated HSCs, which exhibit the highly motile myofibroblast phenotype. Additionally, NRP-1 colocalized with PDGF-receptor β (PDGFRβ) in HSCs both in the injury models and in human and rat HSC cell lines. In human HSCs, siRNA-mediated knockdown of NRP-1 attenuated PDGF-induced chemotaxis, while NRP-1 overexpression increased cell motility and TGF-β–dependent collagen production. Similarly, mouse HSCs genetically modified to lack NRP-1 displayed reduced motility in response to PDGF treatment. Immunoprecipitation and biochemical binding studies revealed that NRP-1 increased PDGF binding affinity for PDGFRβ-expressing cells and promoted downstream signaling. An NRP-1 neutralizing Ab ameliorated recruitment of HSCs, blocked liver fibrosis in a rat model of liver injury, and also attenuated VEGF responses in cultured liver endothelial cells. In addition, NRP-1 overexpression was observed in human specimens of liver cirrhosis caused by both hepatitis C and steatohepatitis. These studies reveal a role for NRP-1 as a modulator of multiple growth factor targets that regulate liver fibrosis and the vascular changes that accompany it and may have broad implications for liver cirrhosis and myofibroblast biology in a variety of other organ systems and disease conditions. PMID:20577048

  12. BORIS up-regulates OCT4 via histone methylation to promote cancer stem cell-like properties in human liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuying; Chen, Kefei; Liu, Zhongjian; Huang, Yuan; Zhao, Rongce; Wei, Ling; Yu, Xiaoqin; He, Jingyang; Liu, Jun; Qi, Jianguo; Qin, Yang; Li, Bo

    2017-09-10

    Accumulating evidence has revealed the importance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in chemoresistance and recurrence. BORIS, a testes-specific CTCF paralog, has been shown to be associated with stemness traits of embryonic cancer cells and epithelial CSCs. We previously reported that BORIS is correlated with the expression of the CSC marker CD90 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These results encourage us to wonder whether BORIS exerts functions on CSC-like traits of human liver cancer cells. Here, we report that BORIS was enriched in HCC tissues. Exogenous overexpression of BORIS promoted CSC-like properties, including self-renewal, chemoresistance, migration and invasion in Huh7 and HCCLM3 cells. Conversely, BORIS knockdown suppressed CSC-like properties in SMMC-7721 and HepG2 cells and inhibited tumorigenicity in SMMC-7721 cells. Moreover, BORIS alteration did not affect the DNA methylation status of the minimal promoter and exon 1 region of OCT4. However, BORIS overexpression enhanced the amount of BORIS bound on the OCT4 promoter and increased H3K4me2, while reducing H3K27me3; BORIS depletion decreased BORIS and H3K4me2 on the OCT4 promoter, while increasing H3K27me3. These results revealed that BORIS is associated with the CSC-like traits of human liver cancer cells through the epigenetic regulation of OCT4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Citreoviridin Induces Autophagy-Dependent Apoptosis through Lysosomal-Mitochondrial Axis in Human Liver HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexia; Liu, Yanan; Liu, Xiaofang; Jiang, Liping; Yang, Guang; Sun, Xiance; Geng, Chengyan; Li, Qiujuan; Yao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Min

    2015-08-06

    Citreoviridin (CIT) is a mycotoxin derived from fungal species in moldy cereals. In our previous study, we reported that CIT stimulated autophagosome formation in human liver HepG2 cells. Here, we aimed to explore the relationship of autophagy with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis in CIT-treated cells. Our data showed that CIT increased the expression of LC3-II, an autophagosome biomarker, from the early stage of treatment (6 h). After treatment with CIT for 12 h, lysosomal membrane permeabilization occurred, followed by the release of cathepsin D in HepG2 cells. Inhibition of autophagosome formation with siRNA against Atg5 attenuated CIT-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In addition, CIT induced collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential as assessed by JC-1 staining. Furthermore, caspase-3 activity assay showed that CIT induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Inhibition of autophagosome formation attenuated CIT-induced apoptosis, indicating that CIT-induced apoptosis was autophagy-dependent. Cathepsin D inhibitor, pepstatin A, relieved CIT-induced apoptosis as well, suggesting the involvement of the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in CIT-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data demonstrated that CIT induced autophagy-dependent apoptosis through the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in HepG2 cells. The study thus provides essential mechanistic insight, and suggests clues for the effective management and treatment of CIT-related diseases.

  14. CPM Is a Useful Cell Surface Marker to Isolate Expandable Bi-Potential Liver Progenitor Cells Derived from Human iPS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Taketomo; Koui, Yuta; Suzuki, Kaori; Kobayashi, Ayaka; Miura, Yasushi; Chern, Edward Y; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2015-10-13

    To develop a culture system for large-scale production of mature hepatocytes, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) with a high proliferation potential would be advantageous. We have found that carboxypeptidase M (CPM) is highly expressed in embryonic LPCs, hepatoblasts, while its expression is decreased along with hepatic maturation. Consistently, CPM expression was transiently induced during hepatic specification from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). CPM(+) cells isolated from differentiated hiPSCs at the immature hepatocyte stage proliferated extensively in vitro and expressed a set of genes that were typical of hepatoblasts. Moreover, the CPM(+) cells exhibited a mature hepatocyte phenotype after induction of hepatic maturation and also underwent cholangiocytic differentiation in a three-dimensional culture system. These results indicated that hiPSC-derived CPM(+) cells share the characteristics of LPCs, with the potential to proliferate and differentiate bi-directionally. Thus, CPM is a useful marker for isolating hiPSC-derived LPCs, which allows development of a large-scale culture system for producing hepatocytes and cholangiocytes.

  15. Metabolites profiling of 10 bufadienolides in human liver microsomes and their cytotoxicity variation in HepG2 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lingyu; Wang, Hongjie; Si, Nan; Ren, Wei; Gao, Bo; Li, Yan; Yang, Jian; Xu, Miao; Zhao, Haiyu; Bian, Baolin

    2016-04-01

    Bufadienolides, a class of polyhydroxy steroids, exhibit significant antitumor activity. In this study, a total of 39 metabolites from 10 bufadienolides were detected and identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with an LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The results showed that hydroxylation and dehydrogenation were the major metabolic pathways of bufadienolides in human liver microsomes (HLMs). CYP3A4 was found to be the major metabolic enzyme and CYP2D6 only mediated the dehydrogenation reaction. A systematic validated cytotoxicity evaluation method for bufadienolide metabolites at equal equivalents was established. Hellebrigenin (1), hellebrigenol (2), arenobufagin (3), bufotalin (5), and bufalin (6) were selected to determine their cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells before and after incubation in HLMs. All the test samples were enriched by a validated solid-phase extraction (SPE) method. Although the cytotoxicities of metabolites were weaker than those of the parent compounds to different degrees, their effects were still strong.

  16. Novel, high-yield red blood cell production methods from CD34-positive cells derived from human embryonic stem, yolk sac, fetal liver, cord blood, and peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Emmanuel; Qiu, Caihong; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2012-08-01

    The current supply of red blood cells expressing rare blood groups is not sufficient to cover all the existing transfusion needs for chronically transfused patients, such as sickle cell disease homozygous carriers, because of alloimmunization. In vitro production of cultured red blood cells is slowly emerging as a possible complement to the existing collection-based red blood cell procurement system. The yield of cultured red blood cells can theoretically be maximized by amplifying the stem, progenitor, or precursor compartment. Here, we combined methods designed to expand these three compartments to optimize the yield of cultured red blood cells and found that exposing CD34(+) cells to a short pulse of cytokines favorable for erythroid differentiation prior to stem cell expansion followed by progenitor expansion produced the highest yield of erythroid cells. This novel serum-free red blood cell production protocol was efficient on CD34(+) cells derived from human embryonic stem cells, 6-8-week yolk sacs, 16-18-week fetal livers, cord blood, and peripheral blood. The yields of cells obtained with these new protocols were larger by an order of magnitude than the yields observed previously. Globin expression analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that these expansion protocols generally yielded red blood cells that expressed a globin profile similar to that expected for the developmental age of the CD34(+) cells.

  17. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Kegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug induced liver injury (DILI is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2±0.9×106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay and cell activity (XTT assay. The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production.

  18. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 10(6) cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production.

  19. Concentration-dependent induction of reactive oxygen species, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human liver cells after nickel nanoparticles exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2015-02-01

    Due to advent of nanotechnology, nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) are increasingly recognized for their utility in various applications including catalysts, sensors and electronics. However, the environmental and human health effects of Ni NPs have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined toxic effects of Ni NPs in human liver (HepG2) cells. Ni NPs were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. We observed that Ni NPs (size, ∼28 nm; concentration range, 25-100 μg/mL) induced cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells and degree of induction was concentration-dependent. Ni NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress in dose-dependent manner evident by induction of reactive oxygen species and depletion of glutathione. Cell cycle analysis of cells treated with Ni NPs exhibited significant increase of apoptotic cell population in subG1 phase. Ni NPs also induced caspase-3 enzyme activity and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Upregulation of cell cycle checkpoint gene p53 and bax/bcl-2 ratio with a concomitant loss in mitochondrial membrane potential suggested that Ni NPs induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells was mediated through mitochondrial pathway. This study warrants that applications of Ni NPs should be carefully assessed as to their toxicity to human health. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparative cytotoxic response of nickel ferrite nanoparticles in human liver HepG2 and breast MFC-7 cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Khan, M A Majeed; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2015-09-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have received much attention for their potential applications in biomedical fields such as magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and cancer hyperthermia. However, little is known about the toxicity of nickel ferrite NPs at the cellular and molecular levels. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in two different types of human cells (i.e., liver HepG2 and breast MCF-7). Nickel ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, which was demonstrated by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Nickel ferrite NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress, which was evident by the depletion of glutathione and the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation. The mitochondrial membrane potential due to nickel ferrite NP exposure was also observed. The mRNA levels for the tumor suppressor gene p53 and the apoptotic genes bax, CASP3 and CASP9 were up-regulated, while the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated following nickel ferrite NP exposure. Furthermore, the activities of apoptotic enzymes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were also higher in both types of cells treated with nickel ferrite NPs. Cytotoxicity induced by nickel ferrite was efficiently prevented by N-acetyl cysteine (ROS scavenger) treatment, which suggested that oxidative stress might be one of the possible mechanisms of nickel ferrite NP toxicity. We also observed that MCF-7 cells were slightly more susceptible to nickel ferrite NP exposure than HepG2 cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the potential mechanisms of different cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in different cell lines.

  1. A Novel Tetraenoic Fatty Acid Isolated from Amaranthus spinosus Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis of Human Liver Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Arijit; Guria, Tanmoy; Maity, Tapan Kumar; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-09-22

    Amaranthus spinosus Linn. (Family: Amaranthaceae) has been shown to be useful in preventing and mitigating adverse pathophysiological conditions and complex diseases. However, only limited information is available on the anticancer potential of this plant. In this study, we examined the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of a novel fatty acid isolated from A. spinosus-(14E,18E,22E,26E)-methyl nonacosa-14,18,22,26 tetraenoate-against HepG2 human liver cancer cells. We used 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay to determine cell viability, flow cytometry assay for cell cycle analysis, and Western blot analysis to measure protein expression of Cdc2), cyclin B1, Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). The MTT assay showed that the fatty acid markedly inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells in a dosage-dependent fashion, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 25.52 µmol/L. This antiproliferative result was superior to that of another known fatty acid, linoleic acid (IC50 38.65 µmol/L), but comparable to that of standard anticancer drug doxorubicin (IC50 24.68 µmol/L). The novel fatty acid also induced apoptosis mediated by downregulation of cyclin B1, upregulation of Bax, and downregulation of Bcl-2, resulting in the G₂/M transition arrest. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that a novel fatty acid isolated from A. spinosus exhibits significant antiproliferative activity mediated through the induction of apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These encouraging results may facilitate the development of A. spinosus fatty acid for the prevention and intervention of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the tumor suppressor FHL2 by p53 in human kidney and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Xu

    Full Text Available Four and a Half LIM protein 2 (FHL2 is a LIM domain only protein that is able to form various protein complexes and regulate gene transcription. Recent findings showed that FHL2 is a potential tumor suppressor gene that was down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Moreover, FHL2 can bind to and activate the TP53 promoter in hepatic cells. In this study, the activity of the two promoters of FHL2, 1a and 1b, were determined in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293 and the activation of these two promoters by p53 was investigated. Our results showed that the 1b promoter has a higher activity than the 1a promoter in HEK 293 cells but the 1a promoter is more responsive to the activation by p53 when compared with the 1b promoter. The regulation of FHL2 by p53 was further confirmed in liver cells by the overexpression of p53 in Hep3B cells and the knockdown of p53 in HepG2 cells. Combining promoter activity results of truncated mutants and predictions by bioinformatics tools, a putative p53 binding site was found in the exon 1a of FHL2 from +213 to +232. The binding between the p53 protein and the putative p53 binding site was then validated by the ChIP assay. Furthermore, the expression of FHL2 and TP53 were down-regulated in majority of HCC tumour samples (n = 41 and significantly correlated (P = 0.026. Finally, we found that the somatic mutation 747 (G→T, a hot spot mutation of the TP53 gene, is potentially associated with a higher expression of FHL2 in HCC tumour samples. Taken together, this is the first in-depth study about the transcriptional regulation of FHL2 by p53.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of the tumor suppressor FHL2 by p53 in human kidney and liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaying; Zhou, Junwei; Li, Man-Shan; Ng, Chor-Fung; Ng, Yuen-Keng; Lai, Paul Bo-San; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2014-01-01

    Four and a Half LIM protein 2 (FHL2) is a LIM domain only protein that is able to form various protein complexes and regulate gene transcription. Recent findings showed that FHL2 is a potential tumor suppressor gene that was down-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Moreover, FHL2 can bind to and activate the TP53 promoter in hepatic cells. In this study, the activity of the two promoters of FHL2, 1a and 1b, were determined in the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293 and the activation of these two promoters by p53 was investigated. Our results showed that the 1b promoter has a higher activity than the 1a promoter in HEK 293 cells but the 1a promoter is more responsive to the activation by p53 when compared with the 1b promoter. The regulation of FHL2 by p53 was further confirmed in liver cells by the overexpression of p53 in Hep3B cells and the knockdown of p53 in HepG2 cells. Combining promoter activity results of truncated mutants and predictions by bioinformatics tools, a putative p53 binding site was found in the exon 1a of FHL2 from +213 to +232. The binding between the p53 protein and the putative p53 binding site was then validated by the ChIP assay. Furthermore, the expression of FHL2 and TP53 were down-regulated in majority of HCC tumour samples (n = 41) and significantly correlated (P = 0.026). Finally, we found that the somatic mutation 747 (G→T), a hot spot mutation of the TP53 gene, is potentially associated with a higher expression of FHL2 in HCC tumour samples. Taken together, this is the first in-depth study about the transcriptional regulation of FHL2 by p53.

  4. A Novel Tetraenoic Fatty Acid Isolated from Amaranthus spinosus Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis of Human Liver Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Arijit; Guria, Tanmoy; Maity, Tapan Kumar; Bishayee, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Amaranthus spinosus Linn. (Family: Amaranthaceae) has been shown to be useful in preventing and mitigating adverse pathophysiological conditions and complex diseases. However, only limited information is available on the anticancer potential of this plant. In this study, we examined the antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of a novel fatty acid isolated from A. spinosus—(14E,18E,22E,26E)-methyl nonacosa-14,18,22,26 tetraenoate—against HepG2 human liver cancer cells. We used 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay to determine cell viability, flow cytometry assay for cell cycle analysis, and Western blot analysis to measure protein expression of Cdc2), cyclin B1, Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). The MTT assay showed that the fatty acid markedly inhibited the proliferation of HepG2 cells in a dosage-dependent fashion, with a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 25.52 µmol/L. This antiproliferative result was superior to that of another known fatty acid, linoleic acid (IC50 38.65 µmol/L), but comparable to that of standard anticancer drug doxorubicin (IC50 24.68 µmol/L). The novel fatty acid also induced apoptosis mediated by downregulation of cyclin B1, upregulation of Bax, and downregulation of Bcl-2, resulting in the G2/M transition arrest. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that a novel fatty acid isolated from A. spinosus exhibits significant antiproliferative activity mediated through the induction of apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These encouraging results may facilitate the development of A. spinosus fatty acid for the prevention and intervention of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:27669220

  5. Lycopene Inhibits Metastasis of Human Liver Adenocarcinoma SK-Hep-1 Cells by Downregulation of NADPH Oxidase 4 Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhou, Bo-Yi; Song, Tuzz-Ying; Lee, Inn; Hu, Miao-Lin; Yang, Nae-Cherng

    2017-08-16

    NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), with the sole function to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), can be a molecular target for disrupting cancer metastasis. Several studies have indicated that lycopene exhibited anti-metastatic actions in vitro and in vivo. However, the role of NOX4 in the anti-metastatic action of lycopene remains unknown. Herein, we first confirmed the anti-metastatic effect of lycopene (0.1-5 μM) on human liver adenocarcinoma SK-Hep-1 cells. We showed that lycopene significantly inhibited NOX4 protein expression, with the strongest inhibition of 64.3 ± 10.2% (P Hep-1 cells. We then determined the effects of lycopene on transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-induced metastasis. We found that TGF-β (5 ng/mL) significantly increased migration, invasion, and adhesion activity, the intracellular ROS level, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-2 activities, the level of NOX4 protein expression, and NOX activity. All these TGF-β-induced effects were antagonized by the incubation of SK-Hep-1 cells with lycopene (2.5 μM). Using transient transfection of siRNA against NOX4, we found that the downregulation of NOX4 could mimic lycopene by inhibiting cell migration and the activities of MMP-9 and MMP-2 during the incubation with or without TGF-β on SK-Hep-1 cells. The results demonstrate that the downregulation of NOX4 plays a crucial role in the anti-metastatic action of lycopene in SK-Hep-1 cells.

  6. Identification of Max binding protein as a novel binding protein of Nck1 and characterization of its role in inhibiting human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qi; HUANG Tao; WANG Ya-feng; ZHANG Kun-sun; CHEN Dong; PENG Bao-gang

    2012-01-01

    Background The tendency of tumor cells to disperse throughout the liver is a distinct feature of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Nck family adaptor proteins function to regulate actin cytoskeletal reorganization that leads to cell motility.We previously found that Max binding protein (MNT) was differentially expressed in HCC,and interacted with Nck1 by 2-DE.MNT is a protein member of the Myc/Max/Mad network which plays roles in cell proliferation,differentiation,and death.We investigated the effects of MNT on migration of human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells to study the migration regulatory role of MNT in HCC cells.Methods Interaction between MNT and Nck1 was further validated in hepatoma cells by GST-pull down assay and immunoprecipitation,siRNAs specific to MNT (MNT siRNA) were used to knockdown MNT expression.Western blotting,transwell assay were used to determine the migration potential of cells.Results Interaction between MNT and Nck1 was validated in hepatoma cells.MNT knockdown promoted the migration of human liver cancer SK-HEP-1 cells (P <0.01 ).Conclusion The results suggest that MNT,via interaction with Nck1,inhibits hepatoma cell migration.

  7. [PCR analysis of the absolute number of copies of human chromosome 18 transcripts in liver and HepG2 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, Y Y; Ptitsyn, K G; Tikhonova, O V; Radko, S P; Kurbatov, L K; Vakhrushev, I V; Zgoda, V G; Ponomarenko, E A; Lisitsa, A V; Archakov, A I

    2017-03-01

    Using reverse transcription in conjunction with the quantitative real-time PCR or digital droplet PCR, the transcriptome profiling of human chromosome 18 has been carried out in liver hepatocytes and hepatoblastoma cells (HepG2 cell line) in terms of the absolute number of each transcript per cell. The transcript abundance varies within the range of 0.006 to 9635 and 0.011 to 4819 copies per cell for HepG2 cell line and hepatocytes, respectively. The expression profiles for genes of chromosome 18 in hepatocytes and HepG2 cells were found to significantly correlate: the Spearman's correlation coefficient was equal to 0.81. The distribution of frequency of transcripts over their abundance was bimodal for HepG2 cells and unimodal for liver hepatocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the differential gene expression has revealed that genes of chromosome 18, overexpressed in HepG2 cells compared to hepatocytes, are associated with cell division and cell adhesion processes. It is assumed that the enhanced expression of those genes in HepG2 cells is related to the proliferation activity of cultured cells. The differences in transcriptome profiles have to be taken into account when modelling liver hepatocytes with cultured HepG2 cells.

  8. Cytosolic purine 5'-nucleotidases of rat liver and human red blood cells: regulatory properties and role in AMP dephosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berghe, G; Bontemps, F; Vincent, M F

    1988-01-01

    Of the various species of cellular 5'-nucleotidases, membranous, lysosomal and cytosolic, only the latter are likely to play a role in the physiologic dephosphorylation of the 5'-nucleoside monophosphates present in the cytoplasm. The necessity to preserve cellular ATP renders a strict control of the dephosphorylation as well as of the deamination of AMP mandatory, because both nucleotides are maintained in equilibrium by adenylate kinase. Our studies of cytosolic purine 5'-nucleotidases purified from rat liver and from human erythrocytes, reviewed in this presentation, have shown that both display complex kinetic properties. Both enzymes have markedly higher affinities for IMP and for GMP than for AMP. In addition, they are stimulated by nucleoside triphosphates, among them ATP and GTP, and inhibited by Pi. The erythrocytic purine 5'-nucleotidase is also stimulated by glycerate 2,3-bisphosphate. It could thus be expected that under conditions of ATP and GTP breakdown, particularly when accompanied by an increase in Pi, the dephosphorylation of AMP would be curtailed. To verify this hypothesis, experiments were performed with isolated rat hepatocytes and with human red blood cells. The rate of dephosphorylation of AMP was measured by following time-wise the production of adenosine in the presence of coformycin (or deoxycoformycin) and 5-iodotubercidin. The coformycins inhibit the deamination of adenosine into inosine by adenosine deaminase, and 5-iodotubercidin inhibits the recycling of adenosine into AMP by adenosine kinase. Upon induction of ATP catabolism by the addition of fructose to isolated rat hepatocytes, the dephosphorylation of AMP was nearly completely suppressed. In accordance with these results, the activity of the rat liver cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase, assayed in the presence of concentrations of substrate and effectors mimicking those measured in intact cells following the addition of fructose, was decreased as compared to control conditions. In

  9. Toxicity and Radioprotective Effects of DF-1 and Carbon Nanotubes in Human Lung and Liver Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Madeline; Holtorf, Heidi; Huff, Janice; Moore, Valerie; Jeevarajan, Antony

    2007-01-01

    The DF-1 compound, a sixty carbon fullerene derivative, has been shown to have antioxidant effects and is thought to possibly help mediate the effects of radiation on cells. While this is potentially useful, it is important to first understand the effect that the DF-1 has on the cells and the growth rate of the cells to determine if the material itself has any innate toxicity. A growth curve was established for both HF-19 cells, human fibroblasts, and HepG2 cells, liver tissue cells in the presence of two different concentrations of DF-1 and for untreated controls. The cells were plated in triplicate in 60mm dishes and were lifted and counted with a hemocytometer daily for one week. The growth curve data for the HF-19 cells show that while the low concentration of DF-1 had no apparent effect on the growth rate, the high concentration of DF-1 appeared to severely inhibit the growth of the HF-19 cells. The growth curve data for the HepG2 cells shows that the DF-1 compound had no significant effect on the rate at which the cells grew. A second growth curve study was performed plain carbon nanotubes, but with only 24 hour exposure to a high and low concentration of material. The carbon nanotubes are another carbon compound similar to DF-1, but in the shape of a tube, rather than a ball. We hypothesize that nanotubes may also mediate the effect of radiation on cells. This time, nanotubes did not showed any significant effect on the growth rate HF-19 or HepG2 cells. A third growth curve study is underway to further determine the effect of DF-1, nanotubes, and a derivatized nanotube (BHT-nanotubes). This derivatized nanotube has been modified with a compound that is known to be very effective at neutralizing free radicals. We expect that the high concentration of DF-1 and possibly the nanotubes and BHT-nanotubes may inhibit the growth of the HF-19 cells while the low concentration will resemble the growth of the control. We also hypothesize that there will be no

  10. Liquid fructose downregulates Sirt1 expression and activity and impairs the oxidation of fatty acids in rat and human liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollo, Alba; Roglans, Núria; Baena, Miguel; Sánchez, Rosa M; Merlos, Manel; Alegret, Marta; Laguna, Juan C

    2014-04-01

    Fructose ingestion is associated with the production of hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia. For fructose to attain these effects in rats, simultaneous induction of fatty acid synthesis and inhibition of fatty acid oxidation is required. We aimed to determine the mechanism involved in the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by fructose and whether this effect occurs also in human liver cells. Female rats were supplemented or not with liquid fructose (10% w/v) for 7 or 14 days; rat (FaO) and human (HepG2) hepatoma cells, and human hepatocytes were incubated with fructose 25mM for 24h. The expression and activity of the enzymes and transcription factors relating to fatty acid β-oxidation were evaluated. Fructose inhibited the activity of fatty acid β-oxidation only in livers of 14-day fructose-supplemented rats, as well as the expression and activity of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα). Similar results were observed in FaO and HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes. PPARα downregulation was not due to an osmotic effect or to an increase in protein-phosphatase 2A activity caused by fructose. Rather, it was related to increased content in liver of inactive and acetylated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α, due to a reduction in sirtuin 1 expression and activity. In conclusion, fructose inhibits liver fatty acid oxidation by reducing PPARα expression and activity, both in rat and human liver cells, by a mechanism involving sirtuin 1 down-regulation.

  11. Up-regulation of lactosylceramide synthase in MDR1 overexpressing human liver tumour cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, [No Value; Klappe, K; Kok, JW

    2005-01-01

    HepG2 cells, stably transfected with MDR1 cDNA, encoding the P-glycoprotein multidrug resistance efflux pump, display an altered sphingolipid composition compared to control cells, stably transfected with empty vector. The MDR1 over-expressing cells display a -3-fold increased level of

  12. Anti-proliferative effects of raw and steamed extracts of Panax notoginseng and its ginsenoside constituents on human liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neo Soek-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Panax notoginseng is a potential source of anticancer compounds. This study aims to investigate the effects of steaming on the chemical profile of P. notoginseng and the anti-proliferative effects of P. notoginseng on liver cancer cells. Methods Samples of powdered raw P. notoginseng roots were steamed for various durations. Extracts of the raw and steamed samples were subjected to ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS analysis for chemical profiling. The anti-proliferative effects on three human liver cancer cells, namely SNU449, SNU182 and HepG2, were evaluated using colorimetric WST-1 assay. Results Steaming changed chromatographic and pharmacological profiles of P. notoginseng, causing differences in activities such as inhibition of cancer growth. Steamed P. notoginseng exhibited greater anti-proliferative effects against liver cancer cells (SNU449, SNU182 and HepG2 than its raw form; steaming up to 24 hours increased bioactivities. Steaming increased the concentrations of ginsenoside Rh2, Rk1, Rk3 and 20S-Rg3 and enhanced growth inhibition of liver cancer cells. Conclusion Steaming changes the chemical profile as well as anti-cancer biological activities of P. notoginseng. Steamed P. notoginseng contains potential compounds for the treatment of liver cancer.

  13. Memory NK cells: why do they reside in the liver?

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yonglin; Peng, Hui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Immune memory is the hallmark of adaptive immunity. However, recent studies have shown that natural killer (NK) cells, key components of the innate immune system, also mediate memory responses in mice and humans. Strikingly, memory NK cells were liver-resident in some models, raising the question as to whether the liver is a special organ for the acquisition of NK cell memory. Here, we review the characteristics of NK cell memory by summarizing recent progress and discuss how the liver may ge...

  14. Phenobarbital induces cell cycle transcriptional responses in mouse liver humanized for constitutive androstane and pregnane x receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Lempiäinen, Harri; Scherbichler, Nina; Braeuning, Albert; Geissler, Miriam; Dubost, Valerie; Müller, Arne; Scheer, Nico; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Hara, Hisanori; Picard, Frank; Theil, Diethilde; Couttet, Philippe; Vitobello, Antonio; Grenet, Olivier; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Thomson, John P; Meehan, Richard R; Elcombe, Clifford R; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Schwarz, Michael; Moulin, Pierre; Terranova, Rémi; Moggs, Jonathan G

    2014-06-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism and play important roles in the mechanism of phenobarbital (PB)-induced rodent nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenesis. Here, we have used a humanized CAR/PXR mouse model to examine potential species differences in receptor-dependent mechanisms underlying liver tissue molecular responses to PB. Early and late transcriptomic responses to sustained PB exposure were investigated in liver tissue from double knock-out CAR and PXR (CAR(KO)-PXR(KO)), double humanized CAR and PXR (CAR(h)-PXR(h)), and wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers exhibited temporally and quantitatively similar transcriptional responses during 91 days of PB exposure including the sustained induction of the xenobiotic response gene Cyp2b10, the Wnt signaling inhibitor Wisp1, and noncoding RNA biomarkers from the Dlk1-Dio3 locus. Transient induction of DNA replication (Hells, Mcm6, and Esco2) and mitotic genes (Ccnb2, Cdc20, and Cdk1) and the proliferation-related nuclear antigen Mki67 were observed with peak expression occurring between 1 and 7 days PB exposure. All these transcriptional responses were absent in CAR(KO)-PXR(KO) mouse livers and largely reversible in wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers following 91 days of PB exposure and a subsequent 4-week recovery period. Furthermore, PB-mediated upregulation of the noncoding RNA Meg3, which has recently been associated with cellular pluripotency, exhibited a similar dose response and perivenous hepatocyte-specific localization in both wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mice. Thus, mouse livers coexpressing human CAR and PXR support both the xenobiotic metabolizing and the proliferative transcriptional responses following exposure to PB.

  15. Co-mutagenicity of coumarin (1,2-benzopyrone) with aflatoxin B1 and human liver S9 in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeger, D E; Hsie, A W; Anderson, K E

    1999-06-01

    Coumarin (1,2-benzopyrone), a natural dietary constituent and drug currently under evaluation for treatment of certain cancers and lymphedema, reduces polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced neoplasms in rodents. Because most rodents metabolize coumarin through 3,4-epoxidation, whereas 7-hydroxylation predominates in humans, their suitability as a model for coumarin effects in humans has been questioned. We examined coumarin chemoprotection against the promutagen and dietary contaminant aflatoxin B1 with human liver S9 bioactivation in the Chinese hamster ovary cell/hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase mutation assay. Coumarin in the absence of aflatoxin B1 was not mutagenic or cytotoxic up to 500 microM. When included with either 1 or 10 microM aflatoxin B1, coumarin produced a dose-dependent increase in mutant frequency and cytotoxicity. At concentrations greater than 50 microM, coumarin stimulated human liver S9 bioactivation of aflatoxin B1 to the mutagenic 8,9-epoxide. This increase was 12- and fivefold at 500 microM coumarin with 1 and 10 microM aflatoxin B1, respectively, compared with incubations with aflatoxin B1 alone. These findings differ from previous results with liver S9 from other species, and indicate that coumarin co-mutagenicity with aflatoxin B1 and human liver S9 is through increased aflatoxin B1 bioactivation.

  16. Basil extract inhibits the sulfotransferase mediated formation of DNA adducts of the procarcinogen 1'-hydroxyestragole by rat and human liver S9 homogenates and in HepG2 human hepatoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Punt, A.; Delatour, T.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a basil extract on the sulfation and concomitant DNA adduct formation of the proximate carcinogen 1¿-hydroxyestragole were studied using rat and human liver S9 homogenates and the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Basil was chosen since it contains the procarcinogen estragole that can b

  17. Inhibitory effects of crude extracts from some edible Thai plants against replication of hepatitis B virus and human liver cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiyaput Wanwisa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edible plants such as Cratoxylum formosum (Jack Dyer, Curcumin longa Lin, Momordica charantia Lin and Moringa oleifera Lam have long been believed in Thai culture to relieve ulcers and the symptoms of liver disease. However, little is known about their anti-liver cancer properties and antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-liver cancer and anti-HBV activities of crude extracts from these edible plants on human liver cancer cells. Methods Plant samples were prepared and extracted using buffer and hydro-alcoholic solvents. The MTT assay was performed to investigate the effects of the plant extracts on the cell viability of HepG2 cells. The inhibitory effect on replication of HBV was analysed by determining the level of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA in transiently transfected HepG2 cells with the DNA expression plasmid of the HBV genome using a quantitative real-time PCR. Results Buffer and hydroalcoholic extracts from C. formosum (leaf reduced cell viability of HepG2 cells and they also inhibited HBV cccDNA. Crude extracts from C. longa (bulb in both solvents did not have any cytotoxic effects on the HepG2 cells, but they significantly decreased the level of HBV cccDNA. Buffer extracts from the leaves of M. charantia and the fruits of M. oleifera showed to have anti-HBV activity and also a mild cytotoxicity effect on the HepG2 cells. In addition, leaves of M. Oleifera extracted by hydroalcoholic solvent drastically decreased the level of cccDNA in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Conclusion Some crude extracts of edible plants contain compounds that demonstrate anti-liver cancer and anti-HBV activities.

  18. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south

  19. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis of the proteomes expressed in the human hepatoma cell line BEL-7404 and normal liver cell line L-02

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Proteome analysis technology has been used extensively in conducting discovery research of biology and has become one of the most essential technologies in functional genomics. The proteomes of the human hepatoma cell line BEL-7404 and the normal human liver cell line L-02 have been separated by high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) with immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF) in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in the second dimension (IPG-DALT). The resulting images have been analyzed using 2-D analysis software. Quantitative analysis reveals that 7 protein spots are detected only in hepatoma BEL-7404 cells, 14 only in L-02 cells, and 78 protein spots show significant fluctuation in quantity in both cell lines (P<0.01).These protein spots have been displayed on a proteome differential expression map. Analysis for the reproducibility of 2-DE indicates that the positional variability in the IEF dimension is 0.73 mm, while the variability in the SDS-PAGE dimension is 0.44 mm, and the quantitative variability is 17.6%-19.2%. These results suggest that the reproducibility of 2-DE has been suitable for the study of differential expression of proteomes. Proteome differential expression maps can be useful tools for disease diagnosis, drug-target validation analysis and biological process elucidation.

  20. Identification of Cancer Stem Cell Subpopulations of CD34+ PLC/PRF/5 That Result in Three Types of Human Liver Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su Cheol; Nguyen, Ngoc Tue; Eun, Jong Ryeol; Zhang, Yanling; Jung, Yong Jin; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Trotsyuk, Artem; Lam, Alexander; Ramsamooj, Rajendra; Zhang, Yanghong; Theise, Neil D.; Zern, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    CD34+ stem cells play an important role during liver development and regeneration. Thus, we hypothesized that some human liver carcinomas (HLCs) might be derived from transformed CD34+ stem cells. Here, we determined that a population of CD34+ cells isolated from PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells (PLC) appears to function as liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) by forming HLCs in immunodeficient mice with as few as 100 cells. Moreover, the CD34+ PLC subpopulation cells had an advantage over CD34− PLCs at initiating tumors. Three types of HLCs were generated from CD34+ PLC: hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs); cholangiocarcinomas (CC); and combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinomas (CHCs). Tumors formed in mice transplanted with 12 subpopulations and 6 progeny subpopulations of CD34+ PLC cells. Interestingly, progenies with certain surface antigens (CD133, CD44, CD90, or EPCAM) predominantly yielded HCCs. CD34+ PLCs that also expressed OV6 and their progeny OV6+ cells primarily produced CHC and CC. This represents the first experiment to demonstrate that the OV6+ antigen is associated with human CHC and CC. CD34+ PLCs that also expressed CD31 and their progeny CD31+ cells formed CHCs. Gene expression patterns and tumor cell populations from all xenografts exhibited diverse patterns, indicating that tumor-initiating cells (TICs) with distinct antigenic profiles contribute to cancer cell heterogeneity. Therefore, we identified CD34+ PLC cells functioning as LCSCs generating three types of HLCs. Eighteen subpopulations from one origin had the capacity independently to initiate tumors, thus functioning as TICs. This finding has broad implications for better understanding of the multistep model of tumor initiation and progression. Our finding also indicates that CD34+ PLCs that also express OV6 or CD31 result in types of HLCs. This is the first report that PLC/PRF/5 subpopulations expressing CD34 in combination with particular antigens defines categories of HLCs, implicating a

  1. Identification of cancer stem cell subpopulations of CD34(+) PLC/PRF/5 that result in three types of human liver carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su Cheol; Nguyen, Ngoc Tue; Eun, Jong Ryeol; Zhang, Yanling; Jung, Yong Jin; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Trotsyuk, Artem; Lam, Alexander; Ramsamooj, Rajendra; Zhang, Yanghong; Theise, Neil D; Zern, Mark A; Duan, Yuyou

    2015-04-15

    CD34(+) stem cells play an important role during liver development and regeneration. Thus, we hypothesized that some human liver carcinomas (HLCs) might be derived from transformed CD34(+) stem cells. Here, we determined that a population of CD34(+) cells isolated from PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells (PLC) appears to function as liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) by forming HLCs in immunodeficient mice with as few as 100 cells. Moreover, the CD34(+) PLC subpopulation cells had an advantage over CD34(-) PLCs at initiating tumors. Three types of HLCs were generated from CD34(+) PLC: hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs); cholangiocarcinomas (CC); and combined hepatocellular cholangiocarcinomas (CHCs). Tumors formed in mice transplanted with 12 subpopulations and 6 progeny subpopulations of CD34(+) PLC cells. Interestingly, progenies with certain surface antigens (CD133, CD44, CD90, or EPCAM) predominantly yielded HCCs. CD34(+) PLCs that also expressed OV6 and their progeny OV6(+) cells primarily produced CHC and CC. This represents the first experiment to demonstrate that the OV6(+) antigen is associated with human CHC and CC. CD34(+) PLCs that also expressed CD31 and their progeny CD31(+) cells formed CHCs. Gene expression patterns and tumor cell populations from all xenografts exhibited diverse patterns, indicating that tumor-initiating cells (TICs) with distinct antigenic profiles contribute to cancer cell heterogeneity. Therefore, we identified CD34(+) PLC cells functioning as LCSCs generating three types of HLCs. Eighteen subpopulations from one origin had the capacity independently to initiate tumors, thus functioning as TICs. This finding has broad implications for better understanding of the multistep model of tumor initiation and progression. Our finding also indicates that CD34(+) PLCs that also express OV6 or CD31 result in types of HLCs. This is the first report that PLC/PRF/5 subpopulations expressing CD34 in combination with particular antigens defines categories of

  2. Induction of apoptosis in human liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line by 5-allyl-7-gen-difluoromethylenechrysin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Wen Tan; Hong Xia; Jin-Hua Xu; Jian-Guo Cao

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of 5-allyl-7-gen-difluoromethylenechrysin (ADFMChR) on apoptosis of human liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line and the molecular mechanisms involved. METHODS: HepG2 cells and L-02 cells were cultured in vitro and the inhibitory effect of ADFMChR on their proliferation was measured by MTT assay. The apoptosis of HepG2 cells was determined by flow cytometry (FCM) using propidium iodide (PI) fluorescence staining.DNA ladder bands were observed by DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. The influence of ADFMChR on the proxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), NF-κB, Bcl-2 and Bax protein expression of HepG2 cells were analyzed by Western blotting. RESULTS: MTT assay showed that ADFMChR significantly inhibited proliferation of HepG2 cells in a dosedependent manner, with little effect on growth of L-02 cells, and when IC50 was measured as 8.45 μmol/L and 191.55 μmol/L respectively, the potency of ADFMChR to HepG2 cells, was found to be similar to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, IC50 was 9.27 μmol/L). The selective index of ADFMChR cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells was 22.67 (191.55/8.45), higher than 5-FU (SI was 7.05 (65.37/9.27). FCM with PI staining demonstrated that the apoptosis rates of HepG2 cells treated with 3.0, 10.0 and 30.0 μmol/L ADFMChR for 48 h were 5.79%, 9.29% and 37.8%, respectively, and were significantly higher when treated with 30.0 μmol/L ADFMChR than when treated with 30.0 μmol/L ChR (16.0%) ( P < 0.05) and were similar to those obtained with 30.0 μmol/L 5-FU (41.0%). DNA agarose gel electrophoresis showed that treatment of HepG2 cells with 10.0 μmol/L ADFMChR for 48 h and 72 h resulted in typical DNA ladders which could be reversed by 10.00 μmol/L GW9662, a blocker of PPARγ. Western blotting analysis revealed that after 24 h of treatment with 3.0, 10.0, 30.0 μmol/L ADFMChR, PPARγ and Bax protein expression in HepG2 cells increased but Bcl-2 and NF-κB expression decreased; however, pre-incubation with 10.0 μmol/L GW

  3. Role of liver functions on liver cell mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takata,Tameyuki

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The control mechanism of mitosis in the regenerating rat liver was studied in relation to the cell functions. Partial hepatec· tomy induces a series of changes prior to the initiation of mitosis, i. e. decrease in serum glucose and albumin levels, loss of glycogen from liver cells, and increased lipid mobilization to liver cells. Massive supplies of glucose and fructose suppressed significantly hepatocellu. lar mitosis with suppression of lipid accumulation and preservation of glycogen in the liver cells and of blood sugar level. Homologous serum administration also suppressed the rate of liver cell mitosis after hepatectomy preventing the decrease in serum albumin level, but did not suppress the lipid accumulation in the liver. Starvation, which would relieve the liver cell from the work of detoxication of intesti. nal toxic products, did not show any suppressive effect on the mitotic rate of liver cells after partial hepatectomy in single animals. But starvation induced severe hypoglycemia, moderate hypoalbuminemia and loss of glycogen content in the liver. These changes in metabo. lism by starvation and partial hepatectomy were suppressed by con· jugating the animals with nonhepatectomized fed.partners by aortic anastomosis, and mitosis was suppressed in the residual liver of the fasting animals in this parabiosis. The results indicate that all the major functions of parenchymal live cells tested, sugar metabolism, serum albumin production, and detoxication, are closely related to the control of liver cell mitosis. Accumulation of lipids in the liver remnant after partial hepatectomy is thought to be for the compensa. tion of reduced glycogen storage and not concerned directly with the liver cell mitosis. Discussion was made briefly on the humoral factor and portal blood factor in relation to excess load of functions on resi. dual liver cells.

  4. Mercury-Induced Externalization of Phosphatidylserine and Caspase 3 Activation in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis arises from the active initiation and propagation of a series of highly orchestrated specific biochemical events leading to the demise of the cell. It is a normal physiological process, which occurs during embryonic development as well as in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Diverse groups of molecules are involved in the apoptosis pathway and it functions as a mechanism to eliminate unwanted or irreparably damaged cells. However, inappropriate induction of apoptosis by environmental agents has broad ranging pathologic implications and has been associated with several diseases including cancer. The toxicity of several heavy metals such as mercury has been attributed to their high affinity to sulfhydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, and their ability to disrupt cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis in various tissues. The aim of this study was to assess the potential for mercury to induce early and late-stage apoptosis in human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells. The Annexin-V and Caspase 3 assays were performed by flow cytometric analysis to determine the extent of phosphatidylserine externalization and Caspase 3 activation in mercury-treated HepG2 cells. Cells were exposed to mercury for 10 and 48 hours respectively at doses of 0, 1, 2, and 3 μg/mL based on previous cytotoxicity results in our laboratory indicating an LD50 of 3.5 ± 0.6 μg/mL for mercury in HepG2 cells. The study data indicated a dose response relationship between mercury exposure and the degree of early and late-stage apoptosis in HepG2 cells. The percentages of cells undergoing early apoptosis were 0.03 ± 0.03%, 5.19 ± 0.04%, 6.36 ± 0.04%, and 8.84 ± 0.02% for 0, 1, 2, and 3 μg/mL of mercury respectively, indicating a gradual increase in apoptotic cells with increasing doses of mercury. The percentages of Caspase 3 positive cells undergoing late apoptosis were 3.58 ± 0.03%, 17.06 ± 0

  5. Human tetraspanin transmembrane 4 superfamily member 4 or intestinal and liver tetraspan membrane protein is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and accelerates tumor cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Li; Leiming Wang; Jie Qiu; Liang Da; Pierre Tiollais; Zaiping Li; Mujun Zhao

    2012-01-01

    The human transmembrane 4 superfamily member 4 or intestinal and liver tetraspan membrane protein (TM4SF4/il-TMP) was originally cloned as an intestinal and liver tetraspan membrane protein and mediates density-dependent cell proliferation.The rat homolog of TM4SF4 was found to be up-regulated in regenerating liver after two-thirds hepatectomy and overexpression of TM4SF4 could enhance liver injury induced by CCl4.However,the expression and significance of TM4SF4/il-TMP in liver cancer remain unknown.Here,we report that TM4SF4/il-TMP is frequently and significantly overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis showed that TM4SF4/il-TMP mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in ~80% of HCC tissues,Immunohistochemical analysis of a 75 paired HCC tissue microarray revealed that TM4SF4/il-TMP was significantly overexpressed in HCC tissues (P < 0.001),and high immunointensity of TM4SF4/iI-TMP tended to be in well-to-moderately differentiated HCC compared with poorly differentiated tumors.Functional studies showed that overexpression of TM4SF4/il-TMP in QGY-7701 and BEL-7404 HCC cell lines through stable transfection of TM4SF4 expression plasmid significantly promoted both cell growth and colony formation of HCC cells.Reduction of TM4SF4/il-TMP expression in QGY-7701 and BEL-7404 cells by stably transfecting TM4SF4 antisense plasmid caused great inhibition of cell proliferation.Our findings suggest that TM4SF4/il-TMP has the potential to be biomarker in HCC and plays a crucial role in promotion of cancer cell proliferation.

  6. Long-term reproducible expression in human fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells with a UCOE-based lentiviral vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niraja Dighe

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic Stem Cell (HSC targeted gene transfer is an attractive treatment option for a number of hematopoietic disorders caused by single gene defects. However, extensive methylation of promoter sequences results in silencing of therapeutic gene expression. The choice of an appropriate promoter is therefore crucial for reproducible, stable and long-term transgene expression in clinical gene therapy. Recent studies suggest efficient and stable expression of transgenes from the ubiquitous chromatin opening element (UCOE derived from the human HNRPA2B1-CBX3 locus can be achieved in murine HSC. Here, we compared the use of HNRPA2B1-CBX3 UCOE (A2UCOE-mediated transgene regulation to two other frequently used promoters namely EF1α and PGK in human fetal liver-derived HSC (hflHSC. Efficient transduction of hflHSC with a lentiviral vector containing an HNRPA2B1-CBX3 UCOE-eGFP (A2UCOE-eGFP cassette was achieved at higher levels than that obtained with umbilical cord blood derived HSC (3.1x; p<0.001. While hflHSC were readily transduced with all three test vectors (A2UCOE-eGFP, PGK-eGFP and EF1α-eGFP, only the A2-UCOE construct demonstrated sustained transgene expression in vitro over 24 days (p<0.001. In contrast, within 10 days in culture a rapid decline in transgene expression in both PGK-eGFP and EF1α-eGFP transduced hflHSC was seen. Subsequently, injection of transduced cells into immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/Il2rg-/- demonstrated sustained eGFP expression for the A2UCOE-eGFP group up to 10 months post transplantation whereas PGK-eGFP and EF1α-eGFP transduced hflHSC showed a 5.1 and 22.2 fold reduction respectively over the same time period. We conclude that the A2UCOE allows a more efficient and stable expression in hflHSC to be achieved than either the PGK or EF1α promoters and at lower vector copy number per cell.

  7. Establishment of human-rhesus chimeric liver using adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells%应用成人骨髓间充质干细胞建立人-猴肝脏嵌合体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何保丽; 马丽花; 陈丽玲; 刘汝文; 杨仁华

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Human-mammal chimeric liver chimera has been a vital significance for the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. OBJECTIVE:To establish an animal model of human-rhesus chimeric liver using adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. METHODS:Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated, purified and cultured for the sixth generation. The number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was no less than 5×108. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells labeled with green fluorescent protein were transplanted into the liver of the embryo rhesus with pregnancy of 10 weeks under guided by type-B ultrasound. At the 1st and 3rd months of birth, the liver tissue of the infant rhesus was taken for biopsy. After routine pathological section, histological specimens were observed under fluorescence microscope to confirm if there were adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells positive for green fluorescent protein and their distribution, and detected by immunohistochemical staining to identify if human albumin expressed in the liver of infant rhesus. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Fluorescence microscope observation indicated that at the 1st and 3rd months after birth, there were surviving bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells derived from human with green fluorescence in the liver of infant rhesus, and these cells migrated to form more concentrated distribution. The immunohistochemical results demonstrated that functional liver cells expressing human albumin were observed in the liver of infant rhesus at the 1st and 3rd months after birth, and their distribution was in accordance with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with green fluorescence. Human-rhesus chimeric liver can be established using adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which can generate functional liver cells in the liver of infant rhesus.%BACKGROUND:Human-mammal chimeric liver chimera has been a vital significance for the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow

  8. Comparative cytotoxicity of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Saura C; Zheng, Jiwen; Graham, Lesley; Chen, Lynn; Ihrie, John; Yourick, Jeffrey J; Sprando, Robert L

    2014-11-01

    The use of silver nanoparticles in food, food contact materials, dietary supplements and cosmetics has increased significantly owing to their antibacterial and antifungal properties. As a consequence, the need for validated rapid screening methods to assess their toxicity is necessary to ensure consumer safety. This study evaluated two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 cells and human colon Caco2 cells, as tools for assessing the potential cytotoxicity of food- and cosmetic-related nanoparticles. The two cell culture models were utilized to compare the potential cytotoxicity of 20-nm silver. The average size of the silver nanoparticle determined by our transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis was 20.4 nm. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis showed no large agglomeration of the silver nanoparticles. The concentration of the 20-nm silver solution determined by our inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis was 0.962 mg ml(-1) . Our ICP-MS and TEM analysis demonstrated the uptake of 20-nm silver by both HepG2 and Caco2 cells. Cytotoxicity, determined by the Alamar Blue reduction assay, was evaluated in the nanosilver concentration range of 0.1 to 20 µg ml(-1) . Significant concentration-dependent cytotoxicity of the nanosilver in HepG2 cells was observed in the concentration range of 1 to 20 µg ml(-1) and at a higher concentration range of 10 to 20 µg ml(-1) in Caco2 cells compared with the vehicle control. A concentration-dependent decrease in dsDNA content was observed in both cell types exposed to nanosilver but not controls, suggesting an increase in DNA damage. The DNA damage was observed in the concentration range of 1 to 20 µg ml(-1) . Nanosilver-exposed HepG2 and Caco2 cells showed no cellular oxidative stress, determined by the dichlorofluorescein assay, compared with the vehicle control in the concentration range used in this study. A concentration-dependent decrease in

  9. Preliminary Toxicological Analysis of the Effect of Coal Slurry Impoundment Water on Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    Coal is usually 'washed' with water and a variety of chemicals to reduce its content of sulfur and mineral matter. The 'washings' or 'coal slurry' derived from this process is a viscous black liquid containing fine particles of coal, mineral matter, and other dissolved and particulate substances. Coal slurry may be stored in impoundments or in abandoned underground mines. Human health and environmental effects potentially resulting from leakage of chemical substances from coal slurry into drinking water supplies or aquatic ecosystems have not been systematically examined. Impoundments are semipermeable, presenting the possibility that inorganic and organic substances, some of which may be toxic, may contaminate ground or surface water. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has concluded that well water in Mingo County, West Virginia, constitutes a public health hazard.

  10. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects of ....... CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that normoglycaemic lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in multiple pathways involving liver, muscle tissue and beta-cell function....

  11. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei-Bo; Xu; Chao; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells(liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future.

  12. Modulation of nuclear T3 binding by T3 in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver) - T3 stimulation of cell growth but not of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatdehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The T3 modulation of nuclear T3 binding (NBT3), the T3 effect on cell growth, and the T3 and insulin effects on malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) were studied in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver). T3 was bound to a high...

  13. Amphipathic silica nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity through oxidative stress mediated and p53 dependent apoptosis pathway in human liver cell line HL-7702 and rat liver cell line BRL-3A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Daiying; Duan, Zhenfang; Jia, Yuanyuan; Chu, Tianxue; He, Qiong; Yuan, Juan; Dai, Wei; Li, Zengqiang; Xing, Liguo; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential cytotoxicity and the underlying mechanism of amphipathic silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) exposure to human normal liver HL-7702 cells and rat normal liver BRL-3A cells. Prior to the cellular studies, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and X ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize SiO2 NPs, which proved the amorphous nature of SiO2 NPs with TEM diameter of 19.8±2.7nm. Further studies proved that exposure to SiO2 NPs dose-dependently induced cytotoxicity as revealed by cell counting kit (CCK-8) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, with more severe cytotoxicity in HL-7702 cells than BRL-3A cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) assays showed elevated oxidative stress in both cells. Morphological studies by microscopic observation, Hochest 33258 and AO/EB staining indicated significant apoptotic changes after the cells being exposed to SiO2 NPs. Further studies by western blot indicated that SiO2 NPs exposure to both cells up-regulated p53, Bax and cleaved caspase-3 expression and down-regulated Bcl-2 and caspase-3 levels. Activated caspase-3 activity detected by colorimetric assay kit and caspase-3/7 activity detected by fluorescent real-time detection kit were significantly increased by SiO2 NPs exposure. In addition, antioxidant vitamin C significantly attenuated SiO2 NPs-induced caspase-3 activation, which indicated that SiO2 NPs-induced oxidative stress was involved in the process of HL-7702 and BRL-3A cell apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggested that SiO2 NPs-induced cytotoxicity in HL-7702 and BRL-3A cells was through oxidative stress mediated and p53, caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2 dependent pathway and HL-7702 cells were more sensitive to SiO2 NPs-induced cytotoxicity than BRL-3A cells.

  14. Inhibitory effect of endostatin expressed by human liver carcinoma SMMC7721 on endothelial Cell proliferation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Wang; Fu-Kun Liu; Xi Li; Jai-Sou Li; Gen-Xin Xu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To constnuct a stable transfectant of human livercarcinoma cell line SMMC7721 that could secret humanencicstatin and to explore the effect of human encostatinexpressed by the transfectant on enciotheliai cell proliferation.METHODS: Recombinant retroviral plasmid pLncx-Endocontaining the eDNA for human endoslsin gene togetherwith mt albumin signal peptide was engineered andtransferred into SMMC7721 cell by lipofectamine. Afterselection with G418, endcotatin-transfected SMMC7721 ceiiswere chosen and expanded. Immunohistochemical stainingand Western blot were used to detect the expression ofhuman endosatin in transfected SMMC7721 cells and itsmedium. The conditioned medium of endostatin-transfectedand control SMMC7721 cells were collected to cultivate withhuman umbilical vein endothelial cells for 72 hours. Theinhibitory effect of endoststin, expressed by transfectedSMMC7721 cells, on endothelial proliferation in vitro wasobserved by using Mn assay.RESULTS: A 550 bp specific fragment of endostatin gene wasdetected from the PCR product of endostatin-transfeclsdSMMC7721 cells. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotanalysis confirmed the expression and secretion of foreighhuman endostatin protein by endoslstin-transfeclsdSMMC7721 cells. In vitro endothelial proliferation assayshowed that 72 hours after cultivation with human umbilicalvein endothelial cells, the optical density (OD) in groupusing the medium from endostatin-transfected SMMC7721cells was 0.51 ±0.06, lower than that from RPMI 1640 group(0.98 ± 0.09) or that from control plasmid pLncx-transfeotedSMMC7721 cells (0. 88 ± 0. 11). The inhibitory rate formedium from endostatin-transfeclsd SMMC7721 cells was 48%, significantly higher than that from empty plasmid plncx-transfected SMMC7721 cells (10.2 %, P< 0.01).CONCLUSION: Human endoslstin can he stably expressedby SMMC7721 cell tran sferred with human endoslsin geneand its product can significantly inhibit the proliferation ofhuman umbilical vein

  15. Human Embryonic St me Cell Lines fromthe Chinese Population and Differentiation to Liver and Muscle Cell Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We have established 6 hES cell lines from IVF surplus blastocysts. Characterization of these lines have shown that 4 of the 6 lines meet all of the criterion (Science) for hES cell lines and 2 of them display most characteristics of hES cells but do not form teratoma. In order to produce hES cell lines without using mouse feeders, we have produced a hES cell line using feeders derived from hES cells themselves, and showed that hES-derived feeders are capable of supporting the derivation of new hES cell line...

  16. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  17. Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Adelaine; Ortiz-Neira, Clara L.; Abou Reslan, Walid; Kaura, Deepak [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Sharon, Raphael; Anderson, Ronald [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Oncology, Calgary, AB (Canada); Pinto-Rojas, Alfredo [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-10-15

    Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) typically presents with hepatomegaly and other signs of liver dysfunction. We present an 11-month-old child having only minimally elevated liver enzymes as an indication of liver involvement. Using sonography as the initial diagnostic tool followed by MRI, LCH of the liver was revealed. A review of sonographic, CT, MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography findings in liver LCH is presented. We recommend that physicians consider sonography and MRI screening for liver involvement in patients with newly diagnosed LCH, as periportal involvement may be present with little or no liver function abnormality present, as in this patient. (orig.)

  18. A microfluidically perfused three dimensional human liver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, Knut; Steinborn, Sandra; Gröger, Marko; Ungerböck, Birgit; Jank, Anne-Marie; Ehgartner, Josef; Nietzsche, Sandor; Dinger, Julia; Kiehntopf, Michael; Funke, Harald; Peters, Frank T; Lupp, Amelie; Gärtner, Claudia; Mayr, Torsten; Bauer, Michael; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2015-12-01

    Within the liver, non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) are critically involved in the regulation of hepatocyte polarization and maintenance of metabolic function. We here report the establishment of a liver organoid that integrates NPCs in a vascular layer composed of endothelial cells and tissue macrophages and a hepatic layer comprising stellate cells co-cultured with hepatocytes. The three-dimensional liver organoid is embedded in a microfluidically perfused biochip that enables sufficient nutrition supply and resembles morphological aspects of the human liver sinusoid. It utilizes a suspended membrane as a cell substrate mimicking the space of Disse. Luminescence-based sensor spots were integrated into the chip to allow online measurement of cellular oxygen consumption. Application of microfluidic flow induces defined expression of ZO-1, transferrin, ASGPR-1 along with an increased expression of MRP-2 transporter protein within the liver organoids. Moreover, perfusion was accompanied by an increased hepatobiliary secretion of 5(6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein and an enhanced formation of hepatocyte microvilli. From this we conclude that the perfused liver organoid shares relevant morphological and functional characteristics with the human liver and represents a new in vitro research tool to study human hepatocellular physiology at the cellular level under conditions close to the physiological situation.

  19. Tomatine-Containing Green Tomato Extracts Inhibit Growth of Human Breast, Colon, Liver, and Stomach Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) synthesize the glycoalkaloids dehydrotomatine and a–tomatine, possibly as a defense against bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. We investigated six green and three red tomato extracts for their ability to induce cell death in human cancer and normal cells ...

  20. Stem cells in liver regeneration and their potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosos, Ioannis; Kolios, George

    2013-10-01

    Stem cells constitute a population of "primitive cells" with the ability to divide indefinitely and give rise to specialized cells under special conditions. Because of these two characteristics they have received particular attention in recent decades. These cells are the primarily responsible factors for the regeneration of tissues and organs and for the healing of lesions, a feature that makes them a central key in the development of cell-based medicine, called Regenerative Medicine. The idea of wound and organ repair and body regeneration is as old as the mankind, reflecting the human desire for inhibiting aging and immortality and it is first described in the ancient Greek myth of Prometheus. It is of interest that the myth refers to liver, an organ with remarkable regenerative ability after loss of mass and function caused by liver injury or surgical resection. Over the last decade there has been an important progress in understanding liver physiology and the mechanisms underlying hepatic development and regeneration. As liver transplantation, despite its difficulties, remains the only effective therapy for advanced liver disease so far, scientific interest has nowadays been orientated towards Regenerative Medicine and the use of stem cells to repair damaged liver. This review is focused on the available literature concerning the role of stem cells in liver regeneration. It summarizes the results of studies concerning endogenous liver regeneration and stem cell experimental protocols. Moreover, this review discusses the clinical studies that have been conducted in humans so far.

  1. Novel combination of sorafenib and celecoxib provides synergistic anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in human liver cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melchiorre Cervello

    Full Text Available Molecular targeted therapy has shown promise as a treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor, recently received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced HCC. However, although sorafenib is well tolerated, concern for its safety has been expressed. Celecoxib (Celebrex® is a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor which exhibits antitumor effects in human HCC cells. The present study examined the interaction between celecoxib and sorafenib in two human liver tumor cell lines HepG2 and Huh7. Our data showed that each inhibitor alone reduced cell growth and the combination of celecoxib with sorafenib synergistically inhibited cell growth and increased apoptosis. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the synergistic antitumor activity of the combination, we investigated the expression profile of the combination-treated liver cancer cell lines using microarray analysis. Combination treatment significantly altered expression levels of 1,986 and 2,483 transcripts in HepG2 and Huh7 cells, respectively. Genes functionally involved in cell death, signal transduction and regulation of transcription were predominantly up-regulated, while genes implicated in metabolism, cell-cycle control and DNA replication and repair were mainly down-regulated upon treatment. However, combination-treated HCC cell lines displayed specificity in the expression and activity of crucial factors involved in hepatocarcinogenesis. The altered expression of some of these genes was confirmed by semi-quantitative and quantitative RT-PCR and by Western blotting. Many novel genes emerged from our transcriptomic analyses, and further functional analyses may determine whether these genes can serve as potential molecular targets for more effective anti-HCC strategies.

  2. Pluripotent stem cells exhibiting similar characteristics can be isolated from human fetal bone marrow,heart,liver,muscle,lung,derma,kidney,and fat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Baijun; SONG Yongping; ZHAO Chunhua; SHI Mingxia; LIN Quande

    2007-01-01

    Previously,we reported that a cell population derived from human fetal bone marrow fBM),termed here Flk1+CD34-postembryonic pluripotent stem cells(PPSCs)that have the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs),could difierentiate into ectodermal,endodermal and mesodermal celI types at the single cell level in vitro,and that these cells could also difierentiate into the epithelium of liver,lung,gut,as well as the hematopoietic and endothelial lineages after transplantion into irradiated non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient(NOD/SCID) mice.In this study,we further isolated pluripotent stem cells from human fetal heart,liver,muscle,lung,derma,kidney,and fat and then analyzed the characteristics and function of these stem cells.It was found that the phenotype of the culture-expanded pluripotent stem cells from different fetal tissues was similar to BM-derived Flk1+CD34-PPSCs.i.e.Flk1 and CD44 positive,GlyA,CD34,CD45,class I-HLA and HLA-DR negative.Morphologically,these cells were fibroblast-like and the doubling time was about 30 h.More importantly,culture-expanded pluripotent stem cells from all these fetal tissues were able to differentiate into cells with morphologic and phenotypic characteristics of adipocytes,osteocytes,neurons,gilal cells and hepatocytes.These pluripotent stem cells with characteristics similar to fetal BM-derived Flk1+CD34-PPSCs can be selected and cultured from tissues other than the BM.This phenomenon may help explain the"stem cell plasticity"found in multiple human tissues.In addition,as fetal BM-derived Flk1+CD34-PPSCs,these pluripotent stem cells from different fetal tissues had the capacity for self-renewal and multi-lineage difierentiation even after being expanded for more than 40 population doublings in vitro.Thus,they may be an ideal source of stem cells for treatment of inherited or degenerative diseases.

  3. Benefits of combined radioimmunotherapy and anti-angiogenic therapy in a liver metastasis model of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Kinuya, Seigo; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa [Department of Biotracer Medicine, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, 13-1 Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8640 (Japan); Koshida, Kiyoshi [Department of Integrative Cancer Therapy and Urology, Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan); Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro [Radioiosotope Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Watanabe, Naoto [Department of Radiology, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama (Japan); Shuke, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Asahikawa Medical College, Asahikawa (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The combined use of anti-angiogenic therapy (AT) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) may improve the therapeutic outcome in patients with cancer lesions. This hypothesis is based on the ability of AT to suppress tumour endothelial compartments and the direct action of RIT against tumour cells. We previously confirmed this hypothesis in an established subcutaneous xenograft model of colon cancer. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine the benefit of this combination within a liver metastasis model, which mimics treatment of minimal disease in an adjuvant setting. Liver metastases were established in nude mice by intrasplenic inoculation of LS180 colon cancer cells; following such inoculation, metastases of <1 mm in diameter can be observed at 1 week and these lesions can attain a size of several millimetres at 2 weeks. Daily AT with 2-methoxyoestradiol (2-ME), 75 mg/kg, was initiated at 1 week. RIT with 7 MBq of {sup 131}I-A7, an IgG1 anti-colorectal monoclonal antibody, was conducted at 2 weeks. RIT employing an irrelevant IgG1, {sup 131}I-HPMS-1, was implemented for comparison. The weight of liver metastases was measured 4 weeks after cell inoculation. The effect of AT on {sup 131}I-A7 accumulation in metastases was also observed. Toxicity of treatment was monitored by blood cell counts. Monotherapy with 2-ME AT or {sup 131}I-A7 RIT significantly suppressed metastasis growth (P<0.0001): metastasis weight was 5.96{+-}0.87 g in non-treated controls, 2.67{+-}1.89 g in cases receiving AT and 0.85{+-}0.68 g in those receiving {sup 131}I-A7 RIT. Combination of AT and {sup 131}I-A7 RIT more effectively suppressed the growth to 0.28{+-}0.32 g (P<0.05 vs RIT alone). The effect of {sup 131}I-HPMS-1 RIT, which suppressed metastasis growth to 2.25{+-}0.88 g, was significant in comparison with the control (P<0.0001); however, the combination of AT and {sup 131}I-HPMS-1 RIT (which suppressed growth to 1.41{+-}0.68 g) was far less effective than the combination of AT

  4. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Moessbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Division of Applied Biophysics, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Prokopenko, P. G. [Russian State Medical University, Faculty of Biochemistry (Russian Federation); Malakheeva, L. I. [Simbio Holding, Science Consultation Department (Russian Federation)

    2004-12-15

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Moessbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  5. Comparative Study of Human Liver Ferritin and Chicken Liver by Mössbauer Spectroscopy. Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A.; Prokopenko, P. G.; Malakheeva, L. I.

    2004-12-01

    A comparative study of normal human liver ferritin and livers from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease was made by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Small differences of quadrupole splitting and isomer shift were found for human liver ferritin and chicken liver. Mössbauer parameters for liver from normal chicken and chicken with Marek disease were the same.

  6. Human augmenter of liver regeneration: molecular cloning, biological activity and roles in liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓明; 谢玲; 邱兆华; 吴祖泽; 贺福初

    1997-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of human augmenter of liver regeneration (hALR) was reported by deduction from nucleotide sequence of its complementary DNA . The cDNA for hALR was isolated by screening a human fetal liver cDNA library and the sequencing of this insert revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein with 125aa and highly homologous (87% ) with rat ALR encoding sequence. The recombinant hALR expressed from its cDNA in transient expression experiments in cos-7 cells could stimulate DNA synthesis of HTC hepatoma cell in the dose-dependent and heat-resistant way. Northern blot analysis with rat ALR cDNA as probe confirmed that ALR mRNA was expressed in the normal rat liver at low level and that dramatically increased in the regenerating liver after partial hepatectomied rat. This size of hALR mRNA is 1.4 kb long and expressed in human fetal liver, kidney and testis. These findings indicated that liver itself may be the resource of ALR and suggested that ALR seems to be an im-portant parac

  7. Identification of biological markers of liver X receptor (LXR activation at the cell surface of human monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Rébé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver X receptor (LXR α and LXR β (NR1H3 and NR1H2 are oxysterol-activated nuclear receptors involved in the control of major metabolic pathways such as cholesterol homeostasis, lipogenesis, inflammation and innate immunity. Synthetic LXR agonists are currently under development and could find applications in various fields such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. The clinical development of LXR agonists requires the identification of biological markers for pharmacodynamic studies. In this context, monocytes represent an attractive target to monitor LXR activation. They are easily accessible cells present in peripheral blood; they express LXR α and β and respond to LXR agonist stimulation in vitro. The aim of our study was to identify cell surface markers of LXR agonists on monocytes. For this, we focused on clusters of differentiation (CD markers because they are well characterized and accessible cell surface molecules allowing easy immuno-phenotyping. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using microarray analysis of monocytes treated or not with an LXR agonist in vitro, we selected three CD, i.e. CD82, CD226, CD244 for further analysis by real time PCR and flow cytometry. The three CD were up-regulated by LXR agonist treatment in vitro in a time- and dose- dependent manner and this induction was LXR specific as assessed by a SiRNA or LXR antagonist strategy. By using flow cytometry, we could demonstrate that the expression of these molecules at the cell surface of monocytes was significantly increased after LXR agonist treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified three new cell surface markers that could be useful to monitor LXR activation. Future studies will be required to confirm the biological and diagnostic significance of the markers.

  8. Microarray Analysis of Mercury-Induced Changes in Gene Expression in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells: Importance in Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mercury is widely distributed in the biosphere, and its toxic effects have been associated with human death and several ailments that include cardiovascular diseases, anemia, kidney and liver damage, developmental abnormalities, neurobehavioral disorders, autoimmune diseases, and cancers in experimental animals. At the cellular level, mercury has been shown to interact with sulphydryl groups of proteins and enzymes, to damage DNA, and to modulate cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of mercury toxicity remain to be elucidated. Our laboratory has demonstrated that mercury exposure induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis, modulates cell cycle, and transcriptionally activates specific stress genes in human liver carcinoma cells. The liver is one of the few organs capable of regeneration from injury. Dormant genes in the liver are therefore capable of reactivation. In this research, we hypothesize that mercury-induced hepatotoxicity is associated with the modulation of specific gene expressions in liver cells that can lead to several disease states involving immune system dysfunctions. In testing this hypothesis, we used an Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray with probe sets complementary to more than 20,000 genes to determine whether patterns of gene expressions differ between controls and mercury (1-3μg/mL treated cells. There was a clear separation in gene expression profiles between controls and mercury-treated cells. Hierarchical cluster analysis identified 2,211 target genes that were affected. One hundred and thirty-eight of these genes were up-regulated, among which forty three were significantly over-expressed (p = 0.001 with greater than a two-fold change, and ninety five genes were moderately over-expressed with an increase of more than one fold (p = 0.004. Two thousand and twentythree genes were down-regulated with only forty five of them reaching a statistically significant decline at

  9. Cloning of cytochrome P-450 2C9 cDNA from human liver and its expression in CHL cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge-Jian Zhu; Ying-Nian Yu; Xin Li; Yu-Li Qian

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Using bacterial, yeast, or mammalian cell expressing a human drug metabolism enzyme would seem good way to study drug metabolism-related problems. Human cytochrome P-450 2C9 ( CYP2 C9) is a polymorphic enzyme responsible for the metabolism of a large number of clinically important drugs. It ranks among the most important drug metabolizing enzymes in humans. In order to provide a sufficient amount of the enzyme for drug metabolic research, the CYP2 C9 eDNA was cloned and expressed stably in CHL cellsMETHODS: After extraction of total RNA from human livertissue, the human CYP2C9 eDNA was amplified withreverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR),and cloned into cloning vector pGEM-T. The cDNA fragmentwas identified by DNA sequencing and subcloned into amammalian expression vector pREP9. A transgenic cell linewas established by transfecting the recombinant vector ofpREP9-CYP2C9 into CHL cells. The enzyme activity ofCYP2C9 catalyzing oxidation of tolbutamide to hydroxytolbutamide in S9 fraction of the cell was determined by highperformance liquid chromatography(HPLC).RESULTS: The amino acid sequence predicted from theeDNA segment was identical to that of CYP2 C9 * 1, the wildtype CYP2 C9. However, there were two base differences, i.e. 21T > C, 1146C > T, but the encoding amino acidsequence was the same, L7, P382. The S9 fraction of theestablished cell line metabolizes tolbutamide to hydroxytolbutamide; tolbutamide hydroxylass activity was found to be0.465 ± 0.109 μmol@ min-1 . g1 S9 protein or 8.62 ± 2.02 mol@ min 1 ~mol-1 CYP, but was undetectable in parental CHL cell.CONCLUSION: The cDNA of human CYP2C9 was successfullycloned and a cell line of CHL- CYP2C9, efficiently expressingthe protein of CYP2C9, was established.

  10. Loss of the SxxSS motif in a human T-cell factor-4 isoform confers hypoxia resistance to liver cancer: an oncogenic switch in Wnt signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Koga

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Aberrantly activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling is important in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC development. Downstream gene expressions involving the Wnt/β-catenin cascade occur through T-cell factor (TCF proteins. Here, we show the oncogenic potential of human TCF-4 isoforms based on the expression of a single conserved SxxSS motif. METHODS: We investigated the TCF-4J and K isoform pair characterized by the presence (K or absence (J of the SxxSS motif. The mRNA expression profiles were examined in 47 pairs of human HCCs and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues by RT-PCR. Proliferation, sphere assays and immunoblot analysis were performed under normoxia and hypoxia conditions. The ability of HCC cells overexpressing TCF-4J (J cells and K (K cells to grow as solid tumors in nude mice was explored. RESULTS: TCF-4J expression was significantly upregulated in HCC tumors compared to corresponding peritumor and normal liver and was preferentially expressed in poorly differentiated HCCs. In contrast, TCF-4K was downregulated in those same HCC tumors. TCF-4J-overexpressing HCC cells (J cells revealed a survival advantage under hypoxic conditions, high proliferation rate and formation of aggregates/spheres compared to overexpression of TCF-4K (K cells. The hypoxic J cells had high expression levels of HIF-2α and EGFR as possible mechanisms to promote tumorigenesis. Increased stability of HIF-2α under hypoxia in J cells was associated with a decreased level of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL protein, a known E3 ligase for HIF-αs. In a xenograft model, the J cells rapidly developed tumors compared to K cells. Tumor tissues derived from J cells exhibited high expression levels of HIF-2α and EGFR compared to the slow developing and small K cell derived tumors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the specific TCF-4J isoform, which lacks a regulatory SxxSS motif, has robust tumor-initiating potential under hypoxic conditions.

  11. DNA Ploidy and Liver Cell Dysplasia in Liver Biopsies from Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed S El-Sayed

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy among pathologists when assessing the presence or absence of liver cell dysplasia in liver biopsies taken from cirrhotic patients. The objective of the present study was to determine the DNA ploidy pattern of hepatocytes of patients with liver cirrhosis and its relationship to liver cell dysplasia. A total of 48 male patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis based on clinical, laboratory and histopathological criteria were included in the study. A liver biopsy was taken from each patient; one part of the biopsy was subjected to histopathology, and the other to flow cytometry. The histopathological examination revealed liver cell dysplasia in 60% of patients with liver cirrhosis (62% of them had large cell dysplasia [LCD] and 38% had small cell dysplasia [SCD]. Abnormal DNA content (aneuploidy was found in 81.5% of positive liver cell dysplasia specimens and found only in 11.1% of negative liver cell dysplasia specimens, with a statistically significant difference (P0.05 in comparison with SCD. In conclusion, SCD (similar to LCD is also associated with aneuploidy and elevated DNA index, and may carry the same risk for progression to hepatocellular carcinoma.

  12. The circulating platelet count is not dictated by the liver, but may be determined in part by the bone marrow : analyses from human liver and stem cell transplantations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, T.; Pittau, G.; Leite, F. J. T.; De Boer, M. T.; Meijer, K.; Kluin-Nelemans, H. C.; Huls, G.; Te Boome, L. C. J.; Kuball, J.; Nowak, G.; Fan, S. T.; Azoulay, D.; Porte, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    . Background: The platelet count varies considerably between individuals, but within an individual the platelet count is remarkably stable over time. Mechanisms controlling the platelet count are not yet established. Objective: In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the liver is importa

  13. The circulating platelet count is not dictated by the liver, but may be determined in part by the bone marrow: analyses from human liver and stem cell transplantations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisman, T.; Pittau, G.; Leite, F.J.; Boer, M.T. De; Meijer, K.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.; Huls, G.A.; Boome, L.C. te; Kuball, J.; Nowak, G.; Fan, S.T.; Azoulay, D.; Porte, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The platelet count varies considerably between individuals, but within an individual the platelet count is remarkably stable over time. Mechanisms controlling the platelet count are not yet established. OBJECTIVE: In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the liver is important

  14. Perivascular mesenchymal progenitors in human fetal and adult liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jörg C; Over, Patrick; Turner, Morris E; Thompson, Robert L; Foka, Hubert G; Chen, William C W; Péault, Bruno; Gridelli, Bruno; Schmelzer, Eva

    2012-12-10

    The presence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been described in various organs. Pericytes possess a multilineage differentiation potential and have been suggested to be one of the developmental sources for MSCs. In human liver, pericytes have not been defined. Here, we describe the identification, purification, and characterization of pericytes in human adult and fetal liver. Flow cytometry sorting revealed that human adult and fetal liver contains 0.56%±0.81% and 0.45%±0.39% of CD146(+)CD45(-)CD56(-)CD34(-) pericytes, respectively. Of these, 41% (adult) and 30% (fetal) were alkaline phosphatase-positive (ALP(+)). In situ, pericytes were localized around periportal blood vessels and were positive for NG2 and vimentin. Purified pericytes could be cultured extensively and had low population doubling times. Immunofluorescence of cultures demonstrated that cells were positive for pericyte and mesenchymal cell markers CD146, NG2, CD90, CD140b, and vimentin, and negative for endothelial, hematopoietic, stellate, muscle, or liver epithelial cell markers von Willebrand factor, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD144, CD326, CK19, albumin, α-fetoprotein, CYP3A7, glial fibrillary acid protein, MYF5, and Pax7 by gene expression; myogenin and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression were variable. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of cultures confirmed surface expression of CD146, CD73, CD90, CD10, CD13, CD44, CD105, and ALP and absence of human leukocyte antigen-DR. In vitro differentiation assays demonstrated that cells possessed robust osteogenic and myogenic, but low adipogenic and low chondrogenic differentiation potentials. In functional in vitro assays, cells had typical mesenchymal strong migratory and invasive activity. In conclusion, human adult and fetal livers harbor pericytes that are similar to those found in other organs and are distinct from hepatic stellate cells.

  15. Nucleoside transporters and liver cell growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valdés, Raquel; Mata, João F; Del Santo, Belén; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Felipe, Antonio; Casado, F Javier

    1998-01-01

    .... This review summarizes work performed in our laboratory on these transport systems, particularly nucleoside transporters, which are up-regulated in physiological situations associated with liver cell growth...

  16. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and beta-cell function in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients. METHODS: [3-3H]glucose was applied during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamps in association with indirect calorimetry in 43 normoglycaemic HIV-infected patients (18 lipodystrophic patients on HAART (LIPO....... CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that normoglycaemic lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in multiple pathways involving liver, muscle tissue and beta-cell function.......OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects...

  17. Rhein Elicits In Vitro Cytotoxicity in Primary Human Liver HL-7702 Cells by Inducing Apoptosis through Mitochondria-Mediated Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy-Armel Bounda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study rhein-induced apoptosis signaling pathway and to investigate its molecular mechanisms in primary human hepatic cells. Results. Cell viability of HL-7702 cells treated with rhein showed significant decrease in dose-dependent manner. Following rhein treatment (25 μM, 50 μM, and 100 μM for 12 h, the detection of apoptotic cells was significantly analyzed by flow cytometry and nuclear morphological changes by Hoechst 33258, respectively. Fatty degeneration studies showed upregulation level of the relevant hepatic markers (P < 0.01. Caspase activities expressed significant upregulation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspase-8. Moreover, apoptotic cells by rhein were significantly inhibited by Z-LEHD-FMK and Z-DEVD-FMK, caspase-9 inhibitor, and caspase-3 inhibitor, respectively. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were detected by fluorometry. Additionally, NAC, a ROS scavenger, significantly attenuated rhein-induced oxidative damage in HL-7702 cells. Furthermore, real-time qPCR results showed significant upregulation of p53, PUMA, Apaf-1, and Casp-9 and Casp-3 mRNA, with no significant changes of Fas and Cytochrome-c. Immunoblotting revealed significant Cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into cytosol and no change in Fas expression. Conclusion. Taken together, these observations suggested that rhein could induce apoptosis in HL-7702 cells via mitochondria-mediated signal pathway with involvement of oxidative stress mechanism.

  18. Ex-vivo and in vitro protective effects of kolaviron against oxygen-derived radical-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in human lymphocytes and rat liver cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farombi, E.O.; Moller, P.; Dragsted, L.O.

    2004-01-01

    mumol/L increased the levels of DNA strand breaks and oxidized purine (formamido-pyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) and pyrimidine (endonuclease III (ENDO III) sites) bases in both human lymphocytes and rat liver cells using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay). Kolaviron was protective...

  19. Combination of retinoic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide and 5-azacytidine promotes cardiac differentiation of human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fuxue; Lei, Han; Hu, Yunfeng; He, Linjing; Fu, Hang; Feng, Rui; Feng, Panpan; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xi; Chang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    There are controversial reports about cardiac differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and there is still no well-defined protocol for the induction of cardiac differentiation. The effects of retinoic acid (RA) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on the proliferation and differentiation of human fetal liver-derived MSCs (HFMSCs) as well as the pluripotent state induced by 5-azacytidine (5-aza) in vitro were investigated. MSCs were isolated from fetal livers and cultured in accordance with previous reports. Cells were plated and were treated for 24 h by the combination of 5-aza, RA and DMSO in different doses. Different culture conditions were tested in our study, including temperature, oxygen content and medium. Three weeks later, cells were harvested for the certification of cardiac differentiation as well as the pluripotency, which indicated by cardiac markers and Oct4. It was found that the cardiac differentiation was only induced when HFMSCs were treated in the following conditions: in high-dose combination (5-aza 50 μM + RA 10(-1) μM + DMSO 1 %) in cardiac differentiation medium at 37 °C and 20 % O2. The results of immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that about 40 % of the cells positively expressed Nkx2.5, desmin and cardiac troponin I, as well as Oct4. No beating cells were observed during the period. The combined treatment with RA, DMSO and 5-aza in high-dose could promote HFMSCs to differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells and possibly through the change of their pluripotent state.

  20. Shizukaol D, a Dimeric Sesquiterpene Isolated from Chloranthus serratus, Represses the Growth of Human Liver Cancer Cells by Modulating Wnt Signalling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lisha; Zhu, Hengrui; Yang, Xianmei; Xie, Fang; Peng, Jingtao; Jiang, Deke; Xie, Jun; Qi, Meiyan; Yu, Long

    2016-01-01

    Natural products have become sources of developing new drugs for the treatment of cancer. To seek candidate compounds that inhibit the growth of liver cancer, components of Chloranthus serratus were tested. Here, we report that shizukaol D, a dimeric sesquiterpene from Chloranthus serratus, exerted a growth inhibition effect on liver cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We demonstrated that shizukaol D induced cells to undergo apoptosis. More importantly, shizukaol D attenuated Wnt signalling and reduced the expression of endogenous Wnt target genes, which resulted in decreased expression of β-catenin. Collectively, this study demonstrated that shizukaol D inhibited the growth of liver cancer cells by modulating Wnt pathway.

  1. Liver stem cells - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The brief and concise preface written by prof. Takahiro Ochiya is particularly well addressed to scholars belonging to different scientific fields: cellular and molecular biology, liver and cancer biology, tissue engineering and stem cell therapy. By a few lines prof Ochiya is telling us that we are getting exciting results, at the lab and the preclinical level, in treating liver injuries thanks to the unprecedented advances in our knowledge on liver stem cells biology....

  2. Gene silencing of Toll-like receptor 2 inhibits proliferation of human liver cancer cells and secretion of inflammatory cytokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzheng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Toll-like receptors (TLRs are key factors in the innate immune system and initiate the inflammatory response to foreign pathogens such as bacteria, fungi and viruses. In the microenvironment of tumorigenesis, TLRs can promote inflammation and cell survival. Toll-like receptor 2/6 (TLR2/6 signaling in tumor cells is regarded as one of the mechanisms of chronic inflammation but it can also mediate tumor cell immune escape and tumor progression. However, the expression of TLR2 and its biological function in the development and progression of hepatocarcinoma have not been investigated. This study aimed to determine the expression of TLRs 1-10 in the established human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line BLE-7402, to investigate the biological effect of TLR2 on cell growth and survival. METHODS: TLR expression in BLE-7402 cells was assayed by RT-PCR, real-time PCR and flow cytometry (FCM. To further investigate the function of TLR2 in hepatocarcinoma growth, BLE-7402 cells were transfected with recombinant plasmids expressing one of three forms of TLR2 siRNA (sh-TLR2 RNAi(A, B and C. TLR2 knockdown was confirmed using RT-PCR, real-time PCR and fluorescence microscopy. Tumor cell proliferation was monitored by MTT assay and secreted cytokines in the supernatant of transfected cells were measured by bead-based FCM, the function of TLR2 siRNA was also investigated in vivo. RESULTS: The BLE-7402 cell line expressed TLRs 2 to 10 at both mRNA and protein levels. TLR2 was the most highly expressed TLR. While all the three siRNAs inhibited TLR2 mRNA and protein expression, sh-TLR2 RNAi(B had the strongest knockdown effect. TLR2 knockdown with sh-TLR2 RNAi(B reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 was also reduced. The result showed a drastic reduction in tumor volume in mice treated with sh-TLR2 RNAi(B. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that TLR2 knockdown inhibit proliferation of cultured hepatocarcinoma cells and

  3. The role of oxidative stress in citreoviridin-induced DNA damage in human liver-derived HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yuntao; Jiang, Li-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Dong; Yang, Guang; Geng, Cheng-Yan; Li, Qiujuan; Zhong, Lai-Fu; Sun, Qinghua; Chen, Min

    2015-05-01

    We hypothesize that citreoviridin (CIT) induces DNA damage in human liver-derived HepG2 cells through an oxidative stress mechanism and that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) protects against CIT-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells. CIT-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells was evaluated by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. To elucidate the genotoxicity mechanisms, the level of oxidative DNA damage was tested by immunoperoxidase staining for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG); the intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were examined; mitochondrial membrane potential and lysosomal membranes' permeability were detected; furthermore, protective effects of NAC on CIT-induced ROS formation and CIT-induced DNA damage were evaluated in HepG2 cells. A significant dose-dependent increment in DNA migration was observed at tested concentrations (2.50-10.00 µM) of CIT. The levels of ROS, 8-OHdG formation were increased by CIT, and significant depletion of GSH in HepG2 cells was induced by CIT. Destabilization of lysosome and mitochondria was also observed in cells treated with CIT. In addition, NAC significantly decreased CIT-induced ROS formation and CIT-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells. The data indicate that CIT induces DNA damage in HepG2 cells, most likely through oxidative stress mechanisms; that NAC protects against DNA damage induced by CIT in HepG2 cells; and that depolarization of mitochondria and lysosomal protease leakage may play a role in CIT-induced DNA damage in HepG2 cells. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals Inc.

  4. In vitro kinetics of amiodarone and its major metabolite in two human liver cell models after acute and repeated treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomponio, Giuliana; Savary, Camille C; Parmentier, Céline; Bois, Frederic; Guillouzo, André; Romanelli, Luca; Richert, Lysiane; Di Consiglio, Emma; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The limited value of in vitro toxicity data for the in vivo extrapolation has been often attributed to the lack of kinetic data. Here the in vitro kinetics of amiodarone (AMI) and its mono-N-desethyl (MDEA) metabolite was determined and modelled in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepaRG cells, after single and repeated administration of clinically relevant concentrations. AMI bioavailability was influenced by adsorption to the plastic and the presence of protein in the medium (e.g. 10% serum protein reduced the uptake by half in HepaRG cells). The cell uptake was quick (within 3h), AMI metabolism was efficient and a dynamic equilibrium was reached in about a week after multiple dosing. In HepaRG cells the metabolic clearance was higher than in PHH and increased over time, as well as CYP3A4. The interindividual variability in MDEA production in PHHs was not proportional to the differences in CYP3A4 activities, suggesting the involvement of other CYPs and/or AMI-related CYP inhibition. After repeated treatment AMI showed a slight potential for bioaccumulation, whereas much higher intracellular MDEA levels accumulated over time, especially in the HepaRG cells, associated with occurrence of phospholipidosis. The knowledge of in vitro biokinetics is important to transform an actual in vitro concentration-effect into an in vivo dose-effect relationship by using appropriate modelling, thus improving the in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation.

  5. Evaluation of Cytotoxicity Effects of Chalcone Epoxide Analogues as a Selective COX-II Inhibitor in the Human Liver Carcinoma Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouran Makhdoumi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Study of the mechanisms involved in cancer progression suggests that cyclooxygenase enzymes play an important role in the induction of inflammation, tumor formation, and metastasis of cancer cells. Thus, cyclooxygenase enzymes could be considered for cancer chemotherapy. Among these enzymes, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2 is associated with liver carcinogenesis. Various COX-2 inhibitors cause growth inhibition of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, but many of them act in the COX-2 independent mechanism. Thus, the introduction of selective COX-2 inhibitors is necessary to achieve a clear result. The present study was aimed to determine the growth-inhibitory effects of new analogues of chalcone epoxide as selective COX-2 inhibitors on the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cell line. Methods: Estimation of both cell growth and the amount of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production were used to study the effect of selective COX-2 inhibitors on the hepatocellular carcinoma cell. Cell growth determination has done by MTT assay in 24 h, 48 h and 72 h, and PGE2 production has estimated by using ELYSA kit in 48 h and 72 h. Results: The results showed growth inhibition of the HepG2 cell line in a concentration and time-dependent manner, as well as a reduction in the formation of PGE2 as a product of COX-2 activity. Among the compounds those analogues with methoxy and hydrogen group showed more inhibitory effect than others. Conclusion: The current in-vitro study indicates that the observed significant growth-inhibitory effect of chalcone-epoxide analogues on the HepG2 cell line may involve COX-dependent mechanisms and the PGE2 pathway parallel to the effect of celecoxib. It can be said that these analogues might be efficient compounds in chemotherapy of COX-2 dependent carcinoma specially preventing and treatment of hepatocellular carcinomas.

  6. Human Ex-Vivo Liver Model for Acetaminophen-induced Liver Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Thomas; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Schlattjan, Martin; Treckmann, Jürgen; Paul, Andreas; Strucksberg, Karl-Heinz; Baba, Hideo A.; Odenthal, Margarete; Gieseler, Robert K.; Gerken, Guido; Arteel, Gavin E.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Reliable test systems to identify hepatotoxicity are essential to predict unexpected drug-related liver injury. Here we present a human ex-vivo liver model to investigate acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Human liver tissue was perfused over a 30 hour period with hourly sampling from the perfusate for measurement of general metabolism and clinical parameters. Liver function was assessed by clearance of indocyanine green (ICG) at 4, 20 and 28 hours. Six pieces of untreated human liver specimen maintained stable liver function over the entire perfusion period. Three liver sections incubated with low-dose acetaminophen revealed strong damage, with ICG half-lives significantly higher than in non-treated livers. In addition, the release of microRNA-122 was significantly higher in acetaminophen-treated than in non-treated livers. Thus, this model allows for investigation of hepatotoxicity in human liver tissue upon applying drug concentrations relevant in patients. PMID:27550092

  7. Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Steve; Erhart, Wiebke; Brosch, Mario; Ammerpohl, Ole; von Schönfels, Witigo; Ahrens, Markus; Heits, Nils; Bell, Jordana T; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Spector, Tim D; Deloukas, Panos; Siebert, Reiner; Sipos, Bence; Becker, Thomas; Röcken, Christoph; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-10-28

    Because of the dearth of biomarkers of aging, it has been difficult to test the hypothesis that obesity increases tissue age. Here we use a novel epigenetic biomarker of aging (referred to as an "epigenetic clock") to study the relationship between high body mass index (BMI) and the DNA methylation ages of human blood, liver, muscle, and adipose tissue. A significant correlation between BMI and epigenetic age acceleration could only be observed for liver (r = 0.42, P = 6.8 × 10(-4) in dataset 1 and r = 0.42, P = 1.2 × 10(-4) in dataset 2). On average, epigenetic age increased by 3.3 y for each 10 BMI units. The detected age acceleration in liver is not associated with the Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score or any of its component traits after adjustment for BMI. The 279 genes that are underexpressed in older liver samples are highly enriched (1.2 × 10(-9)) with nuclear mitochondrial genes that play a role in oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport. The epigenetic age acceleration, which is not reversible in the short term after rapid weight loss induced by bariatric surgery, may play a role in liver-related comorbidities of obesity, such as insulin resistance and liver cancer.

  8. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within

  9. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within week

  10. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Provide Protection against Radiation-Induced Liver Injury by Antioxidative Process, Vasculature Protection, Hepatocyte Differentiation, and Trophic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Francois

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the potential therapeutic effect of the infusion of hMSCs for the correction of liver injuries, we performed total body radiation exposure of NOD/SCID mice. After irradiation, mir-27b level decreases in liver, increasing the directional migration of hMSCs by upregulating SDF1α. A significant increase in plasmatic transaminases levels, apoptosis process in the liver vascular system, and in oxidative stress were observed. hMSC injection induced a decrease in transaminases levels and oxidative stress, a disappearance of apoptotic cells, and an increase in Nrf2, SOD gene expression, which might reduce ROS production in the injured liver. Engrafted hMSCs expressed cytokeratin CK18 and CK19 and AFP genes indicating possible hepatocyte differentiation. The presence of hMSCs expressing VEGF and Ang-1 in the perivascular region, associated with an increased expression of VEGFr1, r2 in the liver, can confer a role of secreting cells to hMSCs in order to maintain the endothelial function. To explain the benefits to the liver of hMSC engraftment, we find that hMSCs secreted NGF, HGF, and anti-inflammatory molecules IL-10, IL1-RA contributing to prevention of apoptosis, increasing cell proliferation in the liver which might correct liver dysfunction. MSCs are potent candidates to repair and protect healthy tissues against radiation damages.

  11. Khellin and visnagin differentially modulate AHR signaling and downstream CYP1A activity in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radim Vrzal

    Full Text Available Khellin and visnagin are two furanochromones that can be frequently found in ethnomedical formulations in Asia and the Middle East. Both compounds possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, therefore modern medicine uses these compounds or structurally related derivatives for treatment of vitiligo, bronchial asthma and renal colics. Despite their frequent usage, the potential toxic properties of visnagin and khellin are not well characterized up-to-now. Many natural compounds modulate the expression and activity of cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1, which is well-known to bioactivate pro-carcinogens. The expression of this enzyme is controlled by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR, a ligand-activated transcription factor and regulator of drug metabolism. Here, we investigated the influence of both furanochromones on AHR signaling in human HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. Both compounds transactivated xenobiotic response element (XRE-driven reporter gene activity in a dose-dependent manner and induced CYP1A1 transcription in HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes. The latter was abolished in presence of a specific AHR antagonist. CYP1A enzyme activity assays done in HepG2 cells and primary hepatocytes revealed an inhibition of enzyme activity by both furanochromones, which may become relevant regarding the metabolism of xenobiotics and co-administered therapeutic drugs. The observed induction of several other members of the AHR gene battery, whose gene products are involved in regulation of cell growth, differentiation and migration, indicates that a further toxicological characterization of visnagin and khelllin is urgently required in order to minimize potential drug-drug interactions and other toxic side-effects that may occur during therapeutic usage of these furanochromones.

  12. Effect of c-fos antisense probe on prostaglandin E2-induced upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA in human liver cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Qi Li; Kai-Shan Tao; Ning Ren; Yi-Hu Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effect of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells and the possible involvement of c-fos protein in this process.METHODS: Human HCC HepG2 cells were divided into three groups treated respectively with PGE2, a combination of PGE2 and c-fos antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASO),and PGE2 plus c-fos sense oligodeoxynudeotide (SO). The expression of VEGF mRNA in HepG2 cells after different treatments was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The relative expression level of VEGF mRNA in HepG2 cells in each group was measured.RESULTS: Administration of PGE2 resulted in an increased expression of c-fosand VEGF mRNA in HepG2 cells. The relative expression level of c-fos mRNA reached the peak at 3 h (68.4±4.7%) after PGE2 treatment, which was significantly higher than that at 0 h (20.6±1.7%, P<0.01).Whereas, the highest expression level of VEGF mRNA was observed at 6 h (100.5±6.1%) after PGE2 treatment, which was significantly higher than that at 0 h (33.2±2.4%,P<0.01). C-fos ASO significantly reduced PGE2-induced VEGF mRNA expression in HepG2 cells.CONCLUSION: PGE2 increases the expression and secretion of VEGF in HCC cells by activating the transcription factor c-fos, promotes the angiogenesis of HCC and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver cancer.

  13. Human platelets inhibit liver fibrosis in severe combined immunodeficiency mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Murata, Soichiro; Fukunaga, Kiyoshi; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    concentration of mouse TGF-β in the liver tissue was significantly lower in the hPLT group than in the PBS group (22 ± 5 ng/g liver vs 39 ± 6 ng/g liver, P = 0.02). Phosphorylation of Met was more prevalent in the hPLT group than in the PBS group (37% ± 4%/GAPDH vs 20% ± 8%/GAPDH, P = 0.03). Phosphorylation of SMAD3 was weaker in the hPLT group than in the PBS group (60% ± 12%/GAPDH vs 84% ± 12%/GAPDH, P = 0.1), although this difference was not significant. Furthermore, a lower rate of hepatocyte apoptosis was observed in the hPLT group than in the PBS group (5.9% ± 1.7% vs 2.9% ± 2.1%, P = 0.02). Significant human platelet accumulation was observed in the fibrotic liver tissues, whereas few platelets accumulated in the normal liver. CONCLUSION: Human platelets inhibit liver fibrosis in SCID mice. Increased concentration of HGF in the liver suppresses hepatic stellate cell activation, induces MMPs, and inhibits hepatocyte apoptosis. PMID:23983427

  14. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E. M. Vickers

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM, diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM. Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM, while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM, terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM, and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM. Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%, CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%–11%, and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%–6%. Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%, while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%. Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%, ETM (66%, DCF, TBF, MMI (61%–60%, APAP, CBZ (57%–56%, and DTL (48%. Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%, CBZ and ETM (44%–43%, APAP and DCF (40%–38%, MMI, TBF and CSA (37%–35%. This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  15. Liver Effects of Clinical Drugs Differentiated in Human Liver Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Alison E M; Ulyanov, Anatoly V; Fisher, Robyn L

    2017-03-07

    Drugs with clinical adverse effects are compared in an ex vivo 3-dimensional multi-cellular human liver slice model. Functional markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, glutathione GSH and ATP levels, were affected by acetaminophen (APAP, 1 mM), diclofenac (DCF, 1 mM) and etomoxir (ETM, 100 μM). Drugs targeting mitochondria more than GSH were dantrolene (DTL, 10 μM) and cyclosporin A (CSA, 10 μM), while GSH was affected more than ATP by methimazole (MMI, 500 μM), terbinafine (TBF, 100 μM), and carbamazepine (CBZ 100 μM). Oxidative stress genes were affected by TBF (18%), CBZ, APAP, and ETM (12%-11%), and mitochondrial genes were altered by CBZ, APAP, MMI, and ETM (8%-6%). Apoptosis genes were affected by DCF (14%), while apoptosis plus necrosis were altered by APAP and ETM (15%). Activation of oxidative stress, mitochondrial energy, heat shock, ER stress, apoptosis, necrosis, DNA damage, immune and inflammation genes ranked CSA (75%), ETM (66%), DCF, TBF, MMI (61%-60%), APAP, CBZ (57%-56%), and DTL (48%). Gene changes in fatty acid metabolism, cholestasis, immune and inflammation were affected by DTL (51%), CBZ and ETM (44%-43%), APAP and DCF (40%-38%), MMI, TBF and CSA (37%-35%). This model advances multiple dosing in a human ex vivo model, plus functional markers and gene profile markers of drug induced human liver side-effects.

  16. Natural Killer cells and liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eFasbender

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 40 years since the discovery of Natural Killer (NK cells it has been well established that these innate lymphocytes are important for early and effective immune responses against transformed cells and infections with different pathogens. In addition to these classical functions of NK cells, we now know that they are part of a larger family of innate lymphoid cells and that they can even mediate memory-like responses. Additionally, tissue resident NK cells with distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics have been identified. Here we focus on the phenotype of different NK cell subpopulations that can be found in the liver and summarize the current knowledge about the functional role of these cells with a special emphasis on liver fibrosis. NK cell cytotoxicity can contribute to liver damage in different forms of liver disease. However, NK cells can limit liver fibrosis by killing hepatic stellate cell-derived myofibroblasts, which play a key role in this pathogenic process. Therefore, liver NK cells need to be tightly regulated in order to balance these beneficial and pathological effects.

  17. Tumorigenicity, Motility and Liver Metastasis of Human Gastric Carcinoma Lines with High Metastatic Potential in the Liver of Nude Mice

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    To analyze the human gastric carcinoma metastasis to the liver, a human gastric carcinoma line, AZ521 was injected into the spleens of nude mice. Cells from the few liver metastatic foci of injected AZ521 were expanded in vitro and subsequently injected into the spleens of nude mice. By repeating these proce-dures five times, we were able to obtain a cell line, designated AZ-H5c, with high metastatic potential in nude mice. It was observed that animals had liver metastasis in 10 of 12 (83%) c...

  18. Study of apoptosis in human liver cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Min Shan; Juan Li

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the action of apoptosis in occurrence ofliver cacinornas in vivo and the biological effect of Solanumlyratum Thumb on BEL-7404 cell line inducing apoptosis invitro.METHODS: The apoptosis in the liver carcinoma wasdetected with terminal deoxynucl neotidyl transferasemediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL); the cancer cellscultured in DMED medium were treated with extract ofSolanum lyratum Thumb and observed under microscope,and their DNA was assayed by gel electrophoresis.RESULTS: In vivo apoptotic cells in the cancer adjacenttissues inceased; in vitro treatment of liver cancers withextract of Solanum lyratum Thumb could induce the cells tomanifest a typical apoptotic morphology. Their DNA wasfractured and a characteristic ladder pattem could be foundusing electrophoresis.CONCLUSION: In vivo the apoptosis of carcinomas waslower; maybe the cells divided quickly and then the cancersoccurred. In the cancer adjacent tissues, the apoptosispricked up, and in vitro Solarium lyratum Thumb couldinduce the apoptosis of BEL-7404 cells.

  19. A hepatoprotective Lindera obtusiloba extract suppresses growth and attenuates insulin like growth factor-1 receptor signaling and NF-kappaB activity in human liver cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroh Thorsten

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In traditional Chinese and Korean medicine, an aqueous extract derived from wood and bark of the Japanese spice bush Lindera obtusiloba (L.obtusiloba is applied to treat inflammations and chronic liver diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. We previously demonstrated anti-fibrotic effects of L.obtusiloba extract in hepatic stellate cells. Thus, we here consequently examine anti-neoplastic effects of L.obtusiloba extract on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cell lines and the signaling pathways involved. Methods Four human HCC cell lines representing diverse stages of differentiation were treated with L.obtusiloba extract, standardized according to its known suppressive effects on proliferation and TGF-β-expression. Beside measurement of proliferation, invasion and apoptosis, effects on signal transduction and NF-κB-activity were determined. Results L.obtusiloba extract inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in all HCC cell lines and provoked a reduced basal and IGF-1-induced activation of the IGF-1R signaling cascade and a reduced transcriptional NF-κB-activity, particularly in the poorly differentiated SK-Hep1 cells. Pointing to anti-angiogenic effects, L.obtusiloba extract attenuated the basal and IGF-1-induced expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Conclusions The traditional application of the extract is confirmed by our experimental data. Due to its potential to inhibit critical receptor tyrosine kinases involved in HCC progression via the IGF-1 signaling pathway and NF-κB, the standardized L.obtusiloba extract should be further analysed for its active compounds and explored as (complementary treatment option for HCC.

  20. Human herpesvirus 6 infections after liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rima Camille Abdel Massih; Raymund R Razonable

    2009-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infections occur in > 95% of humans. Primary infection, which occurs in early childhood as an asymptomatic illness or manifested clinically as roseola infantum, leads to a state of subclinical viral persistence and latency. Reactivation of latent HHV-6 is common after liver transplantation, possibly induced and facilitated by allograft rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. Since the vast majority of humans harbor the virus in a latent state, HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are believed to be mostly due to endogenous reactivation or superinfection (reactivation in the transplanted organ). In a minority of cases, however,primary HHV-6 infection may occur when an HHV-6 negative individual receives a liver allograft from an HHV-6 positive donor. The vast majority of documented HHV-6 infections after liver transplantation are asymptomatic. In a minority of cases, HHV-6 has been implicated as a cause of febrile illness with rash and myelosuppression, hepatitis, pneumonitis, and encephalitis after liver transplantation. In addition,HHV-6 has been associated with a variety of indirect effects such as allograft rejection, and increased predisposition and severity of other infections including cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis C virus, and opportunistic fungi. Because of the uncommon nature of the clinical illnesses directly attributed to HHV-6, there is currently no recommended HHV-6- specific approach to prevention. However, ganciclovir and valganciclovir, which are primarily intended for the prevention of CMV disease, are also active against HHV-6 and may prevent its reactivation after transplantation. The treatment of established HHV-6 disease is usually with intravenous ganciclovir, cidofovir,or foscarnet, complemented by reduction in the degree of immunosuppression. This article reviews the current advances in the pathogenesis, clinical diagnosis, and therapeutic modalities against HHV6 in the setting of liver transplantation.

  1. Expression of ATP7B in normal human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Fanni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available ATP7B is a copper transporting P-type ATPase, also known as Wilson disease protein, which plays a key role in copper distribution inside cells. Recent experimental data in cell culture have shown that ATP7B putatively serves a dual function in hepatocytes: when localized to the Golgi apparatus, it has a biosynthetic role, delivering copper atoms to apoceruloplasmin; when the hepatocytes are under copper stress, ATP7B translocates to the biliary pole to transport excess copper out of the cell and into the bile canaliculus for subsequent excretion from the body via the bile. The above data on ATP7B localization have been mainly obtained in tumor cell systems in vitro. The aim of the present work was to assess the presence and localization of the Wilson disease protein in the human liver. We tested immunoreactivity for ATP7B in 10 human liver biopsies, in which no significant pathological lesion was found using a polyclonal antiserum specific for ATP7B. In the normal liver, immunoreactivity for ATP7B was observed in hepatocytes and in biliary cells. In the hepatocytes, immunoreactivity for ATP7B was observed close to the plasma membrane, both at the sinusoidal and at the biliary pole. In the biliary cells, ATP7B was localized close to the cell membrane, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. The data suggest that, in human liver, ATP7B is localized to the plasma membrane of both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells.

  2. N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine Affords Protection against Lead-Induced Cytotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Although lead exposure has declined in recent years as a result of change to lead-free gasoline, several epidemiological have pointed out that it represents a medical and public health emergency, especially in young children consuming high amounts of lead-contaminated flake paints. A previous study in our laboratory indicated that lead exposure induces cytotoxicity in human liver carcinoma cells. In the present study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress in lead-induced toxicity, and the protective effect of the anti-oxidant n-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC. We hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a role in lead-induced cytotoxicity, and that NAC affords protection against this adverse effect. To test this hypothesis, we performed the MTT [3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay and the trypan blue exclusion test for cell viability. We also performed the thiobarbituric acid test for lipid peroxidation. Data obtained from the MTT assay indicated that NAC significantly increased the viability of HepG2 cells in a dosedependent manner upon 48 hours of exposure. Similar trend was obtained with the trypan blue exclusion test. Data generated from the thiobarbituric acid test showed a significant (p ≤ 0.05 increase of MDA levels in lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells compared to control cells. Interestingly, the addition of NAC to lead nitrate-treated HepG2 cells significantly decreased cellular content of reactive oxygen species (ROS, as evidenced by the decrease in lipid peroxidation byproducts. Overall, findings from this study suggest that NAC inhibits lead nitrate-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. Hence, NAC may be used as a salvage therapy for lead-induced toxicity in exposed persons.

  3. Chrysin, Abundant in Morinda citrifolia Fruit Water-EtOAc Extracts, Combined with Apigenin Synergistically Induced Apoptosis and Inhibited Migration in Human Breast and Liver Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng; Wei, Yu-Xuan; Shen, Ma-Ching; Tu, Yu-Hsuan; Wang, Chia-Chi; Huang, Hsiu-Chen

    2016-06-01

    The composition of Morinda citrifolia (M. citrifolia) was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the anticancer effects of M. citrifolia extract evaluated in HepG2, Huh7, and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. M. citrifolia fruit extracts were obtained by using five different organic solvents, including hexane (Hex), methanol (MeOH), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), chloroform (CHCl3), and ethanol (EtOH). The water-EtOAc extracts from M. citrifolia fruits was found to have the highest anticancer activity. HPLC data revealed the predominance of chrysin in water-EtOAc extracts of M. citrifolia fruit. Furthermore, the combined effects of cotreatment with apigenin and chrysin on liver and breast cancer were investigated. Treatment with apigenin plus chrysin for 72-96 h reduced HepG2 and MDA-MB-231 cell viability and induced apoptosis through down-regulation of S-phase kinase-associated protein-2 (Skp2) and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6) expression. However, the combination treatment for 36 h synergistically decreased MDA-MB-231 cell motility but not cell viability through down-regulation of MMP2, MMP9, fibronectin, and snail in MDA-MB-231 cells. Additionally, chrysin combined with apigenin also suppressed tumor growth in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells xenograft through down-regulation of ki-67 and Skp2 protein. The experimental results showed that chrysin combined with apigenin can reduce HepG2 and MDA-MB-231 proliferation and cell motility and induce apoptosis. It also offers opportunities for exploring new drug targets, and further investigations are underway in this regard.

  4. Gomisin A is a Novel Isoform-Specific Probe for the Selective Sensing of Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 in Liver Microsomes and Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-Jing; Ge, Guang-Bo; He, Yu-Qi; Wang, Ping; Dai, Zi-Ru; Ning, Jing; Hu, Liang-Hai; Yang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of prescription medicines are metabolized by human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A. CYP3A4 and 3A5 are two major isoforms of human CYP3A and share most of the substrate spectrum. A very limited previous study distinguished the activity of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, identifying the challenge in predicting CYP3A-mediated drug clearance and drug-drug interaction. In the present study, we introduced gomisin A (GA) with a dibenzocyclooctadiene skeleton as a novel selective probe of CYP3A4. The major metabolite of GA was fully characterized as 8-hydroxylated GA by LC-MS and NMR. CYP3A4 was assigned as the predominant isozyme involved in GA 8-hydroxylation by reaction phenotyping assays, chemical inhibition assays, and correlation studies. GA 8-hydroxylation in both recombinant human CYP3A4 and human liver microsomes followed classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The intrinsic clearance values indicated that CYP3A4 contributed 12.8-fold more than CYP3A5 to GA 8-hydroxylation. Molecular docking studies indicated different hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions between CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, which might result in the different catalytic activity for GA 8-hydroxylation. Furthermore, GA exhibited a stronger inhibitory activity towards CYP3A4 than CYP3A5, which further suggested a preferred selectivity of CYP3A4 for the transformation of GA. More importantly, GA has been successfully applied to selectively monitor the modulation of CYP3A4 activities by the inducer rifampin in hepG2 cells, which is consistent with the level change of CYP3A4 mRNA expression. In summary, our results suggested that GA could be used as a novel probe for the selective sensing of CYP3A4 in tissue and cell preparations.

  5. Human Liver Infection in a Dish: Easy-To-Build 3D Liver Models for Studying Microbial Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora B Petropolis

    Full Text Available Human liver infection is a major cause of death worldwide, but fundamental studies on infectious diseases affecting humans have been hampered by the lack of robust experimental models that accurately reproduce pathogen-host interactions in an environment relevant for the human disease. In the case of liver infection, one consequence of this absence of relevant models is a lack of understanding of how pathogens cross the sinusoidal endothelial barrier and parenchyma. To fill that gap we elaborated human 3D liver in vitro models, composed of human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC and Huh-7 hepatoma cells as hepatocyte model, layered in a structure mimicking the hepatic sinusoid, which enable studies of key features of early steps of hepatic infection. Built with established cell lines and scaffold, these models provide a reproducible and easy-to-build cell culture approach of reduced complexity compared to animal models, while preserving higher physiological relevance compared to standard 2D systems. For proof-of-principle we challenged the models with two hepatotropic pathogens: the parasitic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica and hepatitis B virus (HBV. We constructed four distinct setups dedicated to investigating specific aspects of hepatic invasion: 1 pathogen 3D migration towards hepatocytes, 2 hepatocyte barrier crossing, 3 LSEC and subsequent hepatocyte crossing, and 4 quantification of human hepatic virus replication (HBV. Our methods comprise automated quantification of E. histolytica migration and hepatic cells layer crossing in the 3D liver models. Moreover, replication of HBV virus occurs in our virus infection 3D liver model, indicating that routine in vitro assays using HBV or others viruses can be performed in this easy-to-build but more physiological hepatic environment. These results illustrate that our new 3D liver infection models are simple but effective, enabling new investigations on infectious disease mechanisms. The

  6. Liver stem cells: from preface to advancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Kanwal; Iqbal, Muhammad Javed; Zahra, Nureen; Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Liver is a major metabolic organ of the body and is known to comprise of two epithelial cell lineages, namely, hepatocytes and cholangiocytes which are known to originate from hepatoblasts during fetal developing stages. Upon acute injury, the hepatocytes and cholangiocytes undergo cellular division to compensate the loss, however, chronic damage may suppress this proliferative ability and as a consequence hepatic and extra-hepatic stem cells may contribute for liver regeneration. Facultative liver stem cells (oval cells) may emerge, proliferate and contribute in replacing damaged hepatic cells. Similarly, bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells are also known for contributing in liver regeneration having their ability of self renewal and differentiation. However, a closer look is still required to bridge the existing knowledge gaps between functionality and limitations. Thereby, we have discussed the detailed mechanistic insights of both hepatic and extra-hepatic stem cells including, stem/progenitor cells, adult/fetal hepatocytes, oval cells, bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells. We have also focused on few in vitro and in vivo studies elucidating therapeutic applications and challenges related to the liver stem cells. We believe that such conversations may provide invaluable contribution for realistic advancement in the state of therapeutic stem-cell transplantation.

  7. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Zhou, Tianyan [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Chen, Guangping, E-mail: guangping.chen@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

  8. Retention of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the liver after therapy-induced hepatitis C virus eradication in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.A. Claassen (Mark); R.J. de Knegt (Robert); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry); P.A. Boonstra (André)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractFollowing infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), in most cases immunity fails to eradicate the virus, resulting in slowly progressing immunopathology in the HCV-infected liver. We are the first to examine intrahepatic T cells and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+regulatory T cells (Treg) in patients

  9. [Changes of ultrastructure of the capillary endotheliocytes of ischemized and nonaffected muscular tissue after transplantation of human hemopoietic stem cells of fetal liver in experiment in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliutin, R V; Zadorozhna, T D; Medvets'kyĭ, E B; Driuk, M F; Petrenko, A Iu

    2010-04-01

    In experiment was investigated ultrastructure of the capillaries endothelial cells and histological peculiarities of muscular tissue on various stages after transplantation of hemopoietic stem cells of fetal liver (HSCFL). There was proved, that in ischemic environment HSCFL stimulate processes of angiogenesis, and in the case of transplantation into intact muscular tissue they are differentiating into the tissue macrophages, not interfering with muscular tissue structure.

  10. Effect of in vitro digested cod liver oil of different quality on oxidative, proteomic and inflammatory responses in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Karin; Istenič, Katja; Wulff, Tune

    2015-01-01

    digested fresh and oxidised cod liver oils in vitro, monitored the levels of lipid peroxidation products and evaluated oxidative, proteomic and inflammatory responses to the two types of digests in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. RESULTS: Digests of cod liver......BACKGROUND: Upon oxidation of the polyunsaturated fatty acids in fish oil, either before ingestion or, as recently shown, during the gastro-intestinal passage, a cascade of potentially cytotoxic peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal, can form. In this study, we...... oil with 22–53 µmol L−1 malondialdehyde and 0.26–3.7 µmol L−1 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal increased intracellular oxidation and cell energy metabolic activity compared to a digested blank in yeast cells and the influence of digests on mitochondrial protein expression was more pronounced for oxidised cod liver...

  11. Hepato-biliary profile of potential candidate liver progenitor cells from healthy rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Céric Maerckx; Isabelle Scheers; Tatiana Tondreau; David Campard; Omar Nyabi; Mustapha Najimi; Etienne Sokal

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the presence of progenitor cells in healthy adult rat liver displaying the equivalent advanced hepatogenic profile as that obtained in humans.METHODS:Rat fibroblastic-like liver derived cells (rFLDC) were obtained from collagenase-isolated liver cell suspensions and characterized and their phenotype profile determined using flow cytometry,immunocyto-chemistry,reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and functional assays.RESULTS:rFLDC exhibit fibroblastoid morphology,express mesenchymal (CD73,CD90,vimentin,α-smooth muscle actin),hepatocyte (UGT1A1,CK8) and biliary (CK19) markers.Moreover,these cells are able to store glycogen,and have glucose 6 phosphatase activity,but not UGT1A1 activity.Under the hepatogenic differentiation protocol,rFLDC display an up-regulation of hepatocyte markers expression (albumin,tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase,G6Pase) correlated to a down-regulation of the expression of the biliary marker CK19.CONCLUSION:Advanced hepatic features observed in human liver progenitor cells could not be demonstrated in rFLDC.However,we demonstrated the presence of an original rodent hepato-biliary cell type.

  12. Natural killer cells in liver disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tian, Zhigang; Chen, Yongyan; Gao, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are enriched in lymphocytes within the liver and have unique phenotypic features and functional properties, including tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis‐inducing ligand...

  13. Flow cytometric evaluation of the contribution of ionic silver to genotoxic potential of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Saura C; Njoroge, Joyce; Bryce, Steven M; Zheng, Jiwen; Ihrie, John

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to nanosilver found in food- and cosmetics-related consumer products is of public concern because of the lack of information about its safety. In this study, two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells, and the flow cytometric micronucleus (FCMN) assay were evaluated as tools for rapid predictive screening of the potential genotoxicity of nanosilver. Recently, we reported the genotoxicity of 20 nm nanosilver using these systems. In the current study presented here, we tested the hypothesis that the nanoparticle size and cell types were critical determinants of its genotoxicity. To test this hypothesis, we used the FCMN assay to evaluate the genotoxic potential of 50 nm nanosilver of the same shape, composition, surface charge and obtained from the same commercial source using the same experimental conditions and in vitro models (HepG2 and Caco2) as previously tested for the 20 nm silver. Results of our study show that up to the concentrations tested in these cultured cell test systems, the smaller (20 nm) nanoparticle is genotoxic to both the cell types by inducing micronucleus (MN). However, the larger (50 nm) nanosilver induces MN only in HepG2 cells, but not in Caco2 cells. Also in this study, we evaluated the contribution of ionic silver to the genotoxic potential of nanosilver using silver acetate as the representative ionic silver. The MN frequencies in HepG2 and Caco2 cells exposed to the ionic silver in the concentration range tested are not statistically significant from the control values except at the top concentrations for both the cell types. Therefore, our results indicate that the ionic silver may not contribute to the MN-forming ability of nanosilver in HepG2 and Caco2 cells. Also our results suggest that the HepG2 and Caco2 cell cultures and the FCMN assay are useful tools for rapid predictive screening of a genotoxic potential of food- and cosmetics-related chemicals including nanosilver.

  14. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity and regulate the apoptotic genes through ROS in human liver cells (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Khan, M A Majeed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws

    2016-12-01

    Cobalt iron oxide (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (CIO NPs) have been one of the most widely explored magnetic NPs because of their excellent chemical stability, mechanical hardness and heat generating potential. However, there is limited information concerning the interaction of CIO NPs with biological systems. In this study, we investigated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated cytotoxicity and apoptotic response of CIO NPs in human liver cells (HepG2). Diameter of crystalline CIO NPs was found to be 23nm with a band gap of 1.97eV. CIO NPs induced cell viability reduction and membrane damage, and degree of induction was dose- and time-dependent. CIO NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress revealed by induction of ROS, depletion of glutathione and lower activity of superoxide dismutase enzyme. Real-time PCR data has shown that mRNA level of tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic genes (bax, CASP3 and CASP9) were higher, while the expression level of anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was lower in cells following exposure to CIO NPs. Activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes was also higher in CIO NPs exposed cells. Furthermore, co-exposure of N-acetyl-cysteine (ROS scavenger) efficiently abrogated the modulation of apoptotic genes along with the prevention of cytotoxicity caused by CIO NPs. Overall, we observed that CIO NPs induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HepG2 cells through ROS via p53 pathway. This study suggests that toxicity mechanisms of CIO NPs should be further investigated in animal models.

  15. Shizukaol D, a Dimeric Sesquiterpene Isolated from Chloranthus serratus, Represses the Growth of Human Liver Cancer Cells by Modulating Wnt Signalling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisha Tang

    Full Text Available Natural products have become sources of developing new drugs for the treatment of cancer. To seek candidate compounds that inhibit the growth of liver cancer, components of Chloranthus serratus were tested. Here, we report that shizukaol D, a dimeric sesquiterpene from Chloranthus serratus, exerted a growth inhibition effect on liver cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We demonstrated that shizukaol D induced cells to undergo apoptosis. More importantly, shizukaol D attenuated Wnt signalling and reduced the expression of endogenous Wnt target genes, which resulted in decreased expression of β-catenin. Collectively, this study demonstrated that shizukaol D inhibited the growth of liver cancer cells by modulating Wnt pathway.

  16. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorrink, Sabine U; Severson, Paul L; Kulak, Mikhail V; Futscher, Bernard W; Domann, Frederick E

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O2 prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity.

  17. Towards a Humanized Mouse Model of Liver Stage Malaria Using Ectopic Artificial Livers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Stevens, Kelly R.; Mota, Maria M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2017-01-01

    The malaria liver stage is an attractive target for antimalarial development, and preclinical malaria models are essential for testing such candidates. Given ethical concerns and costs associated with non‐human primate models, humanized mouse models containing chimeric human livers offer a valuable alternative as small animal models of liver stage human malaria. The best available human liver chimeric mice rely on cellular transplantation into mice with genetically engineered liver injury, but these systems involve a long and variable humanization process, are expensive, and require the use of breeding-challenged mouse strains which are not widely accessible. We previously incorporated primary human hepatocytes into engineered polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoporous human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs), implanted them in mice without liver injury, and rapidly generated human liver chimeric mice in a reproducible and scalable fashion. By re-designing the PEG scaffold to be macroporous, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of implantable porous HEALs that support liver stage human malaria (P. falciparum) infection in vitro, and also after implantation in mice with normal liver function, 60% of the time. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a tissue engineering strategy towards the development of scalable preclinical models of liver stage malaria infection for future applications. PMID:28361899

  18. Kruppel-like factor 2 inhibit the angiogenesis of cultured human liver sinusoidal endothelial cells through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Xiao-Qing, E-mail: zeng.xiaoqing@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Na, E-mail: Linala.2009@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Pan, Du-Yi, E-mail: lasikesmi@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Miao, Qing, E-mail: sadsadvenus@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Ma, Gui-Fen, E-mail: ma.guifen@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Yi-Mei, E-mail: liuyimei1988@163.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Tseng, Yu-Jen, E-mail: dianatseng14@gmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Li, Feng, E-mail: li.feng2@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Xu, Li-Li, E-mail: xu.lili3@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Shi-Yao, E-mail: chen.shiyao@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Gastroenterology of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Institute of Endoscopic Research of Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-09-04

    Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is a crucial anti-angiogenic factor. However, its precise role in hepatic angiogenesis induced by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) remain unclear. This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of KLF2 on angiogenesis of LSECs and to explore the corresponding mechanism. Cultured human LSECs were infected with different lentiviruses to overexpress or suppress KLF2 expression. The CCK-8 assay, transwell migration assay and tube formation test, were used to investigate the roles of KLF2 in the proliferation, migration and vessel tube formation of LSECs, respectively. The expression and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were detected by western blot. We discovered that the up-regulation of KLF2 expression dramatically inhibited proliferation, migration and tube formation in treated LSECs. Correspondingly, down-regulation of KLF2 expression significantly promoted proliferation, migration and tube formation in treated LSECs. Additionally, KLF2 inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 pathway, followed by the function of KLF2 in the angiogenesis of LSECs disrupted. In conclusion, KLF2 suppressed the angiogenesis of LSECs through inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, and vessel tube formation. These functions of KLF2 may be mediated through the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. - Highlights: • Overexpression of KLF2 inhibits the proliferation and migration of LSECs. • Overexpression of KLF2 inhibits the angiogenesis of LSECs. • ERK1/2 signaling pathway involved in the anti-angiogenic process of KLF2 on LSECs.

  19. Insulin-induced inhibition of gluconeogenesis genes, including glutamic pyruvic transaminase 2, is associated with reduced histone acetylation in a human liver cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kazue; Kamikubo, Michiko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2017-06-01

    Hepatic glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT; also known as alanine aminotransferase) is a gluconeogenesis enzyme that catalyzes conversions between alanine and pyruvic acid. It is also used as a blood biomarker for hepatic damage. In this study, we investigated whether insulin regulates GPT expression, as it does for other gluconeogenesis genes, and if this involves the epigenetic modification of histone acetylation. Human liver-derived HepG2 cells were cultured with 0.5-100nM insulin for 8h, and the mRNA expression of GPT, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), PCK1, G6PC and FBP1 was measured. We also investigated the extent of histone acetylation around these genes. Insulin suppressed the mRNA expression of gluconeogenesis genes (GPT2, GOT1, GOT2, GGT1, GGT2, G6PC, and PCK1) in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA levels of GPT2, but not GPT1, were decreased by insulin. Histone acetylation was also reduced around GPT2, G6PC, and PCK1 in response to insulin. The expression of GPT2 and other gluconeogenesis genes such as G6PC and PCK1 was suppressed by insulin, in association with decreases in histone H3 and H4 acetylation surrounding these genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cinnamomum osmophloeum Kanehira ethanol extracts prevents human liver-derived HepG2 cell death from oxidation stress by induction of ghrelin gene expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHU-YING LIU; CHIH-HAO HUANG; JIA-CHING SHIEH; TAI-LIN LEE

    2017-09-01

    Diabetes patients associated with liver disease carry a significant risk of morbidity and mortality. Cinnamon has beenreported to reduce fructose-induced oxidative stress in the rat liver. However, the mechanism by which cinnamon protectsthe liver in a high-saccharide environment remains to be investigated. HepG2 cells were cultured with 30 mM D-ribose tomimic the high-oxidative-stress environment, typical of a liver in a diabetic patient. Three different chemical types of C.osmophloeum ethanol extracts (CEEs) were added in HepG2 culture media and the administration of all three CEEsprotected HepG2 cells from D-ribose damage and increased cell survival by approximately 20%. Exclusively, the transcriptvariant 1 of the ghrelin gene, but not variant 3, was 2–3 times induced by the addition of these CEEs. Moreover, themRNAs of ghrelin processing enzyme, furin, and mboat4 were detected in HepG2 cells. The ghrelin hormones in theculture media were increased 4–9 times by the addition of CEEs. The protective effects of ghrelin on HepG2 cells inD-ribose environment were further confirmed by recombinant ghrelin transfection. We conclude that the CEEs induceghrelin gene expression and protect HepG2 cells from D-ribose-induced oxidative damage through ghrelin signalling.

  1. Photodynamic therapy mediated antiproliferative activity of some metal-doped ZnO nanoparticles in human liver adenocarcinoma HepG2 cells under UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Amel F M; Ali, Mamdouh M; Ismail, Laila F M

    2014-09-05

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising new modality for the treatment of cancer through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this work, human liver adenocarcinoma cells HepG2 were treated with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs), metal-doped-ZnO-NPs: Fe-ZnO-NPs Ag-ZnO-NPs, Pb-ZnO-NPs, and Co-ZnO-NPs, Silica-coated ZnO-NPs, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs), titanium dioxide nano-tubes (TiO2-NTs) and ZnO-NPs/TiO2-NTs nanocomposite under UV irradiation. Doxorubicin was used as a standard drug. The results demonstrated that the ZnO-NPs, Fe-ZnO-NPs, Ag-ZnO-NPs, Pb-ZnO-NPs, and Co-ZnO-NPs showed cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells, with the median growth inhibitory concentrations (IC50) 42.60, 37.20, 45.10, 77.20 and 56.50 μg/ml, respectively, as compared to doxorubicin (IC50: 20.10 μg/ml). Treatment of the cancer cells with ZnO-NPs, Fe-ZnO-NPs, Ag-ZnO-NPs, Pb-ZnO-NPs, and Co-ZnO-NPs resulted in a significant increase in the activity of SOD and the levels of H2O2 and NO than those of control, accompanied with a significant decrease in the activity of CAT and GSH-Px. Also, depletion of reduced GSH, total protein and nucleic acids levels was observed. In conclusion, metal-doped ZnO-NPs may induce antiproliferative effect on HepG2 cells under UV-irradiation due to generation of ROS. Therefore, they could be included in modern clinical trials after in vivo more investigations, using photodynamic therapy technique.

  2. Differential Proteomics in Malignant and Normal Liver Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-jun; WANG Bin; YAN Zhi-yong; QIAN Dong-meng; SONG Xu-xia; Ding Shou-yi; BAI Zhi-qiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To detect differential protein expression in malignant and normal liver cell lines in vitro using the SELDI ProteinChip platform, for investigating the pathogenesis of liver cancer. Methods: Two cell lines, human normal liver cell line L02 and hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 were cultured routinely, harvested in good condition and lysed. After quantification, the supernatant of the lysate was tested by IMAC3 (Immobilized Mental Affinity Capture) and WCX2 (Weak Cation Exchange) chips on the SELDI-TOF-MS ProteinChip reader. Results: Protein expression differed between the malignant and normal liver cell lines. A total of 20 differentially expressed proteins were found, among which, 7 were captured by the IMAC3 chip and 14 by the WCX2 chip. Peaks at 5,419, 7,979 and 11,265 Da were higher and at 8,103, 8,492, 10,160 and 11,304 Da lower in SMMC-7721 cells by the IMAC3 chip; peaks at 7,517, 7,945 and 7,979 Da were higher and at 5,061, 5,551, 5,818, 7,439, 9,401,10,100, 10,312, 11,621, 11,662, 11,830 and 12,772 Da lower in SMMC-7721 cells by the WCX2 chip. Interestingly, both chips captured the 7,979 Da peak. In addition, the 11,081 Da peak corresponded precisely with the molecular mass of the calcium binding protein S100A10, which may participate in the formation of liver cancer in association with p36. Conclusion: Detecting differential protein expression in malignant and normal liver cell lines using the SELDI ProteinChip platform was simple, sensitive and repeatable. The results we obtained can serve as a basis for investigating the pathogenesis of liver cancer and aid the discovery of new therapeutic targets.

  3. Bioprinting of human pluripotent stem cells and their directed differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells for the generation of mini-livers in 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner-Jones, Alan; Fyfe, Catherine; Cornelissen, Dirk-Jan; Gardner, John; King, Jason; Courtney, Aidan; Shu, Wenmiao

    2015-10-21

    We report the first investigation into the bioprinting of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), their response to a valve-based printing process as well as their post-printing differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs). HLCs differentiated from both hiPSCs and human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) sources were bioprinted and examined for the presence of hepatic markers to further validate the compatibility of the valve-based bioprinting process with fragile cell transfer. Examined cells were positive for nuclear factor 4 alpha and were demonstrated to secrete albumin and have morphology that was also found to be similar to that of hepatocytes. Both hESC and hiPSC lines were tested for post-printing viability and pluripotency and were found to have negligible difference in terms of viability and pluripotency between the printed and non-printed cells. hESC-derived HLCs were 3D printed using alginate hydrogel matrix and tested for viability and albumin secretion during the remaining differentiation and were found to be hepatic in nature. 3D printed with 40-layer of HLC-containing alginate structures reached peak albumin secretion at day 21 of the differentiation protocol. This work demonstrates that the valve-based printing process is gentle enough to print human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (both hESCs and hiPSCs) while either maintaining their pluripotency or directing their differentiation into specific lineages. The ability to bioprint hPSCs will pave the way for producing organs or tissues on demand from patient specific cells which could be used for animal-free drug development and personalized medicine.

  4. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets.

  5. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bin; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Cheng; Li, Jialun; Powell, Prudence O.; Hu, Zhenxia; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets. PMID:26934359

  6. The {sup 57}Fe hyperfine interactions in iron storage proteins in liver and spleen tissues from normal human and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia: a Mössbauer effect study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@gmail.com; Alenkina, I. V. [Ural Federal University, Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S. [Ural State Medical University (Russian Federation); Semionkin, V. A. [Ural Federal University, Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Study of human spleen and liver tissues from healthy persons and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. Small variations in the {sup 57}Fe hyperfine parameters for normal and patient’s tissues were detected and related to small variations in the {sup 57}Fe local microenvironment in ferrihydrite cores. The differences in the relative parts of more crystalline and more amorphous core regions were also supposed for iron storage proteins in normal and patients’ spleen and liver tissues.

  7. The 57Fe hyperfine interactions in iron storage proteins in liver and spleen tissues from normal human and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia: a Mössbauer effect study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Alenkina, I. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Study of human spleen and liver tissues from healthy persons and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. Small variations in the 57Fe hyperfine parameters for normal and patient's tissues were detected and related to small variations in the 57Fe local microenvironment in ferrihydrite cores. The differences in the relative parts of more crystalline and more amorphous core regions were also supposed for iron storage proteins in normal and patients' spleen and liver tissues.

  8. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen; Zhou, Tianyan; Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia; Chen, Guangping

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT.

  9. Comparative study of bisphenol A and its analogue bisphenol S on human hepatic cells: a focus on their potential involvement in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyre, Ludovic; Rouimi, Patrick; de Sousa, Georges; Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Carré, Benjamin; Barcellini, Sylvie; Chagnon, Marie-Christine; Rahmani, Roger

    2014-08-01

    For several decades, people have been in contact with bisphenol A (BPA) primarily through their diet. Nowadays it is gradually replaced by an analogue, bisphenol S (BPS). In this study, we compared the effects of these two bisphenols in parallel with the positive control diethylstilbestrol (DES) on different hepatocyte cell lines. Using a cellular impedance system we have shown that BPS is less cytotoxic than BPA in acute and chronic conditions. We have also demonstrated that, contrary to BPA, BPS is not able to induce an increase in intracellular lipid and does not activate the PXR receptor which is known to be involved in part, in this process. In parallel, it failed to modulate the expression of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6, the drug transporter ABCB1 and other lipid metabolism genes (FASN, PLIN). However, it appears to have a weak effect on GSTA4 protein expression and on the Erk1/2 pathway. In conclusion, in contrast to BPA, BPS does not appear to induce the metabolic syndrome that may lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), in vitro. Although we have to pay special attention to BPS, its use could be less dangerous concerning this toxicological endpoint for human health.

  10. Effect of the militarily-relevant heavy metals, depleted uranium and heavy metal tungsten-alloy on gene expression in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexandra C; Brooks, Kia; Smith, Jan; Page, Natalie

    2004-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) and heavy-metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) are dense heavy-metals used primarily in military applications. Chemically similar to natural uranium, but depleted of the higher activity 235U and 234U isotopes, DU is a low specific activity, high-density heavy metal. In contrast, the non-radioactive HMTAs are composed of a mixture of tungsten (91-93%), nickel (3-5%), and cobalt (2-4%) particles. The use of DU and HMTAs in military munitions could result in their internalization in humans. Limited data exist however, regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU and HMTAs in humans. Both DU and HMTAs possess a tumorigenic transforming potential and are genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro. Using insoluble DU-UO2 and a reconstituted mixture of tungsten, nickel, cobalt (rWNiCo), we tested their ability to induce stress genes in thirteen different recombinant cell lines generated from human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2). The commercially available CAT-Tox (L) cellular assay consists of a panel of cell lines stably transfected with reporter genes consisting of a coding sequence for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) under transcriptional control by mammalian stress gene regulatory sequences. DU, (5-50 microg/ml) produced a complex profile of activity demonstrating significant dose-dependent induction of the hMTIIA FOS, p53RE, Gadd153, Gadd45, NFkappaBRE, CRE, HSP70, RARE, and GRP78 promoters. The rWNiCo mixture (5-50 microg/ml) showed dose-related induction of the GSTYA, hMTIIA, p53RE, FOS, NFkappaBRE, HSP70, and CRE promoters. An examination of the pure metals, tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), and cobalt (Co), comprising the rWNiCo mixture, demonstrated that each metal exhibited a similar pattern of gene induction, but at a significantly decreased magnitude than that of the rWNiCo mixture. These data showed a synergistic activation of gene expression by the metals in the rWNiCo mixture. Our data show for the first time that DU and rWNiCo can

  11. Liver-specific gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is induced by liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia Lange; Philipp Bassler; Michael V. Lioznov; Helge Bruns; Dietrich Kluth; Axel R. Zander; Henning C. Fiegel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The origin of putative liver cells from distinct bone marrow stem cells, e.g. hematopoietic stem cells or multipotent adult progenitor cells was found in recent in vitro studies. Cell culture experiments revealed a key role of growth factors for the induction of liver-specific genes in stem cell cultures. We investigated the potential of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow to differentiate into hepatocytic cells in vitro. Furthermore,we assessed the influence of cocultured liver cells on induction of liver-specific gene expression.METHODS: Mesenchymal stem cells were marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) by retroviral gene transduction. Clonal marked MSC were either cultured under liver stimulating conditions using fibronectin-coated culture dishes and medium supplemented with SCF, HGF,EGF, and FGF-4 alone, or in presence of freshly isolated rat liver cells. Cells in cocultures were harvested and GFP+ or GFP- cells were separated using fluorescence activated cell sorting. RT-PCR analysis for the stem cell marker Thy1 and the hepatocytic markers CK-18, albumin, CK-19,and AFP was performed in the different cell populations.RESULTS: Under the specified culture conditions, rat MSC cocultured with liver cells expressed albumin-, CK-18,CK-19, and AFP-RNA over 3 weeks, whereas MSC cultured alone did not show liver specific gene expression.CONCLUSION: The results indicate that (1) rat MSC from bone marrow can differentiate towards hepatocytic lineage in vitro, and (2) that the microenvironment plays a decisive role for the induction of hepatic differentiation of rMSC.

  12. Trefoil factor-3 expression in human colon cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babyatsky, Mark; Lin, Jing; Yio, Xianyang; Chen, Anli; Zhang, Jie-yu; Zheng, Yan; Twyman, Christina; Bao, Xiuliang; Schwartz, Myron; Thung, Swan; Lawrence Werther, J; Itzkowitz, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Deaths from colorectal cancer are often due to liver metastasis. Trefoil factor-3 (TFF3) is expressed by normal intestinal epithelial cells and its expression is maintained throughout the colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Our previous work demonstrated a correlation between TFF3 expression and metastatic potential in an animal model of colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine whether TFF3 is expressed in human colon cancer liver metastasis (CCLM) and whether inhibiting TFF3 expression in colon cancer cells would alter their invasive potential in vitro. Human CCLMs were analyzed at the mRNA and protein level for TFF3 expression. Two highly metastatic rat colon cancer cell lines that either natively express TFF3 (LN cells) or were transfected with TFF3 (LPCRI-2 cells), were treated with two rat TFF3 siRNA constructs (si78 and si365), and analyzed in an in vitro invasion assay. At the mRNA and protein level, TFF3 was expressed in 17/17 (100%) CCLMs and 10/11 (91%) primary colon cancers, but not in normal liver tissue. By real time PCR, TFF3 expression was markedly inhibited by both siRNA constructs in LN and LPCRI-2 cells. The si365 and si78 constructs inhibited invasion by 44% and 53%, respectively, in LN cells, and by 74% and 50%, respectively, in LPCRI-2 cells. These results provide further evidence that TFF3 contributes to the malignant behavior of colon cancer cells. These observations may have relevance for designing new diagnostic and treatment approaches to colorectal cancer.

  13. The Roles of Innate Immune Cells in Liver Injury and Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhongjun Dong; Haiming Wei; Rui Sun; Zhigang Tian

    2007-01-01

    For predominant abundance with liver-specific Kupffer cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and natural killer T (NKT)cells and their rapid responses to several stimuli, the liver is considered as an organ with innate immune features.In contrast to their roles in the defense of many infectious agents like hepatitis viruses and parasites, hepatic innate immune cells are also involved in the immunopathogenesis of human clinical liver diseases and several murine hepatitis models such as concanavalin A (Con A), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly I:C)-induced liver injury. In this review, the destructive roles of NK cells, NKT cells and Kupffer cells in the processes of immune-mediated liver injury and regeneration will be discussed, and some putative mechanisms involving the impairment of liver regeneration caused by activated hepatic innate immune cells are also proposed.

  14. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Sheng

    Full Text Available Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs.

  15. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zhen; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Ruixin; Jiao, Na; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs.

  16. Cytotoxicity and Expression of c-fos, HSP70, and GADD45/153 Proteins in Human Liver Carcinoma (HepG2 Cells Exposed to Dinitrotoluenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Dinitrotoluenes (DNTs are byproducts of the explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT, and exist as a mixture of 2 to 6 isomers, with 2,4-DNT and 2,6-DNT being the most significant. The main route of human exposure at ammunition facilities is inhalation. The primary targets of DNTs toxicity are the hematopoietic system, cardiovascular system, nervous system and reproductive system. In factory workers, exposure to DNTs has been linked to many adverse health effects, including: cyanosis, vertigo, headache, metallic taste, dyspnea, weakness and lassitude, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. Other symptoms including pain or parasthesia in extremities, abdominal discomfort, tremors, paralysis, chest pain, and unconsciousness have been documented. An association between DNTs exposure and increased risk of hepatocellular carcinomas and subcutaneous tumors in rats, as well as renal tumors in mice, has been established. This research was therefore designed targeting the liver to assess the cellular and molecular responses of human liver carcinoma cells following exposure to 2,4-DNT and 2,6-DNT. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay. Upon 48 hrs of exposure, LC50 values of 245 + 14.72μg/mL, and 300 + 5.92μg/mL were recorded for 2,6-DNT and 2,4-DNT respectively, indicating that both DNTs are moderately toxic, and 2,6-DNT is slightly more toxic to HepG2 cells than 2,4-DNT. A dose response relationship was recorded with respect to the cytotoxicity of both DNTs. Western blot analysis resulted in a significant expression (p<0.05 of the 70-kDa heat shock protein in 2,6-DNT-treated cells compared to the control cells and at the 200 μg/mL dose for 2,4-DNT. A statistically significant expression in c-fos was also observed at the 200 and 250 μg/mL treatment level for 2,4- and 2,6-DNT, respectively. However, no statistically significant expression of this protooncogene-related protein was observed at the doses of 0, 100, or 300

  17. Safety of frozen liver for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada A.K. Kirrella

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to ensure and evaluate the safety of imported frozen beef liver traded in supermarkets of Kafr El-Sheikh Governorate, Egypt, through detection of Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella enteritidies, Escherichia coli O157:H7, antibiotic residues, and aflatoxin B1 residue. Fifty samples of imported frozen liver were randomly collected from different shops at Kafr El-Sheikh Governorate for isolation of S. typhimurium, S. enteritidies, and E. coli O157:H7. The results revealed that for both microorganisms 4% of the examined samples presumed to contain Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 organisms, according to the colonial character on Harlequin Salmonella ABC agar media and Harlequin SMAC-BCIG agar media. According to biochemical and serological identifications, both organisms could not be detected in the examined samples. A total of 29 (58% samples were positive for antibiotic residues, using the Premi test (a broad-spectrum screening test for the detection of antibiotic residues in meat at or below the maximum residue limits. In addition, aflatoxin B1 was detected in one (2% samples with a concentration of 1.1 μg/kg. The results reflect that there was good hygiene practice for handling and preparation of frozen liver while selling to consumers. However, a high percentage of antibiotic residues reflect ignorance of withdrawal time before slaughtering of animals as well as misuse of antibiotics in veterinary fields. Furthermore, aflatoxin B1 residue was detected in examined frozen liver samples at a concentration below the maximum residual level, which is not enough to cause threat to humans, but it is enough to cause problem if it is eaten regularly reflect contamination of animal feed with aflatoxins.

  18. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorrink, Sabine U. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Severson, Paul L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Kulak, Mikhail V. [Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Futscher, Bernard W. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Domann, Frederick E., E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced AhR function and

  19. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald; Gretz, Norbert; Dooley, Steven; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Rudovich, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expression of IDE in subjects with T2DM. HepG2 cells were treated with 10 nM insulin for 24 h with or without inhibition of IDE activity using IDE RNAi, and cell transcriptome and proliferation rate were analyzed. Human liver samples (n = 22) were used for the gene expression profiling by microarrays. In HepG2 cells, IDE knockdown changed expression of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. Proliferation rate was lower in IDE knockdown cells than in controls. Microarray analysis revealed the decrease of hepatic IDE expression in subjects with T2DM accompanied by the downregulation of the p53-dependent genes FAS and CCNG2, but not by the upregulation of proliferation markers MKI67, MCM2 and PCNA. Similar results were found in the liver microarray dataset from GEO Profiles database. In conclusion, IDE expression is decreased in liver of subjects with T2DM which is accompanied by the dysregulation of p53 pathway. Prolonged use of IDE inhibitors for T2DM treatment should be carefully tested in animal studies regarding its potential effect on hepatic tumorigenesis.

  20. Antioxidant and cytotoxic effects of hexane extract ofMorinda pubescens leaves in human liver cancer cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaya Kumar D; Jaya Santhi R

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To evaluate the antioxidant and cytotoxic effects of hexane extract ofMorinda pubescens leaves and to find the primary bioactive compound responsible for antioxidant and cytotoxic activities.Methods: The individual compounds were isolated using column chromatography and were characterized by spectroscopic techniques. The antioxidant activity was evaluated for all individual isolated compounds byDPPH method usingL-Ascorbic acid as standard and cytotoxicity was assessed for the extract and the hyoscyamine byMTT assay, caspase test andRT-PCR study.Results:The antioxidant activity of the isolated compounds and the extract increased as the concentration increased. One of the isolated compound hyoscyamine showed the high antioxidant activity. The extract and the hyoscyamine dose-dependently decreased the cell viability in HepG2 cells. Hyoscyamine induced caspase-3mediated apoptosis. Up regulation of p53 gene expression provides cue for apoptotic activity of hyoscyamine. Conclusions: The results indicate that hexane extract possessed potent antioxidant and cytotoxic activity and hyoscyamine is the principal bioactive compound in hexane extract.

  1. Discoidin domain receptor 1: isoform expression and potential functions in cirrhotic human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sunmi; Shackel, Nicholas A; Wang, Xin M; Ajami, Katerina; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Gorrell, Mark D

    2011-03-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds and is activated by collagens. Transcriptional profiling of cirrhosis in human liver using a DNA array and quantitative PCR detected elevated mRNA expression of DDR1 compared with that in nondiseased liver. The present study characterized DDR1 expression in cirrhotic and nondiseased human liver and examined the cellular effects of DDR1 expression. mRNA expression of all five isoforms of DDR1 was detected in human liver, whereas DDR1a demonstrated differential expression in liver with hepatitis C virus and primary biliary cirrhosis compared with nondiseased liver. In addition, immunoblot analysis detected shed fragments of DDR1 more readily in cirrhotic liver than in nondiseased liver. Inasmuch as DDR1 is subject to protease-mediated cleavage after prolonged interaction with collagen, this differential expression may indicate more intense activation of DDR1 protein in cirrhotic compared with nondiseased liver. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence localized intense DDR1 mRNA and protein expression to epithelial cells including hepatocytes at the portal-parenchymal interface and the luminal aspect of the biliary epithelium. Overexpression of DDR1a altered hepatocyte behavior including increased adhesion and less migration on extracelular matrix substrates. DDR1a regulated extracellular expression of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2. These data elucidate DDR1 function pertinent to cirrhosis and indicate the importance of epithelial cell-collagen interactions in chronic liver injury.

  2. Effect of the Human Amniotic Membrane on Liver Regeneration in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Mesut; Şahin, Sevinç; Arslan, Ergin; Börekci, Hasan; Metin, Bayram; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Operations are performed for broader liver surgery indications for a better understanding of hepatic anatomy/physiology and developments in operation technology. Surgery can cure some patients with liver metastasis of some tumors. Nevertheless, postoperative liver failure is the most feared complication causing mortality in patients who have undergone excision of a large liver mass. The human amniotic membrane has regenerative effects. Thus, we investigated the effects of the human amniotic membrane on regeneration of the resected liver. Methods. Twenty female Wistar albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups and underwent a 70% hepatectomy. The human amniotic membrane was placed over the residual liver in the experimental group. Relative liver weight, histopathological features, and biochemical parameters were assessed on postoperative day 3. Results. Total protein and albumin levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. No difference in relative liver weight was observed between the groups. Hepatocyte mitotic count was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Hepatic steatosis was detected in the experimental group. Conclusion. Applying the amniotic membrane to residual liver adversely affected liver regeneration. However, mesenchymal stem cell research has the potential to accelerate liver regeneration investigations. PMID:26457000

  3. Effect of the Human Amniotic Membrane on Liver Regeneration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Sipahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Operations are performed for broader liver surgery indications for a better understanding of hepatic anatomy/physiology and developments in operation technology. Surgery can cure some patients with liver metastasis of some tumors. Nevertheless, postoperative liver failure is the most feared complication causing mortality in patients who have undergone excision of a large liver mass. The human amniotic membrane has regenerative effects. Thus, we investigated the effects of the human amniotic membrane on regeneration of the resected liver. Methods. Twenty female Wistar albino rats were divided into control and experimental groups and underwent a 70% hepatectomy. The human amniotic membrane was placed over the residual liver in the experimental group. Relative liver weight, histopathological features, and biochemical parameters were assessed on postoperative day 3. Results. Total protein and albumin levels were significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group. No difference in relative liver weight was observed between the groups. Hepatocyte mitotic count was significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Hepatic steatosis was detected in the experimental group. Conclusion. Applying the amniotic membrane to residual liver adversely affected liver regeneration. However, mesenchymal stem cell research has the potential to accelerate liver regeneration investigations.

  4. Role of Chymase in the Development of Liver Cirrhosis and Its Complications: Experimental and Human Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansoè, Giovanni; Aragno, Manuela; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Mengozzi, Giulio; Novo, Erica; Parola, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background Tissue Angiotensin II (Ang-II), produced through local non ACE-dependent pathways, stimulates liver fibrogenesis, renal vasoconstriction and sodium retention. Aim To highlight chymase-dependent pathway of Ang-II production in liver and kidney during cirrhosis development. Methods Liver histology, portal pressure, liver and kidney function, and hormonal status were investigated in rat liver cirrhosis induced through 13 weeks of CCl4, with or without chymase inhibitor SF2809E, administered between 4th and 13th CCl4 weeks; liver and kidney chymase immunolocation and Ang-II content were assessed. Chymase immunohistochemistry was also assessed in normal and cirrhotic human liver, and chymase mRNA transcripts were measured in human HepG2 cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC/MFs) in vitro. Results Rats receiving both CCl4 and SF2809E showed liver fibrotic septa focally linking portal tracts but no cirrhosis, as compared to ascitic cirrhotic rats receiving CCl4. SF2809E reduced portal pressure, plasma bilirubin, tissue content of Ang-II, plasma renin activity, norepinephrine and vasopressin, and increased glomerular filtration rate, water clearance, urinary sodium excretion. Chymase tissue content was increased and detected in α-SMA-positive liver myofibroblasts and in kidney tubular cells of cirrhotic rats. In human cirrhosis, chymase was located in hepatocytes of regenerative nodules. Human HepG2 cells and HSC/MFs responded to TGF-β1 by up-regulating chymase mRNA transcription. Conclusions Chymase, through synthesis of Ang-II and other mediators, plays a role in the derangement of liver and kidney function in chronic liver diseases. In human cirrhosis, chymase is well-represented and apt to become a future target of pharmacological treatment. PMID:27637026

  5. Modeling Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease with Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Immature Hepatocyte-Like Cells Reveals Activation of PLIN2 and Confirms Regulatory Functions of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffmann, Nina; Ring, Sarah; Kawala, Marie-Ann; Wruck, Wasco; Ncube, Audrey; Trompeter, Hans-Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD/steatosis) is a metabolic disease characterized by the incorporation of fat into hepatocytes. In this study, we developed an in vitro model for NAFLD based on hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells. We induced fat storage in these HLCs and detected major expression changes of metabolism-associated genes, as well as an overall reduction of liver-related microRNAs. We observed an upregulation of the lipid droplet coating protein Perilipin 2 (PLIN2), as well as of numerous genes of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pathway, which constitutes a regulatory hub for metabolic processes. Interference with PLIN2 and PPARα resulted in major alterations in gene expression, especially affecting lipid, glucose, and purine metabolism. Our model recapitulates many metabolic changes that are characteristic for NAFLD. It permits the dissection of disease-promoting molecular pathways and allows us to investigate the influences of distinct genetic backgrounds on disease progression. PMID:27308945

  6. LIVER AND BONE MARROW STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS AS REGULATORS OF REPARATIVE REGENERATION OF DAMAGED LIVER

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    А. V. Lundup

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review the modern information about effectiveness of liver insufficiency treatment by stem/ progenitor cells of liver (oval cells and bone marrow (hemopoietic cells and mesenchymal cells was presented. It is shown that medical action of these cells is referred on normalization of liver cell interaction and reorganization of processes of a reparative regeneration in damaged liver. It is believed that application of mesenchymal stromal cells from an autological bone marrow is the most perspective strategy. However, for definitive judgement about regenerative possibilities of the autological bone marrow cells it is necessary to carry out large-scale double blind clinical researches. 

  7. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases

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    Yarygin, Konstantin N.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable. PMID:28210629

  8. Photoacoustic physio-chemical analysis of liver conditions in animal and human subjects

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    Wang, Xueding; Xu, Guan; Tian, Chao; Wan, Shanshan; Welling, Theodore H.; Lok, Anna S. F.; Rubin, Jonathan M.

    2016-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease affecting 30% of the population in the United States. Biopsy is the gold standard for diagnosing NAFLD. Liver histology assesses the amount of fat, and determines type and extent of cell injury, inflammation and fibrosis. However, liver biopsy is invasive and is limited by sampling error. Current radiological diagnostic modalities can evaluate the 'physical' morphology in liver by quantifying the backscattered US signals, but cannot interrogate the 'histochemical' components forming these backscatterers. For example, ultrasound (US) imaging can detect the presence of fat but cannot differentiate steatosis alone from steatohepatitis. Our previous study of photoacoustic physiochemical analysis (PAPCA) has demonstrated that this method can characterize the histological changes in livers during the progression of NAFLD in animal models. In this study, we will further validate PAPCA with human livers. Ex vivo human liver samples with steatosis, fibrosis and cirrhosis will be scanned using optical illumination at wavelengths of 680-1700 nm and compared to histology results. In vivo study on human subjects with confirmed steatosis is planned using our PA-ultrasound (US) parallel imaging system based on Verasonic US imaging flatform with an L7-4 probe. 10 mJ/cm2 per pulse optical energy at 755 nm will be delivered to the skin surface, which is under the safety limit of American National Standard Institute. Preliminary study with ex vivo human tissue has demonstrated the potential of the proposed approach in differentiating human liver conditions.

  9. 10-(6'-Plastoquinonyl)decyltriphenylphosphonium (SkQ1) Does Not Increase the Level of Cytochromes P450 in Rat Liver and Human Hepatocyte Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasoedova, K N; Silachev, D N; Petrov, A D

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 did not increase the content of cytochromes P450 in livers of rats that were given SkQ1 in drinking water for 5 days in a dose (2.5 µmol per kg body weight) that exceeded 10 times the SkQ1 therapeutic dose. SkQ1 did not affect the levels of cytochrome P450 forms CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 in monolayer cultures of freshly isolated human hepatocytes, while specific inducers of these forms (omeprazole, phenobarbital, and rifampicin, respectively) significantly increased expression of the cytochromes P450 under the same conditions. We conclude that therapeutic doses of SkQ1 do not induce cytochromes P450 in liver, and the absence of the inducing effect cannot be explained by poor availability of hepatocytes to SkQ1 in vivo.

  10. Transplantation of fetal liver epithelial progenitor cells ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Fang Zheng; Li-Jian Liang; Chang-Xiong Wu; Jin-Song Chen; Zhen-Sheng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of transplanted fetal liver epithelial progenitor (FLEP) cells on liver fibrosis in mice.METHODS: FLEP cells were isolated from embryonal day (ED) 14 BALB/c mice and transplanted into female syngenic BALB/c mice (n = 60). After partial hepatectomy (PH), diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was administered to induce liver fibrosis. Controls received FLEP cells and non-supplemented drinking water, the model group received DEN-spiked water, and the experimental group received FLEP cells and DEN.Mice were killed after 1, 2, and 3 mo, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), hyaluronic acid (HA), and laminin (LN) in serum,and hydroxyproline (Hyp) content in liver were assessed.Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) of liver was tested by immunohistochemistry. Transplanted male mice FLEP cells were identified by immunocytochemistry for sry (sex determination region for Y chromosome) protein.RESULTS: Serum ALT, AST, HA, and LN were markedly reduced by transplanted FLEP cells. Liver Hyp content and α-SMA staining in mice receiving FLEP cells were lower than that of the model group, which was consistent with altered liver pathology. Transplanted cells proliferated and differentiated into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells with 30%-50% repopulation in the liver fibrosis induced by DEN after 3 mo.CONCLUSION: Transplanted FLEP cells proliferate and differentiate into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells with high repopulation capacity in the fiberized liver induced by DEN, which restores liver function and reduces liver fibrosis.

  11. The inhibition of the human cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase gene (CYP7A1) promoter by fibrates in cultured cells is mediated via the liver x receptor α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α heterodimer

    OpenAIRE

    Gbaguidi, G. Franck; Agellon, Luis B.

    2004-01-01

    In previous work, we showed that the binding of the liver x receptor α:peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (LXRα:PPARα) heterodimer to the murine Cyp7a1 gene promoter antagonizes the stimulatory effect of their respective ligands. In this study, we determined if LXRα:PPARα can also regulate human CYP7A1 gene promoter activity. Co-expression of LXRα and PPARα in McArdle RH7777 hepatoma cells decreased the activity of the human CYP7A1 gene promoter in response to fibrates and 25-hydrox...

  12. Effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell adjuvant therapy on liver function and fibrosis indicators as well as the degree of inflammation in patients with hepatitis B cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gui-Jin Luo; Ping-Guang Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell adjuvant therapy on liver function and fibrosis indicators as well as the degree of inflammation in patients with hepatitis B cirrhosis.Methods:A total of 80 cases with hepatitis B cirrhosis in our hospital from August 2012 to November 2014 were included for study. According to different treatment methods, all included patients were divided into observation group and control group by half. Control group received conventional treatment, observation group received human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell adjuvant therapy, and then differences in the levels of liver function indicators, liver fibrosis indicators, inflammation-related indicators and illness-related indicators were compared between two groups.Results:Serum ALB, GLB and A/G values of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group, andα2-M, TB, APO-A1 and GGT values were lower than those of control group (P<0.05); serum HA, LN, CIV, PⅢNP and PLD values of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group (P<0.05); serum TGF-β1, PCT, WBC and SIL-2R levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group (P<0.05); serum FT3 and ADP values of observation group after treatment were higher than those of control group, and NO, EGF, ADM and IR values were lower than those of control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell adjuvant therapy for patients with hepatitis B cirrhosis can optimize liver function and inhibit disease progression, and it has active clinical significance.

  13. Characterization of hepatic progenitors from human fetal liver using CD34 as a hepatic progenitor marker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parveen Nyamath; Ayesha AM; Aejaz Habeeb; Sanjeev Khosla; Aleem A Khan; CM Habibullah

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To enrich putative hepatic progenitors from the developing human fetal liver using CD34 as a marker.METHODS: Aborted fetuses of 13-20 wk were used for the isolation of liver cells. The cells were labeled with anti CD34; a marker used for isolating progenitor population and the cells were sorted using magnetic cell sorting. The positive fractions of cells were assessed for specific hepatic markers. Further, these cells were cultured in vitro for long term investigation.RESULTS: Flow cytometric and immunocytochemical analysis for alphafetoprotein (AFP) showed that the majority of the enriched CD34 positive cells were positive for AFP. Furthermore, these enriched cells proliferated in the long term and maintained hepatic characteristics in in vitro culture.CONCLUSION: The study shows that aborted human fetal liver is a potential source for isolation of hepatic progenitors for clinical applications. The study also demonstrates that CD34 can be a good marker for the enrichment of progenitor populations.

  14. HIBADH Plays an Important Role in the Course of Liver Cell Necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the biological function of human 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH). Methods Human 3-hydroxyisobutyrate dehydrogenase (HIBADH, 3-hydroxy-2-methyl propanoate: NAD+oxidoreductase) recombinant protein was expressed inE. coli BL21,and puriifed by Ni+ column. The special antisera was obtained from rabbits immunized by this purified antigen. On the distribution of HIBADH, it was found that HIBADH over-expressed in the injured liver cells when serious hepatitis occurred. The phenomenon was conifrmed in the animal models of SD rats with acute liver cell injury induced by CCl4, but this phenomenon did not exist in the models induced by endotoxin combined with galactosamine. Further more, HIBADH’s overexpression in liver cells will induce cell necrosis through the pathway of oxidative stress. Results When the liver cells injured by drug or other chemical materials, HIBADH will be compensationally over-expressed for the deifciency of energy, so liver cells can make enough ATP through brand-chain amino acid catabolism. However, the overexpression of HIBADH will be harmful for liver cells through the product of much more active oxygens which will induce the cell necrosis. Conclusions HIBADH over-expression is a signal of the liver cell metabolism injury, and it can aggravate the liver cell injury through oxidative stress.

  15. Extracellular Matrix Molecular Remodeling in Human Liver Fibrosis Evolution.

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    Andrea Baiocchini

    Full Text Available Chronic liver damage leads to pathological accumulation of ECM proteins (liver fibrosis. Comprehensive characterization of the human ECM molecular composition is essential for gaining insights into the mechanisms of liver disease. To date, studies of ECM remodeling in human liver diseases have been hampered by the unavailability of purified ECM. Here, we developed a decellularization method to purify ECM scaffolds from human liver tissues. Histological and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that the ECM scaffolds, devoid of plasma and cellular components, preserved the three-dimensional ECM structure and zonal distribution of ECM components. This method has been then applied on 57 liver biopsies of HCV-infected patients at different stages of liver fibrosis according to METAVIR classification. Label-free nLC-MS/MS proteomics and computation biology were performed to analyze the ECM molecular composition in liver fibrosis progression, thus unveiling protein expression signatures specific for the HCV-related liver fibrotic stages. In particular, the ECM molecular composition of liver fibrosis was found to involve dynamic changes in matrix stiffness, flexibility and density related to the dysregulation of predominant collagen, elastic fibers and minor components with both structural and signaling properties. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular bases underlying ECM remodeling in liver fibrosis and suggests new molecular targets for fibrolytic strategies.

  16. Donor liver natural killer cells alleviate liver allograft acute rejection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Dong Yu; Tian-Zhu Long; Guo-Lin Li; Li-Hong Lv; Hao-Ming Lin; Yong-Heng Huang; Ya-Jin Chen; Yun-Le Wan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver enriched natural killer (NK) cells are of high immune activity. However, the function of donor liver NK cells in allogeneic liver transplantation (LTx) remains unclear. METHODS: Ten Gy of whole body gamma-irradiation (WBI) from a 60Co source at 0.6 Gy/min was used for depleting donor-derived leukocytes, and transfusion of purified liver NK cells isolated from the same type rat as donor (donor type liver NK cells, dtlNKs) through portal vein was performed immediately after grafting the irradiated liver. Post-transplant survival observation on recipients and histopathological detection of liver grafts were adoptive to evaluate the biological impact of donor liver NK cells on recipients' survival in rat LTx. RESULTS: Transfusion of dtlNKs did not shorten the survival time among the recipients of spontaneous tolerance model (BN to LEW rat) after rat LTx, but prolonged the liver graft survival among the recipients depleted of donor-derived leukocytes in the acute rejection model (LEW to BN rat). Compared to the recipients in the groups which received the graft depleted of donor-derived leukocytes, better survival and less damage in the allografts were also found among the recipients in the two different strain combinations of liver allograft due to transfusion of dtlNKs. CONCLUSIONS: Donor liver NK cells alone do not exacerbate liver allograft acute rejection. Conversely, they can alleviate it, and improve the recipients' survival.

  17. Liver grafts contain a unique subset of natural killer cells that are transferred into the recipient after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroso, Viviana; Metselaar, Herold J; Mancham, Shanta; Tilanus, Hugo W; Eissens, Diana; van der Meer, Arnold; van der Laan, Luc J W; Kuipers, Ernst J; Joosten, Irma; Kwekkeboom, Jaap

    2010-07-01

    In contrast to other solid organ transplantations, liver grafts have tolerogenic properties. Animal models indicate that donor leukocytes transferred into the recipient after liver transplantation (LTX) play a relevant role in this tolerogenic phenomenon. However, the specific donor cell types involved in modulation of the recipient alloresponse are not yet defined. We hypothesized that this unique property of liver grafts may be related to their high content of organ-specific natural killer (NK) and CD56(+) T cells. Here, we show that a high proportion of hepatic NK cells that detach from human liver grafts during pretransplant perfusion belong to the CD56bright subset, and are in an activated state (CD69(+)). Liver NK cells contained perforin and granzymes, exerted stronger cytotoxicity against K562 target cells when compared with blood NK cells, and secreted interferon-gamma, but no interleukin-10 or T helper 2 cytokines, upon stimulation with monokines. Interestingly, whereas the CD56bright subset is classically considered as noncytolytic, liver CD56bright NK cells showed a high content of cytolytic molecules and degranulated in response to K562 cells. After LTX, but not after renal transplantation, significant numbers of donor CD56dim NK and CD56(+) T cells were detected in the recipient circulation for approximately 2 weeks. In conclusion, during clinical LTX, activated and highly cytotoxic NK cells of donor origin are transferred into the recipient, and a subset of them mixes with the recirculating recipient NK cell pool. The unique properties of the transferred hepatic NK cells may enable them to play a role in regulating the immunological response of the recipient against the graft and therefore contribute to liver tolerogenicity.

  18. Human Fetal Liver: An In Vitro Model of Erythropoiesis

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    Guillaume Pourcher

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously described the large-scale production of RBCs from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs of diverse sources. Our present efforts are focused to produce RBCs thanks to an unlimited source of stem cells. Human embryonic stem (ES cells or induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS are the natural candidates. Even if the proof of RBCs production from these sources has been done, their amplification ability is to date not sufficient for a transfusion application. In this work, our protocol of RBC production was applied to HSC isolated from fetal liver (FL as an intermediate source between embryonic and adult stem cells. We studied the erythroid potential of FL-derived CD34+ cells. In this in vitro model, maturation that is enucleation reaches a lower level compared to adult sources as observed for embryonic or iP, but, interestingly, they (i displayed a dramatic in vitro expansion (100-fold more when compared to CB CD34+ and (ii 100% cloning efficiency in hematopoietic progenitor assays after 3 days of erythroid induction, as compared to 10–15% cloning efficiency for adult CD34+ cells. This work supports the idea that FL remains a model of study and is not a candidate for ex vivo RBCS production for blood transfusion as a direct source of stem cells but could be helpful to understand and enhance proliferation abilities for primitive cells such as ES cells or iPS.

  19. Signal molecule-mediated hepatic cell communication during liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Yu Zheng; Shun-Yan Weng; Yan Yu

    2009-01-01

    Liver regeneration is a complex and well-orchestrated process, during which hepatic cells are activated to produce large signal molecules in response to liver injury or mass reduction. These signal molecules, in turn, set up the connections and cross-talk among liver cells to promote hepatic recovery. In this review, we endeavor to summarize the network of signal molecules that mediates hepatic cell communication in the regulation of liver regeneration.

  20. Evaluation of cytotoxic compounds in different organs of the sea bream Sarpa salpa as related to phytoplankton consumption: an in vitro study in human liver cell lines HepG2 and WRL68.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellassoued, Khaled; Hamza, Asma; Van Pelt, Jos; Elfeki, Abdelfattah

    2012-09-01

    The present study was aimed to assess the cytotoxic effects of not-yet identified compounds present in organ extracts of Sarpa salpa, collected in autumn, the period with a peak in health problems. In addition, we studied the cytotoxicity of extracts of epiphytes found in the stomach content of S. salpa collected in summer and of epiphytes collected from the sea in the Sfax area at the end of spring. We tested these fractions in two human hepatic cell lines: HepG2 and WRL68. We observed a significant loss of viable cells when HepG2 cells were exposed for 72 h to acetone extracts of livers of S. salpa at a concentration of 2.5 mg/ml protein. Proteins extracted from brain or muscle did not significantly induce cell death at the studied concentrations (≤10 mg/ml). There was a significant loss of viable cells when treated with liver extract of S. salpa dissolved in DMSO. Extracts of epiphytes collected in late spring showed a cytotoxic effect in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, we observed a significantly decreased cell viability of HepG2 at a dilution (1/40) of epiphyte extracts from stomach contents of two fish we had collected. The cytotoxic effect of the observed epiphyte extracts confirms the transfer of toxins originating from toxic dinoflagellates which live in epiphyte on the Posidonia oceanica leaves to fish organs by grazing. Hence, the liver of this fish can cause a threat to human health and consumption should for this reason be dissuaded.

  1. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  2. Pooled human liver preparations, HepaRG, or HepG2 cell lines for metabolism studies of new psychoactive substances? A study using MDMA, MDBD, butylone, MDPPP, MDPV, MDPB, 5-MAPB, and 5-API as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lilian H J; Flockerzi, Veit; Maurer, Hans H; Meyer, Markus R

    2017-09-05

    Metabolism studies play an important role in clinical and forensic toxicology. Because of potential species differences in metabolism, human samples are best suitable for elucidating metabolism. However, in the case of new psychoactive substances (NPS), human samples of controlled studies are not available. Primary human hepatocytes have been described as gold standard for in vitro metabolism studies, but there are some disadvantages such as high costs, limited availability, and variability of metabolic enzymes. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate and compare the metabolism of six methylenedioxy derivatives (MDMA, MDBD, butylone, MDPPP, MDPV, MDPB) and two bioisosteric analogues (5-MAPB, 5-API) using pooled human liver microsomes (pHLM) combined with cytosol (pHLC) or pooled human liver S9 fraction (pS9) all after addition of co-substrates for six phase I and II reactions. In addition, HepaRG and HepG2 cell lines were used. Results of the different in vitro tools were compared to each other, to corresponding published data, and to metabolites identified in human urine after consumption of MDMA, MDPV, or 5-MAPB. Incubations with pHLM plus pHLC showed similar results as pS9. A more cost efficient model for prediction of targets for toxicological screening procedures in human urine should be identified. As expected, the incubations with HepaRG provided better results than those with HepG2 concerning number and signal abundance of the metabolites. Due to easy handling without special equipment, incubations with pooled liver preparations should be the most suitable alternative to find targets for toxicological screening procedures for methylenedioxy derivatives and bioisosteric analogues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Reelin expression in human liver of patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

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    Simone Carotti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reelin is a secreted extracellular glycoprotein that plays a critical role during brain development. Several studies have described Reelin expression in hepatic stellate cells of the human liver. In order to investigate the possible role of Reelin in the process of hepatic fibrogenesis, in this study we investigated Reelin expression in the liver tissue of patients infected with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV. On this basis, Reelin expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry during liver biopsies of 81 patients with HCV-related chronic hepatitis. A Knodell score was used to stage liver fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblast immunohistochemical markers (CRBP-1, alpha-SMA were also evaluated. As further confirmed by co-localization experiments (Reelin +CRBP-1, Reelin protein was expressed by hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts, and a significant positive correlation was found between Reelin expression and the stage of liver fibrosis (P=0.002. Moreover, Reelin correlated with CRBP-1 positive cells (P=0.002, but not with alpha-SMA, suggesting that Reelin should not be regarded as a marker of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts differentiation but rather as a functional protein expressed during some phases of liver fibrosis. Furthermore, Disabled-1 (Dab1, a Reelin adaptor protein, was expressed in cells of ductular reaction suggesting a paracrine role for Reelin with regards these elements. In conclusion, Reelin was expressed by human hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts and the number of these cells increased significantly in the lobule as the liver fibrosis progressed, suggesting a role for Reelin in the activation of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts during liver injury. Reelin may potentially be incorporated into liver injury evaluations in combination with other histological data.

  4. Reelin Expression in Human Liver of Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotti, Simone; Perrone, Giuseppe; Amato, Michelina; Gentilucci, Umberto Vespasiani; Righi, Daniela; Francesconi, Maria; Pellegrini, Claudio; Zalfa, Francesca; Zingariello, Maria; Picardi, Antonio; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Morini, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Reelin is a secreted extracellular glyco-protein that plays a critical role during brain development. Several studies have described Reelin expression in hepatic stellate cells of the human liver. In order to investigate the possible role of Reelin in the process of hepatic fibrogenesis, in this study we investigated Reelin expression in the liver tissue of patients infected with the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). On this basis, Reelin expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry during liver biopsies of 81 patients with HCV-related chronic hepatitis. A Knodell score was used to stage liver fibrosis. Hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblast immunohistochemical markers (CRBP-1, alpha-SMA) were also evaluated. As further confirmed by colocalization experiments (Reelin +CRBP-1), Reelin protein was expressed by hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts, and a significant positive correlation was found between Reelin expression and the stage of liver fibrosis (P=0.002). Moreover, Reelin correlated with CRBP-1 positive cells (P=0.002), but not with alpha-SMA, suggesting that Reelin should not be regarded as a marker of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts differentiation but rather as a functional protein expressed during some phases of liver fibrosis. Furthermore, Disabled-1 (Dab1), a Reelin adaptor protein, was expressed in cells of ductular reaction suggesting a paracrine role for Reelin with regards these elements. In conclusion, Reelin was expressed by human hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts and the number of these cells increased significantly in the lobule as the liver fibrosis progressed, suggesting a role for Reelin in the activation of hepatic stellate cells/myofibroblasts during liver injury. Reelin may potentially be incorporated into liver injury evaluations in combination with other histological data. PMID:28348420

  5. [Clinical effect of ultrasound-guided injection of biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-Fe3O4 in situ implant for magnetic thermal ablation in treatment of nude mice with human liver cancer SMMC-7721 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, B; Zuo, G Q; Zheng, Y Y; He, S; Zuo, D Y

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To prepare the Fe3O4-loaded biodegradable liquid-solid phase inversion poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) in situ implant for ultrasound-guided injection into nude mouse tumor model, and to investigate its clinical effect in thermomagnetic treatment of nude mice with human liver cancer SMMC-7721 cells in an alternating magnetic field. Methods: An in situ implant containing 10% Fe3O4 was prepared, and 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP gel was injected into the subcutaneous tissue of Kunming mice. The degradation of this material was observed for 2 consecutive months, and the changes in body weight were recorded. HE staining and Prussian blue staining were performed for the heart, liver, spleen, lung, and kidney of Kunming mice. Fresh ex vivo bovine liver was taken and cut into cubes with a dimension of 2 cm×2 cm×2 cm and then 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP gel was injected; after phase inversion, the cubes of ex vivo bovine liver were heated for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes, respectively, and then cut open for observing the range of ablation; HE staining was also performed. Micro-CT scan was performed after ultrasound-guided injection of 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA gel into the tumors of the nude mice, and then the nude mice were divided into treatment group and control group. The mice in the treatment group were given thermomagnetic treatment for 3 minutes, and tumor growth was observed daily. Results: The biodegradation of Fe3O4-PLGA-NMP implant showed that the subcutaneously injected material was gradually metabolized at 2 weeks after injection and that the nude mice were in good condition. The bovine liver ablation experiment showed that the range of ablation of 50 μl Fe3O4-PLGA implant reached 1.46 ± 0.11 cm. HE staining showed that part of bovine liver had coagulative necrosis. The phase inversion experiment of Fe3O4-PLGA gel showed quick liquid-solid phase inversion of the material after injection into the tumor, and the process of liquid-solid phase inversion could be

  6. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nurlina Wan Yahya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration.

  7. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration. PMID:24991941

  8. Chimeric mice with a humanized liver as an animal model of troglitazone-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuni, Masakazu; Morita, Mayu; Matsuo, Kentaro; Katoh, Yumiko; Nakajima, Miki; Tateno, Chise; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2012-10-02

    Troglitazone (Tro) is a thiazolidinedione antidiabetic drug that was withdrawn from the market due to its association with idiosyncratic severe liver injury. Tro has never induced liver injury in experimental animals in vivo. It was assumed that the species differences between human and experimental animals in the pharmaco- or toxicokinetics of Tro might be associated with these observations. In this study, we investigated whether a chimeric mouse with a humanized liver that we previously established, whose replacement index with human hepatocytes is up to 92% can reproduce Tro-induced liver injury. When the chimeric mice were orally administered Tro for 14 or 23 days (1000mg/kg/day), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was significantly increased by 2.1- and 3.6-fold, respectively. Co-administration of l-buthionine sulfoximine (10mM in drinking water), an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis, unexpectedly prevented the Tro-dependent increase of ALT, which suggests that the GSH scavenging pathway will not be involved in Tro-induced liver injury. To elucidate the mechanism of the onset of liver injury, hepatic GSH content, the level of oxidative stress markers and phase I and phase II drug metabolizing enzymes were determined. However, these factors were not associated with Tro-induced liver injury. An immune-mediated reaction may be associated with Tro-induced liver toxicity in vivo, because the chimeric mouse is derived from an immunodeficient SCID mouse. In conclusion, we successfully reproduced Tro-induced liver injury using chimeric mice with a humanized liver, which provides a new animal model for studying idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytotoxic, apoptotic, and sensitization properties of ent-kaurane-type diterpenoids from Croton tonkinensis Gagnep on human liver cancer HepG2 and Hep3b cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Minh Quan; Iscache, Anne Laure; Pham, Quoc Long; Gairin, Jean Edouard

    2016-04-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common type of liver cancer, the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. A very poor prognosis and a lack of effective treatments make liver cancer a major public health problem, notably in less developed regions, particularly in eastern Asia. This fully justifies the search of new molecules and therapeutic strategies against HCC. Ent-kaurane diterpenoids are natural compounds displaying a broad spectrum of potential therapeutic effects including anticancer activity. In this study, we analyzed the pharmacological properties of a family of ent-kaurane diterpenoids from Croton tonkinensis Gagnep in human HepG2 and Hep3b cell lines, used as cellular reference models for in vitro evaluation of new molecules active on HCC. A structure-related cytotoxicity was observed against both HCC cell lines, enlighting the role of the 16-en-15-one skeleton of ent-kaurane diterpenoids. Cytotoxicity was closely correlated to apoptosis, evidenced by concentration-dependent subG1 cell accumulation, and increased annexin V expression. In addition, subtoxic concentration of ent-kaurane diterpenoid dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of HCC cells to doxorubicin. All together, our data bring strong support to the potential interest of ent-kaurane diterpenoids, alone or in combination with a cytotoxic agent, in cancer and more precisely against HCC.

  10. Anti-tumor Effect and Potential Mechanism of Arsenic Trioxide on SMMC-7721 Cells of Human Liver Cancer in Vivo and Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Bo

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe the anti-tumor effect of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) on SMMC-7721 cells of patients with liver cancer in vivo and vitro. Methods: Methyl Thiazolyl Tetrazolium (MTT) method, fluorescence microscope, FITC-AnnexinⅤ/PI double-tagging method and colorimetry were used to detect the survival rate, morphological change, apoptosis and Caspase-3 activity change of SMMC-7721 cells in different concentration of As2O3 for 48 h, respectively. As2O3 was injected into the transplanted tumors in nude mice with SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells to observe the growth of tumors. The mice were sacriifced after 12 d, followed by the extirpation and weighing of the tumors. Then Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3 expression were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: As2O3 could obviously inhabit the proliferation of SMMC-7721 cells, with inhibition concentration (IC) being (18.17±2.10) μmol/L. Microscope showed typical morphological change of cell apoptosis and As2O3 treatment group was evidently higher than control group in apoptosis rate of SMMC-772 cells, suggesting that As2O3 could improve SMMC-772 cell activity. Internal injection of As2O3 into transplanted tumors in nude mice with SMMC-7721 hepatocellular lines could remarkably inhabit the growth of tumors with inhabiting rate being 52.37%, and immunohistochemistry also revealed that As2O3 could apparently up-regulate cell apoptosis-related Bax and Caspase-3 expression, and down-regulate Bcl-2 expression. Conclusion: As2O3 can inhabit the growth and in vivo oncogenesis of hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells, and induce SMMC-7721 cell apoptosis.

  11. The human liver-specific proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Caroline; Mardinoglu, Adil; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Edlund, Karolina; Lundberg, Emma; Pontén, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-07-01

    Human liver physiology and the genetic etiology of the liver diseases can potentially be elucidated through the identification of proteins with enriched expression in the liver. Here, we combined data from RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and antibody-based immunohistochemistry across all major human tissues to explore the human liver proteome with enriched expression, as well as the cell type-enriched expression in hepatocyte and bile duct cells. We identified in total 477 protein-coding genes with elevated expression in the liver: 179 genes have higher expression as compared to all the other analyzed tissues; 164 genes have elevated transcript levels in the liver shared with at least one other tissue type; and an additional 134 genes have a mild level of increased expression in the liver. We identified the precise localization of these proteins through antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of these proteins through immunofluorescent-based profiling. We also identified the biological processes and metabolic functions associated with these proteins, investigated their contribution in the occurrence of liver diseases, and identified potential targets for their treatment. Our study demonstrates the use of RNA-Seq and antibody-based immunohistochemistry for characterizing the human liver proteome, as well as the use of tissue-specific proteins in identification of novel drug targets and discovery of biomarkers.-Kampf, C., Mardinoglu, A., Fagerberg, L., Hallström, B. M., Edlund, K., Lundberg, E., Pontén, F., Nielsen, J., Uhlen, M. The human liver-specific proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling. © FASEB.

  12. Monoterpene indole alkaloid hydrazone derivatives with apoptosis inducing activity in human HCT116 colon and HepG2 liver carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Angela; Borralho, Pedro M; Gomes, Sofia E; Mulhovo, Silva; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2015-09-01

    The derivatization of dregamine (1) and tabernaemontanine (2), two epimeric monoterpene indole alkaloids isolated from the methanol extract of the roots of Tabernaemontana elegans, with several hydrazines and hydroxylamine gave rise to ten new derivatives (3-12). Their structures were assigned by spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR experiments. The compounds were tested for their ability to induce apoptosis in HCT116 colon and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Firstly, the cytotoxicity of all compounds (1-12) was evaluated in both cell lines by the MTS assay. The most active compounds (6, 9, 10) along with 1 and 2 were further investigated for their apoptosis induction capability by Guava ViaCount flow cytometry assays, nuclear morphology evaluation by Hoechst staining, and caspase-3/7 activity assays. Compounds 9 and 10 showed promising apoptosis induction profile, displaying higher activities than 5-fluorouracil, the mainstay in colon cancer treatment.

  13. Human liver microsomal metabolism of (+)-discodermolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yun; Schreiber, Emanuel M; Day, Billy W

    2009-10-01

    The polyketide natural product (+)-discodermolide is a potent microtubule stabilizer that has generated considerable interest in its synthetic, medicinal, and biological chemistry. It progressed to early clinical oncology trials, where it showed some efficacy in terms of disease stabilization but also some indications of causing pneumotoxicity. Remarkably, there are no reports of its metabolism. Here, we examined its fate in mixed human liver microsomes. Due to limited availability of the agent, we chose a nanoflow liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analytical approach employing quadrupolar ion trap and quadrupole-quadrupole-time-of-flight instruments for these studies. (+)-Discodermolide was rapidly converted to eight metabolites, with the left-side lactone (net oxidation) and the right-side diene (epoxidation followed by hydrolysis, along with an oxygen insertion product) being the most metabolically labile sites. Other sites of metabolism were the allylic and pendant methyl moieties in the C12-C14 region of the molecule. The results provide information on the metabolic soft spots of the molecule and can be used in further medicinal chemistry efforts to optimize discodermolide analogues.

  14. A new human 3D-liver model unravels the role of galectins in liver infection by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora B Petropolis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of human parasitic diseases depend on the availability of appropriate in vivo animal models and ex vivo experimental systems, and are particularly difficult for pathogens whose exclusive natural hosts are humans, such as Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for amoebiasis. This common infectious human disease affects the intestine and liver. In the liver sinusoids E. histolytica crosses the endothelium and penetrates into the parenchyma, with the concomitant initiation of inflammatory foci and subsequent abscess formation. Studying factors responsible for human liver infection is hampered by the complexity of the hepatic environment and by the restrictions inherent to the use of human samples. Therefore, we built a human 3D-liver in vitro model composed of cultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes in a 3D collagen-I matrix sandwich. We determined the presence of important hepatic markers and demonstrated that the cell layers function as a biological barrier. E. histolytica invasion was assessed using wild-type strains and amoebae with altered virulence or different adhesive properties. We showed for the first time the dependence of endothelium crossing upon amoebic Gal/GalNAc lectin. The 3D-liver model enabled the molecular analysis of human cell responses, suggesting for the first time a crucial role of human galectins in parasite adhesion to the endothelial cells, which was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of galectin-1. Levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including galectin-1 and -3, were highly increased upon contact of E. histolytica with the 3D-liver model. The presence of galectin-1 and -3 in the extracellular medium stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release, suggesting a further role for human galectins in the onset of the hepatic inflammatory response. These new findings are relevant for a better understanding of human liver infection by E. histolytica.

  15. A new human 3D-liver model unravels the role of galectins in liver infection by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropolis, Debora B; Faust, Daniela M; Deep Jhingan, Gagan; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-09-01

    Investigations of human parasitic diseases depend on the availability of appropriate in vivo animal models and ex vivo experimental systems, and are particularly difficult for pathogens whose exclusive natural hosts are humans, such as Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan parasite responsible for amoebiasis. This common infectious human disease affects the intestine and liver. In the liver sinusoids E. histolytica crosses the endothelium and penetrates into the parenchyma, with the concomitant initiation of inflammatory foci and subsequent abscess formation. Studying factors responsible for human liver infection is hampered by the complexity of the hepatic environment and by the restrictions inherent to the use of human samples. Therefore, we built a human 3D-liver in vitro model composed of cultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes in a 3D collagen-I matrix sandwich. We determined the presence of important hepatic markers and demonstrated that the cell layers function as a biological barrier. E. histolytica invasion was assessed using wild-type strains and amoebae with altered virulence or different adhesive properties. We showed for the first time the dependence of endothelium crossing upon amoebic Gal/GalNAc lectin. The 3D-liver model enabled the molecular analysis of human cell responses, suggesting for the first time a crucial role of human galectins in parasite adhesion to the endothelial cells, which was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of galectin-1. Levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including galectin-1 and -3, were highly increased upon contact of E. histolytica with the 3D-liver model. The presence of galectin-1 and -3 in the extracellular medium stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release, suggesting a further role for human galectins in the onset of the hepatic inflammatory response. These new findings are relevant for a better understanding of human liver infection by E. histolytica.

  16. Role of gamma-delta T cells in liver inflammation and fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda; Hammerich; Frank; Tacke

    2014-01-01

    Conventional adaptive T cell responses contribute to liver inflammation and fibrogenesis,especially in chronic viral infections and autoimmune hepatitis.However,the role of unconventional gamma-delta(γδ)T cells in liver diseases is less clear.In the past two decades,accumulating evidence revealed thatγδT cell numbers remarkably increase in the liver upon various inflammatory conditions in mice and humans.More recent studies demonstrated that the functional effect ofγδT cells on liver disease progression depends on the subsets involved,which can be identified by the expression of distinct T cell receptor chains and of specific cytokines.Fascinatingly,γδT cells may have protective as well as pathogenic functions in liver diseases.Interferonγ-producingγδT cells,for example,induce apoptosis in hepatocytes but also in hepatic tumor cells;while interleukin-17-expressingγδT cells can downregulate pathogenic effector functions of other immune cells and can promote apoptosis of fibrogenic stellate cells.However,the results obtained in human liver disease as well as murine models are not fully conclusive at present,and the effects ofγδT cells on the outcome of liver disease might vary dependent on etiology and stage of disease.Further definitions of theγδT cell subsets in-volved in acute and chronic liver inflammation,as well as their effector cytokines might uncover whether interference withγδT cells could be a useful target for the treatment of liver disease.

  17. Lineage tracing reveals conversion of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells into hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhaoli; Chen, Keyan; Shao, Yong; Gao, Lihua; Wang, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Jin, Yang; Hu, Xianwen; Wang, Youliang

    2016-09-01

    Although liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) have long been known to contribute to liver regeneration following injury, the exact role of these cells in liver regeneration remains poorly understood. In this work, we performed lineage tracing of LSECs in mice carrying Tie2-Cre or VE-cadherin-Cre constructs to facilitate fate-mapping of LSECs in liver regeneration. Some YFP-positive LSECs were observed to convert into hepatocytes following a two-thirds partial hepatectomy (PH). Furthermore, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) could be triggered to convert into cells that closely resembled hepatocytes when cultured with serum from mice that underwent an extended PH. These findings suggest that mature non-hepatocyte LSECs play an essential role in mammalian liver regeneration by converting to hepatocytes. The conversion of LSECs to hepatocyte-like (iHep) cells may provide a new approach to tissue engineering.

  18. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation.

  19. Activated hepatic stellate cells in liver cirrhosis. A morphologic and morphometrical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Guido; Franchitto, Antonio; Morini, Sergio; Corradini, Stefano Ginanni; Merli, Manuela; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells have been considered the most important cell-type involved in hepatic fibrogenesis. Proliferation and differentiation of hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblast-like cells has been related to the development of liver fibrosis. The alpha-actin expressed by hepatic stellate cells was considered a marker of their activation to myofibroblast-like cell. The aim of this study is to evaluate the changes in morphology, distribution, percentage and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression of hepatic stellate cells in normal and cirrhotic livers, and to correlate activated hepatic stellate cells with the progression of fibrosis. Human liver biopsies (n=121) were divided in five groups: 1) normal livers (controls); 2) cirrhosis post-HCV hepatitis; 3) cirrhosis post-HBV hepatitis; 4) non viral related cirrhosis; 5) recurrent HCV hepatitis after orthotopic liver transplantation. Samples immunostained with anti alpha-smooth muscle actin antibody by immunoperoxidase method were semi-quantitatively evaluated. Liver fibrosis was quantified by computer image analysis on specimens stained with Masson's trichrome. In normal adult livers stellate cells were very rarely stained for alpha-smooth muscle actin. In cirrhotic livers, a strongly enhanced percentage of stellate cells expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin was detected in cirrhotic fragments with respect to the control group, with a significant correlation between alpha-smooth muscle actin positive stellate cells and the volume fraction of fibrosis. Moreover, liver biopsies of recurrent hepatitis revealed an increased number of activated stellate cells compared to normal livers, and intermediate volume fraction of fibrosis. These results confirmed that a direct correlation existed between activated stellate cells and the progression of fibrosis. Alpha-smooth muscle actin confirmed to be a reliable marker of hepatic stellate cells activation also in precocious stages of the disease.

  20. 肝部分切除术促人结肠癌Caco-2细胞肝转移及相关机制%Partial hepatectomy promotes Caco-2 human colon cancer cells liver metastases and corresponding mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任春振; 杨贺庆; 刘艳良

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of partial hepatectomy to the liver metastases of Caco-2 human coloncancer cells and discover its mechanism. Methods In order to constructing the colorectal liver metastases nude mice model, the Caco-2 human colon cells were injected into nude mice through portal vein trunk to imitate the liver metastases pathway of colon cancer cells. Meanwhile, the partial hepatectomy (PH ) was performed, and the Sham operation was set to control. Then the siRNA-Snail was imported into Caco-2 cells to interfere the expression of Snail mRNA; and area of the liver metastases, the expression of Snail and MMP-2 was detected. Results The metastases area, the expression of snail and MMP-2 of PH group was significantly higher than Sham group and the siRNA-Snail-PH group. Conclusion PH may promote the liver metastases of colorectal cancer, this closely correlates with up-regulating Snail expression and increasing its nucleus displacement and thus up-regulating MMP-2 expression.%目的 研究肝部分切除术对人结肠癌Caco-2细胞肝转移的影响及其相关机制.方法 应用人结肠癌Caco-2细胞系,构建结肠癌肝转移裸小鼠模型,同时行肝部分切除术(PH),假手术(Sham)设为对照,并对Caco-2细胞行siRNA-Snail干扰.观察肝转移灶面积,肿瘤组织Snail和基质金属蛋白酶2蛋白(MMP-2)表达.结果 PH组转移灶面积、Snail蛋白和MMP-2表达均显著大于Sham组和siRNA-Snail-PH组.结论 PH可促进结肠癌发生肝转移,该作用与促进Snail表达及上调Snail调控的MMP-2表达相关.

  1. A Distinct Subpopulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Muse Cells, Directly Commit to the Replacement of Liver Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, H; Kushida, Y; Nojima, M; Kuroda, Y; Wakao, S; Ishida, K; Endo, F; Kume, K; Takahara, T; Nitta, H; Tsuda, H; Dezawa, M; Nishizuka, S S

    2016-02-01

    Genotyping graft livers by short tandem repeats after human living-donor liver transplantation (n = 20) revealed the presence of recipient or chimeric genotype cases in hepatocytes (6 of 17, 35.3%), sinusoidal cells (18 of 18, 100%), cholangiocytes (15 of 17, 88.2%) and cells in the periportal areas (7 of 8, 87.5%), suggesting extrahepatic cell involvement in liver regeneration. Regarding extrahepatic origin, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been suggested to contribute to liver regeneration but compose a heterogeneous population. We focused on a more specific subpopulation (1-2% of BM-MSCs), called multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, for their ability to differentiate into liver-lineage cells and repair tissue. We generated a physical partial hepatectomy model in immunodeficient mice and injected green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled human BM-MSC Muse cells intravenously (n = 20). Immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization and species-specific polymerase chain reaction revealed that they integrated into regenerating areas and expressed liver progenitor markers during the early phase and then differentiated spontaneously into major liver components, including hepatocytes (≈74.3% of GFP-positive integrated Muse cells), cholangiocytes (≈17.7%), sinusoidal endothelial cells (≈2.0%), and Kupffer cells (≈6.0%). In contrast, the remaining cells in the BM-MSCs were not detected in the liver for up to 4 weeks. These results suggest that Muse cells are the predominant population of BM-MSCs that are capable of replacing major liver components during liver regeneration.

  2. Role of Th17 cells in common liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Linlin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been found that T helper type 17 (Th17 cells are a new subset of CD4+ Th cells. Th17 cells play an important role in the onset and development of many liver diseases and have become the research focus in immunology. This paper summarizes the studies on the relationship between Th17 cells and various liver diseases in order to provide a new idea for the study and treatment of liver diseases.

  3. Negundoside, an irridiod glycoside from leaves of Vitex negundo, protects human liver cells against calcium-mediated toxicity induced by carbon tetrachloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheikh A Tasduq; Peerzada J Kaiser; Bishan D Gupta; Vijay K Gupta; Rakesh K Johri

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of 2'-p-hydroxy benzoylmussaenosidic acid [negundoside (NG), against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced toxicity in HUH-7 cells.METHODS: CCl4 is a well characterized hepatotoxin, and inducer of cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1)-mediated oxidative stress. In addition, lipid peroxidation and accumulation of intracellular calcium are important steps in the pathway involved in CCl4 toxicity. Liver cells (HUH-7) were treated with CCl4, and the mechanism of the cytoprotective effect of NG was assessed. Silymarin, a known hepatoprotective drug, was used as control.RESULTS: NG protected HUH-7 cells against CCl4 toxicity and loss of viability without modulating CYP2E1 activity. Prevention of CCl4, toxicity was associated with a reduction in oxidative damage as reflected by decreased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a decrease in lipid peroxidation and accumulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels and maintenance of intracellular glutathione homeostasis. Decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), induction of caspases mediated DNA fragmentation and cell cycle arrest, as a result of CCl4 treatment, were also blocked by NG. The protection afforded by NG seemed to be mediated by activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis and inhibition of phospholipases (cPLA2).CONCLUSION: NG exerts a protective effect on CYP2El-dependent CCl4 toxicity via inhibition of lipid peroxidation, followed by an improved intracellular calcium homeostasis and inhibition of Ca2+-dependent proteases.

  4. Isolation and characterization of liver epithelial progenitor cells from normal adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifang Jin; Shaohui Ji; Xianghui Tang; Xiangyu Guo; Yongqing Lu; Hongwei Chen; Hongkui Deng; Qi Zhou; Weizhi Ji

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Based on their ability to proliferate and the capacity to differentiate into specific cell types, hepatic progenitor/stem cells (HPCs) from adult human liver may have potential therapeutic effects on end-stage liver failure. In addition, adult HPCs have a reduced risk of teratoma formation and are not subject to the same ethical issues as fetal HPCs or embryonic stem cells [1]. The HPCs from rhesus monkeys are relevant because they may serve as a valuable preclinical model for assessment of cell therapy in humans. To date, there are no reports of HPCs or liver epithelial progenitor cells (LEPCs) isolated from normal adult rhesus monkey although a few studies in other species were reported [2, 3]. We report here for the first time the successful isolation of rhesus monkey LEPCs (mLEPCs) from normal adult livers (n=12).

  5. Enantioselective Metabolism of Flufiprole in Rat and Human Liver Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chunmian; Miao, Yelong; Qian, Mingrong; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Hu

    2016-03-23

    The enantioselective metabolism of flufiprole in rat and human liver microsomes in vitro was investigated in this study. The separation and determination were performed using a liquid chromatography system equipped with a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer and a Lux Cellulose-2 chiral column. The enantioselective metabolism of rac-flufiprole was dramatically different in rat and human liver microsomes in the presence of the β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate regenerating system. The half-lives (t1/2) of flufiprole in rat and human liver microsomes were 7.22 and 21.00 min, respectively, for R-(+)-flufiprole, whereas the values were 11.75 and 17.75 min, respectively, for S-(-)-flufiprole. In addition, the Vmax of R-(+)-flufiprole was about 3-fold that of S-(-)-flufiprole in rat liver microsomes, whereas its value in the case of S-(-)-flufiprole was about 2-fold that of R-(+)-flufiprole in human liver microsomes. The CLint of rac-flufiprole also showed opposite enantioselectivy in rat and human liver microsomes. The different compositions and contents of metabolizing enzyme in the two liver microsomes might be the reasons for the difference in the metabolic behavior of the two enantiomers.

  6. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. F. Chang; J. Y. Fan; F. C. Zhang; J. Ma; C. S. Xu

    2010-12-01

    Eight liver cell types were isolated using the methods of Percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic beads to explore effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression profiles of genes associated with metabolism of histidine and its catabolites for the above-mentioned eight liver cell types, and bioinformatic and systems biology approaches were employed to analyse the relationship between above genes and rat liver regeneration. The results showed that the urocanic acid (UA) was degraded from histidine in Kupffer cells, acts on Kupffer cells itself and dendritic cells to generate immune suppression by autocrine and paracrine modes. Hepatocytes, biliary epithelia cells, oval cells and dendritic cells can convert histidine to histamine, which can promote sinusoidal endothelial cells proliferation by GsM pathway, and promote the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary epithelia cells by GqM pathway.

  7. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C F; Fan, J Y; Zhang, F C; Ma, J; Xu, C S

    2010-12-01

    Eight liver cell types were isolated using the methods of Percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic beads to explore effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression profiles of genes associated with metabolism of histidine and its catabolites for the above-mentioned eight liver cell types, and bioinformatic and systems biology approaches were employed to analyse the relationship between above genes and rat liver regeneration. The results showed that the urocanic acid (UA) was degraded from histidine in Kupffer cells, acts on Kupffer cells itself and dendritic cells to generate immune suppression by autocrine and paracrine modes. Hepatocytes, biliary epithelia cells, oval cells and dendritic cells can convert histidine to histamine, which can promote sinusoidal endothelial cells proliferation by GsM pathway, and promote the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary epithelia cells by GqM pathway.

  8. Con A affinity glycoproteomics of normal human liver tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN QiangLing; LU HaoJie; LIU YinKun; LU WenJing; CHENG Gang; ZHOU HaiJun; ZHOU XinWen; WEI LiMing; DAI Zhi; GUO Kun

    2007-01-01

    In order to establish the novel high throughput, high efficiency and Iow cost technological platform for the research of N-glycoproteomics, to resolve the significance of characteristic expression profile of glycoprotein and to find the proteins with biological functional importance, the glycoproteins with high-mannose core and the two antennary types were purified and enriched by the Con A affinity chromatography. Con A affinity protein expression profiles of normal human liver tissue were generated by using SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by fast fluorescence staining based on multiplexed proteomics (MP) technology. 301 visible protein spots on the gel were detected and 85 of glycoproteins were further successfully identified via peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) by a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS/MS) and annotated to IPI databases. Identified glycoproteins definitely take part in the regulation of cell cycle and metabolic processes. The glycosylation sites were predicted with NetNGlyc 1.0 and NetOGlyc 3.1 software, meanwhile they were classified according to the geneontology methods. The construction of Con A affinity glycoprotein database of normal human liver tissue would contribute to the subsequent research.

  9. Con A affinity glycoproteomics of normal human liver tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In order to establish the novel high throughput, high efficiency and low cost technological platform for the research of N-glycoproteomics, to resolve the significance of characteristic expression profile of glycoprotein and to find the proteins with biological functional importance, the glycoproteins with high-mannose core and the two antennary types were purified and enriched by the Con A affinity chromatography. Con A affinity protein expression profiles of normal human liver tissue were gener- ated by using SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by fast fluorescence stain- ing based on multiplexed proteomics (MP) technology. 301 visible protein spots on the gel were de- tected and 85 of glycoproteins were further successfully identified via peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) by a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF- MS/MS) and annotated to IPI databases. Identified glycoproteins definitely take part in the regulation of cell cycle and metabolic processes. The glycosylation sites were predicted with NetNGlyc 1.0 and NetOGlyc 3.1 software, meanwhile they were classified according to the geneontology methods. The construction of Con A affinity glycoprotein database of normal human liver tissue would contribute to the subsequent research.

  10. Label-free detection of liver cancer cells by aptamer-based microcantilever biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejuan; Pan, Yangang; Liu, Huiqing; Bai, Xiaojing; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Bailin

    2016-05-15

    Liver cancer is one of the most common and highly malignant cancers in the world. There are no effective therapeutic options if an early liver cancer diagnosis is not achieved. In this work, detection of HepG2 cells by label-free microcantilever array aptasensor was developed. The sensing microcantilevers were functionalized by HepG2 cells-specific aptamers. Meanwhile, to eliminate the interferences induced by the environment, the reference microcantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol self-assembled monolayers. The aptasensor exhibits high specificity over not only human liver normal cells, but also other cancer cells of breast, bladder, and cervix tumors. The linear relation ranges from 1×10(3) to 1×10(5)cells/mL, with a detection limit of 300 cells/mL (S/N=3). Our work provides a simple method for detection of liver cancer cells with advantages in terms of simplicity and stability.

  11. Establishment and characterization of feeder-cell-dependent bovine fetal liver cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment and initial characterization of bovine fetal liver cell lines is described. Bovine fetal hepatocytes were cultured from the liver of a 34-day bovine fetus by physical disruption of the liver tissue. Released liver cells and clumps of cells were plated on STO feeder layers and wer...

  12. Obesity accelerates epigenetic aging of human liver

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, S; Erhart, W.; Brosch, M; Ammerpohl, O.; von Schonfels, W.; Ahrens, M.; Heits, N.; Bell, J.T.; Tsai, P.-C.; Spector, T D; Deloukas, P.; Siebert, R.; Sipos, B.; Becker, T.; Rocken, C.

    2014-01-01

    Because obese people are at an increased risk of many age-related diseases, it is a plausible hypothesis that obesity increases the biological age of some tissues and cell types. However, it has been difficult to detect such an accelerated aging effect because it is unclear how to measure tissue age. Here we use a recently developed biomarker of aging (known as “epigenetic clock”) to study the relationship between epigenetic age and obesity in several human tissues. We report an unexpectedly ...

  13. HEMOGLOBIN PRODUCTION FACTORS IN THE HUMAN LIVER : ANEMIAS, HYPOPROTEINEMIA, CIRRHOSIS, PIGMENT ABNORMALITIES, AND PREGANCY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, G H; Robscheit-Robbins, F S

    1942-09-01

    Human liver tissue has been assayed to determine the amount of hemoglobin production factors in normal and abnormal states. Standardized dogs made anemic by blood removal have been used in this biological assay. Normal animal liver as control is rated as 100 per cent. Normal human liver tissue as compared with the normal animal control contains more of these hemoglobin production factors-a biological assay ratio of 120 to 160 per cent. Infections, acute and chronic, do not appear to modify these values, the concentration of hemoglobin-producing factors falling within the normal range. Pernicious anemia and aplastic anemia both show large liver stores of hemoglobin-producing factors-a biological assay ratio of 200 to 240 per cent. Therapy in pernicious anemia reduces these liver stores as new red cells are formed. Secondary anemia presents a low normal or subnormal liver store of hemoglobin-producing factors-an assay of 60 to 130 per cent. Hemochromatosis, erythroblastic anemia, and hemolytic icterus in spite of large iron deposits in the liver usually show a biological assay which is normal or close to normal. Polycythemia shows low reserve stores of hemoglobin-producing factors. Leukemias present a wide range of values discussed above. Hypoproteinemia almost always is associated with low reserve stores of hemoglobin-producing factors in the liver-biological assays of 60 to 80 per cent. Hypoproteinemia means a depletion of body protein reserve stores including the labile protein liver reserves-a strong indication that the prehemoglobin material (or globin) is related to these liver stores. Pregnancy, eclampsia, and lactation all may present subnormal liver stores of hemoglobin-producing factors. Exhaustion of protein stores lowers the barrier to infection and renders the liver very susceptible to many toxic substances. It should not be difficult to correct hypoproteinemia under these conditions and thus relieve the patient of a real hazard.

  14. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemolato, S.; Van Eyken, P.; Cabras, T.; Cau, F.; Fanari, M.U.; Locci, A.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Messana, I.; Castagnola, M.; Faa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1). At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4. PMID:22073372

  15. Expression pattern of thymosin beta 4 in the adult human liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nemolato

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a member of beta-thymosins, a family of small peptides involved in polymerization of G-actin, and in many critical biological processes including apoptosis, cell migration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. Previous studies in the newborn liver did not reveal any significant reactivity for Tβ4 during the intrauterine life. The aim of the present study was to investigate by immunohistochemistry Tβ4 expression in the adult normal liver. Thirty-five human liver samples, including 11 needle liver biopsies and 24 liver specimens obtained at autopsy, in which no pathological change was detected at the histological examination, were immunostained utilizing an anti-Tβ4 commercial antibody. Tβ4 was detected in the hepatocytes of all adult normal livers examined. A zonation of Tβ4 expression was evident in the vast majority of cases. Immunostaining was preferentially detected in zone 3, while a minor degree of reactivity was detected in periportal hepatocytes (zone 1. At higher power, Tβ4-reactive granules appeared mainly localized at the biliary pole of hepatocytes. In cases with a strong immunostaining, even perinuclear areas and the sinusoidal pole of hepatocytes appeared interested by immunoreactivity for Tβ4. The current work first evidences a strong diffuse expression of Tβ4 in the adult human liver, and adds hepatocytes to the list of human cells able to synthesize large amounts of Tβ4 in adulthood. Moreover, Tβ4 should be added to the liver proteins characterized by a zonate expression pattern, in a descending gradient from the terminal vein to the periportal areas of the liver acinus. Identifying the intimate role played by this peptide intracellularly and extracellularly, in physiology and in different liver diseases, is a major challenge for future research focusing on Tβ4.

  16. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  17. Role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Kolios; Vassilis Valatas; Elias Kouroumalis

    2006-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages have long been considered as mostly scavenger cells responsible for removing particulate material from the portal circulation. However, evidence derived mostly from animal models, indicates that Kupffer cells may be implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases including viral hepatitis, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, intrahepatic cholostasis, activation or rejection of the liver during liver transplantation and liver fibrosis. There is accumulating evidence, reviewed in this paper, suggesting that Kupffer cells may act both as effector cells in the destruction of hepatocytes by producing harmful soluble mediators as well as antigen presenting cells during viral infections of the liver. Moreover they may represent a significant source of chemoattractant molecules for cytotoxic CD8 and regulatory T cells. Their role in fibrosis is well established as they are one of the main sources of TGFβ1 production, which leads to the transformation of stellate cells into myofibroblasts. Whether all these variable functions in the liver are mediated by different Kupffer cell subpopulations remains to be evaluated. In this review we propose a model that demonstrates the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  18. Bimodal role of Kupffer cells during colorectal cancer liver metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Shu Wen; Ager, Eleanor I; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are resident liver macrophages that play a crucial role in liver homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Evidence suggests KCs have both stimulatory and inhibitory functions during tumor development but the extent of these functions remains to be defined. Using KC depletion studies in an orthotopic murine model of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases we demonstrated the bimodal role of KCs in determining tumor growth. KC depletion with gadolinium chloride...

  19. The inhibition of the human cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene (CYP7A1) promoter by fibrates in cultured cells is mediated via the liver x receptor alpha and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha heterodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbaguidi, G Franck; Agellon, Luis B

    2004-01-01

    In previous work, we showed that the binding of the liver x receptor alpha:peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (LXRalpha:PPARalpha) heterodimer to the murine Cyp7a1 gene promoter antagonizes the stimulatory effect of their respective ligands. In this study, we determined if LXRalpha:PPARalpha can also regulate human CYP7A1 gene promoter activity. Co-expression of LXRalpha and PPARalpha in McArdle RH7777 hepatoma cells decreased the activity of the human CYP7A1 gene promoter in response to fibrates and 25-hydroxycholesterol. In vitro, the human CYP7A1 Site I bound LXRalpha:PPARalpha, although with substantially less affinity compared with the murine Cyp7a1 Site I. The binding of LXRalpha:PPARalpha to human CYP7A1 Site I was increased in the presence of either LXRalpha or PPARalpha ligands. In HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, fibrates and 25-hydroxycholesterol inhibited the expression of the endogenous CYP7A1 gene as well as the human CYP7A1 gene promoter when co-transfected with plasmids encoding LXRalpha and PPARalpha. However, a derivative of the human CYP7A1 gene promoter that contains a mutant form of Site I that does not bind LXRalpha:PPARalpha was not inhibited by WY 14,643 or 25-hydroxycholesterol in both McArdle RH7777 and HepG2 cells. The ligand-dependent recruitment of LXRalpha:PPARalpha heterodimer onto the human CYP7A1 Site I can explain the inhibition of the human CYP7A1 gene promoter in response to fibrates and 25-hydroxycholesterol.

  20. Advances in human placenta-derived stem cells for liver regeneration%胎盘源性干细胞在肝脏疾病中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建; 朱争艳; 杜智

    2013-01-01

    人类胎盘源性干细胞(hPDSCs)是干细胞的混合群.再生医学已将其用于某些功能衰竭和损伤器官的细胞再生、抗细胞凋亡、抗炎,抗肿瘤和细胞功能恢复研究.目前已有许多实验研究证明:胎盘间充质干细胞(PDMSCs)可以在体外分化为肝细胞样细胞,并于体内外促进干细胞增生和抗肝细胞凋亡,在动物肝损伤模型抑制肝纤维化.本文就胎盘干细胞的来源、分类、生物学特性以及胎盘干细胞在肝脏疾病中的治疗研究做一综述,以便为进一步探讨胎盘源性干细胞在肝脏疾病治疗中的应用提供新的思路.%Human placenta-derived stem cells (hPD-SCs) are a mixed group of stem cells.Stem cell medicine has applications for organ damage or failure through regenerative,anti-apoptotic,anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties in addition to cell function recovery.Presently,human placenta mesenchymal stem cells (hPMSCs) have similar characteristics to the differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells by promoting hepatocyte regeneration,anti-hepatocyte apoptosis and anti-liver fibrosis,in vitro or in animal models.To further our investigation,a summary of the origin,sorting and biological properties of hPDSCs along with a narration of hPDSCs for liver disease therapy was written.This leads to a discussion for new ideas to further explore cell treatment for liver disease.

  1. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human liver arginase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Y.; Takiguchi, M.; Amaya, Y.; Kawamoto, S.; Matsuda, I.; Mori, M.

    1987-01-01

    Arginase (EC3.5.3.1) catalyzes the last step of the urea cycle in the liver of ureotelic animals. Inherited deficiency of the enzyme results in argininemia, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hyperammonemia. To facilitate investigation of the enzyme and gene structures and to elucidate the nature of the mutation in argininemia, the authors isolated cDNA clones for human liver arginase. Oligo(dT)-primed and random primer human liver cDNA libraries in lambda gt11 were screened using isolated rat arginase cDNA as a probe. Two of the positive clones, designated lambda hARG6 and lambda hARG109, contained an overlapping cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 322 amino acid residues (predicted M/sub r/, 34,732), a 5'-untranslated sequence of 56 base pairs, a 3'-untranslated sequence of 423 base pairs, and a poly(A) segment. Arginase activity was detected in Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid carrying lambda hARG6 cDNA insert. RNA gel blot analysis of human liver RNA showed a single mRNA of 1.6 kilobases. The predicted amino acid sequence of human liver arginase is 87% and 41% identical with those of the rat liver and yeast enzymes, respectively. There are several highly conserved segments among the human, rat, and yeast enzymes.

  2. Stem cell-derived hepatocytes for functional liver replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eChrist

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternate cell source to substitute for primary hepatocytes in hepatocyte transplantation because of their multiple differentiation potential and nearly unlimited availability. They may differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and maintain specific hepatocyte functions also after transplantation into the regenerating livers of mice or rats both under injury and non-injury conditions. Depending on the underlying liver disease their mode of action is either to replace the diseased liver tissue or to support liver regeneration through their anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic as well as their pro-proliferative action.

  3. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The interferon (IFN system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. METHODS: This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC. Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. RESULTS: Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1, suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  4. A study of human liver ferritin and chicken liver and spleen using Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B.; Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University-UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2008-01-15

    Lyophilized samples of human liver ferritin and chicken liver and spleen were measured at room temperature using Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution. An increase in the velocity resolution of Moessbauer spectroscopy permitted us to increase accuracy and decrease experimental error in determining the hyperfine parameters of human liver ferritin and chicken liver and spleen. Moessbauer spectroscopy with high velocity resolution may be very useful for revealing small differences in hyperfine parameters during biomedical research.

  5. Regeneration and Cell Recruitment in an Improved Heterotopic Auxiliary Partial Liver Transplantation Model in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoshihiro; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Angelica; Yovchev, Mladen I; Matsubara, Kentaro; Yokota, Shinichiro; Guzman-Lepe, Jorge; Handa, Kan; Collin de l'Hortet, Alexandra; Thomson, Angus W; Geller, David A; Yagi, Hiroshi; Oertel, Michael; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Auxiliary partial liver transplantation (APLT) in humans is a therapeutic modality used especially to treat liver failure in children or congenital metabolic disease. Animal models of APLT have helped to explore therapeutic options. Though many groups have suggested improvements, standardizing the surgical procedure has been challenging. Additionally, the question of whether graft livers are reconstituted by recipient-derived cells after transplantation has been controversial. The aim of this study was to improve experimental APLT in rats and to assess cell recruitment in the liver grafts. To inhibit recipient liver regeneration and to promote graft regeneration, we treated recipients with retrorsine and added arterial anastomosis. Using green fluorescence protein transgenic rats as recipients, we examined liver resident cell recruitment within graft livers by immunofluorescence costaining. In the improved APLT model, we achieved well-regenerated grafts that could maintain regeneration for at least 4 weeks. Regarding the cell recruitment, there was no evidence of recipient-derived hepatocyte, cholangiocyte, or hepatic stellate cell recruitment into the graft. Macrophages/monocytes, however, were consistently recruited into the graft and increased over time, which might be related to inflammatory responses. Very few endothelial cells showed colocalization of markers. We have successfully established an improved rat APLT model with arterial anastomosis as a standard technique. Using this model, we have characterized cell recruitment into the regenerating grafts.

  6. New evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin to treat nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzaugarat, María Eugenia; De Matteo, Elena; Baz, Placida; Lucero, Diego; García, Cecilia Claudia; Gonzalez Ballerga, Esteban; Daruich, Jorge; Sorda, Juan Antonio; Wald, Miriam Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The immune system acts on different metabolic tissues that are implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Leptin and linoleic acid have the ability to potentially affect immune cells, whereas curcumin is a known natural polyphenol with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Aims This study was designed to evaluate the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects of leptin and linoleic acid on immune cells from patients with NAFLD and to corroborate the modulatory effects of curcumin and its preventive properties against the progression of NAFLD using a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model. Results The ex vivo experiments showed that linoleic acid increased the production of reactive oxygen species in monocytes and liver macrophages, whereas leptin enhanced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production in monocytes and interferon-γ production in circulating CD4+ cells. Conversely, oral administration of curcumin prevented HFD-induced liver injury, metabolic alterations, intrahepatic CD4+ cell accumulation and the linoleic acid- and leptin- induced pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant effects on mouse liver macrophages. Conclusion Our findings provide new evidence for the therapeutic potential of curcumin to treat human NAFLD. However, the development of a preventive treatment targeting human circulating monocytes and liver macrophages as well as peripheral and hepatic CD4+ cells requires additional research. PMID:28257515

  7. SECs (Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells), Liver Microenvironment, and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Harris, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response to chronic liver injury such as alcoholic/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis with no FDA-approved treatments. Liver fibrosis results in a continual accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and paves the way for replacement of parenchyma with nonfunctional scar tissue. The fibrotic condition results in drastic changes in the local mechanical, chemical, and biological microenvironment of the tissue. Liver parenchyma is supported by an efficient network of vasculature lined by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). These nonparenchymal cells are highly specialized resident endothelial cell type with characteristic morphological and functional features. Alterations in LSECs phenotype including lack of LSEC fenestration, capillarization, and formation of an organized basement membrane have been shown to precede fibrosis and promote hepatic stellate cell activation. Here, we review the interplay of LSECs with the dynamic changes in the fibrotic liver microenvironment such as matrix rigidity, altered ECM protein profile, and cell-cell interactions to provide insight into the pivotal changes in LSEC physiology and the extent to which it mediates the progression of liver fibrosis. Establishing the molecular aspects of LSECs in the light of fibrotic microenvironment is valuable towards development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic targets of liver fibrosis. PMID:28293634

  8. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicate stable expression of hepatotoxicity related genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, Maria; Olinga, Peter; van Leeuwen, E. M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W. G.; Heisterkamp, S. H.; Groothuis, Genoveva

    2011-01-01

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on changes in the gene expression profile of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be dir

  9. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M. G. L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E. M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W. G.; Heisterkamp, S. H.; Groothuis, G. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be direct

  10. Development of a 3D cell printed construct considering angiogenesis for liver tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Choi, Yeong-Jin; Yong, Woon-Jae; Pati, Falguni; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kang, Kyung Shin; Kang, In-Hye; Park, Jaesung; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-12

    Several studies have focused on the regeneration of liver tissue in a two-dimensional (2D) planar environment, whereas actual liver tissue is three-dimensional (3D). Cell printing technology has been successfully utilized for building 3D structures; however, the poor mechanical properties of cell-laden hydrogels are a major concern. Here, we demonstrate the printing of a 3D cell-laden construct and its application to liver tissue engineering using 3D cell printing technology through a multi-head tissue/organ building system. Polycaprolactone (PCL) was used as a framework material because of its excellent mechanical properties. Collagen bioink containing three different types of cells-hepatocytes (HCs), human umbilical vein endothelial cells , and human lung fibroblasts--was infused into the canals of a PCL framework to induce the formation of capillary--like networks and liver cell growth. A co-cultured 3D microenvironment of the three types of cells was successfully established and maintained. The vascular formation and functional abilities of HCs (i.e., albumin secretion and urea synthesis) demonstrated that the heterotypic interaction among HCs and nonparenchymal cells increased the survivability and functionality of HCs within the collagen gel. Therefore, our results demonstrate the prospect of using cell printing technology for the creation of heterotypic cellular interaction within a structure for liver tissue engineering.

  11. Pitavastatin suppressed liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, He-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Xie, Xue-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Hai; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Jiang, Fei-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Pitavastatin classically functions as a blood cholesterol-lowering drug. Previously, it was discovered with antiglioma stem cell properties through drug screening. However, whether it can be used for liver cancer cell therapy has never been reported. In this study, the cell viability and colony formation assay were utilized to analyze the cytotoxicity of pitavastatin on liver cancer cells. The cell cycle alteration was checked after pitavastatin treatment. Apoptosis-related protein expression and the effect of caspase inhibitor were also checked. The in vivo inhibitory effect of pitavastatin on the growth of liver tumor was also tested. It was found that pitavastatin inhibited growth and colony formation of liver cancer Huh-7 cells and SMMC7721 cells. It induced arrest of liver cancer cells at the G1 phase. Increased proportion of sub-G1 cells was observed after pitavastatin treatment. Pitavastatin promoted caspase-9 cleavage and caspase-3 cleavage in liver cancer cells. Caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK reversed the cleavage of cytotoxic effect of pitavastatin. Moreover, pitavastatin decreased the tumor growth and improved the survival of tumor-bearing mice. This study suggested the antiliver cancer effect of the old drug pitavastatin. It may be developed as a drug for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27621652

  12. In Vitro transformation of LW13 Rat liver epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHICAN; KARLFETNANSKY; 等

    1992-01-01

    A rat liver epithelial cell line designated LW 13 was established using a sequential sedimentation method.The cell line retained many normal proerties of liver epithelial cells and showed some structural and functional features resembling those of liver parenchymal cells,LW13 cells became malignant after the intrduction of exogenous transforming EJ Ha ras gene,Tumors produced by inoculation of the transformed cells into baby rats contained areas of poorly differentialted hepatocellular carcinoma,In situ hybridization analysis confirmed the random rather than specific integration of exogenous ras gene into host chromosomes.Furthermore,an at least tenfold increase in the expression of the endogenous c mys gene was detected among transformed cell lines,suggesting the involvement of the c myc proto oncogene in the in vitro transformation of rat liver epithelial cells by EJ Ha ras oncogene.

  13. A shift in paradigm towards human biology-based systems for cholestatic-liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Fozia

    2015-12-01

    Cholestatic-liver diseases (CLDs) arise from diverse causes ranging from genetic factors to drug-induced cholestasis. The so-called diseases of civilization (obesity, diabetes, metabolic disorders, non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular diseases, etc.) are intricately implicated in liver and gall bladder diseases. Although CLDs have been extensively studied, there seem to be important gaps in the understanding of human disease. Despite the fact that many animal models exist and substantial clinical data are available, translation of this knowledge towards therapy has been disappointingly limited. Recent advances in liver cell culture such as in vivo-like 3D cultivation of human primary hepatic cells, human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes; and cutting-edge analytical techniques such as 'omics' technologies and high-content screenings could play a decisive role in deeper mechanistic understanding of CLDs. This Topical Review proposes a roadmap to human biology-based research using omics technologies providing quantitative information on mechanisms in an adverse outcome/disease pathway framework. With modern sensitive tools, a shift in paradigm in human disease research seems timely and even inevitable to overcome species barriers in translation.

  14. Macrophages and dendritic cells in the development of liver injury leading to liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananiev, J; Penkova, M; Tchernev, G; Chokoeva, A A; Philipov, S; Tana, C; Gulubova, M; Wollina, U

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure (LF) continues to be a serious problem due to different underlying disorders. Not only hepatocytes but Kupffer cells (KCs) and dendritic cells (DCs) are of importance in this instance. We wanted to investigate the possible role of KCs and liver DCs in the development of liver injury in patients with liver failure. Liver specimens from 23 patients who died after liver failure were examined for the presence and distribution of CD68-positive KCs and CD83-positive DCs by immunohistochemistry. The distribution of the CD83-positive DC in the sinusoidal and the periportal spaces was not even. While 39.1% of patients had a high sinusoidal density of CD83-positive cells, 60.9% demonstrated a high density of CD83-positive cells in the periportal tract. The number of CD83-positive DCs in periportal tracts in patients with advanced liver fibrosis (n=5) were high, while those with mild liver fibrosis (n=18) had low numbers of mature dendritic cells (χ2=4.107; p=0.043). In addition, all patients with intensive fibrosis had low counts of CD68-positive KC’s in portal tracts vs patients with mild fibrosis of which 67% had high counts (χ2=6.97; p=0.008). In seven of the patients with moderate steatosis (87.5%) low numbers of CD68-positive KCs were found in sinusoids, in contrast to those with severe steatosis, where 12 patients (80%) had high KC counts (χ2=13.4; p less than 0.001). The distribution and number of CD68-positive KC and CD83-positive DC reflect the progression of liver fibrosis leading to liver failure.

  15. Primary culture of adult rat liver cells. I. Preparation of isolated cells from trypsin-perfused liver of adult rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazaki,Masahiro

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated hepatic cells from adult rats were prepared by perfusing the livers with trypsin. The highest yield of viable cells was obtained by perfusing the liver with 0.1% trypsin, pH 7.0, at 37 degrees C for 30 min. Following this treatment about 70% of cells excluded trypan blue. The isolated cells contained many binucleate cells. Between 60 and 70% of DNA present originally in the liver was recovered from the isolated hepatic cells, which had higher glucose 6-phosphatase activity than the liver. Thus the resulting cell population seems to be rich in hepatocytes. The isolated hepatic cells, however, lost some of their cellular proteins such as alanine and tyrosine amino-transferases. It was suggested that the membranes of isolated hepatic cells might be damaged by both enzymatic digestion and mechanical destruction.

  16. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ursula; M; Gehling; Marc; Willems; Kathleen; Schlagner; Ralf; A; Benndorf; Maura; Dandri; Jrg; Petersen; Martina; Sterneck; Joerg-Matthias; Pollok; Dieter; K; Hossfeld; Xavier; Rogiers

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To test the hypothesis that liver cirrhosis is associated with mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. METHODS:Peripheral blood samples from 72 patients with liver cirrhosis of varying etiology were analyzed by flow cytometry.Identified progenitor cell subsets were immunoselected and used for functional assays in vitro. Plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1(SDF-1) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.RESULTS:Progenitor cells with a CD133 + /CD45 + CD14 + phenotype we...

  17. Long Term Maintenance of a Microfluidic 3-D Human Liver Sinusoid

    OpenAIRE

    Prodanov, Ljupcho; Jindal, Rohit; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Hegde, Manjunath; McCarty, William J.; Golberg, Inna; Bhushan, Abhinav; Yarmush, Martin L.; Usta, O. Berk

    2015-01-01

    The development of long-term human organotypic liver-on-a-chip models for successful prediction of toxic response is one of the most important and urgent goals of the NIH/DARPA’s initiative to replicate and replace chronic and acute drug testing in animals. For this purpose we developed a microfluidic chip that consists of two microfluidic chambers separated by a porous membrane. The aim of this communication is to demonstrate the recapitulation of a liver sinusoid-on-a-chip using human cells...

  18. Glucuronidation of thyroxine in human liver, jejunum, and kidney microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Miki; Katoh, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    Glucuronidation of thyroxine is a major metabolic pathway facilitating its excretion. In this study, we characterized the glucuronidation of thyroxine in human liver, jejunum, and kidney microsomes, and identified human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms involved in the activity. Human jejunum microsomes showed a lower K(m) value (24.2 microM) than human liver (85.9 microM) and kidney (53.3 microM) microsomes did. Human kidney microsomes showed a lower V(max) value (22.6 pmol/min/mg) than human liver (133.4 pmol/min/mg) and jejunum (184.6 pmol/min/mg) microsomes did. By scaling-up, the in vivo clearances in liver, intestine, and kidney were estimated to be 1440, 702, and 79 microl/min/kg body weight, respectively. Recombinant human UGT1A8 (108.7 pmol/min/unit), UGT1A3 (91.6 pmol/min/unit), and UGT1A10 (47.3 pmol/min/unit) showed high, and UGT1A1 (26.0 pmol/min/unit) showed moderate thyroxine glucuronosyltransferase activity. The thyroxine glucuronosyltransferase activity in microsomes from 12 human livers was significantly correlated with bilirubin O-glucuronosyltransferase (r = 0.855, p microsomes was mainly catalyzed by UGT1A8 and UGT1A10 and to a lesser extent by UGT1A1, and the activity in human kidney microsomes was mainly catalyzed by UGT1A7, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10. The changes of activities of these UGT1A isoforms via inhibition and induction by administered drugs as well as genetic polymorphisms may be a causal factor of interindividual differences in the plasma thyroxine concentration.

  19. Hydrophobicity of Antifungal β-Peptides Is Associated with Their Cytotoxic Effect on In Vitro Human Colon Caco-2 and Liver HepG2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Navarro, Camilo; Méndez-Vega, Janet; Caraballo-León, Jean; Lee, Myung-ryul; Palecek, Sean; Torres-Lugo, Madeline; Ortiz-Bermúdez, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The widespread distribution of fungal infections, with their high morbidity and mortality rate, is a global public health problem. The increase in the population of immunocompromised patients combined with the selectivity of currents treatments and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal strains are among the most imperative reasons to develop novel antifungal formulations. Antimicrobial β-peptides are peptidomimetics of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have been proposed as developmental platforms to enhance the AMPs selectivity and biostability. Their tunability allows the design of sequences with remarkable activity against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as the human pathogenic Candida spp., both in planktonic and biofilm morphology. However, the β-peptide’s effect on surrounding host cells remains greatly understudied. Assessments have mainly relied on the extent of hemolysis that a candidate peptide is able to cause. This work investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of various β-peptides in the Caco-2 and HepG2 mammalian cell lines. Results indicated that the cytotoxic effect of the β-peptides was influenced by cell type and was also correlated to structural features of the peptide such as hydrophobicity. We found that the selectivity of the most hydrophobic β-peptide was 2–3 times higher than that of the least hydrophobic one, for both cell types according to the selectivity index parameter (IC50/MIC). The IC50 of Caco-2 and HepG2 increased with hydrophobicity, which indicates the importance of testing putative therapeutics on different cell types. We report evidence of peptide-cell membrane interactions in Caco-2 and HepG2 using a widely studied β-peptide against C. albicans. PMID:26992117

  20. Hydrophobicity of Antifungal β-Peptides Is Associated with Their Cytotoxic Effect on In Vitro Human Colon Caco-2 and Liver HepG2 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Mora-Navarro

    Full Text Available The widespread distribution of fungal infections, with their high morbidity and mortality rate, is a global public health problem. The increase in the population of immunocompromised patients combined with the selectivity of currents treatments and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal strains are among the most imperative reasons to develop novel antifungal formulations. Antimicrobial β-peptides are peptidomimetics of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, which have been proposed as developmental platforms to enhance the AMPs selectivity and biostability. Their tunability allows the design of sequences with remarkable activity against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as the human pathogenic Candida spp., both in planktonic and biofilm morphology. However, the β-peptide's effect on surrounding host cells remains greatly understudied. Assessments have mainly relied on the extent of hemolysis that a candidate peptide is able to cause. This work investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of various β-peptides in the Caco-2 and HepG2 mammalian cell lines. Results indicated that the cytotoxic effect of the β-peptides was influenced by cell type and was also correlated to structural features of the peptide such as hydrophobicity. We found that the selectivity of the most hydrophobic β-peptide was 2-3 times higher than that of the least hydrophobic one, for both cell types according to the selectivity index parameter (IC50/MIC. The IC50 of Caco-2 and HepG2 increased with hydrophobicity, which indicates the importance of testing putative therapeutics on different cell types. We report evidence of peptide-cell membrane interactions in Caco-2 and HepG2 using a widely studied β-peptide against C. albicans.

  1. Clinical potential of regulatory T cell therapy in liver diseases: An overview and current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Claire Jeffery

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes, that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg. The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients.Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases, chronic rejection and post-transplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases (GVHD and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the autoimmune liver diseases for more than three decades; thus the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients.

  2. Downregulation of sulfotransferase expression and activity in diseased human livers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Emine B; More, Vijay; Neira, Karissa L; Lu, Zhenqiang James; Cherrington, Nathan J; Slitt, Angela L; King, Roberta S

    2013-09-01

    Sulfotransferase (SULT) function has been well studied in healthy human subjects by quantifying mRNA and protein expression and determining enzyme activity with probe substrates. However, it is not well known if sulfotransferase activity changes in metabolic and liver disease, such as diabetes, steatosis, or cirrhosis. Sulfotransferases have significant roles in the regulation of hormones and excretion of xenobiotics. In the present study of normal subjects with nonfatty livers and patients with steatosis, diabetic cirrhosis, and alcoholic cirrhosis, we sought to determine SULT1A1, SULT2A1, SULT1E1, and SULT1A3 activity and mRNA and protein expression in human liver tissue. In general, sulfotransferase activity decreased significantly with severity of liver disease from steatosis to cirrhosis. Specifically, SULT1A1 and SULT1A3 activities were lower in disease states relative to nonfatty tissues. Alcoholic cirrhotic tissues further contained lower SULT1A1 and 1A3 activities than those affected by either of the two other disease states. SULT2A1, on the other hand, was only reduced in alcoholic cirrhotic tissues. SULT1E1 was reduced both in diabetic cirrhosis and in alcoholic cirrhosis tissues, relative to nonfatty liver tissues. In conclusion, the reduced levels of sulfotransferase expression and activity in diseased versus nondiseased liver tissue may alter the metabolism and disposition of xenobiotics and affect homeostasis of endobiotic sulfotransferase substrates.

  3. A Transcriptomic Signature of Mouse Liver Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Passman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver progenitor cells (LPCs can proliferate extensively, are able to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and contribute to liver regeneration. The presence of LPCs, however, often accompanies liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, indicating that they may be a cancer stem cell. Understanding LPC biology and establishing a sensitive, rapid, and reliable method to detect their presence in the liver will assist diagnosis and facilitate monitoring of treatment outcomes in patients with liver pathologies. A transcriptomic meta-analysis of over 400 microarrays was undertaken to compare LPC lines against datasets of muscle and embryonic stem cell lines, embryonic and developed liver (DL, and HCC. Three gene clusters distinguishing LPCs from other liver cell types were identified. Pathways overrepresented in these clusters denote the proliferative nature of LPCs and their association with HCC. Our analysis also revealed 26 novel markers, LPC markers, including Mcm2 and Ltbp3, and eight known LPC markers, including M2pk and Ncam. These markers specified the presence of LPCs in pathological liver tissue by qPCR and correlated with LPC abundance determined using immunohistochemistry. These results showcase the value of global transcript profiling to identify pathways and markers that may be used to detect LPCs in injured or diseased liver.

  4. The role of natural killer cells in autoimmune liver disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, Kelly; Pontarini, Elena; Tentorio, Paolo; Cimino, Matteo; Donadon, Matteo; Torzilli, Guido; Lugli, Enrico; Della Bella, Silvia; Gershwin, M Eric; Mavilio, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are important players of the innate arm of the immune system and provide an early defense against pathogens and tumor-transformed cells. Peripheral blood NK (PB-NK) cells were first identified because of their ability to spontaneously kill tumor-cell targets in vitro without the need for specific antigen priming, which is the reason that they were named 'natural killer' cells. The characterization of NK cells in human tissues and body organs represented another important step forward to better understand their physiology and physiopathology. In this regard, many reports revealed over the past decade a differential anatomic distribution of NK cell subsets in several sites such as the intestine, lung, cervix, placenta and liver as well as in secondary lymphoid organs such as spleen, lymph nodes and tonsils. Among all these tissues, the liver is certainly unique as its parenchyma contains an unusually high number of infiltrating immune cells with 30-50% of total lymphocytes being NK cells. Given the constant liver intake of non-self antigens from the gastrointestinal tract via the portal vein, hepatic NK (H-NK) cells must retain a certain degree of tolerance in the context of their immune-surveillance against dangers to the host. Indeed, the breakdown of the tolerogenic state of the liver-associated immune system has been shown to induce autoimmunity. However, the role of NK cells during the course of autoimmune liver diseases is still being debated mainly because a complete characterization of H-NK cells normally resident in healthy human liver has not yet been fully disclosed. Furthermore, the differences in phenotype and functions between human and mouse H-NK cells often preclude translation of results obtained from murine models into experimental approaches to be performed in humans. Here, we provide an extensive characterization of the phenotype of H-NK cells physiologically resident in the human liver by both mentioning data available

  5. Gene expression profiling of liver cancer stem cells by RNA-sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Y Ho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence supports that tumor growth and cancer relapse are driven by cancer stem cells. Our previous work has demonstrated the existence of CD90(+ liver cancer stem cells (CSCs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Nevertheless, the characteristics of these cells are still poorly understood. In this study, we employed a more sensitive RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq to compare the gene expression profiling of CD90(+ cells sorted from tumor (CD90(+CSCs with parallel non-tumorous liver tissues (CD90(+NTSCs and elucidate the roles of putative target genes in hepatocarcinogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD90(+ cells were sorted respectively from tumor and adjacent non-tumorous human liver tissues using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The amplified RNAs of CD90(+ cells from 3 HCC patients were subjected to RNA-Seq analysis. A differential gene expression profile was established between CD90(+CSCs and CD90(+NTSCs, and validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR on the same set of amplified RNAs, and further confirmed in an independent cohort of 12 HCC patients. Five hundred genes were differentially expressed (119 up-regulated and 381 down-regulated genes between CD90(+CSCs and CD90(+NTSCs. Gene ontology analysis indicated that the over-expressed genes in CD90(+CSCs were associated with inflammation, drug resistance and lipid metabolism. Among the differentially expressed genes, glypican-3 (GPC3, a member of glypican family, was markedly elevated in CD90(+CSCs compared to CD90(+NTSCs. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that GPC3 was highly expressed in forty-two human liver tumor tissues but absent in adjacent non-tumorous liver tissues. Flow cytometry indicated that GPC3 was highly expressed in liver CD90(+CSCs and mature cancer cells in liver cancer cell lines and human liver tumor tissues. Furthermore, GPC3 expression was positively correlated with the number of CD90(+CSCs in liver tumor tissues. CONCLUSIONS

  6. EMP-1 is a junctional protein in a liver stem cell line and in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Sherley, James L; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chiu, Chien-Chang; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Liang, Ja-Der; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Sheu, Jin-Chuan

    2005-09-09

    In an attempt to discover cell markers for liver stem cells, a cDNA microarray analysis was carried out to compare the gene expression profiles between an adult liver stem cell line, Lig-8, and mature hepatocytes. Several genes in the categories of extracellular matrix, cell membrane, cell adhesion, transcription factor, signal molecule, transporter, and metabolic enzyme were shown to be differentially expressed in Lig-8 cells. Among them, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 has been previously implicated with stem cell phenotypes. Antiserum to EMP-1 was produced to localize its expression. On monolayers of Lig-8 cells, EMP-1 was expressed along the intercellular border. In the liver harboring proliferating oval cells, the liver progenitors, EMP-1 was localized as ribbon bands, a staining pattern for epithelial junctions, all the way through bile duct epithelia, oval cell ductules, and into peri-hepatocytic regions. These peri-hepatocytic regions were proved to be bile canaliculi by co-localization of EMP-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase IV, an enzyme located on bile canaliculi. This report is the first to indicate EMP-1 to be a junctional protein in the liver.

  7. Cell therapy for liver diseases: current medicine and future promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandra, Meza-Ríos; Juan, Armendáriz-Borunda; Ana, Sandoval-Rodríguez

    2015-06-01

    Liver diseases are a major health problem worldwide since they usually represent the main causes of death in most countries, causing excessive costs to public health systems. Nowadays, there are no efficient current therapies for most hepatic diseases and liver transplant is infrequent due to the availability of organs, cost and risk of transplant rejection. Therefore, alternative therapies for liver diseases have been developed, including cell-based therapies. Stem cells (SCs) are characterized by their self-renewing capacity, unlimited proliferation and differentiation under certain conditions into tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. Cell-based therapies for liver diseases have been successful in experimental models, showing anti-inflammatory, antifibrogenic and regenerative effects. Nowadays, clinical trials using SCs for liver pathologies are increasing in number, and those that have reached publication have achieved favorable effects, encouraging us to think that SCs will have a potential clinical use in a short time.

  8. Synchrotron refractive-index microradiography of human liver cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Yongpeng; ZHANG Guilin; LI Yan; HWU Yeukuang; TSAI Wenli; JE Jung Ho; Margaritondo G.; YUAN Dong

    2005-01-01

    Three human liver tissue samples (~5 mm × 40 mm × 20 mm) were excised from a cancer patient's liver during surgery. The microradiology analysis was performed with a non-standard approach on a synchrotron. High-resolution refractive-index edge-enhanced microradiographs that cover a larger volume of the liver tissue sample were obtained. The cancer tissue and normal tissue could be clearly identified and distinguished based on their different textures. Furthermore, new blood vessel hyperplasia was found near the cancer area. Blood vessels with a diameter smaller than 20 μm could be identified. These findings were fully consistent with the histopathological examination of the same area. Microradiographs of the newly formed blood vessels at different angles were also obtained. This result shows that it is possible to further develop this approach into a technique of microradiographic imaging for clinic diagnosis of liver cancer at the early stage.

  9. Effect of human liver source on the functionality of isolated hepatocytes and liver slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olinga, Peter; Hof, I.H; de Jong, Kurt; Slooff, M.JH; Meijer, D.K F; Groothuis, Geny; Merema, M.T.

    1998-01-01

    In vitro experiments using human liver tissue to study drug metabolism and transport are usually performed and interpreted without real consideration of the differences in procurement of the tissue, if it is obtained from different sources. Therefore, in this study the functionality of isolated hepa

  10. Hepatocyte differentiation of human fibroblasts from cirrhotic liver in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Ling Sun; Sheng-Yong Yin; Lin Zhou; Hai-Yang Xie; Feng Zhang; Li-Ming Wu; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and fibro-blasts have intimate relationships, and the phenotypic homology between fibroblasts and MSCs has been recently described. The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatic differentiating potentialofhumanfibroblastsincirrhoticliver. METHODS: The phenotypes of fibroblasts in cirrhotic liver were labeled by biological methods. After that, the differentiation potential of these fibroblasts in vitro was characterized in terms of liver-specific gene and protein expression. Finally, an animal model of hepatocyte regeneration in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice was created by retrorsine injection and partial hepatectomy, and the expression of human hepatocyte proteins in SCID mouse livers was checked by immunohistochemicalanalysisafterfibroblastadministration. RESULTS: Surface immunophenotyping revealed that a minority of fibroblasts expressed markers of MSCs and hepatic epithelial cytokeratins as well as alpha-smooth muscle actin, but homogeneously expressed vimentin, desmin, prolyl 4-hydroxylase and fibronectin. These fibroblasts presented the characteristics of hepatocytes in vitro and differentiated directly into functional hepatocytes in the liver of hepatecto-mized SCID mice. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that fibroblasts in cirrhotic liver have the potential to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and in vivo. Our findings infer that hepatic differentiation of fibroblasts may serve as a new target for reversion of liver fibrosis and a cell source for tissue engineering.

  11. The cucurbitacins E, D and I: investigation of their cytotoxicity toward human chondrosarcoma SW 1353 cell line and their biotransformation in man liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Suzanne; Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Habib, Lamice; Netter, Patrick; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Magdalou, Jacques

    2013-02-04

    Cucurbitacins are a class of natural compounds known for their numerous potential pharmacological effects. The purpose of this work was to compare the cytotoxicity of three cucurbitacins I, D, E on the chondrosarcoma SW 1353 cancer cell line and to investigate their biotransformation in man. Cucurbitacins I and D showed a very strong cytotoxicity, which was higher than that of cytochalasin D, used as a drug reference. Almost 100% of the cells were apoptotic as observed by DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay) after 12 h with cucurbitacins I and D (1 μM) and cucurbitacin E (10 μM). In terms of IC(50) values, cucurbitacins I and E presented a higher toxicity compared to that of cucurbitacin D (MTT assay). Cucurbitacin E was readily hydrolyzed by human hepatic microsomes, leading to cucurbitacin I (K(m) 22 μM, V(max) 571 nmol/mg proteins/min). On the other hand, the three cucurbitacins were hydroxylated at a very low extent, but they were sulfated and glucuronidated. In terms of V(max)/K(m), the cucurbitacin E was the best substrate of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. This study shows that cucurbitacins I, D and E present a potent cytotoxic activity toward the chondrosarcoma SW 1353 cell line and are metabolized as sulfate and glucuronide conjugates.

  12. Intraperitoneal transplantation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of acute liver injury in rats%人脐带间充质干细胞腹腔移植治疗急性肝损伤大鼠

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑学峰; 刘霞

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:In vitro experiments have confirmed that human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells can be induced to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, thus which can be considered to function as liver repair. OBJECTIVE:To observe the therapeutic effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem celltransplantation on acute liver injuries in rats through in vivo animal experiments. METHODS:Healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups:normal control group without modeling, celltransplantation group, and PBS group. Rat models of acute liver injury were prepared by 10%CCl4-olive oil solution in the celltransplantation and PBS groups which were fol owed by intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 mL human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cellsuspension and 0.5 mL PBS, respectively. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that pathological changes related to acute liver injury appeared at 24 hours after intraperitoneal injection of CCl 4 . Then, the liver structure recovered at 7 days after celltransplantation, but it did not recover til the 14th day after PBS injection. Compared with the normal control group, serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were significantly increased in the other two groups (P  目的:进行动物体内实验,观察人脐带间充质干细胞移植治疗大鼠急性肝损伤的效果。  方法:将健康SD大鼠随机分为3组,正常对照组不造模,细胞移植组和PBS组腹腔注射体积分数10%CCl4橄榄油溶液制造急性肝损伤模型后24 h,分别经腹腔移植人脐带间充质干细胞悬液0.5 mL和等量PBS。  结果与结论:苏木精-伊红染色显示,CCl4腹腔注射24 h后大鼠肝脏出现急性肝损伤的病理变化,细胞移植后7 d时肝脏结构完全恢复正常,PBS组14 d才恢复正常肝脏组织结构。与正常对照组相比,其他2组大鼠血清丙氨酸转氨酶及天门冬氨

  13. Liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shennen A; Glorioso, Jaime M; Nyberg, Scott L

    2014-04-01

    The liver is unique in its ability to regenerate in response to injury. A number of evolutionary safeguards have allowed the liver to continue to perform its complex functions despite significant injury. Increased understanding of the regenerative process has significant benefit in the treatment of liver failure. Furthermore, understanding of liver regeneration may shed light on the development of cancer within the cirrhotic liver. This review provides an overview of the models of study currently used in liver regeneration, the molecular basis of liver regeneration, and the role of liver progenitor cells in regeneration of the liver. Specific focus is placed on clinical applications of current knowledge in liver regeneration, including small-for-size liver transplant. Furthermore, cutting-edge topics in liver regeneration, including in vivo animal models for xenogeneic human hepatocyte expansion and the use of decellularized liver matrices as a 3-dimensional scaffold for liver repopulation, are proposed. Unfortunately, despite 50 years of intense study, many gaps remain in the scientific understanding of liver regeneration.

  14. Mixtures of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy) and its major human metabolites act additively to induce significant toxicity to liver cells when combined at low, non-cytotoxic concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Diana Dias; Silva, Elisabete; Carvalho, Félix; Carmo, Helena

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic injury after 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) intoxications is highly unpredictable and does not seem to correlate with either dosage or frequency of use. The mechanisms involved include the drug metabolic bioactivation and the hyperthermic state of the liver triggered by its thermogenic action and exacerbated by the environmental circumstances of abuse at hot and crowded venues. We became interested in understanding the interaction between ecstasy and its metabolites generated in vivo as users are always exposed to mixtures of parent drug and metabolites. With this purpose, Hep G2 cells were incubated with MDMA and its main human metabolites methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), α-methyldopamine (α-MeDA) and N-methyl-α-methyldopamine (N-Me-α-MeDA), individually and in mixture (drugs combined in proportion to their individual EC01 ), at normal (37 °C) and hyperthermic (40.5 °C) conditions. After 48 h, viability was assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Extensive concentration-response analysis was performed with single drugs and the parameters of the individual non-linear logit fits were used to predict joint effects using the well-founded models of concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA). Experimental testing revealed that mixture effects on cell viability conformed to CA, for both temperature settings. Additionally, substantial combination effects were attained even when each substance was present at concentrations that individually produced unnoticeable effects. Hyperthermic incubations dramatically increased the toxicity of the tested drug and metabolites, both individually and combined. These outcomes suggest that MDMA metabolism has hazard implications to liver cells even when metabolites are found in low concentrations, as they contribute additively to the overall toxic effect of MDMA.

  15. Methylglyoxal Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of glucose is aberrantly increased in hyperglycemia, which causes various harmful effects on the liver. Methylglyoxal is produced during glucose degradation and the levels of methylglyoxal are increased in diabetes patients. In this study we investigated whether methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial impairment and apoptosis in HepG2 cells and induces liver toxicity in vivo. Methylglyoxal caused apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Moreover, methylglyoxal significantly promoted the p...

  16. Fixation methods for electron microscopy of human and other liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eddie; Wisse; Filip; Braet; Hans; Duimel; Celien; Vreuls; Ger; Koek; Steven; WM; Olde; Damink; Maartje; AJ; van; den; Broek; Bart; De; Geest; Cees; HC; Dejong; Chise; Tateno; Peter; Frederik

    2010-01-01

    For an electron microscopic study of the liver,expertise and complicated,time-consuming processing of hepatic tissues and cells is needed.The interpretation of electron microscopy(EM) images requires knowledge of the liver fine structure and experience with the numerous artifacts in fixation,embedding,sectioning,contrast staining and microscopic imaging.Hence,the aim of this paper is to present a detailed summary of different methods for the preparation of hepatic cells and tissue,for the purpose of preserv...

  17. Human adipese-derived sterm cells treatment of actute liver failure in rats%人脂肪干细胞治疗急性肝功能衰竭大鼠疗效的探索

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金银鹏; 李莉; 周桁; 陈光风; 傅青春; 刘小青; 程明亮; 王晓今; 陈成伟; 吴银霞; 江甫柱

    2013-01-01

    Objective Isolate human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSC ) and explore its efficacy for acute liver failure rats in liver function reconstruction .Methods hADSC were isolated from fat tissue .30 SD rats induced by D-gal were randomly divided into hADSC transplantation group and PBS control group ,treatment group received 5 × 106 hADSC through spleen route and the control group received the same volume of PBS .Moreover ,20 SD rats were randomly divided into spleen transplantation group and femoral vein transplantation group ,5 × 106 hADSC were injected via the spleen and femoral vein respectively ,immunohistochemical method were applied to detect the migration of hADSC infected with lenti-virus expressed ZsGreen .Results hADSC which obtained from vitro cultured human adipose tissue express mesenchymal stem cell-associated surface antigens and differentiate into adipocytes ,cartilage cells and osteocytes .The hADSC transplan-tation group showed lower mortality (13 .3% ) significantly compared with the PBS control group (40% ) .Serum ALT and AST were significantly lower than the PBS control group after hADSC transplantation indicating the liver functional improvement .HE staining also showed significant improvement in liver tissue morphology .Moreover ,Tunnel assay and Ki-67 assay showed that hADSC transplantation could reduce cell apoptosis and promote cell proliferation .We further tracked the distribution of hADSC transplantation through spleen and femoral vein .Most hADSC migrated to the liver ,spleen and lung in both routes ,however ,more hADSC migrated to the liver via femoral vein transplantation route .Conclusion hADSC can be obtained through the adherent culture of isolated adipose tissue in vitro ;hADSC transplant through spleen and femoral vein promotes regneration and inhibits apoptosis ,improves liver function and survival rate of liver failure rat .%目的探讨人脂肪干细胞(adipose-derived stem cells ,hADSC )对急性肝衰竭大鼠生存

  18. Epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Taghdouini, Adil; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver injury to hepatocytes or cholangiocytes, when left unmanaged, leads to the development of liver fibrosis, a condition characterized by the excessive intrahepatic deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Activated hepatic stellate cells constitute the predominant source of extracellular matrix in fibrotic livers and their transition from a quiescent state during fibrogenesis is associated with important alterations in their transcriptional and epigenetic landscape. Areas covered: We briefly describe the processes involved in hepatic stellate cell activation and discuss our current understanding of alterations in the epigenetic landscape, i.e DNA methylation, histone modifications and the functional role of non-coding RNAs that accompany this key event in the development of chronic liver disease. Expert commentary: Although great progress has been made, our understanding of the epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation is limited and, thus far, insufficient to allow the development of epigenetic drugs that can selectively interrupt liver fibrosis.

  19. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects...... acids (P combined study groups, RLF correlated with hepatic insulin sensitivity (r = 0.69), incremental glucose disposal (r = 0.71) and incremental exogenous glucose storage (r = 0.40), all P ....01. Disposition index (i.e. first-phase insulin response to intravenous glucose multiplied by incremental glucose disposal) was reduced by 46% (P = 0.05) in LIPO compared with the combined groups of NONLIPO and NAIVE, indicating an impaired adaptation of beta-cell function to insulin resistance in LIPO...

  20. Interaction of low density lipoproteins with rat liver cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Harkes (Leendert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe most marked conclusion is the establishment of the important role of non-parenchymal cells in the catabolism of the low density lipoproteins by the rat liver. Because the liver is responsible for 70-80% of the removal of LDL from blood this conclusion can be extended to total LDL tur

  1. The Liver X Receptor (LXR) and its Target Gene ABCA1 are Regulated Upon Low Oxygen in Human Trophoblast Cells : A Reason for Alterations in Preeclampsia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plosch, T.; Gellhaus, A.; van Straten, E. M. E.; Wolf, N.; Huijkman, N. C. A.; Schmidt, M.; Dunk, C. E.; Kuipers, F.; Winterhager, E.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The Liver X receptors (LXR) alpha and beta and their target genes such as the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have been shown to be crucially involved in the regulation of cellular cholesterol homeostasis. The aim of this study was to characterize the role of LXR alpha/beta in th

  2. DNA damage and oxidative stress in human liver cell L-02 caused by surface water extracts during drinking water treatment in a waterworks in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ai-Lin; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Hui-Juan; Jin, Bang-Xiong; Lu, Wen-Hong; Li, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2010-04-01

    Because of the daily and life-long exposure to disinfection by-products formed during drinking water treatment, potential adverse human health risk of drinking water disinfection is of great concern. Toxicological studies have shown that drinking water treatment increases the genotoxicity of surface water. Drinking water treatment is comprised of different potabilization steps, which greatly influence the levels of genotoxic products in the surface water and thus may alter the toxicity and genotoxicity of surface water. The aim of the present study was to understand the influence of specific steps on toxicity and genotoxicity during the treatment of surface water in a water treatment plant using liquid chlorine as the disinfectant in China. An integrated approach of the comet and oxidative stress assays was used in the study, and the results showed that both the prechlorination and postchlorination steps increased DNA damage and oxidative stress caused by water extracts in human derived L-02 cells while the tube settling and filtration steps had the opposite effect. This research also highlighted the usefulness of an integrated approach of the comet and oxidative stress assays in evaluating the genotoxicity of surface water during drinking water treatment.

  3. SURVIVAL OF LIVER CELLS, IMMOBILIZED ON 3D-MATRIXES, IN LIVER FAILURE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Shagidulin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was examined a new method for correction of hepatic failure by transplantation of liver support biounit (liver cells, immobilized on biocompatible and biodegradable 3D-matrixes ElastoPOB® into small intestine mesentery. It was determined that after modeling of acute hepatic failure on dogs by 65–70% liver resection and transplantation liver support biounit the restoration of disturbed biochemical indecies (such as total protein, lactate, cytolytic ensymes-ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, fibrinogen, protrombine index and others took place more rapidly on 9–14th day instead of 18th day in control. It was made a preposition about efficiency of the suggested method for correction both acute hepatic failure because even 90 days after transplantation of liver support biounit alive hepatocytes and neogenic plethoric vessels, growing through matrix were revealed. 

  4. Contribution of ionic silver to genotoxic potential of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells evaluated by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Saura C; Roy, Shambhu; Zheng, Jiwen; Ihrie, John

    2016-04-01

    Extensive human exposure to food- and cosmetics-related consumer products containing nanosilver is of public concern because of the lack of information about their safety. Genotoxicity is an important endpoint for the safety and health hazard assessment of regulated products including nanomaterials. The in vitro cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a very useful test for predictive genotoxicity testing. Recently, we have reported the genotoxicity of 20 nm nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells evaluated using the CBMN assay. The objective of our present study was three-fold: (i) to evaluate if HepG2 and Caco2 cells are valuable in vitro models for rapid genotoxicity screening of nanosilver; (ii) to test the hypothesis that the nanoparticle size and cell types are critical determinants of its genotoxicity; and (iii) to determine if ionic silver contributes to the nanosilver genotoxicity. With these objectives in mind, we evaluated the genotoxic potential of 50 nm nanosilver of the same shape, composition, surface charge, obtained from the same commercial source, under the same experimental conditions and the same genotoxic CBMN endpoint used for the previously tested 20 nm silver. The ionic silver (silver acetate) was also evaluated under the same conditions. Results of our study show that up to the concentrations tested in these cell types, the smaller (20 nm) nanosilver induces micronucleus formation in both the cell types but the larger (50 nm) nanosilver and the ionic silver provide a much weaker response compared with controls under the same conditions.

  5. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijk, Ewart W; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-02-26

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat.

  6. Repair pathways evident in human liver organ slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vickers, Alison E. M.; Fisher, Robyn; Olinga, Peter; Dial, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The extension of human liver slice culture viability for several days broadens the potential of this ex vivo model for characterizing pathways of organ injury and repair, and allows for the multiple dosing of compounds. Extended viability is demonstrated by continued synthesis of GSH and ATP, and ma

  7. Structural and functional aspects of the liver and liver sinusoidal cells in relation to colon carcinoma metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katrien Vekemans; Filip Braet

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, liver metastasis remains difficult to cure. When tumor cells escape and arrive in the liver sinusoids, they encounter the local defense mechanism specific to the liver. The sinusoidal cells have been widely described in physiologic conditions and in relation to metastasis during the past 30 years. This paper provides an "overview" of how these cells function in health and in diseases such as liver metastasis.

  8. Clinical Potential of Regulatory T Cell Therapy in Liver Diseases: An Overview and Current Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; Braitch, Manjit Kaur; Brown, Solomon; Oo, Ye Htun

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg). The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis, or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients. Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment, and good manufacturing practice facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), chronic rejection, and posttransplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases, and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the AILD for more than three decades; thus, the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior, and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients. PMID:27656181

  9. Hepatocyte-specific NEMO deletion promotes NK/NKT cell- and TRAIL-dependent liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beraza, Naiara; Malato, Yann; Sander, Leif E; Al-Masaoudi, Malika; Freimuth, Julia; Riethmacher, Dieter; Gores, Gregory J; Roskams, Tania; Liedtke, Christian; Trautwein, Christian

    2009-08-03

    Nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) is one of the main transcription factors involved in regulating apoptosis, inflammation, chronic liver disease, and cancer progression. The IKK complex mediates NF-kappaB activation and deletion of its regulatory subunit NEMO in hepatocytes (NEMO(Delta hepa)) triggers chronic inflammation and spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma development. We show that NEMO(Delta hepa) mice were resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis but hypersensitive to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as the result of a strong up-regulation of its receptor DR5 on hepatocytes. Additionally, natural killer (NK) cells, the main source of TRAIL, were activated in NEMO(Delta hepa) livers. Interestingly, depletion of the NK1.1(+) cells promoted a significant reduction of liver inflammation and an improvement of liver histology in NEMO(Delta hepa) mice. Furthermore, hepatocyte-specific NEMO deletion strongly sensitized the liver to concanavalin A (ConA)-mediated injury. The critical role of the NK cell/TRAIL axis in NEMO(Delta hepa) livers during ConA hepatitis was further confirmed by selective NK cell depletion and adoptive transfer of TRAIL-deficient(-/-) mononuclear cells. Our results uncover an essential mechanism of NEMO-mediated protection of the liver by preventing NK cell tissue damage via TRAIL/DR5 signaling. As this mechanism is important in human liver diseases, NEMO(Delta hepa) mice are an interesting tool to give insight into liver pathophysiology and to develop future therapeutic strategies.

  10. Glypican-3 Targeting of Liver Cancer Cells Using Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O. Park

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging is essential in accurately detecting, staging, and treating primary liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC], one of the most prevalent and lethal malignancies. We developed a novel multifunctional nanoparticle (NP specifically targeting glypican-3 (GPC3, a proteoglycan implicated in promotion of cell growth that is overexpressed in most HCCs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the differential GPC3 expression in two human HCC cells, Hep G2 (high and HLF (negligible. These cells were treated with biotin-conjugated GPC3 monoclonal antibody (αGPC3 and subsequently targeted using superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs conjugated to streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 647. Flow cytometry demonstrated that only GPC3-expressing Hep G2 cells were specifically targeted using this αGPC3-NP conjugate (fourfold mean fluorescence over nontargeted NP, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI experiments showed similar findings (threefold R2 relaxivity. Confocal fluorescence microscopy localized the αGPC3 NPs only to the cell surface of GPC3-expressing Hep G2 cells. Further characterization of this construct demonstrated a negatively charged, monodisperse, 50 nm NP, ideally suited for tumor targeting. This GPC3-specific NP system, with dual-modality imaging capability, may enhance pretreatment MRI, enable refined intraoperative HCC visualization by near-infrared fluorescence, and be potentially used as a carrier for delivery of tumor-targeted therapies, improving patient outcomes.

  11. T cells infiltrate the liver and kill hepatocytes in HLA-B(∗)57:01-associated floxacillin-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuillemin, Natascha; Terracciano, Luigi; Beltraminelli, Helmut; Schlapbach, Christoph; Fontana, Stefano; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Pichler, Werner J; Yerly, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is a major safety issue. It can cause severe disease and is a common cause of the withdrawal of drugs from the pharmaceutical market. Recent studies have identified the HLA-B(∗)57:01 allele as a risk factor for floxacillin (FLUX)-induced liver injury and have suggested a role for cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells in the pathomechanism of liver injury caused by FLUX. This study aimed to confirm the importance of FLUX-reacting cytotoxic lymphocytes in the pathomechanism of liver injury and to dissect the involved mechanisms of cytotoxicity. IHC staining of a liver biopsy from a patient with FLUX-induced liver injury revealed periportal inflammation and the infiltration of cytotoxic CD3(+) CD8(+) lymphocytes into the liver. The infiltration of cytotoxic lymphocytes into the liver of a patient with FLUX-induced liver injury demonstrates the importance of FLUX-reacting T cells in the underlying pathomechanism. Cytotoxicity of FLUX-reacting T cells from 10 HLA-B(∗)57:01(+) healthy donors toward autologous target cells and HLA-B(∗)57:01-transduced hepatocytes was analyzed in vitro. Cytotoxicity of FLUX-reacting T cells was concentration dependent and required concentrations in the range of peak serum levels after FLUX administration. Killing of target cells was mediated by different cytotoxic mechanisms. Our findings emphasize the role of the adaptive immune system and especially of activated drug-reacting T cells in human leukocyte antigen-associated, drug-induced liver injury.

  12. Carcinoma-associated perisinusoidal laminin may signal tumour cell metastasis to the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1992-01-01

    The perisinusoidal space of the liver shows extensive modulation of the extracellular matrix in response to various pathological conditions. We studied perisinusoidal laminin expression immunohistochemically using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in 110 human liver specimens obtained at autopsy...... in cancer patients without liver metastasis. In 3 cases of leukaemia sinusoids were laminin negative. In cirrhosis and chronic passive congestion there was, as expected, laminin immunoreactivity in the perisinusoidal space. The results obtained using polyclonal antibodies against laminin were confirmed...... using chain-specific monoclonal antibodies against B2 laminin. In an ex vivo assay, viable tumour cells (Panc-1 and clone A) were found to bind with remarkable specificity to frozen sections of liver tissue containing perisinusoidal laminin as opposed to liver tissues without laminin. We suggest...

  13. Effector CD8(+) T cell-derived interleukin-10 enhances acute liver immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Jessica; Di Lucia, Pietro; Magini, Diletta; Moalli, Federica; Boni, Carolina; Benechet, Alexandre Pierre; Fumagalli, Valeria; Inverso, Donato; Vecchi, Andrea; Fiocchi, Amleto; Wieland, Stefan; Purcell, Robert; Ferrari, Carlo; Chisari, Francis V; Guidotti, Luca G; Iannacone, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Besides secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and effector molecules, effector CD8(+) T cells that arise upon acute infection with certain viruses have been shown to produce the regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and, therefore, contain immunopathology. Whether the same occurs during acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and role that IL-10 might play in liver disease is currently unknown. Mouse models of acute HBV pathogenesis, as well as chimpanzees and patients acutely infected with HBV, were used to analyse the role of CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 in liver immunopathology. Mouse HBV-specific effector CD8(+) T cells produce significant amounts of IL-10 upon in vivo antigen encounter. This is corroborated by longitudinal data in a chimpanzee acutely infected with HBV, where serum IL-10 was readily detectable and correlated with intrahepatic CD8(+) T cell infiltration and liver disease severity. Unexpectedly, mouse and human CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 was found to act in an autocrine/paracrine fashion to enhance IL-2 responsiveness, thus preventing antigen-induced HBV-specific effector CD8(+) T cell apoptosis. Accordingly, the use of mouse models of HBV pathogenesis revealed that the IL-10 produced by effector CD8(+) T cells promoted their own intrahepatic survival and, thus supported, rather than suppressed liver immunopathology. Effector CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 enhances acute liver immunopathology. Altogether, these results extend our understanding of the cell- and tissue-specific role that IL-10 exerts in immune regulation. Lay summary: Interleukin-10 is mostly regarded as an immunosuppressive cytokine. We show here that HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells produce IL-10 upon antigen recognition and that this cytokine enhances CD8(+) T cell survival. As such, IL-10 paradoxically promotes rather than suppresses liver disease. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunohistochemical Analysis of the Stem Cell Marker LGR5 in Pediatric Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zahida; Orr, Anne; Michalopoulos, George K; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan

    2017-01-01

    Aims In regenerating liver, hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) are recruited in response to injury; however, few highly specific human HPC markers exist for the hepatocyte lineage. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), a Wnt-associated stem cell marker, has been extensively studied in intestinal stem cells, but little is known about its expression in human liver. We hypothesized that LGR5+ HPCs are induced in the regenerative response to pediatric liver injury. Methods and results Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize LGR5 expression in pediatric liver explants (n = 36). We found cytoplasmic LGR5 expression in all cases; although, much less was observed in acute hepatic necrosis compared to chronic liver diseases. In the latter cases, >50% of hepatocytes were LGR5+, signifying a robust regenerative response mainly in the periphery of regenerative nodules. Only weak LGR5 staining was noted in bile ducts, suggesting hepatocyte-specific expression at the interface. Conclusions Although we observed some degree of regenerative response in all cases, LGR5 was highly expressed in chronic liver disease, possibly due to alternate regeneration and reprogramming pathways. LGR5 is predominant in peri-septal hepatocytes rather than epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) positive ductular reactions in chronic pediatric liver diseases and may represent a transitional HPC phenotype for the hepatocyte lineage. These studies are the first to support a unique role for LGR5 in human hepatocyte regeneration and as a potential predictive biomarker for recovery of liver function in children. Future work will also investigate the molecular mechanisms behind LGR5 expression.

  15. Convenient and efficient enrichment of the CD133+ liver cells from rat fetal liver cells as a source of liver stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-hui; Li, Ren; Dou, Ke-feng

    2011-03-01

    Although the stem cells are commonly isolated by FACS or MACS, they are very expensive and these is no specific marker for liver stem/progentior cells (LSPCs). This paper applied a convenient and efficient method to enrich LSPCs. The fetal liver cells (FLCs) were firstly enriched by Percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation (PDGC) from the rat fetal liver. Then the FLCs in culture were purified to be homogeneous in size by differential trypsinization and differential adherence (DTDA). Flow cytometric analysis revealed more than half of the purified FLCs expressed alternative markers of LSPCs (CD117, c-Met, Sca-1, CD90, CD49f and CD133). In other words, the purified FLCs were heterogeneous. Therefore, they were sequentially layered into six fractions by Percoll continuous gradient centrifugation (PCGC). Both CD133 and CD49f expressed decreasingly from fraction 1 to 6. In fraction 1 and 2, about 85% FLCs expressed CD133, which were revealed to be LSPCs by high expressions of AFP and CK-19, low expressions of G-6-P and ALB. To conclude, the purity of CD133(+) LSPCs enriched by combination of PDGC, DTDA and PCGC is close to that obtained by MACS. This study will greatly contribute to two important biological aspects: liver stem cells isolation and liver cell therapy.

  16. The secretion of high molecular weight cathepsin B from cultured human liver cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohsawa,Toshiya

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical characteristics of cathepsin B secreted from cultured human liver cancer cells were examined. The enzyme activity of culture medium against a synthetic substrate, N-carbobenzoxy-L-arginyl-L-arginine-4-methyl-coumaryl-7-amide, was dependent on the addition of cysteine, and the optimal pH was found to be 6.0. No activity was observed when the enzyme source was fresh medium not used for culture. These results suggest that the enzyme released from liver cancer cells is the thiol-protease cathepsin B. The molecular weight of the enzyme with 90% of the total activity was 40,000. Two cathepsin B molecules were found in liver tissue from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC; one was equivalent in size to the secreted enzyme, and a smaller one was the same as normal liver cathepsin B (27,000, which was also obtained from HCC-bearing cirrhotic liver. These results demonstrate that two molecules of cathepsin B are synthesized in liver cancer, and that the larger one is released into the surrounding tissue.

  17. L-arginine activates expression of endogenous coagulation factor Ⅷ in human normal liver cells%L-精氨酸对人肝细胞中内源凝血因子Ⅷ表达的激活作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱重阳; 李鑫; 温泉; 张军

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨L-精氨酸对人肝细胞LO2中内源凝血因子Ⅷ(Coagulation factorⅧ,FⅧ)表达的激活作用.方法 将LO2细胞分为试验组和对照组,试验组加入L-精氨酸(终浓度为10 mmol/L)分别培养24、36、48和60 h,对照组用等体积的灭菌水取代L-精氨酸培养.采用RT-PCR法检测LO2细胞中人FⅧ基因mRNA的转录水平并测序鉴定,一期法检测细胞培养上清液中人FⅧ的促凝活性(FⅧ:C),Western blot检测24、48 h时相点LO2细胞中人FⅧ蛋白的表达,免疫荧光染色结合激光共聚焦显微镜观察L-精氨酸作用48 h后LO2细胞中人FⅧ的表达.结果 加入L-精氨酸培养36、48、60 h后,LO2细胞中有人FⅧ基因mRNA的转录,而对照组未出现人FⅧ基因mRNA的转录;各时相点两组细胞培养上清液中人FⅧ:C的水平差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05);Western blot及激光共聚焦均观察到加L-精氨酸培养48 h后LO2细胞中出现人FⅧ的表达,而对照组细胞中均无人FⅧ的表达.结论 L-精氨酸可激活人正常肝细胞中内源FⅧ的表达.%Objective To explore the activating effect of L-arginine on expression of endogenous coagulation factor Ⅷ (Ⅷ) in human normal liver LO2 cells. Methods LO2 cells were divided into test and control groups. The cells in test group were treated with L-arginine (at afinal concentration of 10 mmol/L) for 24, 36, 48 and 60 h respectively, while those in control group with physiological saline. The transcription level of FⅧ mRNA in LO2 cells was determined by RT-PCR, and the PCR product was sequenced. The cell culture supernatant was collected and determined for clotting activity of human FⅧ (FⅧ : C) by one-stage method. The expressions of Ⅷ in LO2 cells 24 and 48 h after treatment were determined by Western blot, and that 48 h after treatment by IFA combined with laser confocal microscopy. Results Transcription of FⅧ mRNA was observed in the cells 36, 48 and 60 h after treatment with L

  18. Liver Immunology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Gao, Bin; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2014-01-01

    The liver is the largest organ in the body and is generally regarded by non-immunologists as not having lymphoid function. However, such is far from accurate. This review highlights the importance of the liver as a lymphoid organ. Firstly, we discuss experimental data surrounding the role of liver as a lymphoid organ. The liver facilitates a tolerance rather than immunoreactivity, which protects the host from antigenic overload of dietary components and drugs derived from the gut and is also instrumental to fetal immune tolerance. Loss of liver tolerance leads to autoaggressive phenomena which if are not controlled by regulatory lymphoid populations may lead to the induction of autoimmune liver diseases. Liver-related lymphoid subpopulations also act as critical antigen-presenting cells. The study of the immunological properties of liver and delineation of the microenvironment of the intrahepatic milieu in normal and diseased livers provides a platform to understand the hierarchy of a series of detrimental events which lead to immune-mediated destruction of the liver and the rejection of liver allografts. The majority of emphasis within this review will be on the normal mononuclear cell composition of the liver. However, within this context, we will discus select, but not all, immune mediated liver disease and attempt to place these data in the context of human autoimmunity. PMID:23720323

  19. Liver-derived systemic factors drive β-cell hyperplasia in insulin resistant states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Kawamori, Dan; Dirice, Ercument; Liew, Chong Wee; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Hu, Jiang; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Qian, Weijun; Wagers, Amy J.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2013-02-21

    Integrative organ cross-talk regulates key aspects of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation may underlie metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. To test the hypothesis that cross-talk between the liver and pancreatic islets modulates β-cell growth in response to insulin resistance, we used the Liver-specific Insulin Receptor Knockout (LIRKO) mouse, a unique model that exhibits dramatic islet hyperplasia. Using complementary in vivo parabiosis and transplantation assays, and in vitro islet culture approaches, we demonstrate that humoral, non-neural, non-cell autonomous factor(s) induce β-cell proliferation in LIRKO mice. Furthermore, we report that a hepatocyte-derived factor(s) stimulates mouse and human β-cell proliferation in ex vivo assays, independent of ambient glucose and insulin levels. These data implicate the liver as a critical source of β-cell growth factors in insulin resistant states.

  20. A novel form of the human manganese superoxide dismutase protects rat and human livers undergoing ischaemia and reperfusion injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hide, Diana; Ortega-Ribera, Martí; Fernández-Iglesias, Anabel; Fondevila, Constantino; Salvadó, M Josepa; Arola, Lluís; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos; Mancini, Aldo; Bosch, Jaime; Gracia-Sancho, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    ...), liver grafts from healthy and steatotic rats, and human liver samples, we aimed to characterize the effects of a new recombinant form of human manganese superoxide dismutase (rMnSOD) on hepatic CS+WR injury. After CS...

  1. Signals and Cells Involved in Regulating Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I. Kang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration is a complex phenomenon aimed at maintaining a constant liver mass in the event of injury resulting in loss of hepatic parenchyma. Partial hepatectomy is followed by a series of events involving multiple signaling pathways controlled by mitogenic growth factors (HGF, EGF and their receptors (MET and EGFR. In addition multiple cytokines and other signaling molecules contribute to the orchestration of a signal which drives hepatocytes into DNA synthesis. The other cell types of the liver receive and transmit to hepatocytes complex signals so that, in the end of the regenerative process, complete hepatic tissue is assembled and regeneration is terminated at the proper time and at the right liver size. If hepatocytes fail to participate in this process, the biliary compartment is mobilized to generate populations of progenitor cells which transdifferentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver size.

  2. Human precision-cut liver slices as a model to test antifibrotic drugs in the early onset of liver fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, Inge M.; Mutsaers, Henricus A. M.; Luangmonkong, Theerut; Hadi, Mackenzie; Oosterhuis, Dorenda; de Jong, Koert P.; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Olinga, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is the progressive accumulation of connective tissue ultimately resulting in loss of organ function. Currently, no effective antifibrotics are available due to a lack of reliable human models. Here we investigated the fibrotic process in human precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) and stu

  3. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAOUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITINABSTRACT Both dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) release iron from human liver ferritin (HLF) with or without the presence of ascorbic acid. ...

  4. [Correction of cronic liver failure by transplantation of liver cells suspension and cell-engineering designs (experimental investigation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Got'e, S V; Shagidulin, M Iu; Onishchenko, N A; Krasheninnikov, M E; Il'inskiĭ, I M; Mozheĭko, N P; Liundup, A V; Volkova, E A; Petrakov, K I; Avramov, P V; Perova, N V; Sevast'ianov, V I

    2013-01-01

    On an experimental model of chronic fibrotic liver damage (male rats Wistar (n-60), damage of CCl4, the duration of the experiment 90 days) it was studied the effectiveness of cell therapy for the correction of chronic liver failure. These rats were divided into 3 experimental groups: in the Ist-group (control, n=10) isotonic saline (650 mkl.) was injected; in the IInd-group (n=20) suspension of liver cells was applicated in a dose 8 - l0 x 10(6) cells; in the IIIrd-group (n=30) suspension of liver cells and bone marrow cells (mesenchymal stromal cells) in ratio 5:1 were used as cell associates on microparticles intjectable heterogeneous biopolymer hydrogel "SpheroGEL" (cell-engineering design) in common dose 8 - l0 x 10(6) It was ascertained that in the 2nd and in the 3rd groups the accelerated normalization of disturbed liver functional indices (ALT, AST, ALP) took place - to 30 days, but in the control group only to 90 days. The reliable differences in rats ofnormalization offunctional indices were absent between the IInd and the IIIrd groups. But in 90 days by using special histological dyeing it was found out that defibrotic processes in liver tissue were more expressed in the IIIrd group in comparison with the IIIrd group. Received results were consequence of prolonged vital activity of cells (liver cells and mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells) into cell-engineering designs, which were transplanted in the IIIrd group. The obtained effect can be explained by that the developed cell-engineering designs provide adequate conditions for prolonged vital activity of the transplanted cells.

  5. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ausiliatrice Puglisi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases.

  6. Hepatic stellate cells and innate immunity in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang-Gun Suh; Won-Il Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Constant alcohol consumption is a major cause of chronic liver disease, and there has been a growing concern regarding the increased mortality rates worldwide. Alcoholic liver diseases (ALDs) range from mild to more severe conditions, such as steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The liver is enriched with innate immune cells (e.g. natural killer cells and Kupffer cells) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and interestingly, emerging evidence suggests that innate immunity contributes to the development of ALDs (e.g. steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis). Indeed, HSCs play a crucial role in alcoholic steatosis via production of endocannabinoid and retinol metabolites. This review describes the roles of the innate immunity and HSCs in the pathogenesis of ALDs, and suggests therapeutic targets and strategies to assist in the reduction of ALD.

  7. Convenient and efficient enrichment of the CD133+ liver cells from rat fetal liver as a source of liver stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihui; You, Nan; Dou, Kefeng

    2012-01-01

    Although stem cells are commonly isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or magnetic affinity cell sorting, they are very expensive, and they need known markers. However, there is no specific marker for liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs). Here, we describe a convenient and efficient method (three-step method) to enrich LSPCs. The fetal liver cells (FLCs) were firstly enriched by Percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation from the rat fetal liver. Then the FLCs in culture were purified to be homogeneous in size by differential trypsinization and differential adherence. Finally, fetal liver stem/progenitor cells (FLSPCs) were enriched from purified FLCs by Percoll continuous gradient centrifugation. Flow cytometric analysis combining with marker CD133 was used to detect the purity of FLSPCs and evaluate the isolating effects of the three-step method.

  8. 血红铆钉菇子实体对人肝星状细胞LX-2和人肝癌细胞Hep G2增殖的影响%Effects of Chemical Fractions from Chroogomphus rutilus Fruiting Body on the Proliferation of Human Hepatic Stellate Cells LX-2 and Human Liver Carcinoma Hep G2 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝鹤鸣; 吴艳玲; 李雪; 姚大雷; 张昌浩; 崔炯谟; 李镐

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] To study the effects of chemical fractions from Chroogomphus rutilus fruiting body on the proliferation of human hepatic stellate cells LX-2 and human liver carcinoma Hep G2 cells,and to screen the active fractions with anti-hepatic fibrosis and anti-tumor activity from C.rutilus fruiting body.[Method] The polysaccharide,petroleum ether,dichloromethane,ethyl acetate,n-butanol and aqueous fractions from C.rutilus fruiting body were obtained by the methods of nature products chemistry.MTT assay was used to determine the effects of above fractions on the proliferation of human hepatic stellate cells LX-2 and human liver carcinoma Hep G2 cells.Morphological changes were observed through invert microscope.[Result] The petroleum ether fraction,dichloromethane fraction and ethyl acetate fraction showed inhibitory activities on human hepatic stellate cells LX-2 with IC50 values at 519.6,526,675.7 μg/ml,respectively,and human liver carcinoma Hep G2 cells with IC50 values at 727.6,610.1,618.1 μg/ml,respectively.Morphological change of apoptosis body formation was observed by invert microscope.[Conclusion] Among polysaccharide and solvent fractions from C.rutilus fruiting body,the petroleum ether fraction,dichloromethane fraction and ethyl acetate fraction have anti-hepatic fibrosis and anti-tumor activities as the main active parts.%[目的]探讨血红铆钉菇子实体对人肝癌细胞HepG2和人肝星状细胞LX-2增殖的影响,筛选出血红铆钉菇子实体抗肝纤维化和抗肿瘤作用的活性部位.[方法]利用天然药物化学方法提取得到血红铆钉菇子实体的石油醚、二氯甲烷、乙酸乙酯、正丁醇、水和粗多糖提取物,应用MTT法观察血红铆钉菇子实体不同溶剂提取物对体外培养的人肝星状细胞LX-2和人肝癌细胞Hep G2增殖的抑制作用,通过倒置显微镜观察细胞的形态学变化.[结果]血红铆钉菇子实体石油醚、二氯甲烷和乙酸乙酯提

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells support hepatocyte function in engineered liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yoshie; Yagi, Hiroshi; Inomata, Kenta; Matsubara, Kentaro; Hibi, Taizo; Abe, Yuta; Kitago, Minoru; Shinoda, Masahiro; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that organ decellularization is a promising approach to facilitate the clinical application of regenerative therapy by providing a platform for organ engineering. This unique strategy uses native matrices to act as a reservoir for the functional cells which may show therapeutic potential when implanted into the body. Appropriate cell sources for artificial livers have been debated for some time. The desired cell type in artificial livers is primary hepatocytes, but in addition, other supportive cells may facilitate this stem cell technology. In this context, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is an option meeting the criteria for therapeutic organ engineering. Ideally, supportive cells are required to (1) reduce the hepatic cell mass needed in an engineered liver by enhancing hepatocyte function, (2) modulate hepatic regeneration in a paracrine fashion or by direct contact, and (3) enhance the preservability of parenchymal cells during storage. Here, we describe enhanced hepatic function achieved using a strategy of sequential infusion of cells and illustrate the advantages of co-cultivating bone marrow-derived MSCs with primary hepatocytes in the engineered whole-liver scaffold. These co-recellularized liver scaffolds colonized by MSCs and hepatocytes were transplanted into live animals. After blood flow was established, we show that expression of adhesion molecules and proangiogenic factors was upregulated in the graft.

  10. Human endostatin gene transfer, either naked or with liposome, has the same inhibitory effect on growth of mouse liver tumor cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Li-Fen; Liu, Hua; Guo, Chun; Liu, Su-Xia; Cao, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Li-Ning; Sun, Wen-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore a safe and efficient strategy of tumor therapy using anti-angiogenetic agents. METHODS: Endostatin gene with a signal sequence of human IgG γ chain was amplified by PCR and cloned into pVAX1 plasmid which was the only vector authorized by FDA in clinical trial to construct a recombinant plasmid named as pVAX-sEN. The recombinant plasmid was detected with Eco I/Kpn I and DNA sequencing. BALB/c mice bearing hepatocarcinoma cell line H22 were treated with naked pVAX-sEN or liposome-DNA complex in which the dose of DNA and the ratio of DNA and liposome were different from each other. To compare the efficiency of gene transfection, expression of endostatin at the treated tumor site was assayed with ELISA. To investigate the effect of pVAX1-sEN on hepatocellular carcinoma, pVAX-sEN either naked or in liposome-DNA complex was injected into BALB/c mice bearing H22, then the diameter of tumors was measured, microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry, endostatin expression in vivo was assayed at different time points. RESULTS: DNA sequencing showed the endostatin gene with the signal peptide was correctly cloned. In situ gene expression assay indicated that both the ratio of DNA and liposome and the dose of DNA could affect the gene transfection efficiency. Interestingly, naked pVAX-sEN had a similar in situ endostatin expression to pVAX-sEN with liposome. Animal experiments showed that pVAX-sEN together with pVAX-sEN-liposome complex could efficiently suppress the growth of mouse hepatoma cells. CONCLUSION: Naked endostatin plasmid intratumoral injection can get a similar gene transfection efficiency to liposome-DNA complex when used in situ. PMID:15334690

  11. Human endostatin gene transfer,either naked or with liposome,has the same inhibitory effect on growth of mouse liver tumor cells in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hong Ma; Wen-Sheng Sun; Yan Zhang; Xiao-Yan Wang; Li-Fen Gao; Hua Liu; Chun Guo; Su-Xia Liu; Ying-Lin Cao; Li-Ning Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore a safe and efficient strategy of tumor therapy using anti-angiogenetic agents.METHODS: Endostatin gene with a signal sequence of human IgG γ chain was amplified by PCR and cloned into pVAX1 plasmid which was the only vector authorized by FDA in clinical trial to construct a recombinant plasmid named as pVAX-sEN. The recombinant plasmid was detected with EcoRI/KpnI and DNA sequencing. BALB/c mice bearing hepatocarcinoma cell line H22 were treated with naked pVAX-sEN or liposome-DNA complex in which the dose of DNA and the ratio of DNA and liposome were different from each other. To compare the efficiency of gene transfection, expression of endostatin at the treated tumor site was assayed with ELISA. To investigate the effect of pVAX1-sEN on hepatocellular carcinoma, pVAX-sEN either naked or in liposome-DNA complex was injected into BALB/c mice bearing H22, then the diameter of tumors was measured, microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry, endostatin expression in vivo was assayed at different time points.RESULTS: DNA sequencing showed the endostatin gene with the signal peptide was correctly cloned. In situ gene expression assay indicated that both the ratio of DNA and liposome and the dose of DNA could affect the gene transfection efficiency. Interestingly, naked pVAX-sEN had a similar in situ endostatin expression to pVAX-sEN with liposome. Animal experiments showed that pVAX-sEN together with pVAX-sEN-liposome complex could efficiently suppress the growth of mouse hepatoma cells.CONCLUSION: Naked endostatin plasmid intratumoral injection can get a similar gene transfection efficiency to liposome-DNA complex when used in situ.

  12. Characterization of hepatic progenitors from human fetal liver during second trimester

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mekala Subba Rao; Aleem Ahmed Khan; Nyamath Parveen; Mohammed Aejaz Habeeb; Chittor Mohammed Habibullah; Gopal Pande

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To enrich hepatic progenitors using epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAH) as a marker from human fetal liver and investigate the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and their markers associated with hepatic progenitor cells.METHODS: EpCAM +ve cells were isolated usingmagnetic cell sorting (MACS) from human fetuses (n =10) at 15-25 wk gestation.Expression of markers for hepatic progenitors such as albumin,alpha-fetoprotein (AFP),CD29 (integrin β1),CD49f (integrin α6) and CD90 (Thy 1) was studied by using flow cytometry,immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR; HLA class Ⅰ (A,B,C) and class Ⅱ (DR) expression was studied by flow cytometry only.RESULTS: FACS analysis indicated that EpCAM +ve cells were positive for CD29,CD49f,CD90,CD34,HLA class Ⅰ,albumin and AFP but negative for HLA class Ⅱ (DR) and CD45.RT PCR showed that EpCAM +ve cells expressed liver epithelial markers (CK18),biliary specific marker (CK19) and hepatic markers (albumin,AFP).On immunocytochemical staining,EpCAH +ve cells were shown positive signals for CK18 and albumin.CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that these EpCAM +ve cells can be used as hepatic progenitors for cell transplantation with a minimum risk of alloreactivity and these cells may serve as a potential source for enrichment of hepatic progenitor.

  13. Granulin-epithelin precursor and ATP-dependent binding