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Sample records for human leukocyte proteins

  1. Detection of CFTR protein in human leukocytes by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jan; Vezzalini, Marzia; Verzè, Genny; Caldrer, Sara; Bolognin, Silvia; Buffelli, Mario; Bellisola, Giuseppe; Tridello, Gloria; Assael, Baroukh Maurice; Melotti, Paola; Sorio, Claudio

    2014-07-01

    Leukocytes have previously been shown to express detectable levels of the protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This study aims to evaluate the application of flow cytometric (FC) analysis to detect CFTR expression, and changes thereof, in these cells. Aliquots (200 μL) of peripheral whole blood from 12 healthy control volunteers (CTRLs), 12 carriers of a CFTR mutation (CFC), and 40 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) carrying various combinations of CFTR mutations were incubated with specific fluorescent probes recognizing CFTR protein expressed on the plasma membrane of leukocytes. FC was applied to analyze CFTR expression in monocytes, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. CFTR protein was detected in monocytes and lymphocytes, whereas inconclusive results were obtained from the analysis of PMN cells. Mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) ratio value and %CFTR-positive cells above a selected threshold were the two parameters selected to quantify CFTR expression in cells. Lowest variability and the highest reproducibility were obtained when analyzing monocytes. ANOVA results indicated that both parameters were able to discriminate monocytes of healthy controls and CF individuals according to CFTR mutation classes with high accuracy. Significantly increased MFI ratio values were recorded in CFTR-defective cells that were also able to improve CFTR function after ex vivo treatment with PTC124 (Ataluren), an investigative drug designed to permit the ribosome to read through nonsense CFTR mutations. The method described is minimally invasive and may be used in the monitoring of responses to drugs whose efficacy can depend on increased CFTR protein expression levels. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of human leukocyte proteins from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Thorsrud, A.K.; Munthe, E.; Jellum, E.

    1982-04-01

    Human leukocyte proteins from more than 150 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, together with age- and sex-matched controls, were analyzed by use of the ISO-DALT technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, psoriatic arthritis, calcium tendinitis, post-infectious arthritis, and asymmetrical seronegative arthritis were also included as positive controls. Synthesis of several proteins, referred to by number as members of the Rheuma set, is shown to increase in the leukocyte preparations from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Several of these proteins are specific to monocytes or granulocytes; others are of unknown cellular origin, but appear to be unique to rheumatoid arthritis. The Rheuma proteins appear to be indicators of disease activity, because their increased synthesis can be correlated with sedimentation rate and other clinical indices of rheumatoid disease activity.

  3. Identification of calprotectin, a calcium binding leukocyte protein, in human dental calculus matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, J; Nishikawa, S; Ishida, H; Yamashita, K; Kitamura, S; Kohri, K; Nagata, T

    1997-05-01

    Calprotectin is a calcium binding protein produced by leukocytes, macrophages and epithelial cells, and its levels in several tissues increase during infections and in many inflamed areas, suggesting that it may be an indicator of inflammatory activity. Osteopontin is a prominent phosphorylated glycoprotein in bone matrix, having calcium binding capacity. Recently, it has been reported that calprotectin and osteopontin are present in urinary stones (pathological mineralized masses in the body), and that these proteins may be involved in their formation. Dental calculus formed by mineralization of dental plaque is an inflammatory factor which may contribute to periodontal disease. It contains many organic components involved in mineralization. We recently found osteopontin molecules in human dental calculus and suggested that the components of its matrix may be similar to those of urinary stones. In this study, we investigated the presence of calprotectin in human dental calculus by immunohistochemical and immunoblotting analyses using a specific antibody for calprotectin. After fixation and demineralization of dental calculi adhered to tooth roots, sections embedded in paraffin were immunoreacted with the antibody for calprotectin and positive immunostaining for calprotectin was observed. Dental calculus proteins were then extracted with EDTA and separated by electrophoresis on 15% polyacrylamide gels. By immunoblotting analysis, 3 or 4 bands were observed at 11, 14.5, 22-25, 28 or 36.5 kDa and these patterns corresponded to those of calprotectin subunits. When non-immune rabbit serum was used instead of calprotectin-specific antibody as a negative control, no immunoreactivity was observed. These findings indicate that calprotectin is associated not only with antibacterial action but also with calcium binding capacity during dental calculus formation.

  4. Distribution of cytoskeletal proteins, integrins, leukocyte adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins in plastic-embedded human and rat kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Coers, W; van der Horst, MLC; Suurmeijer, AJH

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha -actinin, vinculin, beta -tubulin, keratin, vimentin, desmin), adhesion molecules for cell-matrix interations (very later antigens [VLA1-6], beta1, beta2 [CD18], vitronectin receptor [alphav beta3], CD 11b), leukocyte adhesi

  5. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Simon, Christian; Kudahl, Ulrich J.;

    2015-01-01

    target diverse regions in highly variable viral pathogens and this diversity may need to be addressed through redefinition of suitable peptide targets. Methods: We have developed a method for antigen assessment and target selection for polyvalent vaccines, with which we identified immune epitopes from...... the number of potential vaccine targets compared to the number of targets discovered using the traditional approach where low-frequency peptides are excluded. Conclusions: We developed a webserver with an intuitive visualization scheme for summarizing the T cell-based antigenic potential of any given protein......Background: Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often...

  6. Protein Profiling of Isolated Leukocytes, Myofibroblasts, Epithelial, Basal, and Endothelial Cells from Normal, Hyperplastic, Cancerous, and Inflammatory Human Prostate Tissues

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    Zahraa I. Khamis, Kenneth A. Iczkowski, Ziad J. Sahab, Qing-Xiang Amy Sang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ neoplastic prostate cells are not lethal unless they become invasive and metastatic. For cells to become invasive, the prostate gland must undergo degradation of the basement membrane and disruption of the basal cell layer underneath the luminal epithelia. Although the roles of proteinases in breaking down the basement membrane have been well-studied, little is known about the factors that induce basal cell layer disruption, degeneration, and its eventual disappearance in invasive cancer. It is hypothesized that microenvironmental factors may affect the degradation of the basal cell layer, which if protected may prevent tumor progression and invasion. In this study, we have revealed differential protein expression patterns between epithelial and stromal cells isolated from different prostate pathologies and identified several important epithelial and stromal proteins that may contribute to inflammation and malignant transformation of human benign prostate tissues to cancerous tissues using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and proteomics methods. Cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 was downregulated in basal cells of benign prsotate. Caspase-1 and interleukin-18 receptor 1 were highly expressed in leukocytes of prostate cancer. Proto-oncogene Wnt-3 was downregulated in endothelial cells of prostatitis tissue and tyrosine phosphatase non receptor type 1 was only found in normal and benign endothelial cells. Poly ADP-ribose polymerase 14 was downregulated in myofibroblasts of prostatitis tissue. Interestingly, integrin alpha-6 was upregulated in epithelial cells but not detected in myofibroblasts of prostate cancer. Further validation of these proteins may generate new strategies for the prevention of basal cell layer disruption and subsequent cancer invasion.

  7. Oral glucosamine sulfate supplementation does not induce endoplasmic reticulum stress or activate the unfolded protein response in circulating leukocytes of human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Cameron S; Beriault, Daniel R; Behdinan, Tina; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H

    2014-04-01

    Glucosamine sulfate is a dietary supplement that is marketed as a treatment for osteoarthritis. Recent evidence from animal and cell culture models have suggested that glucosamine treatment can promote the misfolding of proteins and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated whether glucosamine sulfate supplementation activates the UPR in circulating leukocytes of human subjects. Cultured Thp1 human monocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations of glucosamine (0, 0.25, 1.0, 4.0 mmol · L(-1)) for 18 h. We observed a dose-dependent increase in intracellular glucosamine levels as well as the activation of UPR. To test the effect of glucosamine sulfate supplementation in humans, 14 healthy human subjects took 1500 mg · day(-1) glucosamine sulfate for 14 days. Metabolic parameters and blood samples were collected before and after supplementation. In humans, glucosamine sulfate supplementation did not alter metabolic parameters including lipid levels and glucose tolerance. Further, glucosamine sulfate supplementation did not affect intracellular glucosamine levels or activate the UPR in the leukocytes of human subjects. Our results indicate that in healthy human subjects, the recommended dose of glucosamine sulfate (1500 mg · day(-1)) for 14 days does not significantly alter intracellular glucosamine levels and does not activate the UPR in circulating leukocytes.

  8. Epac inhibits apoptosis of human leukocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandoch, M.; Bujok, V.; Fleckenstein, D.; Schmidt, M.; Fischer, J. W.; Weber, A. -A.

    2009-01-01

    cAMP is known to participate in the regulation of apoptosis in leukocytes. Depending on the cell type, pro- and antiapoptotic effects of cAMP have been described. Thus far, most of the cAMP-dependent effects have been attributed to the activation of PKA. However, Epac proteins (direct cAMP targets a

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine

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    Hamid Nawaz-Tipu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1 protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine’s candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Threealleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens moreprevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  10. Hepatitis C Virus Subtype 3a Envelope Protein 1 Binding with Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Types of Pakistani Population: Candidate Epitopes for Synthetic Peptide Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz-Tipu, Hamid

    2015-10-01

    The object of this cross sectional study was to determine the HCV subtype 3a envelope protein binding affinity with Human Leukocyte Antigen. Envelope 1 (E1) protein is one of the structural proteins responsible for entering the cells through the receptors. The binding affinity of E1 protein epitopes to the selected Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles was investigated using the computer-based tools. These prediction tools were also used to design the synthetic vaccine's candidate epitopes and to identify the individuals/populations who are likely to be responder to those vaccines.The mean frequency of HLA I antigens in Pakistani population was calculated. Three alleles each from HLA A and B were selected. E1 protein sequence extracted from HCV 3a isolates was retrieved and twenty-four sequences of it were selected. NetMHCcons 1.0 server was used to determine the binding affinities of HLA alleles to the epitope sequences of 10 amino acids in length.A02, A03, A11, A24, A33, B08, B13, B15, B35 and B40 were the first five antigens more prevalent in Pakistan each from HLA A and HLA B.. We did not find any binding affinity between HLA A*201, B*1501 and B*4001 and epitopes from E1 sequences in a threshold of 50 nM. Totally five various epitopes derived from different isolates were characterized.The prediction of HLA-E1 epitope specific bindings and the forthcoming response can be a useful bioinformatics tool to uncover the right synthetic peptides for vaccine design purposes.

  11. Does human leukocyte elastase degrade intact skin elastin?

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    Schmelzer, Christian E H; Jung, Michael C; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Heinz, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    This study aimed to investigate the susceptibility of intact fibrillar human elastin to human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. Elastin is a vital protein of the extracellular matrix of vertebrates, and provides exceptional properties including elasticity and tensile strength to many tissues and organs, including the aorta, lung, cartilage, elastic ligaments and skin, and is thus critical for their long-term function. Mature elastin is an insoluble and extremely durable protein that undergoes very little turnover, but sustained exposure to proteases may lead to irreversible and severe damage, and thus to functional loss of the elastic fiber network. Hence, it is a key issue to understand which enzymes actually initiate elastolysis under certain pathological conditions or during intrinsic aging. In this paper, we provide a complete workflow for isolation of pure and intact elastin from very small tissue samples to test enzymes for their elastolytic potential. This workflow was applied to skin samples from variously aged individuals, and it was found that strong differences exist in the degradability of the elastins investigated. In summary, human leukocyte elastase was unable to degrade intact elastin fibers but hydrolyzed elastin derived from the skin of old people. However, cathepsin G cleaved all elastin samples, even those derived from younger individuals. These results indicate that human leukocyte elastase is not a driving force for elastolysis, but may nevertheless promote further breakdown of elastic fibers after the action of other enzymes such as cathepsin G. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  12. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses bind differentially to human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Winnie M; Bartee, Eric C; Moreb, Jan S; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H; McFadden, Grant

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes.

  13. Ekspresi Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G dan Heat-Shock Protein-70 (Hsp-70 pada Pertumbuhan Janin Terhambat

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    Sri Sulistyowati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intra uterine growth retardation (IUGR is one of the leading causes of higher morbidity and mortality in perinatal. Immune maladaptation affects trophoblast invasion and spiralis arteria remodeling that will cause placental tissue hypoxia. This research aimed to analyze human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G and heat-shock protein-70 (Hsp-70 expression on the IUGR trophoblast and normal pregnancy, by applying analytical observational method and cross sectional approach. This research was conducted at the Obstetric and Gynecology Department of Dr. Moewardi Hospital Surakarta from November to December 2011. The total samples were 30, divided into two groups. There were 15 samples trophoblast on IUGR and 15 samples trophoblast from normal pregnancy. All samples were tested for HLA-G and Hsp-70 using immunohistochemistry. The data were analyzed by using t-test. The mean of HLA-G expression on the IUGR groups was 32.42±8.90 and on the normal pregnancy groups was 43.92±14.91 (p=0.016. Heat-shock protein70 expression on the IUGR groups was 2.4355+0.26647 and on the normal pregnancy groups was 1.5920+0.17142 with p=0.008. In conclusion, in IUGR, the HLA-G expression is lower and the Hsp-70 expression is higher than in normal pregnancy.

  14. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  15. Screening of genes for proteins interacting with the PS1TP5 protein of hepatitis B virus: probing a human leukocyte cDNA library using the yeast two-hybrid system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-kang; ZHAO Long-feng; CHENG Jun; GUO Jiang; LUN Yong-zhi; HONG Yuan

    2006-01-01

    Background The hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome includes S, C, P and X regions. The S region is divided into four subregions of pre-pre-S, pre-S1, pre-S2 and S. PS1TP5 (human gene 5 transactivated by pre-S1 protein of HBV) is a novel target gene transactivated by the pre-S1 protein that has been screened with a suppression subtractive hybridization technique in our laboratory (GenBank accession: AY427953). In order to investigate the biological function of the PS1TP5 protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid system 3 to screen proteins from a human leukocyte cDNA library interacting with the PS 1TP5 protein.Methods The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to amplify the gene of PS1TP5 from the mRNA of HepG2 cells and the gene was then cloned into the pGEM-T vector. After being sequenced and analyzed with Vector NTI 9.1 and NCBI BLAST software, the target gene of PS1TP5 was cut from the pGEM-T vector and cloned into a yeast expression plasmid pGBKT7, then "bait" plasmid pGBKT7-PS 1TP5 was transformed into the yeast strain AH109. The yeast protein was isolated and analyzed with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting hybridization.After expression of the pGBKT7-PS1TP5 fusion protein in the AH109 yeast strain was accomplished, a yeast two-hybrid screening was performed by mating AH 109 with Y 187 containing a leukocyte cDNA library plasmid.The mated yeast was plated on quadruple dropout medium and assayed for α-gal activity. The interaction between the PS1TP5 protein and the proteins obtained from positive colonies was further confirmed by repeating the yeast two-hybrid screen. After extracting and sequencing of plasmids from blue colonies we carried out a bioinformatic analysis.Results Forty true positive colonies were selected and sequenced, full length sequences were obtained and we searched for homologous DNA sequences from GenBank. Among the 40 positive colonies, 23 coding genes

  16. The Many Faces of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2014-01-01

    is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, a nonclassical HLA protein displaying limited polymorphism, restricted tissue distribution, and a unique alternative splice pattern. HLA-G is primarily expressed in placenta and plays multifaceted roles during pregnancy, both as a soluble and a membrane-bound molecule...... pregnancy and pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia, recurrent spontaneous abortions, and subfertility or infertility. This review aims to clarify the multifunctional role of HLA-G in pregnancy-related disorders by focusing on genetic variation, differences in mRNA stability between HLA-G alleles...

  17. Effects of Pneumolysin on Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes and Platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, M K; Boese-Marrazzo, D; Pierce, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    Pneumolysin was bound by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a reaction which occurred very rapidly at 0 degrees C. Low concentrations of pneumolysin were found to stimulate leukocyte migration and lysosomal enzyme secretion. At increasing lysin levels, inhibition of spontaneous migration and chemotaxis, cell death, and lysis were observed. Pneumolysin was also found to lyse platelets and to activate serum to become chemotactic.

  18. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, John B; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E

    2016-08-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces.

  19. Longitudinal Changes in Leukocyte Telomere Length and Mortality in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Laila; Thinggaard, Mikael; Fenger, Mogens;

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) ostensibly shortens with age and has been moderately associated with mortality. In humans, these findings have come almost solely from cross-sectional studies. Only recently has LTL shortening within individuals been analyzed in longitudinal studies. Such studies...... are relevant to establish LTL dynamics as biomarkers of mortality as well as to disentangle the causality of telomeres on aging....

  20. Characterization of Leukocyte Formin FMNL1 Expression in Human Tissues

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    Heuser, Vanina D.; Iljin, Kristiina; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Carpén, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Formins are cytoskeleton regulating proteins characterized by a common FH2 structural domain. As key players in the assembly of actin filaments, formins direct dynamic cytoskeletal processes that influence cell shape, movement and adhesion. The large number of formin genes, fifteen in the human, suggests distinct tasks and expression patterns for individual family members, in addition to overlapping functions. Several formins have been associated with invasive cell properties in experimental models, linking them to cancer biology. One example is FMNL1, which is considered to be a leukocyte formin and is known to be overexpressed in lymphomas. Studies on FMNL1 and many other formins have been hampered by a lack of research tools, especially antibodies suitable for staining paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissues. Here we characterize, using bioinformatics tools and a validated antibody, the expression pattern of FMNL1 in human tissues and study its subcellular distribution. Our results indicate that FMNL1 expression is not restricted to hematopoietic tissues and that neoexpression of FMNL1 can be seen in epithelial cancer. PMID:24700756

  1. Identifying coevolutionary patterns in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules.

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    Jiang, Xiaowei; Fares, Mario A

    2010-05-01

    The antigenic peptide, major histocompatibility complex molecule (MHC; also called human leukocyte antigen, HLA), coreceptor CD8, or CD4 and T-cell receptor (TCR) function as a complex to initiate effectors' mechanisms of the immune system. The tight functional and physical interaction among these molecules may have involved strong coevolution links among domains within and between proteins. Despite the importance of unraveling such dependencies to understand the arms race of host-pathogen interaction, no previous studies have aimed at achieving such an objective. Here, we perform an exhaustive coevolution analysis and show that indeed such dependencies are strongly shaping the evolution and probably the function of these molecules. We identify intramolecular coevolution in HLA class I and II at domains important for their immune activity. Most of the amino acid sites identified to be coevolving in HLAI have been also detected to undergo positive Darwinian selection highlighting therefore their adaptive value. We also identify coevolution among antigen-binding pockets (P1-P9) and among these and TCR-binding sites. Conversely to HLAI, coevolution is weaker in HLAII. Our results support that such coevolutionary patterns are due to selective pressures of host-pathogen coevolution and cooperative binding of TCRs, antigenic peptides, and CD8/CD4 to HLAI and HLAII.

  2. Imaging Cytometry of Human Leukocytes with Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

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    Wu, Cheng-Ham; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Huang, Shih-Hung; Lin, Jong-Wei; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Wu, Hau-Tieng; Wu, Yao-Ming; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Based on third-harmonic-generation (THG) microscopy and a k-means clustering algorithm, we developed a label-free imaging cytometry method to differentiate and determine the types of human leukocytes. According to the size and average intensity of cells in THG images, in a two-dimensional scatter plot, the neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes in peripheral blood samples from healthy volunteers were clustered into three differentiable groups. Using these features in THG images, we could count the number of each of the three leukocyte types both in vitro and in vivo. The THG imaging-based counting results agreed well with conventional blood count results. In the future, we believe that the combination of this THG microscopy-based imaging cytometry approach with advanced texture analysis of sub-cellular features can differentiate and count more types of blood cells with smaller quantities of blood.

  3. Comparison of photonic and electromagnetic effects on the human leukocyte

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    DellaVecchia, Michael A.; Beard, Richard B.; Feng, D.; Dai, Xiaoyan; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Priezzhev, Alexander V.

    1998-06-01

    The dielectric and magnetic influence on human cells have been widely studied previously by the authors. Recently, the effects of energy in the visible electromagnetic spectrum have been investigated. In this subsequent study, the photonic effects on the in vitro migration of the polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are compared with the corresponding electromagnetic field effects. Dielectric spectra of the polymorph in the 300 KHz to 400 KHz and 700 KHz to 800 KHz range have been measured. At frequencies of 350 KHz and 720 KHz an increase in the migration of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte have been observed. This stimulation was attributed to the charges on the nuclear surface. Recent preliminary data have shown a similar increased migration in the 20 MHz range. Photonic studies have indicated an enhanced migration for the polymorphonuclear leukocytes at a wavelength of 660 nm (red) and an inhibited migration at 565 nm (green). The photonic effects were postulated to be the results of a biochemical interaction rather than a membranous surface charge displacement secondary to an electric field. The migration of the white blood cells were measurement via the Boyden chamber technique and expressed in terms of a cytokinetic index which expresses the cellular movement independent of its environmental concentration gradient.

  4. In silico identification of epitopes from house cat and dog proteins as peptide immunotherapy candidates based on human leukocyte antigen binding affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Tipu, H. N.; Ahmed, D.; Gardezi, S. A. H.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this descriptive study was to determine Felis domesticus (cat) and Canis familiaris (dog) protein epitopes that bind strongly to selected HLA class II alleles to identify synthetic vaccine candidate epitopes and to identify individuals/populations who are likely to respond to vaccines. FASTA amino acid sequences of experimentally validated allergenic proteins of house cat and dog were identified using International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) allergen nomenclature...

  5. Human leukocyte antigen-G in the male reproductive system and in seminal plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Bzorek, Michael; Pass, Malene B

    2011-01-01

    -eclampsia. We have investigated whether HLA-G protein is present in human seminal plasma and in different tissue samples of the male reproductive system. Western blot technique and a soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) assay were used to detect sHLA-G in human seminal plasma samples. Immunohistochemical staining......One of the non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib proteins, HLA-G, is believed to exert important immunoregulatory functions, especially during pregnancy. The presence of HLA protein in paternal seminal fluid has been suggested to have an influence on the risk of developing pre...... was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue samples. We detected sHLA-G protein in seminal plasma, and HLA-G expression in normal testis and in epididymal tissue of the male reproductive system but not in the seminal vesicle. Furthermore, the results indicated a weak expression of HLA-G in hyperplastic prostatic...

  6. Functional expression of human leukocyte elastase (HLE)/medullasin in eukaryotic cells.

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    Okano, K; Aoki, Y; Shimizu, H; Naruto, M

    1990-03-30

    We have cloned a full length cDNA for human leukocyte elastase (HLE, EC 3.4.21.37)/medullasin from the cDNA library of human leukemic cell line, ML3. Recombinant plasmid for the expression of HLE cDNA in eukaryotic cells was constructed in which HLE cDNA was fused in a frame to a leader sequence of human interleukin-2 (IL-2). COS-1 cells, transfected with the plasmid, secreted fusion protein consists of N-terminal 8 amino acid (aa) residues of human IL-2 and 238 aa residues of HLE. As the fusion protein was designed to be connected through lysine residue, elastase activity was generated after digestion of the fusion protein with lysyl-endopeptidase.

  7. In silico identification of epitopes from house cat and dog proteins as peptide immunotherapy candidates based on human leukocyte antigen binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipu, H N; Ahmed, D; Gardezi, S A H

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this descriptive study was to determine Felis domesticus (cat) and Canis familiaris (dog) protein epitopes that bind strongly to selected HLA class II alleles to identify synthetic vaccine candidate epitopes and to identify individuals/populations who are likely to respond to vaccines. FASTA amino acid sequences of experimentally validated allergenic proteins of house cat and dog were identified using International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) allergen nomenclature database. NetMHCII 2.2 server was used to determine binding affinities in the form of 1-log 50 k and in nM with commonly found HLA II alleles. Screening of house cat and dog allergenic proteins identified 4 (with 2 isoforms for chain 1 and 3 isoforms for chain 2 for fel d 1) and 6 proteins, respectively. Number of strong binders from each protein against each HLA type was determined as potential candidate for allergen immunotherapy. HLA-DRB1(*)0101 bound maximum number of epitopes (207 and 275 from house cat and dog, respectively) while HLA-DRB1(*)0802 bound none. We conclude that HLA specific epitope prediction can help identify synthetic peptide vaccine candidates and predict response as well.

  8. DNA integrity of human leukocytes after magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Szerencsi, Ágnes; Kubinyi, Györgyi; Váliczkó, Éva; Juhász, Péter; Rudas, Gábor; Mester, Ádám; Jánossy, Gábor; Bakos, József; Thuróczy, György

    2013-10-01

    This study focuses on the effects of high-field (3T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans on the DNA integrity of human leukocytes in vitro in order to validate the study where genotoxic effects were obtained and published by Lee et al. The scanning protocol and exposure situation were the same as those used under routine clinical brain MRI scan. Peripheral blood samples from healthy non-smoking male donors were exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF) produced by 3T magnetic resonance imaging equipment for 0, 22, 45, 67, and 89 min during the scanning procedure. Samples of positive control were exposed to ionizing radiation (4 Gy of (60)Co-γ). Single breaks of DNA in leukocytes were detected by single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). Chromosome breakage, chromosome loss and micronuclei formations were detected by a micronucleus test (MN). Three independent experiments were performed. The data of comet tail DNA%, olive tail moment and micronucleus frequency showed no DNA damages due to MRI exposure. The results of the Comet assay and the micronucleus test indicate that the applied exposure of MRI does not appear to produce breaks in the DNA and has no significant effect on DNA integrity.

  9. Unsupervised explorative data analysis of normal human leukocytes and BCR/ABL positive leukemic cells mid-infrared spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellisola, G.; Bolomini-Vittori, M.; Cinque, G.; Dumas, P.; Fiorini, Z.; Laudanna, C.; Mirenda, M.; Sandt, C.; Silvestri, G.; Tomasello, L.; Vezzalini, M.; Wehbe, K.; Sorio, C.

    2015-01-01

    We proved the ability of Fourier Transform Infrared microspectroscopy (microFTIR) complemented by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to detect protein phosphorylation/de-phosphorylation in mammalian cells. We analyzed by microFTIR human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMNs) leukocytes, mouse-derived p

  10. Cell penetrating peptides to dissect host-pathogen protein-protein interactions in Theileria -transformed leukocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Haidar, Malak

    2017-09-08

    One powerful application of cell penetrating peptides is the delivery into cells of molecules that function as specific competitors or inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. Ablating defined protein-protein interactions is a refined way to explore their contribution to a particular cellular phenotype in a given disease context. Cell-penetrating peptides can be synthetically constrained through various chemical modifications that stabilize a given structural fold with the potential to improve competitive binding to specific targets. Theileria-transformed leukocytes display high PKA activity, but PKAis an enzyme that plays key roles in multiple cellular processes; consequently genetic ablation of kinase activity gives rise to a myriad of confounding phenotypes. By contrast, ablation of a specific kinase-substrate interaction has the potential to give more refined information and we illustrate this here by describing how surgically ablating PKA interactions with BAD gives precise information on the type of glycolysis performed by Theileria-transformed leukocytes. In addition, we provide two other examples of how ablating specific protein-protein interactions in Theileria-infected leukocytes leads to precise phenotypes and argue that constrained penetrating peptides have great therapeutic potential to combat infectious diseases in general.

  11. Diterpenoids from Tetraclinis articulata that inhibit various human leukocyte functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Alejandro F; Quílez del Moral, José F; Lucas, Rut; Payá, Miguel; Akssira, Mohamed; Akaad, Said; Mellouki, Fouad

    2003-06-01

    Ten new compounds, eight of them pimarane derivatives (1-8), together with a menthane dimer (9) and a totarane diterpenoid (10), were isolated from the leaves and wood of Tetraclinis articulata. The structures of 1-10 were established by using spectroscopic techniques, including 2D NMR spectra. Pimaranes 1-5 were found to possess an unusual cis interannular union of the B and C rings, which, from a biogenetic perspective, could be derived from the hydration of a carbocation at C-8. Compounds 4-6 and a mixture of 7 and 11 modulated different human leukocyte functions at a concentration of 10 microM, mainly the degranulation process measured as myeloperoxidase release and, to a lesser extent, the superoxide production measured by chemiluminescence.

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen Diversity: A Southern African Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mqondisi Tshabalala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasingly well-documented evidence of high genetic, ethnic, and linguistic diversity amongst African populations, there is limited data on human leukocyte antigen (HLA diversity in these populations. HLA is part of the host defense mechanism mediated through antigen presentation to effector cells of the immune system. With the high disease burden in southern Africa, HLA diversity data is increasingly important in the design of population-specific vaccines and the improvement of transplantation therapeutic interventions. This review highlights the paucity of HLA diversity data amongst southern African populations and defines a need for information of this kind. This information will support disease association studies, provide guidance in vaccine design, and improve transplantation outcomes.

  13. Induction of the Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 2 Antigen-specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Using Human Leukocyte Antigen Tetramer-based Artificial Antigen-presenting Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ling LU; Zhi-Hui LIANG; Cai-E ZHANG; Sheng-Jun LU; Xiu-Fang WENG; Xiong-Wen WU

    2006-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) antigen are important reagents for the treatment of some EBV-associated malignancies,such as EBV-positive Hodgkin's disease and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. However, the therapeutic amount of CTLs is often hampered by the limited supply of antigen-presenting cells. To address this issue, an artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) was made by coating a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-pLMP2 tetrameric complex, anti-CD28 antibody and CD54 molecule to a cell-sized latex bead, which provided the dual signals required for T cell activation. By co-culture of the HLA-A2-LMP2 bearing aAPC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HLA-A2 positive healthy donors, LMP2 antigen-specific CTLs were induced and expanded in vitro. The specificity of the aAPC-induced CTLs was demonstrated by both HLA-A2-LMP2tetramer staining and cytotoxicity against HLA-A2-LMP2 bearing T2 cell, the cytotoxicity was inhibited by the anti-HLA class I antibody (W6/32). These results showed that LMP2 antigen-specific CTLs could be induced and expanded in vitro by the HLA-A2-LMP2-bearing aAPC. Thus, aAPCs coated with an HLApLMP2 complex, anti-CD28 and CD54 might be promising tools for the enrichment of LMP2-specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy.

  14. Syntenin-1 and ezrin proteins link activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule to the actin cytoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tudor, C.; Riet, J. te; Eich, C.; Harkes, R.; Smisdom, N.; Bouhuijzen-Wenger, J.; Ameloot, M.; Holt, M.; Kanger, J.S.; Figdor, C.G.; Cambi, A.; Subramaniam, V.

    2014-01-01

    Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is a type I transmembrane protein member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules. Involved in important pathophysiological processes such as the immune response, cancer metastasis, and neuronal development, ALCAM undergoes both

  15. Protein-bound uremic toxins stimulate crosstalk between leukocytes and vessel wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletinck, Anneleen; Glorieux, Griet; Schepers, Eva; Cohen, Gerald; Gondouin, Bertrand; Van Landschoot, Maria; Eloot, Sunny; Rops, Angelique; Van de Voorde, Johan; De Vriese, An; van der Vlag, Johan; Brunet, Philippe; Van Biesen, Wim; Vanholder, Raymond

    2013-12-01

    Leukocyte activation and endothelial damage both contribute to cardiovascular disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in CKD. Experimental in vitro data link several protein-bound uremic retention solutes to the modulation of inflammatory stimuli, including endothelium and leukocyte responses and cardiovascular damage, corroborating observational in vivo data. However, the impact of these uremic toxins on the crosstalk between endothelium and leukocytes has not been assessed. This study evaluated the effects of acute and continuous exposure to uremic levels of indoxylsulfate (IS), p-cresylsulfate (pCS), and p-cresylglucuronide (pCG) on the recruitment of circulating leukocytes in the rat peritoneal vascular bed using intravital microscopy. Superfusion with IS induced strong leukocyte adhesion, enhanced extravasation, and interrupted blood flow, whereas pCS caused a rapid increase in leukocyte rolling. Superfusion with pCS and pCG combined caused impaired blood flow and vascular leakage but did not further enhance leukocyte rolling over pCS alone. Intravenous infusion with IS confirmed the superfusion results and caused shedding of heparan sulfate, pointing to disruption of the glycocalyx as the mechanism likely mediating IS-induced flow stagnation. These results provide the first clear in vivo evidence that IS, pCS, and pCG exert proinflammatory effects that contribute to vascular damage by stimulating crosstalk between leukocytes and vessels.

  16. Influence of Magnetite Nanoparticles on Human Leukocyte Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Džarová, Anežka; Dubničková, Martina; Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Kopčanský, Peter; Gojzewski, Hubert; Timko, Milan

    2010-12-01

    Chemically synthesized magnetite particles coated by sodium oleate and PEG (MNP), and magnetosomes (MS) influence the process of phagocytosis and the metabolic activity (lysozyme and peroxidase activity) in leukocytes. Lysozyme activity is oxygen-independent liquidation mechanisms of engulfed microorganism, peroxidase activity is an oxygen-dependent mechanism. Both tested types of nanoparticles lysed leukocyte cells during incubation. MNP at concentrations of 10 and 20 μg/mL lysed almost all leukocytes and their cell viability was in the 14±0.05% range. On the other hand MS begin to influence leukocytes activity at the concentration of 1 μg/ml and this influence grows with increasing concentration up to 20 μg/ml. MS are more suitable for biological applications than MNP which are more aggressive material than MS. MS should not be used above 10 μg/mL.

  17. Current opinion on human leukocyte antigen-G in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Wei-hua; LIN Ai-fen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Since discovery and cloning of the non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ⅰ antigen HLA-G by Geraghty et al1 in 1987, a large number of studies have been carried out. HLA-G has a low polymorphism, limited distribution to normal tissues and seven isoforms resulting from its primary mRNA alternative splicing.2 HLA-G expression was first found on the extravillous cytotrophoblasts, at the fetal-maternal interface during normal pregnancy, which lacks the expression of HLA-A, -B and HLA Ⅱ antigens. Initial studies on HLA-G mainly addressed its function in fetal-maternal immunotolerance.3 Two decades later,HLA-G is now considered to be a very important immune molecule which plays a vital immune inhibitory role in the context of reproduction, oncology, transplantation,infection and also in autoimmune disease.4 A number of Chinese research teams are interested in, and have contributed to, the publication of more than 80 peer-reviewed articles and reviews on HLA-G over the past ten years. We summarize the key points in this field that were presented and discussed by them.

  18. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Amari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  19. HLA-Modeler: Automated Homology Modeling of Human Leukocyte Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Shinji; Kataoka, Ryoichi; Ikegami, Takashi; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2013-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) structures of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules are indispensable for the studies on the functions at molecular level. We have developed a homology modeling system named HLA-modeler specialized in the HLA molecules. Segment matching algorithm is employed for modeling and the optimization of the model is carried out by use of the PFROSST force field considering the implicit solvent model. In order to efficiently construct the homology models, HLA-modeler uses a local database of the 3D structures of HLA molecules. The structure of the antigenic peptide-binding site is important for the function and the 3D structure is highly conserved between various alleles. HLA-modeler optimizes the use of this structural motif. The leave-one-out cross-validation using the crystal structures of class I and class II HLA molecules has demonstrated that the rmsds of nonhydrogen atoms of the sites between homology models and crystal structures are less than 1.0 Å in most cases. The results have indicated that the 3D structures of the antigenic peptide-binding sites can be reproduced by HLA-modeler at the level almost corresponding to the crystal structures.

  20. Imputing amino acid polymorphisms in human leukocyte antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Jia

    Full Text Available DNA sequence variation within human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes mediate susceptibility to a wide range of human diseases. The complex genetic structure of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC makes it difficult, however, to collect genotyping data in large cohorts. Long-range linkage disequilibrium between HLA loci and SNP markers across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region offers an alternative approach through imputation to interrogate HLA variation in existing GWAS data sets. Here we describe a computational strategy, SNP2HLA, to impute classical alleles and amino acid polymorphisms at class I (HLA-A, -B, -C and class II (-DPA1, -DPB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, and -DRB1 loci. To characterize performance of SNP2HLA, we constructed two European ancestry reference panels, one based on data collected in HapMap-CEPH pedigrees (90 individuals and another based on data collected by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC, 5,225 individuals. We imputed HLA alleles in an independent data set from the British 1958 Birth Cohort (N = 918 with gold standard four-digit HLA types and SNPs genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K and Illumina Immunochip microarrays. We demonstrate that the sample size of the reference panel, rather than SNP density of the genotyping platform, is critical to achieve high imputation accuracy. Using the larger T1DGC reference panel, the average accuracy at four-digit resolution is 94.7% using the low-density Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K, and 96.7% using the high-density Illumina Immunochip. For amino acid polymorphisms within HLA genes, we achieve 98.6% and 99.3% accuracy using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500 K and Illumina Immunochip, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate how imputation and association testing at amino acid resolution can facilitate fine-mapping of primary MHC association signals, giving a specific example from type 1 diabetes.

  1. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N [Institute of Cell Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Matyunin, S N [Section of Applied Problems at the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nazarov, M M [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, O P [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  2. The role of human leukocyte antigen in susceptibility and clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the association of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) with susceptibility and clinical manifestations of sarcoidosis, fifty-five patients with sarcoidosis were studied by using allele group specific polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR). Our data

  3. Integrin αDβ2 (CD11d/CD18 is expressed by human circulating and tissue myeloid leukocytes and mediates inflammatory signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunari Miyazaki

    Full Text Available Integrin α(Dβ(2 is the most recently identified member of the leukocyte, or β(2, subfamily of integrin heterodimers. Its distribution and functions on human leukocytes have not been clearly defined and are controversial. We examined these issues and found that α(Dβ(2 is prominently expressed by leukocytes in whole blood from healthy human subjects, including most polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes. We also found that α(Dβ(2 is displayed by leukocytes in the alveoli of uninjured and inflamed human lungs and by human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells, indicating broad myeloid expression. Using freshly-isolated human monocytes, we found that α(Dβ(2 delivers outside-in signals to pathways that regulate cell spreading and gene expression. Screening expression analysis followed by validation of candidate transcripts demonstrated that engagement of α(Dβ(2 induces mRNAs encoding inflammatory chemokines and cytokines and secretion of their protein products. Thus, α(Dβ(2 is a major member of the integrin repertoire of both circulating and tissue myeloid leukocytes in humans. Its broad expression and capacity for outside-in signaling indicate that it is likely to have important functions in clinical syndromes of infection, inflammation, and tissue injury.

  4. Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein preserves leukocyte functions after major liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiezer, M J; Meijer, C; Sietses, C; Prins, H A; Cuesta, M A; Beelen, R H; Meijer, S; van Leeuwen, P A

    2000-08-01

    To analyze postoperative leukocyte functions in patients undergoing hemihepatectomy, and to assess the effect of treatment with the endotoxin-neutralizing agent bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (rBPI21). Extensive liver resection is associated with a high incidence of infectious complications. Because elimination of pathogenic microorganisms occurs mainly by leukocytes, this increased rate of infections is most likely due to an impaired function of these cells. Endotoxin, translocated from the gut into the systemic circulation as a result of increased gut permeability and reduced hepatic clearance function after major liver resection, may play an important role in the impairment of posthepatectomy leukocyte function. To investigate whether hemihepatectomy results in impaired leukocyte functions and to determine the role of endotoxin in this process, leukocyte oxidative burst and leukocyte antigen expression were studied in three groups of patients: patients undergoing a hemihepatectomy and receiving rBPI21 treatment, patients undergoing hemihepatectomy and receiving placebo, and as an extra control group patients undergoing other major abdominal surgeries. Blood samples were collected before surgery, 2 hours after surgery, and at days 1, 2, 5, and 7. Phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated oxidative burst was measured using dihydrorhodamine, and leukocyte surface expression of the antigens CD11b, CD16, and CD14 was investigated by indirect immunofluorescence. Both oxidative burst and membrane surface expression were quantified by flow cytometry. An indication of the antiendotoxin effect of rBPI21 treatment was provided by assessment of plasma lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The oxidative burst in the hemihepatectomized patients receiving placebo and the controls increased 2 hours after surgery, whereas it decreased in the rBPI21-treated patients, resulting in significant differences between the groups

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen Alleles and Cytomegalovirus Infection After Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futohi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Several studies have been conducted on the relationship between a number of human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles and cytomegalovirus infection (CMV, in kidney transplant recipients, after transplantation. However, only a limited number of HLAs have been investigated, so far, and the results have been contradictory. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the relationship between 59 HLA alleles and the CMV infection, in transplant recipients, after kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted on 200 patients, receiving a kidney transplant, in Baqiyatallah Hospital, in Tehran, during 2013. Throughout a one-year follow-up of kidney transplant recipients, in case of detecting the CMV antigen in patients’ blood, at any time, they were placed in the group of patients with CMV infection, whereas, if no CMV-specific antigen was developed, over a year, patients were placed in the group of patients without CMV infection, after transplantation. This study investigated the relationship between CMV infection in kidney transplant recipients and 59 HLA alleles, including 14 HLA-A, 28 HLA-B, and 17 HLA-DRB1 cases. Results Of all participants, 104 patients (52% were diagnosed with CMV infection. There was no significant difference between the two groups, with and without CMV infection, in terms of patient’s characteristics. The CMV infection, in patients receiving a transplanted organ from deceased donor, was significantly more prevalent than in those receiving kidney transplant from living donor (63% vs. 39%, respectively, P = 0.001. Recipients with HLA-B44 were more infected with CMV compared with patients without this allele (80% vs. 50%, respectively, P = 0.024; on the contrary, kidney recipients with HLA-DRB1-1 were less infected with CMV than patients without this allele (31% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.020. There was no significant relationship between CMV infection and other HLA alleles

  6. Uncovering the mystery of opposite circadian rhythms between mouse and human leukocytes in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Liu, Min; Chan, Xue Ying; Tan, Sue Yee; Subramaniam, Sharrada; Fan, Yong; Loh, Eva; Chang, Kenneth Tou En; Tan, Thiam Chye; Chen, Qingfeng

    2017-08-29

    Many immune parameters show circadian rhythms over the 24-hour day in mammals. The most striking circadian oscillation is the number of circulating immune cells which display an opposite rhythm between humans and mice. The physiological roles and mechanisms of circadian variations in mouse leukocytes are well studied, while for humans they remain unclear due to the lack of a proper model. In this study, we found that consistent with their natural host species, mouse and human circulating leukocytes exhibited opposite circadian oscillations in humanized mice. This cyclic pattern of trafficking correlated well with the diurnal expression levels of CXCR4 which were controlled by the intracellular HIF-lα/ARNTLl heterodimer. Furthermore, we also discovered that p38MAPK/MK2 had opposite effects between mice and humans in generating intracellular reactive oxygen species which subsequently regulated HIF-1α expression. In conclusion, we propose humanized mice as a robust model for human circadian studies and reveal insights on a novel molecular clock network in the human circadian rhythm. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  7. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: Role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baeuerlein, Annette; Ackermann, Stefanie; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...... (polymyxin, colistin) completely abrogated transepithelial activation of leukocytes. Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin is a crucial factor in transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes, regardless of whether it is produced by probiotics or other bacteria. Hence, transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes...

  8. Chemokine Ligand 20: A Signal for Leukocyte Recruitment During Human Ovulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alem, Linah; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Rosewell, Kathy; Brännström, Mats; Akin, James; Boldt, Jeffrey; Muse, Ken; Curry, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Ovulation is one of the cornerstones of female fertility. Disruption of the ovulatory process results in infertility, which affects approximately 10% of couples. Using a unique model in which the dominant follicle is collected across the periovulatory period in women, we have identified a leukocyte chemoattractant, chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20), in the human ovary. CCL20 mRNA is massively induced after an in vivo human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulus in granulosa (>10 000-fold) and theca (>4000-fold) cells collected during the early ovulatory (12-18 h) and late ovulatory (18-34 h) periods after hCG administration. Because the LH surge sets in motion an inflammatory reaction characterized by an influx of leukocytes and CCL20 is known to recruit leukocytes in other systems, the composition of ovarian leukocytes (CD45+) containing the CCL20 receptor CCR6 was determined immediately prior to ovulation. CD45+/CCR6+ cells were primarily natural killer cells (41%) along with B cells (12%), T cells (11%), neutrophils (10%), and monocytes (9%). Importantly, exogenous CCL20 stimulated ovarian leukocyte migration 59% within 90 minutes. Due to the difficulties in obtaining human follicles, an in vitro model was developed using granulosa-lutein cells to explore CCL20 regulation. CCL20 expression increased 40-fold within 6 hours after hCG, was regulated partially by the epithelial growth factor pathway, and was positively correlated with progesterone production. These results demonstrate that hCG dramatically increases CCL20 expression in the human ovary, that ovarian leukocytes contain the CCL20 receptor, and that CCL20 stimulates leukocyte migration. Our findings raise the prospect that CCL20 may aid in the final ovulatory events and contribute to fertility in women.

  9. Human leukocyte Antigen-DM polymorphisms in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro-Benito, Miguel; Morrison, Eliot; Wieczorek, Marek; Sticht, Jana; Freund, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Classical MHC class II (MHCII) proteins present peptides for CD4(+) T-cell surveillance and are by far the most prominent risk factor for a number of autoimmune disorders. To date, many studies have shown that this link between particular MHCII alleles and disease depends on the MHCII's particular ability to bind and present certain peptides in specific physiological contexts. However, less attention has been paid to the non-classical MHCII molecule human leucocyte antigen-DM, which catalyses peptide exchange on classical MHCII proteins acting as a peptide editor. DM function impacts the presentation of both antigenic peptides in the periphery and key self-peptides during T-cell development in the thymus. In this way, DM activity directly influences the response to pathogens, as well as mechanisms of self-tolerance acquisition. While decreased DM editing of particular MHCII proteins has been proposed to be related to autoimmune disorders, no experimental evidence for different DM catalytic properties had been reported until recently. Biochemical and structural investigations, together with new animal models of loss of DM activity, have provided an attractive foundation for identifying different catalytic efficiencies for DM allotypes. Here, we revisit the current knowledge of DM function and discuss how DM function may impart autoimmunity at the organism level.

  10. Combination of DNA-based and conventional methods to detect human leukocyte antigen polymorphism and its use for paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturya, László; Rajczya, Katalin; Lászikb, András; Gyódia, Eva; Pénzes, Mária; Falus, András; Petrányia, Gyõzõ G

    2002-03-01

    In cases of disputed paternity, the scientific goal is to promote either the exclusion of a falsely accused man or the affiliation of the alleged father. Until now, in addition to anthropologic characteristics, the determination of genetic markers included human leukocyte antigen gene variants; erythrocyte antigens and serum proteins were used for that reason. Recombinant DNA techniques provided a new set of highly variable genetic markers based on DNA nucleotide sequence polymorphism. From the practical standpoint, the application of these techniques to paternity testing provides greater versatility than do conventional genetic marker systems. The use of methods to detect the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigen loci significantly increases the chance of validation of ambiguous results in paternity testing. The outcome of 2384 paternity cases investigated by serologic and/or DNA-based human leukocyte antigen typing was statistically analyzed. Different cases solved by DNA typing are presented involving cases with one or two accused men, exclusions and nonexclusions, and tests of the paternity of a deceased man. The results provide evidence for the advantage of the combined application of various techniques in forensic diagnostics and emphasizes the outstanding possibilities of DNA-based assays. Representative examples demonstrate the strength of combined techniques in paternity testing.

  11. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) might contaminate murine monoclonal antibodies after purification on protein G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Jörg A; Fettke, Joerg; Lenz, Christine; Albers, Katharina; Mallwitz, Frank; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Kusch, Emely; Sellrie, Frank

    2012-03-31

    The large scale production of a monoclonal anti-progesterone antibody in serum free medium followed by affinity chromatography on protein G lead to a contamination of the antibody sample with a protein of about 14 kDa. This protein was identified by mass spectrometry as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). This SLPI contamination lead to a failure of the fiber-optic based competitive fluorescence assay to detect progesterone in milk. Purification of the monoclonal antibody using protein A columns circumvented this problem.

  12. The essential oil of bergamot stimulates reactive oxygen species production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Marco; Luini, Alessandra; Bombelli, Raffaella; Corasaniti, Maria T; Bagetta, Giacinto; Marino, Franca

    2014-08-01

    Bergamot (Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia) essential oil (BEO) is used in folk medicine as an antiseptic and anthelminthic and to facilitate wound healing. Evidence indicates that BEO has substantial antimicrobial activity; however its effects on immunity have never been examined. We studied the effects of BEO on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the role of Ca(2+) in the functional responses evoked by BEO in these cells. Results show that BEO increased intracellular ROS production in human PMN, an effect that required the contribution of extracellular (and, to a lesser extent, of intracellular) Ca(2+) . Bergamot essential oil also significantly increased ROS production induced by the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and reduced the response to the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. In conclusion, this is the first report showing the ability of BEO to increase ROS production in human PMN. This effect could both contribute to the activity of BEO in infections and in tissue healing as well as underlie an intrinsic proinflammatory potential. The relevance of these findings for the clinical uses of BEO needs careful consideration.

  13. Potential Predictors of Poor Visual Outcome in Human Leukocyte Antigen-B27-Associated Uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Fleurieke H; Brouwer, Anna H; Kuiper, Jonas J W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/342171070; Ossewaarde-van Norel, Jeannette; ten Dam-van Loon, Ninette H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304816957; de Boer, Joke H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140201890

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify potential predictors of permanent vision loss in patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27-associated uveitis in a tertiary referral center. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. METHODS: The charts of 212 patients (338 eyes) with HLA-B27-associated uveitis that visite

  14. Human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in squamous metaplastic epithelium of bronchial airways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarbiou, J.; Schadewijk, A. van; Stolk, J.; Sont, J.K.; Boer, W.I.; Rabe, K.F.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Mauad, T.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze a possible contribution of human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) to the induction of airway epithelial changes such as squamous cell metaplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The presence of these molecules and the num

  15. No Evidence of Human Leukocyte Antigen Gene Association With Rheumatic Fever Among Children in Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Guliz; Seifried, Steven E

    2015-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) have been implicated in rheumatic fever pathogenesis. This pilot whole genome association study compares genotypes of Samoan children with rheumatic fever to unaffected siblings and unrelated healthy controls. No risk-related genotypes were associated with HLA genes. Thirteen Regions of Interest were identified as candidates for further study.

  16. Potential Predictors of Poor Visual Outcome in Human Leukocyte Antigen-B27-Associated Uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Fleurieke H; Brouwer, Anna H; Kuiper, Jonas J W; Ossewaarde-van Norel, Jeannette; ten Dam-van Loon, Ninette H; de Boer, Joke H

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify potential predictors of permanent vision loss in patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27-associated uveitis in a tertiary referral center. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study. METHODS: The charts of 212 patients (338 eyes) with HLA-B27-associated uveitis that visite

  17. Familial occurrence of subacute thyroiditis associated with human leukocyte antigen-B35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, AB; Roozendaal, C; Dullaart, RPF

    2004-01-01

    Subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is a spontaneously remitting inflammatory disorder of the thyroid, associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B35, and may be virally induced in genetically predisposed individuals. A 57-year-old Caucasian man presented with symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as enlarg

  18. Jon Van Rood: pioneer at the crossroad of human leukocyte antigens and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan

    2007-04-01

    Jon Van Rood (born in 1926) has made major contributions to the fields of transfusion medicine as well as organ and stem cell transplantation. His group was the first to start unraveling the complexity of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system through collaborative studies that used panels of sera and leukocyte samples. Furthermore, using HLA typing, he introduced the first HLA-matched platelet transfusions and developed routine leukocyte depletion as a means to prevent HLA alloimmunization. Van Rood has also been active in the fields of kidney transplantation (Eurotransplant) and stem cell transplantation (Europdonor). He combined scientific laboratory research with application to clinical medicine. He retired from his university position in 1991 but remains active in the field.

  19. Determination of an unrelated donor pool size for human leukocyte antigen-matched platelets in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bonet Bub

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Successful transfusion of platelet refractory patients is a challenge. Many potential donors are needed to sustain human leukocyte antigen matched-platelet transfusion programs because of the different types of antigens and the constant needs of these patients. For a highly mixed population such as the Brazilian population, the pool size required to provide adequate platelet support is unknown. Methods: A mathematical model was created to estimate the appropriate size of an unrelated donor pool to provide human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet support for a Brazilian population. A group of 154 hematologic human leukocyte antigen-typed patients was used as the potential patient population and a database of 65,500 human leukocyte antigen-typed bone marrow registered donors was used as the donor population. Platelet compatibility was based on the grading system of Duquesnoy. Results: Using the mathematical model, a pool containing 31,940, 1710 and 321 donors would be necessary to match more than 80% of the patients with at least five completely compatible (no cross-reactive group, partial compatible (one cross-reactive group or less compatible (two cross-reactive group donors, respectively. Conclusion: The phenotypic diversity of the Brazilian population has probably made it more difficulty to find completely compatible donors. However, this heterogeneity seems to have facilitated finding donors when cross-reactive groups are accepted as proposed by the grading system of Duquesnoy. The results of this study may help to establish unrelated human leukocyte antigen-compatible platelet transfusions, a procedure not routinely performed in most Brazilian transfusion services.

  20. The ACAT2 expression of human leukocytes is responsible for the excretion of lipoproteins containing cholesteryl/steryl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dongqing; Zhang, Xiaowei; Li, Qin; Qian, Lei; Xu, Jiajia; Lu, Ming; Hu, Xihan; Zhu, Ming; Chang, Catherine C Y; Song, Baoliang; Chang, Tayuan; Xiong, Ying; Li, Boliang

    2016-11-01

    Acyl-coenzymeA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) is abundantly expressed in intestine and fetal liver of healthy human. Our previous studies have shown that in monocytic cells the low-level expression of human ACAT2 gene with specific CpG-hypomethylated promoter is regulated by the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) transcription factors. In this study, we further report that the ACAT2 gene expression is attributable to the C/EBPs in the human leukocytes and correlated with the excretion of fluorescent lipoproteins containing the ACAT2-catalyzed NBD22-steryl esters. Moreover, this lipoprotein excretion can be inhibited by the ACAT2 isoform-selective inhibitor pyripyropene A (PPPA) in a dose-dependent manner, and employed to determine the half maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of PPPA. Significantly, it is found that the differentiation-inducing factor all-trans retinoic acid, but not the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α, enhances this ACAT2-dependent lipoprotein excretion. These data demonstrate that the ACAT2 expression of human leukocytes is responsible for the excretion of lipoproteins containing cholesteryl/steryl esters (CE/SE), and suggest that the excretion of lipoproteins containing the ACAT2-catalyzed CS/SE may avoid cytotoxicity through decreasing the excess intracellular cholesterols/sterols (especially various oxysterols), which is essential for the action of the human leukocytes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. A simple skin blister technique for the study of in vivo transmigration of human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsson, Lisa; Björkman, Lena; Christenson, Karin; Alsterholm, Mikael; Movitz, Charlotta; Thorén, Fredrik B; Karlsson, Anna; Welin, Amanda; Bylund, Johan

    2013-07-31

    The study of human leukocytes is almost exclusively conducted using cells isolated from peripheral blood. This is especially true for neutrophils, despite the fact that these cells are of main (pathological) importance in extravascular tissues upon e.g., infection and/or tissue damage. The journey from circulation to tissue is typically associated with a number of cellular changes, making the cells primed, or hyper-responsive, and in many aspects distinct from the cells present in circulation. Models to obtain in vivo transmigrated leukocytes from human tissue are available, but not widely used. We describe here an easy-to-use model for the study of local inflammation, stemming from limited tissue damage, which can be used to isolate viable and functional leukocytes. The model is based on the generation of aseptic skin blisters, formed by the application of negative pressure, and allows for investigations of the cellular infiltrate as well as of soluble mediators present in the exudate. We believe that this method, combined with modern analysis equipment suitable for small volumes and cell numbers, could be of great use for increasing our understanding of the nature and function of leukocytes that have left circulation and transmigrated to inflamed tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxygen-independent killing of Bacteroides fragilis by granule extracts from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherall, B L; Pruul, H; McDonald, P J

    1984-03-01

    Granule proteins from human neutrophils were prepared by extraction with acetate, and their antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis was determined. Activity was highly dependent on pH; greatest killing occurred at the most acid pH tested (pH 5.0). Optimum activity was observed at physiological ionic strength and low bacterial numbers. Killing was inhibited by incubation temperatures of less than 37 degrees C. Eight times more extract was required to kill 50% of stationary-phase bacteria, compared with those growing in logarithmic phase. The antibacterial effect of granule extract was destroyed by boiling, but some activity was retained after heating to 56 degrees C and 80 degrees C. Granule extract activity was tested under conditions in which oxygen-dependent antibacterial systems were inhibited. The rate and extent of killing was not affected by anaerobiosis, sodium azide, or cysteine hydrochloride. These results suggest that the activity of granule extract is independent of oxidative antibacterial systems, and therefore, under conditions that occur in anaerobic infections, potent leukocyte granule-associated mechanisms exist for the destruction of B. fragilis.

  3. SRC protein tyrosine kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and NF-kappaBp65 signaling in commercial and wild-type turkey leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies comparing signaling in wild-type turkey (WT) leukocytes and commercial turkey (CT) leukocytes found that the activity of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) and MAP kinases, ERK 1/2 and p38, were significantly higher in WT leukocytes compared to CT lines upon exposure to both SE and OPSE on days...

  4. [Gamma interferon induced in human leukocytes by phytohemagglutinin: its production and biological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielescu, G; Maniu, H; Georgescu, T; Cajal, N

    1988-01-01

    Human gamma type interferon (IFN) preparations were obtained through phytohemagglutinin stimulation of leukocytes from the peripheral blood. Biological value of these preparations varied between 160 u and 800 u/ml, depending on leukocyte incubation medium, culture system and inductor conservation. The rising of the antiviral activity through association between gamma (3 u) and alpha (27 u) interferons was revealed by the virus quantity reduction (in this case the vesicular stomatitis virus was used) during a 24-hour multiplication cycle. The protection ensured by the mixture of the two types of interferon was about ten times higher than the additive effect of the two preparations. Study of the antiproliferative activity of a gamma interferon preparation was conducted on two human cell lines of tumoral origin (T-10 from a glioblastoma, and HEp-2) and revealed the difficulties to quantify precisely this property of the crude gamma interferon preparations.

  5. Modulation of ROS production in human leukocytes by ganglioside micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gavella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported that exogenous gangliosides, the sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids, are able to modulate many cellular functions. We examined the effect of micelles of mono- and trisialoganglioside GM1 and GT1b on the production of reactive oxygen species by stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils using different spectroscopic methods. The results indicated that exogenous gangliosides did not influence extracellular superoxide anion (O2.- generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils activated by receptor-dependent formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. However, when neutrophils were stimulated by receptor-bypassing phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, gangliosides above their critical micellar concentrations prolonged the lag time preceding the production in a concentration-dependent way, without affecting total extracellular O2.- generation detected by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction. The effect of ganglioside GT1b (100 µM on the increase in lag time was shown to be significant by means of both superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction assay and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.005, respectively. The observed phenomena can be attributed to the ability of ganglioside micelles attached to the cell surface to slow down PMA uptake, thus increasing the diffusion barrier and consequently delaying membrane events responsible for PMA-stimulated O2.- production.

  6. Human leukocyte telomere length is associated with DNA methylation levels in multiple subtelomeric and imprinted loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Jessica L; Suderman, Matthew; Pappas, Jane J; Borghol, Nada; McArdle, Wendy; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Hertzman, Clyde; Power, Christine; Szyf, Moshe; Pembrey, Marcus

    2014-05-14

    In humans, leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is positively correlated with lifespan, and shorter LTL is associated with increased risk of age-related disease. In this study we tested for association between telomere length and methylated cytosine levels. Measurements of mean telomere length and DNA methylation at >450,000 CpG sites were obtained for both blood (N = 24) and EBV-transformed cell-line (N = 36) DNA samples from men aged 44-45 years. We identified 65 gene promoters enriched for CpG sites at which methylation levels are associated with leukocyte telomere length, and 36 gene promoters enriched for CpG sites at which methylation levels are associated with telomere length in DNA from EBV-transformed cell-lines. We observed significant enrichment of positively associated methylated CpG sites in subtelomeric loci (within 4 Mb of the telomere) (P telomere length, DNA methylation and gene expression in health and disease.

  7. Unveiling the in Vivo Protein Corona of Circulating Leukocyte-like Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Taraballi, Francesca; Toledano Furman, Naama E; Hartman, Kelly A; Sherman, Michael B; De Rosa, Enrica; Kirui, Dickson K; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2017-03-10

    Understanding interactions occurring at the interface between nanoparticles and biological components is an urgent challenge in nanomedicine due to their effect on the biological fate of nanoparticles. After the systemic injection of nanoparticles, a protein corona constructed by blood components surrounds the carrier's surface and modulates its pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Biomimicry-based approaches in nanotechnology attempt to imitate what happens in nature in order to transfer specific natural functionalities to synthetic nanoparticles. Several biomimetic formulations have been developed, showing superior in vivo features as a result of their cell-like identity. We have recently designed biomimetic liposomes, called leukosomes, which recapitulate the ability of leukocytes to target inflamed endothelium and escape clearance by the immune system. To gain insight into the properties of leukosomes, we decided to investigate their protein corona in vivo. So far, most information about the protein corona has been obtained using in vitro experiments, which have been shown to minimally reproduce in vivo phenomena. Here we directly show a time-dependent quantitative and qualitative analysis of the protein corona adsorbed in vivo on leukosomes and control liposomes. We observed that leukosomes absorb fewer proteins than liposomes, and we identified a group of proteins specifically adsorbed on leukosomes. Moreover, we hypothesize that the presence of macrophage receptors on leukosomes' surface neutralizes their protein corona-meditated uptake by immune cells. This work unveils the protein corona of a biomimetic carrier and is one of the few studies on the corona performed in vivo.

  8. Flow cytofluorometric assay of human whole blood leukocyte DNA degradation in response to Yersinia pestis and Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Alexander L.; Grebenyukova, Tatyana P.; Bobyleva, Elena V.; Golovko, Elena M.; Malyukova, Tatyana A.; Lyapin, Mikhail N.; Kostyukova, Tatyana A.; Yezhov, Igor N.; Kuznetsov, Oleg S.

    2001-05-01

    Human leukocytes containing less than 2C DNA per cell (damaged or dead cells) were detected and quantified by flow cytometry and DNA-specific staining with ethidium bromide and mithramycin in whole blood infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Yersinia pestis. Addition of live S. aureus to the blood (100 microbe cells per one leukocyte) resulted in rapid degradation of leukocyte DNA within 3 to 6 hours of incubation at 37 degree(s)C. However, only about 50 percent cells were damaged and the leukocytes with the intact genetic apparatus could be found in the blood for a period up to 24 hours. The leukocyte injury was preceded by an increase of DNA per cell content (as compared to the normal one) that was likely to be connected with the active phagocytosis of S. aureus by granulocytes (2C DNA of diploid phagocytes plus the all bacterial DNA absorbed). In response to the same dose of actively growing (at 37 degree(s)C) virulent Y. pestis cells, no increase in DNA content per cell could be observed in the human blood leukocytes. The process of the leukocyte DNA degradation started after a 6-hour incubation, and between 18 to 24 hours of incubation about 90 percent leukocytes (phagocytes and lymphocytes) lost their specific DNA fluorescence. These results demonstrated a high potential of flow cytometry in comparative analysis in vitro of the leukocyte DNA degradation process in human blood in response to bacteria with various pathogenic properties. They agree with the modern idea of an apoptotic mechanism of immunosuppression in plague.

  9. Screening for arthrofibrosis after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: analysis of association with human leukocyte antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skutek, Michael; Elsner, Holger-A; Slateva, Kalina; Mayr, Hermann-O; Weig, Thomas-G; van Griensven, Martijn; Krettek, Christian; Bosch, Ulrich

    2004-05-01

    Arthrofibrosis represents a severe complication of trauma and reconstructive joint surgery because of generalized connective tissue proliferation resulting in painful joint stiffness. It often appears stereotypical in terms of its clinical and pathologic features, comprising excess deposition of extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen type I, III, and VI and proliferation of fibroblasts. However, trauma and surgery around joints does not always lead to fibrosis, suggesting a genetic predisposition. For a number of autoimmune diseases, strong associations have been described. The objective of the study was to investigate whether an association of HLA (human leukocyte antigen) with primary arthrofibrosis exists. Retrospective cohort study. Seventeen patients with primary arthrofibrosis after autologous anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction were identified and clinically reviewed. Blood samples were taken, and DNA was isolated by column extraction method. DNA samples were typed for the loci HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1. Results were compared with the frequencies of allelic groups as determined for the caucasoid population. HLA-Cw*07 was significantly less often found in the patient group than in the general population (P =.022). The opposite effect was seen for Cw*08, which was found in 17.6% of the patient group but only in 3.8% of the reference group (P =.045). A significant difference was also seen for DQB1*06, because 23.5% of the patients but 48.6% of the reference group possessed an allelic variant of this group (P =.048). However, according to the relatively small number of patients, a statistical bias cannot be excluded. A possible link may exist between arthrofibrosis and HLA-Cw*07- and DQB1*06-negative as well as Cw*08-positive individuals. Further investigation is necesessary to confirm or vitiate the possible association. Level IV.

  10. Matricellular protein CCN1/CYR61: a new player in inflammation and leukocyte trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Yalin; Imhof, Beat A

    2014-03-01

    Cystein-rich protein 61 (CYR61/CCN1) is a component of the extracellular matrix, which is produced and secreted by several cell types including endothelial cells, fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. CCN1 has been implicated in leukocyte migration and the inflammatory process, but it is also involved in cardiovascular development and carcinogenesis. It exerts its functions through binding to multiple integrins present in many different cell types. This multiplicity in function is now known to contribute to the diverse array of cellular processes it can regulate. The expression of CCN1 is tightly regulated by cytokines and growth factors. However, CCN1 can directly modulate cell adhesion and migratory processes whilst simultaneously regulating the production of other cytokines and chemokines through paracrine and autocrine feedback loops. This complex functionality of CCN1 has highlighted the pivotal role this molecule can play in regulating the immunosurveillance process. Furthermore, CCN1 has now emerged as an important partner when targeting components of the infectious or chronic inflammatory disease processes such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. This review will focus on CYR61/CCN1 and its ability to control the migration of leukocytes, the production of cytokines and cell proliferation or senescence at the site of inflammation.

  11. Extracellular Fibrinogen-binding Protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus Inhibits the Formation of Platelet-Leukocyte Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Mareike G; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Abubaker, Aisha Alsheikh; Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina; Canobbio, Ilaria; Bagby, Stefan; Pula, Giordano

    2016-02-05

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits platelet activation, although its mechanism of action has not been established. In this study, we discovered that the N-terminal region of Efb (Efb-N) promotes platelet binding of fibrinogen and that Efb-N binding to platelets proceeds via two independent mechanisms: fibrinogen-mediated and fibrinogen-independent. By proteomic analysis of Efb-interacting proteins within platelets and confirmation by pulldown assays followed by immunoblotting, we identified P-selectin and multimerin-1 as novel Efb interaction partners. The interaction of both P-selectin and multimerin-1 with Efb is independent of fibrinogen. We focused on Efb interaction with P-selectin. Excess of P-selectin extracellular domain significantly impaired Efb binding by activated platelets, suggesting that P-selectin is the main receptor for Efb on the surface of activated platelets. Efb-N interaction with P-selectin inhibited P-selectin binding to its physiological ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), both in cell lysates and in cell-free assays. Because of the importance of P-selectin-PSGL-1 binding in the interaction between platelets and leukocytes, we tested human whole blood and found that Efb abolishes the formation of platelet-monocyte and platelet-granulocyte complexes. In summary, we present evidence that in addition to its documented antithrombotic activity, Efb can play an immunoregulatory role via inhibition of P-selectin-PSGL-1-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes.

  12. Association of human cytomegalovirus viremia with human leukocyte antigens in liver transplantation recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Hu; Jun Fan; Xueqin Meng; Hong Zhao; Xuan Zhang; Hainv Gao; Meifang Yang; Yadan Ma; Minhuan Li; Weihang Ma

    2011-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) reactivation is a common complication after liver transplantation (LT).Here, we investigated whether human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matching was related to HCMV infection and subsequent graft failure after LT for hepatitis B virus cirrhosis. This retrospective study reviewed 91 LT recipients.All the patients were grouped according to HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DR locus matching. Clinical data were collected, including complete HLA-typing, HCMV viremia, graft failure, and the time of HCMV viremia.HLA typing was performed using a sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction kit. HCMV was detected by pp65 antigenemia using a commercial kit.The incidence of HCMV infection post-LT was 81.32%.Graft failure was observed in 16 of 91 (17.6%) patients during the 4-year study. The incidence of HCMV viremia was 100% (5/5), 91.4% (32/35), and 72.5% (37/51) in HLA-A two locus, one locus, and zero locus compatibility,respectively. Nevertheless, the degree of the HLA-A,HLA-B, or HLA-DR match did not influence the time of HCMV viremia, graft failure, or the time of graft failure after a diagnosis of HCMV viremia (all P> 0.05). An interesting discovery was that the risk of HCMV viremia tended to be higher in patients with better HLA-A compatibility. Graft failure, time of HCMV viremia, and graft failure after a diagnosis of HCMV viremia appear to be independent of HLA allele compatibility.

  13. TNFα signals via p66(Shc to induce E-Selectin, promote leukocyte transmigration and enhance permeability in human endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Laviola

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells participate in inflammatory events leading to atherogenesis by regulating endothelial cell permeability via the expression of VE-Cadherin and β-catenin and leukocyte recruitment via the expression of E-Selectins and other adhesion molecules. The protein p66(Shc acts as a sensor/inducer of oxidative stress and may promote vascular dysfunction. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of p66(Shc in tumor necrosis factor TNFα-induced E-Selectin expression and function in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Exposure of HUVEC to 50 ng/ml TNFα resulted in increased leukocyte transmigration through the endothelial monolayer and E-Selectin expression, in association with augmented phosphorylation of both p66(Shc on Ser(36 and the stress kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK-1/2, and higher intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Overexpression of p66(Shc in HUVEC resulted in enhanced p66(Shc phosphorylation on Ser(36, increased ROS and E-Selectin levels, and amplified endothelial cell permeability and leukocyte transmigration through the HUVEC monolayer. Conversely, overexpression of a phosphorylation-defective p66(Shc protein, in which Ser(36 was replaced by Ala, did not augment ROS and E-Selectin levels, nor modify cell permeability or leukocyte transmigration beyond those found in wild-type cells. Moreover, siRNA-mediated silencing of p66(Shc resulted in marked reduction of E-Selectin expression and leukocyte transmigration. In conclusion, p66(Shc acts as a novel intermediate in the TNFα pathway mediating endothelial dysfunction, and its action requires JNK-dependent phosphorylation of p66(Shc on Ser(36.

  14. Interactions of TANGO and leukocyte integrin CD11c/CD18 regulate the migration of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Stephanie; Melle, Christian; Mondal, Krishna; Klein, Gerd; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2007-12-01

    The TANGO gene was originally identified as a new member of the MIA gene family. It codes for a protein of yet unknown function. TANGO revealed a very broad expression pattern in contrast to the highly restricted expression pattern determined for the other family members. The only cells lacking TANGO expression are cells of the hematopoietic system. One of the major differences between mature hematopoietic cells and other tissue cells is the lack of adhesion until these cells leave the bloodstream. In this study, we observed that TANGO expression was induced after adhesion of human monocytic cells to substrate. To understand the mechanism of TANGO function during monocyte adhesion we isolated interacting proteins and found an interaction between TANGO and the leukocyte-specific integrin CD11c. In functional assays, we observed reduced attachment of human monocytic cells to fibrinogen, ICAM-1 and to human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) after stimulation with recombinant TANGO protein. Additionally, the migrating capacity of premonocytic cells through fibrinogen or HMECs was increased after stimulation of these cells with recombinant TANGO. Therefore, we suggest that TANGO reduced the attachment to fibrinogen or other cell adhesion molecules. As TANGO does not compete for CD11c ligand binding directly, we hypothesize TANGO function by modulation of integrin activity. Taken together, the results from this study present TANGO as a novel ligand for CD11c, regulating migratory processes of hematopoietic cells.

  15. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäuerlein, A.; Ackermann, S.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli K12, probiotic E. coli Nissle, EPEC) induced basolateral production of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL 6, 8, and 10. Gram-positive probiotics (Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp.) had virtually no effect. In addition, commensals (Enterococcus faecalis, Bacteroides vulgatus) and food...... strains, and some of their pathogen-associated molecular patterns, were incubated apically on a confluent layer of intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), which were basolaterally co-cultured with human mononuclear leukocytes. Only Gram-negative bacteria having Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin (commensal......' innate immune response seems to not be linked to the health-promoting effects ofprobiotics....

  16. Impact of human leukocyte antigen mismatching on outcomes of liver transplantation:A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To assess the effect of human leukocyte antigen(HLA) mismatching on liver graft outcome and acute rejection from a meta-analysis of available cohort studies.METHODS:Articles in PubMed/MEDLINE,EMBASE and the Cochrane database from January 1970 to June 2009,including non-English literature identified in these databases,were searched.Only studies comparing HLA or sub-phenotype matching with mismatching were extracted.The percentage of graft survival was extracted by "Engauge Digitizer" from survival curves...

  17. The recognition of adsorbed and denatured proteins of different topographies by β2 integrins and effects on leukocyte adhesion and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brevig, T.; Holst, B.; Ademovic, Z.

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte beta(2) integrins Mac-1 and p150,95 are promiscuous cell-surface receptors that recognise and mediate cell adhesion to a variety of adsorbed and denatured proteins. We used albumin as a model protein to study whether leukocyte adhesion and activation depended on the nm-scale topography ...

  18. The clinical application of procalcitonin, leukocyte count and C-reactive protein in elderly patients with infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴培

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze and compare the clinical application values of procalcitonin(PCT) ,leukocyte count (WBC) and C-reactive protein(CRP) in elder patients with infection. Methods In patients(age≥65 yrs,axillary temperature>38.0℃) with infection or suspected infection

  19. Arginine-rich cationic proteins of human eosinophil granules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, I.; Venge, P.; Spitznagel, J.K.; Lehrer, R.I.

    1977-01-01

    Several arginine-rich cationic proteins previously isolated from granules of leukemic myeloid cells have been found to reside primarily in human eosinophil leukocytes. The major component has a molecular weight of 21,000 and it contains approximately 2.6 moles of zinc per mole of protein. Velocity centrifugation of cytoplasm from leukocytes of patients with marked eosinophilia showed that this group of proteins is packaged in the crystalloid-containing large eosinophil granules. Approximately 30% of the protein content of eosinophil granules belonged to this group of cationic proteins. Bactericidal or esterolytic activities of the cationic proteins were not detected, nor did they inhibit guinea pig anaphylatoxin or histamine-induced contraction. The basic protein previously demonstrated in guinea pig eosinophils may be analogous to the group of basic proteins of human eosinophils but great differences are found for molecular weight and amino acid composition.

  20. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol modulates human endothelial cell/leukocyte interactions by controlling selectin expression through CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperi, Valeria; Evangelista, Daniela; Chiurchiù, Valerio; Florenzano, Fulvio; Savini, Isabella; Oddi, Sergio; Avigliano, Luciana; Catani, Maria Valeria; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Accumulated evidence points to a key role for endocannabinoids in cell migration, and here we sought to characterize the role of these substances in early events that modulate communication between endothelial cells and leukocytes. We found that 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) was able to initiate and complete the leukocyte adhesion cascade, by modulating the expression of selectins. A short exposure of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to 2-AG was sufficient to prime them towards an activated state: within 1h of treatment, endothelial cells showed time-dependent plasma membrane expression of P- and E-selectins, which both trigger the initial steps (i.e., capture and rolling) of leukocyte adhesion. The effect of 2-AG was mediated by CB1 and CB2 receptors and was long lasting, because endothelial cells incubated with 2-AG for 1h released the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) for up to 24h. Consistently, TNF-α-containing medium was able to promote leukocyte recruitment: human Jurkat T cells grown in conditioned medium derived from 2-AG-treated HUVECs showed enhanced L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL1) expression, as well as increased efficiency of adhesion and trans-migration. In conclusion, our in vitro data indicate that 2-AG, by acting on endothelial cells, might indirectly promote leukocyte recruitment, thus representing a potential therapeutic target for treatment of diseases where impaired endothelium/leukocyte interactions take place.

  1. Human leukocyte antigen-G expression in differentiated human airway epithelial cells: lack of modulation by Th2-associated cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-G is a nonclassical class I antigen with immunomodulatory roles including up-regulation of suppressor T regulatory lymphocytes. HLA-G was recently identified as an asthma susceptibility gene, and expression of a soluble isoform, HLA-G5, has been demonstrated in human airway epithelium. Increased presence of HLA-G5 has been demonstrated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from patients with mild asthma; this suggests a role for this isoform in modulating airway inflammation though the mechanisms by which this occurs is unclear. Airway inflammation associated with Th2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 is a principal feature of asthma, but whether these cytokines elicit expression of HLA-G is not known. Methods We examined gene and protein expression of both soluble (G5 and membrane-bound (G1 HLA-G isoforms in primary differentiated human airway epithelial cells collected from normal lungs and grown in air-liquid interface culture. Cells were treated with up to 10 ng/ml of either IL-4, IL-5, or IL-13, or 100 ng/ml of the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10, or 10,000 U/ml of the Th1-associated cytokine interferon-beta, for 24 hr, after which RNA was isolated for evaluation by quantitative PCR and protein was collected for Western blot analysis. Results HLA-G5 but not G1 was present in dAEC as demonstrated by quantitative PCR, western blot and confocal microscopy. Neither G5 nor G1 expression was increased by the Th2-associated cytokines IL-4, IL-5 or IL-13 over 24 hr, nor after treatment with IL-10, but was increased 4.5 ± 1.4 fold after treatment with 10,000 U/ml interferon-beta. Conclusions These data demonstrate the constitutive expression of a T lymphocyte regulatory molecule in differentiated human airway epithelial cells that is not modulated by Th2-associated cytokines.

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigen F Presents Peptides and Regulates Immunity through Interactions with NK Cell Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulberger, Charles L; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Hölzemer, Angelique; Neu, Karlynn E; Liu, Victor; Steinbach, Adriana M; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Sulak, Michael; Jabri, Bana; Lynch, Vincent J; Altfeld, Marcus; Hildebrand, William H; Adams, Erin J

    2017-06-20

    Evidence is mounting that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-F (human leukocyte antigen F) regulates the immune system in pregnancy, infection, and autoimmunity by signaling through NK cell receptors (NKRs). We present structural, biochemical, and evolutionary analyses demonstrating that HLA-F presents peptides of unconventional length dictated by a newly arisen mutation (R62W) that has produced an open-ended groove accommodating particularly long peptides. Compared to empty HLA-F open conformers (OCs), HLA-F tetramers bound with human-derived peptides differentially stained leukocytes, suggesting peptide-dependent engagement. Our in vitro studies confirm that NKRs differentiate between peptide-bound and peptide-free HLA-F. The complex structure of peptide-loaded β2m-HLA-F bound to the inhibitory LIR1 revealed similarities to high-affinity recognition of the viral MHC-I mimic UL18 and a docking strategy that relies on contacts with HLA-F as well as β2m, thus precluding binding to HLA-F OCs. These findings provide a biochemical framework to understand how HLA-F could regulate immunity via interactions with NKRs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibitory effects of N-acetylcysteine on superoxide anion generation in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagrasa, V; Cortijo, J; Martí-Cabrera, M; Ortiz, J L; Berto, L; Esteras, A; Bruseghini, L; Morcillo, E J

    1997-05-01

    It has been suggested that reactive oxygen species released by activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in man is one mechanism of tissue injury. Therapeutic action aimed at increasing antioxidant defence mechanisms is still a clinical challenge. This study examines the activity of N-acetylcysteine, a known antioxidant, in the protection of PMN exposed in-vitro to the chemoattractant peptide fMet-Leu-Phe (FMLP), the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate or the lipid peroxidation promoter t-butyl hydroperoxide. FMLP (3-300 nM) and phorbol myristate acetate (160 pm-160 nM) induced concentration-related superoxide anion generation. Pre-treatment with N-acetylcysteine (33-333 microM) resulted in concentration-related inhibition of superoxide production induced by FMLP (30 nM) or phorbol myristate acetate (16 nM);-log IC50 values were 3.97 +/- 0.07 and 3.91 +/- 0.10, respectively. Changes in intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) induced by FMLP (30 nM) were studied in fura-2-loaded human PMN. FMLP produced a transient calcium response, i.e. a peak followed by decay to a residual value above baseline. N-Acetylcysteine (333 microM) did not affect either basal [Ca2+]i values or changes in [Ca2+]i values after treatment with FMLP. Activation by phorbol myristate acetate caused a reduction in glutathione levels from 5.94 +/- 0.86 (control) to 1.84 +/- 0.51 nmol/3 x 10(6) cells (P 0.05 compared with control). Exposure to t-butyl hydroperoxide (0.5 mM, 30 min) markedly increased malondialdehyde levels (from 0.03 +/- 0.02 to 0.73 +/- 0.07 nmol/10(6) cells), and index of lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde levels were significantly reduced in PMN treated with N-acetylcysteine (333 microM; 0.55 +/- 0.04 nmol/10(6) cells; P < 0.05 compared with untreated cells exposed to t-butyl hydroperoxide). In conclusion, N-acetylcysteine reduces superoxide generation in response to FMLP and phorbol myristate acetate and partially protects against lipid

  4. Changes in phospholipase D activity of leukocytes during human systemic inflammatory response syndrome induced by cardiopulmonary bypass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴明; 卢韵碧; 陈如坤; 周汉良

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the fluctuations in arterial leukocyte phospholipase D (PLD) activity during the perioperative period of open heart surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and the relationship between PLD activity and systemic inflammatory response induced by CPB.Methods Arterial blood was obtained from 26 patients undergoing open heart surgery at 8 different time points during the perioperative period, from which leukocytes were isolated for determination of PLD activity, CD11b expression and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Plasma IL-6, IL-8 and C-reactive protein were also determined. The 26 cases were retrospectively divided into 3 groups according to perfusion time in order to detect the possible influences of CPB on PLD activity and IL-6 and IL-8 levels.Results When the ascending aorta was declamped, average arterial leukocyte PLD activity was 0.305±0.132 nmol choline·min-1·mg-1,5.0 times higher of the pre-CPB value, and remained (5.4 times higher of the pre-CPB level) at 72 hours after CPB. Leukocyte CD11b expression and plasma IL-6 and IL-8 levels increased significantly at the end of CPB, while MPO activity and C-reactive protein concentration reached their peaks at 1 and 24 hours, respectively, after CPB. At the end of CPB, the arterial leukocyte PLD activity of patients whose CPB duration was longer than 90 minutes were 1.82- and 1.74-fold that of the other two groups with CPB lasting between 90 and 60 minutes and less than 60 minutes.Conclusions Arterial leukocyte PLD activity rises significantly in CPB and its elevation is earlier and more persistent than other inflammation-related indicators tested; longer CPB duration leads to higher leukocyte PLD activity at the end of CPB. These results imply that PLD could be a new target for prevention of systemic inflammatory response induced by CPB.

  5. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciaran J McCoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf. Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When exposed to certain pathogens PMNs release extracellular traps (NETs in the form of chromatin loaded with various antimicrobial molecules and proteases.In vitro, PMNs expel large amounts of NETs that capture but do not kill B. malayi Mf. NET morphology was confirmed by fluorescence imaging of worm-NET aggregates labelled with DAPI and antibodies to human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and citrullinated histone H4. A fluorescent, extracellular DNA release assay was used to quantify and observe Mf induced NETosis over time. Blinded video analyses of PMN-to-worm attachment and worm survival during Mf-leukocyte co-culture demonstrated that DNase treatment eliminates PMN attachment in the absence of serum, autologous serum bolsters both PMN attachment and PMN plus peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC mediated Mf killing, and serum heat inactivation inhibits both PMN attachment and Mf killing. Despite the effects of heat inactivation, the complement inhibitor compstatin did not impede Mf killing and had little effect on PMN attachment. Both human PMNs and monocytes, but not lymphocytes, are able to kill B. malayi Mf in vitro and NETosis does not significantly contribute to this killing. Leukocytes derived from presumably parasite-naïve U.S. resident donors vary in their ability to kill Mf in vitro, which may reflect the pathological heterogeneity associated with filarial parasitic infections.Human innate immune cells are able to recognize, attach to and kill B. malayi

  6. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Ciaran J.; Reaves, Barbara J.; Giguère, Steeve; Coates, Ruby; Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Background Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf). Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When exposed to certain pathogens PMNs release extracellular traps (NETs) in the form of chromatin loaded with various antimicrobial molecules and proteases. Principal findings In vitro, PMNs expel large amounts of NETs that capture but do not kill B. malayi Mf. NET morphology was confirmed by fluorescence imaging of worm-NET aggregates labelled with DAPI and antibodies to human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase and citrullinated histone H4. A fluorescent, extracellular DNA release assay was used to quantify and observe Mf induced NETosis over time. Blinded video analyses of PMN-to-worm attachment and worm survival during Mf-leukocyte co-culture demonstrated that DNase treatment eliminates PMN attachment in the absence of serum, autologous serum bolsters both PMN attachment and PMN plus peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) mediated Mf killing, and serum heat inactivation inhibits both PMN attachment and Mf killing. Despite the effects of heat inactivation, the complement inhibitor compstatin did not impede Mf killing and had little effect on PMN attachment. Both human PMNs and monocytes, but not lymphocytes, are able to kill B. malayi Mf in vitro and NETosis does not significantly contribute to this killing. Leukocytes derived from presumably parasite-naïve U.S. resident donors vary in their ability to kill Mf in vitro, which may reflect the pathological heterogeneity associated with filarial parasitic infections. Conclusions/Significance Human innate immune cells are able to

  7. Expression of the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase CYP2J2 in human monocytic leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kaeko; Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-08-29

    CYP2J2 is one of the cytochrome P450 epoxygenases involved in the metabolism of arachidonic acid. CYP2J2 has been identified in several tissues, especially cardiovascular tissues. CYP2J2 has cardiovascular effects, as epoxyeicosatrienoic acid, one of its metabolites, has anti-inflammatory and vasodilative activities. We investigated the expression of CYP2J2 in human leukocytes using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunostaining. Human monocytic cells, but not human neutrophils, exhibited constitutive expression of CYP2J2. Furthermore, the expression of CYP2J2 mRNA increased when the human monocytic cell line THP-1 cells and human monocytes were stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and macrophage-colony stimulating factor in combination with granulocyte/macrophage-colony stimulating factor, respectively. These results suggest that expression of CYP2J2 was up-regulated when human monocytes differentiated into macrophages and that human monocytic cells and macrophages have a pathway to metabolize arachidonic acid using CYP epoxygenases.

  8. Appropriate clinical use of human leukocyte antigen typing for coeliac disease: an Australasian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Din, J A; Cameron, D J S; Daveson, A J; Day, A S; Dellsperger, P; Hogan, C; Newnham, E D; Shepherd, S J; Steele, R H; Wienholt, L; Varney, M D

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing emerge as a remarkably popular test for the diagnostic work-up of coeliac disease with high patient acceptance. Although limited in its positive predictive value for coeliac disease, the strong disease association with specific HLA genes imparts exceptional negative predictive value to HLA typing, enabling a negative result to exclude coeliac disease confidently. In response to mounting evidence that the clinical use and interpretation of HLA typing often deviates from best practice, this article outlines an evidence-based approach to guide clinically appropriate use of HLA typing, and establishes a reporting template for pathology providers to improve communication of results. PMID:25827511

  9. Comprehensive analysis of leukocytes, vascularization and matrix metalloproteinases in human menstrual xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; He, Bin; Xu, Xiangbo; Wang, Jiedong

    2011-02-17

    In our previous study, menstrual-like changes in mouse were provoked through the pharmacologic withdrawal of progesterone with mifepristone following induction of decidualization. However, mouse is not a natural menstruation animal, and the menstruation model using external stimuli may not truly reflect the occurrence and development of the human menstrual process. Therefore, we established a model of menstruation based on human endometrial xenotransplantation. In this model, human endometrial tissues were transplanted subcutaneously into SCID mice that were ovarectomized and supplemented with estrogen and progestogen by silastic implants with a scheme imitating the endocrinological milieu of human menstrual cycle. Morphology, hormone levels, and expression of vimentin and cytokeratin markers were evaluated to confirm the menstrual-like changes in this model. With 28 days of hormone treatment, transplanted human endometrium survived and underwent proliferation, differentiation and disintegration, similar to human endometrium in vivo. Human CD45+ cells showed a peak of increase 28 days post-transplantation. Three days after progesterone withdrawal, mouse CD45+ cells increased rapidly in number and were significantly greater than human CD45+ cell counts. Mouse CD31+ blood vascular-like structures were detected in both transplanted and host tissues. After progesterone withdrawal, the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 1, 2, and 9 were increased. In summary, we successfully established a human endometrial xenotransplantation model in SCID mice, based on the results of menstrual-like changes in which MMP-1, 2 and 9 are involved. We showed that leukocytes are originated from in situ proliferation in human xenografts and involved in the occurrence of menstruation. This model will help to further understand the occurrence, growth, and differentiation of the endometrium and the underlying mechanisms of menstruation.

  10. Comprehensive analysis of leukocytes, vascularization and matrix metalloproteinases in human menstrual xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Guo

    Full Text Available In our previous study, menstrual-like changes in mouse were provoked through the pharmacologic withdrawal of progesterone with mifepristone following induction of decidualization. However, mouse is not a natural menstruation animal, and the menstruation model using external stimuli may not truly reflect the occurrence and development of the human menstrual process. Therefore, we established a model of menstruation based on human endometrial xenotransplantation. In this model, human endometrial tissues were transplanted subcutaneously into SCID mice that were ovarectomized and supplemented with estrogen and progestogen by silastic implants with a scheme imitating the endocrinological milieu of human menstrual cycle. Morphology, hormone levels, and expression of vimentin and cytokeratin markers were evaluated to confirm the menstrual-like changes in this model. With 28 days of hormone treatment, transplanted human endometrium survived and underwent proliferation, differentiation and disintegration, similar to human endometrium in vivo. Human CD45+ cells showed a peak of increase 28 days post-transplantation. Three days after progesterone withdrawal, mouse CD45+ cells increased rapidly in number and were significantly greater than human CD45+ cell counts. Mouse CD31+ blood vascular-like structures were detected in both transplanted and host tissues. After progesterone withdrawal, the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP 1, 2, and 9 were increased. In summary, we successfully established a human endometrial xenotransplantation model in SCID mice, based on the results of menstrual-like changes in which MMP-1, 2 and 9 are involved. We showed that leukocytes are originated from in situ proliferation in human xenografts and involved in the occurrence of menstruation. This model will help to further understand the occurrence, growth, and differentiation of the endometrium and the underlying mechanisms of menstruation.

  11. MiR-126 and miR-126* regulate shear-resistant firm leukocyte adhesion to human brain endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, Camilla; Edwards, Laura J.; de Vries, Helga E.; Sharrack, Basil; Male, David K.; Romero, Ignacio A.

    2017-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to brain endothelial cells, the blood-brain barrier main component, is a critical step in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Leukocyte adhesion is mediated mainly by selectins, cell adhesion molecules and chemokines induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFα and IFNγ, but the regulation of this process is not fully clear. This study investigated the regulation of firm leukocyte adhesion to human brain endothelium by two different brain endothelial microRNAs (miRs), miR-126 and miR-126*, that are downregulated by TNFα and IFNγ in a human brain endothelial cell line, hCMEC/D3. Using a leukocyte adhesion in vitro assay under shear forces mimicking blood flow, we observed that reduction of endothelial miR-126 and miR-126* enhanced firm monocyte and T cell adhesion to hCMEC/D3 cells, whereas their increased expression partially prevented THP1, Jurkat and primary MS patient-derived PBMC firm adhesion. Furthermore, we observed that miR-126* and miR-126 downregulation increased E-selectin and VCAM1, respectively, while miR-126 overexpression reduced VCAM1 and CCL2 expression by hCMEC/D3 cells, suggesting that these miRs regulate leukocyte adhesion by modulating the expression of adhesion-associated endothelial mRNA targets. Hence, human brain endothelial miR-126 and miR-126* could be used as a therapeutic tool to reduce leukocyte adhesion and thus reduce neuroinflammation. PMID:28358058

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...

  13. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Ca2+-Linked Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Are Essential for Endothelial/Leukocyte Adherence▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Brian J.; Solt, Laura A.; Chowdhury, Ibrul; Kazi, Altaf S.; Abid, M. Ruhul; Aird, William C.; May, Michael J.; Foskett, J. Kevin; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2007-01-01

    Receptor-mediated signaling is commonly associated with multiple functions, including the production of reactive oxygen species. However, whether mitochondrion-derived superoxide (mROS) contributes directly to physiological signaling is controversial. Here we demonstrate a previously unknown mechanism in which physiologic Ca2+-evoked mROS production plays a pivotal role in endothelial cell (EC) activation and leukocyte firm adhesion. G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and tyrosine kinase-media...

  14. Power Generation from Human Leukocytes/Lymphocytes in Mammalian Biofuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güray Güven

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative to batteries power sources is needed for the human implants of the future that tend to be less invasive and more integrated to human biology and physiology. Human metabolism could be exploited for the generation of power, but mammalian cells protect their energy production apparatus from external electrochemical scavengers. We report here evidence that, in the case of white blood cells, chemical energy can be harvested directly on an electrode as electricity in fuel cells whose stability is roughly parallel to the viability of cells in vitro. Electrochemical activity of human leukocytes immobilized on modified carbon mesh electrodes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Oxidation peaks at 0.33 V versus Ag/AgCl were observed. An open-circuit potential of 0.44 V was recorded between anode and cathode compartments where the biofuel cell potential operating under an external load of 5 kΩ was below 0.35 V. Average power outputs of 10 μW (2.4×10-6 μW/cell were increased to 15 μW by the activation of white blood cells. Power densities of 1.5 μW cm−2 for lower than physiological cell concentrations are low for most of today’s implants, but possibility of cell immobilization allows a positive outlook for the future utility of the reported findings.

  15. Broad spectrum activity of a lectin-like bacterial serine protease family on human leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Ayala-Lujan

    Full Text Available The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system.

  16. Kinetics of staphylococcal opsonization, attachment, ingestion and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes: a quantitative assay using [3H]thymidine labeled bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, J; Peterson, P K; Quie, P G

    1977-01-01

    A method has been developed for studying quantitatively the separate processes of bacterial opsonization, phagocytosis, and killing by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes using [3H]thymidine labeled Staphylococcus aureus. Phagocytosis is determined by assaying for leukocytes-associated radioactivity after differential centrifugation and washing the leukocytes. Opsonization is studied by incubating bacteria with an opsonic source for varying durations and then adding leukocytes. By treatment of samples with the muralytic enzyme, lysostaphin, the attachment and ingestion phases of phagocytosis can be separated. Sampling for colony forming units after disruption of the leukocytes permits the measurement of bacterial killing. Using this method, differences in the kinetics of staphylococcal opsonization by normal and C2 deficient sera were defined, opsonic influences on the attachment and ingestion phases of pH agocytosis were delineated, and the influences of different opsonins and leukocyte populations on killing were determined.

  17. A review of the mitochondrial and glycolytic metabolism in human platelets and leukocytes: implications for their use as bioenergetic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Philip A; Ravi, Saranya; Chacko, Balu; Johnson, Michelle S; Darley-Usmar, Victor M

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of metabolic function in cells isolated from human blood for treatment and diagnosis of disease is a new and important area of translational research. It is now becoming clear that a broad range of pathologies which present clinically with symptoms predominantly in one organ, such as the brain or kidney, also modulate mitochondrial energetics in platelets and leukocytes allowing these cells to serve as "the canary in the coal mine" for bioenergetic dysfunction. This opens up the possibility that circulating platelets and leukocytes can sense metabolic stress in patients and serve as biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction in human pathologies such as diabetes, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. In this overview we will describe how the utilization of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation differs in platelets and leukocytes and discuss how they can be used in patient populations. Since it is clear that the metabolic programs between leukocytes and platelets are fundamentally distinct the measurement of mitochondrial function in distinct cell populations is necessary for translational research.

  18. In vitro ZnCl2 cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human leukocytes: Zero-order kinetic cellular zinc influx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pereira de Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element for cellular viability, but concentrations above physiologic level may lead to cellular damage. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro ZnCl2 genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in human leukocyte cells. This was assessed in an unprecedented way that correlated the level of intracellular Zn after cell exposition with the cellular damage. The exposure to increased Zn concentrations (2.5-20 µg mL-1, showed significantly reduced cellular leukocyte viability. However, significant DNA damages were observed only when the Zn exposure concentrations were from 10-20 µg mL-1. The Zn intracellular levels found in leukocytes was from 72.25-268.9 ρg cell-1, starting to induce cytotoxicity and genotoxicity at concentrations of 95.68 and 126.2 ρg cell-1, respectively. The relationship between the exposure concentration and intracellular levels of Zn suggests that the influx of Zn, in the form of ZnCl2, occurs in human leukocytes under zero-order kinetics.

  19. Characterization of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-induced vasoconstriction in isolated human umbilical veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, S W; Yu, R; Stearns, C D; Haynes, N A; Winquist, R J

    1998-11-01

    We investigated the contractile effects of both activated and unactivated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) on human vascular tissue to characterize the influence of human PMNs on vascular tone. PMNs were added either unactivated or after f-met-leu-phe (fMLP) activation (10(-8) M), into tissue chambers containing human umbilical vein segments under either control or cytokine-treated conditions. The activation state of different PMN preparations was measured by immunofluorescence staining of the adhesion glycoproteins Mac-1 and L-selectin. Both unactivated and activated PMNs induced a cell number-dependent (1.5 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(6) cells/ml) vasoconstriction in human umbilical vein segments. This PMN-induced response was not inhibited by treatment with indomethacin (10(-5) M), superoxide dismutase (2 x 10(-7) M) or L-nitro-monomethyl arginine (10(-4) M). However, treatment of PMNs with the leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor BIRM-270 partially inhibited (-61 +/- 19%, P <.05) the contraction induced only by unactivated PMNs. Moreover, the supernatant from unactivated, but not that from activated, PMNs elicited a contractile response comparable to that from the addition of cells. We observed a significant correlation between the Mac-1/L-selectin ratio of activated PMNs and the contractile response they generated (r = 0.77, P <.05). The activated PMN response had an endothelium-dependent component, whereas the unactivated PMN response was endothelium-independent. These results suggest that human PMNs of varying activation states have the capacity to modulate vascular smooth muscle tone via distinct mechanisms. Unactivated PMNs appear to modulate tone via a secreted product, whereas the more activated phenotype modulates vascular tone via a cognate interaction with the endothelium.

  20. Monocyte human leukocyte antigen-DR transcriptional downregulation by cortisol during septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tulzo, Yves; Pangault, Celine; Amiot, Laurence; Guilloux, Valérie; Tribut, Olivier; Arvieux, Cédric; Camus, Christophe; Fauchet, Renée; Thomas, Rémi; Drénou, Bernard

    2004-05-15

    Monocyte deactivation has been identified as a major factor of immunosuppression in sepsis and is associated with a loss of surface human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) expression on circulating monocytes. Using flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we investigated this phenomenon in septic patients. We confirmed the early loss of monocyte HLA-DR expression in all infected patients and demonstrated that this persistent lowered expression at Day 6 correlated with severity scores, secondary infection, and death. This phenomenon occurred at a transcriptional level via a decrease in the class II transactivator A (CIITA) transcription. Furthermore, these abnormalities correlated with the high cortisol levels observed in sepsis and not with those of other putative factors such as catecholamines or interleukin-10. Finally, in vitro studies evidenced that glucocorticoids decrease HLA-DR expression at a transcriptional level via a decrease in CIITA mRNA levels, mainly by down modulating its isoforms I and III. We conclude that in human sepsis, the loss of HLA-DR expression on circulating monocytes is associated with a poor outcome. We suggest that the high endogenous cortisol level observed in septic shock may be a possible new factor involved in the loss of HLA-DR expression on monocytes via its effect on HLA-DR and CIITA transcription.

  1. Assessment of malathion and its effects on leukocytes in human blood samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit Kumar; Tiwari, Udita; Gaur, Mulayam Singh; Tiwari, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the present paper, we report a reproducible, cost effective, fast response method for detection of malathion and its effects on leukocytes in different human blood groups. Spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis spectrometry) and Fourier transform infrared coupled with solid phase extraction were applied for analyzing malathion content in human blood plasma. The spiking levels of malathion in the range of 0.1-1.7 µg/mL were extracted from blood plasma samples using SPE. The present active functional groups (C = O; P-O-C; -OH; P = S) were also characterized. The recovery rate of malathion was 80%±4.5%. The calculated correlation coefficient was 0.9799, indicating the linearity of the results. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were (0.1-1.7) µg/mL and (0.3-1.5) µg/mL, respectively. Malathion <1.0 µg/mL showed no significant change while higher levels of malathion exposure (1.5 µg/mL and 3.0 µg/mL) reduced the number of white blood cells. In conclusion, the spectroscopic results may be useful to understand the mechanism of other pesticides such as methyl parathion and parathion.

  2. Persistence of hepatitis C virus in a white population: associations with human leukocyte antigen class 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Liam J

    2012-02-03

    The aim of this study was to define novel associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class 1 alleles and persistence or clearance of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a white population. All individuals in the study were seropositive for anti-HCV antibodies. Viral status was determined by the Roche HCV Amplicor test. HLA-A, -B, -C allelic group profile was molecularly defined by reverse line probe hybridization. The strongest individual allelic group associations with persistent HCV infection were HLA A*11 (p = 0.044) and Cw*04 (p = 0.006). However, only the HLA C*04 association survived correction for multiple comparisons. Further analysis of alleles in linkage with HLA Cw*04 revealed that the haplotype HLA A*11, Cw*04 was present in 11 individuals, 10 of whom were viremic (p = 0.05). No gene dosage effect was observed. No association between HLA class 1 allelic groups and aviremia and virus load was evident in this white population. HLA B*44 is associated with low virus load in human immunodeficiency virus disease, but this association was not evident in this HCV-infected population. Novel HLA class 1 alleles associated with persistence of HCV have been identified.

  3. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Within the Male Reproductive System: Implications for Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2015-01-01

    In sexual reproduction in humans, a man has a clear interest in ensuring that the immune system of his female partner accepts the semi-allogenic fetus. Increasing attention has been given to soluble immunomodulatory molecules in the seminal fluid as one mechanism of ensuring this, possibly by "priming" the woman's immune system before conception and at conception. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of the immunoregulatory and tolerance-inducible human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G in the male reproductive organs. The expression of HLA-G in the blastocyst and by extravillous trophoblast cells in the placenta during pregnancy has been well described. Highly variable amounts of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in seminal plasma from different men have been reported, and the concentration of sHLA-G is associated with HLA-G genotype. A first pilot study indicates that the level of sHLA-G in seminal plasma may even be associated with the chance of pregnancy in couples, where the male partner has reduced semen quality. More studies are needed to verify these preliminary findings.

  4. Human periodontal ligament cells facilitate leukocyte recruitment and are influenced in their immunomodulatory function by Th17 cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, A; Beyer, M; Deschner, J; Allam, J P; Novak, N; Winter, J; Jepsen, S; Jäger, A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the immunomodulatory impact of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells on the nature and magnitude of the leukocyte infiltrate in periodontal inflammation, particularly with regard to Th17 cells. PDL cells were challenged with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-17A, and IFN-γ) and analyzed for the expression of cytokines involved in periodontal immunoinflammatory processes (IL-6, MIP-3 alpha, IL-23A, TGFß1, IDO, and CD274). In order to further investigate a direct involvement of PDL cells in leukocyte function, co-culture experiments were conducted. The expression of the immunomodulatory cytokines studied was significantly increased under pro-inflammatory conditions in PDL cells. Although PDL cells did not stimulate leukocyte proliferation or Th17 differentiation, these cells induced the recruitment of leukocytes. The results of our study suggest that PDL cells might be involved in chronic inflammatory mechanisms in periodontal tissues and thus in the transition to an adaptive immune response in periodontitis.

  5. Characterisation of leukocytes in a human skin blister model of acute inflammation and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, William; Motwani, Madhur; Veighey, Kristin; Newson, Justine; Audzevich, Tatsiana; Nicolaou, Anna; Murphy, Sharon; Macallister, Raymond; Gilroy, Derek W

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing need to understand the leukocytes and soluble mediators that drive acute inflammation and bring about its resolution in humans. We therefore carried out an extensive characterisation of the cantharidin skin blister model in healthy male volunteers. A novel fluorescence staining protocol was designed and implemented, which facilitated the identification of cell populations by flow cytometry. We observed that at the onset phase, 24 h after blister formation, the predominant cells were CD16hi/CD66b+ PMNs followed by HLA-DR+/CD14+ monocytes/macrophages, CD11c+ and CD141+ dendritic cells as well as Siglec-8+ eosinophils. CD3+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and CD56+ NK cells were also present, but in comparatively fewer numbers. During resolution, 72 h following blister induction, numbers of PMNs declined whilst the numbers of monocyte/macrophages remain unchanged, though they upregulated expression of CD16 and CD163. In contrast, the overall numbers of dendritic cells and Siglec-8+ eosinophils increased. Post hoc analysis of these data revealed that of the inflammatory cytokines measured, TNF-α but not IL-1β or IL-8 correlated with increased PMN numbers at the onset. Volunteers with the greatest PMN infiltration at onset displayed the fastest clearance rates for these cells at resolution. Collectively, these data provide insight into the cells that occupy acute resolving blister in humans, the soluble mediators that may control their influx as well as the phenotype of mononuclear phagocytes that predominate the resolution phase. Further use of this model will improve our understanding of the evolution and resolution of inflammation in humans, how defects in these over-lapping pathways may contribute to the variability in disease longevity/chronicity, and lends itself to the screen of putative anti-inflammatory or pro-resolution therapies.

  6. Influence of human leukocyte antigen genes on TCR V gene segment frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevée, C; Farace, F; Chung, V; Diu, A; Raffoux, C; Charron, D; Hercend, T; Triebel, F

    1994-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-dependent selection mechanisms exerted during thymic maturation are supposed to be main contributing factors to the genetic predetermination of the TCR repertoire and may have a detectable effect on adult peripheral blood lymphocyte V segment frequencies. Here, we analyzed whether polymorphic or non-polymorphic HLA determinants are associated with selected expression of some V gene segment specificities. We first examined the reactivity of 17 V segment specific mAb on purified CD4+ and CD8+ cell fractions in 10 unrelated people. We found a significant overexpression of only three V segment products (V beta 2, V beta 5.1 and V beta 6.7) in CD4+ and none in CD8+ cell fractions in most individuals. Skewing of certain V beta segments by non-polymorphic HLA determinants (i.e. class II for CD4+ and class I for CD8+ cells) is therefore more limited (3/17) than previously thought. Considering the effects of polymorphic HLA determinants, we compared TCR V segment frequencies in HLA-identical siblings to sibling pairs who differ at one or both HLA haplotypes, using 13 V beta specific mAb. In pairwise comparisons, we found that the HLA complex had no detectable effect on TCR repertoire in five large families with multiple siblings. Together, these observations suggest that HLA-predicted selection mechanisms exerted during thymic maturation might not have a predominant influence shaping the TCR repertoire of normal adults.

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G and Regulatory T Cells during Specific Immunotherapy for Pollen Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Johnsen, Claus R; Dalgaard, Louise Torp;

    2013-01-01

    with pollen extract in vitro and immune factors were evaluated. Results: During SIT, the main changes in the peripheral blood were an increase in CXCR3+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs and a decrease in CCR4+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs, an increase in allergen-specific IgG4, and a decrease in sHLA-G during the first......Background: TH2-biased immune responses are important in allergy pathogenesis. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) might include the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 blocking antibodies, a reduction in the number of effector cells, and skewing...... of the cytokine profile towards a TH1-polarized immune response. We investigated the effects of SIT on T cells, on immunomodulation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, which has been associated with allergy, on regulatory cytokine expression, and on serum allergen-specific antibody subclasses (IgE and IgG4...

  8. Human leukocyte antigen-B27 alleles in Xinjiang Uygur patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, H-Y; Yu, W-Z; Wang, Z; He, J; Jiao, M

    2015-05-25

    We investigated the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang. B27-positive patients with ankylosing spondylitis were subtyped by using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing. The HLA-B27 subtype frequencies of Uygur patients were compared with those in Han patients in Xinjiang and the other areas of China. B*2705 was the predominant subtype in Uygur patients with a frequency of 58.95%, which was much higher than that in Han patients in Xinjiang (31.58%, P ankylosing spondylitis patients; B*2704 was the main (61.18%) subtype in Han patients in Xinjiang, followed by B*2705 (31.58%) and was similar to the characteristics of Han patients in the other areas of China. B*2724 in Han ankylosing spondylitis patients has not been previously reported. Additionally, the B*2702/B*2705 homozygote was identified in Uygur patients. B*2702/B*2704, B*2704/B*2705, and B*2705/B*2705 homozygotes were identified in 3 Han patients. The distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang significantly differed from that in Han patients. Understanding the distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in ethnic minority populations of Xinjiang is important for anthropological genetic studies and for analyzing the impact of genetic background on ankylosing spondylitis susceptibility.

  9. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, S; Rangaswamy, D; Prakash, S; Sharma, R K; Khan, M I; Sonawane, A; Agrawal, S

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival.

  10. A melanoma immune response signature including Human Leukocyte Antigen-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremante, Elisa; Ginebri, Agnese; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Benassi, Barbara; Frascione, Pasquale; Grammatico, Paola; Cappellacci, Sandra; Catricalà, Caterina; Arcelli, Diego; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Di Filippo, Franco; Mottolese, Marcella; Visca, Paolo; Benevolo, Maria; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Paired cultures of early-passage melanoma cells and melanocytes were established from metastatic lesions and the uninvolved skin of five patients. In this stringent autologous setting, cDNA profiling was used to analyze a subset of 1477 genes selected by the Gene Ontology term 'immune response'. Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E) was ranked 19th among melanoma-overexpressed genes and was embedded in a transformation signature including its preferred peptide ligand donors HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-G. Mostly undetectable in normal skin and 39 nevi (including rare and atypical lesions), HLA-E was detected by immunohistochemistry in 17/30 (57%) and 32/48 (67%) primary and metastatic lesions, respectively. Accordingly, surface HLA-E was higher on melanoma cells than on melanocytes and protected the former (6/6 cell lines) from lysis by natural killer (NK) cells, functionally counteracting co-expressed triggering ligands. Although lacking HLA-E, melanocytes (4/4 cultures) were nevertheless (and surprisingly) fully protected from NK cell lysis.

  11. Human leukocyte antigens in indigenous (mapuche) people in a regional renal transplantation program in chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droguett, M A; Oyarzún, M J; Alruiz, P; Jerez, V; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2005-10-01

    An active regional transplantation program established in the southern region of Chile has allowed the incorporation of ethnic minorities particularly Mapuche living in this geographic area in the development of a histocompatibility database. To identify possible differences in the human leukocyte (HLA) antigen distribution in Chilean Mapuche compared with non-Mapuche, we reviewed 442 HLA tissue-typing studies. Seventy-eight of 309 recipients (25%) and 18 of 133 donors (13%) were Mapuche. Among recipients, Mapuche people showed a significantly higher frequency of the HLA antigens, A28, B16, DR4, and DR8, and a lower one for A19, B15, and DR1 (P Mapuche individuals. A particularly higher frequency of the haplotype A28, -B16, -DR4 was also evidenced in Mapuche. Besides, these recipients showed a higher frequency of the allele -DR4 when compared with Mapuche donors. A greater frequency of some histocompatibility antigens in patients with chronic renal disease might be attributed to allelic concentration due to a high index of endogamy, but a possible association with the development of progressive renal disease cannot be ignored, especially when a higher prevalence of DR4 was observed among Mapuche recipients.

  12. Detection of human leukocyte antigen compatibility and antibodies in liver transplantation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Qin Meng; Xuan Zhang; Jun Fan; Lin Zhou; Bing Hao; Xiao-Ming Chen; Wei-Hang Ma; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The exact roles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility, HLA antibodies and underlying diseases in acute rejection of liver transplants are not clear. Moreover, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, one of the most common infections after transplantation, is related to HLA genotype and the incidence of acute rejection. METHODS: Since there are controversial reports, we analyzed the impact of HLA matching, HLA antibodies and underlying diseases in 38 liver transplant recipients in China, and assessed the association of CMV infection and HLA compatibility. RESULTS: The frequency of no HLA compatibility was high in patients without antigenemia (P=0.019). All 17 patients with HLA-A matching developed antigenemia (P0.05). In patients with acute rejection, no differences were found in the incidence of acute rejection in transplants for hepatitis B, tumors, or combined hepatitis B and tumors (P>0.05).CONCLUSIONS: There are fewer acute rejections in transplants with more HLA compatibilities. Speciifc investigations of underlying diseases and HLA typing may be necessary in liver transplantation. The mechanisms of CMV infection and HLA matching should be further studied. HLA before transplantation should be examined for the prevention of acute rejection and CMV infection.

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Polymorphisms Association With Cancer Post-Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarte, Julieta; Goldraich, Livia; Manlhiot, Cedric; Kozuszko, Stella; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Post transplantation, a major complication is the development of malignancies. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is a molecule that inhibits the immune system and it is utilized by malignant cells to hide from the immune system. Expression of HLA-G from the donor and recipient cells in transplant patients is regulated by gene variations however, the association between genotype and cancer remains unknown. Our objective was to determine the association between genotype and outcome. Heart transplant recipients (251) and available corresponding donors (196) samples were genotyped for polymorphisms and the association of polymorphisms to outcome was evaluated with parametric hazard regression models. Risk of cancer was 22% at 10years post-transplantation. The mean follow-up was of 4.9±3.6years. In a multivariable analysis, donor-recipient SNP 3187 matching was identified as a protective factor for cancer (hazard ratio 0.43; 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.93; p=0.03). While coding region allele (haplotype 6) was identified as an independent risk factor (hazard ratio 3.7; 95% confidence interval 1.36-10.06; p=0.01). In this investigation, we identified an association between cancer post-transplantation and HLA-G polymorphisms, which may reveal a pathway for potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for cancer post-transplantation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A PRIMARY STUDY OF THE CORRELASTIONS BETWEEN HUMAN LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN (HLA)AND OSTEOSARCOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Weibin; Luo Jiong; Shen Caiwei; Cai Tidong; Yang Yuqin; Yao Fangjuan; Fan LiAn

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and osteosarcoma in Chinese Han nationality. Methods: The frequencies of HLA-A, B,DR, DQ locus antigens were tested in a group of 25osteosarcoma patients in comparison with 250 healthy controls by using complement-dependent microlymphocytotoxity technique. Both of them are Chinese Han nationality. The results were compared statistically.Results: The frequency of HLA-B35 was 0.400 in patient group, and comparing with 0.048 in controls. The relative risk of suffering from osteosarcoma in persons carrying HLA-B35 was 13.220 times as high as that in those without this antigen (P<0.01). Patients with HLA-B13 had increased in the relative risk of poor prognosis with 12.048 fold comparing with those without this antigen (P<0.05). A tendency of the worst prognosis was presented in the patients who carry both HLA-B13 and HLA-B35.For those patients with HLA-B40, the relative safety was 7.057 times higher than the negative persons (P<0.05).Conclusion: HLA-B35 is in close linkage to osteosarcoma susceptibility genes in Chinese Han nationality. HLA-B13and HLA-B40 may be associated to the malignant and resistant genes of osteosarcoma respectively.

  15. The experience of two European preimplantation genetic diagnosis centres on human leukocyte antigen typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Hilde; De Rycke, Martine; De Man, Caroline; De Hauwere, Kim; Fiorentino, Francesco; Kahraman, Semra; Pennings, Guido; Verpoest, Willem; Devroey, Paul; Liebaers, Inge

    2009-03-01

    Two European centres report on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing of preimplantation embryos for haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation: 'UZ Brussel' in Brussels and 'Genoma' in Rome. Both centres have 6 years' experience with technical and clinical aspects of this type of genetic analysis on single blastomeres. Both centres apply a similar technique for preimplantation HLA typing using short tandem repeats linked to the HLA locus in multiplex PCR for haplotyping. At present, a conclusive HLA diagnosis could be assured in 92.8% and 90.3% of the embryos at UZ Brussel and at Genoma, respectively. The implantation rates were 32.4% and 28.2%, respectively, and the birth rates per cycle were 9.4% and 18.6%, respectively. The HLA programme at UZ Brussel and at Genoma resulted in the birth of 9 babies and 3 successful HSC transplantations, and 42 babies and 7 successful HSC transplantations, respectively, so far. Drastic embryo selection for preimplantation HLA typing (in theory 1/4 for HLA, 1/8 for HLA in combination with sexing for X-linked recessive diseases, 3/16 for HLA in combination with autosomal recessive disorders) resulted overall in the birth of 51 babies (15.9% live birth rate per started cycle) in two European centres.

  16. Prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1 alleles in Kuwaiti children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaeid, Khaled; Haider, M Z; Kamal, H; Srivastva, B S; Ayoub, E M

    2002-02-01

    The prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR alleles has been determined in 69 Kuwaiti Arab children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and compared to that in 212 ethnically matched normal healthy controls using a PCR-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. A very high incidence of DR3 was detected in JRA patients compared to the controls (P JRA patients was accounted for mainly by an excess of DRB1*0307 (P JRA were analysed separately; 73% compared to 58% for the whole JRA patient group. The frequency of DR1 was also higher in the JRA group compared to controls (P = 0.019, RR = 3.585). Although the incidence of some alleles was higher in the control group (DR13 and DR7), none reached a statistically significant level. All the patients with iridocyclitis had either a DR1 or DR3 allele, except for one child. The frequency of DRB1*03 was found to be much higher in the polyarticular subtype of Kuwaiti JRA cases compared to the oligoarticular subgroup and the controls. Also, a non-significant increase in the frequency of the DRB1*04, *11 and *15 alleles was detected in the polyarticular subtype of the Kuwaiti JRA cases compared to the controls.

  17. Increased plasma soluble human leukocyte antigen-G in persistent wheezy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, Fulya; Eke Gungor, Hatice; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Saraymen, Berkay

    2017-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I antigen characterized by limited polymorphism in its coding region, unique tissue expression pattern in physiologic conditions and immunomodulatory properties. Recently, the level of soluble (s)HLA-G was found to be higher in atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis, but this remains to be clarified in wheezy infants. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate sHLA-G in wheezy infants. The subjects consisted of infants with persistent wheezing and positive modified asthma predictive index (mAPI; n = 30; persistent group) and those with transient wheezing and negative mAPI (n = 17; transient group). sHLA-G was measured in plasma using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and eosinophil count were measured, and skin testing was performed with a battery of 13 antigens with appropriate positive and negative controls. sHLA-G was significantly higher in the persistent wheezing (positive mAPI) group compared with the transient wheezing (negative mAPI) group (P = 0.008). There was no significant difference in peripheral blood eosinophil count and total IgE between the groups. The increased sHLA-G in infants with persistent wheeze suggests that sHLA-G may be able to be used to distinguish persistent from transient wheeze. Further comprehensive studies are needed on this topic. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Origins and relatedness of human leukocyte antigen class I allele supertypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugler, Christopher

    2010-09-01

    Class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles can be classified into supertypes based on the epitope specificity of their peptide binding grooves. The evolutionary origin of these supertypes has been the topic of prior research and remains an important question because of the increasing interest in HLA supertypes in the contexts of infection and cancer epidemiology and vaccine development. Here I re-examine the origins of HLA class I supertypes using the nucleotide sequences of 88 HLA-A alleles and 117 HLA-B alleles. Phylogenetic trees with ancestral character state reconstruction show that the HLA-A02, A03, and A24 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestral origin while HLA-A01 shows multiple independent origins all from HLA-A03 ancestors. HLA-B supertypes show multiple origins for the B07, B08, and B27 supertypes, while the B44, B58, and B62 supertypes largely form clades with a single ancestor. Supertypes arising multiple times show different amino acid substitutions in each clade. These findings suggest that convergent evolution has occurred in only a few HLA allele supertypes and may indicate different evolutionary pressures shaping certain supertypes.

  19. The antioxidant effect of free bilirubin on cumene-hydroperoxide treated human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilkaya, A; Altinayak, R; Korgun, D K

    2000-07-01

    To examine the antioxidant effect of bilirubin (BR) on leukocyte, we treated leukocytes obtained from healthy subjects with an oxidant and various concentrations of BR. High concentrations of BR decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and catalase activities, increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but had no effect on glutathione (GSH) concentration. Our results showed that under physiological conditions, BR has an antioxidant effect only in high concentrations.

  20. Antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans strains and genotoxicity assessment in human leukocyte cells of Euphorbia tirucalli L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Flávio Souza de Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last times, focus on plant research has increased all over the world. Euphorbia tirucalli L., a plant known popularly as Aveloz, and originally used in Africa, has been drawing attention for its use in the United States and Latin America, both for use as an ornamental plant and as a medicinal plant. E. tirucalli L. is a member of the family Euphorbiaceae and contains many diterpenoids and triterpenoids, in particular phorbol esters, apparently the main constituent of this plant, which are assumed to be responsible for their activities in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro antifungal activities of Euphorbia tirucalli (L. against opportunistic yeasts were studied using microbroth dilution assay. The results showed that aqueous extract and latex preparation were effective against ten clinical strains of Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro (Latex and extract MIC range of 3.2 - > 411 µg/mL. Aiming the safe use in humans, the genotoxic effects of E. tirucalli were evaluated in human leukocytes cells. Our data show that both aqueous extract and latex preparation have no genotoxic effect in human leukocytes cells in vitro. Although the results cannot be extrapolated by itself for use in vivo, they suggest a good perspective for a therapeutic application in future. In conclusion, our results show that the aqueous extract and latex preparation from E. tirucalli L. are antifungal agents effectives against several strains of C. neoformans and do not provoke DNA damage in human leukocyte cells, considering the concentrations tested.

  1. Salmonella induces SRC protein tyrosine kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and NF-kappaBp65 signaling pathways in commercial and wild-type turkey leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies comparing signaling in wild-type turkey (WT) leukocytes and commercial turkey (CT) leukocytes found that the activity of protein tyrosine kinases and MAP kinases, ERK 1/2 and p38, were significantly higher in WT leukocytes compared to CT lines upon exposure to both SE and OPSE on d...

  2. The effects of stress on the enzymes of peripheral leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leise, E. M.; Gray, I.

    1973-01-01

    Previous work showed an early response of rabbit and human leukocyte enzymes to the stress of bacterial infection. Since these represented a mixed population of leukocytes and since polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) increased in these preparations, it was necessary to establish whether the observed increase in lactate dehydrenase (LDH) and protein was the result of an increase in any one particular cell type or in all cells. The need for the development of a simple reproducible method for the differential separation of peripheral leukocytes for the furtherance of our own studies was apparent. It was also becoming increasingly apparent that morphologically similar cells, such as small lymphocytes (L) and macrophages, were capable of different biological functions. A dextran gradient centrifugation method was developed which has provided an easily reproducible technique for separating L from PMN. During the course of this work, in which over 250 rabbits were examined, the pattern of daily leukocyte protein and enzyme variation became increasingly more apparent. This information could have some impact on future work with leukocyte enzymes, by our group and by other workers. The differences in normal protein and enzyme levels maintained by some individuals, and some inbred strains, were evaluated and reported separately. It has been shown that one type of leukocyte may react more to a given stress than other leukocytes.

  3. Identification of chemokines associated with the recruitment of decidual leukocytes in human labour: potential novel targets for preterm labour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Hamilton

    Full Text Available Current therapies for preterm labour (PTL focus on arresting myometrial contractions but are largely ineffective, thus alternative therapeutic targets need to be identified. Leukocytes infiltrate the uterus around the time of labour, and are in particularly abundant in decidua (maternal-fetal interface. Moreover, decidual inflammation precedes labour in rat pregnancies and thus may contribute to initiation of labour. We hypothesized that chemokines mediate decidual leukocyte trafficking during preterm labour (PTL and term labour (TL, thus representing potential targets for preventing PTL. Women were recruited into 4 groups: TL, term not in labour (TNL, idiopathic PTL and PTL with infection (PTLI. Choriodecidual RNA was subjected to a pathway-specific PCR array for chemokines. Differential expression of 12 candidate chemokines was validated by real time RT-PCR and Bioplex assay, with immunohistochemistry to confirm cellular origin. 25 chemokines were upregulated in choriodecidua from TL compared to TNL. A similar pattern was detected in PTL, however a distinct profile was observed in PTLI consistent with differences in leukocyte infiltration. Upregulation of CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein was confirmed in TL, with CCL8 upregulated in PTL. Significant correlations were detected between these chemokines and decidual leukocyte abundance previously assessed by immunohistochemical and image analysis. Chemokines were primarily expressed by decidual stromal cells. In addition, CXCL8 and CCL5 were significantly elevated in maternal plasma during labour, suggesting chemokines contribute to peripheral inflammatory events during labour. Differences in chemokine expression patterns between TL and idiopathic PTL may be attributable to suppression of chemokine expression by betamethasone administered to women in PTL; this was supported by in vitro evidence of chemokine downregulation by clinically relevant concentrations of the steroid

  4. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  5. Leukocyte Lysis and Cytokine Induction by the Human Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Frances; Diala, Fitz Gerald I.; Chen, Yi-Pei; Molgora, Brenda M.; Ng, Shek Hang; Johnson, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv) is an extracellular protozoan parasite that causes the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection: trichomoniasis. While acute symptoms in women may include vaginitis, infections are often asymptomatic, but can persist and are associated with medical complications including increased HIV susceptibility, infertility, pre-term labor, and higher incidence of cervical cancer. Heightened inflammation resulting from Tv infection could account for these complications. Effective cellular immune responses to Tv have not been characterized, and re-infection is common, suggesting a dysfunctional adaptive immune response. Using primary human leukocyte components, we have established an in vitro co-culture system to assess the interaction between Tv and the cells of the human immune system. We determined that in vitro, Tv is able to lyse T-cells and B-cells, showing a preference for B-cells. We also found that Tv lysis of lymphocytes was mediated by contact-dependent and soluble factors. Tv lysis of monocytes is far less efficient, and almost entirely contact-dependent. Interestingly, a common symbiont of Tv, Mycoplasma hominis, did not affect cytolytic activity of the parasite, but had a major impact on cytokine responses. M. hominis enabled more diverse inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to Tv and, of the cytokines tested, Tv strains cleared of M. hominis induced only IL-8 secretion from monocytes. The quality of the adaptive immune response to Tv is therefore likely influenced by Tv symbionts, commensals, and concomitant infections, and may be further complicated by direct parasite lysis of effector immune cells. PMID:27529696

  6. Production of reactive oxygen species by man-made vitreous fibres in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, M; Hirvonen, M R; Luoto, K; Savolainen, K M

    1999-06-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) or erythrocytes, isolated from human blood, were exposed to graded doses of asbestos (chrysotile), quartz, or man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF), i.e. refractory ceramic fibres (RCF), glasswool, or rockwool fibres. None of the MMVF affected either the viability of PMNL, as measured by trypan blue exclusion test, or induced haemolysis, whereas the positive controls, quartz and chrysotile, dose-dependently induced haemolysis in PMNL. MMVF did not increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the PMNL, whereas the positive controls, chrysotile and quartz, induced a marked and dose-dependent release of LDH. When PMNL were exposed to MMVF, some of the fibre types slightly increased the levels of free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) within the cells in a manner similar to that induced by chrysotile or quartz. All MMVF induced a dose-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PMNL, with RCF-induced production of ROS being the most marked. Production of ROS by MMVF seemed to depend on the availability of extracellular calcium because it could be attenuated with a Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil, or a Ca2+ chelating agent, EGTA. Production of ROS may be a common pathway through which PMNL respond to MMVF-induced cell activation, but alterations of levels of free intracellular Ca2+ do not seem to be an absolute prerequisite for this effect. Fibre length seemed not to be an important factor in affecting the ability of MMVF to induce ROS production in PMNL. However, the balance between different elements in the fibre seemed importantly to affect the biological activity of a fibre.

  7. Leukocyte Lysis and Cytokine Induction by the Human Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Mercer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv is an extracellular protozoan parasite that causes the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection: trichomoniasis. While acute symptoms in women may include vaginitis, infections are often asymptomatic, but can persist and are associated with medical complications including increased HIV susceptibility, infertility, pre-term labor, and higher incidence of cervical cancer. Heightened inflammation resulting from Tv infection could account for these complications. Effective cellular immune responses to Tv have not been characterized, and re-infection is common, suggesting a dysfunctional adaptive immune response. Using primary human leukocyte components, we have established an in vitro co-culture system to assess the interaction between Tv and the cells of the human immune system. We determined that in vitro, Tv is able to lyse T-cells and B-cells, showing a preference for B-cells. We also found that Tv lysis of lymphocytes was mediated by contact-dependent and soluble factors. Tv lysis of monocytes is far less efficient, and almost entirely contact-dependent. Interestingly, a common symbiont of Tv, Mycoplasma hominis, did not affect cytolytic activity of the parasite, but had a major impact on cytokine responses. M. hominis enabled more diverse inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to Tv and, of the cytokines tested, Tv strains cleared of M. hominis induced only IL-8 secretion from monocytes. The quality of the adaptive immune response to Tv is therefore likely influenced by Tv symbionts, commensals, and concomitant infections, and may be further complicated by direct parasite lysis of effector immune cells.

  8. Antipseudomonal agents exhibit differential pharmacodynamic interactions with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes against established biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen infecting the lower respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, where it forms tracheobronchial biofilms. Pseudomonas biofilms are refractory to antibacterials and to phagocytic cells with innate immunity, leading to refractory infection. Little is known about the interaction between antipseudomonal agents and phagocytic cells in eradication of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Herein, we investigated the capacity of three antipseudomonal agents, amikacin (AMK), ceftazidime (CAZ), and ciprofloxacin (CIP), to interact with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) against biofilms and planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa isolates recovered from sputa of CF patients. Three of the isolates were resistant and three were susceptible to each of these antibiotics. The concentrations studied (2, 8, and 32 mg/liter) were subinhibitory for biofilms of resistant isolates, whereas for biofilms of susceptible isolates, they ranged between sub-MIC and 2 × MIC values. The activity of each antibiotic alone or in combination with human PMNs against 48-h mature biofilms or planktonic cells was determined by XTT [2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide] assay. All combinations of AMK with PMNs resulted in synergistic or additive effects against planktonic cells and biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates compared to each component alone. More than 75% of CAZ combinations exhibited additive interactions against biofilms of P. aeruginosa isolates, whereas CIP had mostly antagonistic interaction or no interaction with PMNs against biofilms of P. aeruginosa. Our findings demonstrate a greater positive interaction between AMK with PMNs than that observed for CAZ and especially CIP against isolates of P. aeruginosa from the respiratory tract of CF patients.

  9. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, O. L.; Hellerud, B. C.; Christiansen, D.

    2011-01-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant ......-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant...... were incubated with whole blood using lepirudin as anticoagulant which has no adverse effects on complement. Bacteria free in plasma, bound to erythrocytes or phagocytized by granulocytes and monocytes were quantified using flow cytometry. The effects of the C3 inhibitor compstatin, a C5a receptor...

  10. Cd, Cu, and Mn from Uruguay River Basin in Uruguaiana, RS, Brazil, and their toxicological potential for human leukocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislaine Rezer Costa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the limnology from the Medium Uruguay River Basin in Uruguaiana, Brazil, with a focus on the concentration of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, and Mn, to assess the toxicological potential (cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for humans using as biological matrix of study human leukocyte cells. The conductivity, resistivity, and dissolved O2 levels exceeded the limits recommended by the National Environmental Council (Conselho Nacional do Meio Ambiente - CONAMA. The percentage of non-viable human leukocyte cells exposed to water samples was approximately 20% higher than that of the negative control (<3%, but similar to the positive control. The DNA damage index was high for all heavy metal concentrations assayed when compared to the negative control 12±2.96, p < 0.0001, with a range of 155.66±23.89 to 194.33±23.23, but similar to the positive control (210.62±27.48. Moreover, the leukocyte degeneration index was higher in all samples containing heavy metals than in the negative control (4%, which demonstrates to be due the presence of Cu (11.8-12.5%, Cd (13-15.6%, and Mn (15.6-22.5%. Taken together, our results show that the quality from water samples analyzed is below than recommended by CONAMA and offers risk of contamination by heavy metals for the general population.

  11. Effects of coupled dose and rhythm manipulation of plasma cortisol levels on leukocyte transcriptional response to endotoxin challenge in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Sleight, Kirsten; Nguyen, Tung T; Calvano, Steve E; Coyle, Susette M; Corbett, Siobhan A; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-10-01

    Severe traumas are associated with hypercortisolemia due to both disruption of cortisol secretion rhythm and increase in its total concentration. Understanding the effects of altered cortisol levels and rhythms on immune function is of great clinical interest, to prevent conditions such as sepsis from complicating the recovery. This in vivo study assesses the responses of circulating leukocytes to coupled dose and rhythm manipulation of cortisol, preceding an immune challenge induced by endotoxin administration. Through continuous infusion, plasma cortisol concentration was increased to and kept constant at a level associated with major physiologic stress. In response, transcriptional programming of leukocytes was altered to display a priming response before endotoxin exposure. Enhanced expression of a number of receptors and signaling proteins, as well as lowered protein translation and mitochondrial function indicated a sensitization against potential infectious threats. Despite these changes, response to endotoxin followed very similar patterns in both cortisol and saline pre-treated groups except one cluster including probe sets associated with major players regulating inflammatory response. In sum, altered dose and rhythm of plasma cortisol levels engendered priming of circulating leukocytes when preceded an immune challenge. This transcriptional program change associated with stimulated surveillance function and suppressed energy-intensive processes, emphasized permissive actions of cortisol on immune function.

  12. Microfluidic chambers for monitoring leukocyte trafficking and humanized nano-proresolving medicines interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Caroline N; Dalli, Jesmond; Dimisko, Laurie; Wong, Elisabeth; Serhan, Charles N; Irimia, Daniel

    2012-12-11

    Leukocyte trafficking plays a critical role in determining the progress and resolution of inflammation. Although significant progress has been made in understanding the role of leukocyte activation in inflammation, dissecting the interactions between different leukocyte subpopulations during trafficking is hampered by the complexity of in vivo conditions and the lack of detail of current in vitro assays. To measure the effects of the interactions between neutrophils and monocytes migrating in response to various chemoattractants, at single-cell resolution, we developed a microfluidic platform that replicates critical features of focal inflammation sites. We integrated an elastase assay into the focal chemotactic chambers (FCCs) of our device that enabled us to distinguish between phlogistic and nonphlogistic cell recruitment. We found that lipoxin A(4) and resolvin D1, in solution or incorporated into nano-proresolving medicines, reduced neutrophil and monocyte trafficking toward leukotriene B(4). Lipoxin A(4) also reduced the elastase release from homogenous and heterogenous mixtures of neutrophils and monocytes. Surprisingly, the effect of resolvin D1 on heterogenous mixtures was antisynergistic, resulting in a transient spike in elastase activity, which was quickly terminated, and the degraded elastin removed by the leukocytes inside the FCCs. Therefore, the microfluidic assay provides a robust platform for measuring the effect of leukocyte interactions during trafficking and for characterizing the effects of inflammation mediators.

  13. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC Related Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA Haplotype Sharing among Southern East Asian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Yuliwulandari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human leukocyte antigens (HLAs play important roles in the immune systems to response to various pathogens and disease among individuals. The aim of this study was analyze the HLA allele and haplotype frequencies of Southern East Asian population that show high incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC to evaluate the shared HLA haplotype contribution to NPC susceptibility among the population and analyses the genetic affinities between the population. We collect information of HLA haplotype from our previous study, other published paper, and HLA database in 19 population during 2005 to 2015. Haplotype frequencies were estimated using the maximum likelihood method based on an expectation maximization algorithm with ARLEQUIN v.2.0 software. We also calculated the genetic distance among 19 Southern East Asians based on HLA allele frequency using modified Cavalli-Sforza (DA distance method. Then, a phylogenetic tree was constructed using DISPAN software and principal component analysis (PCA was performed using XLSTAT-PRO software. A33-B58-DR3 haplotype, tightly linked to NPC, was commonly observed in all populations, supporting the high incidence of NPC in the populations. In addition, A2-B46 haplotype also associated with NPC, was also commonly found in several population that may also have a role in the disease development. The conclusion is the HLA haplotype sharing has an important role than the HLA allele sharing. The A33-B58-DR3 haplotype and A2-B46-DR9 haplotype in this study could be related to NPC in the Southern East Asian populations. The observed haplotype needs to be tested in the real patients to confirm the assumption. Abstrak Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs berperan penting dalam sistem imun untuk merespons berbagai patogen dan penyakit di antara individu yang berbeda. Tujuan penelitian ini menganalisis frekuensi alel dan haplotipe HLA populasi Southern East Asia yang menunjukkan insidensi yang tinggi terhadap

  14. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to human leukocyte antigens in Brazilian renal transplant candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Keiko Saito

    Full Text Available Pre-transplant sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA is a risk factor for graft failure. Studies of the immunological profile related to anti-HLA antibodies in Brazilian renal transplant candidates are few. In this study, we evaluated the humoral immune response to HLA antigens in 269 renal transplant candidates, in Paraná State, Brazil. The HLA typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide method (PCR-SSO combined with Luminex technology, using an SSO-LABType commercial kit (One Lambda, Inc., Canoga Park, CA, USA. The percentages of panel-reactive antibodies (PRA and the specificity of anti-HLA antibodies were determined using the LS1PRA and LS2PRA commercial kits (One Lambda, Inc.. The PRA-positive group consisted of 182 (67.7% patients, and the PRA-negative group of 87 (32.3% patients. The two groups differed significantly only with respect to gender. Females were the most sensitized. Among the 182 patients with PRA- positive, 62 (34.1% were positive for class I and negative for class II, 39 (21.4% were negative for class I and positive for class II, and 81 (44.5% were positive for both classes I and II. The HLA-A*02, A*24, A*01, B*44, B*35, B*15, DRB1*11, DRB1*04 and DRB1*03 allele groups were the most frequent. The specificities of anti-HLA antibodies were more frequent: A34, B57, Cw15, Cw16, DR51, DQ8 and DP14. This study documented the profile of anti-HLA antibodies in patients with chronic renal failure who were on waiting lists for an organ in Paraná, and found high sensitization to HLA antigens in the samples.

  15. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to human leukocyte antigens in Brazilian renal transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Patricia Keiko; Yamakawa, Roger Haruki; Aparecida, Erica Pereira; da Silva Júnior, Waldir Verissimo; Borelli, Sueli Donizete

    2014-01-01

    Pre-transplant sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) is a risk factor for graft failure. Studies of the immunological profile related to anti-HLA antibodies in Brazilian renal transplant candidates are few. In this study, we evaluated the humoral immune response to HLA antigens in 269 renal transplant candidates, in Paraná State, Brazil. The HLA typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide method (PCR-SSO) combined with Luminex technology, using an SSO-LABType commercial kit (One Lambda, Inc., Canoga Park, CA, USA). The percentages of panel-reactive antibodies (PRA) and the specificity of anti-HLA antibodies were determined using the LS1PRA and LS2PRA commercial kits (One Lambda, Inc.). The PRA-positive group consisted of 182 (67.7%) patients, and the PRA-negative group of 87 (32.3%) patients. The two groups differed significantly only with respect to gender. Females were the most sensitized. Among the 182 patients with PRA- positive, 62 (34.1%) were positive for class I and negative for class II, 39 (21.4%) were negative for class I and positive for class II, and 81 (44.5%) were positive for both classes I and II. The HLA-A*02, A*24, A*01, B*44, B*35, B*15, DRB1*11, DRB1*04 and DRB1*03 allele groups were the most frequent. The specificities of anti-HLA antibodies were more frequent: A34, B57, Cw15, Cw16, DR51, DQ8 and DP14. This study documented the profile of anti-HLA antibodies in patients with chronic renal failure who were on waiting lists for an organ in Paraná, and found high sensitization to HLA antigens in the samples.

  16. Human leukocyte antigen E contributes to protect tumor cells from lysis by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-09-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Lo Monaco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3 of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D. Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  18. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Elisa Lo; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-01-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network. PMID:21969815

  19. Association of human leukocyte antigen class I antigens in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Hossein; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Toofan, Hesam; Ehsani, Amir Hooshang; Hosseini, Seyed Hamed; Rezaei, Nima

    2013-04-01

    There are a limited number of reports indicating the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles in pemphigus vulgaris. This study was designed to highlight the association of HLA class I alleles with pemphigus vulgaris in Iran. Fifty patients with pemphigus vulgaris, diagnosed based on clinical, histological and direct immunofluorescence findings were enrolled into this study. The control group consisted of 50 healthy, age- and sex-matched individuals. HLA typing of class I (A, B and C alleles) was carried out using polymerase chain reaction based on the sequence-specific primer method. This study showed the higher frequency of HLA-B*44:02 (P = 0.007), -C*04:01 (P pemphigus vulgaris was significantly lower than the controls. Regarding the linkage disequilibrium between HLA class I alleles, the HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype (4% vs 0%, P = 0.04) is suggested to be a predisposing factor, whereas HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype (0% vs 6%, P = 0.01) is suggested to be a protective factor. In conclusion, it is suggested that HLA-B*44:02, -C*04:01, -C*15:02 alleles and HLA-A*03:01, -B*51:01, -C*16:02 haplotype are susceptibility factors for development of pemphigus vulgaris in the Iranian population, while HLA-C*06:02, -C*18:01 alleles and HLA-A*26:01, -B*38, -C*12:03 haplotype may be considered as protective alleles.

  20. Suppression of TNF-alpha production by S-adenosylmethionine in human mononuclear leukocytes is not mediated by polyamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, J.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Sauter, S.

    2006-01-01

    precursors or metabolites [phosphatidylcholine, choline, betaine, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)] have a modulating effect on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production by endotoxin-stimulated human mononuclear leukocytes and whether SAM-dependent polyamines (spermidine, spermine) are mediators of SAM......-induced inhibition of TNF-alpha synthesis. Methionine and betaine had a moderate stimulatory effect on TNF-alpha production, whereas phosphatidylcholine (ID(50) 5.4 mM), SAM (ID(50) 131 microM), spermidine (ID(50) 4.5 microM) and spermine (ID(50) 3.9 microM) had a predominantly inhibitory effect. Putrescine did...... not alter TNF-alpha release. Inhibitors of polyamine synthesis that blocked either putrescine (difluoromethylornithine) or spermine (CGP48664A) production did not affect TNF-alpha synthesis. Endotoxin stimulation of leukocytes did not alter the intracellular levels of polyamines. In addition...

  1. Human leukocyte mobilization and morphology in nickel contact allergy using a skin chamber technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, A; Bisgaard, H; Christensen, J D

    1981-01-01

    An improved skin chamber technique has been devised and used for quantitative evaluation of the leukocyte mobilization rate (LMR). The method was applied in 10 nickel-hypersensitive patients exposed to nickel sulphate. Each patient served as his own control and for additional control purpose, 5...... healthy individuals without nickel hypersensitivity were studied. The kinetics of the mobilized leukocytes were followed over a 48-hour period. After an initial lag phase of 2-4 hours, maximum migration was observed from the 24th to the 48th hour, with a wide interindividual variability in the number...... is a valuable means for quantitative evaluation of leukocyte mobilization and morphology in skin exudates during exposure to an allergen in delayed hypersensitivity reactions....

  2. Ontogeny and characterization of blood leukocyte subsets and serum proteins in piglets before and after weaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Madsen, H.R.; Jensen, K.H.; Nielsen, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    Existing knowledge about the development of the porcine immune system was extended by phenotypic characterization of leukocyte subsets and with assessment of Mannan-Binding Lectin (MBL) and immunoglobulin concentrations in peripheral blood of healthy piglets. Single-color and/or double-color flow...... parameters seem to be affected at the time of weaning which took place at 45 weeks of age. Using principal component analysis, all analyzed variables - except one were grouped into 8 factors with distinct developmental profiles. Several of these factors revealed an apparent suppression, a steady state...

  3. Involvement of activated leukocytes in the regulation of plasma levels of acute phase proteins in microgravity simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna; Turin-Kuzmin, Alexey

    2016-07-01

    Earth-based studies of microgravity effects showed the induction of the mechanisms of acute phase reaction (APR). APR comprises the transition of stress-sensitive protein kinases of macrophages and other responsive cells into the active state and the phosphorylation of transcription factors which in turn stimulate the production of acute-phase reaction cytokines. Leukocyte activation is accompanied by the acceleration of the formation of oxygen radicals which can serve a functional indice of leukocyte cell state. The series of events at acute phase response result in selective changes in the synthesis of a number of secretory blood proteins (acute phase proteins, APPs) in liver cells thus contributing the recovery of homeostasis state in the organism. Earlier experiment with head-down tilt showed the increase in plasma concentrations of two cytokine mediators of acute phase response, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) being the outcome of the activation of producer cells, foremost, leukocytes. In experiment with 4-day dry immersion chemiluminescent (ChL) reply of the whole blood samples to a test stimulus were studied along with the measurements of plasma levels of APPs, namely, alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT), alpha1-acid glycoprotein (alpha1-AGP), alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M), ceruloplasmin (Cer), haptoglobin (Hp), C3-complement component (C3), C-reactive protein (CRP). Eight individuals aged 21.2 ± 3.2 years were the test subjects in the investigation. Protein studies showed a noticeable increase in the mean plasma levels of all APPs measured in experiment thus producing the evidence of the activation of acute phase response mechanisms while individual patterns revealed variability during the immersion period. The overall trends were similar to these in the previous immersion series. The augment in the strength of signal in stimulated light emission tests was higher after 1- and 2-day of immersion exposure than before the

  4. Ionizing radiation modulates the surface expression of human leukocyte antigen-G in a human melanoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelin, S.; Gallegos, C.E.; Dubner, D. [Radiopathology Laboratory, Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Favier, B.; Carosella, E.D. [CEA, I2BM, Hopital Saint-Louis, IUH, Service de Recherches en Hemato-Immunologie, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule involved in fetus protection from the maternal immune system, transplant tolerance, and viral and tumoral immune escape. Tumor-specific HLA-G expression has been described for a wide variety of malignancies, including melanomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ionizing radiation (IR) could modulate the surface expression of HLA-G1 in a human melanoma cell line that expresses endogenously membrane-bound HLA-G1. For this purpose, cells were exposed to increasing doses of {gamma}-irradiation (0-20 Gy) and HLA-G1 levels at the plasma membrane were analyzed at different times postirradiation by flow cytometry. HLA-G total expression and the presence of the soluble form of HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1) in the culture medium of irradiated cells were also evaluated. IR was capable of down regulating cell surface and total HLA-G levels, with a concomitant increase of sHLA-G1 in the medium. These results could indicate that {gamma}-irradiation decreases HLA-G1 surface levels by enhancing the proteolytic cleavage of this molecule. (authors)

  5. Frequency of null allele of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) locus in subjects to recurrent miscarriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Nazila; Mosaferi, Elnaz; Farzadi, Laya; Majidi, Jafar; Monfaredan, Amir; Yousefi, Bahman; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class I molecule highly expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells. Due to a single base pair deletion, its function can be compensated by other isoforms. Investigating the frequency of null allele in Recurrent Miscarriage (RM) subjects could be useful in understanding the relationship between frequency of this allele and RM in a given population. Objective: This study aimed to determine the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele and its potential association with down-regulation of HLA-G in subjects with RM. Materials and Methods: Western blotting was used to assess the level of HLA-G protein expression. For investigating the frequency of HLA-G*0105N null allele in RM subjects, PCR-RFLP method was used. Exon 3 of HLA-G gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequently, PpuM-1 enzyme was employed to digest the PCR products and fragments were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Results: Digestion using restriction enzyme showed the presence of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele in 10% of the test population. Western blotting results confirmed the decrease in expression of HLA-G in the placental tissue of subjects with RM compared to subjects who could give normal birth. Conclusion: The frequency of heterozygous HLA-G*0105N null allele was high to some extent in subjects with RM. The mutation rate in subjects suggested that there is a significant association between RM and frequency of mutations in this allele. PMID:27525330

  6. Deorphanization of the human leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) receptor by a signaling screen of the extracellular proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbing; Pao, Lily I.; Zhou, Aileen; Brace, Arthur D.; Halenbeck, Robert; Hsu, Amy W.; Bray, Thomas L.; Hestir, Kevin; Bosch, Elizabeth; Lee, Ernestine; Wang, Gang; Liu, Haixia; Wong, Brian R.; Kavanaugh, W. Michael; Williams, Lewis T.

    2014-01-01

    There are many transmembrane receptor-like proteins whose ligands have not been identified. A strategy for finding ligands when little is known about their tissue source is to screen each extracellular protein individually expressed in an array format by using a sensitive functional readout. Taking this approach, we have screened a large collection (3,191 proteins) of extracellular proteins for their ability to activate signaling of an orphan receptor, leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK). Only two related secreted factors, FAM150A and FAM150B (family with sequence similarity 150 member A and member B), stimulated LTK phosphorylation. FAM150A binds LTK extracellular domain with high affinity (KD = 28 pM). FAM150A stimulates LTK phosphorylation in a ligand-dependent manner. This strategy provides an efficient approach for identifying functional ligands for other orphan receptors. PMID:25331893

  7. Depression of leukocyte protein synthesis, immune function and growth performance induced by high environmental temperature in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Nancy N.; Ahmed, Ayman M. H.; Mehaisen, Gamal M. K.; Mashaly, Magdi M.; Abass, Ahmed O.

    2017-09-01

    In tropical and semitropical regions, raising broiler chickens out of their thermal comfort zone can cause an added economic loss in the poultry industry. The cause for the deleterious effects on immunity and growth performance of broilers under high environmental temperatures is still poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the effect of heat stress on leukocytes protein synthesis and immune function as a possible direct cause of low performance in broiler chickens under such condition. In this study, 300 one-day-old male broiler chicks (Cobb500™) were randomly assigned into 2 groups with 5 replicates of 30 chicks each. From 21 to 42 days of age, one group was exposed to non-stressed condition at 24 °C and 50% relative humidity (control group), while the other group was exposed to heat stress at 35 °C and 50% relative humidity (HS group). At 42 days of age, blood samples were collected from each group to evaluate stress indicators, immune function, and leukocytes protein synthesis. Production performance was also recorded. Noteworthy, protein synthesis in leukocytes was significantly ( P < 0.05) inhibited in HS group by 38% compared to control group. In contrast, the phosphorylation level on threonine 56 site (Thr56) of eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF2), which indicates the suppression of protein translation process through altering the protein elongation phase, was significantly threefold higher in HS group than in control ( P < 0.05). In addition, an increase in stress indicators was markedly ( P < 0.05) presented in the HS birds by twofold increase in heterophil/lymphocyte (H/L) ratio and threefold increase in plasma corticosterone level compared to control. Furthermore, the immune function was significantly ( P < 0.05) suppressed in HS birds than control (0.99 vs. 1.88 mg/mL plasma IgG, 89.2 vs. 148.0 μg/mL plasma IgM, 4.80 vs. 7.20 antibody titer against SRBC, and 1.38 vs. 3.39 stimulation index of lymphocyte

  8. Preimplantation diagnosis: efficient tool for human leukocyte antigen matched bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anver Kuliev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is among the most frequent indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD to allow at risk couples reproducing without fear of having an affected child. In addition, those already having the affected child, have also the option to produce an unaffected offspring that may be also a complete human leukocyte antigen (HLA match to affected child to ensure successful bone marrow transplantation. We present here the results of retrospective analysis of 293 PGD cycles for thalassemia, including 144cases of simultaneous HLA typing, resulting in birth of 70 thalassemia-free children and 12 unaffected HLA matched ones, providing their cord blood and/or bone marrow for transplantation treatment of their affected siblings. The present overall experience includes successful cord blood or bone marrow transplantation in more than three dozens of cases with HLA matched stem cells obtained from children born after PGD, demonstrating that PGD is an efficient approach for improving success of bone marrow transplantation treatment for thalassemia.   植入前遗传学诊断(PGD)是地中海贫血(地贫)最常用的疗法,该病患者夫妇无须担心孕儿受到感染。此外,如果已经怀上受到感染的宝宝,他们也可有选择性再生育一个未受感染的后代,提供完全匹配的HLA,来确保骨髓成功移植。本文将提供293个地贫病例的PGD周期诊断结果,包括144例HLA同时配型,有70例宝宝无地贫出生和12例未受感染的HLA配型宝宝出生。将这些健康宝宝的脐带血和/或骨髓取出以完成对他们同胞的移植手术,通过使用经诊断后的,出生宝宝身上取出的HLA配型干细胞,成功完成36例宝宝的脐带或骨髓移植手术。结果表明PGD能有效提高地贫患儿骨髓移植手术的成功率。

  9. Association of human leukocyte A, B, and DR antigens in Colombian patients with diagnosis of spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana M; Peña, Paola; Avila, Mabel; Briceño, Ignacio; Jaramillo, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcon, Gilberto; Rueda, Juan C; Saldarriaga, Eugenia-Lucia; Angarita, Jose-Ignacio; Martinez-Rodriguez, Nancy; Londono, John

    2017-04-01

    There is substantial evidence that non-B27 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are associated with spondyloarthritis (SpA). Studies in Mexican and Tunisian populations demonstrated the association of SpA and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B15. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of HLA-A, B, and DR antigens in a group of Colombian patients with a diagnosis of SpA. A total of 189 patients and 100 healthy subjects were included in the present study. All subjects underwent a complete characterization of HLA alleles A, B, and DR. Of the 189 studied patients, 35 were reactive arthritis (ReA), 87 were ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and 67 undifferentiated SpA (uSpA). According to the Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria, 167 were axial SpA (axSpA) and 171 were peripheral SpA (pSpA). 63.8% were men, with a mean age of 35.9 ± 12.7 years. 40.7% (77/189) of patients were HLA-B27 positive of which 52.9% had AS and 42.5% axSpA. 23.2% (44/189) of patients were HLA-B15 positive: 23.8% were uSpA, 12.57% were axSpA, and 11.7% were pSpA. In addition, HLA-DRB1*01 was associated with AS (58.6%) and axSpA (42.5%). Also, HLA-DRB1*04 was present in 62 patients with AS (71.2%) and in 26 with axSpA (15.5%). In this population, we found a strong association between the presence of HLA-B27 and the diagnosis of axSpA and AS, but the HLA-B15 is also significantly associated with all subtypes of the disease, predominantly with pSpA. Additionally, HLA-DR1 and DR4 were associated in a cohort of patients with SpA from Colombia.

  10. Oxygen-independent killing of Bacteroides fragilis by granule extracts from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Wetherall, B L; Pruul, H; McDonald, P J

    1984-01-01

    Granule proteins from human neutrophils were prepared by extraction with acetate, and their antibacterial activity against Bacteroides fragilis was determined. Activity was highly dependent on pH; greatest killing occurred at the most acid pH tested (pH 5.0). Optimum activity was observed at physiological ionic strength and low bacterial numbers. Killing was inhibited by incubation temperatures of less than 37 degrees C. Eight times more extract was required to kill 50% of stationary-phase ba...

  11. Human sperm quality and lipid content after migration into normal ovulatory human cervical mucus containing low numbers of leukocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nozha Chakroun-Feki; Patrice Therond; Martine Couturier; Florence Eustache; Gerard Limea; Alain Legrand; Pierre Jouannet; Jacques Auger

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a relationship exists between the presence of low number of leukocytes in normal ovulatory cervical mucus and sperm quality and lipid content after migration. The percentages of live, motile and morphologically normal spermatozoa, movement parameters assessed by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA), and ionophore-induced acrosome reaction measured by flow cytometry were determined before and after migration. High-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection was used to measure the sperm lipid content, including the various diacyl subspecies. The number of leukocytes found in solubilized mucus samples was counted using a haemocytometric method. Overall, the presence of leukocytes in the cervical mucus samples did not significantly influence sperm motility and morphology, sperm kinematic parameters, or the sperm content in sphingomyelin or cholesterol. In contrast, after migration, the decrease in various sperm diacyls and the level of induced acrosome reaction was significantly less pronounced in mucus samples containing ≥ 104 leukocytes than in mucus samples with no or rare leukocytes whereas the level of induced acrosome reaction was higher. The present data suggest that the low level of leukocytes found in normal ovulatory cervical mucus could influence the process of sperm lipid remodelling/capacitation.

  12. Human leukocyte antigen genotypes and trial of desensitization in patients with oxcarbazepine-induced skin rash: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bolyun; Yu, Hee Joon; Kang, Eun-Suk; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun

    2014-08-01

    Skin rash associated with specific antiepileptic drugs occurs not infrequently and it usually necessitates discontinuation of the causative drugs. An alternative strategy is to desensitize the individual to the offending drug. We checked the human leukocyte antigen genotypes and conducted a pilot study to investigate the usefulness and safety of desensitization in pediatric patients with skin rash associated with oxcarbazepine. We enrolled 19 patients with epilepsy who had discontinued oxcarbazepine because of skin rash despite an initial good response and then became refractory to other antiepileptic drugs along with an individual with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with a similar situation. High-resolution HLA-A and -B genotyping was performed to investigate the genetic risk. The desensitization began with 0.1 mg daily reaching 120 mg on the thirty-first day. Thereafter, the dose was increased at a rate of 12 mg/day. Nineteen patients completed the desensitization protocol to a target dosage over 2-5 months. Five patients developed itching and erythema during desensitization, but the symptoms disappeared after withholding a dose increment transiently. There were no human leukocyte antigen genotypes relevant to aromatic antiepileptic drug-induced severe hypersensitivity reactions. The seizure frequency was reduced to less than at baseline in 18 individuals. This study demonstrated 95% efficacy, including 42% seizure-free patients and the favorable tolerability of desensitization to oxcarbazepine in patients with intractable epilepsy and one patient with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia. Screening for sensitive human leukocyte antigen types and exclusion of severe hypersensitivity reactions should precede desensitization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 is expressed on human megakaryocytes and negatively regulates the maturation of primary megakaryocytic progenitors and cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jiangnan, E-mail: xuejinagnan@263.net [Department of Immunology, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai 264003 (China); Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Haiya; Fu, Qiang; Cao, Yanning; Wang, Yuesi; Feng, Xiaoying; Fu, Aili [Department of Immunology, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai 264003 (China)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} LAIR-1 is expressed on human megakaryocytes from an early stage. {yields} Up-regulation of LAIR-1 negatively regulates megakaryocytic differentiation of cell line. {yields} LAIR-1 negatively regulates the differentiation of primary megakaryocytic progenitors. -- Abstract: Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is an inhibitory collagen receptor which belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily. Although the inhibitory function of LAIR-1 has been extensively described in multiple leukocytes, its role in megakaryocyte (MK) has not been explored so far. Here, we show that LAIR-1 is expressed on human bone marrow CD34{sup +}CD41a{sup +} and CD41a{sup +}CD42b{sup +} cells. LAIR-1 is also detectable in a fraction of human cord blood CD34{sup +} cell-derived MK that has morphological characteristics of immature MK. In megakaryoblastic cell line Dami, the membrane protein expression of LAIR-1 is up-regulated significantly when cells are treated with phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Furthermore, cross-linking of LAIR-1 in Dami cells with its natural ligand or anti-LAIR-1 antibody leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation and PMA-promoted differentiation when examined by the MK lineage-specific markers (CD41a and CD42b) and polyploidization. In addition, we also observed that cross-linking of LAIR-1 results in decreased MK generation from primary human CD34{sup +} cells cultured in a cytokines cocktail that contains TPO. These results suggest that LAIR-1 is a likely candidate for an early marker of MK differentiation, and provide initial evidence indicating that LAIR-1 serves as a negative regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis.

  14. Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis in schizophrenic Caucasians: confirming clues for associations with human leukocyte class I and II antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettling, M; Cascorbi, I; Opgen-Rhein, C; Schaub, R

    2007-10-01

    Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis (CA) is still among the least understood adverse drug reactions in psychopharmacology. In particular, its genetic background is far from being clarified. Within the framework of a case-control study, we performed human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping and haplotype analyses in 42 non-Jewish Caucasian schizophrenic patients (N=42) suffering from CA and 75 non-Jewish Caucasian schizophrenic patients treated with clozapine without developing CA. While controlling for age (Pgenes might play a role, but currently, only HLA associations with CA are identified as clinically relevant.

  15. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Region Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms are Associated with Leprosy Susceptibility in Vietnam and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Andrea; Huong, Nguyen Thu; Singh, Meenakshi; Orlova, Marianna; Van Thuc, Nguyen; Katoch, Kiran; Gao, Xiaojiang; Thai, Vu Hong; Ba, Nguyen Ngoc; Carrington, Mary; Abel, Laurent; Mehra, Narinder; Alcaïs, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggested the existence of unidentified leprosy susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. To identify such genetic risk factors, a high-density association scan of a 1.9-mega-base (Mb) region in the HLA complex was performed. Among 682 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 59 were associated with leprosy (P leprosy families. Genotyping of these SNPs in an independent sample of 292 Vietnamese single-case leprosy families replicated the association of 12 SNPs (P leprosy and 371 control subjects from North India. These results implicated class I alleles in leprosy pathogenesis. PMID:21459816

  16. Human Leukocytes Kill Brugia malayi Microfilariae Independently of DNA-Based Extracellular Trap Release

    OpenAIRE

    Ciaran J. McCoy; Reaves, Barbara J.; Giguère, Steeve; Coates, Ruby; Rada, Balázs; Wolstenholme, Adrian J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori infect over 100 million people worldwide and are the causative agents of lymphatic filariasis. Some parasite carriers are amicrofilaremic whilst others facilitate mosquito-based disease transmission through blood-circulating microfilariae (Mf). Recent findings, obtained largely from animal model systems, suggest that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) contribute to parasitic nematode-directed type 2 immune responses. When expos...

  17. Age- and disease-related innate immunity of human leukocytes ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatczak, Bogna; Leszek, Jerzy; Siemieniec, Iwona; Sochocka, Marta; Wiśniewska, Agnieszka; Tarkowski, Radosław; Bębenek, Marek; Błach-Olszewska, Zofia

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms of innate immunity, i.e. resistance to viral infection and the production of cytokines by leukocytes, were compared in blood isolated from four groups of donors: healthy young (19-35 years old), healthy elderly (over 60), elderly Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, and elderly patients with alimentary tract cancer (CA). Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) were isolated by gradient centrifugation in Gradisol G. The degree of resistance was calculated from the kinetics of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication in the PBLs. Cytokine (TNFα, IFNα, IFNγ, IL-12, and IL-10) levels were determined by ELISA. The antiviral resistance of the PBLs varied, but a difference was observed only between the young and elderly groups and not between the healthy elderly controls and those with AD or cancer. Differences observed in all the groups concerned the ability and intensity of cytokine production. The most impressive results were obtained for spontaneous TNF and IFNα release. While TNF was released spontaneously by the PBLs of the elderly CA patients and the young healthy group, it was usually undetected in the AD and only sometimes in the healthy elderly group. Leukocytes isolated from the elderly groups responded to VSV infection with more intense IFNα and IFNγ production than the younger group.

  18. Screening and identification of interacting proteins with hepatitis B virus core protein in leukocytes and cloning of new gene C1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Mei Lin; Jun Cheng; Yin-Ying Lu; Shu-Lin Zhang; Qian Yang; Tian-Yan Chen; Min Liu; Lin Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological function of HBcAg in pathogenesis of HBV replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs).METHODS: HBcAg region was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and HBV HBcAg bait plasmid pGBKT7-HBcAg was constructed by routine molecular biological methods. Then the recombinant plasmid DNA was transformed into yeast AH109. After the HBV core protein was expressed in AH10g yeast strains (Western blot analysis), yeast-two hybrid screening was performed by mating AH109 with Y187 containing leukocyte cDNA library plasmid. Diploid yeast cells were plated on synthetic dropout nutrient medium (SD/-Trp-Leu-HisAde) (QDO) and synthetic dropout nutrient medium (SD/-Trp-Leu-His-Ade) (TDO). The second screening was performed with the LacZ report gene ( yeast cells were grown in QDO medium containing X-a-gal). The interaction between HBV core protein and the protein obtained from positive colonies was further confirmed by repeating yeast-two hybrid. After plasmid DNA was extracted from blue colonies and sequenced, the results were analyzed by bioinformatic methods.RESULTS: Eighteen colonies were obtained and sequenced, including hypermethylated in cancer 2 (3colones), eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (2colones), acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase 3 (1 colone),DNA polymerase gamma (1 colone), putative translation initiation factor (1 colone), chemokine (C-C motif)receptor 5 (1 colone), mitochondrial ribosomal protein L41 (1 colone), kyot binding protein genes (1 colone),RanBPM (1 colone), HBeAg-binding protein 3 (1 colone),programmed cell death 2 (1 colone). Four new genes with unknown function were identified.CONCLUSION: Successful cloning of genes of HBV core protein interacting proteins in leukocytes may provide some new clues for studying the biological functions of HBV core protein.

  19. TRA-418, a thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist and prostacyclin receptor agonist, inhibits platelet-leukocyte interaction in human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Ohno, Michihiro; Yamada, Naohiro; Ohtake, Atsushi; Matsushita, Teruo

    2010-10-01

    TRA-418, a compound with both thromboxane A2 receptor (TP receptor) antagonistic and prostacyclin receptor (IP receptor) agonistic activities, was synthesised in our laboratory as a new antithrombotic agent. In this study, we examined the effects of TRA-418 on platelet-leukocyte interactions in human whole blood. Platelet-leukocyte interactions were induced by U-46619 in the presence of epinephrine (U-46619 + epinephrine) or with thrombin receptor agonist peptide 1-6 (TRAP). Platelet-leukocyte interactions were assessed by flow cytometry, with examination of both platelet-neutrophil and platelet-monocyte complexes. In a control experiment, the TP receptor antagonist SQ-29548 significantly inhibited the induction of platelet-leukocyte complexes by the combination of U-46619 and epinephrine, but not TRAP-induced formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes. Conversely, the IP receptor agonist beraprost sodium inhibited platelet-leukocyte complex formation induced by both methods, although the IC50 values of beraprost sodium for U-46619 + epinephrine were at least 10-fold greater than for TRAP. Under such conditions, TRA-418 inhibited both U-46619 + epinephrine-induced and TRAP-induced platelet-leukocyte complex formation in a concentration-dependent manner, in a similar range. These results suggest that TRA-418 exerts its inhibitory effects on platelet-leukocyte interactions by acting as a TP receptor antagonist as well as an IP receptor agonist in an additive or synergistic manner. These inhibitory effects of TRA-418 on formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes suggest the compound is beneficial effects as an antithrombotic agent.

  20. Leakage of protein into lungs of preterm ventilated rabbits is correlated with activation of clotting, complement, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, F; vanOeveren, W; Heikamp, A; Okken, A; Oetomo, SB

    We investigated whether leakage of protein in lungs of pre term ventilated rabbits of 28- and 29-d gestational age is correlated with activation of clotting, complement, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in plasma. We found signs of systemic activation of clotting, complement, and PMN in

  1. Leakage of protein into lungs of preterm ventilated rabbits is correlated with activation of clotting, complement, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, F; vanOeveren, W; Heikamp, A; Okken, A; Oetomo, SB

    1996-01-01

    We investigated whether leakage of protein in lungs of pre term ventilated rabbits of 28- and 29-d gestational age is correlated with activation of clotting, complement, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in plasma. We found signs of systemic activation of clotting, complement, and PMN in ventil

  2. High dietary protein restores overreaching induced impairments in leukocyte trafficking and reduces the incidence of upper respiratory tract infection in elite cyclists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witard, O.C.; Turner, J.E.; Jackmann, S.R.; Kies, A.K.; Jeukendrup, A.E.; Bosch, J.A.; Tipton, K.D.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined whether a high protein diet prevents the impaired leukocyte redistribution in response to acute exercise caused by a large volume of high-intensity exercise training. Eight cyclists (VO2max: 64.2 ± 6.5 mL kg−1 min−1) undertook two separate weeks of high-intensity training

  3. Human-leukocyte antigen typing in Javanese patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Savitri Ernawati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is a common oral disorder that despite extensive researches, the etiology of this phenomenon is still unknown. Because this phenomenon has been observed more often in families than in individual cases, genetic influence has been investigated in most researches. Purpose: The aim of study was to evaluate the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA and RAS in Javanese more precisely. Method: The analysis of HLA-A, and HLA-B in 85 Javanese RAS patients and 71 healthy control subjects, were performed by using the standard NIH microlymhocytotoxicity technique. Immunohistochemistry was performed for identification of HLA-DR and HLA- DQ antigen using monoclonal antibodies anti HLA-DR and DQ. Result: Our result revealed a close association between HLA-A9 and HLA-B35 RAS subject. A significant increase in the frequency of some antigens such as HLA-A9 (72,94%, p < 0,05;RR = 2,21, HLA-A24 (65,82%; RR = 1,24 and HLA-B35 in subjects with RAS was observed. Analysis with Immunohistochemistry HLA-DR, HLA-DQ is expressed on the surface of epithelial cells membrane of oral mucosa and macrophages in both major and minor RAS patients. Conclusion: HLA antigens are involved in susceptibility to RAS and the phenotypes were difference with other previous studies. HLA- linked genetic factors may play a role in the development of RAS.Latar belakang: Stomatitis aftosa rekuren (SAR merupakan salah satu gangguan di rongga mulut yang paling sering terjadi. Fenomenapenyakit ini masih belum jelas dan masih membutuhkanpenelitian yang lebih lanjut. Faktor keturunan lebih sering daripada kasus individual. Pengaruh faktor genetik telah diteliti oleh beberapapeneliti. Tujuan: Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui adanya kaitan HLA dengan SARpada suku jawa secara lebih tepat. Metode: Analisis HLA-A, HLA-Bpada 85penderita RAS dan 71 penderita kontrol yang berasal dari suku Jawa dihitung dengan menggunakan teknik NIH Micro

  4. The modulating effect of royal jelly consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Rafat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to assess the radioprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study, peripheral blood samples were obtained on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 of the study from six healthy male volunteers taking a 1000 mg RJ capsule orally per day for 14 consecutive days. On each sampling day, all collected whole blood samples were divided into control and irradiated groups which were then exposed to the selected dose of 4 Gy X-ray. Percentage of apoptotic cells (Ap % was evaluated for all samples immediately after irradiation (Ap0 and also after a 24 h postirradiation incubation at 37°C in 5% CO2 (Ap24 by the use of neutral comet assay. Concerning Ap0, collected data demonstrated that the percentage of apoptotic cells in both control and irradiated groups did not significantly change during the study period. However, with respect to Ap24, the percentage of apoptotic cells in irradiated groups gradually reduced during the experiment, according to which a significant decrease was found after 14 days RJ consumption (P = 0.002. In conclusion, the present study revealed the protective role of 14 days RJ consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

  5. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the oxidative burst induced by phagocytosis of bacteria in human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomé, J A; Jordá, J; Espinós, D; Bruseghini, L; Esteras, A

    1998-05-01

    The basal peroxide production and the oxidative burst induced by phagocytosis of opsonized E. coli was studied by flow cytometry using dihydrorhodamine 123. The human leukocytes were incubated in the absence and presence of N-acetylcysteine. The oxidative response to the phagocytosis of bacteria differed among cell populations. Thus, 90% of granulocytes and 50% of monocytes showed an oxidative burst in response to opsonized bacteria while less than 1% of lymphocytes showed a fluorescence signal. N-Acetylcysteine (4.7, 9.5, 19, 38 or 76 mM) produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the oxidative response to phagocytosis in the three cellular populations reaching almost complete inhibition for 76 mM. This protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against oxidative stress in leukocytes was obtained without cytotoxicity (assessed by flow cytometry with staining with propidium iodide) or changes in the pH of the medium. These results give further support to the antioxidant effect of N-acetylcysteine in human peripheral blood cells.

  6. Influence of 1.8-GHz (GSM) radiofrequency radiation (RFR) on DNA damage and repair induced by X-rays in human leukocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhijian, Chen; Xiaoxue, Li; Yezhen, Lu; Deqiang, Lu; Shijie, Chen; Lifen, Jin; Jianlin, Lou; Jiliang, He

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the in vitro comet assay was used to determine whether 1.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) can influence DNA repair in human leukocytes exposed to X-rays. The specific energy absorption rate (SAR) of 2 W/kg (the current European safety limit) was applied. The leukocytes from four young healthy donors were intermittently exposed to RFR for 24 h (fields on for 5 min, fields off for 10 min), and then irradiated with X-rays at doses of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy. DNA damage to human leukocytes was detected using the comet assay at 0, 15, 45, 90, 150 and 240 min after exposure to X-rays. Using the comet assay, the percent of DNA in the tail (% tail DNA) served as the indicator of DNA damage; the DNA repair percentage (DRP) served as the indicator of the DNA repair speed. The results demonstrated that (1) the DNA repair speeds of human leukocytes after X-ray exposure exhibited individual differences among the four donors; (2) the intermittent exposures of 1.8-GHz RFR at the SAR of 2 W/kg for 24 h did not directly induce DNA damage or exhibit synergistic effects with X-rays on human leukocytes.

  7. Contribution of Human Lung Parenchyma and Leukocyte Influx to Oxidative Stress and Immune System-Mediated Pathology following Nipah Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaffre, Olivier; Saito, Tais B; Juelich, Terry L; Ikegami, Tetsuro; Smith, Jennifer K; Perez, David D; Atkins, Colm; Levine, Corri B; Huante, Matthew B; Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Endsley, Janice J; Freiberg, Alexander N; Rockx, Barry

    2017-08-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic emerging paramyxovirus that can cause fatal respiratory illness or encephalitis in humans. Despite many efforts, the molecular mechanisms of NiV-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remain unclear. We previously showed that NiV replicates to high titers in human lung grafts in NOD-SCID/γ mice, resulting in a robust inflammatory response. Interestingly, these mice can undergo human immune system reconstitution by the bone marrow, liver, and thymus (BLT) reconstitution method, in addition to lung tissue engraftment, giving altogether a realistic model to study human respiratory viral infections. Here, we characterized NiV Bangladesh strain (NiV-B) infection of human lung grafts from human immune system-reconstituted mice in order to identify the overall effect of immune cells on NiV pathogenesis of the lung. We show that NiV-B replicated to high titers in human lung grafts and caused similar cytopathic effects irrespective of the presence of human leukocytes in mice. However, the human immune system interfered with virus spread across lung grafts, responded to infection by leukocyte migration to small airways and alveoli of the lung grafts, and accelerated oxidative stress in lung grafts. In addition, the presence of human leukocytes increased the expression of cytokines and chemokines that regulate inflammatory influx to sites of infection and tissue damage. These results advance our understanding of how the immune system limits NiV dissemination and contributes to ALI and inform efforts to identify therapeutic targets.IMPORTANCE Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging paramyxovirus that can cause a lethal respiratory and neurological disease in humans. Only limited data are available on NiV pathogenesis in the human lung, and the relative contribution of the innate immune response and NiV to acute lung injury (ALI) is still unknown. Using human lung grafts in a human immune system-reconstituted mouse model, we showed that the NiV Bangladesh

  8. Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) Is an Endogenous Activator of the MMP-9 Secreted by Placental Leukocytes: Implication in Human Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Pliego, Arturo; Espejel-Nuñez, Aurora; Castillo-Castrejon, Marisol; Meraz-Cruz, Noemi; Beltran-Montoya, Jorge; Zaga-Clavellina, Veronica; Nava-Salazar, Sonia; Sanchez-Martinez, Maribel; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe; Estrada-Gutierrez, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    The activity of matrix degrading enzymes plays a leading role in the rupture of the fetal membranes under normal and pathological human labor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) it is considered a biomarker of this event. To gain further insight into local MMP-9 origin and activation, in this study we analyzed the contribution of human placental leukocytes to MMP-9 secretion and explored the local mechanisms of the pro-enzyme activation. Placental blood leukocytes were obtained from women at term gestation without labor and maintained in culture up to 72 h. MMP-9 activity in the culture supernatants was determined by zymography and using a specific substrate. The presence of a potential pro-MMP-9 activator in the culture supernatants was monitored using a recombinant biotin-labeled human pro-MMP-9. To characterize the endogenous pro-MMP-9 activator, MMP-1, -3, -7 and -9 were measured by multiplex assay in the supernatants, and an inhibition assay of MMP-9 activation was performed using an anti-human MMP-3 and a specific MMP-3 inhibitor. Finally, production of MMP-9 and MMP-3 in placental leukocytes obtained from term pregnancies with and without labor was assessed by immunofluorescence. Placental leukocytes spontaneously secreted pro-MMP-9 after 24 h of culture, increasing significantly at 48 h (P≤0.05), when the active form of MMP-9 was detected. Culture supernatants activated the recombinant pro-MMP-9 showing that placental leukocytes secrete the activator. A significant increase in MMP-3 secretion by placental leukocytes was observed since 48 h in culture (P≤0.05) and up to 72 h (P≤0.001), when concentration reached its maximum value. Specific activity of MMP-9 decreased significantly (P≤0.005) when an anti-MMP-3 antibody or a specific MMP-3 inhibitor were added to the culture media. Placental leukocytes from term labor produced more MMP-9 and MMP-3 compared to term non-labor cells. In this work we confirm that placental leukocytes from human term

  9. Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3 Is an Endogenous Activator of the MMP-9 Secreted by Placental Leukocytes: Implication in Human Labor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Flores-Pliego

    Full Text Available The activity of matrix degrading enzymes plays a leading role in the rupture of the fetal membranes under normal and pathological human labor, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 it is considered a biomarker of this event. To gain further insight into local MMP-9 origin and activation, in this study we analyzed the contribution of human placental leukocytes to MMP-9 secretion and explored the local mechanisms of the pro-enzyme activation.Placental blood leukocytes were obtained from women at term gestation without labor and maintained in culture up to 72 h. MMP-9 activity in the culture supernatants was determined by zymography and using a specific substrate. The presence of a potential pro-MMP-9 activator in the culture supernatants was monitored using a recombinant biotin-labeled human pro-MMP-9. To characterize the endogenous pro-MMP-9 activator, MMP-1, -3, -7 and -9 were measured by multiplex assay in the supernatants, and an inhibition assay of MMP-9 activation was performed using an anti-human MMP-3 and a specific MMP-3 inhibitor. Finally, production of MMP-9 and MMP-3 in placental leukocytes obtained from term pregnancies with and without labor was assessed by immunofluorescence.Placental leukocytes spontaneously secreted pro-MMP-9 after 24 h of culture, increasing significantly at 48 h (P≤0.05, when the active form of MMP-9 was detected. Culture supernatants activated the recombinant pro-MMP-9 showing that placental leukocytes secrete the activator. A significant increase in MMP-3 secretion by placental leukocytes was observed since 48 h in culture (P≤0.05 and up to 72 h (P≤0.001, when concentration reached its maximum value. Specific activity of MMP-9 decreased significantly (P≤0.005 when an anti-MMP-3 antibody or a specific MMP-3 inhibitor were added to the culture media. Placental leukocytes from term labor produced more MMP-9 and MMP-3 compared to term non-labor cells.In this work we confirm that placental leukocytes from

  10. Polystyrene microspheres enable 10‐color compensation for immunophenotyping of primary human leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Karen D.; Norman, John C.; Huye, Leslie; Hegde, Meenakshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Compensation is a critical process for the unbiased analysis of flow cytometry data. Numerous compensation strategies exist, including the use of bead‐based products. The purpose of this study was to determine whether beads, specifically polystyrene microspheres (PSMS) compare to the use of primary leukocytes for single color based compensation when conducting polychromatic flow cytometry. To do so, we stained individual tubes of both PSMS and leukocytes with panel specific antibodies conjugated to fluorochromes corresponding to fluorescent channels FL1‐FL10. We compared the matrix generated by PSMS to that generated using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Ideal for compensation is a sample with both a discrete negative population and a bright positive population. We demonstrate that PSMS display autofluorescence properties similar to PBMC. When comparing PSMS to PBMC for compensation PSMS yielded more evenly distributed and discrete negative and positive populations to use for compensation. We analyzed three donors' PBMC stained with our 10‐color T cell subpopulation panel using compensation generated by PSMS vs.PBMC and detected no significant differences in the population distribution. Panel specific antibodies bound to PSMS represent an invaluable valid tool to generate suitable compensation matrices especially when sample material is limited and/or the sample requires analysis of dynamically modulated or rare events. © 2015 The Authors. Cytometry Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26202733

  11. The Peri-islet Basement Membrane, a Barrier to Infiltrating Leukocytes in Type 1 Diabetes in Mouse and Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korpos, Eva; Kadri, Nadir; Kappelhoff, Reinhild

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first comprehensive analysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of peri-islet capsules, composed of the peri-islet basement membrane (BM) and subjacent interstitial matrix (IM), in development of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice and in human type 1 diabetes. Our data...... activity at sites of leukocyte penetration of the peri-islet BM in association with a macrophage subpopulation in NOD mice and human type 1 diabetic samples and, hence, potentially a novel therapeutic target specifically acting at the islet penetration stage. Interestingly, the peri-islet BM and underlying...... IM are reconstituted once inflammation subsides, indicating that the peri-islet BM-producing cells are not lost due to the inflammation, which has important ramifications to islet transplantation studies....

  12. Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail protein in preventing a protective polymorphonuclear leukocyte response during bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Jarrett, Clayton O; Callison, Julie A; Gardner, Donald; Buchanan, Susan K; Plano, Gregory V

    2011-12-01

    The ability of Yersinia pestis to forestall the mammalian innate immune response is a fundamental aspect of plague pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of Ail, a 17-kDa outer membrane protein that protects Y. pestis against complement-mediated lysis, on bubonic plague pathogenesis in mice and rats. The Y. pestis ail mutant was attenuated for virulence in both rodent models. The attenuation was greater in rats than in mice, which correlates with the ability of normal rat serum, but not mouse serum, to kill ail-negative Y. pestis in vitro. Intradermal infection with the ail mutant resulted in an atypical, subacute form of bubonic plague associated with extensive recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or neutrophils) to the site of infection in the draining lymph node and the formation of large purulent abscesses that contained the bacteria. Systemic spread and mortality were greatly attenuated, however, and a productive adaptive immune response was generated after high-dose challenge, as evidenced by high serum antibody levels against Y. pestis F1 antigen. The Y. pestis Ail protein is an important bubonic plague virulence factor that inhibits the innate immune response, in particular the recruitment of a protective PMN response to the infected lymph node.

  13. Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail Protein in Preventing a Protective Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Response during Bubonic Plague▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, B. Joseph; Jarrett, Clayton O.; Callison, Julie A.; Gardner, Donald; Buchanan, Susan K.; Plano, Gregory V.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Yersinia pestis to forestall the mammalian innate immune response is a fundamental aspect of plague pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of Ail, a 17-kDa outer membrane protein that protects Y. pestis against complement-mediated lysis, on bubonic plague pathogenesis in mice and rats. The Y. pestis ail mutant was attenuated for virulence in both rodent models. The attenuation was greater in rats than in mice, which correlates with the ability of normal rat serum, but not mouse serum, to kill ail-negative Y. pestis in vitro. Intradermal infection with the ail mutant resulted in an atypical, subacute form of bubonic plague associated with extensive recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or neutrophils) to the site of infection in the draining lymph node and the formation of large purulent abscesses that contained the bacteria. Systemic spread and mortality were greatly attenuated, however, and a productive adaptive immune response was generated after high-dose challenge, as evidenced by high serum antibody levels against Y. pestis F1 antigen. The Y. pestis Ail protein is an important bubonic plague virulence factor that inhibits the innate immune response, in particular the recruitment of a protective PMN response to the infected lymph node. PMID:21969002

  14. Bacteria-induced histamine release from human bronchoalveolar cells and blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clementsen, P; Milman, N; Struve-Christensen, E

    1991-01-01

    Histamine release induced by Staphylococcus aureus was examined in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in non-atopic individuals. Approximately half of the individuals responded with mediator release to the bacterium, and the release was found to be time- and concentration dependent....... No difference was found between the patients who responded and those who did not respond in regard to age, sex, smoker/non-smoker, % recovery of BAL-fluid, total cell count, differential cell counts, histamine content per mast cell, or diagnoses. Also stimulation of the BAL-cells with the calcium-ionophore A......23187 resulted in histamine release. S. aureus-induced histamine release from basophils was examined in leukocyte suspensions obtained from the same individuals, and in all experiments release was found. The dose-response curves were similar to those obtained with BAL cells. The bacteria...

  15. Modulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes function by incubation with human serum from oxidant-challenged individuals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Hoffer; T Machamid; A Tabak; Y Baum; A Tamir; Y Lerman

    2003-02-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) from healthy donors were tested for stimulated release of superoxide anions after being incubated with serum of welders and of a group of unexposed individuals. These two groups were further subdivided either according to age or to smoking habits. The experiments showed that stimulated superoxide production from PMN was inhibited ( < 0.05) by serum from young smokers as compared to that of young nonsmokers, both from the unexposed group. Incubation of PMN with serum from elderly nonsmoking individuals decreased superoxide production as compared to incubation with serum from young nonsmoking individuals, both from the unexposed group. A decrease in superoxide production by incubation with serum of welders as compared to that of unexposed individuals was significant only when the comparison was carried out between the young, non-smoking subgroups. These findings suggest that age, smoking, and exposure to oxidants induce appearance in serum of factors that affect the PMN function.

  16. Differential chromosomal radiosensitivity within the first G1-phase of the cell cycle of early-dividing human leukocytes in vitro after stimulation with PHA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, B.; Obe, G.

    1977-02-11

    Human leukocyte cultures were irradiated with 200 R X rays before the addition of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in the Go-stage and at different times up to 25 h within the first G1-phase of the cell cycle after the addition of PHA. The results of the analysis of chromosomal aberrations show that the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes increase significantly when leukocytes leave the Go-stage, reaching a minimum yield of aberrations about halfway through the first G1-phase. After that, toward the end of the G1-phase, the frequencies of dicentric chromosomes decrease again to a level similar to that found in the Go-stage. Different possible explanations for the differential chromosomal radiosensitivity of human leukocytes within the first post-stimulation G1-phase are discussed.

  17. Association of human leukocyte antigen class II alleles with severe Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeer, Ali H; Balkhy, Hanan; Johani, Sameera; Yousef, Mohammed Z; Arabi, Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a disease of the lower respiratory tract and is characterized by high mortality. It is caused by a beta coronavirus (CoV) referred to as MERS-CoV. Majority of MERS-CoV cases have been reported from Saudi Arabia. We investigated the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) Class II alleles in patients with severe MERS who were admitted in our Intensive Care Unit. A total of 23 Saudi patients with severe MERS-CoV infection were typed for HLA class II, results were compared with those of 161 healthy controls. Two HLA class II alleles were associated with the disease; HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02, but not with the disease outcome. Our results suggest that the HLA-DRB1*11:01 and DQB1*02:02 may be associated with susceptibility to MERS.

  18. Tapasin discriminates peptide-human leukocyte antigen-A*02:01 complexes formed with natural ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Gustav Andreas; Geironson, Linda; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A plethora of peptides are generated intracellularly, and most peptide-human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-I interactions are of a transient, unproductive nature. Without a quality control mechanism, the HLA-I system would be stressed by futile attempts to present peptides not sufficient for the stable...... according to the identity of the peptide. The facilitation was also specific for the identity of the HLA-I heavy chain, where it correlated to established tapasin dependence hierarchies. Two large sets of HLA-A*02:01 binding peptides, one extracted from natural HLA-I ligands from the SYFPEITHI database...... functionally discriminate the selected SYFPEITHI peptides from the other peptide binders with high sensitivity and specificity. We suggest that this HLA-I- and peptide-specific function, together with the functions exerted by the more C-terminal parts of tapasin, are major features of tapasin-mediated HLA...

  19. Genomic loss of mismatched human leukocyte antigen and leukemia immune escape from haploidentical graft-versus-leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Luca; Toffalori, Cristina; Ciceri, Fabio; Fleischhauer, Katharina

    2012-12-01

    Recent developments in cell processing and immunosuppressive strategies has allowed the safe infusion of high numbers of donor T cells in the context of clinical haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Haploidentical T cells display an intrinsic ability to recognize and eliminate residual patient leukemic cells, largely due to alloreactivity against the patient-specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules encoded on the mismatched haplotype. However, recent evidence has shown that leukemia, like many other tumors displaying pronounced genomic instability, is frequently able to evade this potent graft-versus-leukemia effect by undergoing de novo genomic mutations, which result in the permanent loss of only those HLA molecules targeted by haploidentical donor T-cell alloreactivity. This review summarizes the recent clinical and experimental evidence regarding this phenomenon, and its therapeutic and clinical consequences.

  20. Mapping the human protein interactome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Figeys

    2008-01-01

    Interactions are the essence of all biomolecules because they cannot fulfill their roles without interacting with other molecules. Hence, mapping the interactions of biomolecules can be useful for understanding their roles and functions. Furthermore, the development of molecular based systems biology requires an understanding of the biomolecular interactions. In recent years, the mapping of protein-protein interactions in different species has been reported, but few reports have focused on the large-scale mapping of protein-protein interactions in human. Here, we review the developments in protein interaction mapping and we discuss issues and strategies for the mapping of the human protein interactome.

  1. Activation of protein kinase C and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase in leukocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kensaku; Yasunari, Kenichi; Sato, Eisuke F; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Inoue, Masayasu

    2003-12-01

    The involvement of oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) in the pathogenesis of hypertension remains to be elucidated. We analyzed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the circulating and peritoneally infiltrating PMN from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). Flow cytometric analysis revealed that ROS generation by PMN from SHR was higher than that from WKY before (at 6 weeks of age) and after (at 16 weeks of age) the onset of hypertension. In vivo, ROS generation by PMN from SHR, but not that by PMN from WKY, was significantly suppressed by 10-week treatment with 50 mg/kg/day carvedilol, and this treatment did not affect blood pressure. Western blotting analysis revealed that protein kinase C alpha (PKCalpha), but not PKCbetaI or betaII, was activated more strongly in PMN from SHR than in PMN from WKY. Furthermore, expression of p47phox of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, but not of p67phox, in PMN from SHR was higher than that in PMN from WKY. These results suggest that ROS generation by PMN is principally enhanced in SHR through activation of PKCalpha and p47phox.

  2. Oxidative stress in leukocytes is a possible link between blood pressure, blood glucose, and C-reacting protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2002-03-01

    Because oxidative stress and inflammation are believed to play roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, oxidative stress in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) has been measured. A total of 529 subjects participated this study. Intracellular oxidative stress in PMNs and MNCs was measured by gated flow cytometry using carboxyfluorescin diacetate bis-acetoxymethyl ester. C-reacting protein (CRP), insulin action (homeostasis model assessment), and traditional risk factors such as age, gender, body mass index, triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, hemoglobin A(1c), and mean blood pressure were also measured. Multiple regression analysis revealed a significant correlation between mean blood pressure and PMN oxidative stress (r=0.104, P=0.018). It also demonstrated a significant correlation between hemoglobin A(1c) and PMN oxidative stress (r=0.112, P=0.021). A significant correlation was also found between CRP and MNC oxidative stress (r=0.116, P=0.008) by multiple regression analysis. In patients with both hypertension and diabetes, both PMN and MNC oxidative stress was increased (n=21, P=0.022 and P=0.006). These results suggest that both hypertension and diabetes lead to increased oxidative stress of PMNs and MNCs, and that CRP is related to MNC oxidative stress.

  3. Oligonol Supplementation Affects Leukocyte and Immune Cell Counts after Heat Loading in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Beom Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligonol is a low-molecular-weight form of polyphenol and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, making it a potential promoter of immunity. This study investigates the effects of oligonol supplementation on leukocyte and immune cell counts after heat loading in 19 healthy male volunteers. The participants took a daily dose of 200 mg oligonol or a placebo for 1 week. After a 2-week washout period, the subjects were switched to the other study arm. After each supplement, half-body immersion into hot water was made, and blood was collected. Then, complete and differential blood counts were performed. Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and phenotype lymphocyte subsets. Serum concentrations of interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 in blood samples were analyzed. Lymphocyte subpopulation variables included counts of total T cells, B cells, and natural killer (NK cells. Oligonol intake attenuated elevations in IL-1β (an 11.1-fold change vs. a 13.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 12.0-fold change vs. a 12.6-fold change 1h after heating and IL-6 (an 8.6-fold change vs. a 9.9-fold change immediately after heating; a 9.1-fold change vs. a 10.5-fold change 1h after heating immediately and 1 h after heating in comparison to those in the placebo group. Oligonol supplementation led to significantly higher numbers of leukocytes (a 30.0% change vs. a 21.5% change immediately after heating; a 13.5% change vs. a 3.5% change 1h after heating and lymphocytes (a 47.3% change vs. a 39.3% change immediately after heating; a 19.08% change vs. a 2.1% change 1h after heating relative to those in the placebo group. Oligonol intake led to larger increases in T cells, B cells, and NK cells at rest (p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.001, respectively and immediately after heating (p < 0.001 in comparison to those in the placebo group. In addition, levels of T cells (p < 0.001 and B cells (p < 0.001 were significantly higher 1 h after heating in comparison to those in

  4. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between th

  5. The expression and functional activity of membrane-bound human leukocyte antigen-G1 are influenced by the 3'-untranslated region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Signe Goul; Hantash, Basil M; Zhao, Longmei

    2013-01-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an immunosuppressive molecule acting on both the innate and adaptive immune system. A 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs66554220) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-G gene has been associated with a number of diseases, pregnancy complications...

  6. Cytogenetic observations in human peripheral blood leukocytes following in vitro exposure to THz radiation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeni, O; Gallerano, G P; Perrotta, A; Romanò, M; Sannino, A; Sarti, M; D'Arienzo, M; Doria, A; Giovenale, E; Lai, A; Messina, G; Scarfì, M R

    2007-04-01

    Emerging technologies are considering the possible use of Terahertz radiation in different fields ranging from telecommunications to biology and biomedicine. The study of the potential effects of Terahertz radiation on biological systems is therefore an important issue in order to safely develop a variety of applications. This paper describes a pilot study devoted to determine if Terahertz radiation could induce genotoxic effects in human peripheral blood leukocytes. For this purpose, human whole blood samples from healthy donors were exposed for 20 min to Terahertz radiation. Since, to our knowledge, this is the first study devoted to the evaluation of possible genotoxic effects of such radiation, different electromagnetic conditions were considered. In particular, the frequencies of 120 and 130 GHz were chosen: the first one was tested at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4 mW g-1, while the second one was tested at SAR levels of 0.24, 1.4, and 2 mW g-1. Chromosomal damage was evaluated by means of the cytokinesis block micronucleus technique, which also gives information on cell cycle kinetics. Moreover, human whole blood samples exposed to 130 GHz at SAR levels of 1.4 and 2 mW g-1 were also tested for primary DNA damage by applying the alkaline comet assay immediately after exposure. The results obtained indicate that THz exposure, in the explored electromagnetic conditions, is not able to induce either genotoxicity or alteration of cell cycle kinetics in human blood cells from healthy subjects.

  7. Effects of exercise on leukocyte death: prevention by hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with glutamine dipeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Levada-Pires, Adriana C; Folador, Alessandra; Gorjão, Renata; Alba-Loureiro, Tatiana C; Hirabara, Sandro M; Peres, Fabiano P; Silva, Paulo R S; Curi, Rui; Pithon-Curi, Tania C

    2008-06-01

    Lymphocyte and neutrophil death induced by exercise and the role of hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with glutamine dipeptide (Gln) supplementation was investigated. Nine triathletes performed two exhaustive exercise trials with a 1-week interval in a randomized, double blind, crossover protocol. Thirty minutes before treadmill exhaustive exercise at variable speeds in an inclination of 1% the subjects ingested 50 g of maltodextrin (placebo) or 50 g of maltodextrin plus 4 tablets of 700 mg of hydrolyzed whey protein enriched with 175 mg of glutamine dipeptide dissolved in 250 mL water. Cell viability, DNA fragmentation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined in lymphocytes and neutrophils. Exhaustive exercise decreased viable lymphocytes but had no effect on neutrophils. A 2.2-fold increase in the proportion of lymphocytes and neutrophils with depolarized mitochondria was observed after exhaustive exercise. Supplementation of maltodextrin plus Gln (MGln) prevented the loss of lymphocyte membrane integrity and the mitochondrial membrane depolarization induced by exercise. Exercise caused an increase in ROS production by neutrophils, whereas supplementation of MGln had no additional effect. MGln supplementation partially prevented lymphocyte apoptosis induced by exhaustive exercise possibly by a protective effect on mitochondrial function.

  8. Characterization of early and terminal complement proteins associated with polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro and in vivo after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvan Manuel D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system has been suggested to affect injury or disease of the central nervous system (CNS by regulating numerous physiological events and pathways. The activation of complement following traumatic CNS injury can also result in the formation and deposition of C5b-9 membrane attack complex (C5b-9/MAC, causing cell lysis or sublytic effects on vital CNS cells. Although complement proteins derived from serum/blood-brain barrier breakdown can contribute to injury or disease, infiltrating immune cells may represent an important local source of complement after injury. As the first immune cells to infiltrate the CNS within hours post-injury, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs may affect injury through mechanisms associated with complement-mediated events. However, the expression/association of both early and terminal complement proteins by PMNs has not been fully characterized in vitro, and has not observed previously in vivo after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI. Method We investigated the expression of complement mRNAs using rt-PCR and the presence of complement proteins associated with PMNs using immunofluroescence and quantitative flow cytometry. Results Stimulated or unstimulated PMNs expressed mRNAs encoding for C1q, C3, and C4, but not C5, C6, C7 or C9 in culture. Complement protein C1q or C3 was also detected in less than 30% of cultured PMNs. In contrast, over 70% of PMNs that infiltrated the injured spinal cord were associated with C1q, C3, C7 and C5b-9/MAC 3 days post-SCI. The localization/association of C7 or C5b-9/MAC with infiltrating PMNs in the injured spinal cord suggests the incorporation or internalization of C7 or C5b-9/MAC bound cellular debris by infiltrating PMNs because C7 and C5b-9/MAC were mostly localized to granular vesicles within PMNs at the spinal cord epicenter region. Furthermore, PMN presence in the injured spinal cord was observed for many weeks post-SCI, suggesting that this

  9. Development of methods to examine the effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zussman, Lisa Ann

    In vitro methods to study the effect of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on leukocyte function using human peripheral blood were developed. These methods were demonstrated using the blood of 1-5 individuals and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) urban PM #1648, diesel PM #1650, silica PM, and a locally collected PM sample (New Jersey PM10). For the blood samples analyzed in this study NIST urban PM and New Jersey PM10 treatment mediated the release of granule contents from peripheral blood leukocytes and induced structural changes associated with degranulation. Flow cytometry revealed PM-induced changes in phagocytosis and cell structure associated with degranulation. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed NIST urban PM-induced cell structure changes were associated with PM internalization. Colorametric and electrophoretic methods showed no PM-induced release of primary granules and a slight PM-induced release of secondary granules associated with only NIST urban PM. Enzyme Immunosorbent Assays detected increased histamine release from basophils treated with NIST urban PM, a locally collected PM, and the soluble and insoluble components of these particles. NIST urban PM was found to be a potent inducer of histamine release in 4 out of 6 individuals tested. Fractionation studies revealed that soluble (aqueous) and insoluble fractions of NIST urban PM contain histamine-releasing activity. This was also demonstrated for the New Jersey PM10 sample for which the soluble fraction exhibited the most activity. Complementary studies with inhibitors of IgE-mediated histamine release conducted on one test subject suggest that PM-induced histamine release was partially mediated by IgE. A new hypothesis has been formed, suggesting that particle toxicity is related to PM-induced histamine release. Due to the bioactive nature of histamine and its association with many cardiopulmonary responses, the PM- mediated release of histamine should be investigated

  10. Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein Regulates Leukocyte-Dependent Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Ishihara

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A paracrine interaction between epidermal growth factor (EGF-secreting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1-secreting breast carcinoma cells promotes invasion and metastasis. Here, we show that mice deficient in the hematopoietic-cell-specific Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp are unable to support TAM-dependent carcinoma cell invasion and metastasis in both orthotopic and transgenic models of mammary tumorigenesis. Motility and invasion defects of tumor cells were recapitulated ex vivo upon coculture with WASp−/− macrophages. Mechanistically, WASp is required for macrophages to migrate toward CSF-1-producing carcinoma cells, as well as for the release of EGF through metalloprotease-dependent shedding of EGF from the cell surface of macrophages. Our findings suggest that WASp acts to support both the migration of TAMs and the production of EGF, which in concert promote breast tumor metastasis.

  11. Comparison of dengue infection in human mononuclear leukocytes with mosquito C6/36 and mammalian Vero cells using flow cytometry to detect virus antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydow Farid FO von

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS analysis is useful for the detection of cellular surface antigens and intracellular proteins. We used this methodology in order to detect and quantify dengue antigens in highly susceptible cells such as clone C6/36 (Aedes albopictus and Vero cells (green monkey kidney. Additionally, we analyzed the infection in vitro of human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML. FACS analysis turned out to be a reliable technique to quantify virus growth in traditional cell cultures of C6/36 as well as Vero cells. High rates of infection were achieved with a good statistical correlation between the virus amount used in infection and the percentage of dengue antigen containing cells detected in infected cultures. We also showed that human monocytes (CD14+ are preferred target cells for in vitro dengue infection among PBML. Monocytes were much less susceptible to virus infection than cell lines but they displayed dengue antigens detected by FACS five days after infection. In contrast, lymphocytes showed no differences in their profile for dengue specific immunofluorescence. Without an animal model to reproduce dengue disease, alternative assays have been sought to correlate viral virulence with clinical manifestations and disease severity. Study of in vitro interaction of virus and host cells may highlight this relationship.

  12. The anti-inflammatory pharmacology of Pycnogenol in humans involves COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNA expression in leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canali, Raffaella; Comitato, Raffaella; Schonlau, Frank; Virgili, Fabio

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the effects of Pycnogenol supplementation on the arachidonic acid pathway in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in response to an inflammatory stimulus. Pycnogenol is a standardised extract of French maritime pine bark consisting of procyanidins and polyphenolic monomers. Healthy volunteers aged 35 to 50 years were supplemented with 150 mg Pycnogenol a day for five days. Before and after the final day of supplementation, blood was drawn and PMNL were isolated. PMNL were primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stimulated with the receptor-mediated agonist formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) to activate the arachidonic acid pathway and the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, thromboxane and prostaglandins. Pycnogenol supplementation inhibited 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity. This effect was associated with a compensatory up-regulation of COX-1 gene expression. Interestingly, Pycnogenol suspended the interdependency between 5-LOX and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) expression. Pycnogenol supplementation reduced leukotriene production but did not leave prostaglandins unaltered, which we attribute to a decline of COX-2 activity in favour of COX-1. Here we show for the first time that Pycnogenol supplementation simultaneously inhibits COX-2 and 5-LOX gene expression and reduces leukotriene biosynthesis in human PMNL upon pro-inflammatory stimulation ex vivo.

  13. Development of bactericidal capacity and phagocytosis-associated metabolism of fetal pig leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, B; Day, N; Haseman, J; Good, R A

    1972-02-01

    Evidence that the bactericidal ability and the stimulated oxidative metabolism of leukocytes appear in parallel during fetal development of the Minnesota Miniature pig has been obtained by application of the techniques applied to studies of human cells. It was demonstrated that leukocytes from 87- to 90-day fetuses were fully capable of ingesting Staphylococcus aureus but greatly diminished in bactericidal capacity as compared to leukocytes of older fetuses and adults. Although resting levels of oxygen consumption and hexose monophosphate pathway activity of leukocytes from the younger fetuses compared well with those of leukocytes from older animals, the phagocytosis-stimulated increments of metabolism were much less at 87 to 90 days of gestation than at later developmental stages. Both bactericidal capacity and increased metabolism of leukocytes reach adult levels by 100 days of gestation (normal gestation period of 115 to 120 days). Acrylamide gels stained for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and NADH phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase activity after disc electrophoresis of leukocyte extracts revealed normal mobility and intensity of NADH diaphorase bands. Three NADPH diaphorase bands were present in adult leukocyte extracts. Only the fast-migrating NADPH diaphorase band of 87- to 90-day cells stained with decreased intensity. This "deficiency" was no longer present at the later fetal period. The fast-migrating NADPH diaphorase band may represent an electron transfer protein which functions in cyanide-insensitive respiration of the leukocytes of the pig.

  14. Leukocyte populations and C-reactive protein as predictors of bacterial infections in febrile outpatient children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Zühre; Küçükcongar, Aynur; Vurallı, Doğuş; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Gürsel, Türkiz

    2014-03-01

    Amaç: Enfeksiyonlar pediatri polikliniklerinde gereksiz antibiyotik kullanımının en önemli nedeni olmaya devam etmektedir. Tam kan sayımı (CBC) enfeksiyonların tanısında kullanılan önemli bir testtir. C-reaktif protein (CRP) ise ciddi bakteriyel enfeksiyonu olan küçük çocukların değerlendirilmesinde yararlıdır. Bu çalışmanın amacı polikliniğe başvuran ateşli çocuklarda bakteriyel enfeksiyonu ayırdetmede CRP düzeyi ve lökosit popülasyonunun önemini değerlendirmektir. Gereç ve Yöntemler: Polikliniğe başvuran 120 ateşli çocukta Cell-DYN 4000 ile analiz edilen CBC değerleri ile CRP düzeyi, 74 bakteriyel, 46 viral ve 22 kontrol grubunda değerlendirildi. Bulgular: Ortalama CRP, nötrofil ve immature granulosit (IG) değerleri bakteriyel enfeksiyonlarda, viral enfeksiyon ve kontrol grubuna göre anlamlı yüksekti (p<0,05). Bakteriyel enfeksiyonlarda CRP ve nötrofil değerleri arasında anlamlı ilişki bulundu (r:0,76, p<0,05). Özgüllük IG için %93 ile en yüksek, nötrofil için %56 ile orta ve CRP için %18 düşük düzeyde bulunmasına rağmen IG, nötrofil ve CRP kombinasyonu için %100 bulundu. Sonuç: Çocuklarda klinik belirti ve bulgular akut bakteriyel enfeksiyonu işaret etse bile, normal lökosit popülasyonu ve CRP değeri olan hastalarda akut bakteriyel enfeksiyon olasılığı düşüktür.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the low-affinity complex between human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and leukocyte Ig-like receptor B2 (LILRB2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2009-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical MHC class I (MHCI) molecule that is expressed mainly on placenta trophoblast cells. Leukocyte Ig-like receptor B2 (LILRB2) is a human inhibitory immune receptor that recognizes HLA-G with a higher affinity than any other MHCI although this interaction is only in the microM range. The interaction between HLA-G and LILRB2 seems to play a dominant role in the escape of the fetus from the maternal immune response. Here we report the crystallization and x-ray analysis of the LILRB2/HLA-G complex. The extracellular domains of HLA-G and LILRB2 were expressed in Escherichia coli, refolded and purified. The initial crystallization trials using novel PEG-based screening sets provided crystals of the LILRB2/HLA-G complex with 40-50% PEG400 as the precipitant. These crystals belong to space group P3(1)21 (a=b=81.4 A, c=186.7 A, gamma=120 degrees ). Dehydration of the crystals by soaking them in a solution containing a higher concentration of PEG400 dramatically improved the resolution and also the mosaicity.

  16. The Local Inflammatory Responses to Infection of the Peritoneal Cavity in Humans: Their Regulation by Cytokines, Macrophages, and Other Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marien Willem Johan Adriaan Fieren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on infection-induced inflammatory reactions in humans rely largely on findings in the blood compartment. Peritoneal leukocytes from patients treated with peritoneal dialysis offer a unique opportunity to study in humans the inflammatory responses taking place at the site of infection. Compared with peritoneal macrophages (pM from uninfected patients, pM from infected patients display ex vivo an upregulation and downregulation of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, respectively. Pro-IL-1 processing and secretion rather than synthesis proves to be increased in pM from infectious peritonitis suggesting up-regulation of caspase-1 in vivo. A crosstalk between pM, γ T cells, and neutrophils has been found to be involved in augmented TNF expression and production during infection. The recent finding in experimental studies that alternatively activated macrophages (M2 increase by proliferation rather than recruitment may have significant implications for the understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions such as encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS.

  17. Attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of Helicobacter pylori by human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiela, M; Paziak-Domanska, B; Wadström, T

    1995-02-01

    The different steps of phagocytosis, attachment, ingestion and intracellular killing of cells of Helicobacter pylori strain 17874 (expressing sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) and cells of H. pylori strain 17875 (expressing non-sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin) have been studied. More cells of sialopositive H. pylori strain 17874 have been found attached to human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBM) and mouse peritoneal inflammatory macrophages (PIM) than cells of sialonegative H. pylori strain 17875. Binding of cells of H. pylori strain 17874 has been significantly inhibited by treatment of phagocytes with neuraminidase. Inhibition of adhesion of these bacteria preincubated with foetuin to normal phagocytic cells has also been found. Well adhering cells of H. pylori strain 17874 were more resistant to killing mechanisms of human PBM and mouse PIM than cells of strain 17875. Good, probably sialic acid-specific haemagglutinin dependent, adhesion of H. pylori bacteria to phagocytes can be considered as an important virulence factor which facilitates the pathogen to avoid the defence mechanisms.

  18. Chemotaxis of human and rat leukocytes by the delta-selective non-peptidic opioid SNC 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz-Sánchez, Iván; Weber, Richard J; Rice, Kenner C; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Rodríguez-Padilla, C; Tamez-Guerra, R; Méndez-Vázquez, José L; Gómez-Flores, R

    2003-01-01

    Opioids like morphine, represent a major source of relief for most chronic moderate to severe nonmalignant pain. However, opioid abuse may lead to infections such as hepatitis and AIDS because opioids have been associated with suppressing various parameters of immune function including antimicrobial resistance, antibody production, monocyte-mediated phagocytosis, and both neutrophil and monocyte chemotaxis. We have previously reported immunopotentiating properties of non-peptidic opioid receptor selective agonists and antagonists. In this study, we evaluated the effects of the nonpeptidic delta-opioid receptor agonist (+)-4-((alpha R)-alpha-((2S, 5R)-4-allyl-2, 5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl)-N, N-diethyl-benzamide (SNC 80) on chemotaxis of rat thymic and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by using a modified Wilkinson chamber. Cell recruitment is an essential process in acute and chronic inflammatory responses. We observed that SNC 80 at concentrations of 10(-10), 10(-9), 10(-8), 10(-7), and 10(-6) M, significantly (p SNC 80 on chemotaxis of rat and human leukocytes were antagonized by naloxone, indicating that the modulation of chemotaxis by SNC 80 is via a classic opioid receptor. The development and use of non-peptidic opioids like SNC 80 could have an immediate impact not only as potent analgesics, but in immunoregulation.

  19. Grape polyphenols and propolis mixture inhibits inflammatory mediator release from human leukocytes and reduces clinical scores in experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossalayi, M D; Rambert, J; Renouf, E; Micouleau, M; Mérillon, J M

    2014-02-15

    Polyphenols from red fruits and bee-derived propolis (PR) are bioactive natural products in various in vitro and in vivo models. The present study shows that hematotoxicity-free doses of grape polyphenols (GPE) and PR differentially decreased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines from activated human peripheral blood leucocytes. While GPE inhibited the monocytes/macrophage response, propolis decreased both monokines and interferon γ (IFNγ) production. When used together, their distinct effects lead to the attenuation of all inflammatory mediators, as supported by a significant modulation of the transcriptomic profile of pro-inflammatory genes in human leukocytes. To enforce in vitro data, GPE+PR were tested for their ability to improve clinical scores and cachexia in chronic rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA). Extracts significantly reduced arthritis scores and cachexia, and this effect was more significant in animals receiving continuous low doses compared to those receiving five different high doses. Animals treated daily had significantly better clinical scores than corticoid-treated rats. Together, these findings indicate that the GPE+PR combination induces potent anti-inflammatory activity due to their complementary immune cell modulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 class II genes in Mexican Amerindian Mazahuas: genes and languages do not correlate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio; Abd-El-Fatah, Sedeka; Granados-Silvestre, María Angeles; Parga-Lozano, Carlos; Gómez-Prieto, Pablo; Rey, Diego; Areces, Cristina; Peñaranda, Patricia; Menjívar, Martha; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Granados, Julio; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto

    2011-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex genes are located on the short arm of the human sixth chromosome; they are highly polymorphic and therefore have been very advantageous in population genetic studies. A Mazahua group established in North Mexico State and also in nearby Michoacan state in the rainy mountain highlands (Mexico) was studied for their human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles. The relationship with other Amerindians and worldwide populations was studied by using 14,996 chromosomes from 75 different populations and calculating neighbor-joining dendrograms and correspondence multidimensional values. Five principal HLA allele frequencies were found in our group: DRB1*0802 (the most frequent one in this population), DRB1*0407, DRB1*0403, DRB1*0101, and DRB1*1406. Both genetic distances and correspondence analyses clearly show that our Mazahua group is genetically close to some of the most ancient groups living in Mexico (Mayos, Zapotecans, Tennek) and South American Amerindians. Amerindians remain as a group apart from the rest of the world. The results analyzing the HLA-DR locus suggest that Mazahua language (Otomangue) does not correlate with those of the most closely HLA-correlated ethnic groups. The present data may be useful for future transplantation programs, HLA and disease diagnosis, and pharmacogenetic studies.

  1. Involvement of seminal leukocytes, reactive oxygen species, and sperm mitochondrial membrane potential in the DNA damage of the human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobascio, A M; De Felici, M; Anibaldi, M; Greco, P; Minasi, M G; Greco, E

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing leukocytes in semen has been a standard component of the semen analysis, but its true significance remains still unknown. In this study, we have correlated the number of seminal leukocytes to various semen parameters. We found a negative correlation between the leukocyte number and sperm concentration (rs  = -0.22; p = 0.01) and motility (rs  = -0.20; p = 0.02). In contrast, a positive correlation between the number of leukocytes and both seminal ROS (rs  = 0.70, p sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) (10% vs 35%, rs  = 0.25, p = 0.08; n = 50). Overall these results indicate that the presence of high number of leukocytes in the ejaculate negatively affects key semen parameters, as sperm concentration and motility, associated with infertility conditions. Moreover, they suggest that leukocytes are the major source of the seminal ROS and cause of sperm DNA fragmentation. However, the absence of a clear correlation between ROS and sperm DNA fragmentation, and spermatozoa with damaged DNA and MMP loss, suggest that ROS produced by leukocytes might be not the only cause of DNA damage in spermatozoa and that intrinsic mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathways might not have a major impact on sperm DNA fragmentation.

  2. An ex vivo RT-qPCR-based assay for human peripheral leukocyte responsiveness to glucocorticoids in surgically induced inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gråberg T

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Truls Gråberg,1 Lovisa Strömmer,1 Erik Hedman,2 Mehmet Uzunel,3 Ewa Ehrenborg,4 Ann-Charlotte Wikström5 1Division of Surgery, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology (CLINTEC, Karolinska Institutet, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska University Hospital, 3Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, 4Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Solna, 5Unit of Translational Immunology, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Introduction: An assay to determine glucocorticoid (GC responsiveness in humans could be used to monitor GC non-responsiveness in states of GC insufficiency and could provide a tool to adapt GC treatment to individual patients. We propose an ex vivo assay to test GC responsiveness in peripheral leukocytes. The assay was evaluated in a human experimental model of surgery-induced inflammation. Patients and methods: Changes in expression of the GC-regulated genes GILZ, IL1R2, FKBP5, and HLA-DR and glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GRα were determined by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR in peripheral leukocytes from surgical patients and healthy blood donors (total n=60 in response to low (1 nM and high (1 µM dexamethasone (DEX. The final selection of a suitable endogenous control gene was based on the studies of stability during DEX treatment and inflammation. Correlations between pre- and postoperative GC-induced gene expression, the postoperative systemic inflammatory and metabolic response (CRP, IL-6, white blood cell count, cytokines, resistin, free fatty acids, glucose, insulin, and adiponectin, and the clinical outcome were analyzed. The length of stay in the intensive care unit (ICU-LOS, the length of stay in the hospital, and postoperative complications were used to measure clinical outcome. Results: When the blood donors were compared to the patients, there were no significant

  3. FMC46, a cell protrusion-associated leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 epitope on human lymphocytes and thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarski, L M; Turley, E A; Shaw, A R; Gallatin, W M; Laderoute, M P; Gillitzer, R; Beckman, I G; Zola, H

    1991-07-01

    In this report, we describe a 76-kDa glycoprotein recognized by mAb FMC46 that, by virtue of its concentration on cell protrusions involved in motility, may be important in lymphoid cell locomotion. FMC46 detects an epitope of the leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (LAM-1), a member of the selecting family (LAM-1, Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecular-1 (ELAM-1), and Granule Membrane Protein-140 (GMP-140), that is expressed on LAM-1-transfected cell lines, is a glycosylation epitope based on its loss after culture in tunicamycin, and is closely related to the LAM-1.2 epitope. FMC46 is expressed at high density on the majority of CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ peripheral blood T cells (60 to 70%) and on a subset of thymocytes that includes the multinegative CD3- CD4- CD8- progenitor cells (100% FMC46hi) and the CD45R0- presumptive thymic generative lineage (70% FMC46hi). It appears at reduced density and frequency on CD45RA- thymocytes (50% FMC46lo), comprised mainly of death-committed thymocytes. Among thymic subsets defined by expression of CD4 and/or CD8, FMC46 is expressed at high density predominantly on a subset of single-positive cells and not on double-positive cells. These results suggest a fundamental role for LAM-1 in thymic development, with a high density preferentially expressed on cells involved in thymic generative processes and a low density on cells progressing to intrathymic death. A major subset of peripheral blood B cells and thymic B cells also express FMC46. Immunohistochemistry on frozen sections indicated strong staining in splenic follicles and around blood vessels, staining of the thymic medulla and subcapsular areas, and staining of the mantle zone of germinal centers of the lymph node. FMC46+ lymphocytes accumulated along high endothelial venules in the lymph node. On locomoting multinegative thymocytes, FMC46 is concentrated on the leading tip of extended processes, on pseudopods, and on ruffles, unlike the distribution of either CD44 or TQ1 (LAM 1

  4. A meta-analysis of the impact of human leukocyte antigen-G on the outcomes of IVF/ICSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ziru; Wang, Liangyi; Pang, Ronald T K; Guo, Yifan; Yeung, William S B; Yao, Yuanqing

    2017-06-01

    This analysis was performed to determine whether the presence of soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (sHLA-G) in embryo culture medium is predictive of clinical outcomes in IVF treatment. The outcomes of implantation, clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy and miscarriage, between groups with and without sHLA-G in embryo culture media, were analysed. Fifteen studies with a total of 6170 cases were included. Ten of them were prospective studies while five were retrospective studies. Embryo culture media with sHLA-G were associated with significantly higher implantation rate and clinical pregnancy rate when compared with those without; the odd ratios (ORs) were 2.66 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.75-4.06, P G in the embryo culture medium favoured higher implantation rate and pregnancy rate. However, the conclusion needs to be consolidated by further clinical studies using a more precise method of determination of sHLA-G and research on the physiological and molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effect of sHLA-G on early embryo development and implantation. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A combined approach of human leukocyte antigen ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis to improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The breakthrough development of immune checkpoint inhibitors as clinically effective novel therapies demonstrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. The identification of suitable targets for specific immunotherapy, however, remains a challenging task. Most peptides previously used for vaccination in clinical trials were able to elicit strong immunological responses but failed with regard to clinical benefit. This might, at least partly, be caused by an inadequate peptide selection, usually derived from established tumor-associated antigens which are not necessarily presented as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands. Recently, HLA ligandome analysis revealed cancer-associated peptides, which have been used in clinical trials showing encouraging impact on survival. To improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy, our group established a combined approach of HLA ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis for the identification of vaccine peptides. This approach is based on the identification of naturally presented HLA ligands on tumor samples, the selection of tumor-associated/tumor-specific HLA ligands and their subsequent testing for immunogenicity in vitro. In this review, we want to present our pipeline for the identification of vaccine peptides, focusing on ovarian cancer, and want to discuss differences to other approaches. Furthermore, we want to give a short outlook of a potential multi-peptide vaccination trial using the novel identified peptides.

  6. SNP variants associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) correlate with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, Lik-Chin; Chin, Yoon-Ming; Tai, Mei-Chee; Chin, Edmund Fui-Min; Lim, Yat-Yuen; Suthandiram, Sujatha; Chang, Kian-Meng; Ong, Tee-Chuan; Bee, Ping-Chong; Mohamed, Zahurin; Gan, Gin-Gin; Ng, Ching-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Large consortia efforts and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have linked a number of genetic variants within the 6p21 chromosomal region to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Complementing these efforts, we genotyped previously reported SNPs in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I (rs6457327) and class II (rs9271100, rs2647012 and rs10484561) regions in a total of 1,145 subjects (567 NHL cases and 578 healthy controls) from two major ethnic groups in Malaysia, the Malays and the Chinese. We identified a NHL-associated (PNHL_add = 0.0008; ORNHL_add = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.37–0.77) and B-cell associated (PBcell_add = 0.0007; ORBcell_add = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.35–0.76) SNP rs2647012 in the Malaysian Malays. In silico cis-eQTL analysis of rs2647012 suggests potential regulatory function of nearby HLA class II molecules. Minor allele rs2647012-T is linked to higher expression of HLA-DQB1, rendering a protective effect to NHL risk. Our findings suggest that the HLA class II region plays an important role in NHL etiology. PMID:28139690

  7. Comparative evaluation of the cytomegalovirus DNA load in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and plasma of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, G; Handfield, J; Toma, E; Murray, G; Lalonde, R; Bergeron, M G

    1998-02-01

    The cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA load was determined in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and plasma samples from 106 human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects at risk of developing CMV disease (group 1) and from 27 AIDS patients with documented CMV disease (group 2). For both groups, the number of CMV copies in PMNL was significantly higher than in plasma when results were derived from an equivalent blood volume (P < .001, PMNL vs. plasma). Additionally, group 2 (symptomatic) patients had a greater viral DNA load than group 1 (asymptomatic) subjects (P < .001 for both PMNL and plasma). The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of qualitative polymerase chain reaction using PMNL (PCR-PMNL) for the presence of CMV disease were 100%, 58%, 38%, and 100%, respectively, compared with 70%, 93%, 74%, and 92% for qualitative PCR-plasma and 93%, 92%, 76%, and 98% for quantitative PCR-PMNL using a cutoff of 16,000 copies/mL. Thus, the best strategy for diagnosing CMV disease in these individuals relies on quantitative assessment of the viral DNA load in PMNL.

  8. Expression of human leukocyte antigens in diffuse large B cell lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemersma, Sietske Annette

    2006-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma of which 40% present at extra-nodal sites including immune privileged sites such as the testis and the central nervous system (CNS). Loss of Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) expression has been described in many different

  9. Human conglutinin-like protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensenius, J C; Thiel, S; Baatrup, G

    1985-01-01

    The presence in human plasma of a molecule homologous to bovine conglutinin is indicated by the results of biological and immunochemical analysis. The human conglutinin-like protein shows calcium-dependent binding to complement-treated solid phase IgG and immunological cross-reaction with chicken...... anti-bovine conglutinin. The binding of the human protein to complement-treated IgG was inhibited by N-acetyl-D-glucosamine but not by other sugars. Analysis by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting showed reaction of anti-conglutinin with molecules of similar mobility to the monomer and hexamer of bovine...

  10. Influence of Steroids on Oxidant Generation in Activated Human Granulocytes and Mononuclear Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    and hemorrhage- induced lung injury (31), and lung injury induced by hind limb ischemia (11). Administering scavengers of reactive oxygen species or...be altering protein synthesis. For PMNs, E2 or P4 had no effect on oxidants, whereas all hydro- cortisone concentrations showed a modest trend for...activated and non-activated MNCs (35). Similarly, activated macrophages derived from lungs or a macrophage cell line (J774) treated with pharmacological

  11. Assessment of leukocyte trafficking in humans using the cantharidin blister model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, William J; Gilroy, Derek W

    2012-01-01

    The cantharidin blister model provides an in vivo assessment of the innate inflammatory response in humans. It allows researchers to profile the acute and resolving inflammatory response in healthy and diseased states and for the design of crossover trials for the testing of new treatments for acute inflammation. Below we describe the materials and methods required to prepare, induce, aspirate and analyse the forearm cantharidin blisters, in preparation for future study design. PMID:24175059

  12. Activity of superior interferon α against HIV-1 in severe combined immunodeficient mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei; TONG Xiao; Tadashi Nakasone; YUE Xue-tian; Naoki Yamamoto; LIU Xin-yuan; YANG Rong-ge

    2011-01-01

    Background Interferon (IFN) can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro and in clinic.However, IFN therapy for HIV infection was limited by its moderate antiviral efficacy and its frequent adverse effects. In the present study we evaluated the anti-HIV efficacy of a novel synthesized superior interferon α (slFNα).Methods We performed in vitro experiments with HIV-1 IIB infected MT4 cells, and evaluated in vivo anti-HIV efficacy of slFNα in severe combined immunodeficient (SClD) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood leukocytes (hu-PBL-SClD mice).Results We found that the 50% effective concentrations (EC5o) of slFNα against the replication of HIV-1 in MT4 cells was 0.06 ng/ml, representing stronger antiviral activity than interferon-α in vitro. In the hu-PBL-SCID mice, a dose-dependent protection pattern was observed: with 0.45 μg and 1.35 μg slFNα daily treatments, parts of SCID mice were protected from HIV infection, whereas 2.25 μg sIFNα daily treatments resulted in a terminally complete protection.Conclusions slFNα shows good anti-HIV activity both in vitro and in SCID mice, may be a promising anti-HIV agent deserving clinical investigation, especially considering the potential of IFN-α to inhibit HIV replication in patients infected with drug-resistant variants or co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  13. Crystallographic structure of the human leukocyte antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: models of a directional alloimmune response and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Christian S; Gorski, Jack; Stern, Lawrence J

    2007-08-10

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin alphaII(B)betaIII glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the alphaII(B)betaIII 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 A. There are two alphabeta heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4(1)2(1)2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive "1-4-9" peptide binding motif. A beta57 Asp-->Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to alpha76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic beta37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  14. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  15. Effects of Propyl Gallate on Adhesion of Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes to Human Endothelial Cells Induced by Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Yue-rong; CHEN Ke-ji; XU Yong-gang; YANG Xiao-hong; YIN Hui-jun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of Prowl Gallate (PrG) on cellular adhesion between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) as well as the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, CD54) and E-selectin (CD62E) on the VEC surface. Methods: A human VEC inflammation model was induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). VECs were pre-incubated with varying concentrations of PrG (0.001-5 mmol/L) or 1‰ DMSO (v:v) or 10 mmol/L acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) for 1 h, and then were stimulated with 10 ng/mL TNF-α for 6 h. Rose bengal vital staining method was used to measure the adherence rate of PMN to VEC, while flow cytometry was used to determine the expression of CD54 and CD62E on the VEC surface. Results: After 6 h of incubation with TNF-α, the adherence of PMN to HUVECs as well as the percentage of fluorescence-positive cells and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of surface CD54 and CD62E in HUVECs increased significantly (P0.05). ASA at 10 mmol/L had no obvious effect on the positive rate of CD62E and CD54. Conclusions: High concentrations of PrG (0.1-5 mmol/L) exert its inhibitory effect on cellular adherence of PMN to HUVECs, and its mechanism may be related to inhibiting surface expression of CD54 and CD62E in HUVECs. Its action concentration was lower than that of ASA.

  16. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

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    Cui X Tracy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC for biofuel cell (BFC applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient, a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL, and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  17. Leukotriene B4 potentiates CpG signaling for enhanced cytokine secretion by human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Eric; Gosselin, Jean

    2009-08-15

    TLRs are known to be important in innate host defense against a variety of microbial infections. In particular, TLR9 has been associated with immune defense against different foreign organisms by recognition of unmethylated DNA sequences. In this report, we provide evidence that leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) has the capacity to modulate TLR9 expression on human neutrophils. The effect of LTB(4) was found to be specific, because related leukotrienes such as LTC(4) and LTD(4) or neutrophil agonists IL-8 and C5a failed to modulate TLR9 expression in neutrophils. Using fluorochrome-tagged CpG DNA, we observed that LTB(4) treatment also increased TLR9 ligand binding in neutrophils. Moreover, LTB(4) stimulation potentiates CpG-mediated signaling via an endosome-independent mechanism in human neutrophils, leading to enhanced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. The increase in cytokine secretion by LTB(4) following CpG stimulation of neutrophils was associated with the activation of TGF-beta-activated kinase (TAK-1) as well as p38 and c-Jun (JNK) kinases. In contrast, in PBMC LTB(4) leads to an increase in cytokine secretion following CpG stimulation but via a MyD88- and endosome-dependent mechanism. As observed in neutrophils, PBMC stimulation with LTB(4) in the presence of CpG also results in enhanced TAK-1, p38, and JNK phosphorylation/activation. These data provide new evidence underlying the immunomodulatory properties of LTB(4) leading to antimicrobial defense.

  18. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA load in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects: correlation with the presence of Kaposi's sarcoma and response to anticytomegalovirus therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, G; Gaudreau, A; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Routy, J P; Murray, G; Handfield, J; Bergeron, M G

    1999-02-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 microgram of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed.

  19. Human Herpesvirus 8 DNA Load in Leukocytes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects: Correlation with the Presence of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Response to Anticytomegalovirus Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guy; Gaudreau, Annie; Toma, Emil; Lalonde, Richard; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Murray, Gilles; Handfield, Julie; Bergeron, Michel G.

    1999-01-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 μg of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed. PMID:9925538

  20. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Phenotypic Features of Circulating Leukocytes from Non-human Primates Naturally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Resemble the Major Immunological Findings Observed in Human Chagas Disease.

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    Renato Sathler-Avelar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis represent a feasible model for research on Chagas disease since natural T. cruzi infection in these primates leads to clinical outcomes similar to those observed in humans. However, it is still unknown whether these clinical similarities are accompanied by equivalent immunological characteristics in the two species. We have performed a detailed immunophenotypic analysis of circulating leukocytes together with systems biology approaches from 15 cynomolgus macaques naturally infected with T. cruzi (CH presenting the chronic phase of Chagas disease to identify biomarkers that might be useful for clinical investigations.Our data established that CH displayed increased expression of CD32+ and CD56+ in monocytes and enhanced frequency of NK Granzyme A+ cells as compared to non-infected controls (NI. Moreover, higher expression of CD54 and HLA-DR by T-cells, especially within the CD8+ subset, was the hallmark of CH. A high level of expression of Granzyme A and Perforin underscored the enhanced cytotoxicity-linked pattern of CD8+ T-lymphocytes from CH. Increased frequency of B-cells with up-regulated expression of Fc-γRII was also observed in CH. Complex and imbricate biomarker networks demonstrated that CH showed a shift towards cross-talk among cells of the adaptive immune system. Systems biology analysis further established monocytes and NK-cell phenotypes and the T-cell activation status, along with the Granzyme A expression by CD8+ T-cells, as the most reliable biomarkers of potential use for clinical applications.Altogether, these findings demonstrated that the similarities in phenotypic features of circulating leukocytes observed in cynomolgus macaques and humans infected with T. cruzi further supports the use of these monkeys in preclinical toxicology and pharmacology studies applied to development and testing of new drugs for Chagas disease.

  2. Differential Effects of Tea Extracts on Growth and Cytokine Production by Normal and Leukemic Human Leukocytes

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    Diana Bayer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tea is one of the world’s most highly consumed beverages, second only to water. It is affordable and abundant and thus has great potential for improving health of those in both developed and developing areas. Green, oolong, and black teas differ in the extent of fermentation and types of bioactive polyphenols produced. Green tea and its major polyphenol decrease growth of some cancer cells and effect production of immune system cytokines. This study compares the effects of different types of tea extracts on viability and cytokine production by normal and leukemic human T lymphocytes. Generation of the toxic reactive oxygen species H2O2 by extracts was also examined.Methods: The Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and mitogen-stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used in this study. Cell viability was determined by (3-4,5-dimethylthiamizol-2-yl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and production of interleukin-2 by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Levels of H2O2 generated by tea extracts were determined using the xylenol-orange method.Results: We found that green, oolong, and black tea extracts differentially effect the growth and viability of T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, substantially decreasing both growth and viability of leukemic T lymphocytes and having much lesser effects on their normal counterparts. Tea extracts also had differential effects on the production of the T lymphocyte growth factor interleukin-2, significantly decreasing production by leukemic cells while having only minor effects on normal cells. All three extracts induced H2O2 generation, with green and oolong tea extracts having the greatest effect. Leukemic cells were much more susceptible to growth inhibition and killing by H2O2 than normal lymphocytes.Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(4:72-85 Conclusions: The three tea extracts studied altered leukemic T lymphocyte

  3. Hydrophobic interactions are involved in the inhibition of human leukocyte elastase by alkyltrimethylammonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouadri-Boudjelthia, A; Wallach, J M

    1997-02-01

    Electrostatic forces and hydrophobic interactions had been suggested to modify the adsorption of elastases onto insoluble fibrous elastin, which is the initial stage of elastolysis, but conflicting results had been obtained, and comparison between compounds with different structures was difficult. In order to explore these observations, we have studied the effect of six alkyltrimethylammonium bromides, with alkyl chain length ranging from six to 16 carbon atoms, on human leucocyte elastase activities, either with a synthetic substrate or with insoluble elastin. The enzymatic studies were performed either spectrophotometrically or using conductimetry, and direct binding on to elastin was conductimetrically measured. Binding of the alkyltrimethylammonium salts is increasing with alkyl chain length and we could demonstrate a cooperative binding for tetra- and hexadecyl chains. No effect of the six compounds could be evidenced on hydrolysis of a specific synthetic substrate. With insoluble elastin, elastolysis inhibition could be demonstrated for alkyl chain longer than ten carbon atoms, the effect increasing with chain length. A similar inhibition was observed with the soluble kappa-elastin, but it was less effective. The study shows that the interaction between the alkyltrimethylammonium salts and elastin plays a major role in the inhibitory potency of these molecules. As this effect is enhanced with alkyl chain length, it was concluded that hydrophobic interactions favour their binding, protecting elastin against elastase adsorption.

  4. Association of human leukocyte antigen DRB1 with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies in Saudi patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrogy, Abdullah; Dirar, Abduallah; Alrogy, Waleed; Fakhoury, Hana; Hajeer, Ali

    2017-01-01

    The genetic association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 alleles and the risk of development of autoantibodies has been investigated, but there are few studies from the Gulf region. To investigate the association between the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope and the risk for development of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in a Saudi population. Analytical cross-sectional study. Tertiary care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We enrolled consecutive Saudi RA patients attending the rheumatology clinic between January and April 2015. Previously published data on HLA typing on unmatched healthy controls were used for comparison. HLA typing was performed using sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP). Rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibodies, and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were also measured. Logistic regression analysis was used to study the autoantibodies as possible explanatory variables for the presence of the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope. The association between the presence of the shared epitope and the risk of developing anti-CCP antibodies, ANA, and RF. In 76 patients with RA, carrying the shared epitope was associated with a significantly higher risk of having RA [OR=2.65, 95% CI (1.42-4.94), P=.0009]. However, only HLA-DRB1*04:05 was significantly as.sociated with RA [OR=3.73, 95% CI (1.61-8.96), Pc=.016]. In the logistic regression analysis, only anti-CCP was significantly associated with the shared epitope [OR=14.51, 95% CI (1.53-137.49), P=.02]. Our analysis indicates that the presence of the HLA-DRB1 shared epitope is strongly associated with the development of anti-CCP antibodies in Saudi patients with RA. A larger sample size is needed to confirm our finding.

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Natural Susceptibility in the Chinese Population

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    Ming Yue

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II molecule influences host antigen presentation and anti-viral immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within HLA class II gene were associated with different clinical outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Three HLA class II SNPs (rs3077, rs2395309 and rs2856718 were genotyped by TaqMan assay among Chinese population, including 350 persistent HCV infection patients, 194 spontaneous viral clearance subjects and 973 HCV-uninfected control subjects. After logistic regression analysis, the results indicated that the rs2856718 TC genotype was significantly associated with the protective effect of the HCV natural susceptibility (adjusted OR: 0.712, 95% CI: 0.554–0.914 when compared with reference TT genotype, and this remained significant after false discovery rate (FDR correction (p = 0.024. Moreover, the protective effect of rs2856718 was observed in dominant genetic models (adjusted OR: 0.726, 95% CI: 0.574–0.920, and this remained significant after FDR correction (p = 0.024. In stratified analysis, a significant decreased risk was found in rs2856718C allele in the male subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.627–0.966 and hemodialysis subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.713, 95% CI: 0.552–0.921. Our results indicated that the genetic variations of rs2856718 within the HLA-DQ gene are associated with the natural susceptibility to HCV infection among the Chinese population.

  6. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor.

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    Estefanía García-Guerrero

    Full Text Available Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA through the T-cell receptor (TCR. However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR. In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges.

  7. Archetypal and rearranged sequences of human polyomavirus JC transcription control region in peripheral blood leukocytes and in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappi, S; Azzi, A; De Santis, R; Leoncini, F; Sterrantino, G; Mazzotta, F; Mecocci, L

    1999-04-01

    Two forms of human polyomavirus JC (JCV) genome are known based upon the structure of the transcriptional control region (TCR) of the virus: the archetypal form, which is commonly detected in urine, and the rearranged form, which was first detected in brain tissue from progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) patients. The latter actually includes a group of TCR variants that, relative to the former, are characterized by various deletions and/or duplications. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not a correlation exists among the TCR type, the spreading of the virus within the host and its ability to cause PML. JCV TCR sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from various groups of patients were compared. JCV with archetypal TCR was detected in CSF and PBL specimens from patients without neurological disorders or who eventually received a diagnosis of a non-PML neurological disorder. Rearranged TCR sequences were detected in all the CSF and PBL specimens from PML patients. The high similarity observed between the TCR structure detected in PBL and CSF specimens from individual patients could strengthen the hypothesis that PBL has a role in spreading JCV to the brain. Moreover, heterogeneous TCR patterns have been shown in individual PBL specimens from PML patients. This supports the hypothesis that, in PBL, JCV may replicate and undergo rearrangements of the TCR. The detection of JCV DNA by PCR in CSF independently from PML, although rare, could suggest that this assay is not sufficient for a virological diagnosis of PML. Further studies are required to assess the usefulness of quantitative assays or TCR typing in combination with PCR for diagnostic purposes.

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen Profile in the Zaboli Ethnic Group Living in the South-East Region of Iran

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    Hossein Ali Khazaei

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The human leukocyte antigen has become a key component in investigating the genetic relationships between populations. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of HLA class I and II alleles among Zaboli ethnic group of South-east Iran to establish a database for further investigations on ancestry and the genetic factors contributing to complex diseases in this region.Unrelated individuals from the Southeast geographic location throughout Iran were serologically typed using standard microcytotoxicity assays with commercial and local trays. The ethnic background of each individual was self-defined. HLA profiles were determined in 41 Zaboli populations. The most frequent class I alleles of the Zaboli ethnic group being the following: HLA-A1 (34.1%, -A2 (58.5%, -A11 (29.3%, -A24 (23.9%, -B5 (70.7%, -B16 (26.8%, and -Cw4 (24.4%. The class II alleles more frequently observed in this group were HLA-DR1 (26.8%, -DR2 (26.8%, -DR3 (31.7%, -DR4 (29.3%, -DR7 (24.4%, -DR8 (22%, -DR11 (48.8%, -DRw52 (73.2%, -DRw53 (53.7%, -DQ1 (53.7%, -DQ2 (31.7%, and -DQ3 (29.3%. This report utilized a first study of HLA class I and II typed individuals, from widely dispersed areas of Iran. This will help in studies related to disease associations and cadaver organ allocation programmes.

  9. In vitro detection of DNA damage in human leukocytes induced by combined effect of resin composites and adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marovic, Danijela; Tadin, Antonija; Mladinic, Marin; Juric-Kacunic, Danijela; Galic, Nada

    2014-02-01

    To simultaneously evaluate the genotoxicity of dental composites and adhesive systems in vitro using a cytogenetic assay, with respect to the influence of composite shade. Genotoxicity assessment was carried out in human peripheral blood leukocytes using the comet assay. Three resin composite materials, two microhybrids and one nano-hybrid, in shade A1 and A3.5 were used with manufacturer-recommended four adhesive systems. Cultures were treated for 48 hours with samples after elusion for 1 hour, 1 day, 7 days or 30 days, in two different concentrations (4.16 mg/mL, 8.33 mg/mL). Kruskall-Wallis test was used for the statistical analysis (alpha = 0.05). For combinations of micro-hybrid composite (A3.5) with two self-etch adhesives (16.1 +/- 5.50 and 16.2 +/- 9.52) after exposure to samples eluted for 1 day, the incidence of primary DNA damage was significantly higher than for the corresponding negative control (14.7 +/- 2.85). Genotoxicity was also higher after treatment with samples eluted for 1 hour (15.3 +/- 4.70) and 1 day (15.3 +/- 9.10), comprised of nano-hybrid composite (A1) with self-etch adhesive in relation to the control (13.1 +/- 1.70). There was no clear trend of increased DNA damage in material combinations with darker shades of composites. Material composition and higher material concentrations showed greater influence on the genotoxicity.

  10. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

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    Serena Valsami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization.

  11. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization.

  12. Why natural killer cells are not enough: a further understanding of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alecsandru, Diana; García-Velasco, Juan A

    2017-06-01

    The immune system's role in recurrent reproductive failure is a controversial issue in assisted reproduction. Most studies into immune system implication in reproduction have focused on finding markers of peripheral blood and less on the uterine environment. Peripheral blood natural killer cells have become an "immune study core" for women with recurrent miscarriage or recurrent implantation failure, based on the mistaken notion that they cause reproductive failure by killing or "rejecting" the embryo. Maternal-fetal tolerance begins at the uterine level, so successful adaptation to the fetus occurs after a complicated process. Insufficient uterine lining invasion by an invading extravillous trophoblast is the primary defect in pregnancy disorders such as recurrent miscarriage. This process is regulated by the interaction between maternal killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), expressed by uterine natural killer cells (uNK), and their ligand human leukocyte antigen (HLA) C, expressed by the extravillous trophoblast. Pregnancies are an increased risk of disorders in mothers with KIR AA when the fetus has paternal HLA-C2. A recent report has indicated that the expression of more than one paternal HLA-C by the extravillous trophoblast in assisted reproduction may affect placentation in mothers with KIR AA. This review provides insight into the immune system's role in assisted reproductive treatments. These insights can have an impact on the selection of single-embryo transfer and/or oocyte/sperm donor according to HLA-C in patients with recurrent implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage depending on their KIR haplotype. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced intracellular heat shock protein 70 expression of leukocytes and serum interleukins release: comparison of on-pump and off-pump coronary artery surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yuan; Yang, Tung-Lin; Hong, Gou-Jieng; Li, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Feng-Yen; Tsai, Chien-Sung

    2010-04-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) employing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB; "on-pump" technique) is known to induce a systemic inflammatory response and heat-shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70) expression. The objective of the present study was to investigate the perioperative intracellular HSP70 expression of leukocytes and serum interleukin (IL) release in CABG conducted with both on-pump and off-pump techniques. Thirty-seven patients referred for elective CABG were enrolled in this study. These patients were categorized into the following three groups: on-pump cardioplegic arrest (n = 12); on-pump beating heart (n = 13); and off-pump (n = 12). Blood samples were collected at four time points during the perioperative period. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine the serum level of IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, and HSP70. Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular HSP70 was performed in populations of lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes. The clinical outcomes were comparable among the three groups. Elevated serum IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 were found in all three groups during the perioperative period. Serum HSP70 was elevated in all three groups and was significantly lower in the off-pump group than in the on-pump cardioplegic arrest and on-pump beating-heart groups. Heat shock protein-70 expression was found in leukocytes and showed a faster response in monocytes and granulocytes than in lymphocytes. The inflammatory response in the off-pump group was less than in either of the on-pump groups. During the perioperative period, activation of inflammatory response was associated with enhanced expression of HSP70 within leukocytes in CABG patients.

  14. Lipidomic evidence that lowering the typical dietary palmitate to oleate ratio in humans decreases the leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kien, C Lawrence; Bunn, Janice Y; Fukagawa, Naomi K; Anathy, Vikas; Matthews, Dwight E; Crain, Karen I; Ebenstein, David B; Tarleton, Emily K; Pratley, Richard E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported that lowering the high, habitual palmitic acid (PA) intake in ovulating women improved insulin sensitivity and both inflammatory and oxidative stress. In vitro studies indicate that PA can activate both cell membrane toll-like receptor-4 and the intracellular nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptor protein (NLRP3). To gain further insight into the relevance to human metabolic disease of dietary PA, we studied healthy, lean and obese adults enrolled in a randomized, crossover trial comparing 3-week, high-PA (HPA) and low-PA/high-oleic-acid (HOA) diets. After each diet, both hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivities were measured, and we assessed cytokine concentrations in plasma and in supernatants derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as well as proinflammatory gene expression in skeletal muscle. Insulin sensitivity was unaffected by diet. Plasma concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α was higher during the HPA diet. Lowering the habitually high PA intake by feeding the HOA diet resulted in lower secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α by PBMCs, as well as lower relative mRNA expression of cJun and NLRP3 in muscle. Principal components analysis of 156 total variables coupled to analysis of covariance indicated that the mechanistic pathway for the differential dietary effects on PBMCs involved changes in the PA/OA ratio of tissue lipids. Our results indicate that lowering the dietary and tissue lipid PA/OA ratio resulted in lower leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes, but the relevance to diabetes risk is uncertain.

  15. Bryostatins activate protein kinase C in intact human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.B.; Tallant, E.A.; Pettit, G.R.; Wallace, R.W.

    1986-05-01

    Bryostatins, macrocyclic lactones isolated from a marine bryozoan, have antineoplastic activity in the P388 lymphocytic leukemia system. These compounds also stimulate growth in Swiss 3T3 cells, induce secretion in leukocytes, inhibit phorbol dibutyrate binding to a high affinity receptor, and activate the C-kinase in vitro. In human platelets, phorbol esters induce aggregation and activate protein kinase C, resulting in phosphorylation of a 47K protein and the 20K myosin light chain. The authors now show that bryostatin 7 (B-7) triggers platelet aggregation to the same rate and extent as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). B-7 also causes the in vivo activation of the C-kinase, resulting in phosphorylation of both the 47K and the 20K proteins; the time courses and dose-responses of these B-7-induced phosphorylations were similar to those found with PMA. In addition, B-7 increases the level of /sup 32/P-incorporation into the platelet polyphosphoinositides, which also occurs in response to PMA. Bryostatin 3 (B-3), which has been shown to be much less potent than B-7 in mimicking other PMA effects, was much less effective than PMA or B-7 in inducing platelet aggregation and in stimulating /sup 32/P-incorporation into both proteins and the phosphoinositides. These results demonstrate that, intact human platelets, bryostatins mimic the phorbol esters tumor promoters and directly activate protein kinase C.

  16. Human leukocyte antigen-DP loci are associated with the persistent infection of hepatitis B virus in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Yun; ZHANG Dong-Hua; JIN Gen-Di; GONG Qi-Ming; ZHANG Xin-Xin; LIAO Xiang-Wei; LI Xin-Hua; HAN Yue; YANG Zhi-Tao; KONG Xiao-Fei; GU Lei-Lei; YU De-Ming; YAO Bi-Lian

    2012-01-01

    A genome-wide association study recently showed that genetic variants in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DP loci were strongly associated with a risk of persistent infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Japanese and Thai individuals and variants in interleukin 28B (IL-28B) have been associated with responses to anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment.The aim of this study was to investigate whether the HLA-DP loci and IL-28B were associated with different outcomes of chronic HBV infection (CHB) in Chinese subjects.The rs9277535 near HLA-DPB1,rs3077 near HLA-DPA1,and rs12979860 near IL-28B were genotyped by direct sequencing in 185 CHB patients and 193 self-limited hepatitis B virus (SLHBV)-infected subjects who recovered from HBV infection.The rs9277535 near HLA-DPB1 was strongly associated with CHB ( P =0.000018 1,OR =1.905).This association was observed independent of HBV e antigen (HBeAg) status and HBV viral loads in HBeAg-positive CHB patients (P =0.0004,OR =1.956),in HBeAg-negative CHB patients (P =0.000 9,OR =1.857),and in HBeAg-negative CHB individuals without detectable levels of HBV DNA in serum ( P =0.001 1,OR =2.05).The rs3077 near HLA-DPA1 was associated with CHB (P =0.020 6,OR =0.686 5) and HBeAg-positive CHB infection status ( P =0.014 3,OR =0.604 7).Meanwhile,a genetic variation of insertion-deletion (INDEL) polymorphism (rs361527,-/ATAAATGTTGA) near HLA-DPA1 was found to be associated with CHB (P =0.030 7,OR =0.702 8)and HBeAg-positive CHB infection status (P =0.023 3,OR =0.619).However,the rs12979860 genotype near IL-28B had no correlation with CHB.This study demonstrated that in the Han Chinese populations,HLA-DP loci,but not IL-28B,were associated with persistence of infection in different outcomes of HBVinfected patients; however,the mechanism needs to be further investigated.

  17. Human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles and cervical adenocarcinoma: a pooled analysis of two epidemiologic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh eSafaeian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C and class II (DRB1 and DQB1 loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC, a less common but aggressive histologic subtype.We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US cervical cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n=630 ADC; n=775 controls. Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC (DRB1*13:01 (OR=0.61; 95%CI:0.41-0.93, DRB1*13:02 (OR=0.49; 95%CI:0.31-0.77, and DQB1*06:03 (OR=0.64; 95%CI:0.42-0.95; one was associated with increased risk (B*07:02(OR=1.39; 95%CI:1.07-1.79. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.46; 95%CI: 0.27-0.78 was associated with decreased risk of ADC and C*07:02 (OR=1.41; 95%CI:1.09-1.81 was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR=1.33; 95%CI:1.01-1.76 and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.41; 95%CI:0.21-0.80. Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing finding was the difference in risk associated with several alleles restricted to HPV16 or HPV18 related tumors, consistent with the hypothesis that HLA recognition is HPV type specific.

  18. Low expression of soluble human leukocyte antigen G in early gestation and subsequent placenta-mediated complications of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marozio, Luca; Garofalo, Anna; Berchialla, Paola; Tavella, Anna Maria; Salton, Loredana; Cavallo, Franco; Benedetto, Chiara

    2017-07-10

    Abnormal placentation is a common pathogenic mechanism of many placenta-mediated complications of late pregnancy, including pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction, stillbirth, and placental abruption. During successful placentation, the trophoblast (which is a semi-allograft) is not rejected by decidual immune cells because of maternal immune tolerance, mainly induced by human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G). Deficient HLA-G expression seems to be associated with the development of complications of pregnancy. The aim of this study was to determine whether low soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels in maternal blood at the beginning of pregnancy may be associated with subsequent placenta-mediated complications. For this retrospective case-control study, 117 cases of placenta-mediated complications of pregnancy and 234 controls with uneventful pregnancy were selected. Plasma sHLA-G levels were measured at 11-13 weeks' gestation by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method in blood samples previously obtained at first-trimester prenatal screening for chromosomal fetal abnormalities. Women who subsequently developed placenta-mediated complications had significantly lower sHLA-G levels at the beginning of pregnancy (median, 43.08 IU/mL) than controls (median, 49.10 IU/mL; P = 0.008). An sHLA-G level lower than 43.50 IU/mL at the end of the first trimester was associated with a twofold increased risk of developing a pregnancy complication (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.73). The strongest association, although only moderately strong, was observed with severe pre-eclampsia (odds ratio, 2.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-6.56). Placenta-mediated complications of pregnancy may be associated with low sHLA-G levels in the first trimester, suggesting a potential role of sHLA-G in the early stages of placentation. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) micropolymorphism on ligand specificity within the HLA-B*41 allotypic family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bade-Döding, Christina; Theodossis, Alex; Gras, Stephanie; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Seltsam, Axel; Huyton, Trevor; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Blasczyk, Rainer (Springe); (Hannover-MED); (Monash); (Melbourne)

    2011-09-28

    Polymorphic differences between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules affect the specificity and conformation of their bound peptides and lead to differential selection of the T-cell repertoire. Mismatching during allogeneic transplantation can, therefore, lead to immunological reactions. We investigated the structure-function relationships of six members of the HLA-B*41 allelic group that differ by six polymorphic amino acids, including positions 80, 95, 97 and 114 within the antigen-binding cleft. Peptide-binding motifs for B*41:01, *41:02, *41:03, *41:04, *41:05 and *41:06 were determined by sequencing self-peptides from recombinant B*41 molecules by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 bound to a natural 16-mer self-ligand (AEMYGSVTEHPSPSPL) and HLA-B*41:04 bound to a natural 11-mer self-ligand (HEEAVSVDRVL) were solved. Peptide analysis revealed that all B*41 alleles have an identical anchor motif at peptide position 2 (glutamic acid), but differ in their choice of C-terminal p{Omega} anchor (proline, valine, leucine). Additionally, B*41:04 displayed a greater preference for long peptides (>10 residues) when compared to the other B*41 allomorphs, while the longest peptide to be eluted from the allelic group (a 16mer) was obtained from B*41:03. The crystal structures of HLA-B*41:03 and HLA-B*41:04 revealed that both alleles interact in a highly conserved manner with the terminal regions of their respective ligands, while micropolymorphism-induced changes in the steric and electrostatic properties of the antigen-binding cleft account for differences in peptide repertoire and auxiliary anchoring. Differences in peptide repertoire, and peptide length specificity reflect the significant functional evolution of these closely related allotypes and signal their importance in allogeneic transplantation, especially B*41:03 and B*41:04, which accommodate longer peptides, creating structurally distinct peptide

  20. Outcomes of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in patients from human leukocyte antigen matched or mismatched unrelated donors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Tingting; Li Yanfen; Wang Quanshun; Li Honghua; Bo Jian; Zhao Yu; Jing Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background Allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from unrelated donors (UR-PBSCT) is an alternative treatment for many hematologic diseases due to lack of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donors.This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the degree of the HLA match on the clinical efficacy of UR-PBSCT.Methods Patients who underwent UR-PBSCT from September 2003 to September 2012 were retrospectively investigated.They were divided into three groups according to high-resolution molecular typing.SPSS version 17.0 was used to analysis and compare the statistics of engraftment,incidence of GVHD,other complications and survival among the groups.Results One hundred and eleven patients received UR-PBSCT,60 of them with an HLA matched donor (10/10),36 of them with a one locus mismatched donor (9/10),and 15 of them with a two loci mismatched donor (8/10).Similar basic characteristics were found in the three groups.No differences were found in engraftment of myeloid cells or platelets in the three groups (P>0.05).Two-year cumulative incidence of relapse,overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) among those three groups were similar (P>0.05).The cumulative incidence of 100-day Ⅲ-Ⅳ aGVHD in the HLA matched group and the one HLA locus mismatched group were significantly lower than that in the two HLA loci mismatched group (3.3%,8.6%,and 26.7%,P=0.009).The occurrence rate of new pulmonary infections in the HLA matched group was lower than in the two HLA mismatched groups (26.67%,52.78%,and 41.18%,P=0.035).The cumulative incidence of 100-day and 2-year transplantation related mortality (TRM) in two HLA loci mismatched group was higher than in the HLA matched group and in the one HLA locus mismatched group,(8.4%,11.8% and 33.3%,P=0.016) and (12.3%,18.7% and 47.5%,P=0.002).Conclusions HLA mismatch will not significantly impact the engraftment or 2-year survival after UR-PBSCT,but two mismatched HLA loci may

  1. Prevalence of human leukocyte antigen DQA1 and DQB1 alleles in Kuwaiti Arab children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, M Z; Shaltout, A; Alsaeid, K; Qabazard, M; Dorman, J

    1999-12-01

    The prevalence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1 and DQA1 alleles has been determined in 78 Kuwaiti Arab children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and in 57 normal healthy controls with similar ethnic background. The typing of HLA-DQ alleles was carried out using an allele-specific DNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) SSP method. DR typing was also performed in 212 control subjects using PCR-SSP (sequence specific primer) method. A significantly higher frequency of DQB1*0201 allele was found in IDDM cases compared to the controls (p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the prevalence of DQB1 alleles *0302, *0501, and *0602 between IDDM cases and the controls. In contrast, DQB1 alleles *0301, *0402, *0502, *0602, and *0603 were represented at a somewhat higher frequency in controls compared to the IDDM cohort. The frequency of DQA1 allele *0301, which encode for an Arg at codon 52, was significantly higher in the IDDM patients compared to the controls (p<0.001). The frequency of DQA1 allele *0302 was also higher in IDDM cases than controls (p = 0.034) but the difference was less pronounced than DQA1*0301. Amongst the Arg52 alleles, no significant difference was detected in the frequency of *0401 between IDDM cases and the controls and the allele *0501 was detected only in controls. For non-Arg52 alleles *0103, *0104, and *0201, the differences in the two groups were not significant, with the exception of allele *0104 (p = 0.024). DR3 was the most common type in the Kuwaiti general population (28%) and DRB1*0301 was detected in 41% of the individuals with DR3 specificity. Analysis of HLA-DQBI/DQA1 haplotypes from IDDM cases and controls revealed a significantly high frequency of haplotype DQA1*0301/DQB1*0201 between Kuwaiti IDDM cases (49/78, 63%) and the controls (8/57, 14%).

  2. Comparative case control study of clinical features and human leukocyte antigen susceptibility between familial and nonfamilial vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misri Rachita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various studies worldwide suggest that human leukocyte antigen (HLA region may be involved in the genetic susceptibility of vitiligo but little information is available from India. Aim: To find the HLA associated susceptibility to develop vitiligo in Indian patients and to detect role of HLA in familial vitiligo. Methods: This was a case controlled study which included all patients suffering from vitiligo over a period of one and half years. Clinical details were noted and sera collected from these patients were screened for the presence of HLA class I antibodies. The clinical features and HLA antigens were assessed and comparison was made between patients with familial and nonfamilial vitiligo. Results: Out of 114 patients studied, 84 had family history and 30 had no family history. Patients with family history of vitiligo have higher chances of acquiring vitiligo if first degree relatives are affected compared to if second degree relatives are affected. Family history of vitiligo is associated with an early onset of vitiligo (< 20 years. There was no statistically significant difference in the type, stability, and severity of vitiligo in both the groups. HLA results in both the groups revealed increase in HLA A2, A11, A31, A33, B17, B35, B40, and B44 alleles while HLA A9, B13, and B53 alleles were decreased. Family history was associated with HLA A2, A28, A31, and B44 alleles. Early onset of vitiligo (< 20 years was significantly associated with HLA A2, A11, B17, B35, and B44 alleles. The patients with severe affection (> 10% area showed in significant association with HLA A10 and B8. Conclusion: Family history of vitiligo is associated with an early onset of vitiligo. There is no correlation of family history with the type of vitiligo, stability of lesions, and areas involved. Severity is not associated with family history. Apart from other alleles, alleles A2, and B44 play a significant role in vitiligo in the Indian patients.

  3. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B;

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...

  4. Applying generalized hydrophobicity scale of amino acids to quantitative prediction of human leukocyte antigen-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Peng; TIAN Feifei; ZHANG Mengjun; LI Zhiliang

    2006-01-01

    Derived from 149 hydrophobic factors of 20 natural amino acids, a novel amino acid descriptor termed as generalized hydrophobicity scale (GH-scale) was proposed by principal component analysis (PCA). Via genetic algorithm-partial least square (GPLS) method, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was constructed by GH-scale for 152 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes with the model estimated and cross-validated correlative coefficients of R2 = 0.813 and Q2 = 0.725, respectively. It was indicated that hydrophobic interaction played an important role in HLA-A*0201-CTL interaction, prominently at anchor residues.

  5. Production of tumor necrosis factors alpha and beta by human mononuclear leukocytes stimulated with mitogens, bacteria, and malarial parasites.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrante, A; Staugas, R E; Rowan-Kelly, B; Bresatz, S; Kumaratilake, L M; Rzepczyk, C M; Adolf, G R

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factors alpha and beta (TNF-alpha and TNF-beta) are multifaceted polypeptide cytokines which may mediate some of the significant changes in cellular homeostasis which accompany the invasion of the mammalian host by viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Although it is well established that bacterial lipopolysaccharide is a potent inducer of TNF-alpha, there is still very little known of the types of agents which can trigger the production of TNFs in mononuclear leukocytes. Using an ...

  6. Activation of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase by Myocardial Ischemia and Coronary Reperfusion in Human Circulating Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Tóth-Zsámboki, Emese; Horváth, Eszter; Vargova, Katarina; Pankotai, Eszter; Murthy, Kanneganti; Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna; Bárány, Tamás; Pék, Tamás; Fekete, Katalin; Kiss, Róbert Gábor; Préda, István; Lacza, Zsombor; Gerö, Domokos; SzabÓ, Csaba

    2006-01-01

    Reactive free radical and oxidant production leads to DNA damage during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. Consequent overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) promotes cellular energy deficit and necrosis. We hypothesized that PARP is activated in circulating leukocytes in patients with myocardial infarction and reperfusion during primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In 15 patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction, before and after primary PCI and 2...

  7. Towards hemerythrin-based blood substitutes: Comparative performance to hemoglobin on human leukocytes and umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eva Fischer-Fodor; Augustin Mot; Florina Deac; Mariann Arkosi; Radu Silaghi-Dumitrescu

    2011-06-01

    Hemerythrin is a dioxygen-carrying protein whose oxidative/nitrosative stress-related reactivity is lower than that of hemoglobin, which may warrant investigation of hemerythrin as raw material for artificial oxygen carriers (‘blood substitutes’). We report here the first biological tests for hemerythrin and its chemical derivatives, comparing their performance with that of a representative competitor, glutaraldehyde-polymerized bovine hemoglobin. Hemerythrin (native or derivatized) exhibits a proliferative effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) cultures, as opposed to a slight inhibitory effect of hemoglobin. A similar positive effect is displayed on human lymphocytes by glutaraldehyde-polymerized hemerythrin, but not by native or polyethylene glycol-derivatized hemerythrin.

  8. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Man

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells that functionally express blood brain barrier (BBB properties are useful surrogates for studying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions at the BBB. In this study, we compared two different endothelial cellular models: transfected human brain microvascular endothelial cells (THBMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. With each grow under optimal conditions, confluent THBMEC cultures showed continuous occludin and ZO-1 immunoreactivity, while HUVEC cultures exhibited punctate ZO-1 expression at sites of cell-cell contact only. Confluent THBMEC cultures on 24-well collagen-coated transwell inserts had significantly higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower solute permeability than HUVECs. Confluent THBMECs were more restrictive for mononuclear cell migration than HUVECs. Only THBMECs utilized abluminal CCL5 to facilitate T-lymphocyte migration in vitro although both THBMECs and HUVECs employed CCL3 to facilitate T cell migration. These data establish baseline conditions for using THBMECs to develop in vitro BBB models for studying leukocyte-endothelial interactions during neuroinflammation.

  9. Human leukocyte antigen-DRB1*1101 correlates with less severe hepatitis in Taiwanese male carriers of hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Hu, Chung-Yi; Chen, Chi-Lin; Liao, Ya-Tang; Liu, Chun-Jen; Lai, Ming-Yang; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yang, Sien-Sing; Hu, Jui-Ting; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2009-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules are associated with host immune responses against hepatitis B virus infection. Male gender is the apparent host factor when someone encounters with the severity of hepatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the most polymorphic HLA class II allele, human leukocyte antigen-DRB1, with the severity of hepatitis in male carriers of hepatitis B virus. In this prospective cohort study, a total of 204 carriers of hepatitis B virus (131 men and 73 women) who have been followed-up for more than 1 year at the outpatient clinic of a university hospital were collected consecutively. Fifty carriers of hepatitis B virus (group I) with alanine aminotransferase /=2x upper limit of normal (mean follow-up 81.3 months). Alleles of HLA-DRB1 were typed by the polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide probe hybridization and genotypes of hepatitis B virus by melting curve analysis. HLA-DRB1*1101 was found in 18% of group I versus 8% of group II in male carriers (OR 0.23, P = 0.020, after adjustment for age) and 4% versus 9.4% in female carriers (P = 0.094). In male carriers harboring DRB1*1101, the distribution of hepatitis B viral genotype was comparable between the two groups. HLA-DRB1*1101 correlates with less severe hepatitis in Taiwanese male carriers of hepatitis B virus.

  10. Leukocyte Counts, Myeloperoxidase, and Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein A as Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Disease: Towards a Multi-Biomarker Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. I. Lobbes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated leukocyte counts and levels of CRP, fibrinogen, MPO, and PAPP-A in patients with stable and unstable angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction, and healthy controls. All biomarkers were analyzed again after 6 months. Leukocyte counts and concentrations of fibrinogen, CRP, MPO, and PAPP-A were significantly increased in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Leukocyte counts and concentrations of MPO were significantly increased in patients with unstable angina pectoris compared with controls. After 6 months, leukocyte counts and MPO concentrations were still increased in patients with acute myocardial infarction when compared to controls. Discriminant analysis showed that leukocyte counts, MPO, and PAPP-A concentrations classified study group designation for acute coronary events correctly in 83% of the cases. In conclusion, combined assessment of leukocyte counts, MPO, and PAPP-A was able to correctly classify acute coronary events, suggesting that this could be a promising panel for a multibiomarker approach to assess cardiovascular risk.

  11. Genetic variation in TERT and TERC and human leukocyte telomere length and longevity: a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Thinggaard, Mikael; Nygaard, Marianne;

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase is of key importance for telomere maintenance, and variants of the genes encoding its major subunits, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA component (TERC), are candidates for interindividual variation in telomere length. Recently, the two SNPs rs3772190 and rs......12696304 in the TERC locus were reported to be associated with leukocyte telomere length (LTL) in two genome-wide association studies, while one haplotype of TERT (rs2853669, rs2736098, rs33954691, and rs2853691) has been reported to be associated with both LTL and longevity in a candidate gene study...

  12. Hesperidin displays relevant role in the nutrigenomic effect of orange juice on blood leukocytes in human volunteers: a randomized controlled cross-over study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Milenkovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed, in healthy, middle-aged, moderately overweight men, that orange juice decreases diastolic blood pressure and significantly improves postprandial microvascular endothelial reactivity and that hesperidin could be causally linked to the observed beneficial effect of orange juice. The objective was to determine the effect of chronic consumption of orange juice on the gene expression profile of leukocytes in healthy volunteers and to assess to what extent hesperidin is involved in the effect of orange juice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Volunteers were included in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Throughout three 4-week periods, volunteers consumed daily: 500 ml orange juice, 500 ml control drink plus hesperidin or 500 ml control drink and placebo. Blood samplings were performed on 10 overnight-fasted subjects after the 4-week treatment period. Global gene expression profiles were determined using human whole genome cDNA microarrays. Both orange juice and hesperidin consumption significantly affected leukocyte gene expression. Orange juice consumption induced changes in expression of, 3,422 genes, while hesperidin intake modulated the expression of 1,819 genes. Between the orange juice and hesperidin consumption groups, 1,582 regulated genes were in common. Many of these genes are implicated in chemotaxis, adhesion, infiltration and lipid transport, which is suggestive of lower recruitment and infiltration of circulating cells to vascular wall and lower lipid accumulation. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that regular consumption of orange juice for 4 weeks alters leukocyte gene expression to an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic profile, and hesperidin displays a relevant role in the genomic effect of this beverage. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00983086.

  13. Metallothionein mediates leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynes Michael A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metallothionein (MT is a cysteine-rich, metal-binding protein that can be induced by a variety of agents. Modulation of MT levels has also been shown to alter specific immune functions. We have noticed that the MT genes map close to the chemokines Ccl17 and Cx3cl1. Cysteine motifs that characterize these chemokines are also found in the MT sequence suggesting that MT might also act as a chemotactic factor. Results In the experiments reported here, we show that immune cells migrate chemotactically in the presence of a gradient of MT. This response can be specifically blocked by two different monoclonal anti-MT antibodies. Exposure of cells to MT also leads to a rapid increase in F-actin content. Incubation of Jurkat T cells with cholera toxin or pertussis toxin completely abrogates the chemotactic response to MT. Thus MT may act via G-protein coupled receptors and through the cyclic AMP signaling pathway to initiate chemotaxis. Conclusion These results suggest that, under inflammatory conditions, metallothionein in the extracellular environment may support the beneficial movement of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. MT may therefore represent a "danger signal"; modifying the character of the immune response when cells sense cellular stress. Elevated metallothionein produced in the context of exposure to environmental toxicants, or as a result of chronic inflammatory disease, may alter the normal chemotactic responses that regulate leukocyte trafficking. Thus, MT synthesis may represent an important factor in immunomodulation that is associated with autoimmune disease and toxicant exposure.

  14. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  15. Insight into bacterial virulence mechanisms against host immune response via the Yersinia pestis-human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiying; Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Jian; Tan, Yafang; Myeni, Sebenzile K; Li, Dong; Shi, Qinghai; Yan, Yanfeng; Chen, Hui; Guo, Zhaobiao; Yuan, Yanzhi; Yang, Xiaoming; Yang, Ruifu; Du, Zongmin

    2011-11-01

    A Yersinia pestis-human protein interaction network is reported here to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. Up to 204 interactions between 66 Y. pestis bait proteins and 109 human proteins were identified by yeast two-hybrid assay and then combined with 23 previously published interactions to construct a protein-protein interaction network. Topological analysis of the interaction network revealed that human proteins targeted by Y. pestis were significantly enriched in the proteins that are central in the human protein-protein interaction network. Analysis of this network showed that signaling pathways important for host immune responses were preferentially targeted by Y. pestis, including the pathways involved in focal adhesion, regulation of cytoskeleton, leukocyte transendoepithelial migration, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Cellular pathways targeted by Y. pestis are highly relevant to its pathogenesis. Interactions with host proteins involved in focal adhesion and cytoskeketon regulation pathways could account for resistance of Y. pestis to phagocytosis. Interference with TLR and MAPK signaling pathways by Y. pestis reflects common characteristics of pathogen-host interaction that bacterial pathogens have evolved to evade host innate immune response by interacting with proteins in those signaling pathways. Interestingly, a large portion of human proteins interacting with Y. pestis (16/109) also interacted with viral proteins (Epstein-Barr virus [EBV] and hepatitis C virus [HCV]), suggesting that viral and bacterial pathogens attack common cellular functions to facilitate infections. In addition, we identified vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a novel interaction partner of YpkA and showed that YpkA could inhibit in vitro actin assembly mediated by VASP.

  16. The human leukocyte antigen G promotes trophoblast fusion and β-hCG production through the Erk1/2 pathway in human choriocarcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ji-meng [School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhao, Hong-xi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038 (China); Wang, Li [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China); Gao, Zhi-ying, E-mail: gaozy301@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China); Yao, Yuan-qing, E-mail: yqyao@126.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HLA-G expression promotes BeWo cells fusion and fusogenic gene expression. •HLA-G is capable of inducing β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cell lines. •Up-regulation of β-hCG production by HLA-G is mediated via the Erk1/2 pathway. -- Abstract: The human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is expressed on the fetal–maternal interface and plays a role in protecting fetal-derived trophoblasts from the maternal immune response, allowing trophoblasts to invade the uterus. However, HLA-G also possesses immune suppressing-independent functions. We found that HLA-G expressing BeWo choriocarcinoma cells increased cell–cell fusion compared to control BeWo cells under forskolin treatment. Regardless of forskolin treatment, the expression of fusogenic gene mRNAs, including syncytin-1, the transcription factor glial cell missing 1 (Gcm1), and beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) were elevated. HLA-G up-regulates β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cells because HLA-G knockdown in JEG-3 cells induces a dramatic decrease in β-hCG compared with control cells. The defect in β-hCG production in HLA-G knocked-down cells could not be completely overcome by stimulating hCG production through increasing intracellular cAMP levels. HLA-G expressing cells have increased phosphorylation levels for extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) in BeWo cells. The Erk1/2 pathway is inactivated after the inhibition of HLA-G expression in JEG-3 cells. Finally, Erk1/2 inhibition was able to suppress the increased hCG production induced by HLA-G expression. Together, these data suggest novel roles for HLA-G in regulating β-hCG production via the modulation of the Erk1/2 pathway and by inducing trophoblast cell fusion.

  17. Expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase in human granulocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annahita SALLMYR; Anna MILLER; Aida GABDOULKHAKOVA; Valentina SAFRONOVA; Gunnel HENRIKSSON; Anders BREDBERG

    2004-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have been reported to completely lack of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) which is composed of Ku protein and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs, needed for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. Promyelocytic HL-60 cells express a variant form of Ku resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. This raises the question if low efficiency of NHEJ, instrumental for the cellular repair of oxidative damage, is a normal characteristic of myeloid differentiation. Here we confirmed the complete lack of DNAPK in P MN protein extracts, and the expression of the truncated Ku86 variant form in HL-60. However, this degradation of DNA-PK was shown to be due to a DNA-PK-degrading protease in PMN and HL-60. In addition, by using a protease-resistant whole cell assay, both Ku86 and DNA-PKcs could be demonstrated in PMN, suggesting the previously reported absence in PMN of DNA-PK to be an artefact. The levels of Ku86 and DNA-PKcs were much reduced in PMN, as compared with that of the lymphocytes, whereas HL-60 displayed a markedly elevated DNA-PK concentration.In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of reduced, not depleted expression of DNA-PK during the mature stages of myeloid differentiation.

  18. Phagocytic and oxidative-burst activity of blood leukocytes in rats fed a protein-free diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Winnicka, Anna; Chwalibog, André

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two weeks' protein deprivation on the cellular parameters of non-specific immunity in rats. Wistar rats (200-250 g) were divided into two groups (2x12) and were fed two isoenergetic (control and protein-free) diets. The phagocytic activity...... or blood morphology. However, the oxidative burst of stimulated neutrophils was increased indicating that two weeks' protein deprivation does not depress the oxygen-dependent killing mechanism in neutrophils, but may lead to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species....

  19. Phagocytic and oxidative-burst activity of blood leukocytes in rats fed a protein-free diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sawosz, Ewa; Winnicka, Anna; Chwalibog, André;

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two weeks' protein deprivation on the cellular parameters of non-specific immunity in rats. Wistar rats (200-250 g) were divided into two groups (2x12) and were fed two isoenergetic (control and protein-free) diets. The phagocytic activit...... or blood morphology. However, the oxidative burst of stimulated neutrophils was increased indicating that two weeks' protein deprivation does not depress the oxygen-dependent killing mechanism in neutrophils, but may lead to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species....

  20. Leukocyte-Reduced Platelet-Rich Plasma Alters Protein Expression of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Markus; Lang, Siegmund; Hanke, Alexander; Herrmann, Marietta; Huber, Michaela; Brockhoff, Gero; Klein, Silvan; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter; Prantl, Lukas; Gehmert, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Application of platelet-rich plasma and stem cells has become important in regenerative medicine. Recent literature supports the use of platelet-rich plasma as a cell culture media supplement to stimulate proliferation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The underlying mechanism of proliferation stimulation by platelet-rich plasma has not been investigated so far. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in α-minimal essential medium supplemented with platelet-rich plasma or fetal calf serum. Cell proliferation was assessed with cell cycle kinetics using flow cytometric analyses after 48 hours. Differences in proteome expression of the adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were analyzed using a reverse-phase protein array to quantify 214 proteins. Complementary Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis were performed using protein data, and confirmed by Western blot analysis. A higher percentage of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the S phase in the presence of platelet-rich plasma advocates the proliferation stimulation. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis confirm the involvement of the selected proteins in the process of cell growth and proliferation. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed a participation in the top-ranked canonical pathways PI3K/AKT, PTEN, ILK, and IGF-1. Gene set enrichment analysis identified the authors' protein set as being part of significantly regulated protein sets with the focus on cell cycle, metabolism, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway. The present study provides evidence that platelet-rich plasma stimulates proliferation and induces a unique change in the proteomic profile of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The interpretation of altered expression of regulatory proteins represents a step forward toward achieving good manufacturing practice-compliant criteria

  1. The human leukocyte antigen genotype has a modest effect on the insulin gene polymorphism-associated susceptibility to type 1 diabetes in the Finnish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, A P; Hermann, R; Knip, M; Simell, O; Akerblom, H K; Ilonen, J

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the known human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-associated risk, polymorphisms of insulin gene region show association with type 1 diabetes. We analyzed possible interactions between the HLA class II genotypes and -2221 MspI (insulin) INS gene polymorphism in Finnish population, using a series of 1331 diabetic children and 2222 healthy newborns. C/C genotype was increased among diabetic children compared to the controls (83.2 vs 70.1%). This genotype was slightly more common in diabetic children with low or moderate HLA-associated risk than in those with high risk, but INS gene effect was clear in all major HLA-risk genotypes and, thus, can be used as an additional risk prediction marker, irrespective of HLA genotypes.

  2. Two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence for label-free in vivo imaging ingestion of disease-causing bacteria by human leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-02-01

    Real time and in vivo monitoring leukocyte behavior provides unique information to understand the physiological and pathological process of infection. In this study, we demonstrate that two-photon excited reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence provides imaging contrast to distinguish granulocyte and agranulocyte. By using spectral and time-resolved NADH fluorescence, we study the immune response of human neutrophils against bacterial infection (Escherichia coli). The two-photon excited NADH fluorescence images clearly review the morphological changes from resting neutrophils (round shape) to activated neutrophils (ruffle shape) during phagocytosis. The free-tobound NADH ratio of neutrophils decreases after ingesting disease-causing pathogen: Escherichia coli. This finding may provide a new optical tool to investigate inflammatory processes by using NADH fluorescence in vivo.

  3. Up-regulation of Human Leukocyte Antigen G Expression in Primary Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma Associated with Host-vs-tumor Immune Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianfeng FANG; Xuxin ZHANG; Jiawen LI

    2008-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is one of the molecules implicated in immunotolerance. To investigate the role of HLA-G in primary cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM), a series of 47 skin melanocytic lesions were immunohistochemicaily evaluated. The correlation between HLA-G expression and CMM clinicohistopahtologicai data and Bcl-2 expression was also analyzed.HLA-G expression was detected in a variety of cell types. No significant difference in HLA-G expression was observed between malignant and non-malignant melanocytic lesions. HLA-G expres- sion was significantly correlated with the inflammatory infiltration and Bel-2 expression, whereas no significant correlation with ulceration, tumor thickness, clinical stage, histopathologicai subtypes were observed. HLA-G expression may be the result of host immune reaction in tumor microenvi- ronment rather than a malignant feature of CMM.

  4. Whole blood transcriptional profiling reveals significant down-regulation of human leukocyte antigen class I and II genes in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Thomassen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiling studies in the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms have revealed significant deregulation of several immune and inflammation genes that might be of importance for clonal evolution due to defective tumor immune surveillance. Other mechanisms might...... be down-regulation of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I and II genes, which are used by tumor cells to escape antitumor T-cell-mediated immune responses. We have performed whole blood transcriptional profiling of genes encoding human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, β2-microglobulin...... treatment with epigenome modulating agents (DNA-hypomethylators and DNA-hyperacetylators [histone deacetylase inhibitors]) and interferon-α2, our findings call for prospective transcriptional studies of HLA genes during treatment with these agents....

  5. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Stordal, Ketil; Hansen, Tine Plato

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  6. Bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors: the impact of mismatches with substitutions at position 116 of the human leukocyte antigen class I heavy chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, G B; Bacigalupo, A; Lamparelli, T; Lanino, E; Delfino, L; Morabito, A; Parodi, A M; Pera, C; Pozzi, S; Sormani, M P; Bruzzi, P; Bordo, D; Bolognesi, M; Bandini, G; Bontadini, A; Barbanti, M; Frumento, G

    2001-11-15

    The hypothesis was tested that amino acid substitutions in specific positions within human leukocyte antigen class I heavy chain would have different impacts on transplant-related mortality (TRM) in patients receiving transplanted bone marrow from unrelated donors. One hundred patients and their unrelated donors were typed by sequence-based typing for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, and -C loci. All pairs were matched for DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, and DQB1 loci. Forty pairs were also matched at class I, and 60 pairs had one or more mismatches at class I loci. It was found that substitutions at positions 116 and 114 of class I heavy chain significantly increased the risk for TRM in univariate and bivariate Cox analyses. Conversely, no association between number of multiple mismatches or number of amino acid substitutions and TRM was seen when positions 116 and 114 were adjusted for. Variables predictive of TRM in multivariate Cox analysis were number of cells infused, diagnosis (chronic myeloid leukemia [CML] or non-CML), and amino acid substitution at position 116 or 152. The only variable predictive of severe acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in multivariate Cox analysis was substitution at position 116. Actuarial risk for acute GVHD grade III-IV, TRM, and relapse in pairs with substitutions at position 116 (n = 37) compared to other pairs (n = 63) was, respectively, 36% versus 14% (P =.01), 59% versus 28% (P =.001), and 25% versus 31% (P =.4). In conclusion these data suggest that substitutions at position 116 of class I heavy chain increase the risk for acute GVHD and TRM in patients who receive transplanted bone marrow from unrelated donors.

  7. Increased levels of C-reactive protein and leukocyte count are poor predictors of anastomotic leakage following laparoscopic colorectal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben; Roikjær, Ole; Jess, Per

    2012-01-01

    Laparoscopic procedure and fast-track regimen with short post-operative hospital stay are gaining ground in colorectal surgery. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell counts (WBC) have a role as early predictors of post...

  8. C1q/TNF-related protein-9 inhibits cytokine-induced vascular inflammation and leukocyte adhesiveness via AMP-activated protein kinase activation in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Min Jung; Kang, Yu Mi; Lee, Yoo La; Seol, So Mi; Yoon, Hae Kyeong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2016-01-05

    Although recent studies have reported cardioprotective effects of C1q/TNF-related protein 9 (CTRP9), the closet adiponectin paralog, its role on cytokine-induced endothelial inflammation is unknown. We investigated whether CTRP9 prevented inflammatory cytokine-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation and inhibited the expression of adhesion molecules and a chemokine in the vascular endothelial cell. We used human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) to examine the effects of CTRP9 on NF-κB activation and the expression of NF-κB-mediated genes, including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) was used as a representative proinflammatory cytokine. In an adhesion assay using THP-1 cells, CTRP9 reduced TNFα-induced adhesion of monocytes to HAECs. Treatment with CTRP9 significantly decreased TNFα-induced activation of NF-κB, as well as the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1. In addition, treatment with CTRP9 significantly increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the downstream target of AMPK. The inhibitory effect of CTRP9 on the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and MCP-1 and monocyte adhesion to HAECs was abolished after transfection with an AMPKα1-specific siRNA. Our study is the first to demonstrate that CTRP9 attenuates cytokine-induced vascular inflammation in endothelial cells mediated by AMPK activation.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Is Frequently Expressed in a Multicentric Study on Glioblastoma and May Be Induced in Vitro by Combined 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and Interferon-γ Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastowski, Isabela J; Simões, Renata T; Yaghi, Layale

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule involved in immune tolerance processes, playing an important role in the maintenance of the semi-allogeneic fetus. Although HLA-G expression is restricted in normal tissues, it is broadly e...

  10. Protein Misfolding and Human Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter Gerd; Vang, Søren

    2006-01-01

    phenylketonuria, Parkinson's disease, α-1-antitrypsin deficiency, familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, and short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. Despite the differences, an emerging paradigm suggests that the cellular effects of protein misfolding provide a common framework that may contribute......Protein misfolding is a common event in living cells. In young and healthy cells, the misfolded protein load is disposed of by protein quality control (PQC) systems. In aging cells and in cells from certain individuals with genetic diseases, the load may overwhelm the PQC capacity, resulting...... in accumulation of misfolded proteins. Dependent on the properties of the protein and the efficiency of the PQC systems, the accumulated protein may be degraded or assembled into toxic oligomers and aggregates. To illustrate this concept, we discuss a number of very different protein misfolding diseases including...

  11. Monitoring human cytomegalovirus viral load in peripheral blood leukocytes of renal transplant recipients by a simple limiting dilution-PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.L. Caballero

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess the clinical relevance of a semi-quantitative measurement of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV DNA in renal transplant recipients within the typical clinical context of a developing country where virtually 100% of both receptors and donors are seropositive for this virus, we have undertaken HCMV DNA quantification using a simple, semi-quantitative, limiting dilution polymerase chain reaction (PCR. We evaluated this assay prospectively in 52 renal transplant patients from whom a total of 495 serial blood samples were collected. The samples scored HCMV positive by qualitative PCR had the levels of HCMV DNA determined by end-point dilution-PCR. All patients were HCMV DNA positive during the monitoring period and a diagnosis of symptomatic infection was made for 4 of 52 patients. In symptomatic patients the geometric mean of the highest level of HCMV DNAemia was 152,000 copies per 106 leukocytes, while for the asymptomatic group this value was 12,050. Symptomatic patients showed high, protracted HCMV DNA levels, whereas asymptomatic patients demonstrated intermittent low or moderate levels. Using a cut-off value of 100,000 copies per 106 leukocytes, the limiting dilution assay had sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 43% and a negative predictive value of 100% for HCMV disease. In this patient group, there was universal HCMV infection but relatively infrequent symptomatic HCMV disease. The two patient groups were readily distinguished by monitoring with the limiting dilution assay, an extremely simple technology immediately applicable in any clinical laboratory with PCR capability.

  12. Leukocyte Activation and Circulating Leukocyte-Derived Microparticles in Preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lok, Christianne A. R.; Jebbink, Jiska; Nieuwland, Rienk; Faas, Marijke M.; Boer, Kees; Sturk, Augueste; Van Der Post, Joris A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Preeclampsia shows characteristics of an inflammatory disease including leukocyte activation. Analyses of leukocyte-derived microparticles (MP) and mRNA expression of inflammation-related genes in leukocytes may establish which subgroups of leukocytes contribute to the development of preeclampsia. B

  13. Periodic usage of low-protein methionine-fortified diets in broiler chickens under high ambient temperature conditions: effects on performance, slaughter traits, leukocyte profiles and antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Ghasemi, Rohollah; Torki, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of adding methionine supplements to low-protein diets and subsequent re-feeding with a normal diet on the productive performance, slaughter parameters, leukocyte profiles and antibody response in broiler chickens reared under heat stress conditions.During the whole experimental period (6-49 days), the birds were raised in battery cages located in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. A total of 360 6-day-old male chickens were divided into six treatments in six replicates with ten chicks each. Six isoenergetic diets, with similar total sulfur amino acids levels, were formulated to provide 100 and 100 (control), 85 and 100 (85S), 70 and 100 (70S), 85 and 85 (85SG), 70 and 85 (70S85G), and 70 and 70% (70SG) of National Research Council recommended levels for crude protein during the starter (6-21 day) and grower (22-42 day) periods, respectively. Subsequently, all groups received a diet containing the same nutrients during the finisher period (43-49 day). The results showed that, under heat stress conditions, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio and performance index from day 6 to 49, breast and thigh yields and antibody titer against Newcastle disease in the birds fed diets 85S, 70S and 85SG were similar to those of birds fed control diet, whereas feeding diets 70S85G and 70SG significantly decreased the values of above-mentioned parameters. Additionally, diets 85S, 70S and 85SG significantly decreased mortality rate and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio compared with the control diet. In conclusion, the results indicate that supplementation of methionine to diets 85S, 70S and 85SG, and then re-feeding with a conventional diet is an effective tool to maintain productive performance and to improve health indices and heat resistance in broilers under high ambient temperature conditions.

  14. Periodic usage of low-protein methionine-fortified diets in broiler chickens under high ambient temperature conditions: effects on performance, slaughter traits, leukocyte profiles and antibody response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Hossein Ali; Ghasemi, Rohollah; Torki, Mehran

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effects of adding methionine supplements to low-protein diets and subsequent re-feeding with a normal diet on the productive performance, slaughter parameters, leukocyte profiles and antibody response in broiler chickens reared under heat stress conditions. During the whole experimental period (6-49 days), the birds were raised in battery cages located in high ambient temperature in an open-sided housing system. A total of 360 6-day-old male chickens were divided into six treatments in six replicates with ten chicks each. Six isoenergetic diets, with similar total sulfur amino acids levels, were formulated to provide 100 and 100 (control), 85 and 100 (85S), 70 and 100 (70S), 85 and 85 (85SG), 70 and 85 (70S85G), and 70 and 70 % (70SG) of National Research Council recommended levels for crude protein during the starter (6-21 day) and grower (22-42 day) periods, respectively. Subsequently, all groups received a diet containing the same nutrients during the finisher period (43-49 day). The results showed that, under heat stress conditions, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio and performance index from day 6 to 49, breast and thigh yields and antibody titer against Newcastle disease in the birds fed diets 85S, 70S and 85SG were similar to those of birds fed control diet, whereas feeding diets 70S85G and 70SG significantly decreased the values of above-mentioned parameters. Additionally, diets 85S, 70S and 85SG significantly decreased mortality rate and heterophil:lymphocyte ratio compared with the control diet. In conclusion, the results indicate that supplementation of methionine to diets 85S, 70S and 85SG, and then re-feeding with a conventional diet is an effective tool to maintain productive performance and to improve health indices and heat resistance in broilers under high ambient temperature conditions.

  15. [Effect of anti-inflammatory drugs, alone and combined with ofloxacin, on the respiratory burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, E; Velert, M M; Orero, A; Martínez, P; Cantón, E

    2001-06-01

    The antibacterial activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) is based on the production of superoxide anion and H(2)O(2) in the respiratory burst and can be impaired in different ways. The combination of an antibacterial agent and an antiinflammatory drug is quite common in immunodepressed patients whose respiratory burst of PMN could be impaired. In this study we examine in vitro the effect of pretreating (35 degrees C for 30 min) PMNs with the antiinflammatory drugs dexamethasone (0.4, 4 and 40 microgram/ml), methylprednisolone (0.37, 3.7 and 37 microgram/ ml), hydrocortisone (0.048, 0.48 and 4.8 microgram/ml), betamethasone (0.1, 1, 5 and 10 mg/ml), phenylbutazone (1000 microgram/ml) and acetylsalicylic acid (25, 250, 2500 microgram/ml) alone, and combined with 10 mg/ml of ofloxacin on the respiratory burst. Superoxide anion was measured by the cytochrome c reduction microtechnique and H(2)O(2) by phenol red. The antiinflammatory drugs alone decreased the production of H(2)O(2) (except dexamethasone and methylprednisolone) and superoxide anion (except betamethasone) from 15-45%, depending on the antiinflammatory drug and concentration, while ofloxacin increased the production of superoxide anion (20.2 +/- 6.7%). The combination of antiinflammatory drugs with ofloxacin neutralizes the inhibitory effect of the former on the respiratory burst of PMNs. It is therefore important to know the effect of drugs on the respiratory burst in order to choose those that have the same therapeutic effect without interfering with PMN functions.

  16. Inhibition by soya isoflavones of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function: possible relevance for the beneficial effects of soya intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, Serenella; Krauze-Brzósko, Katarzyna; Manarini, Stefano; Martelli, Nicola; Pecce, Romina; Evangelista, Virgilio; Benedetta Donati, Maria; Cerletti, Chiara

    2008-02-01

    Lower CVD incidence is reported in Asian populations consuming soya-containing food. As polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are involved in the risk of CVD, we investigated the modulatory effect of soya isoflavones on several PMN functions and their molecular mechanisms in vitro. PMN, isolated from blood from healthy subjects, were tested upon activation with 1 microm- n-formyl-methyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) for superoxide anion production (ferric cytochrome c reduction) and released elastase (chromogenic test). PMN homotypic aggregates stimulated by fMLP or P-selectin in dynamic conditions were detected by optical microscopy. PMN, mixed with thrombin-activated, washed platelets, formed cell aggregates, measured by flow cytometry. Phosphorylation of Pyk2, a focal adhesion kinase, was studied by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Genistein, daidzein and equol inhibited superoxide anion production (IC50 0.25 (sem 0.1), 21.0 (sem 4.2) and 13.0 (sem 2.8) microm, respectively); the release of elastase was prevented by genistein (IC50 63 (sem 17) microm). PMN homotypic aggregates, stimulated by fMLP, were significantly reduced (24 (sem 12) and 51 (sem 14) % of control) by 100 microm genistein and equol. P-selectin-induced aggregates were reduced to 19 (sem 6), 44 (sem 10) and 28 (sem 9) % of control by 100 microm genistein, daidzein and equol, respectively. Genistein, daidzein and equol also significantly reduced mixed platelet-PMN aggregates (IC50 4.0 (sem 0.9), 57 (sem 6) and 66 (sem 23) microm, respectively). In PMN challenged by fMLP or P-selectin, activation of Pyk2 was prevented by isoflavones. The cardioprotective effect of soya-containing food might be linked to reduction of PMN activation and PMN-platelet interaction, novel targets for the biological effects of soya isoflavones.

  17. Study of the inhibition by polymorphonuclear leukocytes of TNF-α release from human mononuclear cells and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of human PMNs on the production of TNF-α by the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and to elucidate its tentative mechanism.

  18. The solution structure of the active domain of CAP18--a lipopolysaccharide binding protein from rabbit leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Brock, R; Luh, F; Chou, P J; Larrick, J W; Huang, R F; Huang, T H

    1995-08-14

    We have employed the circular dichroism (CD) technique to characterize the solution structure of CAP18(106-137), a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding, antimicrobial protein, and its interaction with lipid A. Our results revealed that CAP18(106-137) may exist in at least three lipid A concentration-dependent, primarily helix conformations. The 'model' structure of CAP18(106-137) in 30% (v/v) TFE, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, was found to be a complete and very rigid helix. In this conformation, the cationic and hydrophobic groups of CAP18(106-137) are separated into patches and stripes in such a way that it can favorably interact with lipid A through either coulombic interaction with the diphosphoryl groups or hydrophobic interaction with the fatty acyl chains.

  19. Leukocyte Trafficking to the Small Intestine and Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtezion, Aida; Nguyen, Linh P; Hadeiba, Husein; Butcher, Eugene C

    2016-02-01

    Leukocyte trafficking to the small and large intestines is tightly controlled to maintain intestinal immune homeostasis, mediate immune responses, and regulate inflammation. A wide array of chemoattractants, chemoattractant receptors, and adhesion molecules expressed by leukocytes, mucosal endothelium, epithelium, and stromal cells controls leukocyte recruitment and microenvironmental localization in intestine and in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs). Naive lymphocytes traffic to the gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes where they undergo antigen-induced activation and priming; these processes determine their memory/effector phenotypes and imprint them with the capacity to migrate via the lymph and blood to the intestines. Mechanisms of T-cell recruitment to GALT and of T cells and plasmablasts to the small intestine are well described. Recent advances include the discovery of an unexpected role for lectin CD22 as a B-cell homing receptor GALT, and identification of the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor 15 (GPR15) as a T-cell chemoattractant/trafficking receptor for the colon. GPR15 decorates distinct subsets of T cells in mice and humans, a difference in species that could affect translation of the results of mouse colitis models to humans. Clinical studies with antibodies to integrin α4β7 and its vascular ligand mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 are proving the value of lymphocyte trafficking mechanisms as therapeutic targets for inflammatory bowel diseases. In contrast to lymphocytes, cells of the innate immune system express adhesion and chemoattractant receptors that allow them to migrate directly to effector tissue sites during inflammation. We review the mechanisms for innate and adaptive leukocyte localization to the intestinal tract and GALT, and discuss their relevance to human intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

  20. 人类乳头瘤病毒感染与白细胞相关性分析%Correlation between human papilloma virus infection and leukocyte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付朝泓; 李艳; 童永清; 戴雯

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the correlation between genotypes of human papilloma virus (HPV) and leu-kocyte and the distribution of HPV genotypes in this region .Methods A total of 273 cases of patients ,treated in De-partment of Gynecology of this hospital from Jul .2011 to Jan .2013 ,were detected for HPV genotypes and routine blood test .Results The total number of leukocyte and percentage of neutrophilic granulocyte in HPV positive cases was higher than HPV negative cases ( P < 0 .05) ,the percentage of lymphocyte was lower ( P < 0 .05) ,while the difference of percentage of monocyte was not significant .The total number of leukocyte and percentage of various classifications were not significantly different in patients with infection of different subtypes of HPV .The most com-mon genotypes of HPV infection in this region were HPV 16 ,33 and 52 ,and the high-risk subtypes occupied larger proportion (88 .8% ) .Conclusion Combined detection of leukocyte and HPV genotypes could increase the diagnostic rate of HPV infection and support for the reducing of incidence of cervical cancer .%目的探讨人类乳头瘤病毒(HPV)感染及分型与白细胞的相关性,并研究本地区 HPV 基因型的分布情况。方法对武汉大学人民医院妇科2011年7月至2013年1月住院的273例患者进行血常规检查,同时进行 HPV 基因分型检查。结果 HPV 阳性患者的白细胞总数及中性粒细胞百分比明显高于 HPV 阴性患者,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);HPV 阳性患者的淋巴细胞百分比明显低于 HPV 阴性患者,差异有统计学意义( P <0.05);HPV 阳性患者的单核细胞百分比与 HPV 阴性患者之间没有差别。 HPV 阳性患者各亚型间的白细胞及分类没有差别。本地区 HPV 感染的亚型主要为 HPV16、HPV33、HPV52,高危亚型感染比例较大(88.8%)。结论白细胞检测结合 HPV 亚型的检测能提高对 HPV 感染的诊断率,为采取针对性措

  1. KCNE gene expression is dependent on the proliferation and mode of activation of leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Laura; Vallejo-Gracia, Albert; Roig, Sara R; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Marruecos, Laura; Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Soler, Concepció; Felipe, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-dependent K (+) (Kv) channels are tightly regulated during the immune system response. Leukocytes have a limited repertoire of Kv channels, whose physiological role is under intense investigation. A functional Kv channel is an oligomeric complex composed of pore-forming and ancillary subunits. The KCNE gene family is a novel group of modulatory Kv channel elements in leukocytes. Here, we characterized the gene expression of KCNEs (1-5) in leukocytes and investigated their regulation during leukocyte proliferation and mode of activation. Murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages, human Jurkat T-lymphocytes and human Raji B-cells were analyzed. KCNEs (1-5) are expressed in all leukocytes lineages. Most KCNE mRNAs show cell cycle-dependent regulation and are differentially regulated under specific insults. Our results further suggest a new and yet undefined physiological role for KCNE subunits in the immune system. Putative associations of these ancillary proteins with Kv channels would yield a wide variety of biophysically and pharmacologically distinct channels that fine-tune the immunological response.

  2. Increased C-reactive protein and decreased Interleukin-2 content in serum from obese individuals with or without insulin resistance: Associations with leukocyte count and insulin and adiponectin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Renata; Ryder, Elena; Diez-Ewald, María; Mosquera, Jesús; Durán, Anyelo; Valero, Nereida; Pedreañez, Adriana; Peña, Caterina; Fernández, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in obesity is associated with co-morbidities such as, hyperglycemia, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. Leukocytes play an important role in this inflammation and C-reactive protein (CRP) and Interleukin-2 (IL-2) can be important effectors during the immune response in obesity; however, the initial inflammatory events in obesity remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the circulating levels of CRP, IL-2, insulin and adiponectin, their association and the association with leukocyte count in obese individuals without co-morbidities and with or without insulin resistance (IR). Nineteen obese non-diabetic and 9 lean subjects were studied for serum levels of CRP, IL-2, insulin, adiponectin, lipids, glycated hemoglobin, glycemia, for homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), arterial pressure and anthropometric parameters, and for leukocyte counts. Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (N/L) was calculated using the loge of leukocyte counts. Associations were determined by Pearson's correlation. None of the studied groups presented co-morbidities and two groups of obese individuals with normal or high levels of insulin (IR) were found. Increased CRP concentration and decreased IL-2 and adiponectin concentrations in obese were observed. Positive correlation between leukocyte type counts with CRP in obese with IR was found; however, no correlations with IL-2 in obese were observed. Insulin in obese were positively correlated with CRP and negatively correlated with IL-2 in IR obese individuals. Adiponectin in obese was negatively correlated with CRP. CRP and IL-2 may represent two important effectors in the early inflammatory events in obese individuals without co-morbidities. Adiponectin and insulin may be involved in anti-inflammatory events. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human telomeric proteins occupy selective interstitial sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Yang; Yuanyan Xiong; Hyyeung Kim; Quanyuan He; Yumei Li; Rui Chen; Zhou Songyang

    2011-01-01

    Human telomeres are bound and protected by protein complexes assembled around the six core telomeric proteins RAP1, TRF1, TRF2, TIN2, TPP1, and POT1. The function of these proteins on telomeres has been studied extensively. Recently, increasing evidence has suggested possible roles for these proteins outside of telomeres. However, the non-canonical (extra-telomeric) function of human telomeric proteins remains poorly understood. To this end, we systematically investigated the binding sites of telomeric proteins along human chromosomes, by performing wholegenome chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for RAP1 and TRF2. ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that RAP1 and TRF2 could be found on a small number of interstitial sites, including regions that are proximal to genes. Some of these binding sites contain short telomere repeats, suggesting that telomeric proteins could directly bind to interstitial sites. Interestingly, only a small fraction of the available interstitial telomere repeat-containing regions were occupied by RAP1 and TRF2. Ectopically expressed TRF2 was able to occupy additional interstitial telomere repeat sites, suggesting that protein concentration may dictate the selective targeting of telomeric proteins to interstitial sites. Reducing RAP1 and TRF2 expression by RNA interference led to altered transcription of RAP1- and TRF2-targeted genes. Our results indicate that human telomeric proteins could occupy a limited number of interstitial sites and regulate gene transcription.

  4. Leukocytes in capillary flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Schönbein, G W; Lee, J

    1995-01-01

    During disease, the flow of blood cells through the capillary network is one of the most perilous events in the microcirculation. Capillary distensibility, cytoplasmic activity of endothelial cells, red cells and leukocytes play an important role in capillary perfusion. Occlusion of capillaries is one of the early signs of vascular failure and is encountered in many different conditions and organs. Adhesion of leukocytes to the endothelium via expression of membrane adhesion molecules leads to microvascular entrapment with capillary occlusion.

  5. Antiviral CD8(+) T Cells Restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Exist during Natural HIV Infection and Exhibit Clonal Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lamothe, Pedro A; Soghoian, Damien Z; Kazer, Samuel W; Cole, Michael B; Shalek, Alex K; Yosef, Nir; Jones, R Brad; Donaghey, Faith; Nwonu, Chioma; Jani, Priya; Clayton, Gina M; Crawford, Frances; White, Janice; Montoya, Alana; Power, Karen; Allen, Todd M; Streeck, Hendrik; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Picker, Louis J; Kappler, John W; Walker, Bruce D

    2016-10-18

    CD8(+) T cell recognition of virus-infected cells is characteristically restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, although rare examples of MHC class II restriction have been reported in Cd4-deficient mice and a macaque SIV vaccine trial using a recombinant cytomegalovirus vector. Here, we demonstrate the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses with antiviral properties in a small subset of HIV-infected individuals. In these individuals, T cell receptor β (TCRβ) analysis revealed that class II-restricted CD8(+) T cells underwent clonal expansion and mediated killing of HIV-infected cells. In one case, these cells comprised 12% of circulating CD8(+) T cells, and TCRα analysis revealed two distinct co-expressed TCRα chains, with only one contributing to binding of the class II HLA-peptide complex. These data indicate that class II-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses can exist in a chronic human viral infection, and may contribute to immune control. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The multiple faces of leukocyte interstitial migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmermann, Tim; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Spatiotemporal control of leukocyte dynamics within tissues is critical for successful innate and adaptive immune responses. Homeostatic trafficking and coordinated infiltration into and within sites of inflammation and infection rely on signaling in response to extracellular cues that in turn controls a variety of intracellular protein networks regulating leukocyte motility, migration, chemotaxis, positioning, and cell–cell interaction. In contrast to mesenchymal cells, leukocytes migrate in an amoeboid fashion by rapid cycles of actin polymerization and actomyosin contraction, and their migration in tissues is generally referred to as low adhesive and nonproteolytic. The interplay of actin network expansion, contraction, and adhesion shapes the exact mode of amoeboid migration, and in this review, we explore how leukocyte subsets potentially harness the same basic biomechanical mechanisms in a cell-type-specific manner. Most of our detailed understanding of these processes derives from in vitro migration studies in three-dimensional gels and confined spaces that mimic geometrical aspects of physiological tissues. We summarize these in vitro results and then critically compare them to data from intravital imaging of leukocyte interstitial migration in mouse tissues. We outline the technical challenges of obtaining conclusive mechanistic results from intravital studies, discuss leukocyte migration strategies in vivo, and present examples of mode switching during physiological interstitial migration. These findings are also placed in the context of leukocyte migration defects in primary immunodeficiencies. This overview of both in vitro and in vivo studies highlights recent progress in understanding the molecular and biophysical mechanisms that shape robust leukocyte migration responses in physiologically complex and heterogeneous environments. PMID:24573488

  7. Low pH immobilizes and kills human leukocytes and prevents transmission of cell-associated HIV in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markham Richard B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both cell-associated and cell-free HIV virions are present in semen and cervical secretions of HIV-infected individuals. Thus, topical microbicides may need to inactivate both cell-associated and cell-free HIV to prevent sexual transmission of HIV/AIDS. To determine if the mild acidity of the healthy vagina and acid buffering microbicides would prevent transmission by HIV-infected leukocytes, we measured the effect of pH on leukocyte motility, viability and intracellular pH and tested the ability of an acidic buffering microbicide (BufferGel® to prevent the transmission of cell-associated HIV in a HuPBL-SCID mouse model. Methods Human lymphocyte, monocyte, and macrophage motilities were measured as a function of time and pH using various acidifying agents. Lymphocyte and macrophage motilities were measured using video microscopy. Monocyte motility was measured using video microscopy and chemotactic chambers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC viability and intracellular pH were determined as a function of time and pH using fluorescent dyes. HuPBL-SCID mice were pretreated with BufferGel, saline, or a control gel and challenged with HIV-1-infected human PBMCs. Results Progressive motility was completely abolished in all cell types between pH 5.5 and 6.0. Concomitantly, at and below pH 5.5, the intracellular pH of PBMCs dropped precipitously to match the extracellular medium and did not recover. After acidification with hydrochloric acid to pH 4.5 for 60 min, although completely immotile, 58% of PBMCs excluded ethidium homodimer-1 (dead-cell dye. In contrast, when acidified to this pH with BufferGel, a microbicide designed to maintain vaginal acidity in the presence of semen, only 4% excluded dye at 10 min and none excluded dye after 30 min. BufferGel significantly reduced transmission of HIV-1 in HuPBL-SCID mice (1 of 12 infected compared to saline (12 of 12 infected and a control gel (5 of 7 infected. Conclusion These

  8. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) Class II is a Xenoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladowski, Joseph M; Reyes, Luz M; Martens, Gregory R; Butler, James R; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Eckhoff, Devin E; Tector, Matt; Tector, A Joseph

    2017-08-24

    Over 130 000 patients in the United States alone need a life-saving organ transplant. Genetically modified porcine organs could resolve the donor organ shortage, but human xenoreactive antibodies destroy pig cells and are the major barrier to clinical application of xenotransplantation. The objective of this study was to determine whether waitlisted patients possess preformed antibodies to swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II, homologs of the class II human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Sera from people currently awaiting solid organ transplant were tested for IgG binding to class II SLA proteins when expressed on mammalian cells. Pig fibroblasts were made positive by transfection with the class II transactivator (CIITA). As a second expression system, transgenes encoding the alpha and beta chains of class II SLA were transfected into Human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. Human sera containing IgG specific for class II HLA molecules exhibited greater binding to class II SLA positive cells than to SLA negative cells. Sera lacking antibodies against class II HLA showed no change in binding regardless of the presence of class II SLA. These antibodies could recognize either SLA-DR or SLA-DQ complexes. Class II SLA proteins may behave as xenoantigens for people with humoral immunity towards class II HLA molecules.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA Class I Down-Regulation by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Negative Factor (HIV-1 Nef: What Might We Learn From Natural Sequence Variants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mwimanzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 causes a chronic infection in humans that is characterized by high plasma viremia, progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, and severe immunodeficiency resulting in opportunistic disease and AIDS. Viral persistence is mediated in part by the ability of the Nef protein to down-regulate HLA molecules on the infected cell surface, thereby allowing HIV-1 to evade recognition by antiviral CD8+ T lymphocytes. Extensive research has been conducted on Nef to determine protein domains that are required for its immune evasion activities and to identify critical cellular co-factors, and our mechanistic understanding of this process is becoming more complete. This review highlights our current knowledge of Nef-mediated HLA class I down-regulation and places this work in the context of naturally occurring sequence variation in this protein. We argue that efforts to fully understand the critical role of Nef for HIV-1 pathogenesis will require greater analysis of patient-derived sequences to elucidate subtle differences in immune evasion activity that may alter clinical outcome.

  10. Exploring the human leukocyte phosphoproteome using a microfluidic reversed-phase-TiO2-reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography phosphochip coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raijmakers, Reinout; Kraiczek, Karsten; de Jong, Ad P; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2010-02-01

    The study of protein phosphorylation events is one of the most important challenges in proteome analysis. Despite the importance of phosphorylation for many regulatory processes in cells and many years of phosphoprotein and phosphopeptide research, the identification and characterization of phosphorylation by mass spectrometry is still a challenging task. Recently, we introduced an approach that facilitates the analysis of phosphopeptides by performing automated, online, TiO(2) enrichment of phosphopeptides prior to mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. The implementation of that method on a "plug-and-play" microfluidic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) chip design will potentially open up efficient phosphopeptide enrichment methods enabling phosphoproteomics analyses by a broader research community. Following our initial proof of principle, whereby the device was coupled to an ion trap, we now show that this so-called phosphochip is capable of the enrichment of large numbers of phosphopeptides from complex cellular lysates, which can be more readily identified when coupled to a higher resolution quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer. We use the phosphochip-Q-TOF setup to explore the phosphoproteome of nonstimulated primary human leukocytes where we identify 1012 unique phosphopeptides corresponding to 960 different phosphorylation sites providing for the first time an overview of the phosphoproteome of these important circulating white blood cells.

  11. Early Differentiation of Human CD11c+NK Cells with γδ T Cell Activation Properties Is Promoted by Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Ramírez, Dalia; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes Andrea; Mayani, Héctor; Estrada-Parra, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Reconstitution of the hematopoietic system during immune responses and immunological and neoplastic diseases or upon transplantation depends on the emergent differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells within the bone marrow. Although in the last decade the use of dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLE) as supportive therapy in both infectious and malignant settings has increased, its activity on the earliest stages of human hematopoietic development remains poorly understood. Here, we have examined the ability of DLE to promote replenishment of functional lymphoid lineages from CD34+ cells. Our findings suggest that DLE increases their differentiation toward a conspicuous CD56+CD16+CD11c+ NK-like cell population endowed with properties such as IFNy production, tumor cell cytotoxicity, and the capability of inducing γδ T lymphocyte proliferation. Of note, long-term coculture controlled systems showed the bystander effect of DLE-stromal cells by providing NK progenitors with signals to overproduce this cell subset. Thus, by direct effect on progenitor cells and through activation and remodeling of the supporting hematopoietic microenvironment, DLE may contribute a robust innate immune response by promoting the emerging lymphopoiesis of functional CD11c+ NK cells in a partially TLR-related manner. Unraveling the identity and mechanisms of the involved DLE components may be fundamental to advance the NK cell-based therapy field. PMID:27847830

  12. Evidence of Qi-gong energy and its biological effect on the enhancement of the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, M; Kataoka, T; Hamada, C; Matsumoto, M

    2001-01-01

    In order to test for an effect of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) treated externally with Qi energy ("Qi-treated" PBS) on the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), rigorously controlled experiments employing masking and randomized procedures were carried out under independent monitoring. In all experiments, Qi treatment was externally applied under monitoring to newly purchased unopened 100 ml bottles of PBS, and the PMN phagocytic activity was assayed by one experimenter in masked, randomized and monitored conditions using a highly sensitive chemiluminescence method. Phagocytic activity data were obtained in triplicate for each sample and then statistically analyzed. The PBS samples Qi-treated by the Qi-gong master and by one of the Qi-gong trainees showed clear stimulation of PMN phagocytic activity which was significant statistically, and this phenomenon was highly reproducible. Out of 10 experiments by the Qi-gong master, only twice did Qi-treatment fail to influence the PBS. The activity of Qi-treated PBS decayed over days or weeks. Furthermore, it was found that Qi-treated PBS had decreased phagocytic stimulatory activity after microwave treatment, but not after autoclave treatment. We also demonstrated that microwave irradiation and infrared laser pulse irradiation have similar effects on PBS as Qi-treatment. The results obtained in this experiment provide evidence of the existence of Qi energy, its ability to influence an electrolyte solution and its biological effect. Furthermore, microwave or infrared laser pulse treatment was found to partly mimic the Qi-treatment of PBS.

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigens and Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Old Associations Offer New Clues into the Role of Immunity in Infection-Associated Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hui eSu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV associated tumor. In addition to EBV, host genetic factors are believed to be important determinants of NPC risk. Of all genes studies to date, human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes have shown the most consistent evidence for association with NPC, both from candidate-gene studies and genome-wide association studies (GWAS. In this report we summarize results from recent studies that evaluated the association between HLA and NPC, and discuss whether findings reflect direct causal associations for HLA genes and/or indirect associations that mark causal associations with other genes in the gene-dense major histocompatibility (MHC region where HLA resides. We also compare GWAS results across cancer sites for which strong hits in the MHC region were observed to generate new hypotheses regarding the role of HLA genes in the development of EBV-associated cancers such as NPC. Of note, we report that MHC associations for EBV-associated cancers (NPC, EBV+ Hodgkin lymphoma are driven by HLA class I genes. In contrast, MHC associations for other viral-associated cancers (cervical cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma or other hematopoetic cancers (EBV- Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphomas are driven by HLA class II genes, and those for other solid tumors with less clear links to infections (lung, testicular, prostate cancers are driven by non-HLA genes in the MHC region. Future studies should aim to better understand these patterns.

  14. Role of metalloproteases in vaccinia virus epitope processing for transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-independent human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B7 class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-03-23

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8(+) lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8(+) T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections.

  15. In vitro evaluation of candidate pretreatment and treatment compounds against sulfur mustard (HD) -induced human mononuclear leukocyte toxicity using a dye exclusion cell viability assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starner, R.A.; Blank, J.A.; Hobson, D.W.; Menton, R.G.; Meier, H.L.

    1993-05-13

    An assay measuring propidium iodide (PI) incorporation into nonviable human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML) was established at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD), and the technology transferred and implemented at Battelle's Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) for use as a screen to evaluate candidate compounds for direct cytotoxicity as well as for efficacy in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity. For assay transition, studies were performed to establish a fixed HD challenge concentration; to develop a positive and negative control dataset; and to establish the reproducibility in obtaining an EC50 (concentration of candidate compound required to provide 50 percent protection against the fixed HD concentration) for niacinamide (NM). Various concentrations of candidate compounds were preincubated for 15 to 30 min with PBML prior to adding the fixed HD challenge. At 24 hr after exposure, PI was added to the cultures and the number of nonviable (PI positive) cells was determined by flow cytometry. Positive (NM pretreated) and negative (HD only) controls were examined concurrently and used to maintain data quality. From this dataset, candidate compounds were evaluated for direct cytotoxic effects and for efficacy in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity. EC50 values for effective candidate compounds were estimated and reported for ranking compound effectiveness. Results from these studies demonstrate assay function and reproducibility during routine screening operations.

  16. The effect of core and lanthanide ion dopants in sodium fluoride-based nanocrystals on phagocytic activity of human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Liskova, Aurelia; Kuricova, Miroslava; Banski, Mateusz; Misiewicz, Jan; Dusinska, Maria; Horvathova, Mira; Ilavska, Silvia; Szabova, Michaela; Rollerova, Eva; Podhorodecki, Artur; Tulinska, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Sodium fluoride-based β-NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) doped with lanthanide ions are promising materials for application as luminescent markers in bio-imaging. In this work, the effect of NPs doped with yttrium (Y), gadolinium (Gd), europium (Eu), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb) and terbium (Tb) ions on phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes and the respiratory burst was examined. The surface functionalization of <10-nm NPs was performed according to our variation of patent pending ligand exchange method that resulted in meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) molecules on their surface. Y-core-based NCs were doped with Eu ions, which enabled them to be excited with UV light wavelengths. Cultures of human peripheral blood ( n = 8) were in vitro treated with five different concentrations of eight NPs for 24 h. In summary, neither type of nanoparticles is found toxic with respect to conducted test; however, some cause toxic effects (they have statistically significant deviations compared to reference) in some selected doses tested. Both core types of NPs (Y-core and Gd-core) impaired the phagocytic activity of monocytes the strongest, having minimal or none whatsoever influence on granulocytes and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells. The lowest toxicity was observed in Gd-core, Yb, Tm dopants and near-infrared nanoparticles. Clear dose-dependent effect of NPs on phagocytic activity of leukocytes and respiratory burst of cells was observed for limited number of samples.

  17. Do FY antigens act as minor histocompatibility antigens in the graft-versus-host disease paradigm after human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Mohamed Hichem; Chaabane, Manel; Kaabi, Houda; Torjemane, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Othmane, Tarek; Hmida, Slama

    2012-03-01

    FY antigens are candidate minor histocompatibility antigens relevant to renal allograft rejection, but no data have been reported about their role in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) incidence after human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical siblings hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to examine the effect of donor/recipient disparity at FY antigens on the incidence of GVHD in Tunisian patients receiving an HLA-identical HSCT. This work enrolled 105 Tunisian pairs of recipients and their HLA-identical sibling donors of HSCs. FY genotyping was performed with the polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer method and donor/recipient disparity for these antigens was analyzed at two levels: incompatibility and nonidentity. The case-control analyses showed no significant correlation between FY disparity and the incidence of either acute or chronic GVHD. Sample size calculation showed that 572 cases and 1716 controls would be necessary to be able to detect a significant association with 80% power and two-sided type I error level of 5% (α=0.05). The lack of association in the studied cohort may be explained by the low immunogenicity of FY antigens in HSCT context, compared with other antigens such as HA-1 and CD31.

  18. The Possible Mechanism of Idiosyncratic Lapatinib-Induced Liver Injury in Patients Carrying Human Leukocyte Antigen-DRB1*07:01.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hirasawa

    Full Text Available Idiosyncratic lapatinib-induced liver injury has been reported to be associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DRB1*07:01. In order to investigate its mechanism, interaction of lapatinib with HLA-DRB1*07:01 and its ligand peptide derived from tetanus toxoid, has been evaluated in vitro. Here we show that lapatinib enhances binding of the ligand peptide to HLA-DRB1*07:01. Furthermore in silico molecular dynamics analysis revealed that lapatinib could change the β chain helix in the HLA-DRB1*07:01 specifically to form a tightly closed binding groove structure and modify a large part of the binding groove. These results indicate that lapatinib affects the ligand binding to HLA-DRB1*07:01 and idiosyncratic lapatinib-induced liver injury might be triggered by this mechanism. This is the first report showing that the clinically available drug can enhance the binding of ligand peptide to HLA class II molecules in vitro and in silico.

  19. Human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B genotypes in blood of AIDS patients: lack of association with either the viral DNA load in leukocytes or presence of retinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, C; Handfield, J; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Bergeron, M G; Boivin, G

    1999-09-01

    It has been suggested that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) glycoprotein B (gB) genotypes could be used as a marker for viral virulence in patients with AIDS. The present study was designed to evaluate a possible association between specific gB genotypes, the presence of HCMV retinitis, and the HCMV viral load. Fifty-four blood samples were obtained from 54 HIV- and HCMV-infected patients. Twenty-seven of these patients were asymptomatic for HCMV, whereas the other 27 patients had been diagnosed recently with HCMV retinitis. HCMV gB genotyping was carried out by using restriction enzyme analysis of PCR-amplified PMNL extracts. Determination of the HCMV viral load in the same specimens was carried out using a quantitative-PCR. HCMV gB genotype 2 was found more frequently than other genotypes in PCR-amplified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) of patients with AIDS (P < 0.05) but not more frequently in samples from patients with HCMV retinitis. No significant association was found between any HCMV gB genotypes and the viral load in blood. In conclusion, the actual HCMV gB genotyping system using PMNL provides no additional benefit over the viral load in blood for identification of HIV-infected subjects at risk of HCMV disease.

  20. Exposure to Sodium Fluoride Produces Signs of Apoptosis in Rat Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrit Suástegui-Domínguez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is naturally present in the earth's crust and can be found in rocks, coal, and clay; thus, it can be found in small quantities in water, air, plants, and animals. Therefore, humans are exposed to fluoride through food, drinking water, and in the air they breathe. Flouride is essential to maintain bone strength and to protect against dental decay, but if it is absorbed too frequently, it can cause tooth decay, osteoporosis, and damage to kidneys, bones, nerves, and muscles. Therefore, the present work was aimed at determining the effect of intake of sodium fluoride (NaF as an apoptosis inducer in leukocytes of rats treated for eight weeks with 1 or 50 parts per million (ppm NaF. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspade-3 were used as apoptotic and general metabolism indicators of leukocyte-like indicators of the (INT oxidation system. Male rats were exposed to NaF (1 and 500 ppm for eight weeks, and then sacrificed weekly to obtain blood samples. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspase-3 were determined in leukocytes by Western blot, and general metabolism of leukocytes was analyzed with a commercial kit. We found changes in the expression of the proteins described, especially when the animals received 50 ppm of NaF. These results indicate that NaF intoxication can be an apoptosis inducer in rat leukocytes treated with the compound for eight weeks.

  1. Exposure to sodium fluoride produces signs of apoptosis in rat leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, José; Morales-González, José A; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Esquivel-Chirino, César; González-Rubio, Manuel García-Luna Y; Suástegui-Domínguez, Sigrit; Valadez-Vega, Carmen

    2010-09-27

    Fluoride is naturally present in the earth's crust and can be found in rocks, coal, and clay; thus, it can be found in small quantities in water, air, plants, and animals. Therefore, humans are exposed to fluoride through food, drinking water, and in the air they breathe. Flouride is essential to maintain bone strength and to protect against dental decay, but if it is absorbed too frequently, it can cause tooth decay, osteoporosis, and damage to kidneys, bones, nerves, and muscles. Therefore, the present work was aimed at determining the effect of intake of sodium fluoride (NaF) as an apoptosis inducer in leukocytes of rats treated for eight weeks with 1 or 50 parts per million (ppm) NaF. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspade-3 were used as apoptotic and general metabolism indicators of leukocyte-like indicators of the (INT) oxidation system. Male rats were exposed to NaF (1 and 500 ppm) for eight weeks, and then sacrificed weekly to obtain blood samples. Expression of p53, bcl-2, and caspase-3 were determined in leukocytes by Western blot, and general metabolism of leukocytes was analyzed with a commercial kit. We found changes in the expression of the proteins described, especially when the animals received 50 ppm of NaF. These results indicate that NaF intoxication can be an apoptosis inducer in rat leukocytes treated with the compound for eight weeks.

  2. Combination of autoantibodies against different histone proteins influences complement-dependent phagocytosis of necrotic cell material by polymorphonuclear leukocytes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullstrand, Birgitta; Lefort, Malin H; Tydén, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) with autoantibody-coated engulfed necrotic cell material (NC) are frequently seen in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We evaluated the roles of complement, different antihistone antibodies (anti-H ab), and oxidative burst in the phagocytosis of NC by PMN...

  3. Susceptibility of feline herpesvirus 1 and a feline calicivirus to feline interferon and recombinant human leukocyte interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Burge, L J

    1985-01-01

    Feline lung monolayer cultures were treated with either a feline interferon (IFN) or one of two recombinant human alpha-IFNs and then challenged with feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (F-9 strain), or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with these IFNs reduced the viral yield for each of these three viruses as compared with that of control cultures. Vesicular stomatitis virus was more sensitive to each IFN than were FHV-1 or feline calicivirus F-9.

  4. Susceptibility of feline herpesvirus 1 and a feline calicivirus to feline interferon and recombinant human leukocyte interferons.

    OpenAIRE

    Fulton, R W; Burge, L J

    1985-01-01

    Feline lung monolayer cultures were treated with either a feline interferon (IFN) or one of two recombinant human alpha-IFNs and then challenged with feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1), feline calicivirus (F-9 strain), or vesicular stomatitis virus. Treatment with these IFNs reduced the viral yield for each of these three viruses as compared with that of control cultures. Vesicular stomatitis virus was more sensitive to each IFN than were FHV-1 or feline calicivirus F-9.

  5. Human leukocyte antigen class II transgenic mouse model unmasks the significant extrahepatic pathology in toxic shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Marietta, Eric V; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Patel, Robin; David, Chella S; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2011-06-01

    Among the exotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, the superantigens (SAgs) are the most potent T-cell activators known to date. SAgs are implicated in several serious diseases including toxic shock syndrome (TSS), Kawasaki disease, and sepsis. However, the immunopathogenesis of TSS and other diseases involving SAgs are still not completely understood. The commonly used conventional laboratory mouse strains do not respond robustly to SAgs in vivo. Therefore, they must be artificially rendered susceptible to TSS by using sensitizing agents such as d-galactosamine (d-galN), which skews the disease exclusively to the liver and, hence, is not representative of the disease in humans. SAg-induced TSS was characterized using transgenic mice expressing HLA class II molecules that are extremely susceptible to TSS without d-galN. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice recapitulated TSS in humans with extensive multiple-organ inflammation affecting the lung, liver, kidneys, heart, and small intestines. Heavy infiltration with T lymphocytes (both CD4(+) and CD8+), neutrophils, and macrophages was noted. In particular, the pathologic changes in the small intestines were extensive and accompanied by significantly altered absorptive functions of the enterocytes. In contrast to massive liver failure alone in the d-galN sensitization model of TSS, findings of the present study suggest that gut dysfunction might be a key pathogenic event that leads to high morbidity and mortality in humans with TSS.

  6. Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xueping

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83% of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once. Results In this work, we proposed an unsupervised statistical approach to score a set of diverse, experimentally identified PPIs from nine primary databases to create subsets of high-confidence human PPI networks. We evaluated this ranking method by comparing it with other methods and assessing their ability to retrieve protein associations from a number of diverse and independent reference sets. These reference sets contain known biological data that are either directly or indirectly linked to interactions between proteins. We quantified the average effect of using ranked protein interaction data to retrieve this information and showed that, when compared to randomly ranked interaction data sets, the proposed method created a larger enrichment (~134% than either ranking based on the hypergeometric test (~109% or occurrence ranking (~46%. Conclusions From our evaluations, it was clear that ranked interactions were always of value because higher-ranked PPIs had a higher likelihood of retrieving high-confidence experimental data. Reducing the noise inherent in aggregated experimental PPIs via our ranking scheme further increased the accuracy and enrichment of PPIs derived from a number of biologically relevant data sets. These results suggest that using our high

  7. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen gene profiles in a cohort of HIV-infected Mexican Mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Rodríguez, Daniela; Ávila-Ríos, Santiago; García-Morales, Claudia; Valenzuela-Ponce, Humberto; Ormsby, Christopher; Reyes-Gopar, Helena; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) represent the most polymorphic genes responsible for natural killer cell function, while human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules define and restrict cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses. Specific KIR, HLA, or KIR-HLA combinations have been implicated in the outcome of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. The remarkable polymorphism of KIR and HLA genes warrants descriptive gene frequency studies in different populations, as well as their impact on HIV disease progression in different immunogenetic contexts. We report KIR and HLA class I gene profiles of 511 unrelated HIV-infected Mexican Mestizo individuals from 18 states for whom genetic ancestry proportions were assessed. KIR and HLA gene profiles were compared between individuals from the north and central-south regions of the country and between individuals with higher European (EUR) or Amerindian (AMI) genetic ancestry component. A total of 65 KIR genotypes were observed, 11 harboring novel KIR gene combinations. A total of 164 HLA alleles were observed: 43 HLA-A, 87 HLA-B, and 34 HLA-C. Differences in the distribution of 12 HLA alleles were observed between individuals with higher AMI or EUR ancestry components (p < 0.05, q < 0.2). After correcting for genetic ancestry, only individual HLA alleles were associated with HIV disease progression, including a novel association with A*02:06, an Amerindian HLA allele associated with lower CD4+ T cell counts. No KIR effects were significant. Our results highlight the advantages of considering a detailed genetic stratification within populations when studying genetic profiles that could be implicated in disease-association studies.

  8. Simple in vitro generation of human leukocyte antigen-G-expressing T-regulatory cells through pharmacological hypomethylation for adoptive cellular immunotherapy against graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamou, Panagiota; Marioli, Dimitra; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Sgourou, Argyro; Vittoraki, Angeliki; Theofani, Efthymia; Pierides, Chryso; Taraviras, Stavros; Costeas, Paul A; Spyridonidis, Alexandros

    2017-04-01

    Major barriers in using classical FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in clinical practice are their low numbers in the circulation, the lack of specific cell surface markers for efficient purification and the loss of expression of Treg signature molecules and suppressive function after in vitro expansion or in a pro-inflammatory microenviroment. A surface molecule with potent immunosuppressive function is the human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G), which is normally expressed in placenta protecting the "semi-allogeneic" fetus from maternal immune attack. Because HLA-G expression is strongly regulated by methylation, we asked whether hypomethylating agents (HA) may be used in vitro to induce HLA-G expression on conventional T cells and convert them to Tregs. Human peripheral blood T cells were exposed to azacytidine/decitabine and analyzed for HLA-G expression and their in vitro suppressor properties. HA treatment induces de novo expression of HLA-G on T cells through hypomethylation of the HLA-G proximal promoter. The HA-induced CD4(+)HLA-G(pos) T cells are FOXP3 negative and have potent in vitro suppression function, which is dependent to a large extent, but not exclusively, on the HLA-G molecule. Converted HLA-G(pos) suppressors retain their suppressor function in the presence of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and preserve hypomethylated the HLA-G promoter for at least 2 days after azacytidine exposure. Decitabine-treated T cells suppressed ex vivo the proliferation of T cells isolated from patients suffering from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We propose, in vitro generation of HLA-G-expressing T cells through pharmacological hypomethylation as a simple, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compatible and efficient strategy to produce a stable Treg subset of a defined phenotype that can be easily purified for adoptive immunotherapy. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cocoa Consumption Alters the Global DNA Methylation of Peripheral Leukocytes in Humans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Crescenti

    Full Text Available DNA methylation regulates gene expression and can be modified by different bioactive compounds in foods, such as polyphenols. Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols, but its role in DNA methylation is still unknown. The objective was to assess the effect of cocoa consumption on DNA methylation and to determine whether the enzymes involved in the DNA methylation process participate in the mechanisms by which cocoa exerts these effects in humans. The global DNA methylation levels in the peripheral blood were evaluated in 214 volunteers who were pre-hypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive or hypercholesterolemic. The volunteers were divided into two groups: 110 subjects who consumed cocoa (6 g/d for two weeks and 104 control subjects. In addition, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from six subjects were treated with a cocoa extract to analyze the mRNA levels of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR genes. Cocoa consumption significantly reduced the DNA methylation levels (2.991±0.366 vs. 3.909±0.380, p<0.001. Additionally, we found an association between the cocoa effects on DNA methylation and three polymorphisms located in the MTHFR, MTRR, and DNMT3B genes. Furthermore, in PBMCs, the cocoa extract significantly lowered the mRNA levels of the DNMTs, MTHFR, and MTRR. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the consumption of cocoa decreases the global DNA methylation of peripheral leukocytes in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. In vitro experiments with PBMCs suggest that cocoa may exert this effect partially via the down-regulation of DNMTs, MTHFR and MTRR, which are key genes involved in this epigenetic process.Clinicaltrials.govNCT00511420 and NCT00502047.

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen C*12:02:02 and Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor 2DL5 are Distinctly Associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis in the Taiwanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Man; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Jan Wu, Yeong-Jian; Lin, Jing-Chi; Wu, Jianming; Chen, Ji-Yih

    2017-08-16

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I ligands and Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells and certain T cells. We examined their genetic predisposition to disease susceptibility and clinical phenotypes in Taiwanese ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. KIR genotyping and Human Leucocyte Antigen C (HLA-C) sequencing were performed in 653 Taiwanese AS patients and 952 healthy controls. KIR genotype distributions and HLA-C allele frequencies were compared in patients and controls and among patients with and without HLA-B27 positivity, early age onset and spinal syndesmophytes. HLA-C alleles were functionally characterized using 3D structural modelling with peptide simulation. This study discovered that the HLA-C*12:02:02 allele (43.42% vs. 3.31%; p C*12:02:02 allele. KIR2DL5 (p = 0.0047; pFDR = 0.0423) and the KIR Bx haplotype (p = 0.0000275) were protective against Taiwanese AS, while KIR 2DS4/1D (22 base pair truncated deletion; p = 0.0044; pFDR = 0.1998) appeared to be a risk factor for it. KIR2DL5 combined with the HLA-C1/C2 heterozygous genotype showed a protective effect (AS 5.97% vs. normal 11.66%; p = 0.002; pFDR = 0.0127, OR, 0.48 95% CI: 0.33-0.70); in contrast, KIR 2DS4/1D combined with the HLA-C1C1 homozygous genotype (AS 45.33% vs. normal 35.92%; p = 0.002; pFDR = 0.0127, OR, 1.48 95% CI: 1.21-1.81) represented a risk factor for AS development. Our data suggested that interactions between KIRs and their cognate HLA-C ligands may contribute to the pathogenesis of AS.

  11. Down-regulation of human leukocyte antigens class I on peripheral T lymphocytes and NK cells from subjects in region of high-incidence gastrointestinal tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-mian; LI Ying-jie; GUAN Xiao; YANG Xiao-yun; GAO Xi-mei; YANG Xiao-jing; WANG Li-shui; ZOU Xiong

    2011-01-01

    Background Many types of human tumors can suppress the immune system to enhance their survival. Loss or down-regulation of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) class I on tumors is considered to be a major mechanism of tumor immune escape. Our previous studies found that HLA class I on peripheral-blood mononuclear cells was significantly lower in gastric cancer patients. The present study made an analysis of HLA class I expression on peripheral-blood T lymphocytes and NK cells from subjects of Lijiadian village, a village with high-incidence gastrointestinal tumor. Methods A total of 181 villagers from Lijiadian village and 153 normal controls from the Department of Health Examination Center were enrolled in this study. Using a multi-tumor markers detection system, these villagers were divided into two groups: high-risk group (tumor markers positive group) and low-risk group (tumor markers negative group). The percentage of T lymphocytes and NK cells and levels of HLA class I on their surface were determined in these subjects by flow cytometry.Results Percentages of T lymphocytes and NK cells in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells did not vary with age. The expression level of HLA class I on peripheral T lymphocytes and NK cells was not affected by age or gender, but was significantly down-regulated in Lijiadian villagers (P<0.05), especially on the surface of NK cells (P<0.01). Compared with the low-risk group, there was a significant reduction of HLA class I on peripheral T lymphocytes (P <0.05) and NK cells (P <0.05) in the high-risk group.Conclusions HLA class I on peripheral T lymphocytes and NK cells may be involved in tumorigenesis and development of gastrointestinal tumor, and understanding their changes in expression may provide new insights into the mechanism of tumor immunity.

  12. Study of the inhibition by polymorphonuclear leukocytes of TNF-α release from human mononuclear cells and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of human PMNs on the production of TNF-α by the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and to elucidate its tentative mechanism. Human PMNs and PBMCs were isolated from the venous blood of healthy donors by dextran sedimentation and density gradient centrifugation. In the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), PMNs and PBMCs were cocultured at the ratio of 2:1 for 20 h and the concentration of TNF-α in the supernatant was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The binding rate of monocytes with the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled LPS (FITC-LPS) and the mean surface fluorescence intensity of monocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results showed that PMNs were capable of inhibiting the TNF-α release from PBMCs (P<0.05). PMNs suppressed the TNF-α release from PBMCs by 45% on average when PMNs and PBMCs cocultured at the ratio of 2:1. Paraformaldehyde-fixed PMNs still demonstrated the same inhibition (P<0.05),which proved that the inhibition was dependent on cell-to-cell contact and suggested that effector molecules responsible for this effect existed on the cell surface of PMNs. In the presence of PMNs, the binding rate of monocytes with the FITC-LPS and the mean surface fluorescence intensity of monocytes were not affected compared with PBMCs alone (P>0.05). As incubation time was prolonged, the binding of FITC-LPS to monocytes increased (P<0.05). Thus PMNs did not block the binding of LPS with monocytes. It was concluded that PMNs suppressed the TNF-α release from PBMCs via cell-to-cell interaction. In a cell-contact dependent manner, PMNs might interfere with the signal transduction pathway through which LPS activated PBMCs, thus attenuating the response of PBMCs to LPS and downregulating the TNF-α release.

  13. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells.

  14. Intravital leukocyte detection using the gradient inverse coefficient of variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Gang; Ray, Nilanjan; Acton, Scott T

    2005-07-01

    The problem of identifying and counting rolling leukocytes within intravital microscopy is of both theoretical and practical interest. Currently, methods exist for tracking rolling leukocytes in vivo, but these methods rely on manual detection of the cells. In this paper we propose a technique for accurately detecting rolling leukocytes based on Bayesian classification. The classification depends on a feature score, the gradient inverse coefficient of variation (GICOV), which serves to discriminate rolling leukocytes from a cluttered environment. The leukocyte detection process consists of three sequential steps: the first step utilizes an ellipse matching algorithm to coarsely identify the leukocytes by finding the ellipses with a locally maximal GICOV. In the second step, starting from each of the ellipses found in the first step, a B-spline snake is evolved to refine the leukocytes boundaries by maximizing the associated GICOV score. The third and final step retains only the extracted contours that have a GICOV score above the analytically determined threshold. Experimental results using 327 rolling leukocytes were compared to those of human experts and currently used methods. The proposed GICOV method achieves 78.6% leukocyte detection accuracy with 13.1% false alarm rate.

  15. New and known iridoid- and phenylethanoid glycosides from Harpagophytum procumbens and their in vitro inhibition of human leukocyte elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boje, Kerstin; Lechtenberg, Matthias; Nahrstedt, Adolf

    2003-09-01

    Ten compounds, harpagoside (1), 8- p-coumaroylharpagide (2), 8-feruloylharpagide (3), 8-cinnamoylmyoporoside (4), pagoside (5), acteoside (6), isoacteoside (7), 6'- O-acetylacteoside (8), cinnamic acid (9) and caffeic acid (10) were isolated from the storage roots of Harpagophytum procumbens, Pedaliaceae. Compounds 1, 2, 6, 7 and 9 are known for H. procumbens; 3 and 10 were isolated the first time from H. procumbens; compounds 4, 5 and 8 are new natural products. Their structures were elucidated using spectroscopic data (NMR, with NOE, COSY and HMBC experiments, UV, [alpha]). The inhibitory activity of aqueous extracts of the roots of H. procumbens and H. zeyheri as well as the main compounds isolated from H. procumbens was tested on human neutrophile elastase. Although inhibition was comparatively weak a dose-dependence was observed. An IC (50) of 542 microg/mL was determined for the aqueous extract of H. procumbens, but 1012 microg/mL for that of H. zeyheri. 6'- O-Acetylacteoside (8), that is not present in H. zeyheri, inhibited the enzyme with an IC (50) of 47 microg/mL (70 microM), compound 7 with 179 microg/mL (286 microM), 2 with 179 microg/mL (331 microM), 5 with 154 microg/mL (260 microM) and 10, which was also used as reference compound, with an IC (50) of 86 microg/mL (475 microM). The IC (50) values of acteoside, harpagoside, cinnamic acid and stachyose were higher than 300 microg/mL and thus not further determined.

  16. Human Leukocyte Antigen-Presented Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Is a Surface Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target for Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Andrea M; Kaabinejadian, Saghar; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Ken W; Zuna, Rosemary E; Husain, Sanam; Adams, Gregory P; MacDonald, Glen; Dillon, Rachelle L; Ames, Harold; Buchli, Rico; Hawkins, Oriana E; Weidanz, Jon A; Hildebrand, William H

    2016-02-01

    T cells recognize cancer cells via HLA/peptide complexes, and when disease overtakes these immune mechanisms, immunotherapy can exogenously target these same HLA/peptide surface markers. We previously identified an HLA-A2-presented peptide derived from macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and generated antibody RL21A against this HLA-A2/MIF complex. The objective of the current study was to assess the potential for targeting the HLA-A2/MIF complex in ovarian cancer. First, MIF peptide FLSELTQQL was eluted from the HLA-A2 of the human cancerous ovarian cell lines SKOV3, A2780, OV90, and FHIOSE118hi and detected by mass spectrometry. By flow cytometry, RL21A was shown to specifically stain these four cell lines in the context of HLA-A2. Next, partially matched HLA-A*02:01+ ovarian cancer (n = 27) and normal fallopian tube (n = 24) tissues were stained with RL21A by immunohistochemistry to assess differential HLA-A2/MIF complex expression. Ovarian tumor tissues revealed significantly increased RL21A staining compared with normal fallopian tube epithelium (P < 0.0001), with minimal staining of normal stroma and blood vessels (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001 compared with tumor cells) suggesting a therapeutic window. We then demonstrated the anticancer activity of toxin-bound RL21A via the dose-dependent killing of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, MIF-derived peptide FLSELTQQL is HLA-A2-presented and recognized by RL21A on ovarian cancer cell lines and patient tumor tissues, and targeting of this HLA-A2/MIF complex with toxin-bound RL21A can induce ovarian cancer cell death. These results suggest that the HLA-A2/MIF complex should be further explored as a cell-surface target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Leukocytes, cytokines, growth factors and hormones in human skeletal muscle and blood after uphill or downhill running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christer; Sjödin, Bertil; Sjöberg, Berit; Lenkei, Rodica; Renström, Per; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Ekblom, Björn

    2004-01-01

    Muscular adaptation to physical exercise has previously been described as a repair process following tissue damage. Recently, evidence has been published to question this hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate inflammatory processes in human skeletal muscle and epimysium after acute physical exercise with large eccentric components. Three groups of subjects (n= 19) performed 45 min treadmill running at either 4 deg (n= 5) or 8 deg (n= 9) downhill or 4 deg uphill (n= 5) and one group served as control (n= 9). One biopsy was taken from each subject 48 h post exercise. Blood samples were taken up to 7 days post exercise. Compared to the control group, none of the markers of inflammation in muscle and epimysium samples was different in any exercised group. Only subjects in the Downhill groups experienced delayed onset of muscle soreness (DOMS) and increased serum creatine kinase activity (CK). The detected levels of immunohistochemical markers for T cells (CD3), granulocytes (CD11b), leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1β (HIF-1β) were greater in epimysium from exercised subjects with DOMS ratings >3 (0–10 scale) compared to exercised subjects without DOMS but not higher than controls. Eccentric physical exercise (downhill running) did not result in skeletal muscle inflammation 48 h post exercise, despite DOMS and increased CK. It is suggested that exercise can induce DOMS by activating inflammatory factors present in the epimysium before exercise. Repeated physical training may alter the content of inflammatory factors in the epimysium and thus reduce DOMS. PMID:14766942

  18. Major histocompatibility complex and strong human leukocyte antigen-DRB1 and gender association with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome in Mexican Mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aláez, Carmen; Flores-A, Hilario; Concha del Río, Luz Elena; Munguía, Andrea; Rodríguez, Araceli; García, David; Arellanes, Lourdes; Gorodezky, Clara

    2011-12-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome (VKH) is a multisystem autoimmune disorder mediated by cytotoxic T cells targeting melanocytes antigen(s). A strong major histocompatibility complex (MHC) association with HLA-DRB1*04:05 has been demonstrated in different populations. We investigated the contribution of HLA-A*, -B*, -C*, -DRB1*, and -DQB1* genes, belonging to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), to the expression of VKH and we analyzed the influence of gender on the HLA association. A total of 76 patients and 256 healthy Mexican Mestizo individuals were included. HLA-A, B, C, and DQB1 typing was performed using the polymerase chain reaction, and hybridization was done using sequence specific probes. DRB1 alleles were defined by means of sequence base typing. The frequency of DRB1*04:05 (odds ratio=2.95) and DRB1*04:04 (odds ratio=2.79) were found to be significantly increased in the patients, conferring a similar risk. Gender stratification analysis showed that these alleles were associated with female gender only. No HLA class I or class II alleles were significantly deviated in males. The frequency of DRB1*04:07 was increased in the whole group, upon withdrawal from analysis the DRB1*04:04 and *04:05 positive patients. A trend of DRB1 alleles contributing to the expression of VKH is suggested: DRB1*04:05=*04:04>*04:07>*01:01>*01:02. Although none of the results were significant after the p value was corrected, the data are consistent with those in numerous other studies, suggesting that several different DRB1* alleles may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of the disease by presenting an overlapping set of ocular peptides to the T cells, which in turn may trigger the autoimmune response that is present in the patients.

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen DQB1 (HLA-DQB1 Polymorphisms and the Risk for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Peng Jin

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is an autoimmune disorder of the peripheral nervous system. There is no consensus regarding reported associations between human leukocyte antigen DQB1 (HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms and the risk for developing GBS. Here, we evaluated possible associations between HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms and the risk for GBS using a meta-analysis. We searched PubMed for case-control genetic association studies for HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms (*020x, *030x, *040x, *050x, and *060x and the risk for GBS. Fixed-effect meta-analytical methods were used for the outcome measure and subgroup analyses. Estimated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to investigate the associations between HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms and the risk for GBS. Nine case-control studies involving 780 cases of GBS and 1353 controls were identified in the current study. The meta-analysis demonstrated no significant associations between HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms and the risk for GBS in Asian and Caucasian populations. There were two associations that approached significance: HLA-DQB1*030x in Asian patients (P = 0.07; OR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.57-1.03 and HLA-DQB1*060x in all patients (P = 0.08; OR: 1.48, 95% CI: 0.96-2.29. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to establish a definitive assessment of the contribution of HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms to GBS risk.

  20. Impact of cyclophosphamide dose of conditioning on the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for aplastic anemia from human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takehiko; Koh, Hideo; Onishi, Yasushi; Kako, Shinichi; Onizuka, Makoto; Kanamori, Heiwa; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Kato, Chiaki; Iida, Hiroatsu; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Maeda, Tetsuo; Nakao, Shinji; Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2016-04-01

    The standard conditioning regimen in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for aplastic anemia from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling has been high-dose cyclophosphamide (CY 200 mg/kg). In the present study, results for 203 patients with aplastic anemia aged 16 years or older who underwent allogeneic HSCT from HLA-identical siblings were retrospectively analyzed using the registry database of Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. Conditioning regimens were defined as a (1) high-dose CY (200 mg/kg or greater)-based (n = 117); (2) reduced-dose CY (100 mg/kg or greater, but less than 200 mg/kg)-based (n = 38); and (3) low-dose CY (less than 100 mg/kg)-based (n = 48) regimen. Patient age and the proportion of patients receiving fludarabine were significantly higher in the reduced- and low-dose CY groups than the high-dose CY group. Engraftment was comparable among the groups. Five-year overall survival (OS) tended to be higher in the low-dose CY group [93.0 % (95 % CI 85.1-100.0 %)] than the high-dose CY [84.2 % (95 % CI 77.1-91.3 %)] or reduced-dose CY groups [83.8 % (95 % CI 71.8-95.8 %); P = 0.214]. Age-adjusted OS was higher in the low-dose CY group than the high- and reduced-dose CY groups with borderline significance (P = 0.067). These results suggest that CY dose can safely be reduced without increasing graft rejection by adding fludarabine in allogeneic HSCT for aplastic anemia from an HLA-identical sibling.

  1. The role of flow cytometry in celiac disease screening using human leukocyte antigen in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

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    Arregui, Miren Vicuña; Urmeneta, Jose Manuel Zozaya; Brito, Helena León; De Esteban, Juan Pablo Martínez; Martínez, Carlos Prieto; Llenas, Lluis Forga; Urtasun, Erkuden Aranburu; Pericas, Francisco Sala; Musgo, Ramón Angós; Gutierrez, Maria Rosario Mercado; Sarrasqueta, Mercedes Palacios

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) have an increased risk of celiac disease (CD). Since CD can be seronegative, more sensible tests for detection are needed. In seronegative patients, CD diagnosis may be difficult because of a lack of specificity. Flow cytometry analysis of lymphocyte populations can be useful in this situation. We aimed to study the prevalence of CD in adult DM1 using human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility-based screening. A secondary goal was to study the role of flow cytometry as a complementary tool in these patients. Methods We selected 200 patients with DM1, of whom 190 (95%) had HLA DQ2, DQ8 or both. Of these, 136 agreed to participate and provided epidemiological data. All patients underwent blood tests and gastroscopy. Results Sixteen patients had a histology consistent with CD. After ruling out other diagnoses, 6 patients were diagnosed with CD, 2 of whom had negative antibodies. All were DQ2.5 homozygous, with a CD prevalence of 9.8% in this group. In the flow cytometry analysis of duodenal biopsy samples, when we compared all non-CD with CD patients, we found that the γ/δ intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) percentage was significantly higher and the CD3 negative IEL percentage significantly lower in the CD group. We found similar results when we compared only those with histological lesions. Conclusions Screening of CD in patients with DM1 by HLA detects only 1% of seronegative patients with CD. DQ2.5 homozygous patients are at most risk of developing CD. The study of lymphocyte populations in the duodenal biopsy by flow cytometry discriminates patients with CD from those without CD with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:28243038

  2. Familial clustering of juvenile thyroid autoimmunity: higher risk is conferred by human leukocyte antigen DR3-DQ2 and thyroid peroxidase antibody status in fathers.

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    Segni, Maria; Pani, Michael A; Pasquino, Anna Maria; Badenhoop, Klaus

    2002-08-01

    Thyroid autoimmunity is one of the most common immune disorders in females, and its polygenic background remains to be elucidated. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ region of chromosome 6 has been shown to confer susceptibility to thyroid autoimmune disease. The aim of our present investigation was to determine whether the transmission of high risk HLA DQ to patients with thyroid autoimmunity differs when transmission is from fathers as opposed to when transmission is from mothers. We studied 91 juvenile patients with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (68 females and 23 males; mean age, 10.5 +/- 3.9 yr), 12 patients with Graves' disease (all females; mean age, 8.8 +/- 4.0 yr), 53 healthy siblings, and their parents for thyroid function, antibodies, ultrasound, and DNA typing for HLA DQ susceptibility alleles. We observed an increased rate of transmission for the DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 (DQ2) haplotype [35 of 53 transmitted (66%); P = 0.02]. This allele was preferentially transmitted by fathers [21 of 27 (78%); P < 0.004], whereas the maternal DQ2 haplotypes were not transmitted more often than expected. Subsequently, families were stratified as follows according to the parental thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb) status: no parent, only mothers, only fathers, and both parents positive. There was no significant maternal transmission disequilibrium in any subset, but the paternal HLA DQ2 was preferentially transmitted [11 of 14 cases (79%); P = 0.03] in the group of TPOAb-positive mothers, and we observed a similar trend in the group of TPOAb- positive fathers (P = 0.08). Also, the portion of offspring affected by Graves' disease was significantly higher in TPOAb-positive than in TPOAb-negative fathers (P < 0.02). In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a significant effect of paternal HLA DQ alleles as well as antibody status on susceptibility to thyroid autoimmune disease in juvenile patients.

  3. Outcome of recipients of human leukocyte antigen incompatible kidney transplants who underwent desensitization at King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia

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    Mohammed Abdulrahim Idris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients whom are highly sensitized immunologically, the benefit of kidney transplantation can be extended to this population through the utilization of organs from human leukocyte antigen incompatible (HLAi donors. This retrospective observational study was designed to identify the incidence and predictors of acute antibody-mediated rejection/acute cellular rejection (AMR/ACR in our kidney recipients from living kidney donors (sensitized and those with low immunologic risk. This single-center study has been conducted at King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam (KFSH-D, Saudi Arabia; during the period of September 2008- August 2013. All eligible recipients of living donor kidneys during the study period were included (n = 213 in the study. Over 60% of patients in the study were females. Thirty of the 213 kidneys were from HLAi donors. During the follow-up period (median follow-up time = 16 months; 3–27 months, the incidence rate of ACR among HLA compatible (HLAc and HLAi groups was 22.2% and 16.7%, respectively (P >0.05. The incidence rate of AMR was 2.6% in HLAc group and 16.7%in the HLAi group (P<0.05. The significantly higher incidence of AMR in HLAi group can be explained by the presence of the donor-specific antibodies in weak titers. These results are consistent with studies from similar populations in published literature. However, the relatively small number and short duration of the study are considered, and longer follow-up of this population will be needed for conclusions on the sustainability of our findings.

  4. [A preliminary study on the effects of feto-maternal microchimerism in activated human leukocyte antigen haploidentical mobilized peripheral blood stem cells on treatment of solid tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shui; Yu, Jin-pu; Li, Hui; An, Xiu-mei; Xin, Ning; Ren, Xiu-bao

    2009-10-01

    To study the effect of feto-maternal microchimerism in the treatment of activated human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haploidentical mobilized peripheral blood cells against solid tumors. Genomic DNA samples of 25 pairs of HLA haploidentical donors and recipients were extracted. The donor-derived HLA-DRB loci were detected with nested PCR-sequence specific primer (SSP) typing. The mixed lymphocyte proliferation action between the patients and respective donors, the engraftment of donor's cells and the serum levels of Th1/Th2 type of cytokines were measured with MTT, FISH and ELISA method respectively. The survival time of patients with or without feto-maternal microchimerism were compared as well. Using nested PCR-SSP typing, the positive rates of feto-maternal microchimerism in the 25 pairs of HLA haploidentical donors and recipients were 40% in the maternal/children pairs and 0 in the paternal/children pairs. The chimerism positive patients showed less proliferation activity when cocultured with respective donors as compared with unrelated ones (P = 0.03). Only one chimerism positive patient experienced the engraft of donor's cell 3 months after treatment as the donor derived XX chromosome was identified with FISH. When the data of chimerism positive patients were deleted, the serum levels of IFNgamma 1 month after treatment dropped dramatically from 171.4 (26.3 approximately 258.4) ng/L to 29.4 (1.2 approximately 39.9) ng/L. The survival time in chimerism positive patients of the maternal/children pairs was significantly longer than that in chimerism negative patients, which was (31.2 +/- 4.3) months and (11.1 +/- 3.3) months, respectively (P = 0.036). Feto-maternal microchimerism might induce anergy in the HLA haploidentical donors, favor the engraftment of donor's progenitors and maintenance of positive microenvironment and prolong the survival time.

  5. Outcomes of Interferon/Ribavirin Therapy in Patients with HCV Defined by Expression of Plasma Soluble Human Leukocyte Antigen-G but Not IL-37

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shi-xiong; Ma, Jian-bo; Hu, Yao-ren; Hu, Ai-rong; Shen, Qiang; Gao, Guo-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to life-threatening complications worldwide. Immunomodulation signals the response to virus clearance. The immune-suppressive molecule human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) has been shown to function in inhibiting both innate and adaptive immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of HLA-G and IL-37 in sustained virological response (SVR) and non-SVR HCV-positive patients before and after complete treatment with a combination of pegylated interferon (IFN) and ribavirin (RBV). Material/Methods Our study included 132 chronic hepatitis C patents who received combined therapy with IFN-α and RBV. Both SVR and non-SVR patients were included. The end-of-treatment response was defined as undetectable HCV RNA at week 48. Patients with end-of-treatment response were detected by HCV RNA at 24 weeks after therapy. The expression levels of HLA-G and IL-37 at the end and 24 weeks after treatment were detected by ELISA. Results Plasma HLA-G and IL-37 were significantly increased in HCV-infected patients compared with healthy individuals before treatment. Furthermore, HLA-G in SVR patients was noticeably decreased after treatment, while HLA-G in non-SVR patients had no changes after treatment. Additionally, both in SVR and non-SVR patients, the expression of IL-37 was remarkably reduced compared with baseline after treatment. Conclusions These findings suggest that elevation of HLA-G and IL-37 in HCV may play an important role in response to combined therapy with IFN-α and RBV. Monitoring the expression of HLA-G during therapy could contribute to adjusting the treatment program of HCV-infected patients. PMID:27112970

  6. Human leukocyte antigen class Ⅱ DQB1*0301, DRB1*1101 alleles and spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus infection: A meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Hong; Rong-Bin Yu; Nan-Xiong Sun; Bin Wang; Yao-Chu Xu; Guan-Ling Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the associations of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ⅱ DQB1*0301 and/or DRB1*1101 allele with spontaneous hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance by meta-analysis of individual dataset from all studies published till date.METHODS: To clarify the impact of HLA class Ⅱ polymorphisms on viral clearance, we performed a metaanalysis of the published data from 11 studies comparing the frequencies of DQB1*0301 and DRB1*1101 alleles in individuals with spontaneous resolution to those with persistent infection. As we identified the heterogeneity between studies, summary statistical data were calculated based on a random-effect model.RESULTS: Meta-analyses yielded summary estimatesodds ratio (OR) of 2.36 [95%CI (1.62, 3.43), P<0.00001]and 2.02 [95%CI (1.56, 2.62), P<0.00001] for the effects of DQB1*0301 and DRB1*1101 alleles on spontaneous clearance of HCV, respectively.CONCLUSION: These results support the hypothesis that specific HLA class Ⅱ alleles might influence the susceptibility or resistance to persistent HCV infection.Both DQB1*0301 and DRB1*1101 are protective alleles and present HCV epitopes more effectively to CD4+T lymphocytes than others, and subjects with these two alleles are at a lower risk of developing chronic HCV infection. Large, multi-ethnic confirmatory and welldesigned studies are needed to determine the host genetic determinants of HCV infection.

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I and II Alleles and Overall Survival in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Follicular Lymphoma

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    Yani Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in the 6p21 chromosomal region, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes and tumor necrosis factor (TNF, has been linked to both etiology and clinical outcomes of lymphomas. We estimated the effects of HLA class I (A, B, and C, class II DRB1 alleles, and the ancestral haplotype (AH 8.1 (HLAA*01-B*08-DRB1*03-TNF-308A on overall survival (OS among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL and follicular lymphoma (FL in a population-based study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. During a median followup of 89 months, 31% (52 of 166 DLBCL and 28% (46 of 165 FL patients died. Using multivariate Cox regression models, we observed statistically significant associations between genetic variants and survival: HLA-Cw*07:01 was associated with poorer OS among DLBCL patients (Hazard ratio [HR] = 1.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–3.05; HLA-A*01:01 was associated with poorer OS (HR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.24–4.01, and HLA-DRB1*13 (HR = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.02–0.90 and HLA-B Bw4 (HR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.20–0.63 with better OS among FL patients. These results support a role for HLA in the prognosis of DLBCL and FL and represent a promising class of prognostic factors that warrants further evaluation.

  8. Human leukocyte antigens-immunogenetics of neuromyelitis optica or Devic's disease and the impact on the immunopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment: a critical review

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    Maria Panos Gontika

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder, predominantly characterized by severe optic neuritis, transverse myelitis and the high level of antibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4 or NMO-immunoglobulin G (IgG. Researches trying to correlate NMO with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles took place in a limited extend in the last few years. Nevertheless, it has become clear that HLAs play a crucial role in the genetic risk of NMO, in the understanding of its pathogenesis and the differential diagnosis mainly from multiple sclerosis (MS, and also from other demyelinating diseases. In this study, we retrieved all the available data in the MEDLINE concerning the distribution of HLA frequencies in NMO and NMO-spectrum diseases, in all available ethnic groups, and compared them with those of MS. The results suggest that, the well-established HLA-DRB1*15:01 allele, associated with MS, plays rather a protective role for NMO. HLA-DRB1*03 allele is highly frequent in the NMO-IgG positive Caucasian patients, while HLA-DPB1*05:01 is the predominant allele in Japanese patients. The HLA-genotype and anti-AQP4 presence are the common immunological components in cases of comorbidity of NMO and other autoimmune diseases. The authors aim to summarize in the critical review the results of these researches worldwide, create a workable table including all this information for an easier reading approach and highlight the importance of these results in therapeutic decision making, using the HLA profile as biomarker in patients' stratification.

  9. Gene polymorphisms against DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide in leukocytes of healthy humans through comet assay: a quasi-experimental study

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    Klautau-Guimarães Maria N

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal cellular metabolism is well established as the source of endogenous reactive oxygen species which account for the background levels of oxidative DNA damage detected in normal tissue. Hydrogen peroxide imposes an oxidative stress condition on cells that can result in DNA damage, leading to mutagenesis and cell death. Several potentially significant genetic variants related to oxidative stress have already been identified, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors have been reported as possible antioxidant agents that can reduce vascular oxidative stress in cardiovascular events. Methods We investigate the influences of haptoglobin, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD Val9Ala, catalase (CAT -21A/T, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1 Pro198Leu, ACE (I/D and gluthatione S-transferases GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene polymorphisms against DNA damage and oxidative stress. These were induced by exposing leukocytes from peripheral blood of healthy humans (N = 135 to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and the effects were tested by comet assay. Blood samples were submitted to genotyping and comet assay (before and after treatment with H2O2 at 250 μM and 1 mM. Results After treatment with H2O2 at 250 μM, the GPx-1 polymorphism significantly influenced results of comet assay and a possible association of the Pro/Leu genotype with higher DNA damage was found. The highest or lowest DNA damage also depended on interaction between GPX-1/ACE and Hp/GSTM1T1 polymorphisms when hydrogen peroxide treatment increased oxidative stress. Conclusions The GPx-1 polymorphism and the interactions between GPX-1/ACE and Hp/GSTM1T1 can be determining factors for DNA oxidation provoked by hydrogen peroxide, and thus for higher susceptibility to or protection against oxidative stress suffered by healthy individuals.

  10. Interaction between polymorphisms of the Human Leukocyte Antigen and HPV-16 Variants on the risk of invasive cervical cancer

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    Ribeiro Karina B

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV is the major risk factor for invasive cervical cancer (ICC, and non-European variants of HPV-16 are associated with an increased risk of persistence and ICC. HLA class II polymorphisms are also associated with genetic susceptibility to ICC. Our aim is to verify if these associations are influenced by HPV-16 variability. Methods We characterized HPV-16 variants by PCR in 107 ICC cases, which were typed for HLA-DQA1, DRB1 and DQB1 genes and compared to 257 controls. We measured the magnitude of associations by logistic regression analysis. Results European (E, Asian-American (AA and African (Af variants were identified. Here we show that inverse association between DQB1*05 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39–1.12] and HPV-16 positive ICC in our previous report was mostly attributable to AA variant carriers (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.10–0.75. We observed similar proportions of HLA DRB1*1302 carriers in E-P positive cases and controls, but interestingly, this allele was not found in AA cases (p = 0.03, Fisher exact test. A positive association with DRB1*15 was observed in both groups of women harboring either E (OR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13–7.86 or AA variants (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.00–5.46. There was an inverse association between DRB1*04 and ICC among women with HPV-16 carrying the 350T [83L] single nucleotide polymorphism in the E6 gene (OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08–0.96. An inverse association between DQB1*05 and cases carrying 350G (83V variants was also found (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.15–0.89. Conclusion Our results suggest that the association between HLA polymorphism and risk of ICC might be influenced by the distribution of HPV-16 variants.

  11. Human leukocyte antigen-G polymorphism influences the age of onset and autoantibody status in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariaselvam, C M; Chaaben, A B; Salah, S; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Negi, V S

    2015-03-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the frequency of three gene polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) gene in south Indian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and analyze their influence on disease susceptibility, phenotype and treatment response. HLA-G 14 bp insertion (Ins)/deletion (del) (rs66554220), HLA-G +3142G>C (rs1063320) and +3187A>G (rs9380142) polymorphism was analyzed in 221 RA patients and 200 healthy controls. Frequency of HLA-G genotypes or alleles did not differ between patients and controls. Analysis based on rheumatoid factor (RF) status revealed that the frequency of allele 'A' (rs9380142) was significantly higher in RF-positive than in RF-negative patients [84% vs 74%, Yates-corrected P value (Pc) = 0.04, odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-3.2]. A similar difference was maintained in RF-positive female patients than their RF-negative counterparts (83% vs 71%, Pc = 0.02, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0 to 3.4) and between RF-positive and RF-negative young onset RA (YORA) patients (84% vs 73%, Pc = 0.03, OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.2), suggesting that rs9380142 polymorphism influenced RF status. The 14 bp Ins allele of rs66554220 was significantly more prevalent in RF-positive YORA than in RF-positive late onset RA (LORA) patients (51% vs 25%, P = 0.03, OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.1-9.8). Frequency of the four major haplotypes [InsGA (48%), DelGA (22%), DelCG (18%), DelCA (9.7%)] observed did not differ between cases and controls. HLA-G does not appear to be a risk factor for development of RA in south Indian Tamils but may act as a genetic modifier of clinical phenotype in terms of autoantibody production, gender preference and age at disease onset.

  12. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy.

  13. Nitrogen and protein components of human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambraeus, L; Lönnerdal, B; Forsum, E; Gebre-Medhin, M

    1978-09-01

    The true protein content of human milk is 0.9%, in well-nourished as well as malnourished mothers. Casein constitutes only about 20% of the protein nitrogen in human milk. The remaining 80% is derived from the whey proteins, the three dominant components being alpha-lactalbumin, lactoferrin and secretory IgA. alpha-lactalbumin is a subunit of lactose synthetase. Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein which plays a role in the defence against gastro-intestinal infections and is probably also involved in iron transport in the gut. Secretory IgA is comparatively stable at low pH; it is resistant to proteolytic enzymes and plays an essential role in the immunological defence against gastro-intestinal infections. Lysozyme is a minor component of the whey proteins and represents an active enzyme with a bactericidal effect. The nutritional and immunological significance of the marked differences with respect to the nitrogen and protein compositions of human milk and cow's milk should not be underestimated, but need further elucidation.

  14. Misoprostol Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production by Equine Leukocytes

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    Emily Medlin Martin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 are potent immune mediators that exacerbate multiple equine diseases such as sepsis and laminitis. Unfortunately, safe and effective cytokine-targeting therapies are lacking in horses; therefore, novel mechanisms of inhibiting cytokine production are critically needed. One potential mechanism for inhibiting cytokine synthesis is elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP. In human leukocytes, intracellular cAMP production is induced by activation of E-prostanoid (EP receptors 2 and 4. These receptors can be targeted by the EP2/4 agonist and prostaglandin E1 analog, misoprostol. Misoprostol is currently used as a gastroprotectant in horses but has not been evaluated as a cytokine-targeting therapeutic. Thus, we hypothesized that misoprostol treatment would inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated equine leukocytes in an in vitro inflammation model. To test this hypothesis, equine leukocyte-rich plasma (LRP was collected from 12 healthy adult horses and used to model LPS-mediated inflammatory signaling. LRP was treated with varying concentrations of misoprostol either before (pretreated or following (posttreated LPS stimulation. LRP supernatants were assayed for 23 cytokines using an equine-specific multiplex bead immunoassay. Leukocytes were isolated from LRP, and leukocyte mRNA levels of four important cytokines were evaluated via RT-PCR. Statistical differences between treatments were determined using one-way RM ANOVA (Holm–Sidak post hoc testing or Friedman’s RM ANOVA on Ranks (SNK post hoc testing, where appropriate (p < 0.05, n = 3–6 horses. These studies revealed that misoprostol pre- and posttreatment inhibited LPS-induced TNFα and IL-6 protein production in equine leukocytes but had no effect on IL-8 protein. Interestingly, misoprostol pretreatment enhanced IL-1β protein synthesis

  15. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary endothelial damage

  16. Modulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between human smooth muscle cells by leukocyte-derived growth factors and cytokines in relation to atherogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, A.

    1997-01-01


    In this thesis, the effect of leukocyte-derived growth factors and cytokines on GJIC between SMC was investigated. GJIC is regarded as an important mechanism in the control of cell growth, cell differentiation and tissue homeostasis. Disturbance of SMC growth control is regarded to be a k

  17. Quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects with and without CMV disease by using PCR and the SHARP Signal Detection System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, G; Handfield, J; Murray, G; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Lazar, J G; Bergeron, M G

    1997-02-01

    We report the development of a simple and rapid PCR assay for quantitation of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA load in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Using this system, a very good correlation was found between a high number of CMV copies in the blood and the presence of CMV disease in subjects with AIDS.

  18. Killing of gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes: role of an O2-independent bactericidal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J; Victor, M; Stendhal, O; Elsbach, P

    1982-04-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a cationic bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) present in both rabbit and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes is the principal O2-independent bactericidal agent of these cells toward several strains of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium (1978. J. Biol. Chem. 253: 2664--2672; 1979. J. Biol. Chem. 254: 11000--11009). To further evaluate the possible role of this protein in the killing of gram-negative bacteria by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we have measured the bactericidal activity of intact rabbit peritoneal exudate leukocytes under aerobic or anaerobic conditions and of intact human leukocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease. Anaerobic conditions were created by flushing the cells under a nitrogen stream. Effective removal of oxygen was demonstrated by the inability of nitrogen-flushed leukocytes to mount a respiratory burst (measured as increased conversion of 1-[14C]glucose leads to 14CO2 or by superoxide production) during bacterial ingestion. At a bacteria/leukocyte ratio of 10:1, killing of gram-positive, BPI-resistant, Staphylococcus epidermidis is markedly impaired in the absence of oxygen (76.4 +/- 3.3% killing in room air, 29.2 +/- 8.2% killing in nitrogen). Essentially all increased bacterial survival is intracellular. In contrast, both a nonopsonized rough strain (MR-10) and an opsonized smooth strain (MS) of S. typhimurium 395 are killed equally well in room air and nitrogen. A maximum of 70--80 MR-10 and 30--40 MS are killed per leukocyte either in the presence or absence of oxygen. There is no intracellular bacterial survival in either condition indicating that intracellular O2-independent bactericidal system(s) of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes can at least match the leukocyte's ingestive capacity. Whole homogenates and crude acid extracts manifest similar bactericidal capacity toward S. typhimurium 395. This activity can be accounted for by the BPI content of these

  19. A monoclonal antibody against human MUDENG protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagley, Yadav; Choi, Jun-Ha; Wickramanayake, Dimuthu Dhammika; Choi, Geun-Yeol; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Oh, Jae-Wook

    2013-08-01

    MUDENG (mu-2-related death-inducing gene, MuD) encodes a predicted ∼54-kDa protein in humans, considered to be involved in trafficking proteins from endosomes toward other membranous compartments as well as in inducing cell death. Here we report on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the middle domain of human (h) MuD. This IgG sub 1 MAb, named M3H9, recognizes residues 244-326 in the middle domain of the MuD protein. Thus, the MuD proteins expressed in an astroglioma cell line and primary astrocytes can be detected by the M3H9 MAb. We showed that M3H9 MAb can be useful in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot experiments. In addition, M3H9 MAb can detect the expression of the MuD protein in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse ovary and uterus tissues. These results indicate that the MuD MAb M3H9 could be useful as a new biomarker of hereditary spastic paraplegia and other related diseases.

  20. Early interleukin-6 and slope of monocyte human leukocyte antigen-DR: a powerful association to predict the development of sepsis after major trauma.

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    Aurélie Gouel-Chéron

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Major trauma is characterized by a pro-inflammatory response, followed by an immunosuppression. Recently, in trauma patients, the lack of recovery of monocyte Human Leukocyte Antigen DR (mHLA-DR, a biomarker of ICU-acquired immunosuppression between days 1-2 and days 3-4 has been demonstrated to be independently associated with sepsis development. The main objective of this study was to determine whether early measurements of IL-6 (interleukin-6 and IL-10 plasma concentrations (as markers of initial severity could improve, in association with mHLA-DR recovery, the prediction of sepsis occurrence in severe trauma patients. DESIGN: Prospective observational study over 24 months in a Trauma ICU at university hospital. PATIENTS: Trauma patients with an ISS over 25 and age over 18 were included. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: mHLA-DR was assessed by flow cytometry, IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations by ELISA. 100 consecutive severely injured patients were monitored (mean ISS 37±10. 37 patients developed sepsis. IL-6 concentrations and slope of mHLA-DR expression between days 1-2 and days 3-4 were significantly different between septic and non-septic patients. IL-10 was not detectable in most patients. After adjustment for usual clinical confounders, when assessed as a pair, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that a slope of mHLA-DR expression (days 3-4/days 1-2≤1.1 and a IL-6 concentration ≥ 67.1 pg/ml remained highly associated with the development of sepsis (adjusted OR 18.4, 95% CI 4.9; 69.4, p = .00002. CONCLUSIONS: After multivariate regression logistic analysis, when assessed as a pair, a high IL-6 concentration and a persistent mHLA-DR decreased expression were found to be in relation with the development of sepsis with the best predictive value. This study underlines the usefulness of daily monitoring of immune function to identify trauma patients at a high risk of infection.

  1. 人类白细胞抗原与银屑病相关性研究进展%Association between human leukocyte antigens and psoriasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐利利; 范星; 杨森

    2016-01-01

    关于银屑病遗传病因学的研究越来越多,人类白细胞抗原基因是其中之一.银屑病与人类白细胞抗原基因的相关性研究提示,银屑病的易感基因或保护基因可能位于人类白细胞抗原基因区内,也可能与人类白细胞抗原单倍型相连锁形成扩展单倍型,这种相关性在不同的种族、地域存在明显差异.目前在中国汉族人群中尚未进行银屑病大样本量人类白细胞抗原基因区域的遗传学研究,今后可以此作为研究方向,以探索中国人群银屑病与人类白细胞抗原基因区域的关联,揭示银屑病病因及发病机制、促进临床治疗,推动银屑病精准医疗的发展.%More and more studies have been conducted on genetic etiology of psoriasis,such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes.It has been suggested that susceptibility or protective genes for psoriasis may be located in the HLA region,or be linked to HLA haplotypes to form extended haplotypes.In addition,the association varies distinctly with races and regions.So far,there has been no large sample-sized studies on HLA genes in Han Chinese patients with psoriasis yet,which are expected be carried out in the future to explore the association between HLA genes and psoriasis in Chinese population,reveal its etiology and pathogenesis,facilitate its diagnosis and treatment,and to promote development of precision medicine for it.

  2. [Polymorphism of human HLA-DRB1 leukocyte antigen alleles and its association to juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in a sample of Colombian mestizo children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavito, Gloria; Malagón, Clara; Ramírez, Luis A; De La Cruz, Oscar F; Uribe, Oscar; Navarro, Edgar; Iglesias, Antonio; Martínez, Paz; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Egea, Eduardo

    2003-09-01

    Oligotypes of the human leukocyte antigen HLA Class II, DRB1 alleles were characterized at the molecular level in a group of Colombian children suffering juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The distribution of these alleles was examined in a group of Colombian mestizo children (genetic admixture of Amerindians, Europeans and Africans) suffering from clinically distinct JRA subsets in order to detect HLA allele frequency differences in patients with different JRA subsets. A group of 65 patients with JRA and 65 controls were characterized for the subtypes of the HLA-DRB1 alleles using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP). The oligotyping protocol recommended by the 12th International Histocompatibility Workshop held in St. Malo, Paris, in 1996, was used. Subtype HLA-DRB1*1104 was the allele most strongly associated with susceptibility to JRA (Fisher's p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 16.79, etiologic fraction (EF) = 0.93). HLA-DRB1*1602 was also associated with susceptibility to a lesser degree (Fisher's p = 0.016, OR = 8.98, EF = 0.88). HLA-DRB1 alleles participating in JRA protection were HLA-DRB1*1501 (preventive fraction (PF) = 0.466, p = 0.005) and HLA DRB1*1402 (PF = 0.49, p = 0.009). The relationship between some HLA-DRB1 alleles and clinical features was also compared. The presence of rheumatic factor was associated with the alleles HLA-DRB1*0407 (p = 0.05, OR = 11.2, EF = 0.45) and HLA-DRB1*1302 (p = 0.02, OR = 22.8, EF = 0.63). There was also an association between HLA-DRB1*0701 (p = 0.001, OR = 58, EF = 0.73) with expressing ANA +. We found that in the oligoarticular subset, the allele HLA-DRB1*1104 (p = 0.0034, OR = 41.53, EF = 0.97) was the one expressed most commonly. In the poliarticular group, the alleles most frequently expressed were HLA-DRB1*0404 (Fisher's p = 0.012, OR = 8.75, EF = 0.88). In patients with systemic JRA, the HLA-DRB1*1602 allele (p = 0.005, OR = 21.33, EF = 0.95) was most frequent. These

  3. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

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    Barquera Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. Methods We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. Results HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031. HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670. DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001. Conclusion Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the

  4. Soluble human leukocyte antigen -G during pregnancy and infancy in Benin: Mother/child resemblance and association with the risk of malaria infection and low birth weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milet, Jacqueline; Cottrell, Gilles; Mondière, Amandine; Avokpaho, Euripide; Gineau, Laure; Sabbagh, Audrey; Massougbodji, Achille; Moutairou, Kabirou; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Favier, Benoit; Carosella, Edgardo; Moreau, Philippe; Rouas-Freiss, Nathalie; Courtin, David; Garcia, André

    2017-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) G is a tolerogenic molecule involved in the maternal-fetal immune tolerance phenomenon. Its expression during some infectious diseases leading to immune evasion has been established. A first study conducted in Benin has shown that the production of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) during the first months of life is strongly correlated with the maternal level at delivery and associated with low birth weight and malaria. However sHLA-G measurements during pregnancy were not available for mothers and furthermore, to date the evolution of sHLA-G in pregnancy is not documented in African populations. To extend these previous findings, between January 2010 and June 2013, 400 pregnant women of a malaria preventive trial and their newborns were followed up in Benin until the age of 2 years. Soluble HLA-G was measured 3 times during pregnancy and repeatedly during the 2 years follow-up to explore how sHLA-G evolved and the factors associated. During pregnancy, plasma levels of sHLA-G remained stable and increased significantly at delivery (p<0.001). Multigravid women seemed to have the highest levels (p = 0.039). In infants, the level was highest in cord blood and decreased before stabilizing after 18 months (p<0.001). For children, a high level of sHLA-G was associated with malaria infection during the follow-up (p = 0.02) and low birth weight (p = 0.06). The mean level of sHLA-G during infancy was strongly correlated with the mother’s level during pregnancy (<0.001), and not only at delivery. Moreover, mothers with placental malaria infection had a higher probability of giving birth to a child with a high level of sHLA-g (p = 0.006). High sHLA-G levels during pregnancy might be associated with immune tolerance related to placental malaria. Further studies are needed but this study provides a first insight concerning the potential role of sHLA-G as a biomarker of weakness for newborns and infants. PMID:28166246

  5. Human leukocyte antigen class II (DRB1 and DQB1) alleles and haplotypes frequencies in patients with pemphigus vulgaris among the Serbian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivanovic, D; Bojic, S; Medenica, L; Andric, Z; Popadic, D

    2016-05-01

    The etiology of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is multifactorial and includes genetic, environmental, hormonal, and immunological factors. Inheritance of certain Human class II leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is by far the best-established predisposing factor for the development of PV. Class II HLA alleles vary among racial/ethnic backgrounds. We have determined an association between HLA class II alleles and PV among the Serbian population. A total of 72 patients with confirmed diagnosis of PV were genotyped for HLA class II alleles. HLA frequencies were compared with unrelated healthy bone marrow donors. The statistical significance of differences between patients and controls was evaluated using Fisher's exact test. The DRB1*04 and DRB1*14 allelic groups were associated with PV (P adj = 4.45 × 10(-13) and 4.06 × 10(-19) respectively), while HLA-DRB1*11 was negatively associated with PV (P adj = 0.0067) suggesting a protective role. DRB1*04:02, DRB1*14:04, DQB1*03:02 and DQB1*05:03 alleles were shown to be strongly associated with PV (P adj = 1.63 × 10(-12), 5.20 × 10(-7), 1.28 × 10(-6), and 4.44 × 10(-5), respectively). The frequency of HLA DRB1*04-DQB1*03 and HLA DRB1*14-DQB1*05 haplotypes in PV patients was significantly higher than in controls (31.3% vs 8.8%, P adj =7.66 × 10(-8) and 30.6% vs 6.3%, P adj = 3.22 × 10(-10), respectively). At high-resolution level, statistical significance was observed in HLA-DRB1*04:02-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*14:04-DQB1*05:03 haplotypes (P adj = 5.55 × 10(-12), and P adj = 3.91 × 10(-6), respectively). Our findings suggest that HLA-DRB1*04:02, DRB1*14:04, HLA-DQB1* 03:02 and DQB1*05:03 alleles and HLA-DRB1*04:02-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*14:04-DQB1*05:03 haplotypes are genetic markers for susceptibility for PV, while DRB1*11 allelic group appears protective in Serbian population.

  6. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants.

  7. A novel human tectonin protein with multivalent beta-propeller folds interacts with ficolin and binds bacterial LPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Hooi Ping Low

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the human genome database has been completed a decade ago, approximately 50% of the proteome remains hypothetical as their functions are unknown. The elucidation of the functions of these hypothetical proteins can lead to additional protein pathways and revelation of new cascades. However, many of these inferences are limited to proteins with substantial sequence similarity. Of particular interest here is the Tectonin domain-containing family of proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified hTectonin, a hypothetical protein in the human genome database, as a distant ortholog of the limulus galactose binding protein (GBP. Phylogenetic analysis revealed strong evolutionary conservation of hTectonin homologues from parasite to human. By computational analysis, we showed that both the hTectonin and GBP form beta-propeller structures with multiple Tectonin domains, each containing beta-sheets of 4 strands per beta-sheet. hTectonin is present in the human leukocyte cDNA library and immune-related cell lines. It interacts with M-ficolin, a known human complement protein whose ancient homolog, carcinolectin (CL5, is the functional protein partner of GBP during infection. Yeast 2-hybrid assay showed that only the Tectonin domains of hTectonin recognize the fibrinogen-like domain of the M-ficolin. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed real-time interaction between the Tectonin domains 6 & 11 and bacterial LPS, indicating that despite forming 2 beta-propellers with its different Tectonin domains, the hTectonin molecule could precisely employ domains 6 & 11 to recognise bacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By virtue of a recent finding of another Tectonin protein, leukolectin, in the human leukocyte, and our structure-function analysis of the hypothetical hTectonin, we propose that Tectonin domains of proteins could play a vital role in innate immune defense, and that this function has been conserved over several

  8. A hot water extract of Curcuma longa inhibits adhesion molecule protein expression and monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kengo; Muroyama, Koutarou; Yamamoto, Norio; Murosaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of arterial leukocytes to endothelial cells is an important step in the progression of various inflammatory diseases. Therefore, its modulation is thought to be a prospective target for the prevention or treatment of such diseases. Adhesion molecules on endothelial cells are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and contribute to the recruitment of leukocytes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hot water extract of Curcuma longa (WEC) on the protein expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion induced by TNF-α in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment of HUVECs with WEC significantly suppressed both TNF-α-induced protein expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion. WEC also suppressed phosphorylation and degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) induced by TNF-α in HUVECs, suggesting that WEC inhibits the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  9. Human SAP is a novel peptidoglycan recognition protein that induces complement- independent phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jang-Hyun; Kurokawa, Kenji; Jung, Dong-Jun; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Chan-Hee; Fujimoto, Yukari; Fukase, Koichi; Coggeshall, K. Mark; Lee, Bok Luel

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for many community-acquired and hospital-associated infections and is associated with high mortality. Concern over the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains has renewed interest in the elucidation of host mechanisms that defend against S. aureus infection. We recently demonstrated that human serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) binds to S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA), a cell wall glycopolymer, a discovery that prompted further screening to identify additional serum proteins that recognize S. aureus cell wall components. In this report, we incubated human serum with 10 different S. aureus mutants and determined that serum amyloid P component (SAP) bound specifically to a WTA-deficient S. aureus ΔtagO mutant, but not to tagO-complemented, WTA-expressing cells. Biochemical characterization revealed that SAP recognizes bacterial peptidoglycan as a ligand and that WTA inhibits this interaction. Although SAP binding to peptidoglycan was not observed to induce complement activation, SAP-bound ΔtagO cells were phagocytosed by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in an Fcγ receptor-dependent manner. These results indicate that SAP functions as a host defense factor, similar to other peptidoglycan recognition proteins and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors. PMID:23966633

  10. Inferring modules from human protein interactome classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaurasia Gautam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of protein-protein interaction networks derived from high-throughput screening approaches and complementary sources is a key topic in systems biology. Although integration of protein interaction data is conventionally performed, the effects of this procedure on the result of network analyses has not been examined yet. In particular, in order to optimize the fusion of heterogeneous interaction datasets, it is crucial to consider not only their degree of coverage and accuracy, but also their mutual dependencies and additional salient features. Results We examined this issue based on the analysis of modules detected by network clustering methods applied to both integrated and individual (disaggregated data sources, which we call interactome classes. Due to class diversity, we deal with variable dependencies of data features arising from structural specificities and biases, but also from possible overlaps. Since highly connected regions of the human interactome may point to potential protein complexes, we have focused on the concept of modularity, and elucidated the detection power of module extraction algorithms by independent validations based on GO, MIPS and KEGG. From the combination of protein interactions with gene expressions, a confidence scoring scheme has been proposed before proceeding via GO with further classification in permanent and transient modules. Conclusions Disaggregated interactomes are shown to be informative for inferring modularity, thus contributing to perform an effective integrative analysis. Validation of the extracted modules by multiple annotation allows for the assessment of confidence measures assigned to the modules in a protein pathway context. Notably, the proposed multilayer confidence scheme can be used for network calibration by enabling a transition from unweighted to weighted interactomes based on biological evidence.

  11. The internal architecture of leukocyte lipid body organelles captured by three-dimensional electron microscopy tomography.

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    Rossana C N Melo

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies (LBs, also known as lipid droplets, are complex organelles of all eukaryotic cells linked to a variety of biological functions as well as to the development of human diseases. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, neutrophils and macrophages, LBs are rapidly formed in the cytoplasm in response to inflammatory and infectious diseases and are sites of synthesis of eicosanoid lipid mediators. However, little is known about the structural organization of these organelles. It is unclear whether leukocyte LBs contain a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids as found in lipid droplets from adipocytes and how diverse proteins, including enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs. Here, leukocyte LB ultrastructure was studied in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM, immunogold EM and electron tomography. By careful analysis of the two-dimensional ultrastructure of LBs from human blood eosinophils under different conditions, we identified membranous structures within LBs in both resting and activated cells. Cyclooxygenase, a membrane inserted protein that catalyzes the first step in prostaglandin synthesis, was localized throughout the internum of LBs. We used fully automated dual-axis electron tomography to study the three-dimensional architecture of LBs in high resolution. By tracking 4 nm-thick serial digital sections we found that leukocyte LBs enclose an intricate system of membranes within their "cores". After computational reconstruction, we showed that these membranes are organized as a network of tubules which resemble the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Our findings explain how membrane-bound proteins interact and are spatially arranged within LB "cores" and support a model for LB formation by incorporating cytoplasmic membranes of the ER, instead of the conventional view that LBs emerge from the ER leaflets. This is important to understand the functional capabilities of leukocyte

  12. The internal architecture of leukocyte lipid body organelles captured by three-dimensional electron microscopy tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Rossana C N; Paganoti, Guillherme F; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Lipid bodies (LBs), also known as lipid droplets, are complex organelles of all eukaryotic cells linked to a variety of biological functions as well as to the development of human diseases. In cells from the immune system, such as eosinophils, neutrophils and macrophages, LBs are rapidly formed in the cytoplasm in response to inflammatory and infectious diseases and are sites of synthesis of eicosanoid lipid mediators. However, little is known about the structural organization of these organelles. It is unclear whether leukocyte LBs contain a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids as found in lipid droplets from adipocytes and how diverse proteins, including enzymes involved in eicosanoid formation, incorporate into LBs. Here, leukocyte LB ultrastructure was studied in detail by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunogold EM and electron tomography. By careful analysis of the two-dimensional ultrastructure of LBs from human blood eosinophils under different conditions, we identified membranous structures within LBs in both resting and activated cells. Cyclooxygenase, a membrane inserted protein that catalyzes the first step in prostaglandin synthesis, was localized throughout the internum of LBs. We used fully automated dual-axis electron tomography to study the three-dimensional architecture of LBs in high resolution. By tracking 4 nm-thick serial digital sections we found that leukocyte LBs enclose an intricate system of membranes within their "cores". After computational reconstruction, we showed that these membranes are organized as a network of tubules which resemble the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our findings explain how membrane-bound proteins interact and are spatially arranged within LB "cores" and support a model for LB formation by incorporating cytoplasmic membranes of the ER, instead of the conventional view that LBs emerge from the ER leaflets. This is important to understand the functional capabilities of leukocyte LBs in health and

  13. Mitochondrial Fusion Proteins and Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Ranieri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are highly dynamic, complex organelles that continuously alter their shape, ranging between two opposite processes, fission and fusion, in response to several stimuli and the metabolic demands of the cell. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics due to mutations in proteins involved in the fusion-fission machinery represent an important pathogenic mechanism of human diseases. The most relevant proteins involved in the mitochondrial fusion process are three GTPase dynamin-like proteins: mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and 2 (MFN2, located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, and optic atrophy protein 1 (OPA1, in the inner membrane. An expanding number of degenerative disorders are associated with mutations in the genes encoding MFN2 and OPA1, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. While these disorders can still be considered rare, defective mitochondrial dynamics seem to play a significant role in the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of more common neurodegenerative diseases, for example, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. This review provides an overview of the basic molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial fusion and focuses on the alteration in mitochondrial DNA amount resulting from impairment of mitochondrial dynamics. We also review the literature describing the main disorders associated with the disruption of mitochondrial fusion.

  14. Cell surface expression level variation between two common Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles, HLA-A2 and HLA-B8, is dependent on the structure of the C terminal part of the alpha 2 and the alpha 3 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Nehlin, Jan O; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive cell surface expression of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I antigens vary extremely from tissue to tissue and individual antigens may differ widely in expression levels. Down-regulation of class I expression is a known immune evasive mechanism used by cancer cells and viruses....... Moreover, recent observations suggest that even minor differences in expression levels may influence the course of viral infections and the frequency of complications to stem cell transplantation. We have shown that some human multipotent stem cells have high expression of HLA-A while HLA-B is only weakly...... expressed, and demonstrate here that this is also the case for the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Using quantitative flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found expression levels of endogenous HLA-A3 (median 71,204 molecules per cell) 9.2-fold higher than the expression of...

  15. Impact of human leukocyte antigen matching and recipients' panel reactive antibodies on two-year outcome in presensitized renal allograft recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Hui-lin; JIN Xun-bo; LI Xiang-tie; WANG Hong-wei; L(U) Jia-ju

    2009-01-01

    Background Renal transplantation in sensitized candidates remains a highly significant challenge worldwide. The production of panel reactive antibody (PRA) against human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is a major risk factor in presensitized recipients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of HLA matching and recipients' PRA on two-year outcome in presensitized renal allograft recipients.Methods We determined the percentage of panel reactivity and specificity of anti-HLA immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies in 73 presensitized renal allograft recipients compared with 81 unsensitized recipients (control group). HLA genotyping of both recipients and corresponding donors was performed by PCR with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). We analyzed the factors influencing the early graft outcome (two-year rejection rates and survival rates of the grafts), including HLA mismatching, class and degree of panel reactivity, and target antigen of donors.Results Presensitized recipients had a worse two-year outcome than unsensitized recipients (P=0.019 for rejection rate, P=0.01 for survival rate). The difference in number of HLA-mismatched alleles with either 6-antigen matching (Ag M) standard or amino acid residue matching (Res M) standard was not significant between the rejection and non-rejection groups of presensitized recipients or between the graft survival group and graft loss group. Compared with the control group, recipients with both PRA-Ⅰ and PRA-Ⅱ antibodies had a significantly worse two-year outcome (P=0.001 for rejection rate, P=0.002 for survival rate). The two-year outcomes of the peak PRA ≥50% group and its subgroup, at-transplant PRA ≥50% group, were significantly worse compared with the control group (P=0.025 and P=0.001 for rejection rate, P=0.043 and P=0.024 for survival rate). The rejection rates of the at-transplant target antigen positive group and its subgroup, HLA-Ⅰ target antigen positive group, were significantly higher than the control

  16. Leukocyte responses to immobilized patterns of CXCL8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girrbach, Maria; Rink, Ina; Ladnorg, Tatjana; Azucena, Carlos; Heißler, Stefan; Haraszti, Tamás; Schepers, Ute; Schmitz, Katja

    2016-06-01

    The attachment of neutrophils to the endothelial surface and their migration towards the site of inflammation following chemokine gradients play an essential role in the innate immune response. Chemokines adhere to glycosaminoglycans on the endothelial surface to be detected by leukocytes and trigger their movement along surface- bound gradients in a process called haptotaxis. In assays to systematically study the response of leukocytes to surface-bound compounds both the spatial arrangement of the compound as well as the mode of immobilization need to be controlled. In this study microcontact printing was employed to create patterns of hydrophobic or functionalized thiols on gold-coated glass slides and CXCL8 was immobilized on the thiol coated areas using three different strategies. Human neutrophils adhered to the CXCL8-coated lines but not to the PEG-coated background. We could show that more cells adhered to CXCL8 adsorbed to hydrophobic octadecanethiol than on CXCL8 covalently bound to amino undecanethiol or CXCL8 specifically bound to immobilized heparin on aminothiol. Likewise general cell activity such as lamellipodia formation and random migration were most pronounced for CXCL8 adsorbed on a hydrophobic surface which may be attributed to the larger amounts of protein immobilized on this type of surface.

  17. Proteins of human milk. I. Identification of major components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, N.G.; Powers, M.T.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1982-04-01

    Traditionally, human milk proteins are identified largely by reference to bovine milk. Hence, to identify the major proteins in human milk, we subjected human and bovine milk, in parallel, to high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis. Isoelectric precipitation at pH 4.6 was our criterion for distinguishing whey proteins from those of the casein complex. The ..cap alpha..- and..beta..-caseins were identified on the basis of relative abundance, relative molecular mass, and relative isoelectric points. No protein disappeared from ISO-DALT patterns of human milk after rennin treatment, and no new protein comparable to bovine para K-casein appeared in the BASO-DALT patterns; this suggests that K-casein is absent from human milk. The proteins identified in human milk patterns include the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. casein families, lactalbumin, albumin, transferrin, IgA, and lactoferrin. Numerous additional proteins seen in patterns for human milk remain to be identified.

  18. Roscovitine blocks leukocyte extravasation by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 and 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberich, Nina; Uhl, Bernd; Joore, Jos; Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Mayer, Bettina A; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that induces tumour cell death, is under evaluation as an anti-cancer drug. By triggering leukocyte apoptosis, roscovitine can also enhance the resolution of inflammation. Beyond death-inducing properties, we tested whether roscovitine affects leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction, a vital step in the onset of inflammation. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were evaluated in venules of mouse cremaster muscle, using intravital microscopy. In primary human endothelial cells, we studied the influence of roscovitine on adhesion molecules and on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. A cellular kinome array, in vitro CDK profiling and RNAi methods were used to identify targets of roscovitine. In vivo, roscovitine attenuated the tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced leukocyte adherence to and transmigration through, the endothelium. In vitro, roscovitine strongly inhibited TNF-α-evoked expression of endothelial adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule). Roscovitine blocked NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, but not the NF-κB activation cascade [inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase activity, IκB-α degradation, p65 translocation]. Using a cellular kinome array and an in vitro CDK panel, we found that roscovitine inhibited protein kinase A, ribosomal S6 kinase and CDKs 2, 5, 7 and 9. Experiments using kinase inhibitors and siRNA showed that the decreased endothelial activation was due solely to blockade of CDK5 and CDK9 by roscovitine. Our study highlights a novel mode of action for roscovitine, preventing endothelial activation and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction by inhibition of CDK5 and 9. This might expand its usage as a promising anti-inflammatory compound. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. A scored human protein-protein interaction network to catalyze genomic interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Taibo; Wernersson, Rasmus; Hansen, Rasmus B;

    2017-01-01

    Genome-scale human protein-protein interaction networks are critical to understanding cell biology and interpreting genomic data, but challenging to produce experimentally. Through data integration and quality control, we provide a scored human protein-protein interaction network (In...

  20. Mild episodes of tourniquet-induced forearm ischaemia-reperfusion injury results in leukocyte activation and changes in inflammatory and coagulation markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastawrous Salah S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocytes and neutrophils are examples of phagocytic leukocytes, with neutrophils being considered as the 'chief' phagocytic leukocyte. Both monocytes and neutrophils have been implicated to play a key role in the development of ischaemia-reperfusion injury, where they are intrinsically involved in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions. In this pilot study we hypothesised that mild episodes of tourniquet induced forearm ischaemia-reperfusion injury results in leukocyte activation and changes in inflammatory and coagulation markers. Methods Ten healthy human volunteers were recruited after informed consent. None had any history of cardiovascular disease with each subject volunteer participating in the study for a 24 hour period. Six venous blood samples were collected from each subject volunteer at baseline, 10 minutes ischaemia, 5, 15, 30, 60 minutes and 24 hours reperfusion, by means of a cannula from the ante-cubital fossa. Monocyte and neutrophil leukocyte sub-populations were isolated by density gradient centrifugation techniques. Leukocyte trapping was investigated by measuring the concentration of leukocytes in venous blood leaving the arm. The cell surface expression of CD62L (L-selectin, CD11b and the intracellular production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were measured via flow cytometry. C-reactive protein (CRP was measured using a clinical chemistry analyser. Plasma concentrations of D-dimer and von Willebrand factor (vWF were measured using enzyme-linked fluorescent assays (ELFA. Results During ischaemia-reperfusion injury, there was a decrease in CD62L and an increase in CD11b cell surface expression for both monocytes and neutrophils, with changes in the measured parameters reaching statistical significance (p =2O2 production by leukocyte sub-populations, which was measured as a marker of leukocyte activation. Intracellular production of H2O2 in monocytes during ischaemia-reperfusion injury reached statistical

  1. Mass Spectrometry of Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Peptidomes Reveals Strong Effects of Protein Abundance and Turnover on Antigen Presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    HLA class I molecules reflect the health state of cells to cytotoxic T cells by presenting a repertoire of endogenously derived peptides. However, the extent to which the proteome shapes the peptidome is still largely unknown. Here we present a high-throughput mass-spectrometry-based workflow tha...

  2. Compact conformations of human protein disulfide isomerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Yang

    Full Text Available Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI composed of four thioredoxin-like domains a, b, b', and a', is a key enzyme catalyzing oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Large scale molecular dynamics simulations starting from the crystal structures of human PDI (hPDI in the oxidized and reduced states were performed. The results indicate that hPDI adopts more compact conformations in solution than in the crystal structures, which are stabilized primarily by inter-domain interactions, including the salt bridges between domains a and b' observed for the first time. A prominent feature of the compact conformations is that the two catalytic domains a and a' can locate close enough for intra-molecular electron transfer, which was confirmed by the characterization of an intermediate with a disulfide between the two domains. Mutations, which disrupt the inter-domain interactions, lead to decreased reductase activity of hPDI. Our molecular dynamics simulations and biochemical experiments reveal the intrinsic conformational dynamics of hPDI and its biological impact.

  3. Adding protein context to the human protein-protein interaction network to reveal meaningful interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H Schaefer

    Full Text Available Interactions of proteins regulate signaling, catalysis, gene expression and many other cellular functions. Therefore, characterizing the entire human interactome is a key effort in current proteomics research. This challenge is complicated by the dynamic nature of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, which are conditional on the cellular context: both interacting proteins must be expressed in the same cell and localized in the same organelle to meet. Additionally, interactions underlie a delicate control of signaling pathways, e.g. by post-translational modifications of the protein partners - hence, many diseases are caused by the perturbation of these mechanisms. Despite the high degree of cell-state specificity of PPIs, many interactions are measured under artificial conditions (e.g. yeast cells are transfected with human genes in yeast two-hybrid assays or even if detected in a physiological context, this information is missing from the common PPI databases. To overcome these problems, we developed a method that assigns context information to PPIs inferred from various attributes of the interacting proteins: gene expression, functional and disease annotations, and inferred pathways. We demonstrate that context consistency correlates with the experimental reliability of PPIs, which allows us to generate high-confidence tissue- and function-specific subnetworks. We illustrate how these context-filtered networks are enriched in bona fide pathways and disease proteins to prove the ability of context-filters to highlight meaningful interactions with respect to various biological questions. We use this approach to study the lung-specific pathways used by the influenza virus, pointing to IRAK1, BHLHE40 and TOLLIP as potential regulators of influenza virus pathogenicity, and to study the signalling pathways that play a role in Alzheimer's disease, identifying a pathway involving the altered phosphorylation of the Tau protein. Finally, we provide the

  4. Susceptibility of different leukocyte cell types to Vaccinia virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez-Puig Juana M

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccinia virus, the prototype member of the family Poxviridae, was used extensively in the past as the Smallpox vaccine, and is currently considered as a candidate vector for new recombinant vaccines. Vaccinia virus has a wide host range, and is known to infect cultures of a variety of cell lines of mammalian origin. However, little is known about the virus tropism in human leukocyte populations. We report here that various cell types within leukocyte populations have widely different susceptibility to infection with vaccinia virus. Results We have investigated the ability of vaccinia virus to infect human PBLs by using virus recombinants expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP, and monoclonal antibodies specific for PBL subpopulations. Flow cytometry allowed the identification of infected cells within the PBL mixture 1–5 hours after infection. Antibody labeling revealed that different cell populations had very different infection rates. Monocytes showed the highest percentage of infected cells, followed by B lymphocytes and NK cells. In contrast to those cell types, the rate of infection of T lymphocytes was low. Comparison of vaccinia virus strains WR and MVA showed that both strains infected efficiently the monocyte population, although producing different expression levels. Our results suggest that MVA was less efficient than WR in infecting NK cells and B lymphocytes. Overall, both WR and MVA consistently showed a strong preference for the infection of non-T cells. Conclusions When infecting fresh human PBL preparations, vaccinia virus showed a strong bias towards the infection of monocytes, followed by B lymphocytes and NK cells. In contrast, very poor infection of T lymphocytes was detected. These finding may have important implications both in our understanding of poxvirus pathogenesis and in the development of improved smallpox vaccines.

  5. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Natasha Z R; Carr, Jessie S; Bonham, Luke W; Geier, Ethan G; Damotte, Vincent; Miller, Zachary A; Desikan, Rahul S; Boehme, Kevin L; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Kauwe, John S K; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Hollenbach, Jill A; Huang, Yadong; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations. Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case-control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls) from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999-2015) and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls) from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), a National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984-2012). We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005-2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals) to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10-4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08-1.37]) in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk factor, apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4. Separate

  6. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Natasha Z. R.; Geier, Ethan G.; Damotte, Vincent; Boehme, Kevin L.; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Kramer, Joel H.; Miller, Bruce L.; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Huang, Yadong

    2017-01-01

    Background Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations. Methods and findings Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case–control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls) from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999–2015) and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls) from the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), a National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984–2012). We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005–2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals) to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10−4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08–1.37]) in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk

  7. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Z R Steele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations.Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case-control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999-2015 and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC, a National Institute on Aging (NIA-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984-2012. We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005-2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10-4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08-1.37] in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk factor, apolipoprotein E (APOE ɛ4. Separate

  8. Protein composition of rhesus monkey milk: comparison to human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, C; Lönnerdal, B

    1993-04-01

    1. Proteins in human milk and Rhesus monkey milk have been compared by FPLC gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography, SDS-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, nitrogen and protein determination. 2. Mature Rhesus milk is higher in protein concentration (15-20 mg/ml) than human milk (8-9 mg/ml). 3. Non-Protein nitrogen is 6-13% in Rhesus milk but 25-30% in human milk. 4. Secretory IgA, lactoferrin, serum albumin, alpha-lactalbumin and lysozyme are present in Rhesus milk, but at a lower concentration than in human milk. 5. The casein subunit pattern is more complex in Rhesus milk compared to human milk. 6. The ratio of whey proteins to casein is similar in both milks (approximately 60/40). 7. A protein with a M(r) of 21,600 is a major component in monkey whey but is not found in human milk.

  9. Benchmarking human protein complexes to investigate drug-related systems and evaluate predicted protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wu

    Full Text Available Protein complexes are key entities to perform cellular functions. Human diseases are also revealed to associate with some specific human protein complexes. In fact, human protein complexes are widely used for protein function annotation, inference of human protein interactome, disease gene prediction, and so on. Therefore, it is highly desired to build an up-to-date catalogue of human complexes to support the research in these applications. Protein complexes from different databases are as expected to be highly redundant. In this paper, we designed a set of concise operations to compile these redundant human complexes and built a comprehensive catalogue called CHPC2012 (Catalogue of Human Protein Complexes. CHPC2012 achieves a higher coverage for proteins and protein complexes than those individual databases. It is also verified to be a set of complexes with high quality as its co-complex protein associations have a high overlap with protein-protein interactions (PPI in various existing PPI databases. We demonstrated two distinct applications of CHPC2012, that is, investigating the relationship between protein complexes and drug-related systems and evaluating the quality of predicted protein complexes. In particular, CHPC2012 provides more insights into drug development. For instance, proteins involved in multiple complexes (the overlapping proteins are potential drug targets; the drug-complex network is utilized to investigate multi-target drugs and drug-drug interactions; and the disease-specific complex-drug networks will provide new clues for drug repositioning. With this up-to-date reference set of human protein complexes, we believe that the CHPC2012 catalogue is able to enhance the studies for protein interactions, protein functions, human diseases, drugs, and related fields of research. CHPC2012 complexes can be downloaded from http://www1.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/xlli/CHPC2012/CHPC2012.htm.

  10. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  11. Development of human protein reference database as an initial platform for approaching systems biology in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars

    2003-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, di...

  12. Reconstruction of human protein interolog network using evolutionary conserved network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chung-Yen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent increase in the use of high-throughput two-hybrid analysis has generated large quantities of data on protein interactions. Specifically, the availability of information about experimental protein-protein interactions and other protein features on the Internet enables human protein-protein interactions to be computationally predicted from co-evolution events (interolog. This study also considers other protein interaction features, including sub-cellular localization, tissue-specificity, the cell-cycle stage and domain-domain combination. Computational methods need to be developed to integrate these heterogeneous biological data to facilitate the maximum accuracy of the human protein interaction prediction. Results This study proposes a relative conservation score by finding maximal quasi-cliques in protein interaction networks, and considering other interaction features to formulate a scoring method. The scoring method can be adopted to discover which protein pairs are the most likely to interact among multiple protein pairs. The predicted human protein-protein interactions associated with confidence scores are derived from six eukaryotic organisms – rat, mouse, fly, worm, thale cress and baker's yeast. Conclusion Evaluation results of the proposed method using functional keyword and Gene Ontology (GO annotations indicate that some confidence is justified in the accuracy of the predicted interactions. Comparisons among existing methods also reveal that the proposed method predicts human protein-protein interactions more accurately than other interolog-based methods.

  13. Identification of peptides from foot-and-mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, L E; Harndahl, M; Nielsen, M; Patch, J R; Jungersen, G; Buus, S; Golde, W T

    2013-06-01

    Characterization of the peptide-binding specificity of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I and II molecules is critical to the understanding of adaptive immune responses of swine toward infectious pathogens. Here, we describe the complete binding motif of the SLA-2*0401 molecule based on a positional scanning combinatorial peptide library approach. By combining this binding motif with data achieved by applying the NetMHCpan peptide prediction algorithm to both SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401, we identified high-affinity binding peptides. A total of 727 different 9mer and 726 different 10mer peptides within the structural proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), strain A24 were analyzed as candidate T-cell epitopes. Peptides predicted by the NetMHCpan were tested in ELISA for binding to the SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401 major histocompatibility complex class I proteins. Four of the 10 predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA-2*0401, whereas five of the nine predicted FMDV peptides bound to SLA-1*0401. These methods provide the characterization of T-cell epitopes in response to pathogens in more detail. The development of such approaches to analyze vaccine performance will contribute to a more accelerated improvement of livestock vaccines by virtue of identifying and focusing analysis on bona fide T-cell epitopes. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Production of a bioengineered G-protein coupled receptor of human formyl peptide receptor 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Wang

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs participate in a wide range of vital regulations of our physiological actions. They are also of pharmaceutical importance and have become many therapeutic targets for a number of disorders and diseases. Purified GPCR-based approaches including structural study and novel biophysical and biochemical function analyses are increasingly being used in GPCR-directed drug discovery. Before these approaches become routine, however, several hurdles need to be overcome; they include overexpression, solubilization, and purification of large quantities of functional and stable receptors on a regular basis. Here we report milligram production of a human formyl peptide receptor 3 (FPR3. FPR3 comprises a functionally distinct GPCR subfamily that is involved in leukocyte chemotaxis and activation. The bioengineered FPR3 was overexpressed in stable tetracycline-inducible mammalian cell lines (HEK293S. After a systematic detergent screening, fos-choline-14 (FC-14 was selected for subsequent solubilization and purification processes. A two-step purification method, immunoaffinity using anti-rho-tag monoclonal antibody 1D4 and gel filtration, was used to purify the receptors to near homogeneity. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that expressed FPR3 was predominantly displayed on cellular membrane. Secondary structural analysis using circular dichroism showed that the purified FPR3 receptor was correctly folded with >50% α-helix, which is similar to other known GPCR secondary structures. Our method can readily produce milligram quantities of human FPR3, which would facilitate in developing human FPR as therapeutic drug targets.

  15. Differentially expressed nuclear proteins in human CCRF-CEM, HL-60, MEC-1 and Raji cells correlate with cellular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Silke; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-10-01

    The human cell lines CCRF-CEM (T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia), HL-60 (acute myeloid leukemia), MEC-1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and Raji (Burkitt's B-cell lymphoma) have been analysed for differences in their nuclear proteomes. Using 2-D DIGE, 55 nuclear proteins have been identified that are differentially expressed (p<0.025) between the four cell lines, including proteins associated with transcription, proliferation, DNA repair and apoptosis. Of these 55 proteins, 22 were over-expressed in just one cell line, and four were down-regulated in one cell line. Proteins uniquely over-expressed between myeloid and lymphoid cell lines include those that may have use as markers for diagnosis, disease progression and B-cell maturation and differentiation. Expression of various proliferation-associated nuclear proteins correlated with relative growth rates of the cell lines, giving these proteins potential diagnostic applications for distinction of chronic versus acute subtypes of haematological malignancies. Identification of these differentially expressed nuclear proteins should facilitate elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying leukocyte differentiation and transformation to leukemias and lymphomas. The nuclear expression profiles should enable classification of subtypes of leukemia, and identify potential nuclear protein targets for development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  16. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Peptide Binding Profiles and the Identification of T cell Epitopes by Tetramer Staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers

    of the specific CTL response elicited as a result of immunization against foot-and-mouth-disease virus (FMDV) and swine influenza A virus. These studies resulted in the identification of T cell epitopes from both viruses. As SLA:peptide binding data accumulates in these and similar studies, it becomes possible...... class I peptide binding characteristics in relation to immune responses to vaccination or infection. Applying proven technologies to newly produced, recombinant swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I proteins yielded a body of data for peptide:SLA:β2m (pSLA) complex affinity and stability. Mapping...... for collaborators at Center for Biological Sequence Analysis (CBS), DTU, to further strengthen the NetMHCpan algorithm. This prediction tool now has the capacity for the selection of peptide candidates to be bound by human (HLA), bovine (bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA)) and swine (SLA) MHC proteins. Expanding...

  17. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Anderson, Robert P. [Autoimmunity and Transplantation Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); McCluskey, James [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rossjohn, Jamie, E-mail: jamie.rossjohn@med.monash.edu.au [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  18. Diagnosis and therapy of dysfunctions of human leukocytes after irradiation. Final report; Diagnose und Therapie von Funktionsstoerungen menschlicher Leukozyten nach Bestrahlung. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuningen, D. van; Kaffenberger, W. [Sanitaetsakademie der Bundeswehr, Muenchen (Germany); Baaske, C.; Leipert, D.

    1999-08-01

    Experiments were performed with isolated human PMN and with the promyelocytic HL-60 cell line, induced to differentiate along the granulocytic lineage with dimethyl sulfoxid. The respiratory burst reaction was triggered with soluble stimuli (chemotactic agent: formylated tripeptide, f-MLP, immune complexes, or phorbol ester) and measured flow cytometrically or as chemiluminescence signals with indicator molecules dihydrorhodamine 123 or luminol, respectively. The presence of enzymes was postulated, verified with Western blotting, and their activities were inhibited pharmacologically, lipid 2{sup nd}-messengers (diacylglycerol) were measured by HPLC. Our results identify protein kinase (PK) C activity as the central element of signal transduction cascades involved in the activation of the NADPH oxidase. In addition, several phospholipases ({beta}, {gamma}), protein tyrosine- as well as protein serine/threonine kinases and DAG kinases in combination with phosphatidate phosphohydrolase contribute to intracellular signal transduction processes. For the first time, besides PKC activity new cytoplasmic/membrane-bound elements of signal transduction processes (DAG concentration and DAG kinase activity, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity), and the FC{gamma} receptor-mediated respiratory burst of PMN were identified as radiosensitive ''targets'' for doses < 5 Gy. Theses results provide a basis for causally-oriented therapeutic approaches and could help to explain immunodeficiencies observed after exposure to ionizing radiation. (orig./MG) [German] Die intrazellulaeren Signaluebertragungsprozesse zur Aktivierung der NADPH-Oxidase sind Gegenstand der vorliegenden Untersuchung an bestrahlten PMN des Menschen und an einem PMN-Modell: HL-60 Promyelozyten, die mit Dimethylsulfoxid zur Differenzierung zu Neutrophilen-aehnlichen induziert wurden. Behandlung der Zellen mit loeslichen Rezeptor-abhaengigen oder -unabhaengigen Stimuli (Chemotaxin und

  19. 重组白细胞抑制因子和水蛭肽嵌合蛋白异构体鉴定%Identification of Recombinant Leukocyte Inhibitory Factor and Hirulog Chimeric Protein Isomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘巍; 范开

    2012-01-01

    This paper established the recombinant leukocyte inhibition factor and leech peptide chimeric protein isoforms identification verification method,by using the appropriate quality control detection method,RP-HPLC method through the test,isoelectric focusing,a reduced SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis,non-denaturing PAGE method,activity analysis,anion exchange HPLC analysis of isomers of qualitative and quantitative control.Using the established RP-HPLC method,PAGE method non degeneration,activity analysis examination could not identify isomers,and isoelectric focusing,a reduced SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis to identify isomers,qualitative analysis.Anion exchange HPLC analyzed isomers' percentage quantitatively.Isoelectric focusing,a reduced SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and anion exchange HPLC analysis can be used as recombinant leukocyte inhibition factor and Hirudin Peptide chimeric protein products of isomer in routine test.%提出了重组白细胞抑制因子和水蛭肽嵌合蛋白异构体鉴定检定方法。采用适宜的质控检测方法,通过试验RP-HPLC法、等电聚焦、非还原型SDS-PAGE凝胶电泳法、非变性PAGE法、活性分析、阴离子交换HPLC分析法对异构体进行定性和定量控制。结果表明:用建立的RP-HPLC法、非变性PAGE法、活性分析法不能鉴别异构体;等电聚焦、非还原型SDS-PAGE凝胶电泳法能鉴别异构体,可定性分析;阴离子交换HPLC分析法能对异构体百分含量进行定量分析。由此表明,等电聚焦、非还原型SDS-PAGE凝胶电泳和阴离子交换HPLC分析法可作为重组白细胞抑制因子和水蛭肽嵌合蛋白产品中异构体的常规检定。

  20. Human leukocyte test system. X. Higher sensitivity to x-irradiation in the GO stage of the cell cycle of early as compared to late replicating cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, B.; Obe, G.

    1976-12-29

    Leukocyte cultures were set up with x-irradiated whole blood (200 R). Cells starting with their DNA synthesis between 25 and 35 h after culture initiation (''early replicating cells'') were pulse-labeled with tritiated thymidine ((3H)TdR). Mitoses were collected with colcemid in adjacent intervals from 36 up to 72 h after culture initiation. At fixation times of 50, 56, 62, and 72 h enough mitoses for a determination of the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations (dicentric and ring chromosomes) were found. After that the preparations were processed for autoradiography. All mitoses analyzed for chromosomal aberrations were re-analyzed for labeling, and the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations in labeled (= ''late replicating cells'') mitoses were compared. At all fixation times, higher frequencies of dicentric chromosomes were found in labeled as compared to unlabeled mitoses, indicating a higher sensitivity of early replicating cells to x-irradiation in the GO stage of the cell cycle.

  1. Fatigue and gene expression in human leukocytes: increased NF-κB and decreased glucocorticoid signaling in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Julienne E; Ganz, Patricia A; Irwin, Michael R; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue is highly prevalent in the general population and is one of the most common side effects of cancer treatment. There is growing evidence that pro-inflammatory cytokines play a role in cancer-related fatigue, although the molecular mechanisms for chronic inflammation and fatigue have not been determined. The current study utilized genome-wide expression microarrays to identify differences in gene expression and associated alterations in transcriptional activity in leukocytes from breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue (n=11) and non-fatigued controls (n=10). We focused on transcription of inflammation-related genes, particularly those responsive to the pro-inflammatory NF-κB transcription control pathway. Further, given the role of glucocorticoids as key regulators of inflammatory processes, we examined transcription of glucocorticoid-responsive genes indicative of potential glucocorticoid receptor (GR) desensitization. Plasma levels of cortisol were also assessed. Consistent with hypotheses, results showed increased expression of transcripts with response elements for NF-κB, and reduced expression of transcripts with response elements for glucocorticoids (p<.05) in fatigued breast cancer survivors. No differences in plasma levels of cortisol were observed. These data indicate that increased activity of pro-inflammatory transcription factors may contribute to persistent cancer-related fatigue and provide insight into potential mechanisms for tonic increases in NF-κB activity, specifically decreased expression of GR anti-inflammatory transcription factors.

  2. Activation of human platelets by misfolded proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herczenik, E.; Bouma, B.; Korporaal, J.A.; Strangi, R.; Zeng, Q.; Gros, P.; van Eck, M.; van Berkel, T.J.C.; Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Akkerman, J.W.N.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Protein misfolding diseases result from the deposition of insoluble protein aggregates that often contain fibrils called amyloid. Amyloids are found in Alzheimer disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and systemic amyloidosis,which are diseases where platelet activation might be

  3. Thirty Minutes of Hypobaric Hypoxia Provokes Alterations of Immune Response, Haemostasis, and Metabolism Proteins in Human Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Hinkelbein

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypobaric hypoxia (HH during airline travel induces several (patho- physiological reactions in the human body. Whereas severe hypoxia is investigated thoroughly, very little is known about effects of moderate or short-term hypoxia, e.g. during airline flights. The aim of the present study was to analyse changes in serum protein expression and activation of signalling cascades in human volunteers staying for 30 min in a simulated altitude equivalent to airline travel. After approval of the local ethics committee, 10 participants were exposed to moderate hypoxia (simulation of 2400 m or 8000 ft for 30 min in a hypobaric pressure chamber. Before and after hypobaric hypoxia, serum was drawn, centrifuged, and analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DIGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF. Biological functions of regulated proteins were identified using functional network analysis (GeneMania®, STRING®, and Perseus® software. In participants, oxygen saturation decreased from 98.1 ± 1.3% to 89.2 ± 1.8% during HH. Expression of 14 spots (i.e., 10 proteins: ALB, PGK1, APOE, GAPDH, C1QA, C1QB, CAT, CA1, F2, and CLU was significantly altered. Bioinformatic analysis revealed an association of the altered proteins with the signalling cascades “regulation of haemostasis” (four proteins, “metabolism” (five proteins, and “leukocyte mediated immune response” (five proteins. Even though hypobaric hypoxia was short and moderate (comparable to an airliner flight, analysis of protein expression in human subjects revealed an association to immune response, protein metabolism, and haemostasis

  4. Expression of innate immune genes, proteins and microRNAs in lung tissue and leukocytes of pigs infected with influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Cirera, Susanna; Vasby, Ditte

    This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of innate immune factors including microRNA (miRNA) in the local and systemic host response to influenza virus infection. Twenty pigs were challenged by influenza A virus subtype H1N2. Expression of miRNA, mRNA and proteins...... acute phase proteins. Likewise, the following miRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more time groups compared to the control pigs: miR-15a, miR-21, miR-146, miR-206, miR-223 and miR-451. At day one pi lung tissue protein levels of IL-6, IL-12 and IFN-α were significantly increased compared...... to the control group, and haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were at significantly increased at day three pi. MiRNA are small non coding RNA molecules, that regulate gene expression in a wide range of organisms. Cellular miRNAs might be involved in influenza infection, both by targeting immune related host...

  5. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  6. Integrin Regulation during Leukocyte Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Jan; Zarbock, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Integrins are recognized as vital players in leukocyte recruitment. Integrin malfunction causes severe disease patterns characterized by the inability to fight pathogens. Although inflammatory reactions are beneficial and necessary for host defense, these reactions have to be controlled to prevent tissue destruction and harmful sequelae. In this review, we discuss the different signaling pathways leading to the change of integrin adhesiveness in neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes. We thereby focus on the importance of integrin activation for the different steps of the leukocyte recruitment cascade, including rolling, adhesion, postadhesion strengthening, intravascular crawling, and transmigration, as each step necessitates the proper functioning of a distinct set of integrin molecules that has to be activated specifically. Additionally, we discuss endogenous mechanisms that balance and counteract integrin activation and limit leukocyte recruitment at the site of inflammation. Further insight into these complex mechanisms may provide new approaches for developing new anti-inflammatory therapies.

  7. Expression of innate immune genes, proteins and microRNAs in lung tissue and leukocytes of pigs infected with influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Cirera, Susanna; Vasby, Ditte

    This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of innate immune factors including microRNA (miRNA) in the local and systemic host response to influenza virus infection. Twenty pigs were challenged by influenza A virus subtype H1N2. Expression of miRNA, mRNA and proteins...... to the control group, and haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were at significantly increased at day three pi. MiRNA are small non coding RNA molecules, that regulate gene expression in a wide range of organisms. Cellular miRNAs might be involved in influenza infection, both by targeting immune related host...... transcripts but also by targeting viral gene products. Our results suggest that in addition to a wide range of immune factors, miRNAs are involved in fine tuning of an efficient innate immune response to influenza infection....

  8. G Protein-Dependent CCR5 Signaling Is Not Required for Efficient Infection of Primary T Lymphocytes and Macrophages by R5 Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The requirement of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced CCR5 activation for infection by R5 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) strains remains controversial. Ectopic CCR5 expression in CD4+-transformed cells or pharmacological inhibition of Gαi proteins coupled to CCR5 left unsolved whether CCR5-dependent cell activation is necessary for the HIV life cycle. In this study, we investigated the role played by HIV-induced CCR5-dependent cell signaling during infection of primary CD4-expressing leukocytes. ...

  9. Genomic signatures characterize leukocyte infiltration in myositis muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leukocyte infiltration plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of myositis, and is highly associated with disease severity. Currently, there is a lack of: efficacious therapies for myositis; understanding of the molecular features important for disease pathogenesis; and potential molecular biomarkers for characterizing inflammatory myopathies to aid in clinical development. Methods In this study, we developed a simple model and predicted that 1 leukocyte-specific transcripts (including both protein-coding transcripts and microRNAs should be coherently overexpressed in myositis muscle and 2 the level of over-expression of these transcripts should be correlated with leukocyte infiltration. We applied this model to assess immune cell infiltration in myositis by examining mRNA and microRNA (miRNA expression profiles in muscle biopsies from 31 myositis patients and 5 normal controls. Results Several gene signatures, including a leukocyte index, type 1 interferon (IFN, MHC class I, and immunoglobulin signature, were developed to characterize myositis patients at the molecular level. The leukocyte index, consisting of genes predominantly associated with immune function, displayed strong concordance with pathological assessment of immune cell infiltration. This leukocyte index was subsequently utilized to differentiate transcriptional changes due to leukocyte infiltration from other alterations in myositis muscle. Results from this differentiation revealed biologically relevant differences in the relationship between the type 1 IFN pathway, miR-146a, and leukocyte infiltration within various myositis subtypes. Conclusions Results indicate that a likely interaction between miR-146a expression and the type 1 IFN pathway is confounded by the level of leukocyte infiltration into muscle tissue. Although the role of miR-146a in myositis remains uncertain, our results highlight the potential benefit of deconvoluting the

  10. Dual Stimulus-Dependent Effect of Oenothera paradoxa Extract on the Respiratory Burst in Human Leukocytes: Suppressing for Escherichia coli and Phorbol Myristate Acetate and Stimulating for Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Burzynska-Pedziwiatr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenols can modulate human immune responses, their simultaneous action on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst is currently poorly understood. Based on the hypothesis that various polyphenols contained in plant extracts might affect the oxidative burst of phagocytes, we evaluated the effects of ethanolic O. paradoxa extract polyphenols on monocyte and neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro activated by different stimuli, including opsonized bacteria E. coli, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP. Samples were analyzed by the dihydrorhodamine flow cytometry assay. Our results showed that the extract repressed significantly and dose-dependently reactive oxygen species production in both cell types stimulated with E. coli and PMA (P < 0.05 and its inhibitory efficiency was stimulus- and cell-type-dependent. Interestingly, there was significant stimulatory effect of the extract on bursting phagocytes induced by fMLP (P < 0.05. Additionally, several flavonoids and phenolic compounds as well as penta-galloyl-β-(D-glucose (PGG, the representative of hydrolyzable tannins, were identified in the 60% extract by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. In summary, the ethanolic O. paradoxa extract, rich in flavonoids and phenolic compounds, exhibits dual stimulus-dependent effect on the respiratory burst in human leukocytes; hence, it might affect immune responses in humans.

  11. Sex difference in leukocyte telomere length is ablated in opposite-sex co-twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benetos, Athanase; Dalgard, Christine; Labat, Carlos; Kark, Jeremy D.; Verhulst, Simon; Christensen, Kaare; Kimura, Masayuki; Horvath, Kent; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Aviv, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Background: In eutherian mammals and in humans, the female fetus may be masculinized while sharing the intra-uterine environment with a male fetus. Telomere length (TL), as expressed in leukocytes, is heritable and is longer in women than in men. The main determinant of leukocyte TL (LTL) is LTL at

  12. Sex difference in leukocyte telomere length is ablated in opposite-sex co-twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetos, Athanase; Dalgård, Christine; Labat, Carlos;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In eutherian mammals and in humans, the female fetus may be masculinized while sharing the intra-uterine environment with a male fetus. Telomere length (TL), as expressed in leukocytes, is heritable and is longer in women than in men. The main determinant of leukocyte TL (LTL) is LTL...

  13. Influência de extratos hidroetanólicos de plantas medicinais sobre a quimiotaxia de leucócitos humanos Influence of some medicinal plant hydroethanolic extracts on human leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Presibella

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Vários métodos in vitro têm sido empregados para a investigação das atividades biológicas de plantas usadas na medicina popular para o tratamento de processos inflamatórios. Neste trabalho, investigou-se a influência dos extratos hidroetanólicos de Rauvolfia sellowii Muell. Arg, Hybanthus bigibbosus (St.-Hil Hassler e Anchieta pyrifolia (Mart. G. Don, conhecidas popularmente como pau-pra-tudo, canela-de-veado e cipó-suma, respectivamente, sobre a quimiotaxia de leucócitos humanos, estimulados a migrar contra um gradiente de caseína, utilizando-se o método de Boyden. A dexametasona foi utilizada como substância de referência da inibição da quimiotaxia leucocitária. Os resultados demonstraram efeito inibitório significativo de todos os extratos das plantas testadas, sobre a migração de polimorfonucleares, induzida por caseína. Entretanto, essa atividade variou de intensidade conforme a concentração e a espécie estudada. Efeitos máximos foram observados, nas concentrações de 1000, 10 e 1µg/ml com os extratos de pau-pra-tudo, canela-de-veado e cipó-suma, respectivamente, com migração de 81,6±3,9%; 85,4±2,4% e 91,7±2,2% dos polimorfonucleares, enquanto que, com a dexametasona, este efeito foi de 70,3±5,9%. Embora estudos mais aprofundados sejam necessários, os resultados apresentados podem servir como base preliminar de dados, contribuindo para esclarecer o mecanismo da atividade antiinflamatória atribuída às essas plantas na medicina caseira.Several in vitro methods have been used for the investigation of the biological activities of plants used in folk medicine for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. In this study, we have investigated the ability of the hydroethanolic extracts from Rauvolfia sellowii Muell. Arg, Hybanthus bigibbosus (St.-Hil Hassler, and Anchieta pyrifolia (Mart. G. Don, locally known as pau-pra-tudo, canela-de-veado, and cipó-suma, respectively, in interfering with the human

  14. Effect of pre-weaning concentrate supplementation on peripheral distribution of leukocytes, functional activity of neutrophils, acute phase protein and behavioural responses of abruptly weaned and housed beef calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Eilish M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of pre-weaning concentrate supplementation on peripheral distribution of leukocytes, functional activity of neutrophils, acute phase protein response, metabolic and behavioural response, and performance of abruptly weaned and housed beef calves was investigated. Calves were grazed with their dams until the end of the grazing season when they were weaned and housed (day (d 0 in a concrete slatted floor shed, and offered grass silage ad libitum plus supplementary concentrates. Twenty-six days prior to weaning and housing, 20 singled suckled, pure-bred Simmental male (non-castrated, (n = 10, m and female (n = 10, f calves were assigned to one of two treatments (i concentrate supplement (CS: n = 10 (5 m and 5 f, mean age (s.d. 201 (12.8 d, mean weight (s.d. 258 (20.2 kg or (ii no concentrate supplement (controls (NCS: n = 10, (5 m and 5 f, mean age (s.d. 201 (13.4 d, mean weight (s.d. 257 (19.6 kg pre-weaning. Results There was a treatment × sampling time interaction (P + and WC1+ (γδ T cells lymphocytes and concentration of plasma globulin. On d 2, percentage CD4+ lymphocytes decreased (P + lymphocytes increased (P + lymphocytes in NCS did not differ (P > 0.05 from d 0. On d 2, WC1+ lymphocytes decreased (P P 0.05 in NCS than CS. Subsequently, percentages did not differ (P > 0.05 from pre-weaning baseline. On d 2, the increase in concentration of globulin was greater (P Conclusions Calves supplemented with concentrate prior to weaning had a lesser reduction in WC1+ lymphocytes, increased percentage CD4+ lymphocytes and concentration of total protein, and spent more time lying post-weaning, compared with non-supplemented calves.

  15. Protein transport into the human endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudek, Johanna; Pfeffer, Stefan; Lee, Po-Hsien; Jung, Martin; Cavalié, Adolfo; Helms, Volkhard; Förster, Friedrich; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Protein transport into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is essential for all eukaryotic cells and evolutionary related to protein transport into and across the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria and archaea. It is based on amino-terminal signal peptides in the precursor polypeptides plus various trans

  16. Determination of dideoxyosone precursors of AGEs in human lens proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linetsky, Mikhail; Kaid Johar, S R; Meltretter, Jasmin; Padmanabha, Smitha; Parmar, Trilok; Vasavada, Abhay R; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Nagaraj, Ram H

    2011-10-01

    Dideoxyosones (DDOs) are intermediates in the synthesis of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs), such as pentosidine and glucosepane. Although the formation of pentosidine and glucosepane in the human lens has been firmly established, the formation of DDOs has not been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable method to detect DDOs in lens proteins. A specific DDO trapping agent, biotinyl-diaminobenzene (3,4-diamino-N-(3-[5-(2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl]aminopropyl)benzamide) (BDAB) was added during in vitro protein glycation or during protein extraction from human lenses. In vitro glycated human lens protein showed strong reaction in monomeric and polymeric crosslinked proteins by Western blot and ELISA. Glycation of BSA in the presence of BDAB resulted in covalent binding of BDAB to the protein and inhibited pentosidine formation. Mass spectrometric analysis of lysozyme glycated in the presence of BDAB showed the presence of quinoxalines at lysine residues at positions K1, K33, K96, and K116. The ELISA results indicated that cataractous lens proteins contain significantly higher levels of DDO than non-cataractous lenses (101.9±67.8 vs. 31.7±19.5AU/mg protein, p<0.0001). This study provides first direct evidence of DDO presence in human tissue proteins and establishes that AGE crosslink synthesis in the human lens occurs via DDO intermediates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Overproduction and biophysical characterization of human HSP70 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Duggan, Kelli D; Tsutsui, Yuko; Hays, Franklin A

    2015-02-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) perform vital cellular functions and modulate cell response pathways to physical and chemical stressors. A key feature of HSP function is the ability to interact with a broad array of protein binding partners as a means to potentiate downstream response pathways or facilitate protein folding. These binding interactions are driven by ATP-dependent conformational rearrangements in HSP proteins. The HSP70 family is evolutionarily conserved and is associated with diabetes and cancer progression and the etiopathogenesis of hepatic, cardiovascular, and neurological disorders in humans. However, functional characterization of human HSP70s has been stymied by difficulties in obtaining large quantities of purified protein. Studies of purified human HSP70 proteins are essential for downstream investigations of protein-protein interactions and in the rational design of novel family-specific therapeutics. Within this work, we present optimized protocols for the heterologous overexpression and purification of either the nucleotide binding domain (NBD) or the nucleotide and substrate binding domains of human HSPA9, HSPA8, and HSPA5 in either Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We also include initial biophysical characterization of HSPA9 and HSPA8. This work provides the basis for future biochemical studies of human HSP70 protein function and structure.

  18. Bioactive proteins in human milk: mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2010-02-01

    Human milk contains a multitude of bioactive proteins, with very diverse functions. Some of these proteins are involved in the synthesis and expression of milk, but the majority appears to have evolved to provide physiological activities in the breast-fed infant. These activities are exerted by a wide variety of mechanisms and have largely been unraveled by in vitro studies. To be active in the gastrointestinal tract, these proteins must be able to resist proteolytic degradation, at least for some time. We have evaluated the human milk proteins lactoferrin, haptocorrin, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, and transforming growth factor -beta in an in vitro digestion model, mimicking the conditions of the infant gastrointestinal milieu. These bioactive proteins are resistant against proteolysis and can remain intact or as larger fragments through passage of the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro digestibility assays can be helpful to assess which human milk proteins can resist proteolysis and to what extent.

  19. Interstitial leukocyte migration and immune function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedl, P.H.A.; Weigelin, B.

    2008-01-01

    The trafficking of leukocytes into and within lymphoid and peripheral tissues is central to immune cell development, immunosurveillance and effector function. Interstitial leukocyte trafficking is the result of amoeboid polarization and migration, guided by soluble or tissue-bound chemoattractant

  20. Preclinical studies for the gene therapy of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon Rico, D.

    2015-07-01

    Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in ITGB2 gene, encoding for CD18 protein (also known as 2 subunit). This protein binds to different CD11 subunits to form 2 integrins, which are expressed in the leukocyte membrane and allow leukocytes to firmly adhere to the endothelium as a previous step to the extravasation. In LAD-I patients, ITGB2 mutations lead to absent, low or aberrant CD18 expression, which results in absent or low 2 integrin expression on the leukocyte membrane. CD18 deficient leukocytes, especially neutrophils, fail to extravasate from the bloodstream to infected tissues. LAD-I patients suffer from recurrent and severe infections leading normally to death. (Author)

  1. INHIBITORY EFFECT OF MELOXICAM ON HUMAN POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTE ADHESION TO HUMAN SYNOVIAL CELL%美洛昔康抑制正常人中性粒细胞与滑膜细胞粘附的作用机理研究(英文)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李良成; 侯琦; 郭颖; 程桂芳

    2002-01-01

    目的研究美洛昔康对正常人中性粒细胞(polymorphonuclear leukocyte,PMN)与滑膜细胞(human synovial cell,HSC)粘附的抑制作用及其作用机理.方法用MTT比色法检测PMN与HSC的粘附,分别用Cell-ELISA和RT-PCR法检测粘附分子ICAM-1和VCAM-1的蛋白及基因表达,用EMSA法检测NF-κB的活性.结果美洛昔康可显著的并以剂量依赖的方式抑制TNF-α(50 u·mL-1)和IL-1β(50 u·mL-1)作用12 h诱导的PMN与HSC粘附,其IC50分别为3.38×10-7和3.56×10-6 mol·L-1.进一步研究发现美洛昔康在1×10-6~1×10-5 mol·L-1时还可在蛋白水平及mRNA水平抑制TNF-α(50 u·mL-1)诱导的HSC细胞ICAM-1的表达,但对VCAM-1蛋白及mRNA表达均未见显著影响;同时美洛昔康还可显著抑制50 u·mL-1 TNF-α诱导的NF-κB的活化.结论美洛昔康抑制NF-κB的活化,进而抑制ICAM-1的表达可能是其抑制PMN与HSC粘附的机制之一.%AIM To investigate the effect of meloxicam on human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) adhesion to human synovial cell (HSC),and to explore its mechanism.METHODS MTT colorimetry was used to determine the adhesion effect of PMN to HSC.Cell-ELISA and RT-PCR methods were used to determine the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1.Nuclear transcription factor-kappa B (NF-κB) was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) method.RESULTS Meloxicam was found to effectively inhibit TNF-α (50 u·mL-1 for 12 h) and IL-1β (50 u·mL-1 for 12 h)-induced adhesion of PMN to HSC (IC50 3.38×10-7 mol·L-1 and 3.56×10-6 mol·L-1,respectively) in a concentration-dependent manner.ICAM-1 protein and mRNA expression induced by TNF-α (50 u·mL-1) were inhibited by meloxicam at 1×10-6~1×10-5 mol·L-1.The activation of NF-κB was also inhibited by meloxicam at 1×10-6~1×10-5 mol·L-1.CONCLUSION These results suggest that meloxicam inhibit TNF-α stimulated PMN-HSC adhesion and expression of ICAM-1 by suppressing the activity of NF-κB.

  2. Human carotid atherosclerotic plaque protein(s) change HDL protein(s) composition and impair HDL anti-oxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elad; Aviram, Michael; Khatib, Soliman; Volkova, Nina; Vaya, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) anti-atherogenic functions are closely associated with cardiovascular disease risk factor, and are dictated by its composition, which is often affected by environmental factors. The present study investigates the effects of the human carotid plaque constituents on HDL composition and biological functions. To this end, human carotid plaques were homogenized and incubated with HDL. Results showed that after incubation, most of the apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) protein was released from the HDL, and HDL diameter increased by an average of approximately 2 nm. In parallel, HDL antioxidant activity was impaired. In response to homogenate treatment HDL could not prevent the accelerated oxidation of LDL caused by the homogenate. Boiling of the homogenate prior to its incubation with HDL abolished its effects on HDL composition changes. Moreover, tryptophan fluorescence quenching assay revealed an interaction between plaque component(s) and HDL, an interaction that was reduced by 50% upon using pre-boiled homogenate. These results led to hypothesize that plaque protein(s) interacted with HDL-associated Apo A1 and altered the HDL composition. Immuno-precipitation of Apo A1 that was released from the HDL after its incubation with the homogenate revealed a co-precipitation of three isomers of actin. However, beta-actin alone did not significantly affect the HDL composition, and yet the active protein within the plaque was elusive. In conclusion then, protein(s) in the homogenate interact with HDL protein(s), leading to release of Apo A1 from the HDL particle, a process that was associated with an increase in HDL diameter and with impaired HDL anti-oxidant activity.

  3. Protein Translation and Signaling in Human Eosinophils

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    Stephane Esnault

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported that, unlike IL-5 and GM-CSF, IL-3 induces increased translation of a subset of mRNAs. In addition, we have demonstrated that Pin1 controls the activity of mRNA binding proteins, leading to enhanced mRNA stability, GM-CSF protein production and prolonged eosinophil (EOS survival. In this review, discussion will include an overview of cap-dependent protein translation and its regulation by intracellular signaling pathways. We will address the more general process of mRNA post-transcriptional regulation, especially regarding mRNA binding proteins, which are critical effectors of protein translation. Furthermore, we will focus on (1 the roles of IL-3-driven sustained signaling on enhanced protein translation in EOS, (2 the mechanisms regulating mRNA binding proteins activity in EOS, and (3 the potential targeting of IL-3 signaling and the signaling leading to mRNA binding activity changes to identify therapeutic targets to treat EOS-associated diseases.

  4. Identification of proteins binding coding and non-coding human RNAs using protein microarrays

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    Siprashvili Zurab

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation and function of mammalian RNAs has been increasingly appreciated to operate via RNA-protein interactions. With the recent discovery of thousands of novel human RNA molecules by high-throughput RNA sequencing, efficient methods to uncover RNA-protein interactions are urgently required. Existing methods to study proteins associated with a given RNA are laborious and require substantial amounts of cell-derived starting material. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a rapid and large-scale approach to characterize binding of in vitro transcribed labeled RNA to ~9,400 human recombinant proteins spotted on protein microarrays. Results We have optimized methodology to probe human protein microarrays with full-length RNA molecules and have identified 137 RNA-protein interactions specific for 10 coding and non-coding RNAs. Those proteins showed strong enrichment for common human RNA binding domains such as RRM, RBD, as well as K homology and CCCH type zinc finger motifs. Previously unknown RNA-protein interactions were discovered using this technique, and these interactions were biochemically verified between TP53 mRNA and Staufen1 protein as well as between HRAS mRNA and CNBP protein. Functional characterization of the interaction between Staufen 1 protein and TP53 mRNA revealed a novel role for Staufen 1 in preserving TP53 RNA stability. Conclusions Our approach demonstrates a scalable methodology, allowing rapid and efficient identification of novel human RNA-protein interactions using RNA hybridization to human protein microarrays. Biochemical validation of newly identified interactions between TP53-Stau1 and HRAS-CNBP using reciprocal pull-down experiments, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrates the utility of this approach to study uncharacterized RNA-protein interactions.

  5. Cloning and expression of special F protein from human liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Ye Liu; Xin-Da Yu; Chun-Juan Song; Wei Lu; Jian-Dong Zhang; Xin-Rong Shi; Ying Duan; Ju Zhang

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To clone human liver special F protein and to express it in a prokaryotic system.METHODS:Total RNA was isolated from human liver tissue and first-strand cDNA was reverse transcribed using the PCR reverse primer. Following this,cDNA of the F protein was ligated into the clone vector pUCm-T. The segment of F protein's cDNA was subcloned into the expression vector pET-15b and transformed into E coli BL21 (DEB) pLyss. Isopropy-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) was then used to induce expression of the target protein.RESULTS:The cDNA clone of human liver special F protein (1134bp) was successfully produced,with the cDNA sequence being published in Gene-bank:DQ188836. We confirmed the expression of F protein by Western blot with a molecular weight of 43 kDa. The expressed protein accounted for 40% of the total protein extracted.CONCLUSION:F protein expresses cDNA clone in a proKaryotic system,which offers a relatively simple way of producing sufficient quantities of F protein and contributes to understanding the principal biological functions of this protein.

  6. The evolution of human cells in terms of protein innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Adam J; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai; Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Gough, Julian; Rackham, Owen J L

    2014-06-01

    Humans are composed of hundreds of cell types. As the genomic DNA of each somatic cell is identical, cell type is determined by what is expressed and when. Until recently, little has been reported about the determinants of human cell identity, particularly from the joint perspective of gene evolution and expression. Here, we chart the evolutionary past of all documented human cell types via the collective histories of proteins, the principal product of gene expression. FANTOM5 data provide cell-type-specific digital expression of human protein-coding genes and the SUPERFAMILY resource is used to provide protein domain annotation. The evolutionary epoch in which each protein was created is inferred by comparison with domain annotation of all other completely sequenced genomes. Studying the distribution across epochs of genes expressed in each cell type reveals insights into human cellular evolution in terms of protein innovation. For each cell type, its history of protein innovation is charted based on the genes it expresses. Combining the histories of all cell types enables us to create a timeline of cell evolution. This timeline identifies the possibility that our common ancestor Coelomata (cavity-forming animals) provided the innovation required for the innate immune system, whereas cells which now form the brain of human have followed a trajectory of continually accumulating novel proteins since Opisthokonta (boundary of animals and fungi). We conclude that exaptation of existing domain architectures into new contexts is the dominant source of cell-type-specific domain architectures.

  7. Untapped Potential of Disordered Proteins in Current Druggable Human Proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gang; Wu, Zhonghua; Wang, Kui; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in design and characterization of drugs often rely on the structure of their protein targets. However, a large fraction of proteins lack unique 3-D structures and exist as highly dynamic structural ensembles. These intrinsically disordered proteins are involved in pathogenesis of various human diseases and are highly abundant in eukaryotes. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the current druggable human proteome covering 12 drug classes and 18 major classes of drug targets we show a significant bias toward high structural coverage and low abundance of intrinsic disorder. We review reasons for this bias including widespread use of the structural information in various stages of drug development and characterization process and difficulty with attaining structures for the intrinsically disordered proteins. We also discuss future of intrinsically disordered proteins as drug targets. Given the overall high disorder content of the human proteome and current bias of the druggable human proteome toward structural proteins, it is inevitable that disordered proteins will have to raise up on the list of prospective drug targets. The protein disorder-assisted drug design can draw from current rational drug design techniques and would also need novel approaches that no longer rely on a unique protein structure.

  8. A catalogue of human secreted proteins and its implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivakumar Keerthikumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Under both normal and pathological conditions, cells secrete variety of proteins through classical and non-classical secretory pathways into the extracellular space. Majority of these proteins represent pathophysiology of the cell from which it is secreted. Recently, though more than 92% of the protein coding genes has been mapped by human proteome map project, but number of those proteins that constitutes secretome of the cell still remains elusive. Secreted proteins or the secretome can be accessible in bodily fluids and hence are considered as potential biomarkers to discriminate between healthy and diseased individuals. In order to facilitate the biomarker discovery and to further aid clinicians and scientists working in these arenas, we have compiled and catalogued secreted proteins from the human proteome using integrated bioinformatics approach. In this study, nearly 14% of the human proteome is likely to be secreted through classical and non-classical secretory pathways. Out of which, ~38% of these secreted proteins were found in extracellular vesicles including exosomes and shedding microvesicles. Among these secreted proteins, 94% were detected in human bodily fluids including blood, plasma, serum, saliva, semen, tear and urine. We anticipate that this high confidence list of secreted proteins could serve as a compendium of candidate biomarkers. In addition, the catalogue may provide functional insights in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions of the cell.

  9. Contour Detection of Leukocyte Cell Nucleus Using Morphological Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriyanti, R.; Satrio, G. P.; Ramadhani, Y.; Siswandari, W.

    2017-04-01

    Leukocytes are blood cells that do not contain color pigments. Leukocyte function to the tool body’s defenses. Abnormal forms of leukocytes can be a sign of serious diseases such example is leukemia. Most laboratories still use cell morphology examination to assist the diagnosis of illness associated with white blood cells such example is leukemia because of limited resources, both infrastructure, and human resources as happens in developing nations, such as Indonesia. This examination is less expensive and quicker process. However, morphological review requires the expertise of a specialist clinical pathology were limited. This process is sometimes less valid cause in some cases trying to differentiate morphology blast cells into the type of myoblasts, lymphoblast, monoblast, or erythroblast thus potentially misdiagnosis. The goal of this research is to develop a detection device types of blood cells automatically as lower-priced, easy to use and accurate so that the tool can be distributed across all units in existing health services throughout Indonesia and in particular for remote areas. However, because the variables used in the identification of abnormal leukocytes are very complex, in this paper, we emphasize on the contour detection of leukocyte cell nucleus using the morphological image. The results show that this method is promising for further development.

  10. Coexpression of fractalkine and its receptor in normal human endometrium and in endometrium from users of progestin-only contraception supports a role for fractalkine in leukocyte recruitment and endometrial remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Natalie J; Jones, Rebecca L; Critchley, Hilary O D; Kovacs, Gabor J; Rogers, Peter A W; Affandi, Biran; Salamonsen, Lois A

    2004-12-01

    Leukocytes are critical mediators of endometrial remodeling, but the mechanisms by which leukocyte subpopulations enter the uterus are currently unknown. Endometrial leukocytes have no genomic progesterone receptors; thus, we hypothesized that leukocyte migration is induced indirectly by progesterone-regulated chemokines. Fractalkine (CX3CL1), a chemotactic membrane-bound adhesion factor, and its receptor (CX3CR1) were assessed by immunohistochemistry in endometrial samples across the menstrual cycle, in early pregnancy, and in women using progestin-only contraceptives. Fractalkine was localized predominantly to glandular epithelial and decidualized stromal cells, with the highest staining intensity in the secretory phase and early pregnancy. It was also detected in subpopulations of endometrial leukocytes (macrophages and uterine NK cells), with maximal numbers during the proliferative phase and early pregnancy. CX3CR1 was similarly colocalized to the glandular epithelium and decidualized stromal cells, with the highest expression in the secretory phase. CX3CR1-positive leukocytes (macrophages and neutrophils) were in greatest abundance during the menstrual phase. In the endometrium of women using progestin-only contraceptives, immunoreactive fractalkine was markedly reduced in the glandular epithelium, but was increased in decidualized stroma and infiltrating leukocytes. These findings support a number of roles for fractalkine in the endometrium, in the secretory phase, in early pregnancy, and when influenced by progestin-only contraceptives.

  11. Leukocyte adhesion - a fundamental process in leukocyte physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahmberg C.G.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte adhesion is of pivotal functional importance. The adhesion involves several different adhesion molecules, the most important of which are the leukocyte ß2-integrins (CD11/CD18, the intercellular adhesion molecules, and the selectins. We and others have extensively studied the specificity and binding sites in the integrins and the intercellular adhesion molecules for their receptors and ligands. The integrins have to become activated to exert their functions but the possible mechanisms of activation remain poorly understood. Importantly, a few novel intercellular adhesion molecules have been recently described, which seem to function only in specific tissues. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly apparent that changes in integrins and intercellular adhesion molecules are associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases.

  12. Effect of fatty acids on leukocyte function

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    Pompéia C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids have various effects on immune and inflammatory responses, acting as intracellular and intercellular mediators. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs of the omega-3 family have overall suppressive effects, inhibiting lymphocyte proliferation, antibody and cytokine production, adhesion molecule expression, natural killer cell activity and triggering cell death. The omega-6 PUFAs have both inhibitory and stimulatory effects. The most studied of these is arachidonic acid that can be oxidized to eicosanoids, such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes and thromboxanes, all of which are potent mediators of inflammation. Nevertheless, it has been found that many of the effects of PUFA on immune and inflammatory responses are not dependent on eicosanoid generation. Fatty acids have also been found to modulate phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species production, cytokine production and leukocyte migration, also interfering with antigen presentation by macrophages. The importance of fatty acids in immune function has been corroborated by many clinical trials in which patients show improvement when submitted to fatty acid supplementation. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain fatty acid modulation of immune response, such as changes in membrane fluidity and signal transduction pathways, regulation of gene transcription, protein acylation, and calcium release. In this review, evidence is presented to support the proposition that changes in cell metabolism also play an important role in the effect of fatty acids on leukocyte functioning, as fatty acids regulate glucose and glutamine metabolism and mitochondrial depolarization.

  13. Human-specific protein isoforms produced by novel splice sites in the human genome after the human-chimpanzee divergence

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    Kim Dong Seon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution of splice sites is a well-known phenomenon that results in transcript diversity during human evolution. Many novel splice sites are derived from repetitive elements and may not contribute to protein products. Here, we analyzed annotated human protein-coding exons and identified human-specific splice sites that arose after the human-chimpanzee divergence. Results We analyzed multiple alignments of the annotated human protein-coding exons and their respective orthologous mammalian genome sequences to identify 85 novel splice sites (50 splice acceptors and 35 donors in the human genome. The novel protein-coding exons, which are expressed either constitutively or alternatively, produce novel protein isoforms by insertion, deletion, or frameshift. We found three cases in which the human-specific isoform conferred novel molecular function in the human cells: the human-specific IMUP protein isoform induces apoptosis of the trophoblast and is implicated in pre-eclampsia; the intronization of a part of SMOX gene exon produces inactive spermine oxidase; the human-specific NUB1 isoform shows reduced interaction with ubiquitin-like proteins, possibly affecting ubiquitin pathways. Conclusions Although the generation of novel protein isoforms does not equate to adaptive evolution, we propose that these cases are useful candidates for a molecular functional study to identify proteomic changes that might bring about novel phenotypes during human evolution.

  14. Spaceflight and protein metabolism, with special reference to humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, T. P.; Gaprindashvili, T.

    1994-01-01

    Human space missions have shown that human spaceflight is associated with a loss of body protein. Specific changes include a loss of lean body mass, decreased muscle mass in the calves, decreased muscle strength, and changes in plasma proteins and amino acids. The major muscle loss is believed to be associated with the antigravity (postural) muscle. The most significant loss of protein appears to occur during the first month of flight. The etiology is believed to be multifactorial with contributions from disuse atrophy, undernutrition, and a stress type of response. This article reviews the results of American and Russian space missions to investigate this problem in humans, monkeys, and rats. The relationship of the flight results with ground-based models including bedrest for humans and hindlimb unweighting for rats is also discussed. The results suggest that humans adapt to spaceflight much better than either monkeys or rats.

  15. Human protein reference database as a discovery resource for proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J. Daniel; Kristiansen, Troels Z.; Amanchy, Ramars; Surendranath, Vineeth; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T. K. B.; Chandrika, K. N.; Deshpande, Nandan; Suresh, Shubha; Rashmi, B. P.; Shanker, K.; Padma, N.; Niranjan, Vidya; Harsha, H. C.; Talreja, Naveen; Vrushabendra, B. M.; Ramya, M. A.; Yatish, A. J.; Joy, Mary; Shivashankar, H. N.; Kavitha, M. P.; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R.; Chandran, Sreenath; Mohan, Sujatha; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Prasad, C. K.; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Deshpande, Krishna S.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2004-01-01

    The rapid pace at which genomic and proteomic data is being generated necessitates the development of tools and resources for managing data that allow integration of information from disparate sources. The Human Protein Reference Database (http://www.hprd.org) is a web-based resource based on open source technologies for protein information about several aspects of human proteins including protein–protein interactions, post-translational modifications, enzyme–substrate relationships and disease associations. This information was derived manually by a critical reading of the published literature by expert biologists and through bioinformatics analyses of the protein sequence. This database will assist in biomedical discoveries by serving as a resource of genomic and proteomic information and providing an integrated view of sequence, structure, function and protein networks in health and disease. PMID:14681466

  16. Mitochondrial protein import and human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, James A; Payne, R Mark

    2007-05-01

    The targeting and assembly of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins are essential processes because the energy supply of humans is dependent upon the proper functioning of mitochondria. Defective import of mitochondrial proteins can arise from mutations in the targeting signals within precursor proteins, from mutations that disrupt the proper functioning of the import machinery, or from deficiencies in the chaperones involved in the proper folding and assembly of proteins once they are imported. Defects in these steps of import have been shown to lead to oxidative stress, neurodegenerative diseases, and metabolic disorders. In addition, protein import into mitochondria has been found to be a dynamically regulated process that varies in response to conditions such as oxidative stress, aging, drug treatment, and exercise. This review focuses on how mitochondrial protein import affects human health and disease.

  17. Structural characterisation of human proteinosis surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Holmskov, U; Højrup, P

    2000-01-01

    Human surfactant protein-A (SP-A) has been purified from a proteinosis patient and characterised by a combination of automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. The complete protein sequence was characterised. The major part of SP-A was shown to consist of SP-A2 gene product, and only...

  18. Protein buffering in model systems and in whole human saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Lamanda

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and alpha-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16% between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva.

  19. Identification and characterization of NBEAL1, a novel human neurobeachin-like 1 protein gene from fetal brain, which is up regulated in glioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen J; Xie Y; Ying K; Lu Y; Xu J; Huang Y; Cheng H; Hu G; Luo C; Lou M; Cao G

    2005-01-01

    The Beige and Chediak-Higashi (BEACH) domain is highly conserved in a large family of eukaryotic proteins, and is crucial for their functions in vesicle trafficking, membrane dynamics and receptor signaling. From a fetal brain cDNA library, we isolated a cDNA of 3858 bp encoding a novel human BEACH protein, which was named as human neurobeachin-like 1 (NBEAL1) gene. The cDNA had an open reading frame (ORF) of 3006 bp encoding a putative 1001 amino acid protein. The NBEAL1 gene was located on human chromosome 2q33-2q34 and consisted of 25 exons spanning about 73 kb of the human genome. PSORT analysis indicated that the NBEAL1 protein contained a vacuolar-targeting motif ILPK, which suggested the protein might be located in the cell lysosome. The expression pattern was examined by reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), which showed that the transcripts were highly expressed in the human brain, kidney, prostate, and testis while lowly in the ovary, small intestine, colon and peripheral blood leukocyte. In addition, the RT-PCR result of and Northern blot showed that the novel gene was highly expressed in the biopsies of different grade glioma, especially in that of lower grade ones, which suggested it might be correlative with the glioma.

  20. Targeted quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay for human protein variants

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    Nedelkov Dobrin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-translational modifications and genetic variations give rise to protein variants that significantly increase the complexity of the human proteome. Modified proteins also play an important role in biological processes. While sandwich immunoassays are routinely used to determine protein concentrations, they are oblivious to protein variants that may serve as biomarkers with better sensitivity and specificity than their wild-type proteins. Mass spectrometry, coupled to immunoaffinity separations, can provide an efficient mean for simultaneous detection and quantification of protein variants. Results Presented here is a mass spectrometric immunoassay method for targeted quantitative proteomics analysis of protein modifications. Cystatin C, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor and a potential marker for several pathological processes, was used as a target analyte. An internal reference standard was incorporated into the assay, serving as a normalization point for cystatin C quantification. The precision, linearity, and recovery characteristics of the assay were established. The new assay was also benchmarked against existing cystatin C ELISA. In application, the assay was utilized to determine the individual concentration of several cystatin C variants across a cohort of samples, demonstrating the ability to fully quantify individual forms of post-translationally modified proteins. Conclusions The mass spectrometric immunoassays can find use in quantifying specific protein modifications, either as a part of a specific protein biomarker discovery/rediscovery effort to delineate the role of these variants in the onset of the disease, progression, and response to therapy, or in a more systematic study to delineate and understand human protein diversity.

  1. Integrin activation by P-Rex1 is required for selectin-mediated slow leukocyte rolling and intravascular crawling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Jan M; Rossaint, Jan; Block, Helena; Welch, Heidi; Zarbock, Alexander

    2013-03-21

    Integrin activation is essential for the function of leukocytes. Impaired integrin activation on leukocytes is the hallmark of the leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome in humans, characterized by impaired leukocyte recruitment and recurrent infections. In inflammation, leukocytes collect different signals during the contact with the microvasculature, which activate signaling pathways leading to integrin activation and leukocyte recruitment. We report the role of P-Rex1, a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchanging factor, in integrin activation and leukocyte recruitment. We find that P-Rex1 is required for inducing selectin-mediated lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) extension that corresponds to intermediate affinity and induces slow leukocyte rolling, whereas P-Rex1 is not involved in the induction of the high-affinity conformation of LFA-1 obligatory for leukocyte arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 is involved in Mac-1-dependent intravascular crawling. In vivo, both LFA-1-dependent slow rolling and Mac-1-dependent crawling are defective in P-Rex1(-/-) leukocytes, whereas chemokine-induced arrest and postadhesion strengthening remain intact in P-Rex1-deficient leukocytes. Rac1 is involved in E-selectin-mediated slow rolling and crawling. In vivo, in an ischemia-reperfusion-induced model of acute kidney injury, abolished selectin-mediated integrin activation contributed to decreased neutrophil recruitment and reduced kidney damage in P-Rex1-deficient mice. We conclude that P-Rex1 serves distinct functions in LFA-1 and Mac-1 activation.

  2. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

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    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  3. A Highly Expressed Human Protein, Apolipoprotein B-100, Serves as an Autoantigen in a Subgroup of Patients With Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Jameson T; Drouin, Elise E; Pianta, Annalisa; Strle, Klemen; Wang, Qi; Costello, Catherine E; Steere, Allen C

    2015-12-01

    To discover novel autoantigens associated with Lyme arthritis (LA), we identified T-cell epitopes presented in vivo by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR molecules in patients' inflamed synovial tissue or joint fluid and tested each epitope for autoreactivity. Using this approach, we identified the highly expressed human protein, apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB-100), as a target of T- and B-cell responses in a subgroup of LA patients. Additionally, the joint fluid of these patients had markedly elevated levels of apoB-100 protein, which may contribute to its autoantigenicity. In patients with antibiotic-refractory LA, the magnitude of apoB-100 antibody responses correlated with increased numbers of plasma cells in synovial tissue, greater numbers and activation of endothelial cells, and more synovial fibroblast proliferation. Thus, a subset of LA patients have high levels of apoB-100 in their joints and autoreactive T- and B-cell responses to the protein, which likely contributes to pathogenic autoimmunity in patients with antibiotic-refractory LA.

  4. Partial primary structure of human pregnancy zone protein: extensive sequence homology with human alpha 2-macroglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Folkersen, J; Kristensen, Torsten;

    1984-01-01

    Human pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is a major pregnancy-associated protein. Its quaternary structure (two covalently bound 180-kDa subunits, which are further non-covalently assembled into a tetramer of 720 kDa) is similar to that of human alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M). Here we show, from the ...

  5. Molecular adaptations in human atrial fibrillation : mechanisms of protein remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brundel, Bianca Johanna Josephina Maria

    2000-01-01

    The main goal was to study the molecular remodeling in human atrial fibrillation. We focussed on gene expression of proteins wich influence the calcium homeostasis and action potential duration in human AF. The impact of modulation sysems like the natriuretic peptide system and the endothelin system

  6. Intracellular localization of VAMP-1 protein in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokina, S M

    2001-02-01

    We studied the intracellular localization of vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP-1 in human neutrophils. VAMP-1 was associated with membranes of gelatinase and specific secretory granules rapidly mobilized during exocytosis. VAMP-1 probably acts as a component of the SNARE complex during exocytosis of gelatinase and specific granules in human neutrophils.

  7. Guidelines for the nomenclature of the human heat shock proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, Harm H.; Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J.; Kubota, Hiroshi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Chen, B.; Hightower, Lawrence E.

    The expanding number of members in the various human heat shock protein (HSP) families and the inconsistencies in their nomenclature have often led to confusion. Here, we propose new guidelines for the nomenclature of the human HSP families, HSPH (HSP110), HSPC (HSP90), HSPA (HSP70), DNAJ (HSP40),

  8. Guidelines for the nomenclature of the human heat shock proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, Harm H.; Hageman, Jurre; Vos, Michel J.; Kubota, Hiroshi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Bruford, Elspeth A.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Chen, B.; Hightower, Lawrence E.

    2009-01-01

    The expanding number of members in the various human heat shock protein (HSP) families and the inconsistencies in their nomenclature have often led to confusion. Here, we propose new guidelines for the nomenclature of the human HSP families, HSPH (HSP110), HSPC (HSP90), HSPA (HSP70), DNAJ (HSP40), a

  9. Human cytomegalovirus IE2 protein interacts with transcription activating factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jinping(徐进平); YE; Linbai(叶林柏)

    2002-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE86 Cdna was cloned into Pgex-2T and fusion protein GST-IE86 was expressed in E. Coli. SDS-PAGE and Western blot assay indicated that fusion protein GST-IE86 with molecular weight of 92 ku is soluble in the supernatant of cell lysate. Protein GST and fusion protein GST-IE86 were purified by affinity chromatography. The technology of co-separation and specific affinity chromatography was used to study the interactions of HCMV IE86 protein with some transcriptional regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors. The results indicated that IE86 interacts separately with transcriptional factor TFIIB and promoter DNA binding transcription trans-activating factors SP1, AP1 and AP2 to form a heterogenous protein complex. These transcriptional trans-activating factors, transcriptional factor and IE86 protein were adsorbed and retained in the affinity chromatography simultaneously. But IE86 protein could not interact with NF-Кb, suggesting that the function of IE86 protein that can interact with transcriptional factor and transcriptional trans-activating factors has no relevance to protein glycosylation. IE86 protein probably has two domains responsible for binding transcriptional trans-activating regulatory proteins and transcriptional factors respectively, thus activating the transcription of many genes. The interactions accelerated the assembly of the transcriptional initiation complexes.

  10. Combination of Human Leukocyte Antigen and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Genetic Background Influences the Onset Age of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Male Patients with Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Pan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR and human leukocyte antigen (HLA genetic background could influence the onset age of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, one hundred and seventy-one males with HBV-related HCC were enrolled. The presence of 12 loci of KIR was detected individually. HLA-A, -B, and -C loci were genotyped with high resolution by a routine sequence-based typing method. The effect of each KIR locus, HLA ligand, and HLA-KIR combination was examined individually by Kaplan-Meier (KM analysis. Multivariate Cox hazard regression model was also applied. We identified C1C1-KIR2DS2/2DL2 as an independent risk factor for earlier onset age of HCC (median onset age was 44 for C1C1-KIR2DS2/2DL2 positive patients compared to 50 for negative patients, P=0.04 for KM analysis; HR = 1.70, P=0.004 for multivariate Cox model. We conclude that KIR and HLA genetic background can influence the onset age of HCC in male patients with HBV infection. This study may be useful to improve the current HCC surveillance program in HBV-infected patients. Our findings also suggest an important role of natural killer cells (or other KIR-expressing cells in the progress of HBV-related HCC development.

  11. Survival of malnourished head and neck cancer patients can be predicted by human leukocyte antigen-DR expression and interleukin-6/tumor necrosis factor-alpha response of the monocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schuer; von Blomberg-van der Flier, B M; Kuik, D J; Scholten, P E; Siroen, M P; Snow, G B; Quak, J J; van Leeuwen, P A

    2000-01-01

    Patients with advanced stages of head and neck cancer are often characterized by malnutrition and by an impaired immune system. Because some of the suppressed immune parameters were shown to be of prognostic importance in trauma and sepsis, we investigated whether these would also correlate with survival in head and neck cancer. Severely malnourished head and neck cancer patients undergoing ablative and reconstructive surgery were followed prospectively and their perioperative immune parameters were related to long-term survival. Forty-nine patients with a preoperative weight loss of more than 10% were followed up for a period of at least 16 months after surgery. Analyses of variance revealed that preoperative human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) expression on monocytes and endotoxin-induced production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were different between patients who survived and patients who died. Proportional hazards identified a weight loss of more than 12%, the presence of coexistent disease, and an HLA-DR expression on monocytes below the cutoff points (mean fluorescence index < 15, peak channel index < 9) to be of significant influence on survival. In addition to known prognostic parameters such as tumor stage, coexistent disease, and weight loss, the immune parameters HLA-DR expression on monocytes and endotoxin-induced cytokine production may carry prognostic value in cancer patients. Immunomodulating therapies leading to improvement of these parameters might in the future lead to increased options for treatment.

  12. Polymorphism of the second exon of human leukocyte antigen-DQA1, -DQB1 gene and genetic susceptibility to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy in people of the Han nationality in northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; LI Wei-min; SUN Ning-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) is characterized by dilation and impaired contraction of the left ventricle or both, and it is a relevant cause of heart failure and a common indication for heart transplantation. The major pathogenetic hypothesis in IDC involves autoimmune mediated damage to myocytes. The development of autoimmune inflammatory damage occurs only in patients with a predisposing genetic background. Changes in the immune system concerning cell-mediated and humoral immunity have been detected. The immune system is strictly related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA), which is located on the surface of antigen presenting cells. Its primary function is to restrict T-cell receptors in the process of recognizing auto- or exterior antigen, and thus participates in or mediates immunological recognition, immunological response and immune regulation at various levels. HLA is a genetic marker of susceptibility to autoimmune myocardial damage.1 In the present study, the HLA-DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles in IDC patients were detected with the techniques of polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) to explore the immunogenetic mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of IDC.

  13. Human neuroglobin protein in cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whalen Gail

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroglobin is a hexacoordinated member of the globin family of proteins. It is predominantly localized to various brain regions and retina where it may play a role in protection against ischemia and nitric oxide-induced neural injury. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected from 12 chronic regional or systemic pain and 5 control subjects. Proteins were precipitated by addition of 50% 0.2 N acetic acid, 50% ethanol, 0.02% sodium bisulfite. The pellet was extensively digested with trypsin. Peptides were separated by capillary liquid chromatography using a gradient from 95% water to 95% acetonitrile in 0.2% formic acid, and eluted through a nanoelectrospray ionization interface into a quadrapole – time-of-flight dual mass spectrometer (QToF2, Waters, Milford, MA. Peptides were sequenced (PepSeq, MassLynx v3.5 and proteins identified using MASCOT ®. Results Six different neuroglobin peptides were identified in various combinations in 3 of 9 female pain subjects, but none in male pain, or female or male control subjects. Conclusion This is the first description of neuroglobin in cerebrospinal fluid. The mechanism(s leading to its release in chronic pain states remain to be defined.

  14. STUDY ON NUCLEAR MATRIX PROTEINS FROM HUMAN BREAST CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Qian; ZHANG Shu-qun; CHU Yong-lie; JIA Xiao-li; JIANG Jian-tao

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the marker protein of human breast carcinoma from nuclear matrix proteins (NMPs).Methods NMPs were injected subcutaneously into rabbit to get antiserum, which was used to detect the NMPs specificity for breast carcinoma.Results There was an apparent positive band (100kD) in the NMPs of breast carcinoma, which did not exist in normal breast and other tumors that were detected.Conclusion One or one group of 100kD NMPs were found to be related to human breast carcinoma, which may be involved in the carcinogenesis and development of human breast carcinoma and valuable for breast carcinoma diagnosis.

  15. HUMAN AND MARE'S MILK - PROTEIN FRACTION AND LIPID COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Gantner

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In human population if the infants are not breast-fed, a substitute for breast milk is nee¬ded. Use of cow's milk can induce allergies during the first 3 years of life. Alternative could be mare's milk. The objectives of this review were to compare human and mare's milk protein fraction and lipid composition as well as to determine adequacy of mare's milk as substitute for breast milk. Similarities are found regarding the protein and salt content; whey protein and NPN concentrations; structure of protein micelles and lipid globules; proportion of saturated fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids. Taking into account determined similarities of human and mare's milk, it could be concluded that mare's milk is suitable nourishment for infants.

  16. Selection of Proteins for Human MHC Class Ⅱ Presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jiang; Ole Lund; Jinquan Tan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the predicted function of proteins eluded from human MHC class Ⅱ molecules. Peptides that are presented by MHC class Ⅱ were obtained from the SYFPEITHI database and the corresponding proteins were found in the SWISSPROT database. The functions of these proteins were predicted using the protfun server. Our analysis showed that human proteins presented by MHC class Ⅱ molecules are likely to be in the cell envelope, be a receptor or involved in immune responses. Presented proteins from bacteria and virus, on the other hand, are more likely to be involved in regulatory functions, translation, transcription as well as replication. These results can lead to better understanding the autoimmunity and the response to infections.

  17. Selection of Proteins for Human MHC Class Ⅱ Presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJiang; OleLund; JinquanTan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the predicted function of proteins eluded from human MHC class Ⅱ molecules. Peptides that are presented by MHC class Ⅱ were obtained from the SYFPEITH! database and the corresponding proteins were found in the SWISSPROT database. The functions of these proteins were predicted using the protfun server. Our analysis showed that human proteins presented by MHC class Ⅱ molecules are likely to be in the cell envelope, be a receptor or involved in immune responses. Presented proteins from bacteria and virus, on the other hand, are more likely to be involved in regulatory functions, translation, transcription as well as replication. These results can lead to better understanding the autoimmunity and the response to infections. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005; 2(1):49-56.

  18. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  19. Prediction of protein-protein interactions between viruses and human by an SVM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guangyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several computational methods have been developed to predict protein-protein interactions from amino acid sequences, but most of those methods are intended for the interactions within a species rather than for interactions across different species. Methods for predicting interactions between homogeneous proteins are not appropriate for finding those between heterogeneous proteins since they do not distinguish the interactions between proteins of the same species from those of different species. Results We developed a new method for representing a protein sequence of variable length in a frequency vector of fixed length, which encodes the relative frequency of three consecutive amino acids of a sequence. We built a support vector machine (SVM model to predict human proteins that interact with virus proteins. In two types of viruses, human papillomaviruses (HPV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, our SVM model achieved an average accuracy above 80%, which is higher than that of another SVM model with a different representation scheme. Using the SVM model and Gene Ontology (GO annotations of proteins, we predicted new interactions between virus proteins and human proteins. Conclusions Encoding the relative frequency of amino acid triplets of a protein sequence is a simple yet powerful representation method for predicting protein-protein interactions across different species. The representation method has several advantages: (1 it enables a prediction model to achieve a better performance than other representations, (2 it generates feature vectors of fixed length regardless of the sequence length, and (3 the same representation is applicable to different types of proteins.

  20. Eotaxin-2, a Novel CC Chemokine that Is Selective for the Chemokine Receptor CCR3, and Acts Like Eotaxin on Human Eosinophil and Basophil Leukocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Forssmann, Ulf; Uguccioni, Mariagrazia; Loetscher, Pius; Dahinden, Clemens A; Langen, Hanno; Thelen, Marcus; Baggiolini, Marco

    1997-01-01

    A novel human CC chemokine consisting of 78 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 8,778.3 daltons (VVIPSPCCMF FVSKRIPENR VVSYQLSSRS TCLKAGVIFT TKKGQQ SCGD PKQEWVQRYM KNLDAKQKKA SPRARAVA) was isolated together with three minor COOH-terminally truncated variants with 73, 75, and 76 residues. The new chemokine was termed eotaxin-2 because it is functionally very similar to eotaxin. In terms of structure, however, eotaxin and eotaxin-2 are rather distant, they share only 39% identical amino ...

  1. Protein kinase CK2 in human diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Barbara; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2008-01-01

    in various disease processes including cancer has been gained in recent years, and the present review may help to further elucidate its aberrant role in many disease states. Its peculiar structural features [3-9] may be advantageous in designing tailor-made compounds with the possibility to specifically...... target this protein kinase [10]. Since not all the aspects of what has been published on CK2 can be covered in this review, we would like to recommend the following reviews; (i) for general information on CK2 [11-18] and (ii) with a focus on aberrant CK2 [19-22]....

  2. Human Proteinpedia enables sharing of human protein data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathivanan, Suresh; Ahmed, Mukhtar; Ahn, Natalie G.; Alexandre, Hainard; Amanchy, Ramars; Andrews, Philip C.; Bader, Joel S.; Balgley, Brian M.; Bantscheff, Marcus; Bennett, Keiryn; Bjorling, Erik; Blagoev, Blagoy; Bose , Ron; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Burlingame, Alma S.; Bustelo, Xos R.; Cagney, Gerard; Cantin, Greg T; Cardasis, Helene L; Celis, Julio E; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chu, Feixia; Cole, Phillip A.; Costello, Catherine E; Cotter , Robert J.; Crockett, David; DeLany , James P.; De Marzo, Angelo M; DeSouza, Leroi V; Deutsch, Eric W.; Dransfield , Eric; Drewes , Gerard; Droit , Arnaud; Dunn, Michael; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo; Ewing, Rob M.; Van Eyk , Jennifer; Faca , Vitor; Falkner , Jayson; Fang, Xiangming; Fenselau , Catherine; Figeys , Daniel; Gagne , Pierre; Gelfi , Cecilia; Gevaert , Kris; Gimble , Jeffrey; Gnad , Florian; Goel, Renu; Gromov , Pavel; Hanash, Samir M.; Hancock, William S.; Harsha , HC; Hart , Gerald; Faith , Hays; He , Fuchu; Hebbar , Prashantha; Helsens , Kenny; Hermeking , Heiko; Hide , Winston; Hjerno, Karin; Hochstrasser, Denis F.; Hofmann, Oliver; Horn , David M.; Hruban , Ralph H.; Ibarrola , Nieves; James , Peter; Jensen , Ole N.; Jensen, Pia H.; Jung , Peter; Kandasamy, Kumaran; Kheterpal , Indu; Kikuno , Reiko; Korf, Ulrike; Korner, Roman; Kuster, Bernhard; Kwon , Min-Seok; Lee , Hyoung-Joo; Lee , Young - Jin; Lefevre , Michael; Lehvaslaiho, Minna; Lescuyer, Pierre; Levander, Fredrik; Lim, Megan S.; Lobke, Christian; Loo, Joseph; Mann, Matthias; Martens , Lennart; Martinez-Heredia, Juan; McComb, Mark E.; McRedmond , James; Mehrle, Alexander; Menon, Rajasree; Miller, Christine A.; Mischak, Harald; Mohan, S Sujatha; Mohmood , Riaz; Molina , Henrik; Moran , Michael F.; Morgan, James D.; Moritz , Robert; Morzel, Martine; Muddiman, David C.; Nalli , Anuradha; Navarro, J. D.; Neubert , Thomas A.; Ohara , Osamu; Oliva, Rafael; Omenn, Gilbert; Oyama , Masaaki; Paik, Young-Ki; Pennington , Kyla; Pepperkok, Rainer; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Poirier, Guy G.; Prasad, T S Keshava; Purvine, Samuel O.; Rahiman , B Abdul; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Ramachandra , Y L; Rice, Robert H.; Rick , Jens; Ronnholm , Ragna H.; Salonen , Johanna; Sanchez , Jean - Charles; Sayd , Thierry; Seshi, Beerelli; Shankari, Kripa; Sheng , Shi Jun; Shetty , Vivekananda; Shivakumar, K.; Simpson, Richard J.; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Siu , K W Michael; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Richard D.; States, David J.; Sugano, Sumio; Sullivan , Matthew; Superti - Furga, Giulio; Takatalo , Maarit; Thongboonkerd , Visith; Trinidad , Jonathan C.; Uhlen , Mathias; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Vasilescu , Julian; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Vidal - Taboada, Jose - Manuel; Vihinen, Mauno; Wait , Robin; Wang, Xiaoyue; Wiemann, Stefan; Wu , Billy; Xu, Tao; Yates, John R.; Zhong, Jun; Zhou, Ming; Zhu, Yunping; Zurbig, Petra; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2008-02-01

    Proteomic technologies, such as yeast twohybrid, mass spectrometry (MS), protein/ peptide arrays and fluorescence microscopy, yield multi-dimensional data sets, which are often quite large and either not published or published as supplementary information that is not easily searchable. Without a system in place for standardizing and sharing data, it is not fruitful for the biomedical community to contribute these types of data to centralized repositories. Even more difficult is the annotation and display of pertinent information in the context of the corresponding proteins. Wikipedia, an online encyclopedia that anyone can edit, has already proven quite successful1 and can be used as a model for sharing biological data. However, the need for experimental evidence, data standardization and ownership of data creates scientific obstacles.

  3. Rapid response to lipids profile and leukocyte gene expression after rosuvastatin administration in Chinese healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Cong-xiao; LI Yi-shi; LIU Yu-qing; LIU Hong; LI Na; WU Ying; XU Li; HUANG Yi-ling

    2008-01-01

    Background Statins are potent lipid-lowering agents widely used in medicaI practice.There has been growing evidence suggesting the pleiotropic effects of statins In addition to the lipid-lowering effect.However,it is still unclear how rapidly the beneficial effects of statins occur.The transcriptome of peripheral blood cells can be used as a sensor to drug therapy.The purpose of the study was to investigate the acute effects of rosuvastatin both on lipids profile and gene expression of peripheral leukocytes following therapy with a single dose of rosuvastatin.Methods Thirty healthy Chinese male volunteers were enrolled.The serum lipids,high-sensitivity C-reactive protein,and plasma fibrinogen were determined before and 72 hours after administration of 20 mg of rosuvastatin.The differentially expressed genes of peripheral leukocytes after administration of rosuvastatin were screened using human oligonucleotide microarray gene expression chips.Then four of the differentially expressed genes including ATM,CASP8,IL8RB and S100B were verified by real-time polymerase chain reaction(PCR).Results Rosuvastatin decreased both serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol significantly 72 hours after administration of a single dose of 20 mg rosuvastatin.However,no significant changes occurred in blood high-density lipoprotein cholesterol,triglycerides,C-reactive protein and fibrinogen after the treatment.A total of 24 genes were differentially expressed after the treatment.They were involved in important cell biological processes such as cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction,apoptosis signaling,etc.Conclusions Rosuvastatin rapidly modulates the serum lipids and affects the gene expression of peripheral leukocytes in healthy volunteers.This finding provides some new clues for further studies on its potential pleiotropic effects.

  4. Leukocyte accumulation promoting fibrin deposition is mediated in vivo by P-selectin on adherent platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palabrica, Theresa; Lobb, Roy; Furie, Barbara C.; Aronovitz, Mark; Benjamin, Christopher; Hsu, Yen-Ming; Sajer, Susan A.; Furie, Bruce

    1992-10-01

    THE glycoprotein P-selectin is a cell adhesion molecule of stimulated platelets and endothelial cells, which mediates the interaction of these cells with neutrophils and monocytes1,2. It is a membrane component of cell storage granules3-6, and is a member of the selectin family which includes E-selectin and L-selectin7,8. P-selectin recognizes both lineage-specific carbohydrate ligands on monocytes and neutrophils, including the Lewis x antigen, sialic acid, and a protein component9-12. In inflammation and thrombosis, P-selectin may mediate the interaction of leukocytes with platelets bound in the region of tissue injury and with stimulated endothelium1,2. To evaluate the role of P-selectin in platelet-leukocyte adhesion in vivo, the accumulation of leukocytes within an experimental thrombus was explored in an arteriovenous shunt model in baboons13. A Dacron graft implanted within an arteriovenous shunt is thrombogenic, accumulating platelets and fibrin within its lumen. These bound platelets express P-selectin14. Here we show that antibody inhibition of leukocyte binding to P-selectin expressed on platelets immobilized on the graft blocks leukocyte accumulation and inhibits the deposition of fibrin within the thrombus. These results indicate that P-selectin is an important adhesion molecule on platelets, mediating platelet-leukocyte binding in vivo, that the presence of leukocytes in thrombi is mediated by P-selectin, and that these leukocytes promote fibrin deposition.

  5. Long non-coding RNA and alternative splicing modulations in Parkinson's leukocytes identified by RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach Soreq

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5'-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia

  6. Pharmacogenetic research in the association between human leukocyte antigen and adverse drug reactions%HLA与药物不良反应相关性遗传药理学方法研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊艳; 张伟; 陈小平

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of pharmacogenetics, more and more studies have shown evidence in the association between polymorphisms at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci and severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). Several HLA-B alleles proved to be associated with SADRs for drugs such as carbamazepine, allopurinol, lamotrigine, and lfucloxacillin. hTe USA Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has even recommended routine screening for HLA-B allele before the use of abacavir and carbamazepine. With the completion of human genome project and the Hapmapproject, several new pharmacogenetics approaches such as genome-wide association study (GWAS) have emerged. hTese newly developed methods will undoubtedly accelerate the identiifcation and clinical utilization of the pharmacogenetic biomakers. In addition, the immunogenetic mechanisms by which the HLA alleles cause SADRs are explored at the cellular and molecular level. hTis review focuses on the recent progresses in HLA alleles and ADRs regarding both the clinical translation and modern pharmacogenetic methods.%随着遗传药理学的迅速发展,越来越多的研究发现人类白细胞抗原(human leukocyte antigen,HLA)基因型与严重药物不良反应之间的关系,如已证实的HLA-B等位基因与阿巴卡韦、卡马西平、别嘌呤醇、拉莫三秦、氟氯西林等药物所致严重皮肤不良反应发生的风险相关。美国食品药物管理局(Food and Drug Administration,FDA)甚至已批准在阿巴卡韦和卡马西平药品标签中增加建议在用药前对HLA-B等位基因进行分型的信息。人类基因组计划(human genome project,HGP)和人类单倍型作图计划(Hapmap计划)的完成为遗传药理学研究带来了新的思路和研究方法,如全基因组关联研究等,这些无疑加快了药物基因组分子遗传标志物的发现及临床转化应用的步伐。同时, HLA等位基因导致药物不良反应发生机制的细胞分子水平研究方面也取得了较大的进展。

  7. The nucleocapsid protein of human coronavirus NL63.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaja Zuwała

    Full Text Available Human coronavirus (HCoV NL63 was first described in 2004 and is associated with respiratory tract disease of varying severity. At the genetic and structural level, HCoV-NL63 is similar to other members of the Coronavirinae subfamily, especially human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E. Detailed analysis, however, reveals several unique features of the pathogen. The coronaviral nucleocapsid protein is abundantly present in infected cells. It is a multi-domain, multi-functional protein important for viral replication and a number of cellular processes. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HCoV-NL63 nucleocapsid protein. Biochemical analyses revealed that the protein shares characteristics with homologous proteins encoded in other coronaviral genomes, with the N-terminal domain responsible for nucleic acid binding and the C-terminal domain involved in protein oligomerization. Surprisingly, analysis of the subcellular localization of the N protein of HCoV-NL63 revealed that, differently than homologous proteins from other coronaviral species except for SARS-CoV, it is not present in the nucleus of infected or transfected cells. Furthermore, no significant alteration in cell cycle progression in cells expressing the protein was observed. This is in stark contrast with results obtained for other coronaviruses, except for the SARS-CoV.

  8. Age-associated DNA methylation changes in immune genes, histone modifiers and chromatin remodeling factors within 5 years after birth in human blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Reinius, Lovisa E; Vitezic, Morana;

    2015-01-01

    the dynamics of DNA methylation. Serial blood samples were collected at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after birth in ten healthy girls born in Finland and participating in the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study. DNA methylation was measured using the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. RESULTS......: After filtering for the presence of polymorphisms and cell-lineage-specific signatures, 794 CpG sites showed significant DNA methylation differences as a function of age in all children (41.6% age-methylated and 58.4% age-demethylated, Bonferroni-corrected P value ... performing DNA methylation studies in children....

  9. Herpes Murine Model as a Biological Assay to Test Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Nohemí Salinas-Jazmín; Sergio Estrada-Parra; Miguel Angel Becerril-García; Alberto Yairh Limón-Flores; Said Vázquez-Leyva; Emilio Medina-Rivero; Lenin Pavón; Marco Antonio Velasco-Velázquez; Sonia Mayra Pérez-Tapia

    2015-01-01

    Human dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLEs) are heterogeneous mixtures of low-molecular-weight peptides that are released on disruption of peripheral blood leukocytes from healthy donors. DLEs improve clinical responses in infections, allergies, cancer, and immunodeficiencies. Transferon is a human DLE that has been registered as a hemoderivate by Mexican health authorities and commercialized nationally. To develop an animal model that could be used routinely as a quality control assay for Tra...

  10. Regulation of the retinoblastoma proteins by the human herpesviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalejta Robert F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that alter the environment of infected cells in order to replicate more efficiently. One way viruses achieve this is by modulating cell cycle progression. The main regulators of progression out of G0, through G1, and into S phase are the members of the retinoblastoma (Rb family of tumor suppressors. Rb proteins repress the transcription of genes controlled by the E2F transcription factors. Because the expression of E2F-responsive genes is required for cell cycle progression into the S phase, Rb arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1. A number of viral proteins directly target Rb family members for inactivation, presumably to create an environment more hospitable for viral replication. Such viral proteins include the extensively studied oncoproteins E7 (from human papillomavirus, E1A (from adenovirus, and the large T (tumor antigen (from simian virus 40. Elucidating how these three viral proteins target and inactivate Rb has proven to be an invaluable approach to augment our understanding of both normal cell cycle progression and carcinogenesis. In addition to these proteins, a number of other virally-encoded inactivators of the Rb family have subsequently been identified including a surprising number encoded by human herpesviruses. Here we review how the human herpesviruses modulate Rb function during infection, introduce the individual viral proteins that directly or indirectly target Rb, and speculate about what roles Rb modulation by these proteins may play in viral replication, pathogenesis, and oncogenesis.

  11. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y;

    1990-01-01

    the highly conserved 60 amino acid homeodomain. This peptide antiserum recognized a protein species of molecular weight 63,000 in immunoblots of nuclear extracts obtained from several tumor cell lines. The predominant molecular weight 63,000 nuclear protein recognized by the peptide antiserum...... the same patients exhibited little immunoreactivity. Both the peptide antiserum and the polyclonal antiserum against the native protein immunoblotted a molecular weight 63,000 protein in nuclear extracts of tumor tissue, but not significantly in extracts of normal tissue. At the molecular level......Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from...

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Peptides Derived from Tumor Antigens Induced by Inhibition of DNA Methylation for Development of Drug-facilitated Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shraibman, Bracha; Kadosh, Dganit Melamed; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of cancer cells with anticancer drugs often fails to achieve complete remission. Yet, such drug treatments may induce alteration in the tumor's gene expression patterns, including those of Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTA). The degradation products of such antigens can be presented as HLA peptides on the surface of the tumor cells and be developed into anticancer immunotherapeutics. For example, the DNA methyl transferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine) has limited antitumor efficacy, yet it induces the expression of many genes, including CTAs that are normally silenced in the healthy adult tissues. In this study, the presentation of many new HLA peptides derived from CTAs and induced by Decitabine was demonstrated in three human Glioblastoma cell lines. Such presentation of CTA-derived HLA peptides can be exploited for development of new treatment modalities, combining drug treatment with anti-CTA targeted immunotherapy. The Decitabine-induced HLA peptidomes include many CTAs that are not normally detected in healthy tissues or in cancer cells, unless treated with the drug. In addition, the study included large-scale analyses of the simultaneous effects of Decitabine on the transcriptomes, proteomes and HLA peptidomes of the human Glioblastoma cells. It demonstrates the poor correlations between these three levels of gene expression, both in their total levels and in their response to the drug. The proteomics and HLA peptidomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003790 and the transcriptomics data are available via GEO with identifier GSE80137.

  13. [Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, Jolanta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2013-05-31

    Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements) which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  14. Proteins of human milk involved in immunological processes 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Lis

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Human milk contains a lot of components (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, inorganic elements which provide basic nutrients for infants during the first period of their lives. Qualitative composition of milk components of healthy mothers is similar, but their levels change during lactation stages. Colostrum is the fluid secreted during the first days postpartum by mammary epithelial cells. Colostrum is replaced by transitional milk during 5-15 days postpartum and from 15 days postpartum mature milk is produced. Human milk, apart from nutritional components, is a source of biologically active molecules, i.e. immunoglobulins, growth factors, cytokines, acute phase proteins, antiviral and antibacterial proteins. Such components of human milk are responsible for specific biological activities of human milk. This secretion plays an important role in growth and development of newborns. Bioactive molecules present in the milk support the immature immune system of the newborn and also protect against the development of infection. In this article we describe the pathways involved in the production and secretion of human milk, the state of knowledge on the proteome of human milk, and the contents of components of milk during lactation. Moreover, some growth factors and proteins involved in innate and specific immunity, intercellular communication, immunomodulation, and inflammatory processes have been characterized.

  15. Development of human protein reference database as an initial platform for approaching systems biology in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Suraj; Navarro, J Daniel; Amanchy, Ramars; Kristiansen, Troels Z; Jonnalagadda, Chandra Kiran; Surendranath, Vineeth; Niranjan, Vidya; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Gandhi, T K B; Gronborg, Mads; Ibarrola, Nieves; Deshpande, Nandan; Shanker, K; Shivashankar, H N; Rashmi, B P; Ramya, M A; Zhao, Zhixing; Chandrika, K N; Padma, N; Harsha, H C; Yatish, A J; Kavitha, M P; Menezes, Minal; Choudhury, Dipanwita Roy; Suresh, Shubha; Ghosh, Neelanjana; Saravana, R; Chandran, Sreenath; Krishna, Subhalakshmi; Joy, Mary; Anand, Sanjeev K; Madavan, V; Joseph, Ansamma; Wong, Guang W; Schiemann, William P; Constantinescu, Stefan N; Huang, Lily; Khosravi-Far, Roya; Steen, Hanno; Tewari, Muneesh; Ghaffari, Saghi; Blobe, Gerard C; Dang, Chi V; Garcia, Joe G N; Pevsner, Jonathan; Jensen, Ole N; Roepstorff, Peter; Deshpande, Krishna S; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Hamosh, Ada; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2003-10-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) is an object database that integrates a wealth of information relevant to the function of human proteins in health and disease. Data pertaining to thousands of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, enzyme/substrate relationships, disease associations, tissue expression, and subcellular localization were extracted from the literature for a nonredundant set of 2750 human proteins. Almost all the information was obtained manually by biologists who read and interpreted >300,000 published articles during the annotation process. This database, which has an intuitive query interface allowing easy access to all the features of proteins, was built by using open source technologies and will be freely available at http://www.hprd.org to the academic community. This unified bioinformatics platform will be useful in cataloging and mining the large number of proteomic interactions and alterations that will be discovered in the postgenomic era.

  16. Protein L. A bacterial Ig-binding protein that activates human basophils and mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patella, V; Casolaro, V; Björck, L; Marone, G

    1990-11-01

    Peptostreptococcus magnus strain 312 (10(6) to 10(8)/ml), which synthesizes a protein capable of binding to kappa L chains of human Ig (protein L), stimulated the release of histamine from human basophils in vitro. P. magnus strain 644, which does not synthesize protein L, did not induce histamine secretion. Soluble protein L (3 x 10(-2) to 3 micrograms/ml) induced histamine release from human basophils. The characteristics of the release reaction were similar to those of rabbit IgG anti-Fc fragment of human IgE (anti-IgE): it was Ca2(+)- and temperature-dependent, optimal release occurring at 37 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 mM extracellular Ca2+. There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.82; p less than 0.001) between the maximal percent histamine release induced by protein L and that induced by anti-IgE, as well as between protein L and protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (r = 0.52; p less than 0.01). Preincubation of basophils with either protein L or anti-IgE resulted in complete cross-desensitization to a subsequent challenge with the heterologous stimulus. IgE purified from myeloma patients PS and PP (lambda-chains) blocked anti-IgE-induced histamine release but failed to block the histamine releasing activity of protein L. In contrast, IgE purified from myeloma patient ADZ (kappa-chains) blocked both anti-IgE- and protein L-induced releases, whereas human polyclonal IgG selectively blocked protein L-induced secretion. Protein L acted as a complete secretagogue, i.e., it activated basophils to release sulfidopeptide leukotriene C4 as well as histamine. Protein L (10(-1) to 3 micrograms/ml) also induced the release of preformed (histamine) and de novo synthesized mediators (leukotriene C4 and/or PGD2) from mast cells isolated from lung parenchyma and skin tissues. Intradermal injections of protein L (0.01 to 10 micrograms/ml) in nonallergic subjects caused a dose-dependent wheal-and-flare reaction. Protein L activates human basophils and mast cells in

  17. Bacterial protein toxins in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosadi, Francesca; Fiorentini, Carla; Fabbri, Alessia

    2016-02-01

    Many bacteria causing persistent infections produce toxins whose mechanisms of action indicate that they could have a role in carcinogenesis. Some toxins, like CDT and colibactin, directly attack the genome by damaging DNA whereas others, as for example CNF1, CagA and BFT, impinge on key eukaryotic processes, such as cellular signalling and cell death. These bacterial toxins, together with other less known toxins, mimic carcinogens and tumour promoters. The aim of this review is to fulfil an up-to-date analysis of toxins with carcinogenic potential that have been already correlated to human cancers. Bacterial toxins-induced carcinogenesis represents an emerging aspect in bacteriology, and its significance is increasingly recognized.

  18. Age-associated DNA methylation changes in immune genes, histone modifiers and chromatin remodeling factors within 5 years after birth in human blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Reinius, Lovisa E; Vitezic, Morana

    2015-01-01

    the dynamics of DNA methylation. Serial blood samples were collected at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after birth in ten healthy girls born in Finland and participating in the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study. DNA methylation was measured using the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. RESULTS......: After filtering for the presence of polymorphisms and cell-lineage-specific signatures, 794 CpG sites showed significant DNA methylation differences as a function of age in all children (41.6% age-methylated and 58.4% age-demethylated, Bonferroni-corrected P value ... frequently located in gene bodies and within +5 to +50 kilobases (kb) of transcription start sites (TSS) and enriched in developmental, neuronal and plasma membrane genes. Age-demethylated CpGs were associated to promoters and DNAse-I hypersensitivity sites, located within -5 to +5 kb of the nearest TSS...

  19. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  20. Quantification of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) in oral gargle specimens collected using mouthwash