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Sample records for human leukocyte gene

  1. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M Hughes

    Full Text Available Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible.To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension.Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  2. Cryopreservation of Human Mucosal Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Sean M; Shu, Zhiquan; Levy, Claire N; Ferre, April L; Hartig, Heather; Fang, Cifeng; Lentz, Gretchen; Fialkow, Michael; Kirby, Anna C; Adams Waldorf, Kristina M; Veazey, Ronald S; Germann, Anja; von Briesen, Hagen; McElrath, M Juliana; Dezzutti, Charlene S; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Baker, Chris A R; Shacklett, Barbara L; Gao, Dayong; Hladik, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how leukocytes in the cervicovaginal and colorectal mucosae respond to pathogens, and how medical interventions affect these responses, is important for developing better tools to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. An effective cryopreservation protocol for these cells following their isolation will make studying them more feasible. To find an optimal cryopreservation protocol for mucosal mononuclear leukocytes, we compared cryopreservation media and procedures using human vaginal leukocytes and confirmed our results with endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Specifically, we measured the recovery of viable vaginal T cells and macrophages after cryopreservation with different cryopreservation media and handling procedures. We found several cryopreservation media that led to recoveries above 75%. Limiting the number and volume of washes increased the fraction of cells recovered by 10-15%, possibly due to the small cell numbers in mucosal samples. We confirmed that our cryopreservation protocol also works well for both endocervical and colorectal leukocytes. Cryopreserved leukocytes had slightly increased cytokine responses to antigenic stimulation relative to the same cells tested fresh. Additionally, we tested whether it is better to cryopreserve endocervical cells on the cytobrush or in suspension. Leukocytes from cervicovaginal and colorectal tissues can be cryopreserved with good recovery of functional, viable cells using several different cryopreservation media. The number and volume of washes has an experimentally meaningful effect on the percentage of cells recovered. We provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol with best practices for cryopreservation of mucosal leukocytes.

  3. Gene expression profiling in peripheral blood leukocytes as a new approach for assessment of human stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokutan, Kazuhito; Morita, Kyoko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Tominaga, Kumiko; Shikishima, Michiyo; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Omori, Tetsuro; Sekiyama, Atsuo

    2005-08-01

    Stress is the coordinated physiological processes to maintain a dynamic equilibrium under stressful conditions. The equilibrium is threatened by certain physiological and psychological stressors. Stressors trigger physiological, behavioural, and metabolic responses that are aimed at reinstating homeostasis. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system play an essential role in the stress response. Excessive,prolonged, or inadequate response that is termed as "allostasis" or "allostatic load" leads to pathological outcomes. Dysregulation of the HPA axis activity is involved in the pathogenesis of stress-related disorders including major depression. The complex brain-immune-endocrine network regulates the HPA axis, and hereditary predisposition as well as environmental factors such as traumatic experiences in early life also modifies the capacity of an individual to cope. Therefore, it is difficult to correctly assess the complex stress response. We have developed a microarray carrying 1,467 cDNAs that were selected to specifically measure stress response in peripheral blood leukocytes. Using this tool, we have succeeded to objectively assess individual response to acute psychological stress and to detect unique expression profiles in patients with depression. Gene expression profile in peripheral blood leukocytes may be a potentially useful for the detection of disease-associated, abnormal stress responses.

  4. Age-associated DNA methylation changes in immune genes, histone modifiers and chromatin remodeling factors within 5 years after birth in human blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Reinius, Lovisa E; Vitezic, Morana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related changes in DNA methylation occurring in blood leukocytes during early childhood may reflect epigenetic maturation. We hypothesized that some of these changes involve gene networks of critical relevance in leukocyte biology and conducted a prospective study to elucidate...... factors (for example, HDAC4, KDM2A, KDM2B, JARID2, ARID3A, and SMARCD3) undergo DNA methylation changes in leukocytes during early childhood. These results open new perspectives to understand leukocyte maturation and provide a catalogue of CpG sites that may need to be corrected for age effects when...

  5. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    , the barrier to the development of peptide-based vaccines with maximum population coverage is that the restricting HLA genes are extremely polymorphic resulting in a vast diversity of peptide-binding HLA specificities and a low population coverage for any given peptide-HLA specificity. One way to reduce......Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  6. Analysis of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and their human leukocyte antigen-ligands gene polymorphisms in Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtari, M; Farazmand, A; Mahmoudi, M; Akbarian, M; Ahmadzadeh, N; Mirkazemi, Z; Mostafaei, S; Jamshidi, A R

    2016-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease. Natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders that mainly express killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). The present study was undertaken to determine the association of the KIR alleles, genotypes, and KIR-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligand gene combinations with the susceptibility to SLE. The genotyping of 17 KIR and 5 HLA loci was performed using the polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP) method. The study population consisted of 230 SLE patients and 273 ethnical-, age-, and sex-matched healthy controls. The association of the polymorphisms with the prevalence of 11 clinical criteria in patients was analyzed. The carrier frequency of HLA-A-Bw4 was modestly decreased in the SLE patients. The prevalence of hematological and renal disorders was significantly increased in patients with combination of KIR3DL1(+); HLA-B-Bw4(Thr80+) and KIR2DS1(+); HLA-C2(+) genes, respectively. Female patients with combination of KIR2DL2(+); HLA-C1(-) genes were more likely to develop serositis. In addition the prevalence of renal disorders, oral ulcer and serositis was significantly increased in male patients with KIR3DP1(+), KIR2DS1(+), and KIR2DS3(+) genotypes respectively. Our results showed that the presence of activating KIR receptors alone or in combination with their HLA ligands and the absence of inhibitory KIRs in combination with their HLA ligands may activate NK cells and are significantly correlated with the prevalence of renal disease, hematologic disorders, serositis, and oral ulcer in SLE patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Sex-specific variation in signaling pathways and gene expression patterns in human leukocytes in response to endotoxin and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Asghar; de Paula Vieira, Rodolfo; Bischof, Felix; Walter, Michael; Movassaghi, Masoud; Berchtold, Nicole C; Niess, Andreas M; Cotman, Carl W; Northoff, Hinnak

    2016-11-10

    While exercise effects on the immune system have received increasing attention in recent years, it remains unclear to what extent gender and fluctuations in sex hormones during menstrual cycle influence immunological responses to exercise. We investigated mRNA changes induced through exhaustive exercise (half-marathon; pre-exercise and post-exercise [30 min, 3 h, 24 h] on whole blood cultures ± lipopolysaccharide [LPS] [1 h]) with a specific focus on sex differences (men vs women in luteal phase) as an extension of our previous study. Inflammation related signaling pathways, TLRs, cytosolic DNA sensing and RIG-I like receptors were differentially activated between sexes in LPS-stimulated cultures. Genes differentially regulated between sexes included TNIP-1, TNIP-3, IL-6, HIVEP1, CXCL3, CCR3, IL-8, and CD69, revealing a bias towards less anti-inflammatory gene regulation in women compared to men. In addition, several genes relevant to brain function (KMO, DDIT4, VEGFA, IGF1R, IGF2R, and FGD4) showed differential activation between sexes. Some of these genes (e.g., KMO in women, DDIT4 in both sexes) potentially constitute neuroprotective mechanisms. These data reveal that the exercise-induced change in gene expression might be gender and menstrual cycle phase dependent.

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Genes Associated With Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Severe Ocular Complications Following Use of Cold Medicine in a Brazilian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, Tais H; Ueta, Mayumi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Okada, Yukinori; Loureiro, Renata R; Costa, Karita A; Sallum, Juliana Maria F; Milhomens, José Arthur; Inoue, Chikara; Sotozono, Chie; Gomes, José Álvaro P; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2017-04-01

    Describing the association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles could facilitate the understanding of increased risk factors for development of Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) in patients with severe ocular complications (SOCs). To investigate the association between HLA class I genes and cold medicine (CM)-associated SJS/TEN with SOCs. This case-control study was conducted between February 8, 2013, and August 29, 2014. Thirty-nine Brazilian patients with CM-SJS/TEN of 74 patients with SJS/TEN with SOCs and 133 healthy Brazilian volunteers were enrolled. Human leukocyte antigen class I genes (HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C) were examined to determine whether there was a genetic predisposition for CM-SJS/TEN with SOC. Patients were interviewed to identify possible etiologic factors. Data analysis was performed from April 14, 2013, to August 29, 2014. Genetic predisposition for CM-SJS/TEN with SOCs by analysis of HLA class I genes. Of 74 patients included in the analysis, 32 (43%) were male; mean (SD) age was 36.01 [15.42] years. HLA-A*66:01 (odds ratio [OR], 24.0; 95% CI, 2.79-206.0; P < .001), HLA-B*44:03 (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.11-6.65; P = .04), and HLA-C*12:03 (OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.67-18.80; P = .006) were associated with Brazilian CM-SJS/TEN with SOCs, and HLA-A*11:01 (OR, 0.074; 95% CI, 0.004-1.26; P = .008), HLA-B*08:01 (OR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.02-1.15; P = .048), and HLA-B*51:01 (OR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.05-1.03; P = .045) were inversely associated with Brazilian CM-SJS/TEN with SOCs (39 cases: 19 Pardo and 16 European ancestry; 14 males and 25 females; age, 35.2 [14.4] years; and 133 controls: 66 Pardo and 61 European ancestry; 55 males and 78 females; age, 41.2 [12.9] years). When multiple test correction within the HLA locus, HLA-A*66:01 and HLA-C*12:03 demonstrated associations. When participants were segregated into Pardo and locus is considered, HLA-A*66:01 was associated with CM-SJS/TEN with SOC among

  9. Gene polymorphisms against DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide in leukocytes of healthy humans through comet assay: a quasi-experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klautau-Guimarães Maria N

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal cellular metabolism is well established as the source of endogenous reactive oxygen species which account for the background levels of oxidative DNA damage detected in normal tissue. Hydrogen peroxide imposes an oxidative stress condition on cells that can result in DNA damage, leading to mutagenesis and cell death. Several potentially significant genetic variants related to oxidative stress have already been identified, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors have been reported as possible antioxidant agents that can reduce vascular oxidative stress in cardiovascular events. Methods We investigate the influences of haptoglobin, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD Val9Ala, catalase (CAT -21A/T, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1 Pro198Leu, ACE (I/D and gluthatione S-transferases GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene polymorphisms against DNA damage and oxidative stress. These were induced by exposing leukocytes from peripheral blood of healthy humans (N = 135 to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and the effects were tested by comet assay. Blood samples were submitted to genotyping and comet assay (before and after treatment with H2O2 at 250 μM and 1 mM. Results After treatment with H2O2 at 250 μM, the GPx-1 polymorphism significantly influenced results of comet assay and a possible association of the Pro/Leu genotype with higher DNA damage was found. The highest or lowest DNA damage also depended on interaction between GPX-1/ACE and Hp/GSTM1T1 polymorphisms when hydrogen peroxide treatment increased oxidative stress. Conclusions The GPx-1 polymorphism and the interactions between GPX-1/ACE and Hp/GSTM1T1 can be determining factors for DNA oxidation provoked by hydrogen peroxide, and thus for higher susceptibility to or protection against oxidative stress suffered by healthy individuals.

  10. Identification of Early Response Genes in Human Peripheral Leukocytes Infected with Orientia tsutsugamushi: The Emergent of a Unique Gene Expression Profile for Diagnosis of O. tsutsugamush Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    master SYBR green I kit (Roche Diagnostics , Indianapolis, Indiana). The 18S rRNA was used as control (house keeping gene, HKG) to normalize the raw real...2333 GDS 2362 GDS 2749 GDS 2756 GDS 2833 Leishmania major, Leishmania donovani, Toxoplasma gondii, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burgia malyi...tsutaugamushi infection from other infections. It is thus plausible to construct a diagnostic platform based on these 22 genes along with necessary control

  11. Epac inhibits apoptosis of human leukocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandoch, M.; Bujok, V.; Fleckenstein, D.; Schmidt, M.; Fischer, J. W.; Weber, A. -A.

    2009-01-01

    cAMP is known to participate in the regulation of apoptosis in leukocytes. Depending on the cell type, pro- and antiapoptotic effects of cAMP have been described. Thus far, most of the cAMP-dependent effects have been attributed to the activation of PKA. However, Epac proteins (direct cAMP targets

  12. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism and type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune multifactorial disease which has a great socio-economic impact. In Morocco, less is known about the contribution of Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles to type 1 diabetes susceptibility. Our study focused on evaluating the distribution of class II ...

  13. Human leukocyte antigen-A genotype as a predictor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reham Khalifa

    2016-01-18

    Jan 18, 2016 ... Human leukocyte antigen-A genotype as a predictor of cytomegalovirus-pp65 antigenemia and cytomegalovirus disease in solid-organ transplant recipients. Reham Khalifa a,. *, Ayman Asaad a. , Maha Hussein b a Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams ...

  14. Longitudinal Changes in Leukocyte Telomere Length and Mortality in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Laila; Thinggaard, Mikael; Fenger, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) ostensibly shortens with age and has been moderately associated with mortality. In humans, these findings have come almost solely from cross-sectional studies. Only recently has LTL shortening within individuals been analyzed in longitudinal studies. Such studies...

  15. Steroid sulfatase of human leukocytes and epidermis and the diagnosis of recessive X-linked ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, E H; Leventhal, M E

    1981-01-01

    Patients with recessive X-linked ichthyosis, one of the inherited types of excessive stratum corneum cohesion, have deficient steroid sulfatase in fibroblasts grown from their dermis. Because of the expense and long period required to grow such cells, we have assayed this enzyme in peripheral blood leukocytes and found it to be undetectable in those from patients with this type of ichthyosis, but normal in those from patients with other hereditary or acquired types of ichthyosis. In addition, steroid sulfatase activity is less in leukocytes from women who are carriers of this disease than normal women, and this assay can be used to detect such carriers. Despite previous studies demonstrating that the gene for this enzyme escapes the inactivation of other x-chromosome genes, normal women have leukocyte steroid sulfatase activity only 1.3 times that of normal men, suggesting that some gene dosage compensation occurs. Normal human epidermis, the tissue most affected clinically, also expresses steroid sulfatase activity. The epidermal enzyme is similar in its subcellular localization, its molecular size, and kinetically to that of placenta, leukocytes, and fibroblasts. PMID:6939689

  16. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses bind differentially to human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Winnie M; Bartee, Eric C; Moreb, Jan S; Dower, Ken; Connor, John H; McFadden, Grant

    2013-04-01

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) and vaccinia virus (VACV), two distinct members of the family Poxviridae, are both currently being developed as oncolytic virotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have demonstrated that ex vivo treatment with MYXV can selectively recognize and kill contaminating cancerous cells from autologous bone marrow transplants without perturbing the engraftment of normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which MYXV specifically recognizes and eliminates the cancer cells in the autografts is not understood. While little is known about the cellular attachment factor(s) exploited by MYXV for entry into any target cells, VACV has been shown to utilize cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate (HS), the extracellular matrix protein laminin, and/or integrin β1. We have constructed MYXV and VACV virions tagged with the Venus fluorescent protein and compared their characteristics of binding to various human cancer cell lines as well as to primary human leukocytes. We report that the binding of MYXV or VACV to some adherent cell lines could be partially inhibited by heparin, but laminin blocked only VACV binding. In contrast to cultured fibroblasts, the binding of MYXV and VACV to a wide spectrum of primary human leukocytes could not be competed by either HS or laminin. Additionally, MYXV and VACV exhibited very different binding characteristics against certain select human leukocytes, suggesting that the two poxviruses utilize different cell surface determinants for the attachment to these cells. These results indicate that VACV and MYXV can exhibit very different oncolytic tropisms against some cancerous human leukocytes.

  17. Screening of anti-human leukocyte monoclonal antibodies for reactivity with equine leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sherif; Saunders, Kelly; Kydd, Julia H; Lunn, D Paul; Steinbach, Falko

    2007-09-15

    Three hundred and seventy-nine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various human CD molecules supplied to the HLDA8 animal homologues section (including four isotype controls) were analysed for cross-reactivity with equine leukocytes. First, flow cytometric identification of positively reacting mAbs was performed in one laboratory. Thereafter, a second round of flow cytometric evaluation was performed, involving three laboratories participating in the study. The first test-round indicated 17 mAbs as potentially positive. After the second round of flow cytometric analysis, 14 mAbs remained (directed against CD2, CD11a, CD18, CD44, CD45, CD49d, CD91, CD163 and CD172) where cross-reactivity was anticipated based on similarities between the human and equine staining pattern. Additionally, there was 1 mAb with weak likely positive reactivity, 12 mAbs with positive staining, which likely do not reflect valuable data, 5 mAbs with clear alternate expression pattern from that expected from humans, 5 mAbs with a questionable staining pattern itself, i.e. that was variable between the three labs, 32 mAbs with weak-positive expression and alternate staining pattern, and 279 negative mAbs (including the four isotype controls) were detected. In 31 cases, more appropriate target cells, such as thymocytes or stem cells, were not available for the screening. The results underline the value of this "cross-reactivity" approach for equine immunology. However, as only a few mAbs against leukocyte surface antigens reacted positively (approximately 4% of the mAbs submitted), the analysis of further anti-human mAbs and directed efforts to develop species-specific anti-CD mAb are still required.

  18. Effects of microcystins on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujbida, Paula; Hatanaka, Elaine; Campa, Ana; Colepicolo, Pio; Pinto, Ernani

    2006-03-03

    Microcystins (MCs) are cyclic heptapeptides produced by cyanobacteria present in water contaminated reservoirs. Reported toxic effects for microcystins are liver injury and tumour promotion. In this study, we evaluated the effects of two MCs, MC-LR and [Asp(3)]-MC-LR, on human neutrophil (PMN). We observed that even at concentrations lower than that recommended by World Health Organization for chronic exposure (0.1 nM), MCs affect human PMN. Both MCs have chemotactic activity, induce the production of reactive oxygen species, and increase phagocytosis of Candida albicans. MC-LR also increased C. albicans killing. The effect of MCs on PMN provides support for a damage process mediated by PMN and oxidative stress, and may explain liver injury and tumour promotion associated to long-term MCs exposures.

  19. Imaging Cytometry of Human Leukocytes with Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Ham; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Hsieh, Chia-Hung; Huang, Shih-Hung; Lin, Jong-Wei; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Wu, Hau-Tieng; Wu, Yao-Ming; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Based on third-harmonic-generation (THG) microscopy and a k-means clustering algorithm, we developed a label-free imaging cytometry method to differentiate and determine the types of human leukocytes. According to the size and average intensity of cells in THG images, in a two-dimensional scatter plot, the neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes in peripheral blood samples from healthy volunteers were clustered into three differentiable groups. Using these features in THG images, we could count the number of each of the three leukocyte types both in vitro and in vivo. The THG imaging-based counting results agreed well with conventional blood count results. In the future, we believe that the combination of this THG microscopy-based imaging cytometry approach with advanced texture analysis of sub-cellular features can differentiate and count more types of blood cells with smaller quantities of blood.

  20. Whole blood transcriptional profiling reveals significant down-regulation of human leukocyte antigen class I and II genes in essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Thomassen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiling studies in the Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms have revealed significant deregulation of several immune and inflammation genes that might be of importance for clonal evolution due to defective tumor immune surveillance. Other mechanisms might...... and members of the antigen processing machinery of HLA class I molecules (LMP2, LMP7, TAP1, TAP2 and tapasin). The findings of significant down-regulation of several of these genes may possibly be of major importance for defective tumor immune surveillance. Since up-regulation of HLA genes is recorded during...

  1. Human leukocyte antigen-G within the male reproductive system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2015-01-01

    In sexual reproduction in humans, a man has a clear interest in ensuring that the immune system of his female partner accepts the semi-allogenic fetus. Increasing attention has been given to soluble immunomodulatory molecules in the seminal fluid as one mechanism of ensuring this, possibly...... by “priming” the woman’s immune system before conception and at conception. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of the immunoregulatory and tolerance-inducible human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G in the male reproductive organs. The expression of HLA-G in the blastocyst and by extravillous trophoblast...

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based, Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glaser, Sally

    2004-01-01

    ... variation. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) component of the immune system, encoded by highly polymorphic genes that vary across racial/ethnic groups, has been suggested to be a biologically based risk factor for breast cancer and thus...

  3. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based, Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glaser, Sally L

    2005-01-01

    .... The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) component of the immune system, coded by highly polymorphic genes whose distribution varies by race/ethnicity, may be a biologically based risk factor for breast cancer and thus may explain...

  4. The Many Faces of Human Leukocyte Antigen-G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2014-01-01

    is the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, a nonclassical HLA protein displaying limited polymorphism, restricted tissue distribution, and a unique alternative splice pattern. HLA-G is primarily expressed in placenta and plays multifaceted roles during pregnancy, both as a soluble and a membrane-bound molecule....... Its immunomodulatory functions involve interactions with different immune cells and possibly regulation of cell migration during placental development. Recent findings include HLA-G contributions from the father and the fetus itself. Much effort has been put into clarifying the role of HLA-G during...

  5. Association of de novo human leukocyte antigen and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene-A antibodies and proteinuria with graft survival 5 years after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L-W; Peng, Z-G; Xian, W-H; Cui, X-Q; Sun, H-B; Li, E-G; Geng, L-N; Zhao, P; Tian, J

    2013-11-01

    Association of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene-A (MICA) antibodies and proteinuria with graft survival 5 years after renal transplantation. De novo presence of HLA and MICA antibodies after renal transplantation is associated with poor graft survival. Proteinuria after transplantation is also considered a risk factor for premature graft loss. In this study, we investigated the association of de novo HLA and MICA antibodies on proteinuria after renal transplantation and the association of proteinuria and de novo antibodies with graft survival. We enrolled 275 patients without preexisting HLA and MICA antibodies followed for >5 years after renal transplantation. All donor organs were from living-related donors or from an organ donation program. HLA and MICA antibodies were detected by the Luminex method. Patients with proteinuria (>150 mg/d) underwent intermittent 24-hour proteinuria examination. The frequencies of de novo HLA and MICA antibody 5 years after transplantation were 25.8% and 12%, respectively. In total, 26.5% of patients had proteinuria at the 5-year follow-up. De novo HLA antibody was associated with increased proteinuria after transplantation (relative risk, 3.12). HLA antibody and proteinuria were both associated with poor 5-year graft survival (P = .027 and P = .006, respectively). De novo HLA and MICA antibodies and proteinuria after renal transplantation are all associated with poor graft survival. De novo HLA antibody is independent risk factor for posttransplant proteinuria, and proteinuria affects the association of de novo antibodies with decreased graft survival after transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interaction between human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and Streptococcus milleri group bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanahita, Anna; Goldsmith, Elizabeth A; Musher, Daniel M; Clarridge, Jill E; Rubio, Jose; Krishnan, Bhuvaneswari; Trial, JoAnn

    2002-01-01

    Because Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) bacteria--Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus anginosus--exhibit a striking propensity to cause abscesses, the interaction of these organisms with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) was examined. After incubation in pooled normal human serum, SMG stimulated less chemotaxis than did Staphylococcus aureus, in contrast to viridans streptococci, which caused greater chemotaxis than did S. aureus. PMNL ingested greater numbers of SMG and viridans streptococci than S. aureus but killed these organisms more slowly and less completely. Relative resistance to killing by PMNL is expected in organisms that cause abscesses, and inhibition of chemotaxis may contribute to pathogenicity, because delayed arrival of PMNL gives a head start to proliferating bacteria. This study helps explain the capacity of SMG to cause abscesses. It is unclear, however, why viridans streptococci, bacteria that rarely produce abscesses, share some of these same properties.

  7. Personality and gene expression: Do individual differences exist in the leukocyte transcriptome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedhara, Kavita; Gill, Sana; Eldesouky, Lameese; Campbell, Bruce K; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Cole, Steven W

    2015-02-01

    The temporal and situational stability of personality has led generations of researchers to hypothesize that personality may have enduring effects on health, but the biological mechanisms of such relationships remain poorly understood. In the present study, we utilized a functional genomics approach to examine the relationship between the 5 major dimensions of personality and patterns of gene expression as predicted by 'behavioural immune response' theory. We specifically focussed on two sets of genes previously linked to stress, threat, and adverse socio-environmental conditions: pro-inflammatory genes and genes involved in Type I interferon and antibody responses. An opportunity sample of 121 healthy individuals was recruited (86 females; mean age 24 years). Individuals completed a validated measure of personality; questions relating to current health behaviours; and provided a 5ml sample of peripheral blood for gene expression analysis. Extraversion was associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory genes and Conscientiousness was associated with reduced expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Both associations were independent of health behaviours, negative affect, and leukocyte subset distributions. Antiviral and antibody-related gene expression was not associated with any personality dimension. The present data shed new light on the long-observed epidemiological associations between personality, physical health, and human longevity. Further research is required to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying these associations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preclinical studies for the gene therapy of leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon Rico, D.

    2015-07-01

    Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I (LAD-I) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in ITGB2 gene, encoding for CD18 protein (also known as 2 subunit). This protein binds to different CD11 subunits to form 2 integrins, which are expressed in the leukocyte membrane and allow leukocytes to firmly adhere to the endothelium as a previous step to the extravasation. In LAD-I patients, ITGB2 mutations lead to absent, low or aberrant CD18 expression, which results in absent or low 2 integrin expression on the leukocyte membrane. CD18 deficient leukocytes, especially neutrophils, fail to extravasate from the bloodstream to infected tissues. LAD-I patients suffer from recurrent and severe infections leading normally to death. (Author)

  9. Activation of innate immune genes in caprine blood leukocytes after systemic endotoxin challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvesen, Øyvind; Reiten, Malin R; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2016-01-01

    , and blood samples were collected throughout the trial. Characteristic signs of acute sepsis, such as sickness behavior, fever, and leukopenia were observed within 1 h of LPS administration. A high-throughput longitudinal gene expression analysis of circulating leukocytes was performed, and genes associated...... in leukocytes in response to LPS supporting a link between the interferon system and defense against bacterial infections. The extrahepatic expression of APPs suggests that leukocytes contribute to synthesis of these proteins at the beginning of a systemic inflammation. Taken together, these findings provide...... insights into the dynamic regulation of innate immune genes, as well as raising new questions regarding the importance of ISGs and extrahepatic APPs in leukocytes after systemic endotoxin challenge....

  10. Human leukocyte antigens and natural selection by malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A V; Yates, S N; Allsopp, C E; Gupta, S; Gilbert, S C; Lalvani, A; Aidoo, M; Davenport, M; Plebanski, M

    1994-11-29

    The extraordinary polymorphism of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) poses a question as to how this remarkable diversity arose and is maintained. The explanation that infectious pathogens are largely responsible is theoretically attractive but clear and consistent associations between HLA alleles and major infectious diseases have rarely been identified. Large case-control studies of HLA types in African children with severe malaria indicate that HLA associations with this parasitic infection do exist and it is becoming possible to investigate the underlying mechanisms by identification of peptide epitopes in parasite antigens. Such analysis reveals how the magnitude and detectability of HLA associations may be influenced by numerous genetic and environmental factors. These complex interactions will give rise to variation over time and space in the selective pressures exerted by infectious diseases and this fluctuation may, in itself, contribute to the maintenance of HLA polymorphism.

  11. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G during pregnancy part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Klitkou, Louise; Christiansen, Ole B

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a class Ib molecule with restricted tissue distribution expressed on the extra-villous trophoblast and seems to have immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy. Studies have linked HLA-G polymorphisms to pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and recurrent...... miscarriage. Levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in blood plasma from non-pregnant donors seem to be associated with these polymorphisms. In the current study, we have genotyped 246 mothers and their offspring for HLA-G polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) and measured sHLA-G in maternal blood...... plasma samples from gestational week 20 and at term, as well as in fetal umbilical cord blood samples. This is the first large study simultaneously performing HLA-G genotyping of mother and offspring and measuring sHLA-G in both maternal and umbilical cord blood. The results showed that increasing...

  12. Diterpenoids from Tetraclinis articulata that inhibit various human leukocyte functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Alejandro F; Quílez del Moral, José F; Lucas, Rut; Payá, Miguel; Akssira, Mohamed; Akaad, Said; Mellouki, Fouad

    2003-06-01

    Ten new compounds, eight of them pimarane derivatives (1-8), together with a menthane dimer (9) and a totarane diterpenoid (10), were isolated from the leaves and wood of Tetraclinis articulata. The structures of 1-10 were established by using spectroscopic techniques, including 2D NMR spectra. Pimaranes 1-5 were found to possess an unusual cis interannular union of the B and C rings, which, from a biogenetic perspective, could be derived from the hydration of a carbocation at C-8. Compounds 4-6 and a mixture of 7 and 11 modulated different human leukocyte functions at a concentration of 10 microM, mainly the degranulation process measured as myeloperoxidase release and, to a lesser extent, the superoxide production measured by chemiluminescence.

  13. Isolation and identification of java race amniotic membrane secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elly Munadziroh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI has been found to facilitate epithelialization, maintain a normal epithelial phenotype, reduce inflammation, secrete growth factors such as IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, EGF, FGF, TGF, HGFand 2-microbulin. SLPI is serine protease inhibitor, which found in secretions such as whole saliva, seminal fluid, cervical mucus, synovial fluid, breast milk, tears, amniotic fluid and amniotic membrane. Impaired healing states are characterized by excessive proteolysis and oftenbacterial infection, leading to the hypothesis that SLPI may have a role in the healing process in oral inflammation and contributes to tissue repair in oral mucosa. The oral wound healing response is impaired in the SLPI sufficient mice since matrix synthesis and collagen deposition delayed. The objective of this research is to isolate and identify the amniotic membrane of Java Race SLPI Gene. Methods: SLPI RNA was isolated from Java Race amniotic membrane and the cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Result: Through sequence analyses, SLPI cDNA was 530 nucleotide in length with a predicted molecular mass about 12 kDa. The nucleotide sequence showed that human SLPI from sample was 98% identical with human SLPI from gene bank. PCR analysis revealed that the mRNA of SLPI was highly expressed in the amniotic membrane from Java Race sample. Conclusion: it is demonstrated that human SLPI are highly conserved in sequence content as compared to the human SLPI from gene.

  14. Evaluation of ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for distinguishing malignant ascites from benign ascites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Juan; Chang, Yan-Xiang; Niu, Chun-Yan

    2017-11-01

    The overexpression of soluble human leukocyte antigen-G is associated with malignant tumours. The purpose of our study was to detect soluble human leukocyte antigen-G concentrations in ascites and to evaluate the value of ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for the diagnosis of malignant ascites. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect soluble human leukocyte antigen-G levels in 64 patients with malignant ascites and 30 patients with benign ascites. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G for the detection of malignant ascites. Ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G levels were significantly higher in the malignant ascites group than in the benign ascites group (20.718 ± 3.215 versus 12.467 ± 3.678 µg/L, t = 7.425, p human leukocyte antigen-G was 0.957 (95% confidence interval, 0.872-0.992). At a cut-off value of 19.60 µg/L, the sensitivity and specificity of ascitic soluble human leukocyte antigen-G were 87.5% (95% confidence interval, 71.0%-96.5%) and 100% (95% confidence interval, 88.4%-100%), respectively. With respect to area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity, ascitic carcinoembryonic antigen (0.810, 68.75% and 83.33%, respectively) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (0.710, 65.63% and 70%, respectively) significantly differed (all p human leukocyte antigen-G was 75%, which was higher than the corresponding rates for ascitic carcinoembryonic antigen (31.25%) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (6.25%; both p human leukocyte antigen-G exhibited good performance for diagnosing malignant ascites, and particularly those that were cytology-negative and biopsy-positive.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and leukocyte responses of recombinant human interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanski, E; Chakraborty, A; Van Wart, S; Huhn, R D; Cutler, D L; Affrime, M B; Jusko, W J

    1998-12-01

    To study the pharmacokinetics and ex vivo leukocyte responses of recombinant human IL-10 (rHuIL-10) following single s.c. and i.v. dosing. A randomized two-way cross-over study was undertaken in 17 healthy volunteers in which rHuIL-10 was administered as 25 microg/kg s.c. and i.v. doses. Blood samples were collected for 48 hr after dosing to determine serum IL-10 concentrations. Inhibitory activity of IL-10 on ex vivo production of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1beta) by LPS-treated peripheral blood cells were measured over 96 hr. A physiologically-relevant modeling approach was developed to determine the pharmacokinetics for two routes of administration (s.c. and i.v.). The i.v. dose showed polyexponential disposition with CL of 65 mL/kg/hr, Vss of 70 mL/kg, and t1/2 of 1.94 hr. Absolute bioavailability averaged 42% for s.c. dosing which produced lower but sustained concentrations. Substantial and prolonged suppression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta production was achieved during IL-10 treatment. The Hill Function was used to account for the joint concentration-dependent immunosuppressive action of rHuIL-10 after both i.v. and s.c. doses. The IC50 values were about 0.03 ng/ml and Imax values were about 0.85 for both TNF-alpha and IL-1beta suppression. The degree of change as well as the duration of leukocyte response was greater after s.c. administration than after i.v. administration. rHuIL-10 shows favorable PKPD characteristics especially by the s.c. route of administration which produced prolonged suppression of cytokine production (ex vivo) which may be applicable in various immune-related disorders.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of the swine leukocyte antigen - 2 gene for Korean native pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to investigate genetic distances of the SLA-2 gene, to characterize SLA-2 alleles, and to provide basic genetic information of Korean pigs. The swine leukocyte antigen - 2 (SLA-2) gene in the MHC classical region was cloned with spleen tissues from Korean native pigs ...

  17. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G during pregnancy part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitkou, Louise; Dahl, Mette; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a class Ib molecule with restricted tissue distribution expressed on trophoblast cells and has been proposed to have immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy. Soluble HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1) can be generated by the shedding of membrane-bound HLA-G molecules; however......, three soluble isoforms also exist (HLA-G5 to -G6). During pregnancy, it is unknown whether there is a correlation between sHLA-G levels in maternal and fetal blood. In 246 pregnancies, we have measured the levels of sHLA-G1/-G5 in maternal blood plasma samples from gestational week 20 (GW20) and at term......, as well as in umbilical cord blood samples. Soluble HLA-G levels declined by 38.4% in maternal blood from GW20 to term, and sHLA-G levels were significantly lower in maternal blood at term than in GW20 (PHLA-G levels were significantly higher in maternal blood than in umbilical...

  18. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein modulates activation of human leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Spirig

    Full Text Available An anti-inflammatory effect of reconstituted High Density Lipoprotein (rHDL has been demonstrated in atherosclerosis and in sepsis models. An increase of adhesion molecules as well as tissue factor expression on endothelial cells in response to inflammatory or danger signals are attenuated by the treatment with rHDL. Here we show the inhibitory effect of rHDL on the activation of human leukocytes in a whole blood assay as well as on monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC. Multiplex analysis of human whole blood showed that phytohaemagglutinin (PHA-induced secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2R, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12(p40, IL-15 and IFN-α was inhibited. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect on the production of the chemokines CCL-2, CCL-4, CCL-5, CXCL-9 and CXCL-10 was observed. Activation of granulocytes and CD14+ monocytes by PHA is inhibited dose-dependently by rHDL shown as decreased up-regulation of ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, we found a strong inhibitory effect of rHDL on toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2- and TLR4-mediated maturation of DC. Treatment of DC with rHDL prevented the up-regulation of cell surface molecules CD80, CD83 and CD86 and it inhibited the TLR-driven activation of inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. These findings suggest that rHDL prevents activation of crucial cellular players of cellular immunity and could therefore be a useful reagent to impede inflammation as well as the link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  19. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein modulates activation of human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Rolf; Schaub, Alexander; Kropf, Alain; Miescher, Sylvia; Spycher, Martin O; Rieben, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An anti-inflammatory effect of reconstituted High Density Lipoprotein (rHDL) has been demonstrated in atherosclerosis and in sepsis models. An increase of adhesion molecules as well as tissue factor expression on endothelial cells in response to inflammatory or danger signals are attenuated by the treatment with rHDL. Here we show the inhibitory effect of rHDL on the activation of human leukocytes in a whole blood assay as well as on monocyte-derived human dendritic cells (DC). Multiplex analysis of human whole blood showed that phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2R, IL-6, IL-7, IL-12(p40), IL-15 and IFN-α was inhibited. Furthermore, an inhibitory effect on the production of the chemokines CCL-2, CCL-4, CCL-5, CXCL-9 and CXCL-10 was observed. Activation of granulocytes and CD14+ monocytes by PHA is inhibited dose-dependently by rHDL shown as decreased up-regulation of ICAM-1 surface expression. In addition, we found a strong inhibitory effect of rHDL on toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)- and TLR4-mediated maturation of DC. Treatment of DC with rHDL prevented the up-regulation of cell surface molecules CD80, CD83 and CD86 and it inhibited the TLR-driven activation of inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. These findings suggest that rHDL prevents activation of crucial cellular players of cellular immunity and could therefore be a useful reagent to impede inflammation as well as the link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  20. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeluts, A A; Esaulkov, M N; Kosareva, O G; Solyankin, P M; Shkurinov, A P [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gapeyev, A B; Pashovkin, T N [Institute of Cell Biophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Matyunin, S N [Section of Applied Problems at the Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nazarov, M M [Institute on Laser and Information Technologies, Russian Academy of Sciences, Shatura, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Cherkasova, O P [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-28

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 – 200 μW cm{sup -2} within the frequency range of 0.1 – 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes. (biophotonics)

  1. Study of terahertz-radiation-induced DNA damage in human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeluts, A. A.; Gapeyev, A. B.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Kosareva, O. G.; Matyunin, S. N.; Nazarov, M. M.; Pashovkin, T. N.; Solyankin, P. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    We have carried out the studies aimed at assessing the effect of terahertz radiation on DNA molecules in human blood leukocytes. Genotoxic testing of terahertz radiation was performed in three different oscillation regimes, the blood leukocytes from healthy donors being irradiated for 20 minutes with the mean intensity of 8 - 200 μW cm-2 within the frequency range of 0.1 - 6.5 THz. Using the comet assay it is shown that in the selected regimes such radiation does not induce a direct DNA damage in viable human blood leukocytes.

  2. Human HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblasts: Immune-activating cells that interact with decidual leukocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamara Tilburgs; Ângela C. Crespo; Anita van der Zwan; Basya Rybalov; Towfique Raj; Barbara Stranger; Lucy Gardner; Ashley Moffett; Jack L. Strominger

    2015-01-01

    Invading human leukocyte antigen-G+ (HLA-G+) extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) are rare cells that are believed to play a key role in the prevention of a maternal immune attack on foreign fetal tissues...

  3. Human leukocyte antigen and idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Toru; Naisbitt, Dean J

    2017-02-01

    A clinical association between a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele and idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs) is a strong indication that IADRs are mediated by the adaptive immune system. For example, it is well-established that HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-B*57:01 are associated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and abacavir-induced hypersensitivity/flucloxacillin-induced liver injury, respectively. Drug-specific T-cells whose response is restricted by specific HLA risk alleles have been detected from IADR patients, also suggesting an adaptive immune pathogenesis. T-cells from carbamazepine SJS/TEN patients are activated by direct pharmacological interaction between carbamazepine and HLA-B*15:02 expressed on antigen presenting cells (APCs). Abacavir-specific, HLA-B*57:01-restricted T-cells are activated by APCs presenting peptides which are only displayed by the HLA molecule when abacavir is bound during peptide loading. Finally, HLA-B*57:01-restricted activation of T-cells from patients with flucloxacillin-induced liver injury is dependent on processing of drug protein adducts. Based on these observations, it is now possible to utilize blood from healthy drug-naïve volunteers to study the priming of naïve T-cells to drugs. Future development of these methodologies may lead to the development of assays that predict intrinsic immunogenicity of drugs and chemicals at the preclinical stage of drug development. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal influences on the transmission of leukocyte gene expression profiles in population samples from Brisbane, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Mason

    Full Text Available Two gene expression profiling studies designed to identify maternal influences on development of the neonate immune system and to address the population structure of the leukocyte transcriptome were carried out in Brisbane, Australia. In the first study, a comparison of 19 leukocyte samples obtained from mothers in the last three weeks of pregnancy with 37 umbilical cord blood samples documented differential expression of 7,382 probes at a false discovery rate of 1%, representing approximately half of the expressed transcriptome. An even larger component of the variation involving 8,432 probes, notably enriched for Vitamin E and methotrexate-responsive genes, distinguished two sets of individuals, with perfect transmission of the two profile types between each of 16 mother-child pairs in the study. A minor profile of variation was found to distinguish the gene expression profiles of obese mothers and children of gestational diabetic mothers from those of children born to obese mothers. The second study was of adult leukocyte profiles from a cross-section of Red Cross blood donors sampled throughout Brisbane. The first two axes in this study are related to the third and fourth axes of variation in the first study and also reflect variation in the abundance of CD4 and CD8 transcripts. One of the profiles associated with the third axis is largely excluded from samples from the central portion of the city. Despite enrichment of insulin signaling and aspects of central metabolism among the differentially expressed genes, there was little correlation between leukocyte expression profiles and body mass index overall. Our data is consistent with the notion that maternal health and cytokine milieu directly impact gene expression in fetal tissues, but that there is likely to be a complex interplay between cultural, genetic, and other environmental factors in the programming of gene expression in leukocytes of newborn children.

  5. A Rare Association Between Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I and Psoriasis in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sayed, Zeinab A.; El-Ghoneimy, Dalia H.; Abd-Allah, Heba; Afifi, Hanaa M

    2011-01-01

    The β2 integrins are expressed exclusively on leukocytes and participate in many immune and inflammatory processes. This subfamily comprises four heterodimeric glycoproteins with a common β-subunit, designated β2 (CD18). Spontaneous mutations of the CD18 gene result in leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD-I). Low level of CD18 expression has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. We here describe a child with recurrent skin infections without pus formation, persistent gin...

  6. Epidemiology of human leukocyte antigens among omani population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Salmi, Issa; Metry, Abdul Massiah; Al Ismaili, Faisal; Hola, Alan; Shaheen, Faissal; Fakhoury, Hana; Hannawi, Suad

    2017-01-01

    Oman is located on the Southeastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, and its population has high levels of consanguinity. Human leukocytic antigen (HLA) typing analysis in human population holds unexploited potential for elucidating the genetic causes of human disease and possibly leads to personalized medicine. This is a retrospective, descriptive study evaluating HLA frequencies of Omani individuals who underwent workup for kidney transplantation at the Royal Hospital (RH) from 2005 to 2016. Data on 870 subjects were collected from the Oman kidney transplant registry at RH as well from electronic medical record system. The mean age (standard deviation) years for the cohort were 33.2 (13.0). Males constituted 56.3% (490) while females constituted 43.7% (380). Seven HLA-A alleles accounted for more than 70% of the total alleles. Of which, HLA-A2 contributed the highest frequency (24%), followed by HLA A11 (9.4%), and A32 (8.1%). Ten alleles accounted for 70% of HLA-B alleles. Of which, HLA-B51 was the most common (18.9%), followed by HLA-B-35 (13.6%), and HLA-B8 (7.9%). Seven HLA-DRB1 alleles accounted for more than 70% of the total HLA DRB1 alleles, of which HLA- DRB1*16 contributed the highest frequency (29.56%). This was followed by HLA-DRB1*03 (14.57%) and HLA-DRB1*11 (9.48%). While three alleles accounted for more than 75% of the total HLA DQB1alleles. Of which, HLA-DQB1*05 contributed the highest frequency (37.56%). This was followed by allele HLA-DQB1*02 (26.48%) and HLA-DQB1*03 (17.18%). This study showed considerable heterogeneity in both HLA Class I and Class II antigens, which reflects admixture of our population with rest of old world countries. Despite the high levels of consanguinity, this population is genetically highly heterogeneous. These findings may be useful for transplantation programs, noncommunicable diseases, epidemiology of HLA linked diseases, pharmacogenomics, and anthropology.

  7. Epidemiology of human leukocyte antigens among omani population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issa Al Salmi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oman is located on the Southeastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula, and its population has high levels of consanguinity. Human leukocytic antigen (HLA typing analysis in human population holds unexploited potential for elucidating the genetic causes of human disease and possibly leads to personalized medicine. This is a retrospective, descriptive study evaluating HLA frequencies of Omani individuals who underwent workup for kidney transplantation at the Royal Hospital (RH from 2005 to 2016. Data on 870 subjects were collected from the Oman kidney transplant registry at RH as well from electronic medical record system. The mean age (standard deviation years for the cohort were 33.2 (13.0. Males constituted 56.3% (490 while females constituted 43.7% (380. Seven HLA-A alleles accounted for more than 70% of the total alleles. Of which, HLA-A2 contributed the highest frequency (24%, followed by HLA A11 (9.4%, and A32 (8.1%. Ten alleles accounted for 70% of HLA-B alleles. Of which, HLA-B51 was the most common (18.9%, followed by HLA-B-35 (13.6%, and HLA-B8 (7.9%. Seven HLA-DRB1 alleles accounted for more than 70% of the total HLA DRB1 alleles, of which HLA- DRB1*16 contributed the highest frequency (29.56%. This was followed by HLA-DRB1*03 (14.57% and HLA-DRB1*11 (9.48%. While three alleles accounted for more than 75% of the total HLA DQB1alleles. Of which, HLA-DQB1*05 contributed the highest frequency (37.56%. This was followed by allele HLA-DQB1*02 (26.48% and HLA-DQB1*03 (17.18%. This study showed considerable heterogeneity in both HLA Class I and Class II antigens, which reflects admixture of our population with rest of old world countries. Despite the high levels of consanguinity, this population is genetically highly heterogeneous. These findings may be useful for transplantation programs, noncommunicable diseases, epidemiology of HLA linked diseases, pharmacogenomics, and anthropology.

  8. A rare association between leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I and psoriasis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Zeinab A; El-Ghoneimy, Dalia H; Abd-Allah, Heba; Afifi, Hanaa M

    2011-04-01

    The β2 integrins are expressed exclusively on leukocytes and participate in many immune and inflammatory processes. This subfamily comprises four heterodimeric glycoproteins with a common β-subunit, designated β2 (CD18). Spontaneous mutations of the CD18 gene result in leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I (LAD-I). Low level of CD18 expression has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. We here describe a child with recurrent skin infections without pus formation, persistent gingivitis and periodontitis. His blood counts showed persistent leukocytosis (neutrophilia). CD11b expression was defective on neutrophils, while that of CD18 was normal. So, our patient represents a mild variant of LAD-I with possible dysfunctional CD18. Moreover, he developed psoriasis with reduced CD18 expression on CD4(+) T-cells. Psoriasiform dermatitis has been described before in association with LAD-I, however, clinically and histologically confirmed psoriasis in association with LAD-I has been described only in CD18 hypomorphic mice. Therefore, our patient represents the first clinically and histopathologically documented association between LAD-I and psoriasis in humans. It lends support to the role of β2 integrins in the etiopathogenesis of psoriasis.

  9. Leukocytes at the maternal-fetal interface in human pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sindram-Trujillo, Aliana Patricia

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to gain a better understanding of the immunoregulatory mechanisms associated with maternal tolerance of the fetus during pregnancy. The distribution of decidual leukocytes, specifically uterine NK cells and T cells, in the decidua basalis and parietalis were studied in the

  10. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäuerlein, A.; Ackermann, S.; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... strains, and some of their pathogen-associated molecular patterns, were incubated apically on a confluent layer of intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), which were basolaterally co-cultured with human mononuclear leukocytes. Only Gram-negative bacteria having Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin (commensal...... fermenters (Lactobacillus spp.) did not stimulate leukocytes transepithelially. Endotoxin from E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium induced comparable transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes, but not endotoxin from B. vulgatus or lipoteichoic acid from E. faecalis. Endotoxin-binding agents...

  11. Transepithelial activation of human leukocytes by probiotics and commensal bacteria: Role of Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baeuerlein, Annette; Ackermann, Stefanie; Parlesak, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to clarify whether commercially available probiotics induce greater trans-epithelial activation of human leukocytes than do commensal, food-derived and pathogenic bacteria and to identify the compounds responsible for this activation. Eleven different bacterial...... strains, and some of their pathogen-associated molecular patterns, were incubated apically on a confluent layer of intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2), which were basolaterally co-cultured with human mononuclear leukocytes. Only Gram-negative bacteria having Enterobacteriaceae-type endotoxin (commensal...... fermenters (Lactobacillus spp.) did not stimulate leukocytes transepithelially. Endotoxin from E. coli and Salmonella enterica Typhimurium induced comparable transepithelial stimulation of leukocytes, but not endotoxin from B. vulgatus or lipoteichoic acid from E. faecalis. Endotoxin-binding agents...

  12. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on leukocyte inflammatory gene expression in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perandini, L A; Sales-de-Oliveira, D; Almeida, D C; Azevedo, H; Moreira-Filho, C A; Cenedeze, M A; Benatti, F B; Lima, F R; Borba, E; Bonfa, E; Sa-Pinto, A L; Roschel, H; Camara, N O S; Gualano, B

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a persistent systemic inflammation. Exercise induced inflammatory response in SLE remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of acuteexercise on leukocyte gene expression in active (SLEACTIVE) and inactive SLE (SLEINACTIVE) patients and healthy controls(HC). All subjects (n = 4 per group) performed a 30-min single bout of acute aerobic exercise (~70% of VO2peak) on a treadmill, and blood samples were collected for RNA extraction from circulating leukocyte at baseline, at the end of exercise, and after three hours of recovery. The expression of a panel of immune-related genes was evaluated by a quantitative PCR array assay. Moreover, network-based analyses were performed to interpret transcriptional changes occurring after the exercise challenge. In all groups, a single bout of acute exercise led to the down-regulation of the gene expression of innate and adaptive immunity at the end of exercise (e.g., TLR3, IFNG, GATA3, FOXP3, STAT4) with a subsequent up-regulation occurring upon recovery. Exercise regulated the expression of inflammatory genes in the blood leukocytes of the SLE patients and HC, although the SLE groups exhibited fewer modulated genes and less densely connected networks (number of nodes: 29, 40 and 58; number of edges: 29, 60 and 195; network density: 0.07, 0.08 and 0.12, for SLEACTIVE, SLEINACTIVE and HC, respectively). The leukocytes from the SLE patients, irrespective of disease activity, showed a down-regulated inflammatory geneexpression immediately after acute aerobic exercise, followed by an up-regulation at recovery. Furthermore, less organized gene networks were observed in the SLE patients, suggesting that they may be deficient in triggering a normal exercised-induced immune transcriptional response. Copyright © 2015 International Society of Exercise and Immunology. All rights reserved.

  13. Arginine does not exacerbate markers of inflammation in cocultures of human enterocytes and leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Negrier, I.; Neveux, N.

    2007-01-01

    , a monolayer of intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) separated compartments with nonpathogenic Escherichia coli and mononuclear leukocytes. Activation of enterocytes and leukocytes was assessed by the measurement of nitric oxide, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and IFN-gamma. Further outcomes were...... with arginine did not affect epithelial integrity, production of any of the cytokines investigated, or the amount of nitric oxide. The amino acid used primarily by nonstimulated intestinal epithelial cells cocultured with leukocytes was glutamine. Activation of IEC with bacteria significantly enhanced......-talk between human enterocytes and leukocytes. Because it also does not seem to affect the integrity of enterocyte layers, a detrimental role of arginine during septic-like conditions seems unlikely....

  14. Human leukocyte antigen DR surface expression on CD14+ monocytes during adverse events after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Michaela; Rohrer, Karin Melanie; Erbacher, Annika; Gieseke, Friederike; Schwarze, Carl-Philipp; Bader, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hofbeck, Michael; Kerst, Gunter

    2015-02-01

    The human leukocyte antigen DR surface expression on CD14+ monocytes reflects the degree to which these cells have been activated. Given the central role monocytes and macrophages play in the immune system, a decreased human leukocyte antigen DR expression on CD14+ monocytes results in a hallmark of altered immune status during systemic inflammatory response syndrome. We hypothesize that human leukocyte antigen DR expression might be similarly altered after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and during post-transplant complications. Using flow cytometry, this study investigates the human leukocyte antigen DR surface expression of CD14+ monocytes in 30 pediatric and young adult patients up to 1 year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Normal values were derived from a control group of healthy children, adolescents, and young adults. Human leukocyte antigen DR expression decreased significantly prior and during bacterial infection or sepsis. By contrast, human leukocyte antigen DR expression levels were elevated before and at the time of viremia. Human leukocyte antigen DR expression was also elevated during acute graft-versus-host disease. In contrast, the expression was reduced when patients had hepatic veno-occlusive disease. A significant decrease of human leukocyte antigen DR expression was associated with a relapse of the underlying disease and before death. Human leukocyte antigen DR expression on CD14+ monocytes appears to be a promising parameter that might allow identification of patients at risk after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  15. Chemokine Ligand 20: A Signal for Leukocyte Recruitment During Human Ovulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alem, Linah; Puttabyatappa, Muraly; Rosewell, Kathy; Brännström, Mats; Akin, James; Boldt, Jeffrey; Muse, Ken; Curry, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Ovulation is one of the cornerstones of female fertility. Disruption of the ovulatory process results in infertility, which affects approximately 10% of couples. Using a unique model in which the dominant follicle is collected across the periovulatory period in women, we have identified a leukocyte chemoattractant, chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20), in the human ovary. CCL20 mRNA is massively induced after an in vivo human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulus in granulosa (>10 000-fold) and theca (>4000-fold) cells collected during the early ovulatory (12-18 h) and late ovulatory (18-34 h) periods after hCG administration. Because the LH surge sets in motion an inflammatory reaction characterized by an influx of leukocytes and CCL20 is known to recruit leukocytes in other systems, the composition of ovarian leukocytes (CD45+) containing the CCL20 receptor CCR6 was determined immediately prior to ovulation. CD45+/CCR6+ cells were primarily natural killer cells (41%) along with B cells (12%), T cells (11%), neutrophils (10%), and monocytes (9%). Importantly, exogenous CCL20 stimulated ovarian leukocyte migration 59% within 90 minutes. Due to the difficulties in obtaining human follicles, an in vitro model was developed using granulosa-lutein cells to explore CCL20 regulation. CCL20 expression increased 40-fold within 6 hours after hCG, was regulated partially by the epithelial growth factor pathway, and was positively correlated with progesterone production. These results demonstrate that hCG dramatically increases CCL20 expression in the human ovary, that ovarian leukocytes contain the CCL20 receptor, and that CCL20 stimulates leukocyte migration. Our findings raise the prospect that CCL20 may aid in the final ovulatory events and contribute to fertility in women.

  16. The expression and functional activity of membrane-bound human leukocyte antigen-G1 are influenced by the 3'-untranslated region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Signe Goul; Hantash, Basil M; Zhao, Longmei

    2013-01-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an immunosuppressive molecule acting on both the innate and adaptive immune system. A 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism (rs66554220) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-G gene has been associated with a number of diseases, pregnancy complication...

  17. Immunosuppressive Drugs Affect High-Mannose/Hybrid N-Glycans on Human Allostimulated Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Pocheć

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-glycosylation plays an important role in the majority of physiological and pathological processes occurring in the immune system. Alteration of the type and abundance of glycans is an element of lymphocyte differentiation; it is also common in the development of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. The N-glycosylation process is very sensitive to different environmental agents, among them the pharmacological environment of immunosuppressive drugs. Some results show that high-mannose oligosaccharides have the ability to suppress different stages of the immune response. We evaluated the effects of cyclosporin A (CsA and rapamycin (Rapa on high-mannose/hybrid-type glycosylation in human leukocytes activated in a two-way mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR. CsA significantly reduced the number of leukocytes covered by high-mannose/hybrid N-glycans, and the synergistic action of CsA and Rapa led to an increase of these structures on the remaining leukocytes. This is the first study indicating that β1 and β3 integrins bearing high-mannose/hybrid structures are affected by Rapa and CsA. Rapa taken separately and together with CsA changed the expression of β1 and β3 integrins and, by regulating the protein amount, increased the oligomannose/hybrid-type N-glycosylation on the leukocyte surface. We suggest that the changes in the glycosylation profile of leukocytes may promote the development of tolerance in transplantation.

  18. Human peripheral blood leukocyte engraftment into SCID mice: critical role of CD4(+) T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duchosal, M. A.; Mauray, S.; Rüegg, M.; Trouillet, P.; Vallet, V.; Aarden, L.; Tissot, J. D.; Schapira, M.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the influence of donor T lymphocytes on human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) engraftment into severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. Mice were injected with unfractionated or subset-depleted human PBL, and treated at various times with OKT3, a cytotoxic monoclonal antibody

  19. Linkage disequilibrium between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II and HLA-G--possible implications for human reproduction and autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Christiansen, Ole B

    2005-01-01

    A line of investigation indicates that one or several genes in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influences reproductive success. Studies have revealed associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes and risk of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) and pre......-eclampsia. However, these genes are not expressed at the feto-maternal interface. Furthermore, associations between polymorphisms in the nonclassical HLA class Ib gene, HLA-G, and reproductive outcome have been demonstrated. HLA-G is expressed by extravillous trophoblast during pregnancy, making it a more obvious...... candidate gene for a possible influence on pregnancy outcome. HLA-G has immunomodulatory functions. We have studied linkage disequilibrium between HLA class II genes, primarily HLA-DRB1 alleles, and HLA-G alleles in women with RSA and their partners (n = 103) and in control women and their partners (n = 92...

  20. Human in situ cytokine and leukocyte responses to acute smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelein, Tegan; Duffield, Rob; Marino, Frank

    2017-12-01

    This study examined immune/inflammatory parameters following an acute tobacco smoking episode in smokers with varying smoking histories. Twenty-eight male habitual smokers were categorized according to smoking history, e.g. younger smoker (YSM) or middle-aged smoker (MSM). Participants were matched for fitness and smoking habits and following baseline testing, undertook a smoking protocol involving consumption of two cigarettes within 15 min. Venous blood was collected pre- and immediately, 1 h, and 4 h post-protocol to permit analyses of circulating levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, IL-1ra, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), C-reactive protein (CRP), and leukocytes. No baseline differences were observed between groups for IL-1ra, IL-1β, or leukocytes. MCP-1 and IL-6 levels were significantly (p < 0.05) elevated at baseline in YSM. Both groups showed an increase in MCP-1 levels from pre- to immediately post-cigarette consumption. The MSM also displayed an increase in IL-6 post-smoking, followed by a decline over the period from 1 to 4 h thereafter. A significant decline in circulating lymphocyte and eosinophil levels from immediately post-cigarette consumption to 1 h later was observed in both groups. Monocyte levels in the YSM followed a similar profile but no significant effects on this cell type were evident in the MSM. From these results, a 10-year difference in smoking history induces mild leukopenia. Altered responses due to smoking were also evident with respect to levels of circulating biomarkers, which may be indicative of an effect of differences in cumulative smoking history.

  1. Gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes in monozygotic twins discordant for chronic fatigue: no evidence of a biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Andrea; Jacks, Andreas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Evengard, Birgitta; Wright, Fred A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2009-06-05

    Chronic fatiguing illness remains a poorly understood syndrome of unknown pathogenesis. We attempted to identify biomarkers for chronic fatiguing illness using microarrays to query the transcriptome in peripheral blood leukocytes. Cases were 44 individuals who were clinically evaluated and found to meet standard international criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome or idiopathic chronic fatigue, and controls were their monozygotic co-twins who were clinically evaluated and never had even one month of impairing fatigue. Biological sampling conditions were standardized and RNA stabilizing media were used. These methodological features provide rigorous control for bias resulting from case-control mismatched ancestry and experimental error. Individual gene expression profiles were assessed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. There were no significant differences in gene expression for any transcript. Contrary to our expectations, we were unable to identify a biomarker for chronic fatiguing illness in the transcriptome of peripheral blood leukocytes suggesting that positive findings in prior studies may have resulted from experimental bias.

  2. Gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes in monozygotic twins discordant for chronic fatigue: no evidence of a biomarker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Byrnes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fatiguing illness remains a poorly understood syndrome of unknown pathogenesis. We attempted to identify biomarkers for chronic fatiguing illness using microarrays to query the transcriptome in peripheral blood leukocytes.Cases were 44 individuals who were clinically evaluated and found to meet standard international criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome or idiopathic chronic fatigue, and controls were their monozygotic co-twins who were clinically evaluated and never had even one month of impairing fatigue. Biological sampling conditions were standardized and RNA stabilizing media were used. These methodological features provide rigorous control for bias resulting from case-control mismatched ancestry and experimental error. Individual gene expression profiles were assessed using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 arrays.There were no significant differences in gene expression for any transcript.Contrary to our expectations, we were unable to identify a biomarker for chronic fatiguing illness in the transcriptome of peripheral blood leukocytes suggesting that positive findings in prior studies may have resulted from experimental bias.

  3. Persistence of hepatitis C virus in a white population: associations with human leukocyte antigen class 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fanning, Liam J

    2012-02-03

    The aim of this study was to define novel associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class 1 alleles and persistence or clearance of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in a white population. All individuals in the study were seropositive for anti-HCV antibodies. Viral status was determined by the Roche HCV Amplicor test. HLA-A, -B, -C allelic group profile was molecularly defined by reverse line probe hybridization. The strongest individual allelic group associations with persistent HCV infection were HLA A*11 (p = 0.044) and Cw*04 (p = 0.006). However, only the HLA C*04 association survived correction for multiple comparisons. Further analysis of alleles in linkage with HLA Cw*04 revealed that the haplotype HLA A*11, Cw*04 was present in 11 individuals, 10 of whom were viremic (p = 0.05). No gene dosage effect was observed. No association between HLA class 1 allelic groups and aviremia and virus load was evident in this white population. HLA B*44 is associated with low virus load in human immunodeficiency virus disease, but this association was not evident in this HCV-infected population. Novel HLA class 1 alleles associated with persistence of HCV have been identified.

  4. Potential Predictors of Poor Visual Outcome in Human Leukocyte Antigen-B27-Associated Uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Fleurieke H; Brouwer, Anna H; Kuiper, Jonas J W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/342171070; Ossewaarde-van Norel, Jeannette; ten Dam-van Loon, Ninette H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304816957; de Boer, Joke H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/140201890

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify potential predictors of permanent vision loss in patients with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27-associated uveitis in a tertiary referral center. Design: Retrospective case-control study. Methods: The charts of 212 patients (338 eyes) with HLA-B27-associated uveitis that

  5. Human leukocyte antigen-G polymorphism in relation to expression, function, and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Hviid, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical class Ib molecule belonging to the major histocompatibility complex. HLA-G appears to play a role in the suppression of immune responses and contribute to long-term immune escape or tolerance. The focus of this review is polymorphism in the HLA...

  6. Human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor in squamous metaplastic epithelium of bronchial airways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarbiou, J.; Schadewijk, A. van; Stolk, J.; Sont, J.K.; Boer, W.I.; Rabe, K.F.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Mauad, T.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze a possible contribution of human neutrophil defensins and secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) to the induction of airway epithelial changes such as squamous cell metaplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The presence of these molecules and the

  7. Bactericidal activity of a granule extract from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes against Bacteroides species.

    OpenAIRE

    Pruul, H; Wetherall, B L; McDonald, P J

    1983-01-01

    The microbicidal activity of an acetate extract of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules was tested against Bacteroides fragilis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides distasonis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. All strains tested were killed by the extract, and there were no significant differences between the different Bacteroides species.

  8. A New Machine Classification Method Applied to Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorvig, Mark E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses pattern classification of images by computer and describes the Two Domain Method in which expert knowledge is acquired using multidimensional scaling of judgments of dissimilarities and linear mapping. An application of the Two Domain Method that tested its power to discriminate two patterns of human blood leukocyte distribution is…

  9. Familial occurrence of subacute thyroiditis associated with human leukocyte antigen-B35

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, AB; Roozendaal, C; Dullaart, RPF

    Subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is a spontaneously remitting inflammatory disorder of the thyroid, associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B35, and may be virally induced in genetically predisposed individuals. A 57-year-old Caucasian man presented with symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as

  10. Mesenchymal contribution to recruitment, infiltration, and positioning of leukocytes in human melanoma tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego, Rafael; Estecha, Ana; Relloso, Miguel; Longo, Natividad; Escat, José L; Longo-Imedio, Isabel; Avilés, José A; del Pozo, Miguel A; Puig-Kröger, Amaya; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma

    2013-09-01

    To understand factors that regulate leukocyte entry and positioning within human melanoma tissues, we performed a multiparametric quantitative analysis of two separated regions: the intratumoral area and the peritumoral stroma. Using two mesenchymal markers, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and CD90, we identified three subsets of mesenchymal cells (MCs): (i) intratumoral FAP(+)CD90(low/-) MC, (ii) peritumoral FAP(+)CD90(+) MC, and (iii) FAP(-)CD90(+) perivascular MC. We characterized CD90(+) MCs, which showed a stable CCL2-secretory phenotype when long-term expanded ex vivo, and heavily surrounded peritumoral Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine(+) (DARC) postcapillary venules, supporting a role for these vessels in peritumoral inflammatory leukocyte recruitment. Conversely, the intratumoral area was variably invaded by FAP(+)CD90(low/-) MCs that colocalized with a distinct extracellular matrix (ECM) network. A positive correlation was observed between intratumoral stromal cell/ECM networks and leukocyte infiltration among tumor cells (TCs), as well as in a stroma-dependent xenograft tumor model. Adoptively transferred T lymphocytes preferentially infiltrated tumors composed of TC+MC, compared with TCs only. Altogether, our results suggest that a variety of MCs contribute to regulate different steps of leukocyte tumor infiltration, that is, CD90(+) cells surrounding peritumoral vessels secrete CCL2 to recruit CCR2(+) leukocytes at the tumor periphery, whereas intratumoral FAP(+) cells organize a stromal scaffold that contact guide further invasion among densely packed tumor cells.

  11. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism and type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Médecins

    distribution of class II HLA genes among Moroccan patients presenting type 1 diabetes coming from different regions of the country. A total of ... Subsequently,. DQB1 and DQA1 genes were shown to be more strongly associated with T1D, and ..... Genetic heterogeneity, mode of inheritance, and risk estimate for joint study of ...

  12. Osteochondrosis-Related Gene Expression in Equine Leukocytes Differs among Affected Joints in Foals

    OpenAIRE

    Serteyn, Didier; Piquemal, David; Mendoza García, Luis; Caudron, Isabelle; Noguier, F.; Bruno, R.; Sandersen, Charlotte; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondrosis (OC) is a developmental disease in horses with a significant impact on the horse’s welfare and performance. Previously, differentially expressed genes in leukocytes of OC-affected have been identified and were differentially expressed in horses of different ages when compared to their age-matched controls.As the time course of the development of OC lesions seems to be joint dependent,the aim of this study is to compare in young OCaffected horses (between 8 to 12 mo...

  13. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Polymorphisms Association With Cancer Post-Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarte, Julieta; Goldraich, Livia; Manlhiot, Cedric; Kozuszko, Stella; Rao, Vivek; Delgado, Diego

    2016-09-01

    Post transplantation, a major complication is the development of malignancies. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is a molecule that inhibits the immune system and it is utilized by malignant cells to hide from the immune system. Expression of HLA-G from the donor and recipient cells in transplant patients is regulated by gene variations however, the association between genotype and cancer remains unknown. Our objective was to determine the association between genotype and outcome. Heart transplant recipients (251) and available corresponding donors (196) samples were genotyped for polymorphisms and the association of polymorphisms to outcome was evaluated with parametric hazard regression models. Risk of cancer was 22% at 10years post-transplantation. The mean follow-up was of 4.9±3.6years. In a multivariable analysis, donor-recipient SNP 3187 matching was identified as a protective factor for cancer (hazard ratio 0.43; 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.93; p=0.03). While coding region allele (haplotype 6) was identified as an independent risk factor (hazard ratio 3.7; 95% confidence interval 1.36-10.06; p=0.01). In this investigation, we identified an association between cancer post-transplantation and HLA-G polymorphisms, which may reveal a pathway for potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for cancer post-transplantation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Human HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblasts: Immune-activating cells that interact with decidual leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburgs, Tamara; van der Zwan, Anita; Rybalov, Basya; Raj, Towfique; Stranger, Barbara; Gardner, Lucy; Moffett, Ashley; Strominger, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    Invading human leukocyte antigen-G+ (HLA‐G+) extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) are rare cells that are believed to play a key role in the prevention of a maternal immune attack on foreign fetal tissues. Here highly purified HLA‐G+ EVT and HLA‐G− villous trophoblasts (VT) were isolated. Culture on fibronectin that EVT encounter on invading the uterus increased HLA‐G, EGF-Receptor-2, and LIF-Receptor expression on EVT, presumably representing a further differentiation state. Microarray and functional gene set enrichment analysis revealed a striking immune-activating potential for EVT that was absent in VT. Cocultures of HLA‐G+ EVT with sample matched decidual natural killer cells (dNK), macrophages, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were established. Interaction of EVT with CD4+ T cells resulted in increased numbers of CD4+CD25HIFOXP3+CD45RA+ resting regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased the expression level of the Treg-specific transcription factor FOXP3 in these cells. However, EVT did not enhance cytokine secretion in dNK, whereas stimulation of dNK with mitogens or classical natural killer targets confirmed the distinct cytokine secretion profiles of dNK and peripheral blood NK cells (pNK). EVT are specialized cells involved in maternal–fetal tolerance, the properties of which are not imitated by HLA‐G–expressing surrogate cell lines. PMID:26015573

  15. Human HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblasts: Immune-activating cells that interact with decidual leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Crespo, Ângela C; van der Zwan, Anita; Rybalov, Basya; Raj, Towfique; Stranger, Barbara; Gardner, Lucy; Moffett, Ashley; Strominger, Jack L

    2015-06-09

    Invading human leukocyte antigen-G+ (HLA-G+) extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) are rare cells that are believed to play a key role in the prevention of a maternal immune attack on foreign fetal tissues. Here highly purified HLA-G+ EVT and HLA-G- villous trophoblasts (VT) were isolated. Culture on fibronectin that EVT encounter on invading the uterus increased HLA-G, EGF-Receptor-2, and LIF-Receptor expression on EVT, presumably representing a further differentiation state. Microarray and functional gene set enrichment analysis revealed a striking immune-activating potential for EVT that was absent in VT. Cocultures of HLA-G+ EVT with sample matched decidual natural killer cells (dNK), macrophages, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were established. Interaction of EVT with CD4+ T cells resulted in increased numbers of CD4+CD25(HI)FOXP3+CD45RA+ resting regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased the expression level of the Treg-specific transcription factor FOXP3 in these cells. However, EVT did not enhance cytokine secretion in dNK, whereas stimulation of dNK with mitogens or classical natural killer targets confirmed the distinct cytokine secretion profiles of dNK and peripheral blood NK cells (pNK). EVT are specialized cells involved in maternal-fetal tolerance, the properties of which are not imitated by HLA-G-expressing surrogate cell lines.

  16. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  17. Dynamic expression of leukocyte innate immune genes in whole blood from horses with lipopolysaccharide-induced acute systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anne Mette L.; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2015-01-01

    ) and sepsis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of 31 selected blood leukocyte immune genes in an equine model of acute systemic inflammation to identify significantly regulated genes and to describe their expression dynamics during a 24-h experimental period. Systemic...

  18. Enhancement of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocytes by snake venoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, V

    1984-08-01

    Snake venoms contain compound(s) that enhanced cyclic AMP content in human mononuclear leukocytes maximally after 5 min of incubation at 37 degrees C. The effect was time- and dose-dependent. The half-maximal stimulation of cyclic AMP production by black cobra venom was found at 0.45 micrograms of venom/ml and the value of the Hill coefficient was 0.7. The black cobra venom enhanced the cyclic AMP content in the cells at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. Similar increase in the cyclic AMP content by six snake venoms was found in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The most active venom was from puff adder (Bitis arietans). The data suggest that one of the effects of the snake venoms may be rapid enhancement of cyclic AMP level in the affected cells.

  19. Association of human leukocyte antigen DQ1 and dengue fever in a white Southern Brazilian population

    OpenAIRE

    Polizel, José Roberto; Bueno, Danilo; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete L; Sell, Ana Maria; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Tsuneto, Luiza Tamie; Dalalio, Marcia Machado O; Coimbra, Maria Teresa M; Moliterno, Ricardo Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Dengue is an infectious disease of viral etiology transmitted by the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti, A. albopictus, and A. scutellaris. It can develop either as a benign form or as a severe hemorrhagic form. Previous work showed an association of the hemorrhagic form with human leukocyte antigens (HLA), suggesting a role of genetic factors in disease susceptibility. Nevertheless, data on HLA association with the classical form of the disease is scarce in literature. Sixty-four patients and 667 norm...

  20. Evaluation of Human Leukocyte Aantigens in Papillon Lefevre Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Fargadian

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Papillon Lefevre Syndrome (PLS is a rare disease, associated with the early onsetperiodontal break down in deciduous and permanent dentition.The etiology of PLS is not exactly determined but recently, mutation in catespin C gene, as a genetic basis for the disease, has been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the HLA status in patients affected with PLS. In this research, the frequency of HLA-I and HLA-DR in 9 PLS patients (Belonged to seven unrelated families were compared with 37 healthy people (controls. Fisher exact test was used for data analysis. The results indicated that the frequency of HLA-B18 was significantly higher in the patients' group, compared to the control group(P<0.05. The present study, based on the serological methods, is the only existing controlled study regarding PLS. However, in order to get accurate results, a molecular technology with more samples is required.

  1. Effects of Tapinanthus globiferus and Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides extracts on human leukocytes in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunbolude, Yetunde; Ibrahim, Mohammad; Elekofehinti, Olusola Olalekan; Adeniran, Adekunle; Abolaji, Amos Olalekan; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Kamdem, Jean Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity effect of Tapinanthus globiferus and Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides to human leukocytes. In addition, the reductive potential and the chemical composition of the two plant extracts were also determined. Materials and Methods: Human leukocytes were obtained from healthy volunteer donors. The genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of T. globiferus and Z. zanthoxyloides were assessed using the comet assay and trypan blue exclusion, respectively. The antioxidant activity of the plant extracts was evaluated by the reducing power assay. Furthermore, high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector was used to characterize and quantify the constituents of these plants. Results: T. globiferus (10-150 µg/mL) was neither genotoxic nor cytotoxic at the concentrations tested, suggesting that it can be consumed safely at relatively high concentrations. However, Z. zanthoxyloides showed cytoxicity and genotoxicity to human leukocytes at the highest concentration tested (150 µg/mL). In addition, the total reducing power of T. globiferus was found higher than Z. zanthoxyloides in potassium ferricyanide reduction. Both plants extract contained flavonoids (rutin and quercetin) and phenolic acids (chlorogenic and caffeic). Conclusion: The results obtained support the fact that some caution should be paid regarding the dosage and the frequency of use of Z. zanthoxyloides extract. PMID:26401368

  2. Changes in the leukocyte methylome and its effect on cardiovascular-related genes after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denham, Joshua; O'Brien, Brendan J; Marques, Francine Z; Charchar, Fadi J

    2015-02-15

    Physical exercise has proven cardiovascular benefits, yet there is no clear understanding of the related molecular mechanisms leading to this. Here we determined the beneficial epigenetic effects of exercise after sprint interval training, a form of exercise known to improve cardiometabolic health. We quantified genome-wide leukocyte DNA methylation of 12 healthy young (18-24 yr) men before and after 4 wk (thrice weekly) of sprint interval training using the 450K BeadChip (Illumina) and validated gene expression changes in an extra seven subjects. Exercise increased subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness and maximal running performance, and decreased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration in conjunction with genome-wide DNA methylation changes. Notably, many CpG island and gene promoter regions were demethylated after exercise, indicating increased genome-wide transcriptional changes. Among genes with DNA methylation changes, epidermal growth factor (EGF), a ligand of the epidermal growth factor receptor known to be involved in cardiovascular disease, was demethylated and showed decreased mRNA expression. Additionally, we found that in microRNAs miR-21 and miR-210, gene DNA methylation was altered by exercise causing a cascade effect on the expression of the mature microRNA involved in cardiovascular function. Our findings demonstrate that exercise alters DNA methylation in circulating blood cells in microRNA and protein-coding genes associated with cardiovascular physiology. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. The random co-polymer glatiramer acetate rapidly kills primary human leukocytes through sialic-acid-dependent cell membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stig Hill; Zhang, Xianwei; Juul-Madsen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    in innate immunity. It shares the positive charge and amphipathic character of GA, and, as shown here, also the ability to kill human leukocyte. The cytotoxicity of both compounds depends on sialic acid in the cell membrane. The killing was associated with the generation of CD45 + debris, derived from cell...... of certain oligomeric and chemical properties to support cytotoxic effects of cationic polymers targeting human leukocytes....

  4. Activation of human leukocytes on tantalum trabecular metal in comparison to commonly used orthopedic metal implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhauer, T A; Peter, E; Muhr, G; Köller, M

    2009-02-01

    We analyzed leukocyte functions and cytokine response of human leukocytes toward porous tantalum foam biomaterial (Trabecular Metaltrade mark, TM) in comparison to equally sized solid orthopedic metal implant materials (pure titanium, titanium alloy, stainless steel, pure tantalum, and tantalum coated stainless steel). Isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN) were cocultured with equally sized metallic test discs for 24 h. Supernatants were analyzed for cytokine content by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Compared to the other used test materials there was a significant increase in the release of IL (interleukin)-1ra and IL-8 from PMN, and of IL-1ra, IL-6, and TNF-alpha from PBMC in response to the TM material. The cytokine release correlated with surface roughness of the materials. In contrast, the release of IL-2 was not induced showing that mainly myeloid leukocytes were activated. In addition, supernatants of these leukocyte/material interaction (conditioned media, CM) were subjected to whole blood cell function assays (phagocytosis, chemotaxis, bacterial killing). There was a significant increase in the phagocytotic capacity of leukocytes in the presence of TM-conditioned media. The chemotactic response of leukocytes toward TM-conditioned media was significantly higher compared to CM obtained from other test materials. Furthermore, the bactericidal capacity of whole blood was enhanced in the presence of TM-conditioned media. These results indicate that leukocyte activation at the surface of TM material induces a microenvironment, which may enhance local host defense mechanisms.

  5. Modulation of ROS production in human leukocytes by ganglioside micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gavella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported that exogenous gangliosides, the sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids, are able to modulate many cellular functions. We examined the effect of micelles of mono- and trisialoganglioside GM1 and GT1b on the production of reactive oxygen species by stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils using different spectroscopic methods. The results indicated that exogenous gangliosides did not influence extracellular superoxide anion (O2.- generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils activated by receptor-dependent formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. However, when neutrophils were stimulated by receptor-bypassing phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, gangliosides above their critical micellar concentrations prolonged the lag time preceding the production in a concentration-dependent way, without affecting total extracellular O2.- generation detected by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction. The effect of ganglioside GT1b (100 µM on the increase in lag time was shown to be significant by means of both superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction assay and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.005, respectively. The observed phenomena can be attributed to the ability of ganglioside micelles attached to the cell surface to slow down PMA uptake, thus increasing the diffusion barrier and consequently delaying membrane events responsible for PMA-stimulated O2.- production.

  6. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of human leukocyte proteins from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Thorsrud, A.K.; Munthe, E.; Jellum, E.

    1982-04-01

    Human leukocyte proteins from more than 150 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, together with age- and sex-matched controls, were analyzed by use of the ISO-DALT technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, psoriatic arthritis, calcium tendinitis, post-infectious arthritis, and asymmetrical seronegative arthritis were also included as positive controls. Synthesis of several proteins, referred to by number as members of the Rheuma set, is shown to increase in the leukocyte preparations from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Several of these proteins are specific to monocytes or granulocytes; others are of unknown cellular origin, but appear to be unique to rheumatoid arthritis. The Rheuma proteins appear to be indicators of disease activity, because their increased synthesis can be correlated with sedimentation rate and other clinical indices of rheumatoid disease activity.

  7. Ovine leukocyte profiles do not associate with variation in the prion gene, but are breed-dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prion genotype in sheep confer resistance to scrapie. In cattle, lymphocyte profile has been found to be associated with prion genotype. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if variations in the sheep prion gene were associated with leukocyte populations as measured by complete blood ce...

  8. Label-free in vivo imaging of human leukocytes using two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence enables label-free morphological and functional imaging of various human blood cells. Specifically, we achieved distinctive morphological contrast to visualize morphology of important leukocytes, such as polymorphonuclear structure of granulocyte and mononuclear feature of agranulocyte, through the employment of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence signals. In addition, NADH fluorescence images clearly reveal the morphological transformation process of neutrophils during disease-causing bacterial infection. Our findings also show that time-resolved NADH fluorescence can be potentially used for functional imaging of the phagocytosis of pathogens by leukocytes (neutrophils) in vivo. In particular, we found that free-to-bound NADH ratios measured in infected neutrophils increased significantly, which is consistent with a previous study that the energy consumed in the phagocytosis of neutrophils is mainly generated through the glycolysis pathway that leads to the accumulation of free NADH. Future work will focus on further developing and applying label-free imaging technology to investigate leukocyte-related diseases and disorders.

  9. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of peripheral leukocytes in relation to the male predominance of Guillain-Barre syndrome: differential gene expression between male and female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peng-Qi; Sun, Yan-Yan; Chen, Hong-Ping; Li, Guo-Zhong; Zhong, Di

    2015-07-28

    Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) fulfils most of the clinical features of an autoimmune disease except for its male predominance. No previous studies have evaluated the differential genome-wide expression between male and female GBS patients. This study sought to identify differences between male and female GBS patients in the gene expression profiles of peripheral leukocytes. We downloaded gene chip data-sets pertaining to peripheral leukocyte samples from GBS patients using the gene expression omnibus (submitted by Chang et al.) and applied hierarchical cluster analysis to detect whether there was a gender difference in genome-wide gene expression levels. Then, we identified the sexually differentially expressed genes using a bioinformatic approach and applied enrichment analysis to the gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes terms to identify significant pathways related to these genes. We observed gender stratification among GBS patients. Twenty genes were expressed more highly in male patients and were enriched for functions, such as macrophage differentiation, leukocyte migration, bladder cancer, pathogenic Escherichia coli infection. In female patients, 62 genes were more highly expressed and were enriched for responses to viral infection and defence, retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors, cytoplasmic DNA sensing. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) seem to play an important role in the male predominance of GBS. This study demonstrated gender differences in the genome-wide gene expression of patients with GBS. Bioinformatic approaches offer new means for identifying candidate genes and pathways relevant to the pathophysiology of GBS.

  10. Human leukocyte antigen-G expression in differentiated human airway epithelial cells: lack of modulation by Th2-associated cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Steven R

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-G is a nonclassical class I antigen with immunomodulatory roles including up-regulation of suppressor T regulatory lymphocytes. HLA-G was recently identified as an asthma susceptibility gene, and expression of a soluble isoform, HLA-G5, has been demonstrated in human airway epithelium. Increased presence of HLA-G5 has been demonstrated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid recovered from patients with mild asthma; this suggests a role for this isoform in modulating airway inflammation though the mechanisms by which this occurs is unclear. Airway inflammation associated with Th2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 is a principal feature of asthma, but whether these cytokines elicit expression of HLA-G is not known. Methods We examined gene and protein expression of both soluble (G5 and membrane-bound (G1 HLA-G isoforms in primary differentiated human airway epithelial cells collected from normal lungs and grown in air-liquid interface culture. Cells were treated with up to 10 ng/ml of either IL-4, IL-5, or IL-13, or 100 ng/ml of the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-10, or 10,000 U/ml of the Th1-associated cytokine interferon-beta, for 24 hr, after which RNA was isolated for evaluation by quantitative PCR and protein was collected for Western blot analysis. Results HLA-G5 but not G1 was present in dAEC as demonstrated by quantitative PCR, western blot and confocal microscopy. Neither G5 nor G1 expression was increased by the Th2-associated cytokines IL-4, IL-5 or IL-13 over 24 hr, nor after treatment with IL-10, but was increased 4.5 ± 1.4 fold after treatment with 10,000 U/ml interferon-beta. Conclusions These data demonstrate the constitutive expression of a T lymphocyte regulatory molecule in differentiated human airway epithelial cells that is not modulated by Th2-associated cytokines.

  11. Ethanol-dependent expression of the NKG2D ligands MICA/B in human cell lines and leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsova, Maria A; Klinkova, Anna V; Kuchukova, Anastasia A; Kadin, Andrey Y; Kanevskiy, Leonid M; Kovalenko, Elena I

    2017-04-01

    Alcohol consumption affects the human immune system, causing a variety of disorders. However, the mechanisms of development of these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that ethanol may influence the expression of MICA and MICB, stress-induced molecules capable of regulating the activity of cytotoxic lymphocytes through the interaction with receptor NKG2D, which substantially affects the functionality of cellular immunity. We analyzed the effects of ethanol on MICA/B expression in tumor cell lines and human leukocytes. In the cell line models, ethanol caused different changes in the surface expression of MICA/B; in particular, it induced the translocation of intracellular proteins MICA/B to the cell surface and shedding of MICA (in soluble and microparticle-associated forms) from the plasma membrane. The observed results are not linked with cell death in cultures, taking place only under higher doses of ethanol. Ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations (and higher) stimulated expression of MICA/B genes in different cell types. The effect of ethanol was more pronounced in hepatocyte line HepG2 compared with hematopoietic cell lines K562, Jurkat, and THP-1. Among the tested leukocytes, the most sensitive to ethanol action were T cells activated ex vivo with IL-2, in which the increase of MICA/B mRNA expression was registered with the smallest dose of ethanol (0.125%). In human monocytes, ethanol may lead to elevations in surface MICA/B levels. Presumably, changes in MICA/B expression caused by ethanol can affect the functions of NKG2D-positive cytotoxic lymphocytes, modulating immune reactions at excessive alcohol consumption.

  12. Interactions of TANGO and leukocyte integrin CD11c/CD18 regulate the migration of human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Stephanie; Melle, Christian; Mondal, Krishna; Klein, Gerd; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2007-12-01

    The TANGO gene was originally identified as a new member of the MIA gene family. It codes for a protein of yet unknown function. TANGO revealed a very broad expression pattern in contrast to the highly restricted expression pattern determined for the other family members. The only cells lacking TANGO expression are cells of the hematopoietic system. One of the major differences between mature hematopoietic cells and other tissue cells is the lack of adhesion until these cells leave the bloodstream. In this study, we observed that TANGO expression was induced after adhesion of human monocytic cells to substrate. To understand the mechanism of TANGO function during monocyte adhesion we isolated interacting proteins and found an interaction between TANGO and the leukocyte-specific integrin CD11c. In functional assays, we observed reduced attachment of human monocytic cells to fibrinogen, ICAM-1 and to human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) after stimulation with recombinant TANGO protein. Additionally, the migrating capacity of premonocytic cells through fibrinogen or HMECs was increased after stimulation of these cells with recombinant TANGO. Therefore, we suggest that TANGO reduced the attachment to fibrinogen or other cell adhesion molecules. As TANGO does not compete for CD11c ligand binding directly, we hypothesize TANGO function by modulation of integrin activity. Taken together, the results from this study present TANGO as a novel ligand for CD11c, regulating migratory processes of hematopoietic cells.

  13. The Peri-islet Basement Membrane, a Barrier to Infiltrating Leukocytes in Type 1 Diabetes in Mouse and Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korpos, Eva; Kadri, Nadir; Kappelhoff, Reinhild

    2013-01-01

    demonstrate global loss of peri-islet BM and IM components only at sites of leukocyte infiltration into the islet. Stereological analyses reveal a correlation between incidence of insulitis and the number of islets showing loss of peri-islet BM versus islets with intact BMs, suggesting that leukocyte...... penetration of the peri-islet BM is a critical step. Protease- and protease inhibitor-specific microarray analyses (CLIP-CHIP) of laser-dissected leukocyte infiltrated and noninfiltrated pancreatic islets and confirmatory quantitative real time PCR and protein analyses identified cathepsin S, W, and C...... activity at sites of leukocyte penetration of the peri-islet BM in association with a macrophage subpopulation in NOD mice and human type 1 diabetic samples and, hence, potentially a novel therapeutic target specifically acting at the islet penetration stage. Interestingly, the peri-islet BM and underlying...

  14. Hesperidin displays relevant role in the nutrigenomic effect of orange juice on blood leukocytes in human volunteers: a randomized controlled cross-over study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Milenkovic

    Full Text Available We previously showed, in healthy, middle-aged, moderately overweight men, that orange juice decreases diastolic blood pressure and significantly improves postprandial microvascular endothelial reactivity and that hesperidin could be causally linked to the observed beneficial effect of orange juice. The objective was to determine the effect of chronic consumption of orange juice on the gene expression profile of leukocytes in healthy volunteers and to assess to what extent hesperidin is involved in the effect of orange juice.Volunteers were included in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Throughout three 4-week periods, volunteers consumed daily: 500 ml orange juice, 500 ml control drink plus hesperidin or 500 ml control drink and placebo. Blood samplings were performed on 10 overnight-fasted subjects after the 4-week treatment period. Global gene expression profiles were determined using human whole genome cDNA microarrays. Both orange juice and hesperidin consumption significantly affected leukocyte gene expression. Orange juice consumption induced changes in expression of, 3,422 genes, while hesperidin intake modulated the expression of 1,819 genes. Between the orange juice and hesperidin consumption groups, 1,582 regulated genes were in common. Many of these genes are implicated in chemotaxis, adhesion, infiltration and lipid transport, which is suggestive of lower recruitment and infiltration of circulating cells to vascular wall and lower lipid accumulation.This study shows that regular consumption of orange juice for 4 weeks alters leukocyte gene expression to an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic profile, and hesperidin displays a relevant role in the genomic effect of this beverage.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00983086.

  15. Hesperidin Displays Relevant Role in the Nutrigenomic Effect of Orange Juice on Blood Leukocytes in Human Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Cross-Over Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Dragan; Deval, Christiane; Dubray, Claude; Mazur, Andrzej; Morand, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously showed, in healthy, middle-aged, moderately overweight men, that orange juice decreases diastolic blood pressure and significantly improves postprandial microvascular endothelial reactivity and that hesperidin could be causally linked to the observed beneficial effect of orange juice. The objective was to determine the effect of chronic consumption of orange juice on the gene expression profile of leukocytes in healthy volunteers and to assess to what extent hesperidin is involved in the effect of orange juice. Methodology/Principal Findings Volunteers were included in a randomized, controlled, crossover study. Throughout three 4-week periods, volunteers consumed daily: 500 ml orange juice, 500 ml control drink plus hesperidin or 500 ml control drink and placebo. Blood samplings were performed on 10 overnight-fasted subjects after the 4-week treatment period. Global gene expression profiles were determined using human whole genome cDNA microarrays. Both orange juice and hesperidin consumption significantly affected leukocyte gene expression. Orange juice consumption induced changes in expression of, 3,422 genes, while hesperidin intake modulated the expression of 1,819 genes. Between the orange juice and hesperidin consumption groups, 1,582 regulated genes were in common. Many of these genes are implicated in chemotaxis, adhesion, infiltration and lipid transport, which is suggestive of lower recruitment and infiltration of circulating cells to vascular wall and lower lipid accumulation. Conclusions This study shows that regular consumption of orange juice for 4 weeks alters leukocyte gene expression to an anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic profile, and hesperidin displays a relevant role in the genomic effect of this beverage. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 00983086 PMID:22110589

  16. Broadly altered gene expression in blood leukocytes in essential hypertension is absent during treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chon, H; Gaillard, CAJM; van der Meijden, BB; Dijstelbloem, HM; Kraaijenhagen, RJ; van Leenen, D; Holstege, FCP; Joles, JA; Bluyssen, HAR; Koomans, HA; Braam, B

    We assessed whether large-scale expression profiling of leukocytes of patients with essential hypertension reflects characteristics of systemic disease and whether such changes are responsive to antihypertensive therapy. Total RNA from leukocytes were obtained from untreated (n=6) and treated (n=6)

  17. Leukocyte count affects expression of reference genes in canine whole blood samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piek, C.J.; Brinkhof, B.; Rothuizen, J.; Dekker, A.; Penning, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The dog is frequently used as a model for hematologic human diseases. In this study the suitability of nine potential reference genes for quantitative RT-PCR studies in canine whole blood was investigated. Findings The expression of these genes was measured in whole blood samples of 263

  18. Gene expression disorders of innate antibacterial signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer patients: implications for leukocyte dysfunction and tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Aleksandra; Lech, Gustaw; Słodkowski, Maciej; Słotwińska, Sylwia M.

    2014-01-01

    The study was carried out to investigate changes in gene expression of innate antibacterial signaling pathways in patients with pancreatic cancer. Expression of the following genes was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes of 55 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR): TLR4, NOD1, MyD88, TRAF6 and HMGB1. The levels of expression of TLR4, NOD1 and TRAF6 genes were significantly elevated (p = 0.007; p = 0.001 and p = 0.01, respectively), while MyD88 expression was markedly reduced (p = 0.0002), as compared to controls. Expression of TLR4 and NOD1 exceeded the normal level more than 3.5-fold and there was a significant correlation found between the expression of these genes (r = 0.558, p < 0.001). TLR4, NOD1 and MyD88 genes were expressed at a similar level both before and after surgery. No significant changes in the expression of HMGB1 gene were observed. The results of the study clearly indicate abnormal expression of genes belonging to innate antibacterial signaling pathways in peripheral blood leukocytes of patients with pancreatic cancer, which may lead to leukocyte dysfunction. Overexpression of TLR4, NOD1 and TRAF6 genes, and decreased MyD88 gene expression may contribute to chronic inflammation and tumor progression by up-regulation of the innate antibacterial response. The parameters tested are useful for monitoring innate immunity gene disorders and pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26155170

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen F Presents Peptides and Regulates Immunity through Interactions with NK Cell Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulberger, Charles L; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Hölzemer, Angelique; Neu, Karlynn E; Liu, Victor; Steinbach, Adriana M; Garcia-Beltran, Wilfredo F; Sulak, Michael; Jabri, Bana; Lynch, Vincent J; Altfeld, Marcus; Hildebrand, William H; Adams, Erin J

    2017-06-20

    Evidence is mounting that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-F (human leukocyte antigen F) regulates the immune system in pregnancy, infection, and autoimmunity by signaling through NK cell receptors (NKRs). We present structural, biochemical, and evolutionary analyses demonstrating that HLA-F presents peptides of unconventional length dictated by a newly arisen mutation (R62W) that has produced an open-ended groove accommodating particularly long peptides. Compared to empty HLA-F open conformers (OCs), HLA-F tetramers bound with human-derived peptides differentially stained leukocytes, suggesting peptide-dependent engagement. Our in vitro studies confirm that NKRs differentiate between peptide-bound and peptide-free HLA-F. The complex structure of peptide-loaded β2m-HLA-F bound to the inhibitory LIR1 revealed similarities to high-affinity recognition of the viral MHC-I mimic UL18 and a docking strategy that relies on contacts with HLA-F as well as β2m, thus precluding binding to HLA-F OCs. These findings provide a biochemical framework to understand how HLA-F could regulate immunity via interactions with NKRs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Leukocyte Populations in Human Preterm and Term Breast Milk Identified by Multicolour Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trend, Stephanie; de Jong, Emma; Lloyd, Megan L; Kok, Chooi Heen; Richmond, Peter; Doherty, Dorota A; Simmer, Karen; Kakulas, Foteini; Strunk, Tobias; Currie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Extremely preterm infants are highly susceptible to bacterial infections but breast milk provides some protection. It is unknown if leukocyte numbers and subsets in milk differ between term and preterm breast milk. This study serially characterised leukocyte populations in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants using multicolour flow cytometry methods for extended differential leukocyte counts in blood. Sixty mothers of extremely preterm (mature milk (d26-30) samples were collected, cells isolated, and leukocyte subsets analysed using flow cytometry. The major CD45+ leukocyte populations circulating in blood were also detectable in breast milk but at different frequencies. Progression of lactation was associated with decreasing CD45+ leukocyte concentration, as well as increases in the relative frequencies of neutrophils and immature granulocytes, and decreases in the relative frequencies of eosinophils, myeloid and B cell precursors, and CD16- monocytes. No differences were observed between preterm and term breast milk in leukocyte concentration, though minor differences between preterm groups in some leukocyte frequencies were observed. Flow cytometry is a useful tool to identify and quantify leukocyte subsets in breast milk. The stage of lactation is associated with major changes in milk leukocyte composition in this population. Fresh preterm breast milk is not deficient in leukocytes, but shorter gestation may be associated with minor differences in leukocyte subset frequencies in preterm compared to term breast milk.

  1. Leukocyte Populations in Human Preterm and Term Breast Milk Identified by Multicolour Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trend, Stephanie; de Jong, Emma; Lloyd, Megan L.; Kok, Chooi Heen; Richmond, Peter; Doherty, Dorota A.; Simmer, Karen; Kakulas, Foteini; Strunk, Tobias; Currie, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Extremely preterm infants are highly susceptible to bacterial infections but breast milk provides some protection. It is unknown if leukocyte numbers and subsets in milk differ between term and preterm breast milk. This study serially characterised leukocyte populations in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants using multicolour flow cytometry methods for extended differential leukocyte counts in blood. Methods Sixty mothers of extremely preterm (leukocyte subsets analysed using flow cytometry. Results The major CD45+ leukocyte populations circulating in blood were also detectable in breast milk but at different frequencies. Progression of lactation was associated with decreasing CD45+ leukocyte concentration, as well as increases in the relative frequencies of neutrophils and immature granulocytes, and decreases in the relative frequencies of eosinophils, myeloid and B cell precursors, and CD16- monocytes. No differences were observed between preterm and term breast milk in leukocyte concentration, though minor differences between preterm groups in some leukocyte frequencies were observed. Conclusions Flow cytometry is a useful tool to identify and quantify leukocyte subsets in breast milk. The stage of lactation is associated with major changes in milk leukocyte composition in this population. Fresh preterm breast milk is not deficient in leukocytes, but shorter gestation may be associated with minor differences in leukocyte subset frequencies in preterm compared to term breast milk. PMID:26288195

  2. SUMOylation of DRIL1 directs its transcriptional activity towards leukocyte lineage-specific genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Prieur

    Full Text Available DRIL1 is an ARID family transcription factor that can immortalize primary mouse fibroblasts, bypass RAS(V12-induced cellular senescence and collaborate with RAS(V12 or MYC in mediating oncogenic transformation. It also activates immunoglobulin heavy chain transcription and engages in heterodimer formation with E2F to stimulate E2F-dependent transcription. Little, however, is known about the regulation of DRIL1 activity. Recently, DRIL1 was found to interact with the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9, but the functional relevance of this association has not been assessed. Here, we show that DRIL1 is sumoylated both in vitro and in vivo at lysine 398. Moreover, we provide evidence that PIASy functions as a specific SUMO E3-ligase for DRIL1 and promotes its sumoylation both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, consistent with the subnuclear localization of PIASy in the Matrix-Associated Region (MAR, SUMO-modified DRIL1 species are found exclusively in the MAR fraction. This post-translational modification interferes neither with the subcellular localization nor the DNA-binding activity of the protein. In contrast, DRIL1 sumoylation impairs its interaction with E2F1 in vitro and modifies its transcriptional activity in vivo, driving transcription of subset of genes regulating leukocyte fate. Taken together, these results identify sumoylation as a novel post-translational modification of DRIL1 that represents an important mechanism for targeting and modulating DRIL1 transcriptional activity.

  3. The local inflammatory responses to infection of the peritoneal cavity in humans: Their regulation by cytokines, macrophages, and other leukocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.J.A. Fieren (Marien)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractStudies on infection-induced inflammatory reactions in humans rely largely on findings in the blood compartment. Peritoneal leukocytes from patients treated with peritoneal dialysis offer a unique opportunity to study in humans the inflammatory responses taking place at the site of

  4. Altered genes profile of renin-angiotensin system, immune system, and adipokines receptors in leukocytes of children with primary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Mieczysław; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Trojanek, Joanna; Niemirska, Anna; Wierzbicka, Aldona; Szalecki, Mieczysław

    2013-02-01

    Renin-angiotensin system, metabolic abnormalities, and immune activity have a role in the pathogenesis of primary hypertension. We assessed the leukocyte mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, angiotensin converting enzyme, renin, angiotensin 2 type 1 receptor, CD14 molecule, adiponectin type 1 receptor, and leptin receptor in hypertensive children before and after nonpharmacological treatment. Leukocyte mRNA expression was measured by means of quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in 23 hypertensive children before and after 6 months of nonpharmacological treatment based on dietary advice and physical activities. Twenty-three normotensive children matched for age, sex, and body mass index served as a control group. Before treatment patients had elevated expression of angiotensin converting enzyme and CD14 mRNA, decreased expression of angiotensinogen and angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA, and unchanged expression of renin, adiponectin, and leptin receptors mRNA as compared with controls. Renin mRNA negatively correlated with 24-hour mean arterial pressure and carotid intima-media thickness. Six months of nonpharmacological treatment caused decrease of blood pressure and normalization of metabolic abnormalities. Renin, adiponectin, and leptin receptors mRNA expression decreased and were lower than in control group. Changes in blood pressure, left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness, body mass index, and waist circumference did not correlate with changes in the expression of renin-angiotensin system genes, CD14, leptin, and adiponectin receptors mRNA. We conclude that leukocytes of hypertensive children displayed alterations in the expression of renin-angiotensin system genes as well as those of CD14. Nonpharmacological treatment resulted in downregulation of genes involved in renin-angiotensin activation and those engaged in leukocyte responses to adipokines.

  5. Leukocyte Populations in Human Preterm and Term Breast Milk Identified by Multicolour Flow Cytometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Trend

    Full Text Available Extremely preterm infants are highly susceptible to bacterial infections but breast milk provides some protection. It is unknown if leukocyte numbers and subsets in milk differ between term and preterm breast milk. This study serially characterised leukocyte populations in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants using multicolour flow cytometry methods for extended differential leukocyte counts in blood.Sixty mothers of extremely preterm (<28 weeks gestational age, very preterm (28-31 wk, and moderately preterm (32-36 wk, as well as term (37-41 wk infants were recruited. Colostrum (d2-5, transitional (d8-12 and mature milk (d26-30 samples were collected, cells isolated, and leukocyte subsets analysed using flow cytometry.The major CD45+ leukocyte populations circulating in blood were also detectable in breast milk but at different frequencies. Progression of lactation was associated with decreasing CD45+ leukocyte concentration, as well as increases in the relative frequencies of neutrophils and immature granulocytes, and decreases in the relative frequencies of eosinophils, myeloid and B cell precursors, and CD16- monocytes. No differences were observed between preterm and term breast milk in leukocyte concentration, though minor differences between preterm groups in some leukocyte frequencies were observed.Flow cytometry is a useful tool to identify and quantify leukocyte subsets in breast milk. The stage of lactation is associated with major changes in milk leukocyte composition in this population. Fresh preterm breast milk is not deficient in leukocytes, but shorter gestation may be associated with minor differences in leukocyte subset frequencies in preterm compared to term breast milk.

  6. Suppression of TNF-alpha production by S-adenosylmethionine in human mononuclear leukocytes is not mediated by polyamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, J.; Parlesak, Alexandr; Sauter, S.

    2006-01-01

    precursors or metabolites [phosphatidylcholine, choline, betaine, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)] have a modulating effect on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production by endotoxin-stimulated human mononuclear leukocytes and whether SAM-dependent polyamines (spermidine, spermine) are mediators of SAM...... not alter TNF-alpha release. Inhibitors of polyamine synthesis that blocked either putrescine (difluoromethylornithine) or spermine (CGP48664A) production did not affect TNF-alpha synthesis. Endotoxin stimulation of leukocytes did not alter the intracellular levels of polyamines. In addition...

  7. Human leukocyte antigen class II variants and adult-onset asthma: does occupational allergen exposure play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, L.A.M.; Strachan, D.P.; Vermeulen, R.; Bakker, P.I.W. de; Demenais, F.; Dumas, O.; Carsin, A.E.; Cullinan, P.; Curjuric, I.; Ghosh, R.E.; Heederik, D.; Imboden, M.; Jarvis, D.; Lathrop, M.; Moual, N. le; Mehta, A.; Miedinger, D.; Sigsgaard, T.; Siroux, V.; Vernez, D.; Zock, J.P.; Kauffmann, F.; Probst-Hensch, N.; Kogevinas, M.; Bouzigon, E.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a locus centred on rs9273349 in the HLA-DQ region emerged from genome-wide association studies of adult-onset asthma. We aimed to further investigate the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II in adult-onset asthma and a possible interaction with occupational exposures. We imputed

  8. Human leukocyte antigen class II variants and adult-onset asthma : does occupational allergen exposure play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Lidwien A M; Strachan, David P; Vermeulen, Roel; de Bakker, Paul I W; Demenais, Florence; Dumas, Orianne; Carsin, Anne-Elie; Cullinan, Paul; Curjuric, Ivan; Ghosh, Rebecca E; Heederik, Dick; Imboden, Medea; Jarvis, Deborah; Lathrop, Mark; Le Moual, Nicole; Mehta, Amar; Miedinger, David; Sigsgaard, Torben; Siroux, Valérie; Vernez, David; Zock, Jan Paul; Kauffmann, Francine; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Kogevinas, Manolis; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a locus centred on rs9273349 in the HLA-DQ region emerged from genome-wide association studies of adult-onset asthma. We aimed to further investigate the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II in adult-onset asthma and a possible interaction with occupational exposures. We imputed

  9. Biochemical and functional characteristics of the human leukocyte membrane antigen family LFA-1, Mo-1 and p150,95

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, G. D.; Borst, J.; Figdor, C. G.; Spits, H.; Miedema, F.; Terhorst, C.; de Vries, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The human leukocyte function-associated (LFA-1) antigen, the monocyte differentiation antigen Mo-1 which is characterized as the C3bi receptor and the glycoprotein p150,95 are characterized biochemically. Immunoprecipitations carried out with 6 different monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against LFA-1

  10. Power Generation from Human Leukocytes/Lymphocytes in Mammalian Biofuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güray Güven

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative to batteries power sources is needed for the human implants of the future that tend to be less invasive and more integrated to human biology and physiology. Human metabolism could be exploited for the generation of power, but mammalian cells protect their energy production apparatus from external electrochemical scavengers. We report here evidence that, in the case of white blood cells, chemical energy can be harvested directly on an electrode as electricity in fuel cells whose stability is roughly parallel to the viability of cells in vitro. Electrochemical activity of human leukocytes immobilized on modified carbon mesh electrodes was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Oxidation peaks at 0.33 V versus Ag/AgCl were observed. An open-circuit potential of 0.44 V was recorded between anode and cathode compartments where the biofuel cell potential operating under an external load of 5 kΩ was below 0.35 V. Average power outputs of 10 μW (2.4×10-6 μW/cell were increased to 15 μW by the activation of white blood cells. Power densities of 1.5 μW cm−2 for lower than physiological cell concentrations are low for most of today’s implants, but possibility of cell immobilization allows a positive outlook for the future utility of the reported findings.

  11. PAMP induced expression of immune relevant genes in head kidney leukocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Raida, Martin Kristian; Holten-Andersen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    ) on the surface of the invader. Phagocytic cells are known to initiate a respiratory burst following an exposure to the pathogen, but the underlying and associated specific elements are poorly elucidated in fish. The present study describes the differential response of head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout...... effect of high concentrations of LPS and zymosan became evident after 4 h exposure. This study suggests that rainbow trout leukocytes respond differently to viral, bacterial and fungal PAMPs, which may reflect activation of specific signaling cascades eventually leading to activation of different immune...

  12. PAMP INDUCED EXPRESSION OF IMMUNE RELEVANT GENES IN HEAD KIDNEY LEUKOCYTES OF RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Holten-Andersen, Lars; Kania, Per Walter

    of the invader. Phagocytic cells are known to initiate a respiratory burst following an exposure to the pathogen, but the underlying and associated specific elements are poorly elucidated in fish. The present study describes the differential response of head kidney leukocytes from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus...... of LPS and zymosan became evident after 4 h exposure. This study suggests that rainbow trout leukocytes respond differently to viral, bacterial and fungal PAMPs, which may reflect activation of specific signaling cascades eventually leading to activation of different immune effector molecules....

  13. Alpha-2-macroglobulin loaded microcapsules enhance human leukocyte functions and innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici Canova, Donata; Pavlov, Anton M; Norling, Lucy V; Gobbetti, Thomas; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Le Fauder, Pauline; Cenac, Nicolas; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Perretti, Mauro

    2015-11-10

    Synthetic microstructures can be engineered to deliver bioactive compounds impacting on their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Herein, we applied dextran-based layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules to deliver alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2MG), a protein with modulatory properties in inflammation. Extending recent observations made with dextran-microcapsules loaded with α2MG in experimental sepsis, we focused on the physical and chemical characteristics of these microstructures and determined their biology on rodent and human cells. We report an efficient encapsulation of α2MG into microcapsules, which enhanced i) human leukocyte recruitment to inflamed endothelium and ii) human macrophage phagocytosis: in both settings microcapsules were more effective than soluble α2MG or empty microcapsules (devoid of active protein). Translation of these findings revealed that intravenous administration of α2MG-microcapsules (but not empty microcapsules) promoted neutrophil migration into peritoneal exudates and augmented macrophage phagocytic functions, the latter response being associated with alteration of bioactive lipid mediators as assessed by mass spectrometry. The present study indicates that microencapsulation can be an effective strategy to harness the complex biology of α2MG with enhancing outcomes on fundamental processes of the innate immune response paving the way to potential future development in the control of sepsis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The essential oil of bergamot stimulates reactive oxygen species production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Marco; Luini, Alessandra; Bombelli, Raffaella; Corasaniti, Maria T; Bagetta, Giacinto; Marino, Franca

    2014-08-01

    Bergamot (Citrus aurantium L. subsp. bergamia) essential oil (BEO) is used in folk medicine as an antiseptic and anthelminthic and to facilitate wound healing. Evidence indicates that BEO has substantial antimicrobial activity; however its effects on immunity have never been examined. We studied the effects of BEO on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and the role of Ca(2+) in the functional responses evoked by BEO in these cells. Results show that BEO increased intracellular ROS production in human PMN, an effect that required the contribution of extracellular (and, to a lesser extent, of intracellular) Ca(2+) . Bergamot essential oil also significantly increased ROS production induced by the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe and reduced the response to the protein kinase C activator phorbol myristate acetate. In conclusion, this is the first report showing the ability of BEO to increase ROS production in human PMN. This effect could both contribute to the activity of BEO in infections and in tissue healing as well as underlie an intrinsic proinflammatory potential. The relevance of these findings for the clinical uses of BEO needs careful consideration. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Effect of aspirin on the metabolism of exogenous arachidonic acid in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punnonen, K.; Uotila, P.

    1984-08-01

    When human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) were incubated with exogenous /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid (/sup 14/C-AA), both lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase metabolites were detected. The amount of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolites formed, including 5-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), was small. The amount of other mono-HETE's (migrating in the vicinity of 12-HETE) was greater, but this was obviously mainly due to the small amount of contaminating platelets. In the presence of calcium ionophore A23187 the rate of formation of 5-HETE was increased, but the formation of other metabolites remained unchanged. When PMNL were incubated with aspirin in the presence of A23187 the formation of the cyclo-oxygenase products was decreased but that of 5-HETE was unchanged. The present study indicates that the calcium ionophore A23187 stimulates specifically the 5-lipoxygenase in human PMNL and that aspirin has no effect on the formation of the 5-lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid in human PMNL.

  16. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  17. A review of the mitochondrial and glycolytic metabolism in human platelets and leukocytes: Implications for their use as bioenergetic biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A. Kramer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of metabolic function in cells isolated from human blood for treatment and diagnosis of disease is a new and important area of translational research. It is now becoming clear that a broad range of pathologies which present clinically with symptoms predominantly in one organ, such as the brain or kidney, also modulate mitochondrial energetics in platelets and leukocytes allowing these cells to serve as “the canary in the coal mine” for bioenergetic dysfunction. This opens up the possibility that circulating platelets and leukocytes can sense metabolic stress in patients and serve as biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction in human pathologies such as diabetes, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. In this overview we will describe how the utilization of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation differs in platelets and leukocytes and discuss how they can be used in patient populations. Since it is clear that the metabolic programs between leukocytes and platelets are fundamentally distinct the measurement of mitochondrial function in distinct cell populations is necessary for translational research.

  18. A review of the mitochondrial and glycolytic metabolism in human platelets and leukocytes: implications for their use as bioenergetic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Philip A; Ravi, Saranya; Chacko, Balu; Johnson, Michelle S; Darley-Usmar, Victor M

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of metabolic function in cells isolated from human blood for treatment and diagnosis of disease is a new and important area of translational research. It is now becoming clear that a broad range of pathologies which present clinically with symptoms predominantly in one organ, such as the brain or kidney, also modulate mitochondrial energetics in platelets and leukocytes allowing these cells to serve as "the canary in the coal mine" for bioenergetic dysfunction. This opens up the possibility that circulating platelets and leukocytes can sense metabolic stress in patients and serve as biomarkers of mitochondrial dysfunction in human pathologies such as diabetes, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. In this overview we will describe how the utilization of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation differs in platelets and leukocytes and discuss how they can be used in patient populations. Since it is clear that the metabolic programs between leukocytes and platelets are fundamentally distinct the measurement of mitochondrial function in distinct cell populations is necessary for translational research.

  19. Social well-being is associated with less pro-inflammatory and pro-metastatic leukocyte gene expression in women after surgery for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutagir, Devika R; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Carver, Charles S; Lechner, Suzanne C; Timpano, Kiara R; Bouchard, Laura C; Gudenkauf, Lisa M; Jacobs, Jamie M; Diaz, Alain; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Cole, Steve W; Heller, Aaron S; Antoni, Michael H

    2017-08-01

    Satisfaction with social resources, or "social well-being," relates to better adaptation and longer survival after breast cancer diagnosis. Biobehavioral mechanisms linking social well-being (SWB) to mental and physical health may involve inflammatory signaling. We tested whether reports of greater SWB were associated with lower levels of pro-inflammatory and pro-metastatic leukocyte gene expression after surgery for non-metastatic breast cancer. Women (N = 50) diagnosed with non-metastatic (0-III) breast cancer were enrolled 2-8 weeks after surgery. SWB was assessed with the social/family well-being subscale of the FACT-B. Leukocyte gene expression for specific pro-inflammatory (cytokines, chemokines, and COX-2) and pro-metastatic genes (e.g., MMP9) was derived from microarray analysis. Multiple regression analyses controlling for age, stage of disease, days since surgery, education, and body mass index (BMI) found higher levels of SWB related to less leukocyte pro-inflammatory and pro-metastatic gene expression (p Emotional well-being, physical well-being, and functional well-being did not relate to leukocyte gene expression (p > 0.05). Greater SWB remained significantly associated with less leukocyte pro-inflammatory and pro-metastatic gene expression after controlling for depressive symptoms. Results have implications for understanding mechanisms linking social resources to health-relevant biological processes in breast cancer patients undergoing primary treatment. NCT01422551.

  20. Immunochip analysis identifies novel susceptibility loci in the human leukocyte antigen region for acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, I; Ricaño-Ponce, I; Pappalardo, E; Cairo, A; Gorski, M M; Casoli, G; Ferrari, B; Alberti, M; Mikovic, D; Noris, M; Wijmenga, C; Peyvandi, F

    2016-12-01

    Essentials Genetic predisposition to acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (aTTP) is mainly unknown. Genetic risk factors for aTTP were studied by Immunochip analysis and replication study. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variant rs6903608 conferred a 2.5-fold higher risk of developing aTTP. rs6903608 and HLA-DQB1*05:03 may explain most of the HLA association signal in aTTP. Click to hear Dr Cataland's presentation on acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura SUMMARY: Background Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy associated with the development of autoantibodies against the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease ADAMTS-13. Similarly to what has been found for other autoimmune disorders, there is evidence of a genetic contribution, including the association of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II complex with disease risk. Objective To identify novel genetic risk factors in acquired TTP. Patients/Methods We undertook a case-control genetic association study in 190 European-origin TTP patients and 1255 Italian healthy controls by using the Illumina Immunochip. Replication analysis in 88 Italian cases and 456 controls was performed with single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) TaqMan assays. Results and conclusion We identified one common variant (rs6903608) located within the HLA class II locus that was independently associated with acquired TTP at genome-wide significance and conferred a 2.6-fold increased risk of developing a TTP episode (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.02-3.27, P = 1.64 × 10(-14) ). We also found five non-HLA variants mapping to chromosomes 2, 6, 8 and X that were suggestively associated with the disease: rs9490550, rs115265285, rs5927472, rs7823314, and rs1334768 (nominal P-values ranging from 1.59 × 10(-5) to 7.60 × 10(-5) ). Replication analysis confirmed the association of HLA variant rs6903608 with acquired TTP (pooled P = 3.95 × 10(-19) ). Imputation of

  1. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  2. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Within the Male Reproductive System: Implications for Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2015-01-01

    In sexual reproduction in humans, a man has a clear interest in ensuring that the immune system of his female partner accepts the semi-allogenic fetus. Increasing attention has been given to soluble immunomodulatory molecules in the seminal fluid as one mechanism of ensuring this, possibly by "priming" the woman's immune system before conception and at conception. Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of the immunoregulatory and tolerance-inducible human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G in the male reproductive organs. The expression of HLA-G in the blastocyst and by extravillous trophoblast cells in the placenta during pregnancy has been well described. Highly variable amounts of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in seminal plasma from different men have been reported, and the concentration of sHLA-G is associated with HLA-G genotype. A first pilot study indicates that the level of sHLA-G in seminal plasma may even be associated with the chance of pregnancy in couples, where the male partner has reduced semen quality. More studies are needed to verify these preliminary findings.

  3. The Effect of Proteasome Inhibition on the Generation of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Peptidome*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Elena; Gutter-Kapon, Lilach; Bassani-Strenberg, Michal; Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Admon, Arie

    2013-01-01

    The Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptidome is thought to be generated mostly through proteasomal degradation of cellular proteins, a notion that is based on the alterations in presentation of selected peptides following proteasome inhibition. We evaluated the effects of proteasome inhibitors, epoxomicin and bortezomib, on human cultured cancer cells. Because the inhibitors did not reduce the level of presentation of the cell surface human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules, we followed their effects on the rates of synthesis of both HLA peptidome and proteome of the cells, using dynamic stable isotope labeling in tissue culture (dynamic-SILAC). The inhibitors reduced the rates of synthesis of most cellular proteins and HLA peptides, yet the synthesis rates of some of the proteins and HLA peptides was not decreased by the inhibitors and of some even increased. Therefore, we concluded that the inhibitors affected the production of the HLA peptidome in a complex manner, including modulation of the synthesis rates of the source proteins of the HLA peptides, in addition to their effect on their degradation. The collected data may suggest that the current reliance on proteasome inhibition may overestimate the centrality of the proteasome in the generation of the MHC peptidome. It is therefore suggested that the relative contribution of the proteasomal and nonproteasomal pathways to the production of the MHC peptidome should be revaluated in accordance with the inhibitors effects on the synthesis rates of the source proteins of the MHC peptides. PMID:23538226

  4. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor in punch biopsies from human colonic mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Nyström

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI is a wellknown protease inhibitor. Its function is thought to be protease/protease-inhibitor balance. Free proteolytic activity, mainly pancreatic elastase, anionic trypsin and granulocytic elastase, has been demonstrated in faecal extracts from patients with ulcerative colitis. We wanted to verify that SLPI is actually secreted from normal human colonic mucosa. Also, we wanted to ascertain whether studies of SLPI secretion based on punch biopsies were dependent on biopsy area or on biopsy circumference. Normal colonic mucosa was sampled during surgery for colonic cancer. A total of 36 samples from four patients were used. Mucosa preparation was carried out using a punch biopsy technique, and samples of 3, 4 and 6 mm diameter were used. All media contained SLPI at varying concentrations. When expressed in terms of the sample area, the secretion per millimetre-squared seemed to decrease with increasing area. When calculated as secretion per circumference, secretion seemed to be constant. In conclusion, SLPI was secreted from normal human colonic mucosa. The SLPI secretion seemed dependent on the circumference of the biopsy rather than on the area of the biopsy.

  5. Subcellular distribution of nitroblue tetrazolium reductase (NBT-R) in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehner, R L

    1975-11-01

    Subcellular distribution study of cytoplasmic organelles was performed on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes after homogenization in 0.34 molar sucrose by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the homogenate. The whole homogenate and each fraction was assayed for nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reductase with and without 1 mM potassium cyanide, and the distribution of this enzyme was compared to the distribution of lysozyme, peroxidase, beta-glucuronidase, and acid and alkaline phosphatase. Enzyme recovery was 97 per cent and ranged between 74 and 124 per cent. Latent activity of all enzymes except NBT-reductase, acid, and alkaline phosphatase was demonstrated by observing a four- to sixfold increase in activity after the addition of Triton-X 100. Maximal relative specific activity using either DPNH or without cyanide for NBT-reductase was found in the 100,000 x g differential centrifugation fraction and was concentrated in the less dense top fraction of the sucrose density gradient. The distribution pattern was similar to acid and alkaline phosphatase. In contrast, the maximal concentration of beta-glucuronidase and peroxidase was found in the heavier 7,200 x g granule fraction and in the more dense bottom fractions of the sucrose density gradient. Maximal lysozyme activity was concentrated in the 30,000 x g granule fraction and in the fractions located between the heaviest and lightest fractions of the sucrose density gradient. The lack of latent activity and the similarity of subcellular distribution of NBT-reductase to acid and alkaline phosphatase, two enzymes associated with microsomes and plasmalemal membranes in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), indicates that NBT-reductase is also a nonlysosomal enzyme located in microsomes or in plasmalemal membranes. These findings support the previously described histochemical observations that initial reduction of NBT to formazan occurs on the PMN plasmalemal surface membrane at

  6. Influence of human leukocyte antigen-B22 alleles on the course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in 3 cohorts of white men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorak, M. Tevfik; Tang, Jianming; Tang, Shenghui; Penman-Aguilar, Ana; Coutinho, Roel A.; Goedert, James J.; Detels, Roger; Kaslow, Richard A.

    2003-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B22 serogroup--which consists of the alleles B*54, B*55, and B*56--has been associated with rapidly progressive disease in white patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Subjects from 3 cohorts of men who have sex with men (N=671), all of whom

  7. Deciphering complement interference in anti-human leukocyte antigen antibody detection with flow beads assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Jonathan; Vigata, Margaux; Daburon, Sophie; Contin-Bordes, Cécile; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Dromer, Claire; Billes, Marc-Alain; Neau-Cransac, Martine; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Taupin, Jean-Luc

    2014-09-27

    Anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody detection in solid-phase flow beads assays can be quenched by complement activation, but the precise mechanism of this interference is not fully elucidated yet. Using the Luminex flow beads screening assay for detection of anti-HLA antibodies, we analyzed the binding of high concentrations of the pan class I anti-HLA monoclonal antibody W6/32 in neat normal, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-treated normal and complement factors C1q, C4/C3, C2, C3, factor B or C5-depleted human sera, using anti-mouse immunoglobulin G as the detection antibody. Complement activation and binding to beads were revealed using anti-human C1q, C4d, and C3d antibodies. To translate our findings to the human setting, we used the class I and class II HLA single-antigen flow beads assays and sera from four patients with high titers of antibodies. Detection of W6/32 did not suffer any interference with C1q and C4/C3-depleted sera. A partial quenching was observed with C2, C3, and factor B-depleted sera, but was more pronounced with the factor B-depleted serum. W6/32 was undetectable in presence of C5-depleted serum. The binding of activation products derived from C3 principally, and also from C4, impaired immunoglobulin G and C1q detection. Accordingly, C4d detection was hindered by deposition of activated C3. Similar findings were obtained with patients' sera. Binding of C4 and C3 activation products is the main responsible for complement interference in flow beads assays. A complete quenching requires complement activation through C3 cleavage and its amplification by the alternative pathway.

  8. Human periodontal ligament cells facilitate leukocyte recruitment and are influenced in their immunomodulatory function by Th17 cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, A; Beyer, M; Deschner, J; Allam, J P; Novak, N; Winter, J; Jepsen, S; Jäger, A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the immunomodulatory impact of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells on the nature and magnitude of the leukocyte infiltrate in periodontal inflammation, particularly with regard to Th17 cells. PDL cells were challenged with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-17A, and IFN-γ) and analyzed for the expression of cytokines involved in periodontal immunoinflammatory processes (IL-6, MIP-3 alpha, IL-23A, TGFß1, IDO, and CD274). In order to further investigate a direct involvement of PDL cells in leukocyte function, co-culture experiments were conducted. The expression of the immunomodulatory cytokines studied was significantly increased under pro-inflammatory conditions in PDL cells. Although PDL cells did not stimulate leukocyte proliferation or Th17 differentiation, these cells induced the recruitment of leukocytes. The results of our study suggest that PDL cells might be involved in chronic inflammatory mechanisms in periodontal tissues and thus in the transition to an adaptive immune response in periodontitis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CD Nomenclature 2015: Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigen Workshops as a Driving Force in Immunology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Engel, P.; Boumsell, L.; Balderas, R.; Gattei, V.; Hořejší, Václav; Jin, B.Q.; Malavasi, F.; Mortari, F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Stockinger, H.; van Zelm, M.C.; Zola, H.; Clark, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 10 (2015), s. 4555-4563 ISSN 0022-1767 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : CD nomenclature, , * leukocyte antigens * HLDA workshop Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.985, year: 2015

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Are Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Natural Susceptibility in the Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yue

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II molecule influences host antigen presentation and anti-viral immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within HLA class II gene were associated with different clinical outcomes of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Three HLA class II SNPs (rs3077, rs2395309 and rs2856718 were genotyped by TaqMan assay among Chinese population, including 350 persistent HCV infection patients, 194 spontaneous viral clearance subjects and 973 HCV-uninfected control subjects. After logistic regression analysis, the results indicated that the rs2856718 TC genotype was significantly associated with the protective effect of the HCV natural susceptibility (adjusted OR: 0.712, 95% CI: 0.554–0.914 when compared with reference TT genotype, and this remained significant after false discovery rate (FDR correction (p = 0.024. Moreover, the protective effect of rs2856718 was observed in dominant genetic models (adjusted OR: 0.726, 95% CI: 0.574–0.920, and this remained significant after FDR correction (p = 0.024. In stratified analysis, a significant decreased risk was found in rs2856718C allele in the male subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.778, 95% CI: 0.627–0.966 and hemodialysis subgroup (adjusted OR: 0.713, 95% CI: 0.552–0.921. Our results indicated that the genetic variations of rs2856718 within the HLA-DQ gene are associated with the natural susceptibility to HCV infection among the Chinese population.

  11. Association between Cryptosporidium infection and human leukocyte antigen class I and class II alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Haque, Rashidul; Duggal, Priya; Mondal, Dinesh; Larsson, Cathy; Peterson, Kristine; Akter, Jasmin; Lockhart, Lauren; Khan, Salwa; Petri, William A

    2008-02-01

    Cryptosporidium species are a common cause of diarrhea, which can be severe and protracted in young children and immunocompromised individuals. A cohort of 226 Bangladeshi children aged 2-5 years was prospectively followed for >3 years to study the role of host genetics in susceptibility to infection, as well as the community impact of cryptosporidiosis on this population. Ninety-six children (42.5%) received a diagnosis of Cryptosporidium infection. A total of 51 (22.6%) had asymptomatic infection. Fifty-eight (25.7%) had cryptosporidiosis, of whom 17 (29.3%) had recurrent disease. Children with cryptosporidiosis presented early, and most had abdominal pain and a short course of diarrhea. Infected children were more likely to carry the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DQB1*0301 allele, particularly those with both asymptomatic and symptomatic infection (P = .009); a strong association was found between carriage of the DQB1*0301/DRB1*1101 haplotype and development of both asymptomatic and symptomatic infection (P = .009). Infected children were also more likely to carry the B*15 HLA class I allele. This is the first study to describe a possible genetic component of the immune response to Cryptosporidium infection, which includes HLA class I and II alleles. Cryptosporidiosis in Bangladeshi children aged 2-5 year is common and often recurrent, but the duration is shorter and the abdominal pain greater than that described in children aged <2 years.

  12. Human leukocyte antigen-B27 alleles in Xinjiang Uygur patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, H-Y; Yu, W-Z; Wang, Z; He, J; Jiao, M

    2015-05-25

    We investigated the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang. B27-positive patients with ankylosing spondylitis were subtyped by using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing. The HLA-B27 subtype frequencies of Uygur patients were compared with those in Han patients in Xinjiang and the other areas of China. B*2705 was the predominant subtype in Uygur patients with a frequency of 58.95%, which was much higher than that in Han patients in Xinjiang (31.58%, P ankylosing spondylitis patients; B*2704 was the main (61.18%) subtype in Han patients in Xinjiang, followed by B*2705 (31.58%) and was similar to the characteristics of Han patients in the other areas of China. B*2724 in Han ankylosing spondylitis patients has not been previously reported. Additionally, the B*2702/B*2705 homozygote was identified in Uygur patients. B*2702/B*2704, B*2704/B*2705, and B*2705/B*2705 homozygotes were identified in 3 Han patients. The distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in Uygur ankylosing spondylitis patients in Xinjiang significantly differed from that in Han patients. Understanding the distribution of HLAB27 subtypes in ethnic minority populations of Xinjiang is important for anthropological genetic studies and for analyzing the impact of genetic background on ankylosing spondylitis susceptibility.

  13. Multiple sclerosis risk: interaction between human leukocyte antigen and the environment in Sardinian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, E; Sardu, C; Murru, R; Frau, J; Lorefice, L; Mamusa, E; Contu, P; Marrosu, M G

    2009-09-01

    The island of Sardinia features a high incidence of multiple sclerosis (MS) characterized by early age at onset and a progressively increasing trend. The current study was aimed at examining variations in human leukocyte antigen-risk genotypes occurring over time in a cohort of patients. Susceptible and neutral DRB1-DQB1 genotypes were identified in 1660 patients. Age at onset was established in 1436 patients divided into two cohorts, an older cohort (subjects born before 1949, N = 233) and a younger one (subjects born from 1960 to 1989, N = 850). Patients from the older cohort were randomly assigned to patients of the same sex from the younger cohort, matched for age at onset. The final sample included 170 pairs. Logistic conditional analysis was performed to determine the probability of a neutral genotype in both cohorts. Kaplan-Meier analysis was applied to ascertain the influence of predisposing and neutral genotypes in age at onset for both cohorts. The probability of carrying a neutral genotype was 1.76-fold higher in the younger than in the older cohort (P = 0.02) and 3.67-fold higher in men (P = 0.005). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed an earlier age at onset in patients of the young cohort carrying the predisposing genotype (P = 0.004). In the Sardinian population, an environment more prone and propitious to autoimmunity may contribute toward the rising incidence of MS or anticipate overt manifestation of the disease in genetically predisposed subjects.

  14. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G and Regulatory T Cells during Specific Immunotherapy for Pollen Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Johnsen, Claus R; Dalgaard, Louise Torp

    2013-01-01

    Background: TH2-biased immune responses are important in allergy pathogenesis. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) might include the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and immunoglobulin (Ig) G4 blocking antibodies, a reduction in the number of effector cells, and skewing...... of the cytokine profile towards a TH1-polarized immune response. We investigated the effects of SIT on T cells, on immunomodulation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G, which has been associated with allergy, on regulatory cytokine expression, and on serum allergen-specific antibody subclasses (IgE and IgG4...... with pollen extract in vitro and immune factors were evaluated. Results: During SIT, the main changes in the peripheral blood were an increase in CXCR3+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs and a decrease in CCR4+CD4+CD25+CD127low/- Tregs, an increase in allergen-specific IgG4, and a decrease in sHLA-G during the first...

  15. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G polymorphism and expression in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seri Jeong

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G is known to be implicated in a tumor-driven immune escape mechanism in malignancies. The purpose of this study was to investigate HLA-G polymorphism and expression in breast cancer. HLA-G alleles were determined by direct DNA sequencing procedures from blood samples of 80 breast cancer patients and 80 healthy controls. Soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from serum specimens. HLA-G expression in breast cancer lesions was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining. The presence of HLA-G 3' untranslated region (UTR 14-bp sequence was analyzed and found to be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer susceptibility based on HLA-G expression in tissues (P = 0.0407. Levels of sHLA-G were higher in the breast cancer group (median 117.2 U/mL compared to the control group (median 10.1 U/mL, P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AU-ROC values of sHLA-G for differentiating breast cancer from normal controls and for detecting metastasis from other stages of breast cancer were 0.89 and 0.79, respectively. HLA-G polymorphism and expression may be involved in breast carcinogenesis and sHLA-G concentrations could be used as a diagnostic marker for detecting breast cancer.

  16. The experience of two European preimplantation genetic diagnosis centres on human leukocyte antigen typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Hilde; De Rycke, Martine; De Man, Caroline; De Hauwere, Kim; Fiorentino, Francesco; Kahraman, Semra; Pennings, Guido; Verpoest, Willem; Devroey, Paul; Liebaers, Inge

    2009-03-01

    Two European centres report on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing of preimplantation embryos for haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation: 'UZ Brussel' in Brussels and 'Genoma' in Rome. Both centres have 6 years' experience with technical and clinical aspects of this type of genetic analysis on single blastomeres. Both centres apply a similar technique for preimplantation HLA typing using short tandem repeats linked to the HLA locus in multiplex PCR for haplotyping. At present, a conclusive HLA diagnosis could be assured in 92.8% and 90.3% of the embryos at UZ Brussel and at Genoma, respectively. The implantation rates were 32.4% and 28.2%, respectively, and the birth rates per cycle were 9.4% and 18.6%, respectively. The HLA programme at UZ Brussel and at Genoma resulted in the birth of 9 babies and 3 successful HSC transplantations, and 42 babies and 7 successful HSC transplantations, respectively, so far. Drastic embryo selection for preimplantation HLA typing (in theory 1/4 for HLA, 1/8 for HLA in combination with sexing for X-linked recessive diseases, 3/16 for HLA in combination with autosomal recessive disorders) resulted overall in the birth of 51 babies (15.9% live birth rate per started cycle) in two European centres.

  17. Antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans strains and genotoxicity assessment in human leukocyte cells of Euphorbia tirucalli L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Flávio Souza de Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last times, focus on plant research has increased all over the world. Euphorbia tirucalli L., a plant known popularly as Aveloz, and originally used in Africa, has been drawing attention for its use in the United States and Latin America, both for use as an ornamental plant and as a medicinal plant. E. tirucalli L. is a member of the family Euphorbiaceae and contains many diterpenoids and triterpenoids, in particular phorbol esters, apparently the main constituent of this plant, which are assumed to be responsible for their activities in vivo and in vitro. The in vitro antifungal activities of Euphorbia tirucalli (L. against opportunistic yeasts were studied using microbroth dilution assay. The results showed that aqueous extract and latex preparation were effective against ten clinical strains of Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro (Latex and extract MIC range of 3.2 - > 411 µg/mL. Aiming the safe use in humans, the genotoxic effects of E. tirucalli were evaluated in human leukocytes cells. Our data show that both aqueous extract and latex preparation have no genotoxic effect in human leukocytes cells in vitro. Although the results cannot be extrapolated by itself for use in vivo, they suggest a good perspective for a therapeutic application in future. In conclusion, our results show that the aqueous extract and latex preparation from E. tirucalli L. are antifungal agents effectives against several strains of C. neoformans and do not provoke DNA damage in human leukocyte cells, considering the concentrations tested.

  18. Increased Expression of Peripheral Blood Leukocyte Genes Implicate CD14+ Tissue Macrophages in Cellular Intestine Allograft Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokkumar, Chethan; Ningappa, Mylarappa; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Higgs, Brandon W.; Sun, Qing; Schmitt, Lori; Snyder, Sara; Dobberstein, Jennifer; Branca, Maria; Jaffe, Ronald; Zeevi, Adriana; Squires, Robert; Alissa, Feras; Shneider, Benjamin; Soltys, Kyle; Bond, Geoffrey; Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Humar, Abhinav; Mazariegos, George; Hakonarson, Hakon; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent rejection shortens graft survival after intestinal transplantation (ITx) in children, most of whom also experience early acute cellular rejection (rejectors). To elucidate mechanisms common to early and recurrent rejection, we used a test cohort of 20 recipients to test the hypothesis that candidate peripheral blood leukocyte genes that trigger rejection episodes would be evident late after ITx during quiescent periods in genome-wide gene expression analysis and would achieve quantitative real-time PCR replication pre-ITx (another quiescent period) and in the early post-ITx period during first rejection episodes. Eight genes were significantly up-regulated among rejectors in the late post-ITx and pre-ITx periods, compared with nonrejectors: TBX21, CCL5, GNLY, SLAMF7, TGFBR3, NKG7, SYNE1, and GK5. Only CCL5 was also up-regulated in the early post-ITx period. Among resting peripheral blood leukocyte subsets in randomly sampled nonrejectors, CD14+ monocytes expressed the CCL5 protein maximally. Compared with nonrejectors, rejectors demonstrated higher counts of both circulating CCL5+CD14+ monocytes and intragraft CD14+ monocyte-derived macrophages in immunohistochemistry of postperfusion and early post-ITx biopsies from the test and an independent replication cohort. Donor-specific alloreactivity measured with CD154+ T-cytotoxic memory cells correlated with the CCL5 gene and intragraft CD14+ monocyte-derived macrophages at graft reperfusion and early post-ITx. CCL5 gene up-regulation and CD14+ macrophages likely prime cellular ITx rejection. Infiltration of reperfused intestine allografts with CD14+ macrophages may predict rejection events. PMID:21854741

  19. Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli are protected from leukocyte phagocytosis by binding to erythrocyte complement receptor 1 in human blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brekke, O. L.; Hellerud, B. C.; Christiansen, D.

    2011-01-01

    The initial interaction of Gram-negative bacteria with erythrocytes and its implications on leukocyte phagocytosis and oxidative burst in human whole blood were examined. Alexa-labeled Escherichia coli, wild-type H44/76 N. meningitidis and the H44/76lpxA lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-deficient mutant...... and bacterial C3 opsonization. In contrast, the C5aRa efficiently reduced phagocytosis, but did not affect the binding of bacteria to erythrocytes. The anti-CR1 blocking mAb dose-dependently reduced bacterial binding to erythrocytes to nil, with subsequent increased phagocytosis and oxidative burst. LPS had......-primates and that the bacteria were mainly found in the lungs. In conclusion, complement-dependent binding of Gram-negative bacteria to erythrocyte CR1 decreases phagocytosis and oxidative burst by leukocytes in human whole blood. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. The molecular basis of leukocyte recruitment and its deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah; Moser, Markus; Sperandio, Markus

    2013-08-01

    The innate immune system responds to inflammation, infection and injury by recruiting neutrophils and other leukocytes. These cells are able to leave the intravascular compartment in a process called leukocyte recruitment. This process involves several distinct steps: selectin-mediated rolling, firm adhesion via integrins, postarrest modifications including adhesion strengthening and leukocyte crawling and finally transmigration into tissue. Genetic defects affecting the different steps of the cascade can result in severe impairment in leukocyte recruitment. So far, three leukocyte adhesion deficiencies (LAD I-III) have been described in humans. These LADs are rare autosomal recessive inherited disorders and, although clinically distinct, exhibit several common features including recurrent bacterial infections and leukocytosis. In LAD-I, mutations within the β2-integrin gene result in a severe defect in β2 integrin-mediated firm leukocyte adhesion. Defects in the posttranslational fucosylation of selectin ligands dramatically reduce leukocyte rolling and lead to LAD-II. Finally, LAD-III, also known as LAD-I variant, is caused by impaired integrin activation due to mutations within the kindlin-3 gene. This review provides an overview on the molecular basis of leukocyte adhesion and its deficiencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of reactive oxygen species by man-made vitreous fibres in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotsalainen, M; Hirvonen, M R; Luoto, K; Savolainen, K M

    1999-06-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) or erythrocytes, isolated from human blood, were exposed to graded doses of asbestos (chrysotile), quartz, or man-made vitreous fibres (MMVF), i.e. refractory ceramic fibres (RCF), glasswool, or rockwool fibres. None of the MMVF affected either the viability of PMNL, as measured by trypan blue exclusion test, or induced haemolysis, whereas the positive controls, quartz and chrysotile, dose-dependently induced haemolysis in PMNL. MMVF did not increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from the PMNL, whereas the positive controls, chrysotile and quartz, induced a marked and dose-dependent release of LDH. When PMNL were exposed to MMVF, some of the fibre types slightly increased the levels of free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) within the cells in a manner similar to that induced by chrysotile or quartz. All MMVF induced a dose-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in PMNL, with RCF-induced production of ROS being the most marked. Production of ROS by MMVF seemed to depend on the availability of extracellular calcium because it could be attenuated with a Ca2+ channel blocker, verapamil, or a Ca2+ chelating agent, EGTA. Production of ROS may be a common pathway through which PMNL respond to MMVF-induced cell activation, but alterations of levels of free intracellular Ca2+ do not seem to be an absolute prerequisite for this effect. Fibre length seemed not to be an important factor in affecting the ability of MMVF to induce ROS production in PMNL. However, the balance between different elements in the fibre seemed importantly to affect the biological activity of a fibre.

  2. Leukocyte Lysis and Cytokine Induction by the Human Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Mercer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv is an extracellular protozoan parasite that causes the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection: trichomoniasis. While acute symptoms in women may include vaginitis, infections are often asymptomatic, but can persist and are associated with medical complications including increased HIV susceptibility, infertility, pre-term labor, and higher incidence of cervical cancer. Heightened inflammation resulting from Tv infection could account for these complications. Effective cellular immune responses to Tv have not been characterized, and re-infection is common, suggesting a dysfunctional adaptive immune response. Using primary human leukocyte components, we have established an in vitro co-culture system to assess the interaction between Tv and the cells of the human immune system. We determined that in vitro, Tv is able to lyse T-cells and B-cells, showing a preference for B-cells. We also found that Tv lysis of lymphocytes was mediated by contact-dependent and soluble factors. Tv lysis of monocytes is far less efficient, and almost entirely contact-dependent. Interestingly, a common symbiont of Tv, Mycoplasma hominis, did not affect cytolytic activity of the parasite, but had a major impact on cytokine responses. M. hominis enabled more diverse inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to Tv and, of the cytokines tested, Tv strains cleared of M. hominis induced only IL-8 secretion from monocytes. The quality of the adaptive immune response to Tv is therefore likely influenced by Tv symbionts, commensals, and concomitant infections, and may be further complicated by direct parasite lysis of effector immune cells.

  3. Leukocyte Lysis and Cytokine Induction by the Human Sexually Transmitted Parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Frances; Diala, Fitz Gerald I; Chen, Yi-Pei; Molgora, Brenda M; Ng, Shek Hang; Johnson, Patricia J

    2016-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis (Tv) is an extracellular protozoan parasite that causes the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection: trichomoniasis. While acute symptoms in women may include vaginitis, infections are often asymptomatic, but can persist and are associated with medical complications including increased HIV susceptibility, infertility, pre-term labor, and higher incidence of cervical cancer. Heightened inflammation resulting from Tv infection could account for these complications. Effective cellular immune responses to Tv have not been characterized, and re-infection is common, suggesting a dysfunctional adaptive immune response. Using primary human leukocyte components, we have established an in vitro co-culture system to assess the interaction between Tv and the cells of the human immune system. We determined that in vitro, Tv is able to lyse T-cells and B-cells, showing a preference for B-cells. We also found that Tv lysis of lymphocytes was mediated by contact-dependent and soluble factors. Tv lysis of monocytes is far less efficient, and almost entirely contact-dependent. Interestingly, a common symbiont of Tv, Mycoplasma hominis, did not affect cytolytic activity of the parasite, but had a major impact on cytokine responses. M. hominis enabled more diverse inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to Tv and, of the cytokines tested, Tv strains cleared of M. hominis induced only IL-8 secretion from monocytes. The quality of the adaptive immune response to Tv is therefore likely influenced by Tv symbionts, commensals, and concomitant infections, and may be further complicated by direct parasite lysis of effector immune cells.

  4. Cd, Cu, and Mn from Uruguay River Basin in Uruguaiana, RS, Brazil, and their toxicological potential for human leukocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislaine Rezer Costa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the limnology from the Medium Uruguay River Basin in Uruguaiana, Brazil, with a focus on the concentration of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, and Mn, to assess the toxicological potential (cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for humans using as biological matrix of study human leukocyte cells. The conductivity, resistivity, and dissolved O2 levels exceeded the limits recommended by the National Environmental Council (Conselho Nacional do Meio Ambiente - CONAMA. The percentage of non-viable human leukocyte cells exposed to water samples was approximately 20% higher than that of the negative control (<3%, but similar to the positive control. The DNA damage index was high for all heavy metal concentrations assayed when compared to the negative control 12±2.96, p < 0.0001, with a range of 155.66±23.89 to 194.33±23.23, but similar to the positive control (210.62±27.48. Moreover, the leukocyte degeneration index was higher in all samples containing heavy metals than in the negative control (4%, which demonstrates to be due the presence of Cu (11.8-12.5%, Cd (13-15.6%, and Mn (15.6-22.5%. Taken together, our results show that the quality from water samples analyzed is below than recommended by CONAMA and offers risk of contamination by heavy metals for the general population.

  5. Associations among Epstein-Barr virus subtypes, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder in bone marrow transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Görzer, Irene; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; van Esser, Joost W J; Niesters, Hubert G M; Cornelissen, Jan J

    2007-01-01

    The association between Epstein-Barr virus subtype, human leukocyte antigen class I alleles, and the development of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder was examined in a group of 25 bone marrow transplant recipients. A highly statistically significant correlation was observed between

  6. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA and Immune Regulation: How Do Classical and Non-Classical HLA Alleles Modulate Immune Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole B. Crux

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic factors associated with susceptibility or resistance to viral infections are likely to involve a sophisticated array of immune response. These genetic elements may modulate other biological factors that account for significant influence on the gene expression and/or protein function in the host. Among them, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in viral pathogenesis in particular human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, is very well documented. We, recently, added a novel insight into the field by identifying the molecular mechanism associated with the protective role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B27/B57 CD8+ T cells in the context of HIV-1 infection and why these alleles act as a double-edged sword protecting against viral infections but predisposing the host to autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review will be reexamining the role of classical and non-classical HLA alleles, including class Ia (HLA-A, -B, -C, class Ib (HLA-E, -F, -G, -H, and class II (HLA-DR, -DQ, -DM, and -DP in immune regulation and viral pathogenesis (e.g., HIV and HCV. To our knowledge, this is the very first review of its kind to comprehensively analyze the role of these molecules in immune regulation associated with chronic viral infections.

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) and Immune Regulation: How Do Classical and Non-Classical HLA Alleles Modulate Immune Response to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crux, Nicole B.; Elahi, Shokrollah

    2017-01-01

    The genetic factors associated with susceptibility or resistance to viral infections are likely to involve a sophisticated array of immune response. These genetic elements may modulate other biological factors that account for significant influence on the gene expression and/or protein function in the host. Among them, the role of the major histocompatibility complex in viral pathogenesis in particular human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), is very well documented. We, recently, added a novel insight into the field by identifying the molecular mechanism associated with the protective role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27/B57 CD8+ T cells in the context of HIV-1 infection and why these alleles act as a double-edged sword protecting against viral infections but predisposing the host to autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review will be reexamining the role of classical and non-classical HLA alleles, including class Ia (HLA-A, -B, -C), class Ib (HLA-E, -F, -G, -H), and class II (HLA-DR, -DQ, -DM, and -DP) in immune regulation and viral pathogenesis (e.g., HIV and HCV). To our knowledge, this is the very first review of its kind to comprehensively analyze the role of these molecules in immune regulation associated with chronic viral infections. PMID:28769934

  8. Evaluation of the humoral immune response to human leukocyte antigens in Brazilian renal transplant candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Keiko Saito

    Full Text Available Pre-transplant sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA is a risk factor for graft failure. Studies of the immunological profile related to anti-HLA antibodies in Brazilian renal transplant candidates are few. In this study, we evaluated the humoral immune response to HLA antigens in 269 renal transplant candidates, in Paraná State, Brazil. The HLA typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide method (PCR-SSO combined with Luminex technology, using an SSO-LABType commercial kit (One Lambda, Inc., Canoga Park, CA, USA. The percentages of panel-reactive antibodies (PRA and the specificity of anti-HLA antibodies were determined using the LS1PRA and LS2PRA commercial kits (One Lambda, Inc.. The PRA-positive group consisted of 182 (67.7% patients, and the PRA-negative group of 87 (32.3% patients. The two groups differed significantly only with respect to gender. Females were the most sensitized. Among the 182 patients with PRA- positive, 62 (34.1% were positive for class I and negative for class II, 39 (21.4% were negative for class I and positive for class II, and 81 (44.5% were positive for both classes I and II. The HLA-A*02, A*24, A*01, B*44, B*35, B*15, DRB1*11, DRB1*04 and DRB1*03 allele groups were the most frequent. The specificities of anti-HLA antibodies were more frequent: A34, B57, Cw15, Cw16, DR51, DQ8 and DP14. This study documented the profile of anti-HLA antibodies in patients with chronic renal failure who were on waiting lists for an organ in Paraná, and found high sensitization to HLA antigens in the samples.

  9. Association of human leukocyte antigen DQ1 and dengue fever in a white Southern Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Polizel

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an infectious disease of viral etiology transmitted by the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti, A. albopictus, and A. scutellaris. It can develop either as a benign form or as a severe hemorrhagic form. Previous work showed an association of the hemorrhagic form with human leukocyte antigens (HLA, suggesting a role of genetic factors in disease susceptibility. Nevertheless, data on HLA association with the classical form of the disease is scarce in literature. Sixty-four patients and 667 normal individuals, living in the state of Paraná, Southern Brazil, were used as test and control group, respectively. The patients developed the disease during a virus 1 dengue outbreak either in Maringá city in 1995 (47 or in Paranavaí city in 1999 (17. The diagnostic was confirmed through serology and/or viral culture. HLA class I and II typing was performed by the classical microlynfocitotoxicity test using monoclonal antisera and fluorobeads. Qui-square statistical analysis confirmed a positive association with HLA-DQ1 (76.6% vs 57.7%; p = 0.005243; pc = 0.026215. HLA-DR1 also presented an increased frequency in the test group, not statistically significant after p correction though (32.8% vs 15.9%; p = 0.005729; pc = 0.080206. In conclusion, genetic factors may play a role on the susceptibility to the classical dengue, virus 1, in the Brazilian population. Further independent studies should be performed in the Brazilian population to confirm these preliminary data.

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Elisa Lo; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-01-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network. PMID:21969815

  11. Human leukocyte antigen E contributes to protect tumor cells from lysis by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Elisa; Tremante, Elisa; Cerboni, Cristina; Melucci, Elisa; Sibilio, Leonardo; Zingoni, Alessandra; Nicotra, Maria Rita; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2011-09-01

    The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK) cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3) of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D). Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  12. Human Leukocyte Antigen E Contributes to Protect Tumor Cells from Lysis by Natural Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Lo Monaco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassic class I human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E molecule engages the inhibitory NKG2A receptor on several cytotoxic effectors, including natural killer (NK cells. Its tissue distribution was claimed to be wider in normal than in neoplastic tissues, and surface HLA-E was undetectable in most tumor cell lines. Herein, these issues were reinvestigated taking advantage of HLA-E-specific antibodies, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical methods detecting intracellular and surface HLA-E regardless of conformation. Contrary to published evidence, HLA-E was detected in a few normal epithelia and in a large fraction (approximately 1/3 of solid tumors, including those derived from HLA-E-negative/low-normal counterparts. Remarkably, HLA-E was detected in 30 of 30 tumor cell lines representative of major lymphoid and nonlymphoid lineages, and in 11 of 11, it was surface-expressed, although in a conformation poorly reactive with commonly used antibodies. Coexpression of HLA-E and HLA class I ligand donors was not required for surface expression but was associated with NKG2A-mediated protection from lysis by the cytotoxic cell line NKL and polyclonal NK cells from healthy donors, as demonstrated by antibody-mediated relief of protection in 10% to 20% of the tested target-effector combinations. NKG2A-mediated protection of additional targets became evident on NK effector blocking with antibodies to activating receptors (DNAM-1, natural cytotoxicity receptors, and NKG2D. Thus, initial evidence that the long-elusive HLA-E molecule is enhanced by malignant transformation and is functional in tumor cells is presented here, although its importance and precise functional role remain to be addressed in the context of a general understanding of the NK ligand-receptor network.

  13. Cytomegalovirus and cancer after kidney transplantation: Role of the human leukocyte antigen system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Germaine; Chakera, Aron; Chapman, Jeremy R; Chadban, Steve C; Pilmore, Helen; Craig, Jonathan C; Lim, Wai H

    2017-02-01

    The role of cytomegalovirus (CMV) in cancer development after transplantation remains uncertain. We aimed to determine the association between donor and recipient CMV serological status and the risk of cancer development after kidney transplantation. Using data from the Australian and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant (ANZDATA) Registry, we assessed the association between CMV donor/recipient (D/R) serological status and the risk of solid organ cancers in primary adult deceased-donor kidney transplant patients between 1990 and 2012. Of 8140 recipients, a total of 895 (11%) recipients developed incident cancers during a follow-up time of 51 555 person-years. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches was an effect modifier between CMV serological status and cancer (P=.03 for interaction). In recipients who have received 0-2 HLA-ABDR mismatched kidneys, the adjusted hazard ratios for cancer incidence among those with CMV D-/R-, CMV D-/R+, and CMV D+/R- were 0.47 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.24-0.91), 1.42 (95% CI: 0.97-2.07), and 1.02 (95% CI: 0.67-1.57), respectively compared with the reference of CMV D+/R+. A similar association was not observed in those with >2 HLA-ABDR mismatches. CMV D-/R- status was associated with a reduced risk of cancer in kidney transplant recipients who have received well-matched renal allografts, suggesting a potential role of HLA matching in cancer development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The link between some alleles on human leukocyte antigen system and autism in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Gehan A; Shehab, Abeer A; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2013-02-15

    The reason behind the initiation of autoimmunity to brain in some patients with autism is not well understood. There is an association between some autoimmune disorders and specific alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system. Thus, we examined the frequency of some HLA-DRB1 alleles in 100 autistic children and 100 healthy matched-children by differential hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. The risk of association between acquisition or absence of these alleles and autism and also a history of autoimmune diseases in autistic relatives was studied. Autistic children had significantly higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*11 allele than controls (Pautism (odds ratio: 3.21 and 0.17, respectively; 95% CI: 1.65-6.31 and 0.06-0.45, respectively). HLA-DRB1*11 had a significant risk for association with a family history of autoimmunity in autistic children (odds ratio: 5.67; 95% CI: 2.07-16.3). In conclusions, the link of some HLA alleles to autism and to family history of autoimmunity indicates the possible contributing role of these alleles to autoimmunity in some autistic children. Despite a relatively small sample size, we are the first to report a probable protective association of HLA-DRB1*03 allele with autism. It warrants a replication study of a larger sample to validate the HLA-DRB1 genetic association with autism. This is important to determine whether therapeutic modulations of the immune function are legitimate avenues for novel therapy in selected cases of autism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Metformin modulates human leukocyte/endothelial cell interactions and proinflammatory cytokines in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Victor M; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Bañuls, Celia; Diaz-Morales, Noelia; Lopez-Domenech, Sandra; Escribano-López, Irene; Rios-Navarro, Cesar; Alvarez, Angeles; Gomez, Marcelino; Rocha, Milagros; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    We aim to assess the effect of metformin treatment on metabolic parameters, endothelial function and inflammatory markers in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) subjects. The study population consisted of 40 reproductive-age women with PCOS, who underwent treatment with metformin during a 12-week period, and their corresponding matched controls (n = 44). We evaluated endocrinological parameters, adhesion molecules (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and E-selectin) and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)) in serum. In addition, interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells and polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells were assessed by flow chamber microscopy. In addition, a group of type 2 diabetes patients who underwent treatment with metformin during a 12-week period was incorporated into the study. Metformin produced beneficial effects on PCOS patients by decreasing polymorphonuclear (PMN) rolling flux and adhesion. It also decreased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, IL-6 and ΤΝFα. In addition, metformin induced an improvement of endocrine and anthropometric parameters in PCOS subjects by reducing glucose, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and androstendione, and by increasing dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S). Metformin also had beneficial effects in type 2 diabetic subjects by reducing body weight, waist circumference and PMN adhesion, and by increasing PMN rolling velocity. Our results highlight the modulating effect of metformin on leukocyte/endothelium interactions. These findings may explain the potential beneficial effect of metformin in reducing the risk of vascular events in PCOS patients and in insulin resistance conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human leukocyte mobilization and morphology in nickel contact allergy using a skin chamber technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, A; Bisgaard, H; Christensen, J D

    1981-01-01

    An improved skin chamber technique has been devised and used for quantitative evaluation of the leukocyte mobilization rate (LMR). The method was applied in 10 nickel-hypersensitive patients exposed to nickel sulphate. Each patient served as his own control and for additional control purpose, 5...... healthy individuals without nickel hypersensitivity were studied. The kinetics of the mobilized leukocytes were followed over a 48-hour period. After an initial lag phase of 2-4 hours, maximum migration was observed from the 24th to the 48th hour, with a wide interindividual variability in the number...... is a valuable means for quantitative evaluation of leukocyte mobilization and morphology in skin exudates during exposure to an allergen in delayed hypersensitivity reactions....

  17. Genetic epidemiology of glioblastoma multiforme: confirmatory and new findings from analyses of human leukocyte antigen alleles and motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I genes mediate cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses and natural killer cell function. In a previous study, several HLA-B and HLA-C alleles and haplotypes were positively or negatively associated with the occurrence and prognosis of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM.As an extension of the Upper Midwest Health Study, we have performed HLA genotyping for 149 GBM patients and 149 healthy control subjects from a non-metropolitan population consisting almost exclusively of European Americans. Conditional logistic regression models did not reproduce the association of HLA-B*07 or the B*07-Cw*07 haplotype with GBM. Nonetheless, HLA-A*32, which has previously been shown to predispose GBM patients to a favorable prognosis, was negatively associated with occurrence of GBM (odds ratio=0.41, p=0.04 by univariate analysis. Other alleles (A*29, A*30, A*31 and A*33 within the A19 serology group to which A*32 belongs showed inconsistent trends. Sequencing-based HLA-A genotyping established that A*3201 was the single A*32 allele underlying the observed association. Additional evaluation of HLA-A promoter and exon 1 sequences did not detect any unexpected single nucleotide polymorphisms that could suggest differential allelic expression. Further analyses restricted to female GBM cases and controls revealed a second association with a specific HLA-B sequence motif corresponding to Bw4-80Ile (odds ratio=2.71, p=0.02.HLA-A allelic product encoded by A*3201 is likely to be functionally important to GBM. The novel, sex-specific association will require further confirmation in other representative study populations.

  18. Production of fibrogenic cytokines by interleukin-2-treated peripheral blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, E J; Brock, B; Silber, I E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the production of fibrogenic cytokines by interleukin-2 (IL-2)-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes and to examine their ability to stimulate the production of connective tissue. METHODS: Culture medium from human peripheral blood leukocytes incubated with or without IL-2...... was tested for induction of fibroblast proliferation, collagen synthesis, and expression of cytokine genes. RESULTS: Supernatants from IL-2-treated peripheral blood leukocytes induced six times more fibroblast proliferation than medium from leukocytes cultured without IL-2. The expression of type I...... procollagen and fibronectin messenger RNAs was increased in human fibroblasts in response to leukocyte supernatants. Unstimulated leukocytes expressed minimal levels of transforming growth factor-beta or platelet-derived growth factor B chain messenger RNAs, but could be greatly enhanced by IL-2 treatment...

  19. Reliability of plant root comet assay in comparison with human leukocyte comet assay for assessment environmental genotoxic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Gabriela Barreto Dos; Andrade-Vieira, Larissa Fonseca; Moraes, Isabella de Campos; César, Pedro Henrique Souza; Marcussi, Silvana; Davide, Lisete Chamma

    2017-08-01

    Comet assay is an efficient test to detect genotoxic compounds based on observation of DNA damage. The aim of this work was to compare the results obtained from the comet assay in two different type of cells extracted from the root tips from Lactuca sativa L. and human blood. For this, Spent Pot Liner (SPL), and its components (aluminum and fluoride) were applied as toxic agents. SPL is a solid waste generated in industry from the aluminum mining and processing with known toxicity. Three concentrations of all tested solutions were applied and the damages observed were compared to negative and positive controls. It was observed an increase in the frequency of DNA damage for human leukocytes and plant cells, in all treatments. On human leukocytes, SPL induced the highest percentage of damage, with an average of 87.68%. For root tips cells of L. sativa the highest percentage of damage was detected for aluminum (93.89%). Considering the arbitrary units (AU), the average of nuclei with high levels of DNA fragmentation was significant for both cells type evaluated. The tested cells demonstrated equal effectiveness for detection of the genotoxicity induced by the SPL and its chemical components, aluminum and fluoride. Further, using a unique method, the comet assay, we proved that cells from root tips of Lactuca sativa represent a reliable model to detect DNA damage induced by genotoxic pollutants is in agreement of those observed in human leukocytes as model. So far, plant cells may be suggested as important system to assess the toxicological risk of environmental agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization and differentiation of equine experimental local and early systemic inflammation by expression responses of inflammation-related genes in peripheral blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anne Mette L; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    , the aim of this study was to investigate the innate peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) immune response to local inflammation in horses, and to compare this response with the PBL immune response during the early phase of acute systemic inflammation. Expression of 22 selected inflammation-related genes...... was measured in whole blood leukocytes from 6 horses in an experimental cross-over model of lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute synovitis (3 μg LPS intraarticularly; locally inflamed [LI] horses) and endotoxemia (1 μg LPS/kg intravenously; systemically inflamed [SI] horses). Multiple clinical...

  1. Symposium: innovative techniques in human embryo viability assessment. Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G and pregnancy success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Carol M; Lampton, Paula W; Newmark, Judith A; Cohen, Jacques

    2008-10-01

    Non-invasive methods of assessing embryo quality are critical for pregnancy success following IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The addition of new non-invasive morphological and biochemical analyses may further improve pregnancy success, allowing the transfer of a single embryo, thereby reducing the risks involved in multiple births following IVF/ICSI. The presence of a protein, soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (sHLA-G), in embryo cultures has been suggested as a way to non-invasively predict embryo quality and pregnancy success, especially when used in conjunction with current embryo quality assessment methods. Detection of sHLA-G in embryo culture medium has been correlated with pregnancy success in 12 studies, but three studies were not able to detect sHLA-G. This is a review of the literature on sHLA-G detection in IVF/ICSI, and reasons are proposed for the reported discrepancies, as well as guidelines for reporting of data in future studies. Furthermore, it is suggested that the use of an HLA-G transgenic mouse model would advance understanding of the mechanism of action of sHLA-G in preimplantation embryos and its correlation to embryo health and viability. Research on a mouse model, combined with clinical studies, should enable the development of a fast and reliable method for utilizing sHLA-G detection to improve pregnancy success after IVF/ICSI.

  2. Preimplantation diagnosis: efficient tool for human leukocyte antigen matched bone marrow transplantation for thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anver Kuliev

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia is among the most frequent indications for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD to allow at risk couples reproducing without fear of having an affected child. In addition, those already having the affected child, have also the option to produce an unaffected offspring that may be also a complete human leukocyte antigen (HLA match to affected child to ensure successful bone marrow transplantation. We present here the results of retrospective analysis of 293 PGD cycles for thalassemia, including 144cases of simultaneous HLA typing, resulting in birth of 70 thalassemia-free children and 12 unaffected HLA matched ones, providing their cord blood and/or bone marrow for transplantation treatment of their affected siblings. The present overall experience includes successful cord blood or bone marrow transplantation in more than three dozens of cases with HLA matched stem cells obtained from children born after PGD, demonstrating that PGD is an efficient approach for improving success of bone marrow transplantation treatment for thalassemia.   植入前遗传学诊断(PGD)是地中海贫血(地贫)最常用的疗法,该病患者夫妇无须担心孕儿受到感染。此外,如果已经怀上受到感染的宝宝,他们也可有选择性再生育一个未受感染的后代,提供完全匹配的HLA,来确保骨髓成功移植。本文将提供293个地贫病例的PGD周期诊断结果,包括144例HLA同时配型,有70例宝宝无地贫出生和12例未受感染的HLA配型宝宝出生。将这些健康宝宝的脐带血和/或骨髓取出以完成对他们同胞的移植手术,通过使用经诊断后的,出生宝宝身上取出的HLA配型干细胞,成功完成36例宝宝的脐带或骨髓移植手术。结果表明PGD能有效提高地贫患儿骨髓移植手术的成功率。

  3. Association of human leukocyte antigen donor-recipient matching and pediatric heart transplant graft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Ryan J; Scheurer, Mark A; Atz, Andrew M; Moussa, Omar; Burnette, Ali L; Hulsey, Thomas C; Savage, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    The effect of donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching on outcomes remains relatively unexplored in pediatric patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of donor-recipient HLA matching on graft survival in pediatric heart transplantation. The UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing) database was queried for heart transplants occurring between October 31, 1987, and December 31, 2012, in a recipient aged ≤17 years with ≥1 postoperative follow-up visit. Retransplants were excluded. Transplants were divided into 3 donor-recipient matching groups: no HLA matches (HLA-no), 1 or 2 HLA matches (HLA-low), and 3 to 6 HLA matches (HLA-high). Primary outcome was graft loss. Four thousand four hundred seventy-one heart transplants met the study inclusion criteria. High degree of donor-recipient HLA matching occurred infrequently: HLA-high (n=269; 6%) versus HLA-low (n=2683; 60%) versus HLA-no (n=1495; 34%). There were no differences between HLA matching groups in the frequency of coronary vasculopathy (P=0.19) or rejection in the first post-transplant year (P=0.76). Improved graft survival was associated with a greater degree of HLA donor-recipient matching: HLA-high median survival, 17.1 (95% confidence interval, 14.0-20.2) years; HLA-low median survival, 14.2 (13.1-15.4) years; and HLA-no median survival, 12.1 (10.9-13.3 years) years; P<0.01, log-rank test. In Cox-regression analysis, HLA matching was independently associated with decreased graft loss: HLA-low versus HLA-no hazard ratio, 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-0.99), P=0.04; HLA-high versus HLA-no, 0.62 (95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.90), P<0.01. Decreased graft loss in pediatric heart transplantation was associated with a higher degree of donor-recipient HLA matching, although a difference in the frequency of early rejection or development of coronary artery vasculopathy was not seen. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Differing leukocyte gene expression profiles associated with fatigue in patients with prostate cancer versus chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Kathleen C; Agarwal, Neeraj; Iacob, Eli; White, Andrea T; Kinney, Anita Y; VanHaitsma, Timothy A; Aizad, Hannah; Hughen, Ronald W; Bateman, Lucinda; Light, Alan R

    2013-12-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) often worsens fatigue in patients with prostate cancer, producing symptoms similar to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Comparing expression (mRNA) of many fatigue-related genes in patients with ADT-treated prostate cancer versus with CFS versus healthy controls, and correlating mRNA with fatigue severity may clarify the differing pathways underlying fatigue in these conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on leukocytes from 30 fatigued, ADT-treated prostate cancer patients (PCF), 39 patients with CFS and 22 controls aged 40-79, together with ratings of fatigue and pain severity. 46 genes from these pathways were included: (1) adrenergic/monoamine/neuropeptides, (2) immune, (3) metabolite-detecting, (4) mitochondrial/energy, (5) transcription factors. PCF patients showed higher expression than controls or CFS of 2 immune transcription genes (NR3C1 and TLR4), chemokine CXCR4, and mitochondrial gene SOD2. They showed lower expression of 2 vasodilation-related genes (ADRB2 and VIPR2), 2 cytokines (TNF and LTA), and 2 metabolite-detecting receptors (ASIC3 and P2RX7). CFS patients showed higher P2RX7 and lower HSPA2 versus controls and PCF. Correlations with fatigue severity were similar in PCF and CFS for only DBI, the GABA-A receptor modulator (r=-0.50, pfatigue and pain severity (r=+0.43 and +0.59, p=0.025 and p=0.001). PCF patients differed from controls and CFS in mean expression of 10 genes from all 5 pathways. Correlations with fatigue severity implicated DBI for both patient groups and P2RY1 for PCF only. These pathways may provide new targets for interventions to reduce fatigue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The human leukocyte antigen G promotes trophoblast fusion and β-hCG production through the Erk1/2 pathway in human choriocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-meng; Zhao, Hong-xi; Wang, Li; Gao, Zhi-ying; Yao, Yuan-qing

    2013-05-10

    The human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is expressed on the fetal-maternal interface and plays a role in protecting fetal-derived trophoblasts from the maternal immune response, allowing trophoblasts to invade the uterus. However, HLA-G also possesses immune suppressing-independent functions. We found that HLA-G expressing BeWo choriocarcinoma cells increased cell-cell fusion compared to control BeWo cells under forskolin treatment. Regardless of forskolin treatment, the expression of fusogenic gene mRNAs, including syncytin-1, the transcription factor glial cell missing 1 (Gcm1), and beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) were elevated. HLA-G up-regulates β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cells because HLA-G knockdown in JEG-3 cells induces a dramatic decrease in β-hCG compared with control cells. The defect in β-hCG production in HLA-G knocked-down cells could not be completely overcome by stimulating hCG production through increasing intracellular cAMP levels. HLA-G expressing cells have increased phosphorylation levels for extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) in BeWo cells. The Erk1/2 pathway is inactivated after the inhibition of HLA-G expression in JEG-3 cells. Finally, Erk1/2 inhibition was able to suppress the increased hCG production induced by HLA-G expression. Together, these data suggest novel roles for HLA-G in regulating β-hCG production via the modulation of the Erk1/2 pathway and by inducing trophoblast cell fusion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The anti-inflammatory pharmacology of Pycnogenol in humans involves COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNA expression in leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canali, Raffaella; Comitato, Raffaella; Schonlau, Frank; Virgili, Fabio

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the effects of Pycnogenol supplementation on the arachidonic acid pathway in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in response to an inflammatory stimulus. Pycnogenol is a standardised extract of French maritime pine bark consisting of procyanidins and polyphenolic monomers. Healthy volunteers aged 35 to 50 years were supplemented with 150 mg Pycnogenol a day for five days. Before and after the final day of supplementation, blood was drawn and PMNL were isolated. PMNL were primed with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and stimulated with the receptor-mediated agonist formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) to activate the arachidonic acid pathway and the biosynthesis of leukotrienes, thromboxane and prostaglandins. Pycnogenol supplementation inhibited 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity. This effect was associated with a compensatory up-regulation of COX-1 gene expression. Interestingly, Pycnogenol suspended the interdependency between 5-LOX and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) expression. Pycnogenol supplementation reduced leukotriene production but did not leave prostaglandins unaltered, which we attribute to a decline of COX-2 activity in favour of COX-1. Here we show for the first time that Pycnogenol supplementation simultaneously inhibits COX-2 and 5-LOX gene expression and reduces leukotriene biosynthesis in human PMNL upon pro-inflammatory stimulation ex vivo.

  7. Kinetics of the accumulation of aluminum(III)-sulfophthalocyanine by human leukocytes measured with a scanning flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribunov, I. G.; Tarasov, Pit A.; Semianov, K. A.; Maltsev, Valerii P.; Chernyshev, A. V.; Chernych, E. R.; Tichonova, M. V.; Nikonov, C. D.

    2000-11-01

    The kinetics of aluminum (III)-sulfophthalocyanine uptake by human leukocytes was measured with a scanning flow cytometer (SFC) during the initial period of accumulation, 40 min. The individual cells were distinguished by SFC from their light scattering traces. The dye fluorescence in the cells was excited by N2 pulse laser, and the kinetics of the cell distribution on the amount of the accumulated dye was obtained. A mathematical model of endocytosis was applied in order to describe the dynamics of cell distribution in the system during the cellular uptake. The main kinetic parameters of the dye accumulation were evaluated.

  8. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Simon, Christian; Kudahl, Ulrich J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often...... the number of potential vaccine targets compared to the number of targets discovered using the traditional approach where low-frequency peptides are excluded. Conclusions: We developed a webserver with an intuitive visualization scheme for summarizing the T cell-based antigenic potential of any given protein...

  9. The random co-polymer glatiramer acetate rapidly kills primary human leukocytes through sialic-acid-dependent cell membrane damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stig Hill; Zhang, Xianwei; Juul-Madsen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    in innate immunity. It shares the positive charge and amphipathic character of GA, and, as shown here, also the ability to kill human leukocyte. The cytotoxicity of both compounds depends on sialic acid in the cell membrane. The killing was associated with the generation of CD45 + debris, derived from cell...... membrane deformation. Nanoparticle tracking analysis confirmed the formation of such debris, even at low GA concentrations. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing measurements also recorded stable alterations in T lymphocytes following such treatment. LL-37 forms oligomers through weak hydrophobic...

  10. Soluble Human Leukocyte Antigen-G5 Activates Extracellular Signal-Regulated Protein Kinase Signaling and Stimulates Trophoblast Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    YiFan Guo; Cheuk-Lun Lee; Kam-Hei So; Jing Gao; Yeung, William S. B.; YuanQing Yao; Kai-Fai Lee

    2013-01-01

    Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class Ib HLA molecule that is secreted from blastocysts. Soluble HLA-G modulates the immune tolerance of the mother and can be used as a prognostic factor for the clinical pregnancy rate. However, the underlying mechanism of how soluble HLA-G5 affects pregnancy remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that soluble HLA-G5 promotes successful implantation and pregnancy by modulating trophoblast invasion through receptor binding and ac...

  11. TRA-418, a thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist and prostacyclin receptor agonist, inhibits platelet-leukocyte interaction in human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Mitsuko; Ohno, Michihiro; Yamada, Naohiro; Ohtake, Atsushi; Matsushita, Teruo

    2010-10-01

    TRA-418, a compound with both thromboxane A2 receptor (TP receptor) antagonistic and prostacyclin receptor (IP receptor) agonistic activities, was synthesised in our laboratory as a new antithrombotic agent. In this study, we examined the effects of TRA-418 on platelet-leukocyte interactions in human whole blood. Platelet-leukocyte interactions were induced by U-46619 in the presence of epinephrine (U-46619 + epinephrine) or with thrombin receptor agonist peptide 1-6 (TRAP). Platelet-leukocyte interactions were assessed by flow cytometry, with examination of both platelet-neutrophil and platelet-monocyte complexes. In a control experiment, the TP receptor antagonist SQ-29548 significantly inhibited the induction of platelet-leukocyte complexes by the combination of U-46619 and epinephrine, but not TRAP-induced formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes. Conversely, the IP receptor agonist beraprost sodium inhibited platelet-leukocyte complex formation induced by both methods, although the IC50 values of beraprost sodium for U-46619 + epinephrine were at least 10-fold greater than for TRAP. Under such conditions, TRA-418 inhibited both U-46619 + epinephrine-induced and TRAP-induced platelet-leukocyte complex formation in a concentration-dependent manner, in a similar range. These results suggest that TRA-418 exerts its inhibitory effects on platelet-leukocyte interactions by acting as a TP receptor antagonist as well as an IP receptor agonist in an additive or synergistic manner. These inhibitory effects of TRA-418 on formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes suggest the compound is beneficial effects as an antithrombotic agent.

  12. Study of the structure and impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G-A, HLA-G-B, and HLA-G-DRB1 haplotypes in families with recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid M; Steffensen, Rudi; Nielsen, Henriette S

    2010-01-01

    A 14-base pair (bp) long insertion (ins)/deletion (del) polymorphism in exon 8 in the 3'-untranslated region of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene is suggested to affect transcription of the gene. Carriage of the G14bp ins is associated with low levels of soluble HLA-G and increases the risk...... increased in probands with RM (p = 0.05). The increased compatibility between probands and their mothers for maternal G14 ins positive haplotypes suggests that maternal-fetal compatibility for chromosomal segments adjacent to HLA-G locus is a risk factor for female offspring to experience RM in their later...... reproductive life....

  13. Towards a computational model of leukocyte adhesion cascade: Leukocyte rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khismatullin, Damir

    2005-11-01

    Recruitment of leukocytes into sites of acute and chronic inflammation is a vital component of the innate immune response in humans and plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. Leukocytes extravasate into the inflamed tissue through a multi-step process called "leukocyte adhesion cascade", which involves initial contact of a leukocyte with activated endothelium (tethering), leukocyte rolling, firm adhesion, and transendothelial migration. Recently we developed a fully three-dimensional CFD model of receptor-mediated leukocyte adhesion to endothelium in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The model treats the leukocyte as a viscoelastic cell with the nucleus located in the intracellular space and cylindrical microvilli distributed over the cell membrane. Leukocyte-endothelial adhesion is assumed to be mediated by adhesion molecules expressed on the tips of cell microvilli and on endothelium. We show that the model can predict both shape changes and velocities of rolling leukocytes under physiological flow conditions. Results of this study also indicate that viscosity of the cytoplasm is a critical parameter of leukocyte adhesion, affecting the cell's ability to roll on endothelium. This work is supported by NIH Grant HL- 57446 and NCSA Grant BCS040006 and utilized the NCSA IBM p690.

  14. The human leukocyte antigen G promotes trophoblast fusion and β-hCG production through the Erk1/2 pathway in human choriocarcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ji-meng [School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Biology, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zhao, Hong-xi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038 (China); Wang, Li [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China); Gao, Zhi-ying, E-mail: gaozy301@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China); Yao, Yuan-qing, E-mail: yqyao@126.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •HLA-G expression promotes BeWo cells fusion and fusogenic gene expression. •HLA-G is capable of inducing β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cell lines. •Up-regulation of β-hCG production by HLA-G is mediated via the Erk1/2 pathway. -- Abstract: The human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) is expressed on the fetal–maternal interface and plays a role in protecting fetal-derived trophoblasts from the maternal immune response, allowing trophoblasts to invade the uterus. However, HLA-G also possesses immune suppressing-independent functions. We found that HLA-G expressing BeWo choriocarcinoma cells increased cell–cell fusion compared to control BeWo cells under forskolin treatment. Regardless of forskolin treatment, the expression of fusogenic gene mRNAs, including syncytin-1, the transcription factor glial cell missing 1 (Gcm1), and beta human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) were elevated. HLA-G up-regulates β-hCG production in human choriocarcinoma cells because HLA-G knockdown in JEG-3 cells induces a dramatic decrease in β-hCG compared with control cells. The defect in β-hCG production in HLA-G knocked-down cells could not be completely overcome by stimulating hCG production through increasing intracellular cAMP levels. HLA-G expressing cells have increased phosphorylation levels for extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) in BeWo cells. The Erk1/2 pathway is inactivated after the inhibition of HLA-G expression in JEG-3 cells. Finally, Erk1/2 inhibition was able to suppress the increased hCG production induced by HLA-G expression. Together, these data suggest novel roles for HLA-G in regulating β-hCG production via the modulation of the Erk1/2 pathway and by inducing trophoblast cell fusion.

  15. The modulating effect of royal jelly consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Rafat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to assess the radioprotective effect of royal jelly (RJ against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study, peripheral blood samples were obtained on days 0, 4, 7, and 14 of the study from six healthy male volunteers taking a 1000 mg RJ capsule orally per day for 14 consecutive days. On each sampling day, all collected whole blood samples were divided into control and irradiated groups which were then exposed to the selected dose of 4 Gy X-ray. Percentage of apoptotic cells (Ap % was evaluated for all samples immediately after irradiation (Ap0 and also after a 24 h postirradiation incubation at 37°C in 5% CO2 (Ap24 by the use of neutral comet assay. Concerning Ap0, collected data demonstrated that the percentage of apoptotic cells in both control and irradiated groups did not significantly change during the study period. However, with respect to Ap24, the percentage of apoptotic cells in irradiated groups gradually reduced during the experiment, according to which a significant decrease was found after 14 days RJ consumption (P = 0.002. In conclusion, the present study revealed the protective role of 14 days RJ consumption against radiation-induced apoptosis in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

  16. Human-leukocyte antigen typing in Javanese patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diah Savitri Ernawati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS is a common oral disorder that despite extensive researches, the etiology of this phenomenon is still unknown. Because this phenomenon has been observed more often in families than in individual cases, genetic influence has been investigated in most researches. Purpose: The aim of study was to evaluate the association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA and RAS in Javanese more precisely. Method: The analysis of HLA-A, and HLA-B in 85 Javanese RAS patients and 71 healthy control subjects, were performed by using the standard NIH microlymhocytotoxicity technique. Immunohistochemistry was performed for identification of HLA-DR and HLA- DQ antigen using monoclonal antibodies anti HLA-DR and DQ. Result: Our result revealed a close association between HLA-A9 and HLA-B35 RAS subject. A significant increase in the frequency of some antigens such as HLA-A9 (72,94%, p < 0,05;RR = 2,21, HLA-A24 (65,82%; RR = 1,24 and HLA-B35 in subjects with RAS was observed. Analysis with Immunohistochemistry HLA-DR, HLA-DQ is expressed on the surface of epithelial cells membrane of oral mucosa and macrophages in both major and minor RAS patients. Conclusion: HLA antigens are involved in susceptibility to RAS and the phenotypes were difference with other previous studies. HLA- linked genetic factors may play a role in the development of RAS.Latar belakang: Stomatitis aftosa rekuren (SAR merupakan salah satu gangguan di rongga mulut yang paling sering terjadi. Fenomenapenyakit ini masih belum jelas dan masih membutuhkanpenelitian yang lebih lanjut. Faktor keturunan lebih sering daripada kasus individual. Pengaruh faktor genetik telah diteliti oleh beberapapeneliti. Tujuan: Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui adanya kaitan HLA dengan SARpada suku jawa secara lebih tepat. Metode: Analisis HLA-A, HLA-Bpada 85penderita RAS dan 71 penderita kontrol yang berasal dari suku Jawa dihitung dengan menggunakan teknik NIH Micro

  17. Effect of human leukocyte antigen-C and -DQ matching on pediatric heart transplant graft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Ryan J; Savage, Andrew J; Nietert, Paul J; Kavarana, Minoo; Moussa, Omar; Burnette, Ali L; Atz, Andrew M

    2014-12-01

    A higher degree of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching at the A, B, and DR loci has been associated with improved long-term survival after pediatric heart transplantation in multiple International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation registry reports. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of HLA matching at the C and DQ loci with pediatric graft survival. The United Network of Organ Sharing database was queried for isolated heart transplants that occurred from 1988 to 2012 with a recipient age of 17 or younger and at least 1 postoperative follow-up encounter. When HLA matching at the C or DQ loci were analyzed, only transplants with complete typing of donor and recipient at the respective loci were included. Transplants were divided into patients with at least 1 match at the C locus (C-match) vs no match (C-no), and at least 1 match at the DQ (DQ-match) locus vs no match (DQ-no). Primary outcome was graft loss. Univariate analysis was performed with the log-rank test. Cox regression analysis was performed with the following patient factors included in the model: recipient age, ischemic time; recipient on ventilator, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, ventricular assist device, or inotropes at transplant; recipient serum bilirubin and creatinine closest to transplant, ratio of donor weight to recipient weight, underlying cardiac diagnosis, crossmatch results, transplant year, and HLA matching at the A, B, and DR loci. Complete typing at the C locus occurred in 2,429 of 4,731 transplants (51%), and complete typing at the DQ locus occurred in 3,498 of 4,731 transplants (74%). Patient factors were similar in C-match and C-no, except for year of transplant (median year, 2007 [interquartile range, 1997-2010] vs year 2005 [interquartile range, 1996-2009], respectively; p = 0.03) and the degree of HLA matching at the A, B, and DR loci (high level of HLA matching in 11.9% vs 3%, respectively; p survival: 13.1 years [95% confidence interval {CI

  18. Contribution of Human Lung Parenchyma and Leukocyte Influx to Oxidative Stress and Immune System-Mediated Pathology following Nipah Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaffre, Olivier; Saito, Tais B; Juelich, Terry L; Ikegami, Tetsuro; Smith, Jennifer K; Perez, David D; Atkins, Colm; Levine, Corri B; Huante, Matthew B; Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Endsley, Janice J; Freiberg, Alexander N; Rockx, Barry

    2017-08-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic emerging paramyxovirus that can cause fatal respiratory illness or encephalitis in humans. Despite many efforts, the molecular mechanisms of NiV-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remain unclear. We previously showed that NiV replicates to high titers in human lung grafts in NOD-SCID/γ mice, resulting in a robust inflammatory response. Interestingly, these mice can undergo human immune system reconstitution by the bone marrow, liver, and thymus (BLT) reconstitution method, in addition to lung tissue engraftment, giving altogether a realistic model to study human respiratory viral infections. Here, we characterized NiV Bangladesh strain (NiV-B) infection of human lung grafts from human immune system-reconstituted mice in order to identify the overall effect of immune cells on NiV pathogenesis of the lung. We show that NiV-B replicated to high titers in human lung grafts and caused similar cytopathic effects irrespective of the presence of human leukocytes in mice. However, the human immune system interfered with virus spread across lung grafts, responded to infection by leukocyte migration to small airways and alveoli of the lung grafts, and accelerated oxidative stress in lung grafts. In addition, the presence of human leukocytes increased the expression of cytokines and chemokines that regulate inflammatory influx to sites of infection and tissue damage. These results advance our understanding of how the immune system limits NiV dissemination and contributes to ALI and inform efforts to identify therapeutic targets. IMPORTANCE Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging paramyxovirus that can cause a lethal respiratory and neurological disease in humans. Only limited data are available on NiV pathogenesis in the human lung, and the relative contribution of the innate immune response and NiV to acute lung injury (ALI) is still unknown. Using human lung grafts in a human immune system-reconstituted mouse model, we showed that the NiV Bangladesh

  19. Bacteria-induced histamine release from human bronchoalveolar cells and blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clementsen, P; Milman, N; Struve-Christensen, E

    1991-01-01

    Histamine release induced by Staphylococcus aureus was examined in cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in non-atopic individuals. Approximately half of the individuals responded with mediator release to the bacterium, and the release was found to be time- and concentration dependent. N......23187 resulted in histamine release. S. aureus-induced histamine release from basophils was examined in leukocyte suspensions obtained from the same individuals, and in all experiments release was found. The dose-response curves were similar to those obtained with BAL cells. The bacteria...

  20. Thrombin receptor PAR-1 activation on endothelial progenitor cells enhances chemotaxis-associated genes expression and leukocyte recruitment by a COX-2-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Audigier, Clément; Cochain, Clément; Rossi, Elisa; Guérin, Coralie L; Bièche, Ivan; Blandinières, Adeline; Marsac, Bérengère; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Gaussem, Pascale; Smadja, David M

    2015-07-01

    Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) represent a subpopulation of endothelial progenitor cells involved in endothelial repair. The activation of procoagulant mechanisms associated with the vascular wall's inflammatory responses to injury plays a crucial role in the induction and progression of atherosclerosis. However, little is known about ECFC proinflammatory potential. To explore the role of the thrombin receptor PAR-1 proinflammatory effects on ECFC chemotaxis/recruitment capacity. The expression of 30 genes known to be associated with inflammation and chemotaxis was quantified in ECFC by real-time qPCR. PAR-1 activation with the SFLLRN peptide (PAR-1-ap) resulted in a significant increase in nine chemotaxis-associated genes expression, including CCL2 and CCL3 whose receptors are present on ECFC. Furthermore, COX-2 expression was found to be dramatically up-regulated consequently to PAR-1 activation. COX-2 silencing with the specific COX-2-siRNA also triggered down-regulation of the nine target genes. Conditioned media (c.m.) from control-siRNA- and COX-2-siRNA-transfected ECFC, stimulated or not with PAR-1-ap, were produced and tested on ECFC capacity to recruit leukocytes in vitro as well in the muscle of ischemic hindlimb in a preclinical model. The capacity of the c.m. from ECFC stimulated with PAR-1-ap to recruit leukocytes was abrogated when COX-2 gene expression was silenced in vitro (in terms of U937 cells migration and adhesion to endothelial cells) as well as in vivo. Finally, the postnatal vasculogenic stem cell derived from infantile hemangioma tumor (HemSC) incubated with PAR-1-ap increased leukocyte recruitment in Matrigel(®) implant. PAR-1 activation in ECFC increases chemotactic gene expression and leukocyte recruitment at ischemic sites through a COX-2-dependent mechanism.

  1. Alcohol Consumption Modulates Host Defense in Rhesus Macaques by Altering Gene Expression in Circulating Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Tasha; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that chronic alcohol use disorder leads to increased susceptibility to several viral and bacterial infections, whereas moderate alcohol consumption decreases the incidence of colds and improves immune responses to some pathogens. In line with these observations, we recently showed that heavy ethanol intake (average blood ethanol concentrations > 80 mg/dl) suppressed, whereas moderate alcohol consumption (blood ethanol concentrations consumption. To uncover the molecular basis for impaired immunity with heavy alcohol consumption and enhanced immune response with moderate alcohol consumption, we performed a transcriptome analysis using PBMCs isolated on day 7 post-modified vaccinia Ankara vaccination, the earliest time point at which we detected differences in T cell and Ab responses. Overall, chronic heavy alcohol consumption reduced the expression of immune genes involved in response to infection and wound healing and increased the expression of genes associated with the development of lung inflammatory disease and cancer. In contrast, chronic moderate alcohol consumption upregulated the expression of genes involved in immune response and reduced the expression of genes involved in cancer. To uncover mechanisms underlying the alterations in PBMC transcriptomes, we profiled the expression of microRNAs within the same samples. Chronic heavy ethanol consumption altered the levels of several microRNAs involved in cancer and immunity and known to regulate the expression of mRNAs differentially expressed in our data set. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Human recombinant antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 3 cloned from peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals with immunity to malaria demonstrate antiparasitic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundquist, Rasmus; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed; Jafarshad, Ali

    2006-01-01

    against MSP-3 residues 194 to 257 (MSP-3(194-257)) on the molecular level. mRNA from peripheral blood leukocytes from clinically immune individuals was used as a source of Fab (fragment antibody) genes. A Fab-phage display library was made, and three distinct antibodies designated RAM1, RAM2, and RAM3...

  3. Fasting during the suckling-weaning transient period of rats induces inflammatory gene expression in the adipose tissue and peripheral leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kazue; Mawatari, Riko; Iikeda, Misa; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency during developmental stages could be associated with subsequent development of inflammation-related metabolic abnormalities. In this study, we examined the effects of a 3-d fast during the suckling-weaning transient period of rats, and subsequent intake of high-fat-high-sucrose (HF) and low-fat-high-starch (LF) diets in adulthood, on the expression of inflammatory genes in adipose tissue and peripheral leukocytes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were deprived of food for 3 d during the suckling-weaning transient period, and were subsequently fed an HF or LF diet for 14 wk from 17 wk of age. Serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) concentration and mRNA levels of inflammatory genes in mesenteric adipose tissues were assessed at 31 wk of age. The mRNA levels of inflammatory genes at 0 h and 2 h after oral glucose load at 30 wk of age in peripheral leukocytes were measured. Fasting induced circulating MCP-1 protein in rats fed an LF diet but not an HF diet. The HF diet induced high mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and S100 proteins in peripheral leukocytes at 2 h after glucose load in fasted rats when compared with controls. Expression of CD11c, an activated macrophage marker, was induced in the fasted group given an HF diet during adulthood. Fasting rats during the suckling-weaning transient period and an HF diet intake during adulthood enhance inflammation by promoting the expression of inflammatory genes in adipose tissue and peripheral leukocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  5. Cocoa Consumption Alters the Global DNA Methylation of Peripheral Leukocytes in Humans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Crescenti

    Full Text Available DNA methylation regulates gene expression and can be modified by different bioactive compounds in foods, such as polyphenols. Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols, but its role in DNA methylation is still unknown. The objective was to assess the effect of cocoa consumption on DNA methylation and to determine whether the enzymes involved in the DNA methylation process participate in the mechanisms by which cocoa exerts these effects in humans. The global DNA methylation levels in the peripheral blood were evaluated in 214 volunteers who were pre-hypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive or hypercholesterolemic. The volunteers were divided into two groups: 110 subjects who consumed cocoa (6 g/d for two weeks and 104 control subjects. In addition, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from six subjects were treated with a cocoa extract to analyze the mRNA levels of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR, and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR genes. Cocoa consumption significantly reduced the DNA methylation levels (2.991±0.366 vs. 3.909±0.380, p<0.001. Additionally, we found an association between the cocoa effects on DNA methylation and three polymorphisms located in the MTHFR, MTRR, and DNMT3B genes. Furthermore, in PBMCs, the cocoa extract significantly lowered the mRNA levels of the DNMTs, MTHFR, and MTRR. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the consumption of cocoa decreases the global DNA methylation of peripheral leukocytes in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. In vitro experiments with PBMCs suggest that cocoa may exert this effect partially via the down-regulation of DNMTs, MTHFR and MTRR, which are key genes involved in this epigenetic process.Clinicaltrials.govNCT00511420 and NCT00502047.

  6. Gene losses during human origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Wang

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudogenization is a widespread phenomenon in genome evolution, and it has been proposed to serve as an engine of evolutionary change, especially during human origins (the "less-is-more" hypothesis. However, there has been no comprehensive analysis of human-specific pseudogenes. Furthermore, it is unclear whether pseudogenization itself can be selectively favored and thus play an active role in human evolution. Here we conduct a comparative genomic analysis and a literature survey to identify 80 nonprocessed pseudogenes that were inactivated in the human lineage after its separation from the chimpanzee lineage. Many functions are involved among these genes, with chemoreception and immune response being outstandingly overrepresented, suggesting potential species-specific features in these aspects of human physiology. To explore the possibility of adaptive pseudogenization, we focus on CASPASE12, a cysteinyl aspartate proteinase participating in inflammatory and innate immune response to endotoxins. We provide population genetic evidence that the nearly complete fixation of a null allele at CASPASE12 has been driven by positive selection, probably because the null allele confers protection from severe sepsis. We estimate that the selective advantage of the null allele is about 0.9% and the pseudogenization started shortly before the out-of-Africa migration of modern humans. Interestingly, two other genes related to sepsis were also pseudogenized in humans, possibly by selection. These adaptive gene losses might have occurred because of changes in our environment or genetic background that altered the threat from or response to sepsis. The identification and analysis of human-specific pseudogenes open the door for understanding the roles of gene losses in human origins, and the demonstration that gene loss itself can be adaptive supports and extends the "less-is-more" hypothesis.

  7. Maneb and paraquat-induced modulation of toxicant responsive genes in the rat liver: comparison with polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Israr; Shukla, Smriti; Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Pandey, Haushila Prasad; Singh, Chetna

    2010-12-05

    Experimental studies have shown that toxicant responsive genes, cytochrome P450s (CYPs) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a critical role in pesticide-induced toxicity. CYPs play pro-oxidant role and GSTs offer protection in maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ)-induced brain and lung toxicities. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated exposures of MB and/or PQ on lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione content (GSH) and toxicant responsive genes, i.e., CYP1A1, 1A2, 2E1, GSTA4-4, GSTA1-1 and GSTA3-3 in the liver and to correlate the same with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A significant augmentation in LPO and reduction in GSH content was observed in a time of exposure dependent manner in the liver and PMNs of MB and/or PQ treated animals. The expression and catalytic activity of CYP2E1 and GSTA4-4 were significantly increased following MB and/or PQ exposure both in the liver and PMNs. Although the expression of GSTA3-3 was increased, the expression of GSTA1-1 was unaltered after MB and/or PQ treatment in both the liver and PMNs. MB augmented the expression and catalytic activity of CYP1A1 in the liver, however, CYP1A2 was unaffected. PQ, on the other hand, significantly increased hepatic CYP1A2 expression and catalytic activity. MB and/or PQ did not produce any significant changes in CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 in PMNs. The results of the study thus demonstrate that MB and PQ differentially regulate hepatic CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 while LPO, GSH, CYP2E1, GSTA4-4 and GSTA3-3 are modulated in the similar fashions both in the liver and PMNs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of opiates and demographic factors on DNA repair synthesis in human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, J J; Falek, A; Shafer, D A; Glick, J H

    1979-11-01

    DNA repair synthesis in leukocytes stressed by far UV irradiation was studied in 90 normal individuals, 38 street-heroin addicts, and 18 methadone maintenance patients. Age, sex, coffee use, and alcohol use had no significant effect on the maximal repair synthesis response of the control subjects, but smoking tobacco significantly decreased the mean response and variance when compared with nonsmoking controls. Heroin addiction had an even more pronounced negative effect, and this may be related to the high rate of chromosome aberrations found in this population. Half of the addicts tested were incapable of repairing UV fluences one-quarter as large as those repaired by the control subjects (5 J/m2 and 20 J/m2, respectively) in the 2-hr assay period. Long-term methadone treatment ameliorated the effects of the street heroin, just as it resulted in a decrease of the chromosome aberration frequency.

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...... epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D), stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA...... inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding...

  10. Development of Behçet's disease in a Caucasian with human leukocyte antigen B51 after immigration to Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takayuki; Asano, Yoshihide; Yamamoto, Mizuho; Sugaya, Makoto; Sato, Shinichi

    2011-06-01

    We herein report a 32-year-old Caucasian woman with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B51 who developed Behçet's disease after immigration to Japan. She was born and raised in Finland and had never experienced any clinical symptoms related to Behçet's disease before immigration to Japan. None of her family members in Finland had similar problems. Two years after the immigration, she developed typical clinical symptoms of Behçet's disease. This report strongly supports the canonical notion that the interaction of genetic factors, such as HLA-B51, with environmental factors specific to the countries in the Silk Road area, including Japan, may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. © 2010 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  11. Human leukocyte antigen HLADRB1 determinants susceptibility to gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Batool Mutar; Hasan, Riyadh Mohamad; Salih, Wafaa Hazim

    2017-01-01

    - Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is characterized by diverse symptoms. There is an evidence for a genetic component to GERD as supported by familial aggregation of this disease. - To investigate whether certain human leucocyte antigen genes HLA-DRB1 are associated with GERD. - Patients and controls were prospectively recruited from GIT center at Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital (Baghdad-Iraq) between January 2014 and July 2016. Sixty Iraqi Arab Muslims patients with a history of heartburn and dyspepsia compared with 100 Iraqi Arab Muslims controls. All study patients and control groups underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations and their serums were analyzed for CagA antibodies Immunoglobulin G (IgG) for H. pylori. HLA-DRB1 genotyping were done to both groups. - A total of 60 patients with erosive gastritis; GERD (Grade II and III) were evaluated, together with 100 controls. There is a significant increase of H. pylori infection (P=0.0001) in GERD patients than control group. HLA-DRB1* 15:01 was significantly increased in GERD patients in comparison with control group and an increased frequency of HLADRB1*11:01 in control group compared with patients group. - There is an association between HLA-DRB1 *15:01 in GERD patients with H. pylori positive patients.

  12. De Novo Donor-Specific Anti-Human Leukocyte Antigen Antibody Detection in Long-Term Adult Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Segundo, D; Alonso, C; Ruiz, P; Roman, I; Arias-Loste, M T; Cuadrado, A; Puente, A; Casafont, F; López-Hoyos, M; Crespo, J; Fábrega, E

    2016-11-01

    Information about the consequences of de novo donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (DSA) antibody development in the long term after adult liver transplantation (LT) is scarce. We conducted a cross-sectional study in LT patients with a follow-up of at least 6 years. A total of 28 adult LT patients were included, with a median follow-up of 77 months (range, 63 to 96) and without preformed anti- human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies prior to LT. The anti-HLA identification was performed with LABScreen Single Antigen, whereas the ability to fix the complement was demonstrated with C1q test (One Lambda). In both assays, a value >3.500 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) was considered positive. The anti-HLA antibody specificities were compared with donor HLA antigens to confirm them as DSA. Hepatic fibrosis was assessed by transient elastography. In 5 patients (17.8%), de novo DSA were detected, all them against DQ locus. In all of these cases (100%) the complement fixation was confirmed by C1q binding. The grade of hepatic fibrosis in de novo DSA patients was significantly higher compared with No-DSA patients (13.2 ± 9.2 KPa vs 7.3 ± 3.7 KPa; P = .02). It is noteworthy that in both groups of patients the levels of liver function tests (LFT) at the time of the study were normal or near the normal range with no difference between patients with or without de novo DSA. Our preliminary results are consistent with those previously demonstrated in pediatric LT, where de novo DSA production and humoral response could contribute to the liver fibrosis observed in the long term after LT in pediatric patients with normal or near-normal LFT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor gene deletion alters bleomycin-induced lung injury, but not development of pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habgood, Anthony N; Tatler, Amanda L; Porte, Joanne; Wahl, Sharon M; Laurent, Geoffrey J; John, Alison E; Johnson, Simon R; Jenkins, Gisli

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive, fatal disease with limited treatment options. Protease-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) activation has been proposed as a pathogenic mechanism of lung fibrosis. Protease activity in the lung is tightly regulated by protease inhibitors, particularly secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). The bleomycin model of lung fibrosis was used to determine the effect of increased protease activity in the lungs of Slpi(-/-) mice following injury. Slpi(-/-), and wild-type, mice received oropharyngeal administration of bleomycin (30 IU) and the development of pulmonary fibrosis was assessed. Pro and active forms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured. Lung fibrosis was determined by collagen subtype-specific gene expression, hydroxyproline concentration, and histological assessment. Alveolar TGF-β activation was measured using bronchoalveolar lavage cell pSmad2 levels and global TGF-β activity was assessed by pSmad2 immunohistochemistry. The active-MMP-9 to pro-MMP-9 ratio was significantly increased in Slpi(-/-) animals compared with wild-type animals, demonstrating enhanced metalloproteinase activity. Wild-type animals showed an increase in TGF-β activation following bleomycin, with a progressive and sustained increase in collagen type I, alpha 1 (Col1α1), III, alpha 1(Col3α1), IV, alpha 1(Col4α1) mRNA expression, and a significant increase in total lung collagen 28 days post bleomycin. In contrast Slpi(-/-) mice showed no significant increase of alveolar TGF-β activity following bleomycin, above their already elevated levels, although global TGF-β activity did increase. Slpi(-/-) mice had impaired collagen gene expression but animals demonstrated minimal reduction in lung fibrosis compared with wild-type animals. These data suggest that enhanced proteolysis does not further enhance TGF-β activation, and inhibits sustained Col1α1, Col3α1, and Col4α1 gene expression

  14. A conserved energetic footprint underpins recognition of human leukocyte antigen-E by two distinct αβ T cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lucy C; Walpole, Nicholas G; Farenc, Carine; Pietra, Gabriella; Sum, Matthew J W; Clements, Craig S; Lee, Eleanor J; Beddoe, Travis; Falco, Michela; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Gras, Stephanie; Rossjohn, Jamie; Brooks, Andrew G

    2017-12-22

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) interact with peptides bound to the polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class Ia (MHC-Ia) and class II (MHC-II) molecules as well as the essentially monomorphic MHC class Ib (MHC-Ib) molecules. Although there is a large amount of information on how TCRs engage with MHC-Ia and MHC-II, our understanding of TCR/MHC-Ib interactions is very limited. Infection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) can elicit a CD8+ T cell response restricted by the human MHC-Ib molecule human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E and specific for an epitope from UL40 (VMAPRTLIL), which is characterized by biased TRBV14 gene usage. Here we describe an HLA-E-restricted CD8+ T cell able to recognize an allotypic variant of the UL40 peptide with a modification at position 8 (P8) of the peptide (VMAPRTLVL) that uses the TRBV9 gene segment. We report the structures of a TRBV9+ TCR in complex with the HLA-E molecule presenting the two peptides. Our data revealed that the TRBV9+ TCR adopts a different docking mode and molecular footprint atop HLA-E when compared with the TRBV14+ TCR-HLA-E ternary complex. Additionally, despite their differing V gene segment usage and different docking mechanisms, mutational analyses showed that the TCRs shared a conserved energetic footprint on the HLA-E molecule, focused around the peptide-binding groove. Hence, we provide new insights into how monomorphic MHC molecules interact with T cells. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Mechanisms and effects of loss of human leukocyte antigen class II expression in immune-privileged site-associated B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booman, M; Douwes, J; Glas, AM; Riemersma, SA; Jordanova, ES; Kok, K; Rosenwald, A; de Jong, D; Schuuring, E; Kluin, PM

    2006-01-01

    Purpose and Experimental Design: Loss of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression on tumor cells is frequent in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) arising in immune-privileged sites, such as the testis and central nervous system, and is associated with small homozygous deletions of HLA-DQ/HLA-DR

  16. Broad spectrum activity of a lectin-like bacterial serine protease family on human leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Ayala-Lujan

    Full Text Available The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system.

  17. The human crystallin gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistow Graeme

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Crystallins are the abundant, long-lived proteins of the eye lens. The major human crystallins belong to two different superfamilies: the small heat-shock proteins (α-crystallins and the βγ-crystallins. During evolution, other proteins have sometimes been recruited as crystallins to modify the properties of the lens. In the developing human lens, the enzyme betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase serves such a role. Evolutionary modification has also resulted in loss of expression of some human crystallin genes or of specific splice forms. Crystallin organization is essential for lens transparency and mutations; even minor changes to surface residues can cause cataract and loss of vision.

  18. Changes in total and differential leukocyte counts during the clinically silent liver phase in a controlled human malaria infection in malaria-naïve Dutch volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wolfswinkel, Marlies E; Langenberg, Marijke C C; Wammes, Linda J; Sauerwein, Robert W; Koelewijn, Rob; Hermsen, Cornelus C; van Hellemond, Jaap J; van Genderen, Perry J

    2017-11-10

    Both in endemic countries and in imported malaria, changes in total and differential leukocyte count during Plasmodium falciparum infection have been described. To study the exact dynamics of differential leukocyte counts and their ratios, they were monitored in a group of healthy non-immune volunteers in two separate Controlled Human Malaria Infection (CHMI) studies. In two CHMI trials, CHMI-a and CHMI-b, 15 and 24 healthy malaria-naïve volunteers, respectively, were exposed to bites of infected mosquitoes, using the P. falciparum research strain NF54 and the novel clones NF135.C10 and NF166.C8. After mosquito bite exposure, twice-daily blood draws were taken to detect parasitaemia and to monitor the total and differential leukocyte counts. All subjects received a course of atovaquone-proguanil when meeting the treatment criteria. A total of 39 volunteers participated in the two trials. Thirty-five participants, all 15 participants in CHMI-a and 20 of the 24 volunteers in CHMI-b, developed parasitaemia. During liver stage development of the parasite, the median total leukocyte count increased from 5.5 to 6.1 × 10 9 leukocytes/L (p = 0.005), the median lymphocyte count from 1.9 to 2.2 (p = 0.001) and the monocyte count from 0.50 to 0.54 (p = 0.038). During the subsequent blood stage infection, significant changes in total and differential leukocyte counts lead to a leukocytopenia (nadir median 3.3 × 10 9 leukocytes/L, p = 0.0001), lymphocytopenia (nadir median 0.7 × 10 9 lymphocytes/L, p = 0.0001) and a borderline neutropenia (nadir median 1.5 × 10 9 neutrophils/L, p = 0.0001). The neutrophil to lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR) reached a maximum of 4.0. Significant correlations were found between parasite load and absolute lymphocyte count (p leukocyte count and differential lymphocytes and monocytes occurs. This finding has not been described previously. This increase is followed by the appearance of parasites in the peripheral blood after 2

  19. Soluble human leukocyte antigen-g5 activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling and stimulates trophoblast invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, YiFan; Lee, Cheuk-Lun; So, Kam-Hei; Gao, Jing; Yeung, William S B; Yao, YuanQing; Lee, Kai-Fai

    2013-01-01

    Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a non-classical class Ib HLA molecule that is secreted from blastocysts. Soluble HLA-G modulates the immune tolerance of the mother and can be used as a prognostic factor for the clinical pregnancy rate. However, the underlying mechanism of how soluble HLA-G5 affects pregnancy remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that soluble HLA-G5 promotes successful implantation and pregnancy by modulating trophoblast invasion through receptor binding and activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Recombinant HLA-G5 protein over-expressed in E. coli BL21 was purified to near homogeneity. We studied the expression of HLA-G5 and its receptors, the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B1 (LILRB1) and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor 2DL4 (KIR2DL4), in primary trophoblasts and trophoblastic (JAr and JEG-3) cell lines by florescence-labeled HLA-G5. HLA-G5 was detected in the primary trophoblasts and JEG-3 cells. The LILRB1 and KIR2DL4 receptors were expressed in both primary trophoblasts and trophoblastic cell lines. HLA-G5 stimulated cell invasion (ptrophoblastic cells. HLA-G5 activated the ERK signaling pathway and induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the trophoblastic cell lines. Addition of ERK inhibitors (U0126 and PD98059) nullified the stimulatory effect of HLA-G5 on trophoblastic cell invasion. Taken together, HLA-G5 induced trophoblast invasion by binding to KIR2DL4 and LILRB1, by increasing uPA and MMPs expressions and by activating the ERK signaling pathway.

  20. Soluble human leukocyte antigen-g5 activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling and stimulates trophoblast invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YiFan Guo

    Full Text Available Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G is a non-classical class Ib HLA molecule that is secreted from blastocysts. Soluble HLA-G modulates the immune tolerance of the mother and can be used as a prognostic factor for the clinical pregnancy rate. However, the underlying mechanism of how soluble HLA-G5 affects pregnancy remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that soluble HLA-G5 promotes successful implantation and pregnancy by modulating trophoblast invasion through receptor binding and activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK signaling pathway. Recombinant HLA-G5 protein over-expressed in E. coli BL21 was purified to near homogeneity. We studied the expression of HLA-G5 and its receptors, the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily B1 (LILRB1 and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor 2DL4 (KIR2DL4, in primary trophoblasts and trophoblastic (JAr and JEG-3 cell lines by florescence-labeled HLA-G5. HLA-G5 was detected in the primary trophoblasts and JEG-3 cells. The LILRB1 and KIR2DL4 receptors were expressed in both primary trophoblasts and trophoblastic cell lines. HLA-G5 stimulated cell invasion (p<0.05 and increased urokinase (uPA and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs transcripts and their activity (p<0.05 in trophoblastic cells. HLA-G5 activated the ERK signaling pathway and induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the trophoblastic cell lines. Addition of ERK inhibitors (U0126 and PD98059 nullified the stimulatory effect of HLA-G5 on trophoblastic cell invasion. Taken together, HLA-G5 induced trophoblast invasion by binding to KIR2DL4 and LILRB1, by increasing uPA and MMPs expressions and by activating the ERK signaling pathway.

  1. Effect of 900 MHz electromagnetic fields on nonthermal induction of heat-shock proteins in human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hooi B; Cook, Greg G; Barker, Anthony T; Coulton, Les A

    2005-01-01

    Despite many studies, the evidence as to whether radiofrequency fields are detrimental to health remains controversial, and the debate continues. Cells respond to some abnormal physiological conditions by producing cytoprotective heat-shock (or stress) proteins. The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to mobile phone-type radiation causes a nonthermal stress response in human leukocytes. Human peripheral blood was sham-exposed or exposed to 900 MHz fields (continuous-wave or GSM-modulated signal) at three average specific absorption rates (0.4, 2.0 and 3.6 W/kg) for different durations (20 min, 1 h and 4 h) in a calibrated TEM cell placed in an incubator to give well-controlled atmospheric conditions at 37 degrees C and 95% air/5% CO(2). Positive (heat-stressed at 42 degrees C) and negative (kept at 37 degrees C) control groups were incubated simultaneously in the same incubator. Heat caused an increase in the number of cells expressing stress proteins (HSP70, HSP27), measured using flow cytometry, and this increase was dependent on time. However, no statistically significant difference was detected in the number of cells expressing stress proteins after RF-field exposure. These results suggest that mobile phone-type radiation is not a stressor of normal human lymphocytes and monocytes, in contrast to mild heating.

  2. Maresin 1 Biosynthesis and Proresolving Anti-infective Functions with Human-Localized Aggressive Periodontitis Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chin-Wei; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Arnardottir, Hildur H; Nguyen, Daniel; Hasturk, Hatice; Chiang, Nan; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Serhan, Charles N

    2015-12-14

    Localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP) is a distinct form of early-onset periodontitis linked to periodontal infection with uncontrolled inflammation and leukocyte-mediated tissue destruction. The resolution of inflammation is an active process orchestrated by specialized proresolving lipid mediators (SPMs). Since the level of the Maresin pathway marker 14-hydroxy-docosahexaenoic acid (14-HDHA) was lower in activated peripheral blood from LAP patients, we investigated the Maresin 1 (MaR1) biosynthetic pathway in these subjects and its role in regulating phagocyte functions. Macrophages from LAP patients had a lower level of expression of 12-lipoxygenase (∼30%) and reduced MaR1 (LAP versus healthy controls [HC], 87.8 ± 50 pg/10(6) cells versus 239.1 ± 32 pg/10(6) cells). Phagocytosis by LAP macrophages was reduced ∼40% compared to that of HC, and killing of periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, were similarly reduced. LAP neutrophils also displayed slower kinetics (∼30%) and decreased maximal phagocytosis (∼20% lower) with these pathogens than those of HC. The administration of MaR1 at 1 nM enhanced phagocytosis (31 to 65% increase), intracellular antimicrobial reactive oxygen species production (26 to 71% increase), bacterial killing of these periodontal pathogens (22 to 38% reduction of bacterial titers), and restored impairment of LAP phagocytes. Together, these results suggest that therapeutics targeting the Maresin pathway have clinical utility in treating LAP and other oral diseases associated with infection, inflammation, and altered phagocyte functions. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Autoantibodies, polymorphisms in the serotonin pathway, and human leukocyte antigen class II alleles in chronic fatigue syndrome: are they associated with age at onset and specific symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Hernandez, Oscar-Danilo; Cuccia, Mariaclara; Bozzini, Sara; Bassi, Nicola; Moscavitch, Samuel; Diaz-Gallo, Lina-Marcela; Blank, Miri; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of autoantibodies, polymorphisms in the serotonin pathway, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes on age at chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) onset and symptoms. Eighty-one CFS patients were enrolled, and clinical data were recorded. Autoantibodies to different components of the central nervous system were tested. Polymorphisms in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene (l/s) and a single nucleotide polymorphism in the serotonin receptor-2A gene (A/G) as well as HLA class II alleles were determined. Multivariate logistic-regression analyses were carried out. The mean age at CFS onset +/- SD was 33.5 +/- 12.5 years. An age at CFS onset (ACFSO) during the third decade of life was associated with the serotonin receptor AA genotype and the HLA-DRB1*03 allele. An ACFSO during the fourth decade of life was associated with the HLA-DRB1*07 allele, whereas an ACFSO > or = 43 years was associated with having at least one copy of the serotonin G allele. Concerning CFS symptoms, the serotonin AG genotype was protective against depressive symptoms. Although having at least one copy of the serotonin A allele and being female were associated with risk for arthralgia, the presence of antineuronal cell antibodies was protective against this. Episodes of unexplained fever were associated with the HLA-DRB1*11 allele. None of the genetic or serological features was associated with myalgia. None of the antibodies determined correlated with any ACFSO or other symptoms. Our results reveal that in CFS, like other autoimmune diseases, different genetic features are related to age at CFS onset and symptoms.

  4. Measurement of Rho-Associated Kinase (ROCK) Activity in Humans: Validity of Leukocyte p-MBS/t-MBS in Comparison with Vascular Response to Fasudil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Takaki; Goto, Chikara; Soga, Junko; Hidaka, Takayuki; Fujii, Yuichi; Idei, Naomi; Fujimura, Noritaka; Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Mikami, Shinsuke; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Noma, Kensuke; Liao, James K.; Higashi, Yukihito

    2013-01-01

    Background Rho-associated kinases (ROCKs) have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. It is clinically important to estimate the degree of ROCK activity in humans. The purpose of this study was to confirm the validity of a leukocyte ROCK parameter as an index of ROCK activity in comparison with vascular response to a ROCK inhibitor. Methods and Results We evaluated the ratio of phospho myosin-binding subunit (p-MBS) on myosin light-chain phosphatase to total MBS in peripheral leukocytes by Western blot analysis and forearm blood flow (FBF) response to the ROCK inhibitor fasudil using strain-gauge plethysmography in 36 healthy subjects and 39 patients with cardiovascular diseases. Fasudil (3, 10, 30 μg/min) was infused intra-arterially for 5 minutes at each dose. Leukocyte p-MBS/total-MBS was higher in cardiovascular diseases than in healthy subjects (0.97±0.37 vs. 0.51±0.14; P=0.002). Fasudil increased FBF from 4.9±1.2 to 14.5±5.7 mL/min/100 mL tissue (P<0.0001) in patients with cardiovascular diseases, while fasudil did not alter FBF in healthy subjects. There was a significant relationship between leukocyte p-MBS/total-MBS and maximal FBF response to fasudil in all subjects (r=0.72, P<0.0001). There was also a significant correlation between p-MBS/total-MBS and maximal FBF response to fasudil in patients with cardiovascular diseases (r=0.59, P<0.0001). In healthy subjects, there was no significant correlation between the two parameters. Conclusions These findings suggest that assessment of leukocyte ROCK activity is minimally invasive and does not require pharmacologic intervention using ROCK inhibitors. Leukocyte p-MBS/total-MBS may be useful for evaluating ROCK activity in a clinical setting. PMID:21035804

  5. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DRB5*01:01 Present Complementary Peptide Repertoires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Margaret Scholz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR15 is a haplotype associated with multiple sclerosis. It contains the two DRB* genes DRB1*1501 (DR2b and DRB5*0101 (DR2a. The reported anchor motif of the corresponding HLA-DR molecules was determined in 1994 based on a small number of peptide ligands and binding assays. DR2a could display a set of peptides complementary to that presented by DR2b or, alternatively, a similar peptide repertoire but recognized in a different manner by T cells. It is known that DR2a and DR2b share some peptide ligands, although the degree of similarity of their associated peptidomes remains unclear. In addition, the contribution of each molecule to the global peptide repertoire presented by the HLA-DR15 haplotype has not been evaluated. We used mass spectrometry to analyze the peptide pools bound to DR2a and DR2b, identifying 169 and 555 unique peptide ligands of DR2a and DR2b, respectively. The analysis of these sets of peptides allowed the refinement of the corresponding binding motifs revealing novel anchor residues that had been overlooked in previous analyses. Moreover, the number of shared ligands between both molecules was low, indicating that DR2a and DR2b present complementary peptide repertoires to T cells. Finally, our analysis suggests that, quantitatively, both molecules contribute to the peptide repertoire presented by cells expressing the HLA-DR15 haplotype.

  6. A genomic study on distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A and HLA-B alleles in Lak population of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Shahsavar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological studies based on the highly polymorphic gene, human leukocyte antigen (HLA, provide useful information for bone marrow donor registry, forensic medicine, disease association studies, as well as infertility treatment, designing peptide vaccines against tumors, and infectious or autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in 100 unrelated Lak/lᴂk/individuals from Lorestan province of Iran. Finally, we compared the results with that previously described in Iranian population. Commercial HLA-Type kits from BAG (Lich, Germany company were used for determination of the HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in genomic DNA, based on polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP assay. The differences between the populations in distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles were estimated by chi-squared test with Yate's correction. The most frequent HLA-A alleles were *24 (20%, *02 (18%, *03 (12% and *11 (10%, and the most frequent HLA-B alleles were *35 (24%, *51 (16%, *18 (6% and *38 (6% in Lak population. HLA-A*66 (1%, *74(1% and HLA-B*48 (1%, *55(1% were the least observed frequencies in Lak population. Our results based on HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies showed that Lak population possesses the previously reported general features of Iranians but still with unique.

  7. Genetic considerations in human sex-mate selection: partners share human leukocyte antigen but not short-tandem-repeat identity markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israeli, Moshe; Kristt, Don; Nardi, Yuval; Klein, Tirza

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies support a role for MHC on mating preference, yet it remains unsettled as to whether mating occurs preferentially between individuals sharing human leukocyte antigen (HLA) determinants or not. Investigating sex-mate preferences in the contemporary Israeli population is of further curiosity being a population with distinct genetic characteristics, where multifaceted cultural considerations influence mate selection. Pairs of male-female sex partners were evaluated in three groups. Two groups represented unmarried (n = 1002) or married (n = 308) couples and a control group of fictitious male-female couples. HLA and short-tandem-repeat (STR) genetic identification markers were assessed for the frequency of shared antigens and alleles. Human leukocyte antigen results showed that Class I and/ or Class II single antigen as well as double antigen sharing was more common in sex partners than in control group couples (P sex-mates and controls (P = 0.78). Sex partnerships shared HLA determinants more frequently than randomly constituted male-female pairs. The observed phenomenon does not reflect a syngenetic background between sex-mates as STR markers were not selectively shared. Thus, sex-mate selection in man may contravene the evolutionary pressure for genetic diversity in regard to HLA. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Inactivation of the rhlA gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa prevents rhamnolipid production, disabling the protection against polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten

    2009-01-01

    and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). We have previously shown that rhamnolipids produced by P. aeruginosa cause necrotic death of PMNs in vitro. This raises the possibility that rhamnolipids may function as a 'biofilm shield' in vivo, which contributes significantly to the increased tolerance of P. aeruginosa...

  9. Ketamine inhibits transcription factors activator protein 1 and nuclear factor-kappaB, interleukin-8 production, as well as CD11b and CD16 expression: studies in human leukocytes and leukocytic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welters, Ingeborg D; Hafer, Georg; Menzebach, Axel; Mühling, Jörg; Neuhäuser, Christoph; Browning, Paul; Goumon, Yannick

    2010-03-01

    Recent data indicate that ketamine exerts antiinflammatory actions. However, little is known about the signaling mechanisms involved in ketamine-induced immune modulation. In this study, we investigated the effects of ketamine on lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of transcription factors activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) in human leukocyte-like cell lines and in human blood neutrophils. Electric mobility shift assays were used to investigate ketamine's effects on nuclear binding activity of both transcription factors in U937 cells, and a whole blood flow cytometric technique was used for AP-1 and NF-kappaB determination in leukocytes. Cell lines with different expression patterns of opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors were used for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to investigate receptors involved in ketamine signaling. Ketamine's effect on interleukin-8 production was assessed in a whole blood assay. Ketamine inhibited both transcription factors in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects did not depend on opiate or N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Ketamine also reduced interleukin-8 production in whole blood and expression of CD11b and CD16 on neutrophils. The immunoinhibitory effects of ketamine are at least in part caused by inhibition of transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1, which regulate production of proinflammatory mediators. However, signaling mechanisms different from those present in the central nervous system are responsible for ketamine-mediated immunomodulation.

  10. Heat sterilized PD-fluids impair growth and inflammatory responses of cultured cell lines and human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieslander, A P; Nordin, M K; Martinson, E; Kjellstrand, P T; Boberg, U C

    1993-06-01

    We have recently demonstrated that commercial PD-fluids inhibit the growth of a cultured mouse fibroblast cell line. Toxic substances produced during heat sterilization were believed to be the probable cause of the growth inhibition. The aim of the present study was to investigate if heat sterilized PD-fluids affect other cell types and other cellular functions than the growth of fibroblasts. The effect of three commercially and one laboratory made PD-fluid on cell growth of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW) and a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) was examined. The influence on stimulated release of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) from the macrophage cell line and stimulated superoxide generation from freshly prepared human leukocytes were also investigated. Compared to the filter sterilized PD-fluid, we found that heat treated PD-fluids significantly inhibited the growth of the two cell lines and impaired the stimulated release of TNF alpha and superoxide radicals. These results demonstrate that heat sterilization of PD-fluids produces substances that are cytotoxic regardless of the cell species, the cell type or the cell function tested.

  11. Role of human leukocyte antigen-G in the induction of adaptive type 1 regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, Silvia; Magnani, Chiara Francesca; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2009-12-01

    Adaptive type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are suppressor cells characterized by the production of interleukin (IL)-10 in the absence of IL-4. IL-10 is essential not only for suppression of effector cells by Tr1 cells, but also for their differentiation in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known on the molecular mechanisms underneath the IL-10-mediated induction of Tr1 cells. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G, a non-classical HLA class I molecule, has both direct inhibitory effects on natural killer cells, dendritic cells (DC), and T cells and long-term tolerogenic indirect effects by inducing regulatory T (Tr) cells. In the present review, we discuss current findings on Tr-cell induction by the different isoforms of HLA-G, focusing on the relationship among HLA-G, its ligands, and IL-10. We recently described a subset of human DC, termed DC-10, that express high levels of HLA-G and ILT4, secrete high amounts of IL-10, and induce allospecific Tr1 cells in vitro via an IL-10-dependent ILT4/HLA-G pathway. IL-10, HLA-G, and ILT4 may also be involved in Tr1-cell induction in vivo. Overall, these data demonstrate that cross-regulation between IL-10 and HLA-G may be instrumental for Tr1-cell induction and tolerance.

  12. The Local Inflammatory Responses to Infection of the Peritoneal Cavity in Humans: Their Regulation by Cytokines, Macrophages, and Other Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marien Willem Johan Adriaan Fieren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on infection-induced inflammatory reactions in humans rely largely on findings in the blood compartment. Peritoneal leukocytes from patients treated with peritoneal dialysis offer a unique opportunity to study in humans the inflammatory responses taking place at the site of infection. Compared with peritoneal macrophages (pM from uninfected patients, pM from infected patients display ex vivo an upregulation and downregulation of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators, respectively. Pro-IL-1 processing and secretion rather than synthesis proves to be increased in pM from infectious peritonitis suggesting up-regulation of caspase-1 in vivo. A crosstalk between pM, γ T cells, and neutrophils has been found to be involved in augmented TNF expression and production during infection. The recent finding in experimental studies that alternatively activated macrophages (M2 increase by proliferation rather than recruitment may have significant implications for the understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions such as encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS.

  13. Human leukocyte antigen-G in the male reproductive system and in seminal plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Margit Hørup; Bzorek, Michael; Pass, Malene B

    2011-01-01

    -eclampsia. We have investigated whether HLA-G protein is present in human seminal plasma and in different tissue samples of the male reproductive system. Western blot technique and a soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) assay were used to detect sHLA-G in human seminal plasma samples. Immunohistochemical staining...

  14. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, K; Plomp, R; Lao, O; Middleton, B; Revell, VL; Skene, DJ; Kayser, M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean ± SD: 23 ± 5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g...

  15. Substitution of Aspartate for glycine 1018 in the Type III procollagen (COL3AI) gene causes type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: The mutated allele is present in most blood leukocytes of the asymptomatic and mosaic mother

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontusaari, S.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Stolle, C. (Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)); Pope, F.M.

    1992-09-01

    A proband with arterial ruptures and skin changes characteristic of the type IV variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was found to have a single-base mutation in the type III procollagen gene, which converted the codon for glycine at amino position 1018 to a codon for aspartate. (Amino acid positions are numbered by the standard convention in which the first glycine of the triple-helical domain of an [alpha] chain is number 1. The numbers of positions in the [alpha]1(III) chains can be converted to positions in the human pro[alpha](III) chain by adding 167.). Nucleotide sequencing of overlapping PCR products in which the two alleles were distinguished demonstrated that the mutation of glycine 1018 was the only mutation that changed the primary structure of type III procollagen. The glycine substitution markedly decreased the amount of type III procollagen secreted into the medium by cultured skin fibroblasts from the proband. It is surprising that the same mutation was found in about 94% of the peripheral blood leukocytes from the proband's asymptomatic 72-year-old mother. Other tissues from the mother contained the mutated allele; it was present in 0%-100% of different samples of hair cells and in about 40% of cells from the oral epithelium. Therefore, the mother was a mosaic for the mutation. Since the mutated allele was present in cells derived from all three germ layers, the results indicated that the mutation arose by the late blastocyst stage of development. The results also indicate that assays of blood leukocytes do not always reveal mosaicism or predict phenotypic involvement of tissues, such as blood vessels, that are derived from the same embryonic cells as are leukocytes. 66 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. OCCURRENCE OF AUTOANTIBODIES TO HUMAN-LEUKOCYTE ELASTASE IN WEGENERS GRANULOMATOSIS AND OTHER INFLAMMATORY DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TERVAERT, JWC; MULDER, L; STEGEMAN, C; ELEMA, J; THE, MHH; KALLENBERG, C

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) constitute a new class of autoantibodies that seem to recognise myeloid lysosomal enzymes. The occurrence of ANCAs with specificity for human leucocyte elastase (HLE) was assessed in serum samples that were routinely submitted for ANCA determination.

  17. Resistance of human leukocytes to vesicular stomatitis virus infection as one of the innate antiviral immune activities; participation of cell subpopulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Duś

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Among reactions of innate immunity, resistance of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL to viral infection seems important. The purpose of our study was to find, which of the subpopulations of PBL is the most responsible for the innate antiviral immunity of these cells. The innate immunity was measured by using the direct method of infection of leukocytes with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV. The lack of VSV replication by infected leukocytes (0-1 log TCID50 was taken as an indicator for complete immunity; a low level of VSV (2-3 log for partial immunity; and high VSV titer (more than 4 log for no immunity. The resistance/innate immunity of whole PBL and subpopulations such as: adherent cells, fractions enriched in lymphocytes T, and lymphocytes B (separated on column with nylon wool, NK(+ and NK(- (separated by microbeads activated cell sorting MACS differ from each other. All fractions express higher resistance/innate immunity than the whole PBL. NK(+ cells were found the most resistant fraction of PBL to VSV infection. The results indicate that among the leukocytes in PBL the regulation mechanisms of innate immunity exist. The study on the mechanism of innate immunity regulation as well as the role of NK in innate immunity of PBL must be continued.

  18. Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G in seminal plasma is associated with HLA-G genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Perin, Trine L; Djurisic, Snezana

    2014-01-01

    -G gene and/or with the outcome of assisted reproduction treatments (ART) in couples attending a fertility clinic. METHOD OF STUDY: In a total of 54 unselected couples, sHLA-G levels were measured in seminal plasma samples and blood samples, HLA-G genotyping was performed, and clinical data were collected...... sHLA-G as an immunomodulatory factor in the female reproductive tract before and at the time of conception....

  19. Genetic variants in human leukocyte antigen-DP influence both hepatitis C virus persistence and hepatitis C virus F protein generation in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Yue, Ming; Jiang, Longfeng; Deng, Xiaozhao; Zhang, Yongxiang; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Danyan; Xiao, Wen; Zhou, Zhenxian; Yao, Wenjuan; Kong, Jing; Yu, Xiaojie; Wei, Juan

    2014-06-03

    Chronic hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that often results in cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to assess the association of human leukocyte antigen-DP (HLA-DP) variants with risk of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) or anti-F antibody generation. We selected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a region including HLA-DPA1 (rs3077) and HLA-DPB1 (rs9277534) and genotyped SNPs in 702 cases and 342 healthy controls from the Chinese population using TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. Moreover, the exon 2 of the HLA-DPA1 and HLA-DPB1 genes were amplified and determined by sequencing-based typing (SBT). The results showed that rs3077 significantly increased the risk of chronic HCV infection in additive models and dominant models (odds ratio (OR) = 1.32 and 1.53). The rs3077 also contributed to decrease the risk of anti-F antibody generation in additive models and dominant models (OR = 0.46 and 0.56). Subsequent analyses revealed the risk haplotypes (DPA1*0103-DPB1*0501 and DPA1*0103-DPB1*0201) and protective haplotypes (DPA1*0202-DPB1*0501 and DPA1*0202-DPB1*0202) to chronic HCV infection. Moreover, we also found that the haplotype of DPA1*0103-DPB1*0201 and DPA1*0202-DPB1*0202 were associated with the anti-F antibody generation. Our findings show that genetic variants in HLA-DP gene are associated with chronic HCV infection and anti-F antibody generation.

  20. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  1. [Neuro-neutrophilic disease suspected by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing and brain biopsy: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Etsuro; Sawamura, Masanori; Maruhama, Shinichiro; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kim, Gan; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    In a 72-year-old female, subacute right hemiplegia and aphasia appeared in late May 2011. The results of hematology, a cerebrospinal fluid test, (13)F-FDG-PET, and cephalic MRI suggested intravascular/malignant lymphoma. Brain biopsy was performed. Pathological findings did not suggest a malignant tumor. In the perivascular space, the infiltration of neutrophils or histiocytes was observed. The patient was referred to the Department of Neurology. Based on the results of various examinations, infection was ruled out, and steroid therapy was conducted. Marked improvement was achieved. Subsequently, the results of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing showed B54/Cw1. As dermal findings were absent, it was impossible to make a definitive diagnosis of neuro-Sweet disease, but the disorder was regarded as a neuro-neutrophilic disease, which is a more comprehensive entity. Few studies have reported brain tissue findings of active neuro-neutrophilic disease. We report the present case, which will contribute to future research.

  2. Monitoring human leukocyte antigen class I molecules by micro-Raman spectroscopy at single-cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gobind; La Rocca, Rosanna; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Gentile, Francesco; Tallerico, Rossana; Zambetti, Lia P.; Devitt, J.; Candeloro, Patrizio; de Angelis, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio; di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2010-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules are formed by three immunoglobulin-like domains (α1, α2, and α3) once folded by peptide and β2-microglobulin show the presence of two α-helix streams and one β-sheet limiting the pocket for the antigenic peptide. The loss of HLA class I expression in tumors and virus-infected cells, on one hand, prevents T cell recognition, while on the other hand, it leads to natural killer (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity. We propose the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to measure the relative expression of HLA class I molecules at the single-cell level. Raman spectra are recorded for three cell lines (K562, T2, and T3) and monomers (HLA class I folded, unfolded and peptide+β2-microlobulin refolded) using 830 nm laser line. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that in the Raman spectra, ranging from 1600 to 1800 cm-1, the intensity variation of cells associated with HLA class I molecules could be measured.

  3. Therapeutic application of human leukocyte antigen-G1 improves atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Naoyoshi; Yamada, Chisato; Takahashi, Ami; Kuroki, Kimiko; Maenaka, Katsumi

    2017-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is an immune checkpoint molecule that plays critical roles in immune response and in triggering inhibitory signaling to immune cells such as T cells, natural killer cells, and antigen-presenting cells. Thus, the application of HLA-G can be considered for treating immune response-related inflammatory disorders. We have previously reported that treatment with HLA-G1 and HLA-G2 ameliorates the joint swelling associated with collagen-induced arthritis of DBA/1 mice, an animal model for rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, we further investigated the effects of HLA-G1 on atopic dermatitis (AD), the most common inflammatory skin disorder. AD-like lesions were induced with the extract of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae in NC/Nga mice. Continuous administration of HLA-G1 ameliorated the AD-like skin lesions in the mice. Furthermore, production of immunoglobulin E, interleukin (IL)-13, and IL-17A was significantly reduced in HLA-G1-treated mice, suggesting a Th2/Th17-mediated immune-inhibitory function of HLA-G1 in vivo. Our studies shed light on novel therapeutic strategies with recombinant HLA-G proteins for immune reaction-mediated chronic inflammatory disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dry Olive Leaf Extract Counteracts L-Thyroxine-Induced Genotoxicity in Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijana Žukovec Topalović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L. leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05. Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  5. Balancing selection and heterogeneity across the classical human leukocyte antigen loci: a meta-analytic review of 497 population studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Owen D; Mack, Steven J; Lancaster, Alex K; Single, Richard M; Tsai, Yingssu; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Thomson, Glenys

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a meta-analysis of high-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele frequency data describing 497 population samples. Most of the datasets were compiled from studies published in eight journals from 1990 to 2007; additional datasets came from the International Histocompatibility Workshops and from the AlleleFrequencies.net database. In all, these data represent approximately 66,800 individuals from throughout the world, providing an opportunity to observe trends that may not have been evident at the time the data were originally analyzed, especially with regard to the relative importance of balancing selection among the HLA loci. Population genetic measures of allele frequency distributions were summarized across populations by locus and geographic region. A role for balancing selection maintaining much of HLA variation was confirmed. Further, the breadth of this meta-analysis allowed the ranking of the HLA loci, with DQA1 and HLA-C showing the strongest balancing selection and DPB1 being compatible with neutrality. Comparisons of the allelic spectra reported by studies since 1990 indicate that most of the HLA alleles identified since 2000 are very-low-frequency alleles. The literature-based allele-count data, as well as maps summarizing the geographic distributions for each allele, are available online.

  6. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Crocodylus siamensis Leukocyte Extract, Revealing Anticancer Activity and Apoptotic Induction on Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theansungnoen, Tinnakorn; Maijaroen, Surachai; Jangpromma, Nisachon; Yaraksa, Nualyai; Daduang, Sakda; Temsiripong, Theeranan; Daduang, Jureerut; Klaynongsruang, Sompong

    2016-06-01

    Known antimicrobial peptides KT2 and RT2 as well as the novel RP9 derived from the leukocyte extract of the freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) were used to evaluate the ability in killing human cervical cancer cells. RP9 in the extract was purified by a combination of anion exchange column and reversed-phase HPLC, and its sequence was analyzed by mass spectrometry. The novel peptide could inhibit Gram-negative Vibrio cholerae (clinical isolation) and Gram-positive Bacillus pumilus TISTR 905, and its MIC values were 61.2 µM. From scanning electron microscopy, the peptide was seen to affect bacterial surfaces directly. KT2 and RT2, which are designed antimicrobial peptides using the C. siamensis Leucrocin I template, as well as RP9 were chemically synthesized for investigation of anticancer activity. By Sulforhodamine B colorimetric assay, these antimicrobial peptides could inhibit both HeLa and CaSki cancer cell lines. The IC50 values of KT2 and RT2 for HeLa and CaSki cells showed 28.7-53.4 and 17.3-30.8 µM, while those of RP9 were 126.2 and 168.3 µM, respectively. Additionally, the best candidate peptides KT2 and RT2 were used to determine the apoptotic induction on cancer cells by human apoptosis array assay. As a result, KT2 and RT2 were observed to induce apoptotic cell death in HeLa cells. Therefore, these results indicate that KT2 and RT2 with antimicrobial activity have a highly potent ability to kill human cervical cancer cells.

  7. Testicular involution prior to sex change in gilthead seabream is characterized by a decrease in DMRT1 gene expression and by massive leukocyte infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meseguer José

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leukocytes are found within the testis of most, if not all, mammals and are involved in immunological surveillance, physiological regulation and tissue remodelling. The testis of seasonal breeding fish undergoes a regression process. In the present study, the second reproductive cycle (RC of the protandrous seasonal teleost fish, gilthead seabream, was investigated and the presence of leukocytes analysed. Special attention has been paid to the testicular degenerative process which is particularly active in the last stage of the second RC probably due to the immediacy of the sex change process. Methods Sexually mature specimens (n = 10–18 fish/month were sampled during the second RC. Some specimens were intraperitoneally injected with bromodeoxyuridin (BrdU before sampling. Light and electron microscopy was used to determine the different stages of gonadal development and the presence of leukocytes and PCR was used to analyse the gene expression of a testis-differentiating gene and of specific markers for macrophages and B and T lymphocytes. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry were performed using a specific antibody against acidophilic granulocytes from the gilthead seabream. Cell proliferation was detected by immunocytochemistry using an anti-BrdU antibody and apoptotic cells by in situ detection of DNA fragmentation. Results The fish in the western Mediterranean area developed as males during the first two RCs. The testis of all the specimens during the second RC underwent a degenerative process, which started at post-spawning and was enhanced during the testicular involution stage, when vitellogenic oocytes appeared in the ovary accompanied by a progressive increase in the ovarian index. However, only 40% of specimens were females in the third RC. Leukocytes (acidophilic granulocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes were present in the gonad and acidophilic granulocyte infiltration occurred during the last two stages. At

  8. Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Is Frequently Expressed in a Multicentric Study on Glioblastoma and May Be Induced in Vitro by Combined 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and Interferon-γ Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastowski, Isabela J; Simões, Renata T; Yaghi, Layale

    2012-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule involved in immune tolerance processes, playing an important role in the maintenance of the semi-allogeneic fetus. Although HLA-G expression is restricted in normal tissues, it is broadly......-G protein expression was associated with a better long-term survival rate. The mechanisms underlying HLA-G gene expression were investigated in glioma cell lines U251MG, D247MG, and U138MG. Induction of HLA-G transcriptional activity was dependent of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment and enhanced...... by interferon-γ. HLA-G protein expression was observed in U251MG cells only. These cells exhibited a permissive chromatin state at the HLA-G gene promoter and the highest levels of induced HLA-G transcriptional activity following 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment. Several antigen-presenting machinery components...

  9. Comparison of high-resolution human leukocyte antigen haplotype frequencies in different ethnic groups: Consequences of sampling fluctuation and haplotype frequency distribution tail truncation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Derek James; Tomich, Alannah; Garnier, Federico; Marry, Evelyne; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine

    2015-05-01

    High-resolution haplotype frequency estimations and descriptive metrics are becoming increasingly popular for accurately describing human leukocyte antigen diversity. In this study, we compared sample sets of publically available haplotype frequencies from different populations to characterize the consequences of unequal sample size on haplotype frequency estimation. We found that for low samples sizes (a few thousand), haplotype frequencies were overestimated, affecting all descriptive metrics of the underlying distribution, such as most frequent haplotype, the number of haplotypes, and the mean/median frequency. This overestimation was a result of random sample fluctuation and truncation of the tail end of the frequency distribution that comprises the least frequent haplotypes. Finally, we simulated balanced datasets through resampling and contrasted the disparities of descriptive metrics among equal and unequal datasets. This simulation resulted in the global description of the most frequent human leukocyte antigen haplotypes worldwide. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Genotype as a Contributor to Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Molecular Epidemiologic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    P, Talamini R, Franceschi S. Population attributable risk for breast cancer: diet , nutrition, and physical exercise. J Natl Cancer Inst 1998;90(5...human leukocyte antigen: distinct DQ and DR alleles are associated with development of gastric cancer and infection by Helicobacter pylori. Cancer Res...2001;61:2684-9. 20 Li Z, Chen D, Zhang C, Li Y, Cao B, Ning T, et al. HLA polymorphisms are associated with Helicobacter pylori infected gastric

  11. TNFα signals via p66(Shc to induce E-Selectin, promote leukocyte transmigration and enhance permeability in human endothelial cells.

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    Luigi Laviola

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells participate in inflammatory events leading to atherogenesis by regulating endothelial cell permeability via the expression of VE-Cadherin and β-catenin and leukocyte recruitment via the expression of E-Selectins and other adhesion molecules. The protein p66(Shc acts as a sensor/inducer of oxidative stress and may promote vascular dysfunction. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of p66(Shc in tumor necrosis factor TNFα-induced E-Selectin expression and function in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Exposure of HUVEC to 50 ng/ml TNFα resulted in increased leukocyte transmigration through the endothelial monolayer and E-Selectin expression, in association with augmented phosphorylation of both p66(Shc on Ser(36 and the stress kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK-1/2, and higher intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. Overexpression of p66(Shc in HUVEC resulted in enhanced p66(Shc phosphorylation on Ser(36, increased ROS and E-Selectin levels, and amplified endothelial cell permeability and leukocyte transmigration through the HUVEC monolayer. Conversely, overexpression of a phosphorylation-defective p66(Shc protein, in which Ser(36 was replaced by Ala, did not augment ROS and E-Selectin levels, nor modify cell permeability or leukocyte transmigration beyond those found in wild-type cells. Moreover, siRNA-mediated silencing of p66(Shc resulted in marked reduction of E-Selectin expression and leukocyte transmigration. In conclusion, p66(Shc acts as a novel intermediate in the TNFα pathway mediating endothelial dysfunction, and its action requires JNK-dependent phosphorylation of p66(Shc on Ser(36.

  12. Characterization of Influenza Virus-Induced Leukocyte Adherence to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    with other viruses. HL-60 cell adherence to endothelial cell virus type A, which did not infect human venous or bovine monolayers was modulated by...LEUCOCYTE ADHERENC:E TO [NDOTIIELIL (FS1% A. B reawsd on parainfluenza virus-infected airway epithelial Poiy-iiysine Codled IPLC) Wells PLC.Wells cells...an antibody against ICAN1- I has no significant effect PLC Wells Virus on parainfluenza -induced neutrophil adherence (58). In 25 *HSV-intected HUVEC

  13. Genetics of human gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranger, Barbara E; Raj, Towfique

    2013-12-01

    A steadily growing number of studies have identified and characterized expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) in human cell-lines, primary cells, and tissues. This class of variation has been shown to play a role in complex traits, including disease. Here, we discuss how eQTLs have the potential to accelerate discovery of disease genes and functional mechanisms underlying complex traits. We discuss how context-specificity of eQTLs is being characterized at an unprecedented scale and breadth, and how this both informs on the intricacy of human genome function, and has important ramifications for elucidating function of genetic variants of interest, particularly for those contributing to disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  15. Prognostic Significance of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule (ALCAM in Association with Promoter Methylation of the ALCAM Gene in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ju Jeong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM has been implicated in tumorigenesis. In this study, we studied DNA methylation status of the ALCAM gene using pyrosequencing in breast cancer tissues. We analyzed the association between the methylation status of the ALCAM gene and its expression. Also, the effects of inflammation on the ALCAM gene methylation and its expression were investigated. The ALCAM gene methylation was associated with the ALCAM transcripts in tumor tissues. The methylation status of the ALCAM gene was not significantly different between tumor and normal tissues. The level of ALCAM transcripts was associated with the expression of TNFα, NF-κB p50, IL-4, and intratumoral inflammation. The IHC expression of ALCAM was associated with histologic grade, HER2 overexpression and molecular subtype. The expression of TNFα, NF-κB p50, and IL-4 showed significant association with the clinicopathologic characteristics. In conclusion, the ALCAM gene methylation was related to the level of ALCAM transcripts. Also, the level of ALCAM transcripts was associated with the inflammatory markers in breast cancer. Our results suggest that the methylation of the ALCAM gene contributes to the decreased expression of ALCAM. Also, ALCAM is linked to the inflammatory response in breast cancer.

  16. Uterine Natural Killer Cell and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G1 and Human Leukocyte Antigen-G5 Expression in Vaginal Discharge of Threatened-Abortion Women: A Case-Control Study

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    Saeideh Sadat Shobeiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunotolerant human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G molecules have a major role in fetal-maternal tolerance during pregnancy. Interaction between these molecules and uterine natural killer (uNK cells inhibitory receptors prevents NK cell invasion against fetus trophoblast cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the percentages of uNK cells and HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion women in comparison with control. In a case-control study, we investigated 30 threatened-abortion women with bleeding or spotting less than 20 weeks of pregnancy as compared to 30 normal pregnant women. uNK cells percentage was assessed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, we evaluated HLA-G1 and HLA-G5 isoforms expression by Real-Time PCR in these groups. The results of this study showed that threatened-abortion women had increased uNK cells and decreased T cells percentage in vaginal discharge in comparison with normal pregnant women (p=0.01, p=0.003, resp.. In addition, HLA-G1 isoform had lower expression in threatened-abortion women in comparison with control group p=0.0001. The increase of uNK cells level with the decrease of HLA-G expression in vaginal discharge of threatened-abortion pregnant women is an indicator of mother’s immune dysregulation. It is concluded that HLA-G expression level with uNK cells percentage can be determined as a diagnostic marker for threatened-abortion women.

  17. A Metabolic Biofuel Cell: Conversion of Human Leukocyte Metabolic Activity to Electrical Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X Tracy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC for biofuel cell (BFC applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient, a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL, and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  18. Rapid flow cytometric measurement of cytokine-induced phosphorylation pathways [CIPP] in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, David T; Lotze, Michael T

    2006-11-01

    Current strategies designed to assess cells in the peripheral blood are limited to evaluation of phenotype or delayed measurement [>6 h] of function, usually quantifying cytokine production, cytolytic activity, or response to antigens. We reasoned that measurable abnormalities in signaling pathways could reflect pathological environs that cells experience in the setting of inflammatory states/cancer and could be represented in the peripheral blood. Two major pathways regulating the immune response are the JAK/STAT and MAPK/ERK pathways. These pathways are initiated by ligand-receptor binding and are rapidly propagated by subsequent protein phosphorylation cascades. We evaluated the brief application of cytokines in vitro to interrogate the early phosphorylation events of these signaling pathways in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Individual cytokine doses and time intervals of treatment were assessed to identify conditions useful in a clinical laboratory and as an initial goal to induce maximal phosphorylation. Surprisingly, all of the STAT proteins assessed and ERK1/2 are maximally phosphorylated within 15 min in human PBMC simply following addition of cytokines without preactivation of the cells. At 2 h, cells typically return to their basal phosphorylation states. For most of the cytokines tested, increased phosphorylation directly correlated with increased concentrations of the individual cytokines. These strategies will enable robust development of simple blood analyses to identify normal levels as well as impairments in STAT and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways associated with various human disease states including acute and chronic inflammatory conditions throughout clinical immunology.

  19. A metabolic biofuel cell: conversion of human leukocyte metabolic activity to electrical currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin, Gusphyl A; Zhang, Yingze; Cui, X Tracy; Bradberry, Charles W; Sun, Mingui; Sclabassi, Robert J

    2011-05-10

    An investigation of the electrochemical activity of human white blood cells (WBC) for biofuel cell (BFC) applications is described. WBCs isolated from whole human blood were suspended in PBS and introduced into the anode compartment of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The cathode compartment contained a 50 mM potassium ferricyanide solution. Average current densities between 0.9 and 1.6 μA cm-2 and open circuit potentials (Voc) between 83 and 102 mV were obtained, which were both higher than control values. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical activity of the activated WBCs in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of electron transfer between the cells and electrode. Voltammograms were obtained for the WBCs, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs - a lymphocyte-monocyte mixture isolated on a Ficoll gradient), a B lymphoblastoid cell line (BLCL), and two leukemia cell lines, namely K562 and Jurkat. An oxidation peak at about 363 mV vs. SCE for the PMA (phorbol ester) activated primary cells, with a notable absence of a reduction peak was observed. Oxidation peaks were not observed for the BLCL, K562 or Jurkat cell lines. HPLC confirmed the release of serotonin (5-HT) from the PMA activated primary cells. It is believed that serotonin, among other biochemical species released by the activated cells, contributes to the observed BFC currents.

  20. Phenotypic Features of Circulating Leukocytes from Non-human Primates Naturally Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Resemble the Major Immunological Findings Observed in Human Chagas Disease.

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    Renato Sathler-Avelar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis represent a feasible model for research on Chagas disease since natural T. cruzi infection in these primates leads to clinical outcomes similar to those observed in humans. However, it is still unknown whether these clinical similarities are accompanied by equivalent immunological characteristics in the two species. We have performed a detailed immunophenotypic analysis of circulating leukocytes together with systems biology approaches from 15 cynomolgus macaques naturally infected with T. cruzi (CH presenting the chronic phase of Chagas disease to identify biomarkers that might be useful for clinical investigations.Our data established that CH displayed increased expression of CD32+ and CD56+ in monocytes and enhanced frequency of NK Granzyme A+ cells as compared to non-infected controls (NI. Moreover, higher expression of CD54 and HLA-DR by T-cells, especially within the CD8+ subset, was the hallmark of CH. A high level of expression of Granzyme A and Perforin underscored the enhanced cytotoxicity-linked pattern of CD8+ T-lymphocytes from CH. Increased frequency of B-cells with up-regulated expression of Fc-γRII was also observed in CH. Complex and imbricate biomarker networks demonstrated that CH showed a shift towards cross-talk among cells of the adaptive immune system. Systems biology analysis further established monocytes and NK-cell phenotypes and the T-cell activation status, along with the Granzyme A expression by CD8+ T-cells, as the most reliable biomarkers of potential use for clinical applications.Altogether, these findings demonstrated that the similarities in phenotypic features of circulating leukocytes observed in cynomolgus macaques and humans infected with T. cruzi further supports the use of these monkeys in preclinical toxicology and pharmacology studies applied to development and testing of new drugs for Chagas disease.

  1. Solid-phase assays for the detection of alloantibody against human leukocyte antigens: panacea or Pandora?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T; Tumer, G; Gebel, H M; Bray, R A

    2014-10-01

    Serological assessments of antibodies directed against human leucocyte antigens (HLA) formed the basis of early histocompatibility testing (Patel & Terasaki, 1969 N Engl J Med, 280, 735). However, over the past decade, significant advances in HLA antibody detection technologies have emerged. The development and implementation of solid-phase assays has led to safer and more efficient allocation of organs by effectively distinguishing HLA from non-HLA antibodies. Although solid-phase assays are not standardized, they are widely accepted as the new 'gold standard'. However, this technology is not without its challenges. This review is intended to provide a better understanding of solid-phase HLA antibody testing and will focus on important caveats associated with this evolving technology. Examples of the limitations of the technology as well as common data misinterpretations will be shown. Both of which could pose potential harm to transplant recipients (Tait et al., Transplantation, 95, 19). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Agent-based modeling of endotoxin-induced acute inflammatory response in human blood leukocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Dong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a highly complex biological response evoked by many stimuli. A persistent challenge in modeling this dynamic process has been the (nonlinear nature of the response that precludes the single-variable assumption. Systems-based approaches offer a promising possibility for understanding inflammation in its homeostatic context. In order to study the underlying complexity of the acute inflammatory response, an agent-based framework is developed that models the emerging host response as the outcome of orchestrated interactions associated with intricate signaling cascades and intercellular immune system interactions.An agent-based modeling (ABM framework is proposed to study the nonlinear dynamics of acute human inflammation. The model is implemented using NetLogo software. Interacting agents involve either inflammation-specific molecules or cells essential for the propagation of the inflammatory reaction across the system. Spatial orientation of molecule interactions involved in signaling cascades coupled with the cellular heterogeneity are further taken into account. The proposed in silico model is evaluated through its ability to successfully reproduce a self-limited inflammatory response as well as a series of scenarios indicative of the nonlinear dynamics of the response. Such scenarios involve either a persistent (noninfectious response or innate immune tolerance and potentiation effects followed by perturbations in intracellular signaling molecules and cascades.The ABM framework developed in this study provides insight on the stochastic interactions of the mediators involved in the propagation of endotoxin signaling at the cellular response level. The simulation results are in accordance with our prior research effort associated with the development of deterministic human inflammation models that include transcriptional dynamics, signaling, and physiological components. The hypothetical scenarios explored in this study would

  3. Agent-based modeling of endotoxin-induced acute inflammatory response in human blood leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xu; Foteinou, Panagiota T; Calvano, Steven E; Lowry, Stephen F; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2010-02-18

    Inflammation is a highly complex biological response evoked by many stimuli. A persistent challenge in modeling this dynamic process has been the (nonlinear) nature of the response that precludes the single-variable assumption. Systems-based approaches offer a promising possibility for understanding inflammation in its homeostatic context. In order to study the underlying complexity of the acute inflammatory response, an agent-based framework is developed that models the emerging host response as the outcome of orchestrated interactions associated with intricate signaling cascades and intercellular immune system interactions. An agent-based modeling (ABM) framework is proposed to study the nonlinear dynamics of acute human inflammation. The model is implemented using NetLogo software. Interacting agents involve either inflammation-specific molecules or cells essential for the propagation of the inflammatory reaction across the system. Spatial orientation of molecule interactions involved in signaling cascades coupled with the cellular heterogeneity are further taken into account. The proposed in silico model is evaluated through its ability to successfully reproduce a self-limited inflammatory response as well as a series of scenarios indicative of the nonlinear dynamics of the response. Such scenarios involve either a persistent (non)infectious response or innate immune tolerance and potentiation effects followed by perturbations in intracellular signaling molecules and cascades. The ABM framework developed in this study provides insight on the stochastic interactions of the mediators involved in the propagation of endotoxin signaling at the cellular response level. The simulation results are in accordance with our prior research effort associated with the development of deterministic human inflammation models that include transcriptional dynamics, signaling, and physiological components. The hypothetical scenarios explored in this study would potentially improve

  4. House Dust Endotoxin and Peripheral Leukocyte Counts: Results from Two Large Epidemiologic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, Michael B; Carnes, Megan U; Salo, Päivi M; Wilkerson, Jesse; Cohn, Richard D; King, Debra; Hoppin, Jane A; Sandler, Dale P; Travlos, Greg; London, Stephanie; Thorne, Peter; Zeldin, Darryl

    2017-05-31

    The peripheral leukocyte count is a biomarker of inflammation and is associated with human all-cause mortality. Although causes of acute leukocytosis are well-described, chronic environmental determinants of leukocyte number are less well understood. We investigated the relationship between house dust endotoxin concentration and peripheral leukocyte counts in human subjects. The endotoxin–leukocyte relationship was evaluated by linear regression in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005–2006 (n=6,254) and the Agricultural Lung Health Study (ALHS; n=1,708). In the ALHS, we tested for a gene [Toll-like Receptor 4 ( TLR4 ), encoding the endotoxin receptor]-by-environment interaction in the endotoxin–leukocyte relationship using regression models with an interaction term. There is a statistically significant, positive association between endotoxin concentration and total leukocyte number [estimated change, 0.186×10 3 /μL (95% CI: 0.070, 0.301×10 3 /μL) per 10-fold change in endotoxin; p=0.004) in the NHANES. Similar positive associations were found for monocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Stratified analyses revealed possible effect modification by asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We observed similar associations in the ALHS. For total leukocytes, there was suggestive evidence in the ALHS of a gene-by-environment interaction for minor allele carrier status at the TLR4 haplotype defined by rs4986790 and rs4986791 (interaction p=0.15). This is, to our knowledge, the first report of an association between house dust endotoxin and leukocyte count in a national survey. The finding was replicated in a farming population. Peripheral leukocyte count may be influenced by residential endotoxin exposure in diverse settings. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP661.

  5. Differential Effects of Tea Extracts on Growth and Cytokine Production by Normal and Leukemic Human Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bayer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tea is one of the world’s most highly consumed beverages, second only to water. It is affordable and abundant and thus has great potential for improving health of those in both developed and developing areas. Green, oolong, and black teas differ in the extent of fermentation and types of bioactive polyphenols produced. Green tea and its major polyphenol decrease growth of some cancer cells and effect production of immune system cytokines. This study compares the effects of different types of tea extracts on viability and cytokine production by normal and leukemic human T lymphocytes. Generation of the toxic reactive oxygen species H2O2 by extracts was also examined.Methods: The Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and mitogen-stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used in this study. Cell viability was determined by (3-4,5-dimethylthiamizol-2-yl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and production of interleukin-2 by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Levels of H2O2 generated by tea extracts were determined using the xylenol-orange method.Results: We found that green, oolong, and black tea extracts differentially effect the growth and viability of T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, substantially decreasing both growth and viability of leukemic T lymphocytes and having much lesser effects on their normal counterparts. Tea extracts also had differential effects on the production of the T lymphocyte growth factor interleukin-2, significantly decreasing production by leukemic cells while having only minor effects on normal cells. All three extracts induced H2O2 generation, with green and oolong tea extracts having the greatest effect. Leukemic cells were much more susceptible to growth inhibition and killing by H2O2 than normal lymphocytes.Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(4:72-85 Conclusions: The three tea extracts studied altered leukemic T lymphocyte

  6. Expression of GR, COX2и MMP1 genes in peripheral blood leukocytes after intensive therapy of the patients with chronic obstructive lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Yelshin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study was aimed at analysis of expression of genes controlling individual stages of an inflammatory process in combined therapy of chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD. Evaluation of activity of GR, COX-2, and MMP1 genes in blood leukocytes was determined in forty one patients with COPD exacerbations (GOLD stage II to III, Group D who underwent a two-week combined treatment including Tiotropium Bromide, Formoterol, and glucocotricoid inhalations, as well as parenteral antibacterial treatment. Before and after treatment, relative content of specific mRNAs for GR, GC receptors, and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (COX-2, GR, and MMP1 genes were determined with real-time PCR. Mean values of the gene expression did not significantly differ between the pre- and post-treatment time points. We have found, however, a highly significant correlation between individual changes of the СОХ2, ММР1 и GR gene expression, as well as reverse correlation between СОХ2, GR expression and positive changes in C-reactive protein levels following treatment course. The results of study confirm some interrelations between changes in expression of the inflammation-modulating genes and improvement of clinical parameters after combined drug therapy of the COPD.

  7. Hydrophobic interactions are involved in the inhibition of human leukocyte elastase by alkyltrimethylammonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouadri-Boudjelthia, A; Wallach, J M

    1997-02-01

    Electrostatic forces and hydrophobic interactions had been suggested to modify the adsorption of elastases onto insoluble fibrous elastin, which is the initial stage of elastolysis, but conflicting results had been obtained, and comparison between compounds with different structures was difficult. In order to explore these observations, we have studied the effect of six alkyltrimethylammonium bromides, with alkyl chain length ranging from six to 16 carbon atoms, on human leucocyte elastase activities, either with a synthetic substrate or with insoluble elastin. The enzymatic studies were performed either spectrophotometrically or using conductimetry, and direct binding on to elastin was conductimetrically measured. Binding of the alkyltrimethylammonium salts is increasing with alkyl chain length and we could demonstrate a cooperative binding for tetra- and hexadecyl chains. No effect of the six compounds could be evidenced on hydrolysis of a specific synthetic substrate. With insoluble elastin, elastolysis inhibition could be demonstrated for alkyl chain longer than ten carbon atoms, the effect increasing with chain length. A similar inhibition was observed with the soluble kappa-elastin, but it was less effective. The study shows that the interaction between the alkyltrimethylammonium salts and elastin plays a major role in the inhibitory potency of these molecules. As this effect is enhanced with alkyl chain length, it was concluded that hydrophobic interactions favour their binding, protecting elastin against elastase adsorption.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies that define canine homologues of human CD antigens: summary of the First International Canine Leukocyte Antigen Workshop (CLAW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbold, S; Metcalfe, S

    1994-03-01

    A panel of 127 monoclonal antibodies against canine leukocyte antigens, including controls, was distributed to 29 laboratories that performed a variety of experiments to identify groups of antibodies against the canine equivalents of some of the human CD antigens. Cluster analysis was performed centrally, using the submitted antibody binding data from immunofluorescence, ELISA and immuno-histology experiments. Immunoprecipitation for molecular weight determination was also performed centrally with T-cell blasts and a B-cell line as the sources of antigen. Clusters of three or more antibodies were found that defined the canine equivalents of the CD5, CD4, CD8 and Thy-1 antigens, and these could be used to label T-cell subsets from the peripheral blood. Other groups of monoclonal antibodies recognized the canine homologues of the CD11/18 group of antigens, CD44 and the CD45/CD45R antigen family: these should be useful in isolating functional subsets of CD4+ helper T cells. There was a cluster of four antibodies that bound strongly to platelets (probably CD41 antigen), three antibodies that were specific to B cells (including CD21) and two antibodies against a granulocyte antigen (possibly CD15). A number of reagents were found against canine MHC-II and immunoglobulin, with some of the latter able to distinguish between Ig subclasses. Properties of each of the canine antigens defined by these monoclonal antibodies are discussed and compared with other species. The availability of such a panel of reagents should allow rapid improvements in the immunological diagnosis of canine disease, and there might now be a potential for testing novel therapeutic strategies in a clinical veterinary setting.

  9. Human leukocyte antigen genetics and clinical features of self-treated patients on a gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, John A; Vande Voort, Jennifer L; Lahr, Brian D; Van Dyke, Carol T; Kroning, Cynthia M; Wu, Tsung-Teh; Gandhi, Manish J; Murray, Joseph A

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, people start a gluten-free diet (GFD) without a clear celiac disease (CD) diagnosis. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping is useful in ruling out CD in patients with equivocal results of serologic testing or small-bowel biopsy (SBB), but its utility and the clinical features of patients on self-treated GFD (ST-GFD) are largely unknown. Retrospective study of single tertiary care center cohort compared 137 patients on ST-GFD and 443 patients with well-defined CD. We compared HLA genotype, symptoms, serologic and SBB results, and response to GFD between the 2 groups. Analysis used univariate logistic regression modeling, adjusted for age and sex. Patients with ST-GFD presented more often with diarrhea (P<0.001), abdominal distention (P<0.001), flatulence (P=0.002), cramping (P=0.02), itchy skin (P=0.02), oral inflammation (P=0.04), and constipation (P=0.01) and less often with anemia (P<0.001) or malaise (P=0.02) than CD patients. In addition, 41% did not carry DQ2.5 and DQ8 versus 6% of CD patients (P<0.001). Only 2% of ST-GFD patients had SBB clearly consistent with CD. Family history of CD showed no difference between groups (P=0.77). Although CD patients had a statistically higher rate of GFD benefit, both groups had a high responsiveness rate (98% vs. 94%; P=0.03). HLA genotyping is useful in evaluating patients on an ST-GFD. Although confirmed CD is rare in self-treated patients, most still report benefit from GFD regardless of DQ2 and DQ8 status. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity may play a role.

  10. Identification of Novel Short C-Terminal Transcripts of Human SERPINA1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamala, Nerea; Aggarwal, Nupur; Iadarola, Paolo; Fumagalli, Marco; Gomez-Mariano, Gema; Lara, Beatriz; Martinez, Maria Teresa; Cuesta, Isabel; Stolk, Jan; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Martinez-Delgado, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Human SERPINA1 gene is located on chromosome 14q31-32.3 and is organized into three (IA, IB, and IC) non-coding and four (II, III, IV, V) coding exons. This gene produces α1-antitrypsin (A1AT), a prototypical member of the serpin superfamily of proteins. We demonstrate that human peripheral blood leukocytes express not only a product corresponding to the transcript coding for the full-length A1AT protein but also two short transcripts (ST1C4 and ST1C5) of A1AT. In silico sequence analysis revealed that the last exon of the short transcripts contains an Open Reading Frame (ORF) and thus putatively can produce peptides. We found ST1C4 expression across different human tissues whereas ST1C5 was mainly restricted to leukocytes, specifically neutrophils. A high up-regulation (10-fold) of short transcripts was observed in isolated human blood neutrophils after activation with lipopolysaccharide. Parallel analyses by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified peptides corresponding to C-terminal region of A1AT in supernatants of activated but not naïve neutrophils. Herein we report for the first time a tissue specific expression and regulation of short transcripts of SERPINA1 gene, and the presence of C-terminal peptides in supernatants from activated neutrophils, in vitro. This gives a novel insight into the studies on the transcription of SERPINA1 gene.

  11. Identification of chemokines associated with the recruitment of decidual leukocytes in human labour: potential novel targets for preterm labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Sarah A; Tower, Clare L; Jones, Rebecca L

    2013-01-01

    Current therapies for preterm labour (PTL) focus on arresting myometrial contractions but are largely ineffective, thus alternative therapeutic targets need to be identified. Leukocytes infiltrate the uterus around the time of labour, and are in particularly abundant in decidua (maternal-fetal interface). Moreover, decidual inflammation precedes labour in rat pregnancies and thus may contribute to initiation of labour. We hypothesized that chemokines mediate decidual leukocyte trafficking during preterm labour (PTL) and term labour (TL), thus representing potential targets for preventing PTL. Women were recruited into 4 groups: TL, term not in labour (TNL), idiopathic PTL and PTL with infection (PTLI). Choriodecidual RNA was subjected to a pathway-specific PCR array for chemokines. Differential expression of 12 candidate chemokines was validated by real time RT-PCR and Bioplex assay, with immunohistochemistry to confirm cellular origin. 25 chemokines were upregulated in choriodecidua from TL compared to TNL. A similar pattern was detected in PTL, however a distinct profile was observed in PTLI consistent with differences in leukocyte infiltration. Upregulation of CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein was confirmed in TL, with CCL8 upregulated in PTL. Significant correlations were detected between these chemokines and decidual leukocyte abundance previously assessed by immunohistochemical and image analysis. Chemokines were primarily expressed by decidual stromal cells. In addition, CXCL8 and CCL5 were significantly elevated in maternal plasma during labour, suggesting chemokines contribute to peripheral inflammatory events during labour. Differences in chemokine expression patterns between TL and idiopathic PTL may be attributable to suppression of chemokine expression by betamethasone administered to women in PTL; this was supported by in vitro evidence of chemokine downregulation by clinically relevant concentrations of the steroid. The current

  12. Human cytomegalovirus UL145 gene is highly conserved among ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    correlated with their geographical origin. 4. Discussion. In the HCMV UL/b′ region, the UL146 gene has been characterized to encode a CXC chemokine that interferes with the recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes at the site of infection (Penfold et al 1999; Saedrup et al 2002). Moreover, a TNF receptor-like protein ...

  13. [Effect of hydrogen peroxide on human leukocyte antigen-G expression in placental trophoblasts in pre-eclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue; Sun, Li-zhou; Yin, Yin

    2010-05-01

    To explore the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the expression of human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) in placental trophoblasts in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia. Forty pregnant women, delivered through cesarean section in the Department of Obstetrics of and Gynecology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from October 2008 to October 2009, were enrolled, including 20 women with pre-eclampsia and 20 healthy gravidas (control group). Colorimetry and western blot were applied, respectively, to determine the level of H2O2 and the expression of HLA-G protein in placental tissues and the correlation between them were analyzed. After 24 hours of seeding, JEG-3 cells (the HLA-G positive cell line of choriocarcinoma) were divided into two groups: intervention group (exposure to 175 micromol/L H2O2) and control group (without H2O2). Immunofluorescence and western blot were used to investigate the expression of HLA-G protein in JEG-3 cells at 24 hours and 48 hours after incubation. (1) The level of H2O2 in placenta in the pre-eclampsia group was significantly higher than that in control group [(105+/-13) nmolxmg(-1)xprot(-1) vs (62+/-18) nmol.mg(-1)xprot(-1), PHLA-G protein in placenta of the pre-eclampsia group was reduced by 88% compared with that of the control (0.20+/-0.08 vs 1.67+/-0.65, PHLA-G level and H2O2 expression in the placenta in both groups (r=-0.895, P=0.000). (4) Compared with the control group, the expression of HLA-G protein in JEG-3 cells, after 24 hours and 48 hours exposure to H2O2, reduced by 39% and 80%, respectively, (3.21+/-0.33 vs 1.95+/-0.25 and 0.65+/-0.08, PHLA-G in JEG-E cells in the intervention group at 48 hours compared to the control group (PHLA-G expression in the placental trophoblasts in pre-eclampsia which may be involved in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia.

  14. Human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles and cervical adenocarcinoma: a pooled analysis of two epidemiologic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh eSafaeian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associations between human leukocyte antigens (HLA alleles and cervical cancer are largely representative of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, the major histologic subtype. We evaluated the association between HLA class I (A, B, and C and class II (DRB1 and DQB1 loci and risk of cervical adenocarcinoma (ADC, a less common but aggressive histologic subtype.We pooled data from the Eastern and Western US cervical cancer studies, and evaluated the association between individual alleles and allele combinations and ADC (n=630 ADC; n=775 controls. Risk estimates were calculated for 11 a priori (based on known associations with cervical cancer regardless of histologic type and 38 non a priori common alleles, as odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI, adjusted for age and study. In exploratory analysis, we compared the risk associations between subgroups with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA in ADC tumor tissues in the Western US study cases and controls. Three of the a priori alleles were significantly associated with decreased risk of ADC (DRB1*13:01 (OR=0.61; 95%CI:0.41-0.93, DRB1*13:02 (OR=0.49; 95%CI:0.31-0.77, and DQB1*06:03 (OR=0.64; 95%CI:0.42-0.95; one was associated with increased risk (B*07:02(OR=1.39; 95%CI:1.07-1.79. Among alleles not previously reported, DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.46; 95%CI: 0.27-0.78 was associated with decreased risk of ADC and C*07:02 (OR=1.41; 95%CI:1.09-1.81 was associated with increased risk. We did not observe a difference by histologic subtype. ADC was most strongly associated with increased risk with B*07:02/C*07:02 alleles (OR=1.33; 95%CI:1.01-1.76 and decreased risk with DRB1*13:02/DQB1*06:04 (OR=0.41; 95%CI:0.21-0.80. Results suggest that HLA allele associations with cervical ADC are similar to those for cervical SCC. An intriguing finding was the difference in risk associated with several alleles restricted to HPV16 or HPV18 related tumors, consistent with the hypothesis that HLA recognition is HPV type specific.

  15. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú de León, David; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Villavicencio, Verónica; García Carranca, Alejandro; Mohar Betancourt, Alejandro; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; López-Tello, Alberto; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Barquera, Rodrigo; Yu, Neng; Yunis, Edmond J; Granados, Julio

    2009-02-05

    The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 - 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027-0.223, p = 0.00001). Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican population where high resolutions HLA

  16. Leukocyte esterase urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003584.htm Leukocyte esterase urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Leukocyte esterase is a urine test to look for ...

  17. Gingipains of Porphyromonas gingivalis Modulate Leukocyte Adhesion Molecule Expression Induced in Human Endothelial Cells by Ligation of CD99

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Peter L. W.; Decarlo, Arthur A.; Hunter, Neil

    2006-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis has been implicated as a key etiologic agent in the pathogenesis of destructive chronic periodontitis. Among virulence factors of this organism are cysteine proteinases, or gingipains, that have the capacity to modulate host inflammatory defenses. Intercellular adhesion molecule expression by vascular endothelium represents a crucial process for leukocyte transendothelial migration into inflamed tissue. Ligation of CD99 on endothelial cells was shown to induce express...

  18. Optimisation of the CT h4S bioassay for detection of human interleukin-4 secreted by mononuclear cells stimulated by phytohaemaglutinin or by human leukocyte antigen mismatched mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Lykke; Russell, Charlotte Astrid; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Limiting dilution analysis has been used in the context of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation to determine anti-recipient interleukin-2 (IL-2) producing helper T lymphocyte precursor (HTLp) frequencies, which in several studies have been predictive of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recently......S bioassay detects 5 pg/ml of human recombinant IL-4 with no detection of IL-2 in concentrations below 500 pg/ml. We have found 72 h of culture optimal for detection of IL-2 and IL-4 produced by human mononuclear cells (MNC) in response to stimulation with phytohaemaglutinin and for detection of IL......-2 in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched mixed leukocyte culture (MLC). An interindividual variation in cytokine accumulation was demonstrated for IL-4 but not for IL-2. With the use of 5x10(4) responder cells/well no IL-4 could be detected in HLA-mismatched MLC between days 1 and 16. The lack...

  19. Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Differentially Facilitate Leukocyte Recruitment and Utilize Chemokines for T Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumei Man

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells that functionally express blood brain barrier (BBB properties are useful surrogates for studying leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions at the BBB. In this study, we compared two different endothelial cellular models: transfected human brain microvascular endothelial cells (THBMECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. With each grow under optimal conditions, confluent THBMEC cultures showed continuous occludin and ZO-1 immunoreactivity, while HUVEC cultures exhibited punctate ZO-1 expression at sites of cell-cell contact only. Confluent THBMEC cultures on 24-well collagen-coated transwell inserts had significantly higher transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER and lower solute permeability than HUVECs. Confluent THBMECs were more restrictive for mononuclear cell migration than HUVECs. Only THBMECs utilized abluminal CCL5 to facilitate T-lymphocyte migration in vitro although both THBMECs and HUVECs employed CCL3 to facilitate T cell migration. These data establish baseline conditions for using THBMECs to develop in vitro BBB models for studying leukocyte-endothelial interactions during neuroinflammation.

  20. Protective effect of dry olive leaf extract in adrenaline induced DNA damage evaluated using in vitro comet assay with human peripheral leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabarkapa, Andrea; Zivković, Lada; Zukovec, Dijana; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2014-04-01

    Excessive release of stress hormone adrenaline is accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species which may cause disruption of DNA integrity leading to cancer and age-related disorders. Phenolic-rich plant product dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) is known to modulate effects of various oxidants in human cells. The aim was to evaluate the effect of commercial DOLE against adrenaline induced DNA damage in human leukocytes by using comet assay. Peripheral blood leukocytes from 6 healthy subjects were treated in vitro with three final concentrations of DOLE (0.125, 0.5, and 1mg/mL) for 30 min at 37°C under two different protocols, pretreatment and post-treatment. Protective effect of DOLE was assessed from its ability to attenuate formation of DNA lesions induced by adrenaline. Compared to cells exposed only to adrenaline, DOLE displayed significant reduction (Pextract was more pronounced at smaller concentrations. Post-treatment with 0.125 mg/mL DOLE was the most effective against adrenaline genotoxicity. Results indicate genoprotective and antioxidant properties in dry olive leaf extract, strongly supporting further explorations of its underlying mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of human leukocyte antigen class I alleles and their population frequencies on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 control among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Song, Wei; Lobashevsky, Elena; Tang, Jianming; Shrestha, Sadeep; Zhang, Kui; McNicholl, Janet M; Gardner, Lytt I; Wilson, Craig M; Klein, Robert S; Rompalo, Anne; Mayer, Kenneth; Sobel, Jack; Kaslow, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    Populations of African ancestry continue to account for a disproportionate burden of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epidemic in the United States. We investigated the effects of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I markers in association with virologic and immunologic control of HIV-1 infection among 338 HIV-1 subtype B-infected African Americans in 2 cohorts: Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health (REACH) and HIV Epidemiology Research Study (HERS). One-year treatment-free interval measurements of HIV-1 RNA viral loads and CD4(+) T cells were examined both separately and combined to represent 3 categories of HIV-1 disease control (76 controllers, 169 intermediates, and 93 noncontrollers). Certain previously or newly implicated HLA class I alleles (A*32, A*36, A*74, B*14, B*1510, B*3501, B*45, B*53, B*57, Cw*04, Cw*08, Cw*12, and Cw*18) were associated with 1 or more of the endpoints in univariate analyses. After multivariable adjustments for other genetic and nongenetic risk factors of HIV-1 progression, the subset of alleles more strongly or consistently associated with HIV-1 disease control included A*32, A*74, B*14, B*45, B*53, B*57, and Cw*08. Carriage of infrequent HLA-B but not HLA-A alleles was associated with more favorable disease outcomes. Certain HLA class I associations with control of HIV-1 infection cross the boundaries of race and viral subtype, whereas others appear confined within one or the other of those boundaries. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. All rights reserved.

  2. Inter-Individual Differences In Habitual Sleep Timing and Entrained Phase of Endogenous Circadian Rhythms of BMAL1, PER2 and PER3 mRNA in Human Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Simon N.; Viola, Antoine U.; Kyriakopoulou, Vanessa; von Schantz, Malcolm; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Individual sleep timing differs and is governed partly by circadian oscillators, which may be assessed by hormonal markers, or by clock gene expression. Clock gene expression oscillates in peripheral tissues, including leukocytes. The study objective was to determine whether the endogenous phase of these rhythms, assessed in the absence of the sleep-wake and light-dark cycle, correlates with habitual sleep-wake timing. Design: Observational, cross-sectional. Setting: Home environment and Clinical Research Center. Participants: 24 healthy subjects aged 25.0 ± 3.5 (SD) years. Measurements: Actigraphy and sleep diaries were used to characterize sleep timing. Circadian rhythm phase and amplitude of plasma melatonin, cortisol, and BMAL1, PER2, and PER3 expression were assessed during a constant routine. Results: Circadian oscillations were more robust for PER3 than for BMAL1 or PER2. Average peak timings were 6:05 for PER3, 8:06 for PER2, 15:06 for BMAL1, 4:20 for melatonin, and 10:49 for cortisol. Individual sleep-wake timing correlated with the phases of melatonin and cortisol. Individual PER3 rhythms correlated significantly with sleep-wake timing and the timing of melatonin and cortisol, but those of PER2 and BMAL1 did not reach significance. The correlation between sleep timing and PER3 expression was stronger in individuals homozygous for the variant of the PER3 polymorphism that is associated with morningness. Conclusions: Individual phase differences in PER3 expression during a constant routine correlate with sleep timing during entrainment. PER3 expression in leukocytes represents a useful molecular marker of the circadian processes governing sleep-wake timing. Citation: Archer SN; Viola AU; Kyriakopoulou V; von Schantz M; Dijk DJ. Inter-individual differences in habitual sleep timing and entrained phase of endogenous circadian rhythms of BMAL1, PER2 and PER3 mRNA in human leukocytes. SLEEP 2008;31(5):608-617. PMID:18517031

  3. Inhibitory effect of human recombinant interferon gamma on synthesis of acute phase proteins in human hepatoma Hep G2 cells stimulated by leukocyte cytokines, TNF alpha and IFN-beta 2/BSF-2/IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magielska-Zero, D; Bereta, J; Czuba-Pelech, B; Pajdak, W; Gauldie, J; Koj, A

    1988-07-01

    Supernatants from endotoxin-stimulated human leukemic cells and human recombinant interferon-beta 2 similarly enhance synthesis of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and haptoglobin but suppress synthesis of albumin in cultured Hep G2 cells. Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor only slightly affects production of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and albumin in a similar manner as leukocyte cytokines. In distinction, recombinant human interferon-gamma profoundly inhibits synthesis of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and especially of haptoglobin, but stimulates production of alpha 2-macroglobulin thus modulating the acute phase response of these cells.

  4. Study of the structure and impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G-A, HLA-G-B, and HLA-G-DRB1 haplotypes in families with recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Astrid Marie; Steffensen, Rudi Nora; Nielsen, Henriette S

    2010-01-01

    A 14-base pair (bp) long insertion (ins)/deletion (del) polymorphism in exon 8 in the 3'-untranslated region of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene is suggested to affect transcription of the gene. Carriage of the G14bp ins is associated with low levels of soluble HLA-G and increases the risk...... of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Due to existence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the HLA region, the primary susceptibility genes for RM in the HLA-G region have not yet been identified. HLA-A, -B, -DRB1, and -G14bp polymorphisms were investigated in 29 Caucasian families with two or more siblings...... suffering unexplained RM. Strong positive LD was detected between the G14bp ins and HLA-A*01, -A*11, -A*31, -B*08, and DRB1*03, whereas strong negative LD was found between G14bp ins and HLA-A*02, -A*03, and -A*24. The frequency of haplotypes with HLA-G14bp ins inherited from the mother was significantly...

  5. Regulation of leukocyte migration by activation of the leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (LAM-1) selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spertini, O; Kansas, G S; Munro, J M; Griffin, J D; Tedder, T F

    1991-02-21

    A central feature of host defence is the ability of leukocytes to enter tissues in response to immune or inflammatory stimuli. The leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (LAM-1) regulates the migration of human leukocytes by mediating the binding both of lymphocytes to high endothelial venules of peripheral lymph nodes and of neutrophils to endothelium at inflammatory sites. As lymphocytes and neutrophils express the same LAM-1 protein, it is not clear how lineage-specific differences in leukocyte migration are controlled. We now report that the affinity of LAM-1 for a carbohydrate-based ligand, PPME, is dramatically increased following lymphocyte and neutrophil activation by lineage-specific stimuli. In addition, activation of lymphocytes by physiological stimuli enhanced LAM-1-dependent binding to high endothelial venules. Thus, transient changes in LAM-1 affinity after leukocyte stimulation probably directly influence leukocyte migration.

  6. Gene losses during human origins.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxia Wang; Grus, Wendy E; Jianzhi Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Pseudogenization is a widespread phenomenon in genome evolution, and it has been proposed to serve as an engine of evolutionary change, especially during human origins (the ?less-is-more? hypothesis). However, there has been no comprehensive analysis of human-specific pseudogenes. Furthermore, it is unclear whether pseudogenization itself can be selectively favored and thus play an active role in human evolution. Here we conduct a comparative genomic analysis and a literature survey to identi...

  7. Relation between HLA genes, human skin volatiles and attractiveness of humans to malaria mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Niels O; Beijleveld, Hans; Qiu, Yu Tong; Maliepaard, Chris; Verduyn, Willem; Haasnoot, Geert W; Claas, Frans H J; Mumm, Roland; Bouwmeester, Harro J; Takken, Willem; van Loon, Joop J A; Smallegange, Renate C

    2013-08-01

    Chemical cues are considered to be the most important cues for mosquitoes to find their hosts and humans can be ranked for attractiveness to mosquitoes based on the chemical cues they emit. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are considered to be involved in the regulation of human body odor and may therefore affect human attractiveness to mosquitoes, and hence, affect the force of malaria transmission. In the present study the correlations between HLA profiles, human skin volatiles and human attractiveness to the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae Giles sensu stricto were examined. Skin emanations of 48 volunteers were collected by rubbing a foot over glass beads. Previously the attractiveness of these emanations to An. gambiae was determined. In this study, the chemical composition of these emanations was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and blood samples of all volunteers were taken for HLA analysis. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), Fisher's exact test and random forest regression were used to test for correlations between individuals classified as either highly or poorly attractive to mosquitoes and their HLA profile and volatile composition. HLA profiling suggests that people carrying HLA gene Cw∗07 are more attractive to mosquitoes. GC-MS revealed that limonene, 2-phenylethanol and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were associated with individuals that were poorly attractive to An.gambiae and lactic acid, 2-methylbutanoic acid, tetradecanoic acid and octanal with individuals that were highly attractive. Such compounds offer potential for disruption of mosquito behavior in malaria intervention programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Disorders of sex development expose transcriptional autonomy of genetic sex and androgen-programmed hormonal sex in human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Bebermeier, Jan-Hendrik; Werner, Ralf; Demeter, Janos; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Cario, Gunnar; Appari, Mahesh; Siebert, Reiner; Riepe, Felix; Brooks, James D; Hiort, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Background Gender appears to be determined by independent programs controlled by the sex-chromosomes and by androgen-dependent programming during embryonic development. To enable experimental dissection of these components in the human, we performed genome-wide profiling of the transcriptomes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with rare defined "disorders of sex development" (DSD, e.g., 46, XY-females due to defective androgen biosynthesis) compared to normal 46, XY-males and 46, XX-females. Results A discrete set of transcripts was directly correlated with XY or XX genotypes in all individuals independent of male or female phenotype of the external genitalia. However, a significantly larger gene set in the PBMC only reflected the degree of external genital masculinization independent of the sex chromosomes and independent of concurrent post-natal sex steroid hormone levels. Consequently, the architecture of the transcriptional PBMC-"sexes" was either male, female or even "intersex" with a discordant alignment of the DSD individuals' genetic and hormonal sex signatures. Conclusion A significant fraction of gene expression differences between males and females in the human appears to have its roots in early embryogenesis and is not only caused by sex chromosomes but also by long-term sex-specific hormonal programming due to presence or absence of androgen during the time of external genital masculinization. Genetic sex and the androgen milieu during embryonic development might therefore independently modulate functional traits, phenotype and diseases associated with male or female gender as well as with DSD conditions. PMID:19570224

  9. Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 is expressed on human megakaryocytes and negatively regulates the maturation of primary megakaryocytic progenitors and cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jiangnan, E-mail: xuejinagnan@263.net [Department of Immunology, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai 264003 (China); Zhang, Xiaoshu; Zhao, Haiya; Fu, Qiang; Cao, Yanning; Wang, Yuesi; Feng, Xiaoying; Fu, Aili [Department of Immunology, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai 264003 (China)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} LAIR-1 is expressed on human megakaryocytes from an early stage. {yields} Up-regulation of LAIR-1 negatively regulates megakaryocytic differentiation of cell line. {yields} LAIR-1 negatively regulates the differentiation of primary megakaryocytic progenitors. -- Abstract: Leukocyte-associated immunoglobulin-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1) is an inhibitory collagen receptor which belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily. Although the inhibitory function of LAIR-1 has been extensively described in multiple leukocytes, its role in megakaryocyte (MK) has not been explored so far. Here, we show that LAIR-1 is expressed on human bone marrow CD34{sup +}CD41a{sup +} and CD41a{sup +}CD42b{sup +} cells. LAIR-1 is also detectable in a fraction of human cord blood CD34{sup +} cell-derived MK that has morphological characteristics of immature MK. In megakaryoblastic cell line Dami, the membrane protein expression of LAIR-1 is up-regulated significantly when cells are treated with phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Furthermore, cross-linking of LAIR-1 in Dami cells with its natural ligand or anti-LAIR-1 antibody leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation and PMA-promoted differentiation when examined by the MK lineage-specific markers (CD41a and CD42b) and polyploidization. In addition, we also observed that cross-linking of LAIR-1 results in decreased MK generation from primary human CD34{sup +} cells cultured in a cytokines cocktail that contains TPO. These results suggest that LAIR-1 is a likely candidate for an early marker of MK differentiation, and provide initial evidence indicating that LAIR-1 serves as a negative regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis.

  10. Human papillomavirus gene sequences in washed human sperm deoxyribonucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, P J; Su, B C; Kalugdan, T; Seraj, I M; Tredway, D R; King, A

    1994-05-01

    The present study demonstrated the presence of HPV gene sequences in Percoll-washed sperm cells using polymerase chain reaction primers targeting smaller gene regions. Up to 64% of the sperm specimens were shown to contain gene sequences indicative of the presence of HPV. Human papillomavirus type 16 was detected about twice as often as HPV type 18. The results suggest the possible role of sperm as a vector for HPV.

  11. Effect of sleep deprivation on rhythms of clock gene expression and melatonin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Katrin; Plomp, Rosina; Lao, Oscar; Middleton, Benita; Revell, Victoria L; Skene, Debra J; Kayser, Manfred

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of sleep deprivation on the human circadian system. Plasma melatonin and cortisol levels and leukocyte expression levels of 12 genes were examined over 48 h (sleep vs. no-sleep nights) in 12 young males (mean±SD: 23±5 yrs). During one night of total sleep deprivation, BMAL1 expression was suppressed, the heat shock gene HSPA1B expression was induced, and the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm increased, whereas other high-amplitude clock gene rhythms (e.g., PER1-3, REV-ERBα) remained unaffected. These data suggest that the core clock mechanism in peripheral oscillators is compromised during acute sleep deprivation.

  12. Metallothionein mediates leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynes Michael A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metallothionein (MT is a cysteine-rich, metal-binding protein that can be induced by a variety of agents. Modulation of MT levels has also been shown to alter specific immune functions. We have noticed that the MT genes map close to the chemokines Ccl17 and Cx3cl1. Cysteine motifs that characterize these chemokines are also found in the MT sequence suggesting that MT might also act as a chemotactic factor. Results In the experiments reported here, we show that immune cells migrate chemotactically in the presence of a gradient of MT. This response can be specifically blocked by two different monoclonal anti-MT antibodies. Exposure of cells to MT also leads to a rapid increase in F-actin content. Incubation of Jurkat T cells with cholera toxin or pertussis toxin completely abrogates the chemotactic response to MT. Thus MT may act via G-protein coupled receptors and through the cyclic AMP signaling pathway to initiate chemotaxis. Conclusion These results suggest that, under inflammatory conditions, metallothionein in the extracellular environment may support the beneficial movement of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. MT may therefore represent a "danger signal"; modifying the character of the immune response when cells sense cellular stress. Elevated metallothionein produced in the context of exposure to environmental toxicants, or as a result of chronic inflammatory disease, may alter the normal chemotactic responses that regulate leukocyte trafficking. Thus, MT synthesis may represent an important factor in immunomodulation that is associated with autoimmune disease and toxicant exposure.

  13. Leukocyte attraction by CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Klein

    Full Text Available We previously identified CCL20 as an early chemokine in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with pneumococcal meningitis but its functional relevance was unknown. Here we studied the role of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in pneumococcal meningitis. In a prospective nationwide study, CCL20 levels were significantly elevated in the CSF of patients with pneumococcal meningitis and correlated with CSF leukocyte counts. CCR6-deficient mice with pneumococcal meningitis and WT mice with pneumococcal meningitis treated with anti-CCL20 antibodies both had reduced CSF white blood cell counts. The reduction in CSF pleocytosis was also accompanied by an increase in brain bacterial titers. Additional in vitro experiments showed direct chemoattractant activity of CCL20 for granulocytes. In summary, our results identify the CCL20-CCR6 axis as an essential component of the innate immune defense against pneumococcal meningitis, controlling granulocyte recruitment.

  14. Distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nageen Hussain

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is one of the classic examples of autoimmune diseases among human beings and is a rare disease in Pakistani population. Clinically it is a quite diverse and complicated autoimmune disease in a sense that it involves multiple organs of the body and mimics with other diseases as well. This study focused on the distribution of HLA alleles in SLE patients with ACE I/D Polymorphism. A total of 122 individuals were enrolled in this study, 61 were the SLE patients who fulfilled revised ACR criteria and 61 were the healthy controls. Mean age of SLE patients at diagnosis was 30.35 ± 1.687 years (12-68 years. ACE gene I/D polymorphism was performed by nested PCR and DNA based HLA typing technique was used. ACE gene I/D polymorphism of Intron16 was studied and found to be involved in the activity of SLE. There is high frequency of HLA-A*01, HLA-B*40, HLA-DRB1*01 alleles in SLE patients with ACE DD genotype. The distribution of HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 alleles was analyzed in SLE patients with various disease phenotypes. HLA-A*01 and HLA-B*40 was the most common allele found in SLE patients with the involvement of skin. HLA-A*01, -A*03, HLA-B*13 and -B*46 were common in SLE patients with arthritis while HLA-A*26 and -A*69 were commonly found in Lupus nephritis cases. SLE patients involving both skin and kidney had an allele HLA-DRB1*01 common in them.

  15. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makino Takashi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. Results We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD or small-scale duplication (SSD, and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. Conclusions Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  16. Duplicability of self-interacting human genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pérez-Bercoff, Asa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is increasing interest in the evolution of protein-protein interactions because this should ultimately be informative of the patterns of evolution of new protein functions within the cell. One model proposes that the evolution of new protein-protein interactions and protein complexes proceeds through the duplication of self-interacting genes. This model is supported by data from yeast. We examined the relationship between gene duplication and self-interaction in the human genome. RESULTS: We investigated the patterns of self-interaction and duplication among 34808 interactions encoded by 8881 human genes, and show that self-interacting proteins are encoded by genes with higher duplicability than genes whose proteins lack this type of interaction. We show that this result is robust against the system used to define duplicate genes. Finally we compared the presence of self-interactions amongst proteins whose genes have duplicated either through whole-genome duplication (WGD) or small-scale duplication (SSD), and show that the former tend to have more interactions in general. After controlling for age differences between the two sets of duplicates this result can be explained by the time since the gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS: Genes encoding self-interacting proteins tend to have higher duplicability than proteins lacking self-interactions. Moreover these duplicate genes have more often arisen through whole-genome rather than small-scale duplication. Finally, self-interacting WGD genes tend to have more interaction partners in general in the PIN, which can be explained by their overall greater age. This work adds to our growing knowledge of the importance of contextual factors in gene duplicability.

  17. Patenting Human Genes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo

    2017-01-01

    In accordance with the concept of the book and the assigned scope of the contribution, this chapter describes the European law with respect to the patent-eligibility of isolated DNA sequences. This chapter will further include a brief comparison with recent developments from the US and Australia....... It will, however, not focus on the important debates regarding the patent-eligibility of other biological material, diagnostic methods patents (as data aggregators) or abstract ideas which will be addressed by other contributions. Moreover, the analysis will merely concentrate on patent-eligibility. Other...... patentability requirement will only be briefly touched upon in the discussion part. The paper starts out in section 1.5.2 by discussing the patent-eligibility of isolated human DNA sequences on the European national level and under the Biotechnology Directive. Then the patent-eligibility of isolated human DNA...

  18. Validation of celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register using duodenal biopsies, celiac disease-specific antibodies, and human leukocyte-antigen genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Stine Dydensborg; Stordal, Ketil; Hansen, Tine Plato

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to validate the celiac disease diagnoses recorded in the Danish National Patient Register. To validate the diagnoses, we used information on duodenal biopsies from a national register of pathology reports (the Patobank) and information on celiac disease......-specific antibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes obtained from patient medical records. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all the children who were born from 1995 to 2012 and who were registered as having celiac disease in the Danish National Patient Register. We reviewed all the pathology reports...... on duodenal biopsies in the Patobank and the information in the medical records on celiac disease-specific antibodies (ie, anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 IgA and IgG, endomysial antibodies IgA, and anti-deamidated gliadin peptide IgG) and HLA genotypes. RESULTS: We identified 2,247 children who were...

  19. Different mechanisms causing loss of mismatched human leukocyte antigens in relapsing t(6;11)(q27;q23) acute myeloid leukemia after haploidentical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Hiroya; Fujioka, Tatsuya; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Yoshihara, Satoshi; Kaida, Katsuji; Taniguchi, Kyoko; Kato, Ruri; Tokugawa, Taduko; Nakata, Jun; Inoue, Takayuki; Yano, Aya; Eguchi, Ryoji; Okada, Masaya; Maruya, Etsuko; Saji, Hiroh; Ogawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-12-01

    Mismatched human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) on leukemic cells can be targeted by donor T cells in HLA-mismatched/haploidentical stem cell transplantation. In two cases of acute myeloid leukemia with t(6;11)(q27;q23) abnormality presented here, flow cytometry analysis showed a lack of HLA-A unshared between recipients and donors in relapsing leukemic cells after HLA-haploidentical transplantation. However, high-resolution HLA genotyping showed that one case lacked a corresponding HLA haplotype, whereas the other preserved it. These cases suggest that leukemic cells, which lacked mismatched HLA expression, might have an advantage in selective expansion under donor T-cell immune surveillance after HLA-haploidentical transplantation. Most importantly, down-regulation of unshared HLA expression potentially occurs by genetic alterations other than loss of HLA alleles. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Factors associated with anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies in patients supported with continuous-flow devices and effect on probability of transplant and post-transplant outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alba, Ana C; Tinckam, Kathryn; Foroutan, Farid

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One major disadvantage of ventricular assist device (VAD) therapy is the development of human-leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. We aimed to identify factors associated with HLA antibodies during continuous flow (CF)-VAD support and assess the effect on transplant probability...... survival model was used to assess transplant waiting time and probability, risk of rejection, and a composite outcome of rejection, graft failure, and death. RESULTS: Thirty-six patients (25%) were female; mean age was 47 ± 13 years. Eighty-one patients (57%) had a pre-VAD PRA of 0%, and 16 were highly.......7% higher post-VAD PRA (p probability of transplant (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-0.99). A high PRA was not associated...

  1. Two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence for label-free in vivo imaging ingestion of disease-causing bacteria by human leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-02-01

    Real time and in vivo monitoring leukocyte behavior provides unique information to understand the physiological and pathological process of infection. In this study, we demonstrate that two-photon excited reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence provides imaging contrast to distinguish granulocyte and agranulocyte. By using spectral and time-resolved NADH fluorescence, we study the immune response of human neutrophils against bacterial infection (Escherichia coli). The two-photon excited NADH fluorescence images clearly review the morphological changes from resting neutrophils (round shape) to activated neutrophils (ruffle shape) during phagocytosis. The free-tobound NADH ratio of neutrophils decreases after ingesting disease-causing pathogen: Escherichia coli. This finding may provide a new optical tool to investigate inflammatory processes by using NADH fluorescence in vivo.

  2. Breed differences in development of anti-insulin antibodies in diabetic dogs and investigation of the role of dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Angela L; Kennedy, Lorna J; Ollier, William E R; Catchpole, Brian

    2015-10-15

    Administration of insulin for treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs can stimulate an immune response, with a proportion of animals developing anti-insulin antibodies (AIA). For an IgG antibody response to occur, this would require B cell presentation of insulin peptides by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, encoded by dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) genes, in order to receive T-cell help for class switching. DLA genes are highly polymorphic in the dog population and vary from breed to breed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate AIA reactivity in diabetic dogs of different breeds and to investigate whether DLA genes influence AIA status. Indirect ELISA was used to determine serological reactivity to insulin in diabetic dogs, treated with either a porcine or bovine insulin preparation. DLA haplotypes for diabetic dogs were determined by sequence-based typing of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 loci. Significantly greater insulin reactivity was seen in treated diabetic dogs (n=942) compared with non-diabetic dogs (n=100). Relatively few newly diagnosed diabetic dogs (3/109) were found to be AIA positive, although this provides evidence that insulin autoantibodies might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease in some cases. Of the diabetic dogs treated with a bovine insulin preparation, 52.3% (182/348) were AIA positive, compared with 12.6% (75/594) of dogs treated with a porcine insulin preparation, suggesting that bovine insulin is more immunogenic. Breeds such as dachshund, Cairn terrier, miniature schnauzer and Tibetan terrier were more likely to develop AIA, whereas cocker spaniels were less likely to develop AIA, compared with crossbreed dogs. In diabetic dogs, DLA haplotype DRB1*0015--DQA1*006--DQB1*023 was associated with being AIA positive, whereas the haplotype DLA-DRB1*006--DQA1*005--DQB1*007 showed an association with being AIA negative. These research findings suggest that DLA genes influence AIA responses in treated diabetic

  3. Advances in gene technology: Human genetic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, W.A.; Ahmad, F.; Black, S.; Schultz, J.; Whelan, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the papers presented at the conference on the subject of ''advances in Gene technology: Human genetic disorders''. Molecular biology of various carcinomas and inheritance of metabolic diseases is discussed and technology advancement in diagnosis of hereditary diseases is described. Some of the titles discussed are-Immunoglobulin genes translocation and diagnosis; hemophilia; oncogenes; oncogenic transformations; experimental data on mice, hamsters, birds carcinomas and sarcomas.

  4. Horizontal gene transfer in human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario

    2015-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer has a tremendous impact on the genome plasticity, adaptation and evolution of bacteria. Horizontally transferred mobile genetic elements are involved in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance and virulence genes, thus contributing to the emergence of novel "superbugs". This review provides update on various mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer and examines how horizontal gene transfer contributes to the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. Special focus is paid to the role horizontal gene transfer plays in pathogenicity of the emerging human pathogens: hypervirulent Clostridium difficile and Escherichia coli (including the most recent haemolytic uraemic syndrome outbreak strain) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which have been associated with largest outbreaks of infection recently.

  5. Population genomics of human gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranger, Barbara E.; Nica, Alexandra C.; Forrest, Matthew S.; Dimas, Antigone; Bird, Christine P.; Beazley, Claude; Ingle, Catherine E.; Dunning, Mark; Flicek, Paul; Koller, Daphne; Montgomery, Stephen; Tavaré, Simon; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variation influences gene expression, and this can be efficiently mapped to specific genomic regions and variants. We used gene expression profiling of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines of all 270 individuals of the HapMap consortium to elucidate the detailed features of genetic variation underlying gene expression variation. We find gene expression levels to be heritable and differentiation between populations in agreement with earlier small-scale studies. A detailed association analysis of over 2.2 million common SNPs per population (5% frequency HapMap) with gene expression identified at least 1348 genes with association signals in cis and at least 180 in trans. Replication in at least one independent population was achieved for 37% of cis- signals and 15% of trans- signals, respectively. Our results strongly support an abundance of cis- regulatory variation in the human genome. Detection of trans- effects is limited but suggests that regulatory variation may be the key primary effect contributing to phenotypic variation in humans. Finally, we explore a variety of methodologies that improve the current state of analysis of gene expression variation. PMID:17873874

  6. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Roe

    Full Text Available Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE. Infection with WNV (NY99 strain significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1 did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101 strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  7. West Nile virus-induced cell adhesion molecules on human brain microvascular endothelial cells regulate leukocyte adhesion and modulate permeability of the in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Kelsey; Orillo, Beverly; Verma, Saguna

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing the mechanisms by which West Nile virus (WNV) causes blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, leukocyte infiltration into the brain and neuroinflammation is important to understand the pathogenesis of WNV encephalitis. Here, we examined the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) in mediating the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes across human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMVE). Infection with WNV (NY99 strain) significantly induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin in human endothelial cells and infected mice brain, although the levels of their ligands on leukocytes (VLA-4, LFA-1and MAC-1) did not alter. The permeability of the in vitro BBB model increased dramatically following the transmigration of monocytes and lymphocytes across the models infected with WNV, which was reversed in the presence of a cocktail of blocking antibodies against ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin. Further, WNV infection of HBMVE significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to the HBMVE monolayer and transmigration across the infected BBB model. The blockade of these CAMs reduced the adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes across the infected BBB model. Further, comparison of infection with highly neuroinvasive NY99 and non-lethal (Eg101) strain of WNV demonstrated similar level of virus replication and fold-increase of CAMs in HBMVE cells suggesting that the non-neuropathogenic response of Eg101 is not because of its inability to infect HBMVE cells. Collectively, these results suggest that increased expression of specific CAMs is a pathological event associated with WNV infection and may contribute to leukocyte infiltration and BBB disruption in vivo. Our data further implicate that strategies to block CAMs to reduce BBB disruption may limit neuroinflammation and virus-CNS entry via 'Trojan horse' route, and improve WNV disease outcome.

  8. MECHANISMS OF CELL RESISTANCE TO CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ARE CONNECTED WITH CELL PROLIFERATION STATE AND TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVITY OF LEUKOCYTE AND IMMUNE INTERFERON GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Sokolova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection in diploid human fibroblasts (HF and levels of cell resistance to this virus were shown to be in direct correlation with high α-interferon (IFNα gene activity and induction of IFNγ gene transcription. Regulation of IFNα mRNA transcription was revealed to be positively associated with cellular DNA synthesis. At the same time, activities of IFNβ and IFNγ genes were at the constantly low level and were not induced in DNA-synthetic phase (S-phase of the cells. Levels of IFNα mRNA synthesis are quite different for G0- vs S-phase-synchronized HF110044 cell cultures: appropriate values for dividing cells (S-phase proved to be 100-fold higher than in resting state (G0. The mode of CMV infection in resting HF-cell could be considered either as acute, or a productive one. On the contrary, proliferating cells exhibited lagging viral syntheses and delayed cell death. Arrest of CMV replication may be, to some extent, comparable with latent infectious state, being associated with high production of IFNα. Both basal and induced levels of IFNα mRNA in CMV-resistant adult human skin fibroblast cells (HSF-1608 were 10-fold higher than in human embryo lung cell line (HELF-977, which is highly sensitive to CMV. Moreover, a short-time induction of IFNγ genes was observed in resistant cells, whereas no such effect was noticed in highly sensitive cells. CMV reproduction in sensitive cell lines (HELF-977 and HELF-110044 partially inhibits IFNα mRNA transcription at the later stages of infection (24 to 48 hours. Thus, cellular resistance and control of CMV infection in diploid fibroblasts are associated predominantly with high transcription of IFNα gene, and with temporal induction of IFNγ gene. We did not reveal any participation of IFNβ genes in protection of human diploid fibroblasts from CMV.

  9. Characterization of a human prothrombin gene enhancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, B.K.

    1991-01-01

    The 5[prime] flanking sequence of the human prothrombin gene was isolated by screening a human liver phage library with a human prothrombin cDNA as a hybridization probe. A phage was identified that contained 3 kilobasepairs of DNA upstream of the initiator methionine codon. Primer extension studies showed that the major transcription initiation sites were located 23 and 36 basepairs upstream of the initiator codon. DNA sequences in the 5[prime] flanking region of the human prothrombin gene were then analyzed for cis-activating transcriptional activity by a transient expression system using the human growth hormone gene as the reporter gene. The chimeric expression vector was introduced into HepG2 cells, and secreted human growth hormone was monitored by using a radioimmunoassay. These studies showed that the 3 kbp fragment contained sequences that were sufficient for the initiation of transcription in HepG2 cells. Subsequent deletion studies showed that the 3 kbp fragment contained two elements: a weak promoter in the region immediately upstream of the mRNA coding sequence, and an enhancer located between nucleotides [minus]860 and [minus]940. The enhancer element was active at a distance and in either orientation. In addition, the enhancer was liver cell specific, and acted on heterologous promoters including the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter and the mouse metallothionein I promoter. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the enhancer with a DNA sequence data base showed the enhancer sequence to be unique. The enhancer sequence is flanked by an inverted repeat, 5[prime] CCTCCC 3[prime], and contains a putative binding site for hepatic nuclear factor 1 (HNF-1). Deoxyribonuclease I footprint analysis and linker scanning mutagenesis showed that the enhancer contains multiple protein binding motifs. A Y-box binding protein sequence was also found, which may be a transcription factor for a number of genes.

  10. Identification, characterization, and localization of the human lysyl oxidase-related gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, K.S.; Mellott, J.K. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yang, T.P. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)]|[Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Lysyl oxidase (lox) initiates the formation of inter- and intra-strand covalent crosslinks of mature collagen and elastin in connective tissue. The lox gene has been cloned and mapped to human chromosome 5q23.3-31.2. The lysyl oxidase gene is approximately 15 kb in size and consists of seven exons. Lox mRNA is expressed at high levels in rat aorta and lung, and is undetectable in brain, kidney, liver, and heart. We have cloned and sequenced a lysyl oxidase-related cDNA, lox2, which exhibits amino acid sequence homology to the carboxyl end of lox. However, the function of lox2 is unknown. The tissue- and cell-specific expression patterns of lox2 have been examined by Northern blot analysis. Levels of lox2 mRNA in mouse and rat tissue is elevated in heart, lung, kidney and spleen; low in brain, and muscle, and is not detected in liver. In cultured cells, lox2 mRNA levels are high in human skin and corneal fibroblasts, human and rat lung fibroblasts, and rat lung epithelial-like cells. Low levels of lox2 mRNA are found in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells and neuroblastoma cells and are undetectable in human hepatoma cells. We have isolated multiple, unique, overlapping lox2 genomic clones from a human leukocyte genomic phage library. Using a genomic phage clone as a probe, we have mapped lox2 to human chromosome 15q23-24 using fluorescence in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes. Characterization of the genomic phage clones indicates significant conservation of gene structure in the 3{prime} conserved region of lox2 relative to lox. This preservation of gene structure suggests a partial gene duplication between human chromosomes 15 and 5.

  11. High levels of brain-type creatine kinase activity in human platelets and leukocytes: a genetic anomaly with autosomal dominant inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Heidwolf; Wienker, Thomas F; Hoffmann, Michael M; Scheuerbrandt, Günter; Kemp, Katharina; Bugert, Peter

    2012-01-15

    The ectopic expression in peripheral blood cells of the brain-type creatine kinase (CKB) is an autosomal dominant inherited anomaly named CKBE (MIM ID 123270). Here, we characterized the CK activity in serum, platelets (PLT) and leukocytes (WBC) of 22 probands (from 8 unrelated families) and 10 controls. CK activity was measured by standard UV-photometry. Expression of the CKB gene was analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. DNA sequencing including bisulfite treatment was used for molecular analysis of the CKB gene. Serum CK levels were comparable between probands and controls. CKBE probands revealed significantly higher CK activity in PLT (3.7 ± 2.7 versus 179.2 ± 83.0 U/10(12) PLT; p<0.001) and WBC (0.4 ± 0.3 versus 2.6 ± 2.1 U/10(9) WBC; p=0.004). Inhibitory anti-CKM antibodies did not affect CK activity indicating that the CK activity is generated exclusively by the CK-BB isoenzyme. CKB mRNA and protein levels were significantly higher in PLT and WBC from probands compared to controls. Re-sequencing of the entire CKB gene and methylation analysis of a CpG island revealed no alteration in CKBE probands. The genetic basis of CKBE remains unclear, however, we propose that a de-methylated CKB gene is inherited that leads to high CKB expression levels in myeloic precursor cells in the bone marrow. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Genomics of the human carnitine acyltransferase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, FR; Huijkman, NCA; Boomsma, C; Kuipers, JRG; Bartelds, B

    2000-01-01

    Five genes in the human genome are known to encode different active forms of related carnitine acyltransferases: CPT1A for liver-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT1B for muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT2 for carnitine palmitoyltransferase II, CROT for carnitine

  13. The human tenascin-R gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprini, A; Gherzi, R; Siri, A; Querzé, G; Viti, F; Zardi, L

    1996-12-06

    The human tenascin-R gene encodes a multidomain protein belonging to the tenascin family, until now detected only in the central nervous system. During embryo development, tenascin-R is presumed to play a pivotal role in axonal path finding through its adhesive and repulsive properties. Recently, the primary structure of human tenascin-R has been elucidated (Carnemolla, B., Leprini, A., Borsi, L., Querzé, G., Urbini, S., and Zardi, L. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8157-8160). As a further step to investigate the role of human tenascin-R, we defined the structure of its gene. The gene, which spans a region of chromosome 1 approximately 85 kilobases in length, consists of 21 exons, ranging in size from 90 to >670 base pairs. The sequence analysis of intron splice donor and acceptor sites revealed that the position of introns in human tenascin-R are precisely conserved in the other two tenascin family members, tenascin-C and tenascin-X. The determination of intronic sequences flanking the exon boundaries will allow investigation of whether mutations may be responsible for altered function of the gene product(s) leading to central nervous system development defects.

  14. Succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid transferase (SCOT): Human cDNA and genomic cloning and chromosomal mapping of the human gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassovska-Bratinova, S.; Mitchell, G.A. [Hopital Ste-Justine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Duncan, A. [Kingston General Hospital, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    SCOT (EC 2.8.3.5) mediates the activation and utilization of ketone bodies in extrahepatic tissues, especially brain, heart and kidney. Children with hereditary SCOT deficiency have episodes of severe ketoacidosis. Using a partial human heart SCOT cDNA, hSCOT-G, we detected a single {approximately}3 Kb mRNA in human heart and leukocytes, but not in liver. The length of the mouse SCOT mRNA detected with hSCOT-G in muscle, heart, kidney and brain is {approximately}3 Kb. We mapped the human SCOT gene to chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization. To date we have isolated human heart cDNAs spanning 2.9 Kb and including a 1248 bp open reading frame. The 3{prime} nontranslated region of the human SCOT mRNA extends at least 1712 bp, in contrast to the 209 bp sequence reported for pig SCOT cDNA. In one heart cDNA clone we detected a 58 bp insertion 258 bp downstream from the stop codon. We performed RT-PCR using a 5{prime} degenerate-sequence primer designed from the pig SCOT leader peptide sequence and 3{prime} human-specific primers. We obtained a fragment of the expected 320 bp length which strongly hybridizes to an internal oligonucleotide and which we are now characterizing. Human genomic Southern blot analysis with a partial human cDNA as probe suggests that the length of the human SCOT gene is about 40 K. Using hSCOT-G as a probe, we screened a human leukocyte genomic library in EMBL-3 phage and isolated two genomic clones. One of them contains a processed pseudogene. The other contains at least two exons of the human SCOT gene spanning cDNA residues 431 to 734. These findings will be useful for mutation analysis in SCOT-deficient patients.

  15. Constitutive intracellular expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DO and HLA-DR but not HLA-DM in trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranella, Anthi; Vassiliadis, Simon; Mastora, Chrisa; Valentina, Michailidou; Dionyssopoulou, Eva; Athanassakis, Irene

    2005-01-01

    The nonclassic human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM molecules have been proved to positively regulate antigen presentation in classic antigen-presenting cells, whereas in B lymphocytes HLA-DO have been identified as negative regulators of the process. The present report examines whether the negative expression of classic class II molecules in trophoblasts implies negative regulation by HLA-DO. It was revealed by immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and subcellular fractionation techniques that human trophoblasts, although not expressing any surface HLA-DR antigens, constitutively express intracellular HLA-DR, HLA-DO, and CD74, but not HLA-DM. Administration of interferon-gamma to the cell culture increased HLA-DR and CD74, induced HLA-DM, but did not alter the expression of HLA-DO and induced HLA-DR release from the cells. These results were confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis except that HLA-DM mRNA was detected in control cells, indicating a posttranscriptional regulation. Under the same experimental conditions, human monocytes/macrophages were not expressing intracellular HLA-DO while exhibiting significant levels of HLA-DR, HLA-DM, and CD74. The results presented here reveal for the first time expression of HLA-DO in trophoblasts, which can be of great importance in maintaining the class II-negative state in these cells and consequently protecting the fetus from maternal immune attack.

  16. Inhibition by soya isoflavones of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function: possible relevance for the beneficial effects of soya intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondo, Serenella; Krauze-Brzósko, Katarzyna; Manarini, Stefano; Martelli, Nicola; Pecce, Romina; Evangelista, Virgilio; Benedetta Donati, Maria; Cerletti, Chiara

    2008-02-01

    Lower CVD incidence is reported in Asian populations consuming soya-containing food. As polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are involved in the risk of CVD, we investigated the modulatory effect of soya isoflavones on several PMN functions and their molecular mechanisms in vitro. PMN, isolated from blood from healthy subjects, were tested upon activation with 1 microm- n-formyl-methyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) for superoxide anion production (ferric cytochrome c reduction) and released elastase (chromogenic test). PMN homotypic aggregates stimulated by fMLP or P-selectin in dynamic conditions were detected by optical microscopy. PMN, mixed with thrombin-activated, washed platelets, formed cell aggregates, measured by flow cytometry. Phosphorylation of Pyk2, a focal adhesion kinase, was studied by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Genistein, daidzein and equol inhibited superoxide anion production (IC50 0.25 (sem 0.1), 21.0 (sem 4.2) and 13.0 (sem 2.8) microm, respectively); the release of elastase was prevented by genistein (IC50 63 (sem 17) microm). PMN homotypic aggregates, stimulated by fMLP, were significantly reduced (24 (sem 12) and 51 (sem 14) % of control) by 100 microm genistein and equol. P-selectin-induced aggregates were reduced to 19 (sem 6), 44 (sem 10) and 28 (sem 9) % of control by 100 microm genistein, daidzein and equol, respectively. Genistein, daidzein and equol also significantly reduced mixed platelet-PMN aggregates (IC50 4.0 (sem 0.9), 57 (sem 6) and 66 (sem 23) microm, respectively). In PMN challenged by fMLP or P-selectin, activation of Pyk2 was prevented by isoflavones. The cardioprotective effect of soya-containing food might be linked to reduction of PMN activation and PMN-platelet interaction, novel targets for the biological effects of soya isoflavones.

  17. Using FRET to quantify changes in integrin structures in human leukocytes induced by chemoattractants with multi-frequency flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrano, Jesus; Smagley, Yelena; Chigaev, Alexandre; Sklar, Larry A.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-02-01

    Flow cytometry for single cell counting uses optical measurements to report multiple cell features such as cell morphology, cell phenotype, and microenvironmental changes. Time-resolved flow cytometry is a unique method that involves the detection of the average fluorescence lifetime as a cytometric parameter. Measuring the average fluorescence lifetime is helpful when discriminating between more than one emission signal from a single cell because of spectrally overlapping emission. In this contribution, we present preliminary measurements toward a study that advances simple time-resolved flow cytometry and introduces a technique to measure fluorescence lifetime values from single cells labeled with a Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) pair. Specifically, donor fluorophore fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescence lifetime is measured to identify its proximity to the acceptor fluorophore. We hypothesize that our time-resolved flow cytometry approach can resolve changes in FRET in order to study integrin structures on the surface of leukocyte cells. Our results show that FITC has an average lifetime of 4.2 +/-0.1 nsec, and an average fluorescence lifetime of 2.4 nsec +/-0.2 nsec when engaged in FRET. After the release of FRET (e.g. dequenched) the average fluorescence lifetime of FITC was measured to be 3.1 +/- 0.5 nsec. Phasor graphs reveal large distributions of fluorescence lifetimes on a per cell basis, suggesting the existence of multiple fluorescence lifetimes. These data suggest more than one integrin conformation occurs throughout the cell population. The impact of this work is the addition of quantitative information for FRET efficiency values and determination of FRET calculations using high-throughput data.

  18. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of an Intracellular Pathogen in Human Peripheral Leukocytes with Hybridizing Magnetic Relaxation Nanosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Boukhriss, Hamza; Santra, Santimukul; Naser, Saleh A.; Perez, J. Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are still a major global healthcare problem. The quick and sensitive detection of pathogens responsible for these infections would facilitate correct diagnosis of the disease and expedite treatment. Of major importance are intracellular slow-growing pathogens that reside within peripheral leukocytes, evading recognition by the immune system and detection by traditional culture methods. Herein, we report the use of hybridizing magnetic nanosensors (hMRS) for the detection of an intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The hMRS are designed to bind to a unique genomic sequence found in the MAP genome, causing significant changes in the sample’s magnetic resonance signal. Clinically relevant samples, including tissue and blood, were screened with hMRS and results were compared with traditional PCR analysis. Within less than an hour, the hMRS identified MAP-positive samples in a library of laboratory cultures, clinical isolates, blood and homogenized tissues. Comparison of the hMRS with culture methods in terms of prediction of disease state revealed that the hMRS outperformed established culture methods, while being significantly faster (1 hour vs 12 weeks). Additionally, using a single instrument and one nanoparticle preparation we were able to detect the intracellular bacterial target in clinical samples at the genomic and epitope levels. Overall, since the nanoparticles are robust in diverse environmental settings and substantially more affordable than PCR enzymes, the potential clinical and field-based use of hMRS in the multiplexed identification of microbial pathogens and other disease-related biomarkers via a single, deployable instrument in clinical and complex environmental samples is foreseen. PMID:22496916

  19. Rapid and sensitive detection of an intracellular pathogen in human peripheral leukocytes with hybridizing magnetic relaxation nanosensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Kaittanis

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections are still a major global healthcare problem. The quick and sensitive detection of pathogens responsible for these infections would facilitate correct diagnosis of the disease and expedite treatment. Of major importance are intracellular slow-growing pathogens that reside within peripheral leukocytes, evading recognition by the immune system and detection by traditional culture methods. Herein, we report the use of hybridizing magnetic nanosensors (hMRS for the detection of an intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP. The hMRS are designed to bind to a unique genomic sequence found in the MAP genome, causing significant changes in the sample's magnetic resonance signal. Clinically relevant samples, including tissue and blood, were screened with hMRS and results were compared with traditional PCR analysis. Within less than an hour, the hMRS identified MAP-positive samples in a library of laboratory cultures, clinical isolates, blood and homogenized tissues. Comparison of the hMRS with culture methods in terms of prediction of disease state revealed that the hMRS outperformed established culture methods, while being significantly faster (1 hour vs 12 weeks. Additionally, using a single instrument and one nanoparticle preparation we were able to detect the intracellular bacterial target in clinical samples at the genomic and epitope levels. Overall, since the nanoparticles are robust in diverse environmental settings and substantially more affordable than PCR enzymes, the potential clinical and field-based use of hMRS in the multiplexed identification of microbial pathogens and other disease-related biomarkers via a single, deployable instrument in clinical and complex environmental samples is foreseen.

  20. Changes in total and differential leukocyte counts during the clinically silent liver phase in a controlled human malaria infection in malaria-naïve Dutch volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van Wolfswinkel (Marlies); Langenberg, M.C.C. (Marijke C. C.); L.J. Wammes (Linda); R.W. Sauerwein (Robert); R. Koelewijn (Rob); C.C. Hermsen (Cornelus); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Both in endemic countries and in imported malaria, changes in total and differential leukocyte count during Plasmodium falciparum infection have been described. To study the exact dynamics of differential leukocyte counts and their ratios, they were monitored in a group of

  1. Changes in total and differential leukocyte counts during the clinically silent liver phase in a controlled human malaria infection in malaria-naive Dutch volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfswinkel, M.E. van; Langenberg, M.C.; Wammes, L.J.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Koelewijn, R.; Hermsen, C.C.; Hellemond, J.J. van; Genderen, P.J. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both in endemic countries and in imported malaria, changes in total and differential leukocyte count during Plasmodium falciparum infection have been described. To study the exact dynamics of differential leukocyte counts and their ratios, they were monitored in a group of healthy

  2. Inflammation, leukocytes and menstruation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jemma; Salamonsen, Lois A

    2012-12-01

    Menstruation has many of the features of an inflammatory process. The complexity and sequence of inflammatory-type events leading to the final tissue breakdown and bleeding are slowly being unravelled. Progesterone has anti-inflammatory properties, and its rapidly declining levels (along with those of estrogen) in the late secretory phase of each non-conception cycle, initiates a sequence of interdependent events of an inflammatory nature involving local inter-cellular interactions within the endometrium. Intracellular responses to loss of progesterone (in decidualized stromal, vascular and epithelial cells) lead to decreased prostaglandin metabolism and loss of protection from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS results in release of NFκB from suppression with activation of target gene transcription and increased synthesis of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins, cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). The resultant leukocyte recruitment, with changing phenotypes and activation, provide further degradative enzymes and MMP activators, which together with a hypoxic environment induced by prostaglandin actions, lead to the tissue breakdown and bleeding characteristic of menstruation. In parallel, at sites where shedding is complete, microenvironmentally-induced changes in phenotypes of neutrophils and macrophages from pro- to anti-inflammatory, in addition to induction of growth factors, contribute to the very rapid re-epithelialization and restoration of tissue integrity.

  3. Mapping genes to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Sarah [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    For this project, 22 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) were fine mapped to regions of human chromosome 19. An EST is a short DNA sequence that occurs once in the genome and corresponds to a single expressed gene. {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probes were made by polymerase chain reaction for each EST and hybridized to filters containing a chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. The location of the ESTs on the chromosome was determined by the location of the ordered cosmid to which the EST hybridized. Of the 22 ESTs that were sublocalized, 6 correspond to known genes, and 16 correspond to anonymous genes. These localized ESTs may serve as potential candidates for disease genes, as well as markers for future physical mapping.

  4. Human proton/oligopeptide transporter (POT) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Botka, C. W.; Wittig, T. W.; Graul, R. C.

    2000-01-01

    The proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POT) gene family currently consists of approximately 70 cloned cDNAs derived from diverse organisms. In mammals, two genes encoding peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2 have been cloned in several species including humans, in addition to a rat...... human orthologue of rPHT1 (expression largely confined to rat brain and retina) was represented by numerous ESTs originating from many tissues. Assembly of these ESTs resulted in a contiguous sequence covering approximately 95% of the suspected coding region. The contig sequences and analyses revealed...... the presence of several possible splice variants of hPHT1. A second closely related human EST-contig displayed high identity to a recently cloned mouse cDNA encoding cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-inducible 1 protein (gi:4580995). This contig served to identify a PAC clone containing deduced exons...

  5. Late regulation of immune genes and microRNAs in circulating leukocytes in a pig model of influenza A (H1N2) infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Louise; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; E. Larsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    and biological implications of miRNA regulation in circulating leukocytes, we collected blood samples before and after (1, 3, and 14 days) IAV challenge of pigs. Differential expression of miRNAs and innate immune factor mRNA transcripts was analysed using RT-qPCR. A total of 20 miRNAs were regulated after IAV...... points to a protracted effect of IAV infection, potentially affecting the host’s ability to respond to secondary infections. In conclusion, experimental IAV infection of pigs demonstrated the dynamic nature of miRNA and mRNA regulation in circulating leukocytes during and after infection, and revealed...

  6. Leukocyte-epithelial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Ke; Parkos, Charles A

    2003-10-01

    As a 'double-edged sword', neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte) migration across epithelial-lined organs is an important component of host defense, but it also results in epithelial pathophysiology and disease symptoms. There have been significant advances in better understanding the mechanisms of how leukocytes cross the vascular endothelium to exit the bloodstream; however, many of the mechanisms that govern polymorphonuclear leukocyte transepithelial migration are different and we are only just beginning to understand them. Recent findings include new junctional adhesion molecules and carbohydrate moieties as receptors for migrating neutrophils. In addition, new insights into leukocyte-epithelial signaling events have emerged that are beginning to shed light on the role of SIRP-CD47 interactions in regulating the rate of neutrophil transepithelial migration and how neutrophils modulate epithelial barrier function.

  7. Comparison of dengue infection in human mononuclear leukocytes with mosquito C6/36 and mammalian Vero cells using flow cytometry to detect virus antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydow Farid FO von

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS analysis is useful for the detection of cellular surface antigens and intracellular proteins. We used this methodology in order to detect and quantify dengue antigens in highly susceptible cells such as clone C6/36 (Aedes albopictus and Vero cells (green monkey kidney. Additionally, we analyzed the infection in vitro of human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML. FACS analysis turned out to be a reliable technique to quantify virus growth in traditional cell cultures of C6/36 as well as Vero cells. High rates of infection were achieved with a good statistical correlation between the virus amount used in infection and the percentage of dengue antigen containing cells detected in infected cultures. We also showed that human monocytes (CD14+ are preferred target cells for in vitro dengue infection among PBML. Monocytes were much less susceptible to virus infection than cell lines but they displayed dengue antigens detected by FACS five days after infection. In contrast, lymphocytes showed no differences in their profile for dengue specific immunofluorescence. Without an animal model to reproduce dengue disease, alternative assays have been sought to correlate viral virulence with clinical manifestations and disease severity. Study of in vitro interaction of virus and host cells may highlight this relationship.

  8. Comparison of dengue infection in human mononuclear leukocytes with mosquito C6/36 and mammalian Vero cells using flow cytometry to detect virus antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydow, F F; Santiago, M A; Neves-Souza, P C; Cerqueira, D I; Gouvea, A S; Lavatori, M F; Bertho, A L; Kubelka, C F

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis is useful for the detection of cellular surface antigens and intracellular proteins. We used this methodology in order to detect and quantify dengue antigens in highly susceptible cells such as clone C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) and Vero cells (green monkey kidney). Additionally, we analyzed the infection in vitro of human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBML). FACS analysis turned out to be a reliable technique to quantify virus growth in traditional cell cultures of C6/36 as well as Vero cells. High rates of infection were achieved with a good statistical correlation between the virus amount used in infection and the percentage of dengue antigen containing cells detected in infected cultures. We also showed that human monocytes (CD14+) are preferred target cells for in vitro dengue infection among PBML. Monocytes were much less susceptible to virus infection than cell lines but they displayed dengue antigens detected by FACS five days after infection. In contrast, lymphocytes showed no differences in their profile for dengue specific immunofluorescence. Without an animal model to reproduce dengue disease, alternative assays have been sought to correlate viral virulence with clinical manifestations and disease severity. Study of in vitro interaction of virus and host cells may highlight this relationship.

  9. Antiviral CD8+ T Cells Restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Exist during Natural HIV Infection and Exhibit Clonal Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Srinika; Lamothe, Pedro A; Soghoian, Damien Z; Kazer, Samuel W; Cole, Michael B; Shalek, Alex K; Yosef, Nir; Jones, R Brad; Donaghey, Faith; Nwonu, Chioma; Jani, Priya; Clayton, Gina M; Crawford, Frances; White, Janice; Montoya, Alana; Power, Karen; Allen, Todd M; Streeck, Hendrik; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Picker, Louis J; Kappler, John W; Walker, Bruce D

    2016-10-18

    CD8+ T cell recognition of virus-infected cells is characteristically restricted by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, although rare examples of MHC class II restriction have been reported in Cd4-deficient mice and a macaque SIV vaccine trial using a recombinant cytomegalovirus vector. Here, we demonstrate the presence of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II-restricted CD8+ T cell responses with antiviral properties in a small subset of HIV-infected individuals. In these individuals, T cell receptor β (TCRβ) analysis revealed that class II-restricted CD8+ T cells underwent clonal expansion and mediated killing of HIV-infected cells. In one case, these cells comprised 12% of circulating CD8+ T cells, and TCRα analysis revealed two distinct co-expressed TCRα chains, with only one contributing to binding of the class II HLA-peptide complex. These data indicate that class II-restricted CD8+ T cell responses can exist in a chronic human viral infection, and may contribute to immune control. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of genotoxic potency of sulfate-rich surface waters on medicinal leech and human leukocytes using different versions of the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaljević, Zlatko; Ternjej, Ivančica; Stanković, Igor; Ivković, Marija; Zelježić, Davor; Mladinić, Marin; Kopjar, Nevenka

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how exposure to sulfate-rich surface waters affects the level of primary DNA damage in hemocytes of leech Hirudo medicinalis. Samples of surface water were collected at two sites near a gypsum factory (Knin, Croatia) and two reference sites. In the laboratory, samples were subjected to detailed chemical analysis and used in toxicity testing. For that purpose, previously acclimatized individuals of H. medicinalis were sub-chronically exposed (for 28 days) to tested water samples. Levels of primary DNA damage were evaluated using the alkaline Comet assay in hemocytes collected on days 7, 14, 21 and 28 of exposure and compared with their baseline values. Genotoxic potency of the water sample with the highest sulfate concentration was further evaluated using the alkaline, neutral and hOGG1-modified Comet assay on human peripheral blood leukocytes exposed ex vivo for 30 min. The purpose was to explore which mechanisms are responsible for DNA damage. Chemical analysis revealed that sulfate concentrations in two water samples collected in Mali Kukar Lake (1630 mg/L SO₄) and Kosovčica River (823.3 mg/L SO₄) exceeded the WHO and US EPA defined limits for sulfate in drinking water. Increased levels of metals were found only in the water sample collected in Mali Kukar Lake. However, of the 65 elements analyzed, only nickel and titanium exceed the value legally accepted in Croatia for drinking water. The levels of DNA damage, estimated by the alkaline Comet assay in hemocytes of medicinal leech, increased with the duration of exposure to two sulfate-rich water samples. Since hemocytes responded sensitively to treatment, they could be used for biomonitoring purposes. As observed on treated human peripheral blood leukocytes, all versions of the Comet assay were effective in detecting DNA damage, which was measured in samples with sulfate concentrations equal to or higher than the legally accepted levels for drinking water

  11. Low pH immobilizes and kills human leukocytes and prevents transmission of cell-associated HIV in a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markham Richard B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both cell-associated and cell-free HIV virions are present in semen and cervical secretions of HIV-infected individuals. Thus, topical microbicides may need to inactivate both cell-associated and cell-free HIV to prevent sexual transmission of HIV/AIDS. To determine if the mild acidity of the healthy vagina and acid buffering microbicides would prevent transmission by HIV-infected leukocytes, we measured the effect of pH on leukocyte motility, viability and intracellular pH and tested the ability of an acidic buffering microbicide (BufferGel® to prevent the transmission of cell-associated HIV in a HuPBL-SCID mouse model. Methods Human lymphocyte, monocyte, and macrophage motilities were measured as a function of time and pH using various acidifying agents. Lymphocyte and macrophage motilities were measured using video microscopy. Monocyte motility was measured using video microscopy and chemotactic chambers. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC viability and intracellular pH were determined as a function of time and pH using fluorescent dyes. HuPBL-SCID mice were pretreated with BufferGel, saline, or a control gel and challenged with HIV-1-infected human PBMCs. Results Progressive motility was completely abolished in all cell types between pH 5.5 and 6.0. Concomitantly, at and below pH 5.5, the intracellular pH of PBMCs dropped precipitously to match the extracellular medium and did not recover. After acidification with hydrochloric acid to pH 4.5 for 60 min, although completely immotile, 58% of PBMCs excluded ethidium homodimer-1 (dead-cell dye. In contrast, when acidified to this pH with BufferGel, a microbicide designed to maintain vaginal acidity in the presence of semen, only 4% excluded dye at 10 min and none excluded dye after 30 min. BufferGel significantly reduced transmission of HIV-1 in HuPBL-SCID mice (1 of 12 infected compared to saline (12 of 12 infected and a control gel (5 of 7 infected. Conclusion These

  12. Regulation of gene expression in human tendinopathy

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    Archambault Joanne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic tendon injuries, also known as tendinopathies, are common among professional and recreational athletes. These injuries result in a significant amount of morbidity and health care expenditure, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms leading to tendinopathy. Methods We have used histological evaluation and molecular profiling to determine gene expression changes in 23 human patients undergoing surgical procedures for the treatment of chronic tendinopathy. Results Diseased tendons exhibit altered extracellular matrix, fiber disorientation, increased cellular content and vasculature, and the absence of inflammatory cells. Global gene expression profiling identified 983 transcripts with significantly different expression patterns in the diseased tendons. Global pathway analysis further suggested altered expression of extracellular matrix proteins and the lack of an appreciable inflammatory response. Conclusions Identification of the pathways and genes that are differentially regulated in tendinopathy samples will contribute to our understanding of the disease and the development of novel therapeutics.

  13. Genetic variation in TERT and TERC and human leukocyte telomere length and longevity: a cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Thinggaard, Mikael; Nygaard, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase is of key importance for telomere maintenance, and variants of the genes encoding its major subunits, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA component (TERC), are candidates for interindividual variation in telomere length. Recently, the two SNPs rs3772190 and rs...

  14. Methylomics of gene expression in human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongmei; Ding, Jingzhong; Reynolds, Lindsay M.; Lohman, Kurt; Register, Thomas C.; De La Fuente, Alberto; Howard, Timothy D.; Hawkins, Greg A.; Cui, Wei; Morris, Jessica; Smith, Shelly G.; Barr, R. Graham; Kaufman, Joel D.; Burke, Gregory L.; Post, Wendy; Shea, Steven; Mccall, Charles E.; Siscovick, David; Jacobs, David R.; Tracy, Russell P.; Herrington, David M.; Hoeschele, Ina

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of several epigenetic mechanisms that contribute to the regulation of gene expression; however, the extent to which methylation of CpG dinucleotides correlates with gene expression at the genome-wide level is still largely unknown. Using purified primary monocytes from subjects in a large community-based cohort (n = 1264), we characterized methylation (>485 000 CpG sites) and mRNA expression (>48K transcripts) and carried out genome-wide association analyses of 8370 expression phenotypes. We identified 11 203 potential cis-acting CpG loci whose degree of methylation was associated with gene expression (eMS) at a false discovery rate threshold of 0.001. Most of the associations were consistent in effect size and direction of effect across sex and three ethnicities. Contrary to expectation, these eMS were not predominately enriched in promoter regions, or CpG islands, but rather in the 3′ UTR, gene bodies, CpG shores or ‘offshore’ sites, and both positive and negative correlations between methylation and expression were observed across all locations. eMS were enriched for regions predicted to be regulatory by ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) data in multiple cell types, particularly enhancers. One of the strongest association signals detected (P < 2.2 × 10−308) was a methylation probe (cg17005068) in the promoter/enhancer region of the glutathione S-transferase theta 1 gene (GSTT1, encoding the detoxification enzyme) with GSTT1 mRNA expression. Our study provides a detailed description of the epigenetic architecture in human monocytes and its relationship to gene expression. These data may help prioritize interrogation of biologically relevant methylation loci and provide new insights into the epigenetic basis of human health and diseases. PMID:23900078

  15. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: The Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study

    KAUST Repository

    Hägg, Sara

    2009-12-04

    Environmental exposures filtered through the genetic make-up of each individual alter the transcriptional repertoire in organs central to metabolic homeostasis, thereby affecting arterial lipid accumulation, inflammation, and the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes) important for CAD development. To this end, two-way clustering was used on 278 transcriptional profiles of liver, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat (n =66/tissue) and atherosclerotic and unaffected arterial wall (n =40/tissue) isolated from CAD patients during coronary artery bypass surgery. The first step, across all mRNA signals (n =15,042/12,621 RefSeqs/genes) in each tissue, resulted in a total of 60 tissue clusters (n= 3958 genes). In the second step (performed within tissue clusters), one atherosclerotic lesion (n =49/48) and one visceral fat (n =59) cluster segregated the patients into two groups that differed in the extent of coronary stenosis (P=0.008 and P=0.00015). The associations of these clusters with coronary atherosclerosis were validated by analyzing carotid atherosclerosis expression profiles. Remarkably, in one cluster (n =55/54) relating to carotid stenosis (P =0.04), 27 genes in the two clusters relating to coronary stenosis were confirmed (n= 16/17, P<10 -27and-30). Genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocytes (TEML) pathway were overrepresented in all three clusters, referred to as the atherosclerosis module (A-module). In a second validation step, using three independent cohorts, the Amodule was found to be genetically enriched with CAD risk by 1.8-fold (P<0.004). The transcription co-factor LIM domain binding 2 (LDB2) was identified as a potential high-hierarchy regulator of the A-module, a notion supported by subnetwork analysis, by cellular and lesion expression of LDB2, and by the

  16. Transcriptomic meta-analysis reveals up-regulation of gene expression functional in osteoclast differentiation in human septic shock.

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    Samanwoy Mukhopadhyay

    Full Text Available Septic shock is a major medical problem with high morbidity and mortality and incompletely understood biology. Integration of multiple data sets into a single analysis framework empowers discovery of new knowledge about the condition that may have been missed by individual analysis of each of these datasets. Electronic search was performed on medical literature and gene expression databases for selection of transcriptomic studies done in circulating leukocytes from human subjects suffering from septic shock. Gene-level meta-analysis was conducted on the six selected studies to identify the genes consistently differentially expressed in septic shock. This was followed by pathway-level analysis using three different algorithms (ORA, GSEA, SPIA. The identified up-regulated pathway, Osteoclast differentiation pathway (hsa04380 was validated in two independent cohorts. Of the pathway, 25 key genes were selected that serve as an expression signature of Septic Shock.

  17. Greater expression of the human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: analytical cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Lidyane Neves; Reginaldo, Fernanda Priscila Santos; Souza, Daliana Maria Berenice Oliveira; Soares, Christiane Pienna; Silva, Tarsia Giabardo Alves; Rocha, Keyla Borges Ferreira; Jatobá, Carlos André Nunes; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio; Andrade, Joanlise Marco Leon; Gonçalves, Ana Katherine Silveira; Crispim, Janaína Cristiana Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Impaired local cell immunity seems to contribute towards the pathogenesis and progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), but the underlying molecular mechanisms promoting its progression remain unclear. Identification of new molecular markers for prognosis and diagnosis of early-stage CIN may aid in decreasing the numbers of CIN cases. Several novel immunoregulatory molecules have been discovered over the past few years, including the human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G), which through interaction with its receptors exerts important tolerogenic functions. Several lines of evidence suggest that T-helper interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing cells (Th17 cells) may play a role in antitumor immunity. However, recent reports have implicated Th17 cells and their cytokines in both pro and anti-tumorigenic processes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the roles of HLA-G and Th17 in the immunopathogenesis of CIN I. Analytical cross-sectional study with a control group using 58 cervical specimens from the files of a public university hospital providing tertiary-level care. We examined HLA-G and IL-17 expression in the cervical microenvironment by means of immunohistochemistry, and correlated these findings with clinical and pathological features. There was a greater tendency towards HLA-G and IL-17 expression in specimens that showed CIN I, thus suggesting that these molecules have a contribution towards cervical progression. These findings suggest that HLA-G and IL-17 expression may be an early marker for assessing the progression of cervical lesions.

  18. Evaluation of basil extract ( Ocimum basilicum L. on oxidative, anti-genotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects in human leukocytes cell cultures exposed to challenging agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Martins Güez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ocimum is one of the most important genera of the Lamiaceae family. Several studies about basil and its popular use reveal many characteristics of the herb, including its use as antioxidant, anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-microbial, and cardiovascular agents, among others. In this paper, we evaluated genotoxic, oxidative, and anti-inflammatory parameters from the extract of Ocimum basilicum in different concentrations, using human leukocytes cultures exposed to challenging agents. Our results confirm that the O. basilicum extract acts as an antioxidant and effectively reverts or subjugates the effects of high oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide. These actions are attributed to its composition, which is rich in polyphenols and flavonoids as well as compounds such as rosmarinic acid, all of which have well-known antioxidant activity. We also show that our basil extract presents anti-inflammatory properties, the mechanism of which is a composed interaction between the inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediator and the stimulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Although pharmacodynamics studies are necessary to evaluate the activities in vivo, our results demonstrated that basil could act as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and a possible alternative for medicinal treatment.

  19. Role of metalloproteases in vaccinia virus epitope processing for transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP)-independent human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B7 class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Elena; García, Ruth; Mir, Carmen; Barriga, Alejandro; Lemonnier, François A; Ramos, Manuel; López, Daniel

    2012-03-23

    The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) translocates the viral proteolytic peptides generated by the proteasome and other proteases in the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. There, they complex with nascent human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules, which are subsequently recognized by the CD8(+) lymphocyte cellular response. However, individuals with nonfunctional TAP complexes or tumor or infected cells with blocked TAP molecules are able to present HLA class I ligands generated by TAP-independent processing pathways. Herein, using a TAP-independent polyclonal vaccinia virus-polyspecific CD8(+) T cell line, two conserved vaccinia-derived TAP-independent HLA-B*0702 epitopes were identified. The presentation of these epitopes in normal cells occurs via complex antigen-processing pathways involving the proteasome and/or different subsets of metalloproteinases (amino-, carboxy-, and endoproteases), which were blocked in infected cells with specific chemical inhibitors. These data support the hypothesis that the abundant cellular proteolytic systems contribute to the supply of peptides recognized by the antiviral cellular immune response, thereby facilitating immunosurveillance. These data may explain why TAP-deficient individuals live normal life spans without any increased susceptibility to viral infections.

  20. Early Differentiation of Human CD11c+NK Cells with γδ T Cell Activation Properties Is Promoted by Dialyzable Leukocyte Extracts

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    Dalia Ramírez-Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstitution of the hematopoietic system during immune responses and immunological and neoplastic diseases or upon transplantation depends on the emergent differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells within the bone marrow. Although in the last decade the use of dialyzable leukocyte extracts (DLE as supportive therapy in both infectious and malignant settings has increased, its activity on the earliest stages of human hematopoietic development remains poorly understood. Here, we have examined the ability of DLE to promote replenishment of functional lymphoid lineages from CD34+ cells. Our findings suggest that DLE increases their differentiation toward a conspicuous CD56+CD16+CD11c+ NK-like cell population endowed with properties such as IFNy production, tumor cell cytotoxicity, and the capability of inducing γδ T lymphocyte proliferation. Of note, long-term coculture controlled systems showed the bystander effect of DLE-stromal cells by providing NK progenitors with signals to overproduce this cell subset. Thus, by direct effect on progenitor cells and through activation and remodeling of the supporting hematopoietic microenvironment, DLE may contribute a robust innate immune response by promoting the emerging lymphopoiesis of functional CD11c+ NK cells in a partially TLR-related manner. Unraveling the identity and mechanisms of the involved DLE components may be fundamental to advance the NK cell-based therapy field.

  1. A novel bridge between oxidative stress and immunity: the interaction between hydrogen peroxide and human leukocyte antigen G in placental trophoblasts during preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue; Zhang, Guo-ying; Wang, Jue; Lu, Shou-lian; Cao, Jun; Sun, Li-zhou

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate a possible association between hydrogen peroxide and human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) in preeclampsia. We explored the correlation between HLA-G and hydrogen peroxide in preeclamptic (n = 30) and normotensive (n = 30) placentas, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments. Furthermore, RNA interference was used to explore the influence of HLA-G on the proliferation, apoptosis and invasion of HTR-8/SVneo cells when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. We found an inverse correlation between hydrogen peroxide and HLA-G expression in preeclamptic placentas. High levels of hydrogen peroxide could down-regulate HLA-G expression in HTR-8/SVneo. Compared with HLA-G knockdown HTR-8/SVneo, increased proliferation inhibition, higher apoptosis, and decreased cell invasion were found in the cell expressing HLA-G when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Our findings highlight that high levels of hydrogen peroxide can down-regulate HLA-G expression in trophoblasts during preeclampsia and trophoblasts expressing HLA-G are vulnerable to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of core and lanthanide ion dopants in sodium fluoride-based nanocrystals on phagocytic activity of human blood leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej [Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Department of Experimental Physics (Poland); Liskova, Aurelia; Kuricova, Miroslava [Slovak Medical University, Medical Faculty, Department of Immunology and Immunotoxicology (Slovakia); Banski, Mateusz; Misiewicz, Jan [Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Department of Experimental Physics (Poland); Dusinska, Maria [Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Health Effects Laboratory, Department of Environmental Chemistry (Norway); Horvathova, Mira; Ilavska, Silvia; Szabova, Michaela [Slovak Medical University, Medical Faculty, Department of Immunology and Immunotoxicology (Slovakia); Rollerova, Eva [Slovak Medical University, Faculty of Public Health, Department of Toxicology (Slovakia); Podhorodecki, Artur, E-mail: artur.p.podhorodecki@pwr.edu.pl [Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Department of Experimental Physics (Poland); Tulinska, Jana, E-mail: jana.tulinska@szu.sk [Slovak Medical University, Medical Faculty, Department of Immunology and Immunotoxicology (Slovakia)

    2017-02-15

    Sodium fluoride-based β-NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) doped with lanthanide ions are promising materials for application as luminescent markers in bio-imaging. In this work, the effect of NPs doped with yttrium (Y), gadolinium (Gd), europium (Eu), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb) and terbium (Tb) ions on phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes and the respiratory burst was examined. The surface functionalization of <10-nm NPs was performed according to our variation of patent pending ligand exchange method that resulted in meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) molecules on their surface. Y-core-based NCs were doped with Eu ions, which enabled them to be excited with UV light wavelengths. Cultures of human peripheral blood (n = 8) were in vitro treated with five different concentrations of eight NPs for 24 h. In summary, neither type of nanoparticles is found toxic with respect to conducted test; however, some cause toxic effects (they have statistically significant deviations compared to reference) in some selected doses tested. Both core types of NPs (Y-core and Gd-core) impaired the phagocytic activity of monocytes the strongest, having minimal or none whatsoever influence on granulocytes and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells. The lowest toxicity was observed in Gd-core, Yb, Tm dopants and near-infrared nanoparticles. Clear dose-dependent effect of NPs on phagocytic activity of leukocytes and respiratory burst of cells was observed for limited number of samples.

  3. Decreased Human Leukocyte Antigen-G Expression by miR-133a Contributes to Impairment of Proinvasion and Proangiogenesis Functions of Decidual NK Cells

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    Wenwei Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-G plays a crucial role in conferring fetal–maternal tolerance and ensuring a successful pregnancy. CD56bright natural killer (NK cells accumulate at the maternal decidua in large numbers during pregnancy and are found in direct contact with fetal trophoblasts. There are increasing evidences that decidual NK (dNK cells are crucial for pregnancy. However, the regulation of dNK cells is mostly unknown. Here, we provide evidences that the secretion function of dNK cells in recurrent spontaneous abortion was impaired, which led to the impairment of the proinvasion and proangiogenesis functions of dNK cells. Decreased HLA-G expression induced by the transfection of miR-133a mimics in HTR-8/SVneo affected the secretory functions of dNK cells. Thus, our data revealed that the functions of dNK cells could be suppressed by the decreased expression of HLA-G and suggest a possible mechanism of recurrent miscarriage.

  4. Ekspresi Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G dan Heat-Shock Protein-70 (Hsp-70 pada Pertumbuhan Janin Terhambat

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    Sri Sulistyowati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intra uterine growth retardation (IUGR is one of the leading causes of higher morbidity and mortality in perinatal. Immune maladaptation affects trophoblast invasion and spiralis arteria remodeling that will cause placental tissue hypoxia. This research aimed to analyze human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G and heat-shock protein-70 (Hsp-70 expression on the IUGR trophoblast and normal pregnancy, by applying analytical observational method and cross sectional approach. This research was conducted at the Obstetric and Gynecology Department of Dr. Moewardi Hospital Surakarta from November to December 2011. The total samples were 30, divided into two groups. There were 15 samples trophoblast on IUGR and 15 samples trophoblast from normal pregnancy. All samples were tested for HLA-G and Hsp-70 using immunohistochemistry. The data were analyzed by using t-test. The mean of HLA-G expression on the IUGR groups was 32.42±8.90 and on the normal pregnancy groups was 43.92±14.91 (p=0.016. Heat-shock protein70 expression on the IUGR groups was 2.4355+0.26647 and on the normal pregnancy groups was 1.5920+0.17142 with p=0.008. In conclusion, in IUGR, the HLA-G expression is lower and the Hsp-70 expression is higher than in normal pregnancy.

  5. EVALUATION OF HUMAN LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN CLASS I AND II ANTIGENS IN HELICOBACTER PYLORI-POSITIVE PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH ACTIVE GASTRITIS AND DUODENAL ULCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevim GÖNEN

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: As being the first bacteria determined to be carcinogenic, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a pathogen localized in the stomach in more than half of the world population. Some earlier studies have found a relation between tissue histocompatibility antigens and gastric cancers depending on the regions. OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to determine the distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I and class II antigens in H. pylori-positive pediatric patients with active gastritis and duodenal ulcer, excluding cancer cases, in our center. METHODS: The study included 40 patients diagnosed with H. pylori-positive active gastritis and duodenal ulcer and 100 controls consisting of healthy donor candidates. The HLA class I and class II antigens were studied in the isolated DNA samples using the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. RESULTS: The frequency of HLA-B*51 antigen was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (40% vs 17%; P=0.003. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of the frequencies of HLA-A, HLA-C, HLA-DR, and HLA-DQ antigens. CONCLUSION: It was determined that HLA-B*51 plays a critical role in H. pylori infection.

  6. Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortese, R.

    1986-01-01

    A large number of proteins are specifically synthesized in the hepatocyte. Only the adult liver expresses the complete repertoire of functions which are required at various stages during development. There is therefore a complex series of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of the differentiated state and for the developmental and physiological variations in the pattern of gene expression. Human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B display a pattern of gene expression similar to adult and fetal liver, respectively; in contrast, cultured fibroblasts or HeLa cells do not express most of the liver specific genes. They have used these cell lines for transfection experiments with cloned human liver specific genes. DNA segments coding for alpha1-antitrypsin and retinol binding protein (two proteins synthesized both in fetal and adult liver) are expressed in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B, but not in HeLa cells or fibroblasts. A DNA segment coding for haptoglobin (a protein synthesized only after birth) is only expressed in the hepatoma cell line HepG2 but not in Hep3B nor in non hepatic cell lines. The information for tissue specific expression is located in the 5' flanking region of all three genes. In vivo competition experiments show that these DNA segments bind to a common, apparently limiting, transacting factor. Conventional techniques (Bal deletions, site directed mutagenesis, etc.) have been used to precisely identify the DNA sequences responsible for these effects. The emerging picture is complex: they have identified multiple, separate transcriptional signals, essential for maximal promoter activation and tissue specific expression. Some of these signals show a negative effect on transcription in fibroblast cell lines.

  7. Human leukocyte antigen Class II associations in serum antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA)-positive and AMA-negative primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Julianne; Wade, Judy A; Cauch-Dudek, Karen; Ng, Chang; Lindor, Keith D; Heathcote, E Jenny

    2002-01-01

    An association of Class II HLA-DR8 antigen is reported in patients with serum antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA)-positive primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC); no information exists as to an association with AMA-negative PBC. We compared the frequency of HLA Class II genes in AMA-positive and AMA-negative PBC patients and healthy controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood of 154 AMA-positive and 26 AMA-negative Caucasian PBC patients and from 216 healthy Caucasian controls and tested for the alleles at two HLA Class II loci, DRbeta1 and DQbeta1. Higher allele frequencies of HLA-DRbeta1*08 and DQbeta1*04 were found in the AMA-positive PBC patients versus controls (14.9% vs. 6.5%, odds ratio (OR)=3.3, global P=0.03 and 14.4% vs. 6.5%, OR=2.6, global P=0.002). All patients positive for DRbeta1*0801 were positive for the DQbeta1*0402 allele, delta score=22 for AMA-positive patients, 11 for controls. In AMA-negative PBC, the frequency of DRbeta1*08 and DQbeta1*04 was 0%, significantly different from the AMA-positive patients (P=0.05, P=0.05). AMA response may identify a group of PBC patients with a distinctive expression of the disease with the response associated with a gene(s) in the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex on the short arm of chromosome 6.

  8. Association between human leukocyte antigen-G 14-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism and cancer risk: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yu-Zheng; Ge, Qian; Li, Ming-Hao; Shi, Guo-Mei; Xu, Xiao; Xu, Lu-Wei; Xu, Zheng; Lu, Tian-Ze; Wu, Ran; Zhou, Liu-Hua; Wu, Jian-Ping; Liang, Kai; Dou, Quan-Liang; Zhu, Jia-Geng; Li, Wen-Cheng; Jia, Rui-Peng

    2014-08-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is involved in the development and progression of human cancers, and numerous molecular epidemiological studies have been conducted to explore the potential relationship of HLA-G 14-bp insertion/deletion (ins/del) polymorphism with cancer risk. However, results from published studies were inconclusive. Both PUBMED and EMBASE databases were searched comprehensively to identify eligible studies investigating the association of HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism with cancer risk. Statistical analysis was performed by using STATA 12.0 and Review Manager 5.0. Fourteen eligible studies with 2340 cancer patients and 3967 controls were included and analyzed with odds ratio (OR) and its corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). Overall, no significant association between HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism and overall cancer risk was detected in all comparison models. Further subgroup analyses based on ethnicity and cancer types demonstrated the significant association among Asians (ins/del vs. del/del: OR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.66-0.95; ins/ins+ins/del vs. del/del: OR = 0.80, 95% CI, 0.65-0.97) and for breast cancer (ins allele vs. del allele: OR = 0.76, 95% CI, 0.61-0.96; ins/ins vs. del/del: OR = 0.57, 95% CI, 0.37-0.87; and ins/ins vs. ins/del+del/del: OR = 0.60, 95% CI, 0.42-0.87). This study suggested that HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism might contribute to breast cancer susceptibility and overall cancer risk among Asians. Further well-designed studies with larger sample size are warranted to validate our conclusion. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case-control study.

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    Natasha Z R Steele

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations.Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case-control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999-2015 and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC, a National Institute on Aging (NIA-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984-2012. We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005-2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10-4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08-1.37] in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk factor, apolipoprotein E (APOE ɛ4. Separate

  10. Fine-mapping of the human leukocyte antigen locus as a risk factor for Alzheimer disease: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Natasha Z R; Carr, Jessie S; Bonham, Luke W; Geier, Ethan G; Damotte, Vincent; Miller, Zachary A; Desikan, Rahul S; Boehme, Kevin L; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Kauwe, John S K; Kramer, Joel H; Miller, Bruce L; Coppola, Giovanni; Hollenbach, Jill A; Huang, Yadong; Yokoyama, Jennifer S

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive disorder that affects cognitive function. There is increasing support for the role of neuroinflammation and aberrant immune regulation in the pathophysiology of AD. The immunoregulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex has been linked to susceptibility for a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including AD; however, studies to date have failed to consistently identify a risk HLA haplotype for AD. Contributing to this difficulty are the complex genetic organization of the HLA region, differences in sequencing and allelic imputation methods, and diversity across ethnic populations. Building on prior work linking the HLA to AD, we used a robust imputation method on two separate case-control cohorts to examine the relationship between HLA haplotypes and AD risk in 309 individuals (191 AD, 118 cognitively normal [CN] controls) from the San Francisco-based University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Memory and Aging Center (collected between 1999-2015) and 11,381 individuals (5,728 AD, 5,653 CN controls) from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), a National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded national data repository (reflecting samples collected between 1984-2012). We also examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker measures for patients seen between 2005-2007 and longitudinal cognitive data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 346, mean follow-up 3.15 ± 2.04 y in AD individuals) to assess the clinical relevance of identified risk haplotypes. The strongest association with AD risk occurred with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype A*03:01~B*07:02~DRB1*15:01~DQA1*01:02~DQB1*06:02 (p = 9.6 x 10-4, odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval] = 1.21 [1.08-1.37]) in the combined UCSF + ADGC cohort. Secondary analysis suggested that this effect may be driven primarily by individuals who are negative for the established AD genetic risk factor, apolipoprotein E (APOE) ɛ4. Separate

  11. Dietary methanol regulates human gene activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V Shindyapina

    Full Text Available Methanol (MeOH is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA, which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling.

  12. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  13. Optimisation of the CT h4S bioassay for detection of human interleukin-4 secreted by mononuclear cells stimulated by phytohaemaglutinin or by human leukocyte antigen mismatched mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren Lykke; Russell, Charlotte Astrid; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    -2 in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched mixed leukocyte culture (MLC). An interindividual variation in cytokine accumulation was demonstrated for IL-4 but not for IL-2. With the use of 5x10(4) responder cells/well no IL-4 could be detected in HLA-mismatched MLC between days 1 and 16. The lack...... high anti-recipient IL-4 producing HTLp frequencies have been reported and associated with a decreased risk of GVHD. The aim of the present study was to define the optimal conditions for combined determination of IL-2 and IL-4 producing anti-recipient HTLp frequencies. We have optimised the CT.h4S...... bioassay with regards to specificity, sensitivity, detection limit, and reproducibility. We have found the optimal assay conditions to be 1 x 10 (4) CT.h4S cells/well deprived of IL-4 for 24 h and preincubated for 7 h followed by 18 h of incubation with tritiated methyl-thymidine. In this setting the CT.h4...

  14. Molecular characterization and expression of a novel human leukocyte cell-surface marker homologous to mouse Ly-9

    OpenAIRE

    Fuente García, Miguel Ángel de la; Tovar, Victoria; Villamor, Neus; Zapater, Nuria; Pizcueta, Pilar; Campo, Elias; Jaime Bosch, Jaime; Engel, Pablo

    2001-01-01

    Producción Científica .Ly-9 is a mouse cell-surface glycoprotein that is selectively expressed on thymocytes and on mature T and B lymphocytes. Ly-9 belongs to the CD2 subset of the immunoglobulin superfamily, an emerging family of cell signaling receptors. Recently, a partial human Ly-9 complementary DNA (cDNA) sequence has been described. Full-length cDNA clones were isolated that included the initiation codon, the sequence encoding the full signal peptide, and 14 amino acids more in the...

  15. Anionic Sites, Fucose Residues and Class I Human Leukocyte Antigen Fate During Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Endothelial Cells

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    Stumbo Ana Carolina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii invades and proliferates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells where it resides in a parasitophorous vacuole. In order to analyze which components of the endothelial cell plasma membrane are internalized and become part of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, the culture of endothelial cells was labeled with cationized ferritin or UEA I lectin or anti Class I human leukocytte antigen (HLA before or after infection with T. gondii. The results showed no cationized ferritin and UEA I lectin in any parasitophorous vacuole membrane, however, the Class I HLA molecule labeling was observed in some endocytic vacuoles containing parasite until 1 h of interaction with T. gondii. After 24 h parasite-host cell interaction, the labeling was absent on the vacuolar membrane, but presents only in small vesicles near parasitophorous vacuole. These results suggest the anionic site and fucose residues are excluded at the time of parasitophorous vacuole formation while Class I HLA molecules are present only on a minority of Toxoplasma-containig vacuoles.

  16. Positive selection on gene expression in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khaitovich, Philipp; Tang, Kun; Franz, Henriette

    2006-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the expression levels of genes transcribed in the brains of humans and chimpanzees have changed less than those of genes transcribed in other tissues [1] . However, when gene expression changes are mapped onto the evolutionary lineage in which they occurred, the brain...... shows more changes than other tissues in the human lineage compared to the chimpanzee lineage [1] , [2] and [3] . There are two possible explanations for this: either positive selection drove more gene expression changes to fixation in the human brain than in the chimpanzee brain, or genes expressed...... in the brain experienced less purifying selection in humans than in chimpanzees, i.e. gene expression in the human brain is functionally less constrained. The first scenario would be supported if genes that changed their expression in the brain in the human lineage showed more selective sweeps than other genes...

  17. Gene Expression in the Human Endolymphatic Sac

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Kirkeby, Svend; Vikeså, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of the present study is to explore, demonstrate, and describe the expression of genes related to the solute carrier (SLC) molecules of ion transporters in the human endolymphatic sac. STUDY DESIGN: cDNA microarrays and immunohistochemistry were used for analyses......a1 sodium-bicarbonate transporter, SLC9a2 sodium-hydrogen transporter, SLC12a3 thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl transporter, and SLC34a2 sodium-phosphate transporter. CONCLUSIONS: Several important ion transporters of the SLC family are expressed in the human endolymphatic sac, including Pendrin......, the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl transporter, and the Na-phosphate transporter SLC34a2. The data provide a new knowledge base considering the ion-dependent metabolic mechanisms maintaining inner ear homeostasis. More specifically, the results indicate a strong similarity with the ion transportation occurring...

  18. Selection of reliable reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR in human T cells and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledderose, Carola; Heyn, Jens; Limbeck, Elisabeth; Kreth, Simone

    2011-10-20

    The choice of reliable reference genes is a prerequisite for valid results when analyzing gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). This method is frequently applied to study gene expression patterns in immune cells, yet a thorough validation of potential reference genes is still lacking for most leukocyte subtypes and most models of their in vitro stimulation. In the current study, we evaluated the expression stability of common reference genes in two widely used cell culture models-anti-CD3/CD28 activated T cells and lipopolysaccharide stimulated neutrophils-as well as in unselected untreated leukocytes. The mRNA expression of 17 (T cells), 7 (neutrophils) or 8 (unselected leukocytes) potential reference genes was quantified by reverse transcription qPCR, and a ranking of the preselected candidate genes according to their expression stability was calculated using the programs NormFinder, geNorm and BestKeeper. IPO8, RPL13A, TBP and SDHA were identified as suitable reference genes in T cells. TBP, ACTB and SDHA were stably expressed in neutrophils. TBP and SDHA were also the most stable genes in untreated total blood leukocytes. The critical impact of reference gene selection on the estimated target gene expression is demonstrated for IL-2 and FIH expression in T cells. The study provides a shortlist of suitable reference genes for normalization of gene expression data in unstimulated and stimulated T cells, unstimulated and stimulated neutrophils and in unselected leukocytes.

  19. Selection of reliable reference genes for quantitative real-time PCR in human T cells and neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledderose Carola

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice of reliable reference genes is a prerequisite for valid results when analyzing gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. This method is frequently applied to study gene expression patterns in immune cells, yet a thorough validation of potential reference genes is still lacking for most leukocyte subtypes and most models of their in vitro stimulation. In the current study, we evaluated the expression stability of common reference genes in two widely used cell culture models-anti-CD3/CD28 activated T cells and lipopolysaccharide stimulated neutrophils-as well as in unselected untreated leukocytes. Results The mRNA expression of 17 (T cells, 7 (neutrophils or 8 (unselected leukocytes potential reference genes was quantified by reverse transcription qPCR, and a ranking of the preselected candidate genes according to their expression stability was calculated using the programs NormFinder, geNorm and BestKeeper. IPO8, RPL13A, TBP and SDHA were identified as suitable reference genes in T cells. TBP, ACTB and SDHA were stably expressed in neutrophils. TBP and SDHA were also the most stable genes in untreated total blood leukocytes. The critical impact of reference gene selection on the estimated target gene expression is demonstrated for IL-2 and FIH expression in T cells. Conclusions The study provides a shortlist of suitable reference genes for normalization of gene expression data in unstimulated and stimulated T cells, unstimulated and stimulated neutrophils and in unselected leukocytes.

  20. [Identification of a novel human MAST4 gene, a new member of the microtubule associated serine-threonine kinase family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Gu, S; Li, X; Sun, Y; Zheng, D; Yu, K; Ji, C; Tang, R; Xie, Y; Mao, Y

    2006-01-01

    Human protein kinases make up a large superfamily of homologous proteins, which are related by virtue of their kinase domains (also known as catalytic domains). Here we report the cloning and characterization of a novel human MAST4 (microtubule associated serine/threonine kinase family member 4) gene, which locates on human chromosome 5q13. The MAST4 cDNA is 7587 base pairs in length and encodes a putative protein of 2435 amino acids which contains a serine/threonine kinase domain and a PDZ domain. MAST4 protein has 64%, 63%, 59% and 39% identical aminoacid residues with MAST1, MAST2, MAST3 and MASTL respectively. RT-PCR analysis revealed relatively high expression level of MAST4 in most normal human tissues, with an exception of in testis, small intestine, colon and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  1. Structure of the human lysyl oxidase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haemaelaeinen, E.R.; Kemppainen, R.; Pihlajaniemi, T.; Kivirikko, K.I. (Univ. of Oulu (Finland))

    1993-09-01

    Lysyl oxidase (EC 1.4.3.13), an extracellular copper enzyme, initiates the crosslinking of collagens and elastin by catalyzing oxidative deamination of the [epsilon]-amino group in certain lysine and hydroxylysine residues. The authors report here that the human lysyl oxidase gene is about 15 kb in size and consists of seven exons. Transcription is initiated at one major site and four minor sites, and the first exon consists of 273 bp of untranslated sequences (calculated to the major site) and 631 bp of translated sequences, which accounts for about half of all the translated sequences of the gene. The seventh exon, on the other hand, codes for only the last codon of amino acid 416 and for amino acid 417, which are followed by the translation termination codon and the 3[prime] untranslated sequences. Exons 2-6 vary in size from 96to157 bp, and the introns from 331 bp to about 3.5 kb. The 5[prime] flanking region contains a TATA-like sequence at -30 relative to the major transcription initiation site and a CCAAT motif at -109. The 5[prime] flanking region and the downstream sequences present in the first exon and first intron contain altogether five possible binding sequences for Sp1, six for AP-2, one for AP-1, three of PEA3, three for MEP-1, and three CCCTCCC motifs, all of which may be involved in the regulation of the expression of the gene. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. N-chlorotaurine, a long-lived oxidant produced by human leukocytes, inactivates Shiga toxin of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Eitzinger

    Full Text Available N-chlorotaurine (NCT, the main representative of long-lived oxidants produced by granulocytes and monocytes, is known to exert broad-spectrum microbicidal activity. Here we show that NCT directly inactivates Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2, used as a model toxin secreted by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC. Bacterial growth and Stx2 production were both inhibited by 2 mM NCT. The cytotoxic effect of Stx2 on Vero cells was removed by ≥5.5 mM NCT. Confocal microscopy and FACS analyses showed that the binding of Stx2 to human kidney glomerular endothelial cells was inhibited, and no NCT-treated Stx2 entered the cytosol. Mass spectrometry displayed oxidation of thio groups and aromatic amino acids of Stx2 by NCT. Therefore, long-lived oxidants may act as powerful tools of innate immunity against soluble virulence factors of pathogens. Moreover, inactivation of virulence factors may contribute to therapeutic success of NCT and novel analogs, which are in development as topical antiinfectives.

  3. Prolonged suppression of monocytic human leukocyte antigen-DR expression correlates with mortality in pediatric septic patients in a pediatric tertiary Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoli, Talita Freitas; Troster, Eduardo Juan; Ferranti, Juliana Ferreira; Sales, Maria Mirtes

    2016-06-01

    Immunoparalysis is a syndrome with no clinical symptoms that occurs in some septic patients. Monocytic human leukocyte antigen-DR (mHLA-DR) expression has been used to identify patients in immunoparalysis and prolonged periods of reduced mHLA-DR expression have been correlated with a poor prognosis in sepsis. However, there is a lack of studies investigating mHLA-DR expression in pediatric septic patients. To determine if mHLA-DR expression correlates with mortality in pediatric septic patients using the QuantiBRITE Anti HLA-DR/Anti-Monocyte,a Bechton Dickinson novel reagent that standardizes flow cytometry values. We determined mHLA-DR expression in 30 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit at Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, between January 2013 and February 2015. mHLA-DR expression was quantified between days 3 to 5 and 5 to 7 after the onset of sepsis and the ΔmHLA-DR (mHLA-DR2 - mHLA-DR1) was calculated. We also measured mHLA-DR levels in 21 healthy control patients. Mean mHLA-DR expression was significantly lower in septic patients than in controls (P = .0001). Mortality was 46% in patients with negative ΔHLA-DR or 1000 mAb/cell. Mean ΔmHLA-DR levels were significantly different between survivors and non-survivors (P = .023). ΔHLA-DR correlates with mortality in pediatric patients with septic shock or severe sepsis. This is the first study to have used the QuantiBRITE Anti HLA-DR/Anti-Monocyte reagent to quantify monocyte HLA-DR expression in pediatric septic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pharmacological activity of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium (L.) Schultz-Bip.): assessment by inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemiluminescence in-vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A M; Edwards, C M; Davey, M R; Power, J B; Lowe, K C

    1997-05-01

    The bioactivity of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) leaf extracts has been analysed, by use of a human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) bioassay, to assess the relative contributions of solvent extraction and parthenolide content to the biological potency of the extract. Extracts prepared in acetone-ethanol (system 1) contained significantly more parthenolide (mean +/- s.d. 1.3 +/- 0.2% dry leaf weight) than extracts in chloroform-PBS (phosphate-buffered saline; system 2; 0.1 +/- 0.04% dry leaf weight) or PBS alone (system 3; 0.5 +/- 0.1% dry leaf weight). Extract bioactivity, measured as inhibition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced, 5-amino-2,3-dihydro-1,4-phthalazinedione (luminol)-enhanced PMNL, chemiluminescence, followed a similar trend. Extracts inhibited phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced oxidative burst by amounts which, if solely attributable to parthenolide, indicated parthenolide concentrations for the respective solvent systems of 2.2 +/- 0.6%, 0.2 +/- 0.1% and 0.9 +/- 0.1% dry leaf weight. The mean ratio of parthenolide concentration to the parthenolide equivalent/PMNL-bioactivity value, for acetone-ethanol and PBS extracts were both 1:1.7. Parthenolide, although a key determinant of biological activity for T. parthenium leaf extracts based on the PMNL-bioassay, seems not to be the sole pharmacologically-active constituent. The identical and elevated bioactivity-parthenolide ratios for both organic and aqueons-phase leaf extracts suggest that a proportion of the other bioactive compounds have solubilities similar to that of parthenolide.

  5. Probability of Finding Marrow Unrelated Donor (MUD) for an Indian patient in a Multi-national Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Aseem K; Bhati-Kushwaha, Himakshi; Kukreja, Pooja; Mishra, Vikash C; Tyagi, Neetu; Sharma, Ashish; Raina, Vimarsh

    2015-06-01

    With an increase in the number of transplants happening globally, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) transplantation from matched unrelated donor (MUD) has begun. The increasing trend of MUD transplants across countries has been largely facilitated with the conspicuous growth of volunteer HSC donor noted in the last decade i.e. 8 million HSC donors in 2002 to more than 22 million in 2013 registered in 71 member registries of the Bone Marrow Donor Worldwide (BMDW). Some populations of the world are still very poorly represented in these registries. Since, the chances of successful engraftment and disease free survival are directly proportional to the HLA compatibility between the recipient and the prospective donor, the diversity of the HLA system at the antigenic and allelic level and the heterogeneity of HLA data of the registered donors has a bearing on the probability of finding a volunteer unrelated HSC donor for patients from such populations. In the present study 126 patients were identified suffering from hematological diseases requiring MUD transplant. Their HLA typing was performed and search was done using BMDW database. The search results for these Indian patients in the multinational registry as well as in the Indian Registries were analyzed using mean, range, standard deviation and finally evaluated in terms of probability for finding matched donor (MUD). Total Asian population is only 11 % in the BMDW making it difficult to find a MUD for an Asian patient. The current study supports this, experimentally; revealing that the probability of finding an allele match for an Indian patient in the multinational Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) registries is 16 % and a dismal 0.008 % in the Indian registries (donors in Indian registries is just 33,678 as compared to 22.5 million in BMDW). This greatly, emphasizes on enhancing the number of Indian donors in Indian and multi-national registries.

  6. CD94-NKG2A Recognition of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E Bound to an HLA Class I Leader Sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie,E.; Clements, C.; Lin, J.; Sullivan, L.; Johnson, D.; Huyton, T.; Heroux, A.; Hoare, H.; Beddoe, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the heterodimeric CD94-NKG2 natural killer (NK) receptor family is a central innate mechanism by which NK cells monitor the expression of other HLA molecules, yet the structural basis of this highly specific interaction is unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structure of CD94-NKG2A in complex with HLA-E bound to a peptide derived from the leader sequence of HLA-G. The CD94 subunit dominated the interaction with HLA-E, whereas the NKG2A subunit was more peripheral to the interface. Moreover, the invariant CD94 subunit dominated the peptide-mediated contacts, albeit with poor surface and chemical complementarity. This unusual binding mode was consistent with mutagenesis data at the CD94-NKG2A-HLA-E interface. There were few conformational changes in either CD94-NKG2A or HLA-E upon ligation, and such a 'lock and key' interaction is typical of innate receptor-ligand interactions. Nevertheless, the structure also provided insight into how this interaction can be modulated by subtle changes in the peptide ligand or by the pairing of CD94 with other members of the NKG2 family. Differences in the docking strategies used by the NKG2D and CD94-NKG2A receptors provided a basis for understanding the promiscuous nature of ligand recognition by NKG2D compared with the fidelity of the CD94-NKG2 receptors.

  7. Human Leukocyte Antigen DQB1 (HLA-DQB1 Polymorphisms and the Risk for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Peng Jin

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS is an autoimmune disorder of the peripheral nervous system. There is no consensus regarding reported associations between human leukocyte antigen DQB1 (HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms and the risk for developing GBS. Here, we evaluated possible associations between HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms and the risk for GBS using a meta-analysis. We searched PubMed for case-control genetic association studies for HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms (*020x, *030x, *040x, *050x, and *060x and the risk for GBS. Fixed-effect meta-analytical methods were used for the outcome measure and subgroup analyses. Estimated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to investigate the associations between HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms and the risk for GBS. Nine case-control studies involving 780 cases of GBS and 1353 controls were identified in the current study. The meta-analysis demonstrated no significant associations between HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms and the risk for GBS in Asian and Caucasian populations. There were two associations that approached significance: HLA-DQB1*030x in Asian patients (P = 0.07; OR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.57-1.03 and HLA-DQB1*060x in all patients (P = 0.08; OR: 1.48, 95% CI: 0.96-2.29. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to establish a definitive assessment of the contribution of HLA-DQB1 polymorphisms to GBS risk.

  8. Greater expression of the human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G and interleukin-17 (IL-17 in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: analytical cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidyane Neves Miranda

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE:Impaired local cell immunity seems to contribute towards the pathogenesis and progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, but the underlying molecular mechanisms promoting its progression remain unclear. Identification of new molecular markers for prognosis and diagnosis of early-stage CIN may aid in decreasing the numbers of CIN cases. Several novel immunoregulatory molecules have been discovered over the past few years, including the human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G, which through interaction with its receptors exerts important tolerogenic functions. Several lines of evidence suggest that T-helper interleukin-17 (IL-17-producing cells (Th17 cells may play a role in antitumor immunity. However, recent reports have implicated Th17 cells and their cytokines in both pro and anti-tumorigenic processes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the roles of HLA-G and Th17 in the immunopathogenesis of CIN I.DESIGN AND SETTING:Analytical cross-sectional study with a control group using 58 cervical specimens from the files of a public university hospital providing tertiary-level care.METHODS:We examined HLA-G and IL-17 expression in the cervical microenvironment by means of immunohistochemistry, and correlated these findings with clinical and pathological features.RESULTS:There was a greater tendency towards HLA-G and IL-17 expression in specimens that showed CIN I, thus suggesting that these molecules have a contribution towards cervical progression.CONCLUSION:These findings suggest that HLA-G and IL-17 expression may be an early marker for assessing the progression of cervical lesions.

  9. Long-Term Effects of Antibodies Against Human Leukocyte Antigens Detected by Flow Cytometry in the First Year After Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kılıçaslan Ayna

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence, dynamics and profiles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-directed antibodies developed after transplantation and their impact on graft rejection and outcome in kidney recipients. Study Design: Prospective follow-up study. Material and Methods: A total of 56 kidney recipients were monitored at 1st, 6th and 12th months for the development of anti-HLA antibodies using bead based flow-cytometry assays (Flow PRA tests. Results: In 21 (37.5% patients, panel reactive antibodies (PRA was positive after transplantation, however, in 35 (62.5% patients PRA was found negative. Twelve (57.1% patients with post-transplantation HLA-reactive antibodies [PRA (+] and 8 (22.9% patients with no detectable alloantibodies [PRA (-] were developed allograft rejection (p=0.010. In the PRA positive patient group the rates of early period infection and delayed graft function (DGF were higher than the PRA negative patient group. Serum creatinine levels of PRA positive group at 6. and 12. months after transplantation were significantly higher than the PRA negative group (p=0.015 and p=0.048, respectively. The rejection rates of patients who had class I and II HLA antibodies were significantly higher than the patients who had either class I or II HLA antibodies (p=0.011. Acute rejection rates were significantly higher in patients who had class I and II HLA antibodies at the first month (p=0.007. Conclusion: Higher occurrence of rejection episodes in PRA positive group may show the importance of anti-HLA antibody monitoring using Flow-PRA after renal transplantation as a prognostic marker in terms of graft survival.

  10. Anti-Fc gamma receptor autoantibodies from patients with Sjögren's syndrome do not react with native receptor on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, A; Le Corre, R; Soubrane, C; Khayat, D; Youinou, P

    1996-04-01

    Sera from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) have been examined for the presence of cell-free Fc-gamma receptor (Fc gamma R) IIIb, which is expressed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), and the production of related autoantibody. Sera from 66 patients with pSS were evaluated by an ELISA using recombinant human Fc gamma RIIIb as the substrate and by flow cytometry. Cell-free Fc gamma RIIIb was also detected by an ELISA. The fine specificity of autoantibodies was established by inhibition with a preparation of Fc gamma RI plus Fc gamma RII, and two ELISAs using Fc gamma RI and Fc gamma RII as the substrates respectively. Anti-Fc gamma RIIIb activity was found in 30 patients (45%), but 25 of them did not react with autologous PMN, whereas they bound to Fc gamma RIIIb eluted from the same PMN in ELISA and Western blotting. Autoantibodies from one serum recognized the three receptors, six with Fc gamma RII in addition to Fc gamma RIII, and three sera were specific for the latter receptor. None of these reacted with Fc gamma RI- and Fc gamma RII-carrying cells. Cell-free Fc gamma RIIIb, but negligible amounts of Fc gamma RIIIa, were detectable in the patient sera. The membrane expression of CD15, an early activation marker, was diminished, while that of three PMN late activation markers was markedly enhanced. Taken together, these results suggest that autoantibodies are produced following the shedding of Fc gamma RIIIb upon PMN activation. A credible candidate for this activation is IgG-containing immune complexes.

  11. The impact of human leukocyte antigen mismatching on graft survival and mortality in adult renal transplantation: A protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinmiao; Han, Wenke; Ding, Jie

    2017-12-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) was important biological barrier to a successful transplantation. Quantitative evaluations of the effect of HLA mismatching on heart, liver, umbilical cord blood, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, have previously been reported. In new era of immunosuppression, the reported magnitude effect of HLA mismatching on survival outcomes of kidney transplantation was controversial. In addition, the current kidney allocation guideline recommendations in different countries were inconsistent in term of HLA mismatching. We undertake this study to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the magnitude effect of HLA mismatching in adult kidney transplantation, with a particular focus on graft survival and mortality. The present systematic review and meta-analysis protocol was conducted following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology protocol (MOOSE-P) and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis protocol (PRISMA-P). PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library Database will be searched without language restriction. Studies fulfill the following criteria will be eligible: included study cohorts comprising adult recipients; reported the association between HLA mismatching (per mismatches or HLA-A, -B, -DR mismatches) and posttransplant survival outcomes; provided effect estimates of hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence interval (CIs). The incidence of measured outcomes was defined according to the European Renal Best Practice Transplantation Guidelines and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes Guidelines. This study will quantitatively assess the association of HLA per mismatches, DR-antigen mismatches, A-antigen mismatches, and B-antigen mismatches with survival outcomes of overall graft failure, death-censored graft failure, all-cause mortality, and mortality with a functioning graft. This study will determine the issues on what extent HLA compatibility influenced recipient and

  12. Association of human leukocyte antigen variants and allopurinol-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingang; Zhao, Zhigang; Sun, Shu-Sen

    2017-05-01

    The association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) variants and allopurinol-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) was evaluated through a pooled analysis of published studies. A comprehensive search was performed in multiple databases, including PubMed, MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge, EMBASE, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, and Science Direct. Studies investigating the association between HLA alleles with allopurinol-induced SJS or TEN were retrieved, and the data were independently extracted. The overall odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine the association between the presence of HLA variant in at least one allele and allopurinol-induced SJS or TEN. To test the robustness of the meta-analysis results, a sensitivity analysis was performed by removing each study one at a time and calculating the pooled ORs of the remaining studies. The fixed-effects and random-effects models were used to pool the collected data. A total of 4 studies with 81 allopurinol-induced SJS or TEN cases and matched controls (allopurinol-tolerant patients) or population controls (general population) were identified. SJS and TEN were found to be significantly associated with HLA-A*33:03 and HLA-C*03:02 alleles in both groups of studies with matched controls and population controls. All of the pooled ORs were not significantly affected by the remaining studies and different modeling methods, indicating robust results. A strong association was found between HLA-A*33:03 and HLA-C*03:02 alleles and allopurinol-induced SJS or TEN, especially in an Asian population. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bioinformatics and phylogenetic analysis of human Tp73 gene

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imtiaz

    2013-06-26

    Jun 26, 2013 ... Accepted 26 April, 2013. The Tp73 gene encoding p73 protein belongs to the Tp53 gene family and it functions in the initiation of .... Phylogenetic tree shows the more similarity between human and chimpanzee, while mouse sequence was distantly related (Figure 1). Tp73 genes of human, mouse, rat and ...

  14. Effect of bovine dialyzable leukocyte extract on induction of cell differentiation and death in K562 human chronic myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Rivera, Crystel A; Franco-Molina, Moisés A; Mendoza-Gamboa, Edgar; Zapata-Benavides, Pablo; Santaolalla-Tapia, Jesús; Coronado-Cerda, Erika E; Tamez-Guerra, Reyes S; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Differentiation induction therapy is an attractive approach in leukemia treatment due to the fact that in blast crisis stage, leukemic cells lose their differentiation capacity. Therefore, it has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to induce terminal differentiation of leukemic blast cells into a specific lineage, leading to prevention of high proliferation rates. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the potential of cell differentiation and death induced by bovine dialyzable leukocyte extract (bDLE) in the K562 cell line. For this purpose K562 and MOLT-3 human leukemic cell lines and primary human monocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages were exposed to bDLE, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and dimethyl sulfoxide for 96 h, and the viability, proliferation and cell cycle were evaluated. To determine the lineage that led to cell differentiation, Romanowsky staining was performed to observe the morphological changes following the treatments, and the expression of the surface markers cluster of differentiation (CD)14(+), CD68(+), CD163(+) and CD42a(+), as well as the phagocytic activity, and the production of nitric oxide (NO) (assessed by colorimetric assay), cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α] and chemokines [chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2, CCL5 and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8] in cell supernatants was assessed by flow cytometry. The results of the present study reveal that high doses of bDLE increase the cell death in K562 and MOLT-3 lines, without affecting the viability of human monocytes and murine peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, low doses of bDLE induce differentiation in K562 cells towards a monocyte/macrophage lineage with an M2 phenotype, and induced moderately upregulated expression of CD42(+), a megakaryocytic marker. Cell cycle arrest in the S and G2/M phases was observed in bDLE-treated K562 cells, which demonstrated similar phagocytic activity, NO levels and cytokine and chemokine

  15. Classification and nomenclature of all human homeobox genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruford Elspeth A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeobox genes are a large and diverse group of genes, many of which play important roles in the embryonic development of animals. Increasingly, homeobox genes are being compared between genomes in an attempt to understand the evolution of animal development. Despite their importance, the full diversity of human homeobox genes has not previously been described. Results We have identified all homeobox genes and pseudogenes in the euchromatic regions of the human genome, finding many unannotated, incorrectly annotated, unnamed, misnamed or misclassified genes and pseudogenes. We describe 300 human homeobox loci, which we divide into 235 probable functional genes and 65 probable pseudogenes. These totals include 3 genes with partial homeoboxes and 13 pseudogenes that lack homeoboxes but are clearly derived from homeobox genes. These figures exclude the repetitive DUX1 to DUX5 homeobox sequences of which we identified 35 probable pseudogenes, with many more expected in heterochromatic regions. Nomenclature is established for approximately 40 formerly unnamed loci, reflecting their evolutionary relationships to other loci in human and other species, and nomenclature revisions are proposed for around 30 other loci. We use a classification that recognizes 11 homeobox gene 'classes' subdivided into 102 homeobox gene 'families'. Conclusion We have conducted a comprehensive survey of homeobox genes and pseudogenes in the human genome, described many new loci, and revised the classification and nomenclature of homeobox genes. The classification scheme may be widely applicable to homeobox genes in other animal genomes and will facilitate comparative genomics of this important gene superclass.

  16. Potential large animal models for gene therapy of human genetic diseases of immune and blood cell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Thomas R; Adler, Rima L; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2009-01-01

    Genetic mutations involving the cellular components of the hematopoietic system--red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets--manifest clinically as anemia, infection, and bleeding. Although gene targeting has recapitulated many of these diseases in mice, these murine homologues are limited as translational models by their small size and brief life span as well as the fact that mutations induced by gene targeting do not always faithfully reflect the clinical manifestations of such mutations in humans. Many of these limitations can be overcome by identifying large animals with genetic diseases of the hematopoietic system corresponding to their human disease counterparts. In this article, we describe human diseases of the cellular components of the hematopoietic system that have counterparts in large animal species, in most cases carrying mutations in the same gene (CD18 in leukocyte adhesion deficiency) or genes in interacting proteins (DNA cross-link repair 1C protein and protein kinase, DNA-activated catalytic polypeptide in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency). Furthermore, we describe the potential of these animal models to serve as disease-specific preclinical models for testing the efficacy and safety of clinical interventions such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy before their use in humans with the corresponding disease.

  17. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase : Dose-dependent suppression of leukocyte and endothelial response after endotoxin challenge in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijen, JW; Tulleken, JE; Kobold, ACM; de Boer, P; van der Werf, TS; Ligtenberg, JJM; Spanjersberg, R; Zijlstra, JG

    Objective: We studied the activity of a single oral dose of RWJ-67657, a synthetic p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor, in preventing dual leukocyte/endothelial activation after endotoxin infusion in healthy volunteers. Design. Prospective placebo-controlled study. Setting: Intensive care

  18. Modulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between human smooth muscle cells by leukocyte-derived growth factors and cytokines in relation to atherogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensink, A.

    1997-01-01


    In this thesis, the effect of leukocyte-derived growth factors and cytokines on GJIC between SMC was investigated. GJIC is regarded as an important mechanism in the control of cell growth, cell differentiation and tissue homeostasis. Disturbance of SMC growth control is regarded to be a

  19. Widespread of horizontal gene transfer in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenze; Tsai, Lillian; Li, Yulong; Hua, Nan; Sun, Chen; Wei, Chaochun

    2017-04-04

    A fundamental concept in biology is that heritable material is passed from parents to offspring, a process called vertical gene transfer. An alternative mechanism of gene acquisition is through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which involves movement of genetic materials between different species. Horizontal gene transfer has been found prevalent in prokaryotes but very rare in eukaryote. In this paper, we investigate horizontal gene transfer in the human genome. From the pair-wise alignments between human genome and 53 vertebrate genomes, 1,467 human genome regions (2.6 M bases) from all chromosomes were found to be more conserved with non-mammals than with most mammals. These human genome regions involve 642 known genes, which are enriched with ion binding. Compared to known horizontal gene transfer regions in the human genome, there were few overlapping regions, which indicated horizontal gene transfer is more common than we expected in the human genome. Horizontal gene transfer impacts hundreds of human genes and this study provided insight into potential mechanisms of HGT in the human genome.

  20. The human tyrosine hydroxylase gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Mark A; Yang, Ming; Gollomp, Kandace L; Jin, Hao; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2003-04-10

    13.329 kilobases of the single copy human tyrosine hydroxylase (hTH) gene were isolated from a genomic library. The 5' flanking 11 kilobases fused to the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP) drove high level expression in TH+ cells of the substantia nigra of embryonic and adult transgenic mice as determined by double label fluorescence microscopy. To provide a basis for future analysis of polymorphisms and structure-function studies, the previously unreported distal 10.5 kilobases of the hTH promoter were sequenced with an average coverage of 20-fold, the remainder with 4-fold coverage. Sequence features identified included four perfect matches to the bicoid binding element (BBE, consensus: BBTAATCYV) all of which exhibited specific binding by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Comparison to published sequences of mouse and rat TH promoters revealed five areas of exceptional homology shared by these species in the upstream TH promoter region -2 kb to -9 kb relative to the transcription start site. Within these conserved regions (CRs I-V), potential recognition sites for NR4A2 (Nurr1), HNF-3beta, HOXA4, and HOXA5 were shared across human, mouse, and rat TH promoters.

  1. Defining the Role of Essential Genes in Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David L.; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2011-01-01

    A greater understanding of the causes of human disease can come from identifying characteristics that are specific to disease genes. However, a full understanding of the contribution of essential genes to human disease is lacking, due to the premise that these genes tend to cause developmental abnormalities rather than adult disease. We tested the hypothesis that human orthologs of mouse essential genes are associated with a variety of human diseases, rather than only those related to miscarriage and birth defects. We segregated human disease genes according to whether the knockout phenotype of their mouse ortholog was lethal or viable, defining those with orthologs producing lethal knockouts as essential disease genes. We show that the human orthologs of mouse essential genes are associated with a wide spectrum of diseases affecting diverse physiological systems. Notably, human disease genes with essential mouse orthologs are over-represented among disease genes associated with cancer, suggesting links between adult cellular abnormalities and developmental functions. The proteins encoded by essential genes are highly connected in protein-protein interaction networks, which we find correlates with an over-representation of nuclear proteins amongst essential disease genes. Disease genes associated with essential orthologs also are more likely than those with non-essential orthologs to contribute to disease through an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, suggesting that these diseases may actually result from semi-dominant mutant alleles. Overall, we have described attributes found in disease genes according to the essentiality status of their mouse orthologs. These findings demonstrate that disease genes do occupy highly connected positions in protein-protein interaction networks, and that due to the complexity of disease-associated alleles, essential genes cannot be ignored as candidates for causing diverse human diseases. PMID:22096564

  2. Leukocytic promotion of prostate cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Kristy L; Begley, Lesa A; Mor-Vaknin, Nirit; Markovitz, David M; Macoska, Jill A

    2010-03-01

    Histological evidence of pervasive inflammatory infiltrate has been noted in both benign prostatic hyperplasia/hypertrophy (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa). Cytokines known to attract particular leukocyte subsets are secreted from prostatic stroma consequent to aging and also from malignant prostate epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized that leukocytes associated with either acute or chronic inflammation attracted to the prostate consequent to aging or tumorigenesis may promote the abnormal cellular proliferation associated with BPH and PCa. An in vitro system designed to mimic the human prostatic microenvironment incorporating prostatic stroma (primary and immortalized prostate stromal fibroblasts), epithelium (N15C6, BPH-1, LNCaP, and PC3 cells), and inflammatory infiltrate (HL-60 cells, HH, and Molt-3 T-lymphocytes) was developed. Modified Boyden chamber assays were used to test the ability of prostate stromal and epithelial cells to attract leukocytes and to test the effect of leukocytes on prostate cellular proliferation. Antibody arrays were used to identify leukocyte-secreted cytokines mediating prostate cellular proliferation. Leukocytic cells migrated towards both prostate stromal and epithelial cells. CD4+ T-lymphocytes promoted the proliferation of both transformed and non-transformed prostate epithelial cell lines tested, whereas CD8+ T-lymphocytes as well as dHL-60M macrophagic and dHL-60N neutrophilic cells selectively promoted the proliferation of PCa cells. The results of these studies show that inflammatory cells can be attracted to the prostate tissue microenvironment and can selectively promote the proliferation of non-transformed or transformed prostate epithelial cells, and are consistent with differential role(s) for inflammatory infiltrate in the etiologies of benign and malignant proliferative disease in the prostate. Prostate 70: 377-389, 2010. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. A novel method to analyze leukocyte rolling behavior in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunne Jessica L.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte endothelial cell interaction is a fundamentally important process in many disease states. Current methods to analyze such interactions include the parallel-plate flow chamber and intravital microscopy. Here, we present an improvement of the traditional intravital microscopy that allows leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction to be studied from the time the leukocyte makes its initial contact with the endothelium until it adheres to or detaches from the endothelium. The leukocyte is tracked throughout the venular tree with the aid of a motorized stage and the rolling and adhesive behavior is measured off-line. Because this method can involve human error, methods to automate the tracking procedure have been developed. This novel tracking method allows for a more detailed examination of leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions.

  4. Identifying gene expression modules that define human cell fates

    OpenAIRE

    Germanguz, I; Listgarten, J; Cinkornpumin, J.; Solomon, A; Gaeta, X.; Lowry, W. E.

    2016-01-01

    Using a compendium of cell-state-specific gene expression data, we identified genes that uniquely define cell states, including those thought to represent various developmental stages. Our analysis sheds light on human cell fate through the identification of core genes that are altered over several developmental milestones, and across regional specification. Here we present cell-type specific gene expression data for 17 distinct cell states and demonstrate that these modules of genes can in f...

  5. Post operative infection and sepsis in humans is associated with deficient gene expression of gammac cytokines and their apoptosis mediators.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, Mary

    2011-06-28

    Abstract Introduction Lymphocyte homeostasis is dependent on the γc cytokines. We hypothesised that sepsis in humans is associated with differential gene expression of the γc cytokines and their associated apoptosis mediators. Methods The study population consisted of a total of 60 patients with severe sepsis, 15 with gram negative bacteraemia, 10 healthy controls and 60 patients undergoing elective lung resection surgery. Pneumonia was diagnosed by CDC NNIC criteria. Gene expression in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) of interleukin (IL)-2, 7, 15 and interferon (IFN)-γ, Bax, Bim, Bcl-2 was determined by qRT-PCR and IL-2 and IL-7 serum protein levels by ELISA. Gene expression of IL-2, 7 and IFN-γ was measured in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL), cultured in the presence of lipopolysacharide (LPS) and CD3 binding antibody (CD3ab) Results IL-2 gene expression was lower in the bacteraemia group compared with controls, and lower still in the sepsis group (P < 0.0001). IL-7 gene expression was similar in controls and bacteraemia, but lower in sepsis (P < 0.0001). IL-15 gene expression was similar in the three groups. Bcl-2 gene expression was less (P < 0.0001) and Bim gene expression was greater (P = 0.0003) in severe sepsis compared to bacteraemic and healthy controls. Bax gene expression was similar in the three groups. In lung resection surgery patients, post-operative pneumonia was associated with a perioperative decrease in IL-2 mRNA (P < 0.0001) and IL-7 mRNA (P = 0.003). IL-2 protein levels were reduced in sepsis and bacteraemia compared to controls (P = 0.02) but similar in pneumonia and non-pneumonia groups. IL-7 protein levels were similar in all groups. In cultured PBLs, IFN-γ gene expression was decreased in response to LPS and increased in response to CD3ab with sepsis: IL-7 gene expression increased in response to LPS in controls and to CD3ab with sepsis; Bcl-2 gene expression decreased in response to combined CD3ab and IL-2 with sepsis

  6. Early interleukin-6 and slope of monocyte human leukocyte antigen-DR: a powerful association to predict the development of sepsis after major trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Gouel-Chéron

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Major trauma is characterized by a pro-inflammatory response, followed by an immunosuppression. Recently, in trauma patients, the lack of recovery of monocyte Human Leukocyte Antigen DR (mHLA-DR, a biomarker of ICU-acquired immunosuppression between days 1-2 and days 3-4 has been demonstrated to be independently associated with sepsis development. The main objective of this study was to determine whether early measurements of IL-6 (interleukin-6 and IL-10 plasma concentrations (as markers of initial severity could improve, in association with mHLA-DR recovery, the prediction of sepsis occurrence in severe trauma patients. DESIGN: Prospective observational study over 24 months in a Trauma ICU at university hospital. PATIENTS: Trauma patients with an ISS over 25 and age over 18 were included. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: mHLA-DR was assessed by flow cytometry, IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations by ELISA. 100 consecutive severely injured patients were monitored (mean ISS 37±10. 37 patients developed sepsis. IL-6 concentrations and slope of mHLA-DR expression between days 1-2 and days 3-4 were significantly different between septic and non-septic patients. IL-10 was not detectable in most patients. After adjustment for usual clinical confounders, when assessed as a pair, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that a slope of mHLA-DR expression (days 3-4/days 1-2≤1.1 and a IL-6 concentration ≥ 67.1 pg/ml remained highly associated with the development of sepsis (adjusted OR 18.4, 95% CI 4.9; 69.4, p = .00002. CONCLUSIONS: After multivariate regression logistic analysis, when assessed as a pair, a high IL-6 concentration and a persistent mHLA-DR decreased expression were found to be in relation with the development of sepsis with the best predictive value. This study underlines the usefulness of daily monitoring of immune function to identify trauma patients at a high risk of infection.

  7. High-Resolution Analyses of Human Leukocyte Antigens Allele and Haplotype Frequencies Based on 169,995 Volunteers from the China Bone Marrow Donor Registry Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Yang; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Li, Jian-Ping; Mao, Wei; Zhang, De-Mei; Liu, Meng-Li; Hei, Ai-Lian; Dai, Da-Peng; Jiang, Ping; Shan, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Bo-Wei; Zhu, Chuan-Fu; Shen, Jie; Deng, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Zheng-Lei; Yu, Wei-Jian; Chen, Qiang; Qiao, Yan-Hui; Zhu, Xiang-Ming; Lv, Rong; Li, Guo-Ying; Li, Guo-Liang; Li, Heng-Cong; Zhang, Xu; Pei, Bin; Jiao, Li-Xin; Shen, Gang; Liu, Ying; Feng, Zhi-Hui; Su, Yu-Ping; Xu, Zhao-Xia; Di, Wen-Ying; Jiang, Yao-Qin; Fu, Hong-Lei; Liu, Xiang-Jun; Liu, Xiang; Zhou, Mei-Zhen; Du, Dan; Liu, Qi; Han, Ying; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Cai, Jian-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a widely used and effective therapy for hematopoietic malignant diseases and numerous other disorders. High-resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotype frequency distributions not only facilitate individual donor searches but also determine the probability with which a particular patient can find HLA-matched donors in a registry. The frequencies of the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 alleles and haplotypes were estimated among 169,995 Chinese volunteers using the sequencing-based typing (SBT) method. Totals of 191 HLA-A, 244 HLA-B, 146 HLA-C, 143 HLA-DRB1 and 47 HLA-DQB1 alleles were observed, which accounted for 6.98%, 7.06%, 6.46%, 9.11% and 7.91%, respectively, of the alleles in each locus in the world (IMGT 3.16 Release, Apr. 2014). Among the 100 most common haplotypes from the 169,995 individuals, nine distinct haplotypes displayed significant regionally specific distributions. Among these, three were predominant in the South China region (i.e., the 20th, 31st, and 81sthaplotypes), another three were predominant in the Southwest China region (i.e., the 68th, 79th, and 95th haplotypes), one was predominant in the South and Southwest China regions (the 18th haplotype), one was relatively common in the Northeast and North China regions (the 94th haplotype), and one was common in the Northeast, North and Northwest China (the 40th haplotype). In conclusion, this is the first to analyze high-resolution HLA diversities across the entire country of China, based on a detailed and complete data set that covered 31 provinces, autonomous regions, and municipalities. Specifically, we also evaluated the HLA matching probabilities within and between geographic regions and analyzed the regional differences in the HLA diversities in China. We believe that the data presented in this study might be useful for unrelated HLA-matched donor searches, donor registry planning, population genetic studies, and anthropogenesis

  8. [Effect of hemofiltration combined with hemoabsorption on improvement of immune function in septic patients with low expression of human leukocyte antigen DR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijun, Ying; Tie, Lyu; Jing, Yan

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effect on improving immune function by hemofiltration combined with hemoabsorption in septic patients with low human leukocyte antigen DR (HLA-DR) expression. A prospective randomized controlled trial was conducted. Sixty sepsis patients aged over 18 years, with HLA-DR expression lower than 30% were enrolled, and they were randomly divided into experimental group and control group, n = 30 in each group. The patients were treated with standard operating procedure for sepsis, and hemofiltration combined with hemoabsorption were added in addition in the experimental group within 1-3 days. The continuous venovenous hemofiltration (CVVH) mode was performed, with former dilution volume 4 L/h, and the hemofilter HF2000 was carried out with blood absorber HA-330H. The expression of HLA-DR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was determined before the treatment and 3, 5, 7 days after treatment. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) score, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and 28-day survival rate were evaluated in both groups. The HLA-DR expression before treatment in experimental group and control group was both lower than 30%, and there was no statistical difference [(25.9 ± 7.3)% vs. (26.4 ± 6.7)%, P > 0.05]. The HLA-DR expression at 3, 5, 7 days after treatment in experimental group was gradually increased, and it was significantly higher than that of the control group [3 days: (38.9 ± 8.6)% vs. (29.3 ± 7.1)%, 5 days: (42.7 ± 9.2)% vs. (31.4 ± 6.5)%, 7 days: (40.9 ± 8.5)% vs. (29.4 ± 6.7)%, all P 0.05). APACHE II score at 3, 5, and 7 days after treatment was gradually decreased in experimental group, and it was obviously lower than that of the control group (3 days: 18.6 ± 3.6 vs. 20.5 ± 4.3, 5 days: 15.8 ± 3.9 vs. 21.1 ± 4.4, 7 days: 14.9 ± 4.2 vs. 19.8 ± 3.7, all P DR in sepsis patients with low expression of HLA-DR, and it can improve immune function and prognosis of

  9. The effects of stress on the enzymes of peripheral leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leise, E. M.; Gray, I.

    1973-01-01

    Previous work showed an early response of rabbit and human leukocyte enzymes to the stress of bacterial infection. Since these represented a mixed population of leukocytes and since polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) increased in these preparations, it was necessary to establish whether the observed increase in lactate dehydrenase (LDH) and protein was the result of an increase in any one particular cell type or in all cells. The need for the development of a simple reproducible method for the differential separation of peripheral leukocytes for the furtherance of our own studies was apparent. It was also becoming increasingly apparent that morphologically similar cells, such as small lymphocytes (L) and macrophages, were capable of different biological functions. A dextran gradient centrifugation method was developed which has provided an easily reproducible technique for separating L from PMN. During the course of this work, in which over 250 rabbits were examined, the pattern of daily leukocyte protein and enzyme variation became increasingly more apparent. This information could have some impact on future work with leukocyte enzymes, by our group and by other workers. The differences in normal protein and enzyme levels maintained by some individuals, and some inbred strains, were evaluated and reported separately. It has been shown that one type of leukocyte may react more to a given stress than other leukocytes.

  10. Novel definition files for human GeneChips based on GeneAnnot

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferrari, Francesco; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Coppe, Alessandro; Sirota, Alexandra; Safran, Marilyn; Shmoish, Michael; Ferrari, Sergio; Lancet, Doron; Danieli, Gian Antonio; Bicciato, Silvio

    2007-01-01

    .... We developed a novel set of custom Chip Definition Files (CDF) and the corresponding Bioconductor libraries for Affymetrix human GeneChips, based on the information contained in the GeneAnnot database...

  11. Mutation analysis of the MCHR1 gene in human obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermter, Anne-Kathrin; Reichwald, Kathrin; Büch, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    The importance of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system for regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight has been demonstrated in rodents. We analysed the human MCH receptor 1 gene (MCHR1) with respect to human obesity.......The importance of the melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) system for regulation of energy homeostasis and body weight has been demonstrated in rodents. We analysed the human MCH receptor 1 gene (MCHR1) with respect to human obesity....

  12. Bioinformatic prediction and functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Cui

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study demonstrated that human KIAA0100 gene was a novel acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (MLAA gene. But the functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene has remained unknown to date. Here, firstly, bioinformatic prediction of human KIAA0100 gene was carried out using online softwares; Secondly, Human KIAA0100 gene expression was downregulated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated (Cas 9 system in U937 cells. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were next evaluated in KIAA0100-knockdown U937 cells. The bioinformatic prediction showed that human KIAA0100 gene was located on 17q11.2, and human KIAA0100 protein was located in the secretory pathway. Besides, human KIAA0100 protein contained a signalpeptide, a transmembrane region, three types of secondary structures (alpha helix, extended strand, and random coil , and four domains from mitochondrial protein 27 (FMP27. The observation on functional characterization of human KIAA0100 gene revealed that its downregulation inhibited cell proliferation, and promoted cell apoptosis in U937 cells. To summarize, these results suggest human KIAA0100 gene possibly comes within mitochondrial genome; moreover, it is a novel anti-apoptotic factor related to carcinogenesis or progression in acute monocytic leukemia, and may be a potential target for immunotherapy against acute monocytic leukemia.

  13. DNA extraction for short tandem repeat typing from mixed samples using anti-human leukocyte CD45 and ABO blood group antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Shizue; Honda, Katsuya; Kaminiwa, Junko; Nishi, Takeki; Iwabuchi, Yayoi; Sugano, Yukiko; Kurosu, Akira; Suzuki, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    DNA testing from mixed cell samples can be difficult to use successfully in criminal investigations. Here, we present a method for the extraction of DNA from mixed bloodstains involving plural contributors, after antibody-microbead captured cell separation. This method, together with the multiplex short tandem repeat typing presented, has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA profiles corresponding to the ABO blood type. Methodological steps include magnetic separation using leukocyte specific CD45 antibody-coated microbeads and centrifugal separation of leukocyte agglutination by ABO antibody. The detection results of variable mixed ratio showed that the target DNA was detected accurately as low as 1:512 mixed ratio, regardless of the large amount of the background DNA present. The method presented here is applicable to PCR-based identification for various kinds of mixed samples. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Characterization of a single peptide derived from cytochrome P4501B1 that elicits spontaneous human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A1 as well as HLA-B35 restricted CD8 T-cell responses in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P.; Hadrup, S.R.; Andersen, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    . Interestingly, the peptide binds to both human Leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A1 and HLA-B35. Hence, peripheral blood lymphocytes from a total of 49 cancer patients (25 melanoma, 13 RCC, and 11 breast cancer; 41 HLA-A1 positive, 8 HLA-B35 positive) were analyzed for reactivity taking advantage of the EliSpot assay...... presenting the peptide on the surface. The characterized CYP240 peptide presented herein opens the avenue for more broader recruitment of patients in vaccination trials targeting CYB1B1. (C) 2008 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved...

  15. Divergence of sperm and leukocyte age-dependent telomere dynamics: implications for male-driven evolution of telomere length in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, Kenneth I; Hunt, Steven C.; Susser, Ezra; Kimura, Masayuki; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Carrell, Douglas; Aviv, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) dynamics in vivo are defined by TL and its age-dependent change, brought about by cell replication. Leukocyte TL (LTL), which reflects TL in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), becomes shorter with age. In contrast, sperm TL, which reflects TL in the male germ cells, becomes longer with age. Moreover, offspring of older fathers display longer LTL. Thus far, no study has examined LTL and sperm TL relations with age in the same individuals, nor considered their implications fo...

  16. The effect of core and lanthanide ion dopants in sodium fluoride-based nanocrystals on phagocytic activity of human blood leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Liskova, Aurelia; Kuricova, Miroslava; Banski, Mateusz; Misiewicz, Jan; Dusinska, Maria; Horvathova, Mira; Ilavska, Silvia; Szabova, Michaela; Rollerova, Eva; Podhorodecki, Artur; Tulinska, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Sodium fluoride-based β-NaLnF4 nanoparticles (NPs) doped with lanthanide ions are promising materials for application as luminescent markers in bio-imaging. In this work, the effect of NPs doped with yttrium (Y), gadolinium (Gd), europium (Eu), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb) and terbium (Tb) ions on phagocytic activity of monocytes and granulocytes and the respiratory burst was examined. The surface functionalization of leukocytes and respiratory burst of cells was observed for limited number of samples.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression during adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stromal cells reveals novel patterns of gene expression during adipocyte differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvin Anyasi Ambele

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have undertaken an in-depth transcriptome analysis of adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs induced to differentiate into adipocytes in vitro. Gene expression was assessed on days 1, 7, 14 and 21 post-induction and genes differentially expressed numbered 128, 218, 253 and 240 respectively. Up-regulated genes were associated with blood vessel development, leukocyte migration, as well as tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. They also shared common pathways with certain obesity-related pathophysiological conditions. Down-regulated genes were enriched for immune response processes. KLF15, LMO3, FOXO1 and ZBTB16 transcription factors were up-regulated throughout the differentiation process. CEBPA, PPARG, ZNF117, MLXIPL, MMP3 and RORB were up-regulated only on days 14 and 21, which coincide with the maturation of adipocytes and could possibly serve as candidates for controlling fat accumulation and the size of mature adipocytes. In summary, we have identified genes that were up-regulated only on days 1 and 7 or days 14 and 21 that could serve as potential early and late-stage differentiation markers.

  18. Lipid droplets in leukocytes: Organelles linked to inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Rossana C N; Weller, Peter F

    2016-01-15

    Studies on lipid droplets (LDs) in leukocytes have attracted attention due to their association with human diseases. In these cells, LDs are rapidly formed in response to inflammatory stimuli or allergic/inflammatory diseases including infections with parasites and bacteria. Leukocyte LDs are linked to the regulation of immune responses by compartmentalization of several proteins and lipids involved in the control and biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). In this mini review, we summarize current knowledge on the composition, structure and function of leukocyte LDs, organelles now considered as structural markers of inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against mink leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W.S.; Pedersen, Mikael; Gram-Nielsen, S.

    1997-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated against mink leukocytes. One antibody reacted with all T lymphocytes, one with all monocytes and one had platelet reactivity. Under reducing conditions, the T lymphocyte reactive antibody immunoprecipitated 18 kDa, 23 kDa, 25 kDa and 32-40 k...... leukocytes of human and various animal species have been analysed for cross-reactivity to mink leukocytes. We found eight to cross-react with mink. Of particular importance was an anticanine CD11a mAb, an antihuman CD79a mAb and an antihuman bcl-2 mAb....

  20. Synthesis of Diethylpropione Derivatives and Their Leukocyte-Increasing Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chung Gang; Sun, Yi Ping; Wang, Guo Ping; Tan, Xiang Duan [Guilin Medical University, Guilin (China)

    2014-09-15

    In search of new antileukopenia agents, twenty dithiolopyrrolone derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their leukocyte-increasing activities in normal mice. Among the synthesized compounds 4-23, compounds 5 and 6 showed significant leukocyte-increasing activity ( p < 0.01), and compounds 4, 9 and 16 had a moderate effect ( p < 0.05). Compound 5 also displayed stronger leukocyte-increasing activity than that of the positive recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). Above all, compound 5 would be a potential antileukopenia agent which deserved further research.

  1. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Peptides Derived from Tumor Antigens Induced by Inhibition of DNA Methylation for Development of Drug-facilitated Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shraibman, Bracha; Kadosh, Dganit Melamed; Barnea, Eilon; Admon, Arie

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of cancer cells with anticancer drugs often fails to achieve complete remission. Yet, such drug treatments may induce alteration in the tumor's gene expression patterns, including those of Cancer/Testis Antigens (CTA). The degradation products of such antigens can be presented as HLA peptides on the surface of the tumor cells and be developed into anticancer immunotherapeutics. For example, the DNA methyl transferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine) has limited antitumor efficacy, yet it induces the expression of many genes, including CTAs that are normally silenced in the healthy adult tissues. In this study, the presentation of many new HLA peptides derived from CTAs and induced by Decitabine was demonstrated in three human Glioblastoma cell lines. Such presentation of CTA-derived HLA peptides can be exploited for development of new treatment modalities, combining drug treatment with anti-CTA targeted immunotherapy. The Decitabine-induced HLA peptidomes include many CTAs that are not normally detected in healthy tissues or in cancer cells, unless treated with the drug. In addition, the study included large-scale analyses of the simultaneous effects of Decitabine on the transcriptomes, proteomes and HLA peptidomes of the human Glioblastoma cells. It demonstrates the poor correlations between these three levels of gene expression, both in their total levels and in their response to the drug. The proteomics and HLA peptidomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003790 and the transcriptomics data are available via GEO with identifier GSE80137. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. [Advance of gene-modified non-human primate models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Cai, Yijun; Sun, Qiang

    2017-10-25

    Non-human primates would be particularly valuable in life sciences and biomedical research area. Gene-modified monkeys with gene overexpression or loss of function have been successfully generated with the rapid advance in gene manipulation technology such as lentivirus infection and programmable nucleases (ZFN, TALEN, CRISPR-Cas9). Here we review the recent development on gene-modified monkey generation by lentivirus and programmable nucleases. Then we discuss three concerns, the long time for sexual maturation, the off target and the mosaicism of founders, which limit the wide application of gene-modified non-human-primates. At last, hotspots and future trend for gene-modified non-human-primates generation are proposed.

  3. Identification of the human beta A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2): localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T. J.; Cerosaletti, K. M.; Fournier, R. E.; Sinke, R. J.; Rocchi, M.; Marzella, R.; Jenkins, N. A.; Gilbert, D. J.; Copeland, N. G.

    1995-01-01

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine beta A2 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe.

  4. Identification of the human beta A2 crystallin gene (CRYBA2) : localization of the gene on human chromosome 2 and of the homologous gene on mouse chromosome 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, T J; Cerosaletti, K M; Fournier, R E; Sinke, R J; Rocchi, M; Marzella, R; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G

    1995-01-01

    By using primers synthesized on the basis of the bovine beta A2 crystallin gene sequence, we amplified exons 5 and 6 of the human gene (CRYBA2). CRYBA2 was assigned to human chromosome 2 by concordance analysis in human x rodent somatic cell hybrids using the amplified PCR products as probe.

  5. Chemiluminescence by polymorphonuclear leukocytes adhering to surfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Yanai, M.; Quie, P. G.

    1981-01-01

    Stimulation of the plasma membranes of granulocytes results in an oxidative metabolic response. This response can be measured by measuring the reduction of oxidizable substrates, such as Nitro Blue Tetrazolium, as well as by measuring the energy released as light (chemiluminescence). While investigating the oxidative response of human granulocytes, we observed a marked variation in the chemiluminescence response when leukocytes were suspended in a balanced salt solution without gelatin or any...

  6. Serum Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor A3 (LILRA3 Is Increased in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Is a Strong Independent Indicator of Disease Severity; 6.7kbp LILRA3 Gene Deletion Is Not Associated with Diseases Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan An

    Full Text Available Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A3 (LILRA3 is a soluble immune regulatory molecule primarily expressed by monocytes and macrophages. A homozygous 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion that removes the first seven of its eight exons is predicted to lead to lack of LILRA3 protein, although this has not been experimentally confirmed. Moreover, there are conflicting results with regards to the link between the LILRA3 homozygous genetic deletion and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS in different European populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILRA3 gene deletion is associated with MS susceptibility in a North American cohort of European ancestry and assess if serum LILRA3 protein level is a marker of clinical subtype and/or disease severity in MS. A total of 456 patients with MS and 99 unrelated healthy controls were genotyped for the 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion and levels of LILRA3 protein in sera determined by in-house sandwich ELISA. We showed that LILRA3 gene deletion was not associated with MS susceptibility and did not affect the age of disease onset, clinical subtype or disease severity. However, we discovered for the first time that homozygous LILRA3 gene deletion results in lack of production of LILRA3 protein. Importantly, LILRA3 protein level was significantly increased in sera of patients with MS when compared with control subjects, particularly in more severe type primary progressive MS. Multiple regression analysis showed that LILRA3 level in serum was one of the strongest independent markers of disease severity in MS, which potentially can be used as a diagnostic marker.

  7. Gene regulation and the origins of human biological uniqueness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholtis, Samuel J; Noonan, James P

    2010-03-01

    What makes us human? It is likely that changes in gene expression and regulation, in addition to those in protein-coding genes, drove the evolution of uniquely human biological traits. In this review, we discuss how efforts to annotate regulatory functions in the human genome are being combined with maps of human-specific sequence acceleration to identify cis-regulatory elements with human-specific activity. Although the evolutionary interpretation of these events is a subject of considerable debate, the technical and analytical means are now at hand to identify the set of evolutionary genetic events that shaped our species. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Human gene therapy: novel approaches to improve the current gene delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-06-01

    Even though gene therapy made its way through the clinics to treat a number of human pathologies since the early years of experimental research and despite the recent approval of the first gene-based product (Glybera) in Europe, the safe and effective use of gene transfer vectors remains a challenge in human gene therapy due to the existence of barriers in the host organism. While work is under active investigation to improve the gene transfer systems themselves, the use of controlled release approaches may offer alternative, convenient tools of vector delivery to achieve a performant gene transfer in vivo while overcoming the various physiological barriers that preclude its wide use in patients. This article provides an overview of the most significant contributions showing how the principles of controlled release strategies may be adapted for human gene therapy.

  9. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  10. Conservation of regional gene expression in mouse and human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Strand

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Many neurodegenerative diseases have a hallmark regional and cellular pathology. Gene expression analysis of healthy tissues may provide clues to the differences that distinguish resistant and sensitive tissues and cell types. Comparative analysis of gene expression in healthy mouse and human brain provides a framework to explore the ability of mice to model diseases of the human brain. It may also aid in understanding brain evolution and the basis for higher order cognitive abilities. Here we compare gene expression profiles of human motor cortex, caudate nucleus, and cerebellum to one another and identify genes that are more highly expressed in one region relative to another. We separately perform identical analysis on corresponding brain regions from mice. Within each species, we find that the different brain regions have distinctly different expression profiles. Contrasting between the two species shows that regionally enriched genes in one species are generally regionally enriched genes in the other species. Thus, even when considering thousands of genes, the expression ratios in two regions from one species are significantly correlated with expression ratios in the other species. Finally, genes whose expression is higher in one area of the brain relative to the other areas, in other words genes with patterned expression, tend to have greater conservation of nucleotide sequence than more widely expressed genes. Together these observations suggest that region-specific genes have been conserved in the mammalian brain at both the sequence and gene expression levels. Given the general similarity between patterns of gene expression in healthy human and mouse brains, we believe it is reasonable to expect a high degree of concordance between microarray phenotypes of human neurodegenerative diseases and their mouse models. Finally, these data on very divergent species provide context for studies in more closely related species that address

  11. Lipid droplets in Leukocytes: organelles linked to inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, Rossana C. N.; Weller, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on lipid droplets (LDs) in leukocytes have attracted attention due to their association with human diseases. In these cells, LDs are rapidly formed in response to inflammatory stimuli or allergic/inflammatory diseases including infections with parasites and bacteria. Leukocyte LDs are linked to the regulation of immune responses by compartmentalization of several proteins and lipids involved in the control and biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). In this mini review, ...

  12. The majority of human genes have regions repeated in other human genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Roy J.

    2005-01-01

    Amino acid sequence comparisons have been made between all of 25,193 human proteins with each of the others by using blast software (National Center for Biotechnology Information) and recording the results for regions that are significantly related in sequence, that is, have an expectation of <1 × 10–3. The results are presented for each amino acid as the number of identical or similar amino acids matched in these aligned regions. This approach avoids summing or dealing directly with the different regions of any one protein that are often related to different numbers and types of other proteins. The results are presented graphically for a sample of 140 proteins. Relationships are not observed for 26.5% of the 12,728,866 amino acids. The average number of related amino acids is 36.5 for the majority (73.5%) that show relationships. The median number of recognized relationships is ≈3 for all of the amino acids, and the maximum number is 718. The results demonstrate the overwhelming importance of gene regional duplication forming families of proteins with related domains and show the variety of the resulting patterns of relationship. The magnitude of the set of relationships leads to the conclusion that the principal process by which new gene functions arise has been by making use of preexisting genes. PMID:15802472

  13. Identification and validation of suitable endogenous reference genes for gene expression studies in human peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Renee J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression studies require appropriate normalization methods. One such method uses stably expressed reference genes. Since suitable reference genes appear to be unique for each tissue, we have identified an optimal set of the most stably expressed genes in human blood that can be used for normalization. Methods Whole-genome Affymetrix Human 2.0 Plus arrays were examined from 526 samples of males and females ages 2 to 78, including control subjects and patients with Tourette syndrome, stroke, migraine, muscular dystrophy, and autism. The top 100 most stably expressed genes with a broad range of expression levels were identified. To validate the best candidate genes, we performed quantitative RT-PCR on a subset of 10 genes (TRAP1, DECR1, FPGS, FARP1, MAPRE2, PEX16, GINS2, CRY2, CSNK1G2 and A4GALT, 4 commonly employed reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, B2M and HMBS and PPIB, previously reported to be stably expressed in blood. Expression stability and ranking analysis were performed using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Results Reference genes were ranked based on their expression stability and the minimum number of genes needed for nomalization as calculated using GeNorm showed that the fewest, most stably expressed genes needed for acurate normalization in RNA expression studies of human whole blood is a combination of TRAP1, FPGS, DECR1 and PPIB. We confirmed the ranking of the best candidate control genes by using an alternative algorithm (NormFinder. Conclusion The reference genes identified in this study are stably expressed in whole blood of humans of both genders with multiple disease conditions and ages 2 to 78. Importantly, they also have different functions within cells and thus should be expressed independently of each other. These genes should be useful as normalization genes for microarray and RT-PCR whole blood studies of human physiology, metabolism and disease.

  14. Nucleotide sequence of the gene for human prothrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degen, S.J.F.; Davie, E.W.

    1987-09-22

    A human genomic DNA library was screened for the gene coding for human prothrombin with a cDNA coding for the human protein. Eighty-one positive lambda phage were identified, and three were chosen for further characterization. These three phage hybridized with 5' and/or 3' probes prepared from the prothrombin cDNA. The complete DNA sequence of 21 kilobases of the human prothrombin gene was determined and included a 4.9-kilobase region that was previously sequenced. The gene for human prothrombin contains 14 exons separated by 13 intervening sequences. The exons range in size from 25 to 315 base pairs, while the introns range from 84 to 9447 base pairs. Ninety percent of the gene is composed of intervening sequence. All the intron splice junctions are consistent with sequences found in other eukaryotic genes, except for the presence of GC rather than GT on the 5' end of intervening sequence L. Thirty copies of Alu repetitive DNA and two copies of partial KpnI repeats were identified in clusters within several of the intervening sequences, and these repeats represent 40% of the DNA sequence of the gene. The size, distribution, and sequence homology of the introns within the gene were the compared to those of the genes for the other vitamin K dependent proteins and several other serine proteases.

  15. Discovery of Novel Human Gene Regulatory Modules from Gene Co-expression and Promoter Motif Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shisong; Snyder, Michael; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2017-07-17

    Deciphering gene regulatory networks requires identification of gene expression modules. We describe a novel bottom-up approach to identify gene modules regulated by cis-regulatory motifs from a human gene co-expression network. Target genes of a cis-regulatory motif were identified from the network via the motif's enrichment or biased distribution towards transcription start sites in the promoters of co-expressed genes. A gene sub-network containing the target genes was extracted and used to derive gene modules. The analysis revealed known and novel gene modules regulated by the NF-Y motif. The binding of NF-Y proteins to these modules' gene promoters were verified using ENCODE ChIP-Seq data. The analyses also identified 8,048 Sp1 motif target genes, interestingly many of which were not detected by ENCODE ChIP-Seq. These target genes assemble into house-keeping, tissues-specific developmental, and immune response modules. Integration of Sp1 modules with genomic and epigenomic data indicates epigenetic control of Sp1 targets' expression in a cell/tissue specific manner. Finally, known and novel target genes and modules regulated by the YY1, RFX1, IRF1, and 34 other motifs were also identified. The study described here provides a valuable resource to understand transcriptional regulation of various human developmental, disease, or immunity pathways.

  16. Identifying gene expression modules that define human cell fates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanguz, I; Listgarten, J; Cinkornpumin, J; Solomon, A; Gaeta, X; Lowry, W E

    2016-05-01

    Using a compendium of cell-state-specific gene expression data, we identified genes that uniquely define cell states, including those thought to represent various developmental stages. Our analysis sheds light on human cell fate through the identification of core genes that are altered over several developmental milestones, and across regional specification. Here we present cell-type specific gene expression data for 17 distinct cell states and demonstrate that these modules of genes can in fact define cell fate. Lastly, we introduce a web-based database to disseminate the results. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolutionary and Topological Properties of Genes and Community Structures in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szedlak, Anthony; Smith, Nicholas; Liu, Li; Paternostro, Giovanni; Piermarocchi, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    The diverse, specialized genes present in today's lifeforms evolved from a common core of ancient, elementary genes. However, these genes did not evolve individually: gene expression is controlled by a complex network of interactions, and alterations in one gene may drive reciprocal changes in its proteins' binding partners. Like many complex networks, these gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are composed of communities, or clusters of genes with relatively high connectivity. A deep understanding of the relationship between the evolutionary history of single genes and the topological properties of the underlying GRN is integral to evolutionary genetics. Here, we show that the topological properties of an acute myeloid leukemia GRN and a general human GRN are strongly coupled with its genes' evolutionary properties. Slowly evolving ("cold"), old genes tend to interact with each other, as do rapidly evolving ("hot"), young genes. This naturally causes genes to segregate into community structures with relatively homogeneous evolutionary histories. We argue that gene duplication placed old, cold genes and communities at the center of the networks, and young, hot genes and communities at the periphery. We demonstrate this with single-node centrality measures and two new measures of efficiency, the set efficiency and the interset efficiency. We conclude that these methods for studying the relationships between a GRN's community structures and its genes' evolutionary properties provide new perspectives for understanding evolutionary genetics.

  18. Identification of Human HK Genes and Gene Expression Regulation Study in Cancer from Transcriptomics Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer. PMID:23382867

  19. Identification of human HK genes and gene expression regulation study in cancer from transcriptomics data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Zhang, Zhang; Liu, Jingxing; Wu, Jiayan; Yu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression is essential for eukaryotes, as it drives the processes of cellular differentiation and morphogenesis, leading to the creation of different cell types in multicellular organisms. RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) provides researchers with a powerful toolbox for characterization and quantification of transcriptome. Many different human tissue/cell transcriptome datasets coming from RNA-Seq technology are available on public data resource. The fundamental issue here is how to develop an effective analysis method to estimate expression pattern similarities between different tumor tissues and their corresponding normal tissues. We define the gene expression pattern from three directions: 1) expression breadth, which reflects gene expression on/off status, and mainly concerns ubiquitously expressed genes; 2) low/high or constant/variable expression genes, based on gene expression level and variation; and 3) the regulation of gene expression at the gene structure level. The cluster analysis indicates that gene expression pattern is higher related to physiological condition rather than tissue spatial distance. Two sets of human housekeeping (HK) genes are defined according to cell/tissue types, respectively. To characterize the gene expression pattern in gene expression level and variation, we firstly apply improved K-means algorithm and a gene expression variance model. We find that cancer-associated HK genes (a HK gene is specific in cancer group, while not in normal group) are expressed higher and more variable in cancer condition than in normal condition. Cancer-associated HK genes prefer to AT-rich genes, and they are enriched in cell cycle regulation related functions and constitute some cancer signatures. The expression of large genes is also avoided in cancer group. These studies will help us understand which cell type-specific patterns of gene expression differ among different cell types, and particularly for cancer.

  20. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA Class I Down-Regulation by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Negative Factor (HIV-1 Nef: What Might We Learn From Natural Sequence Variants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mwimanzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 causes a chronic infection in humans that is characterized by high plasma viremia, progressive loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes, and severe immunodeficiency resulting in opportunistic disease and AIDS. Viral persistence is mediated in part by the ability of the Nef protein to down-regulate HLA molecules on the infected cell surface, thereby allowing HIV-1 to evade recognition by antiviral CD8+ T lymphocytes. Extensive research has been conducted on Nef to determine protein domains that are required for its immune evasion activities and to identify critical cellular co-factors, and our mechanistic understanding of this process is becoming more complete. This review highlights our current knowledge of Nef-mediated HLA class I down-regulation and places this work in the context of naturally occurring sequence variation in this protein. We argue that efforts to fully understand the critical role of Nef for HIV-1 pathogenesis will require greater analysis of patient-derived sequences to elucidate subtle differences in immune evasion activity that may alter clinical outcome.

  1. T-Box Genes in Human Development and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T K; Brook, J D; Wilsdon, A

    2017-01-01

    T-box genes are important development regulators in vertebrates with specific patterns of expression and precise roles during embryogenesis. They encode transcription factors that regulate gene transcription, often in the early stages of development. The hallmark of this family of proteins is the presence of a conserved DNA binding motif, the "T-domain." Mutations in T-box genes can cause developmental disorders in humans, mostly due to functional deficiency of the relevant proteins. Recent studies have also highlighted the role of some T-box genes in cancer and in cardiomyopathy, extending their role in human disease. In this review, we focus on ten T-box genes with a special emphasis on their roles in human disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Epigenome-wide and transcriptome-wide analyses reveal gestational diabetes is associated with alterations in the human leukocyte antigen complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Alexandra M; LaRocca, Jessica; Lesseur, Corina; Marsit, Carmen J; Michels, Karin B

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects approximately 10 % of pregnancies in the United States and increases the risk of adverse health outcomes in the offspring. These adult disease propensities may be set by anatomical and molecular alterations in the placenta associated with GDM. To assess the mechanistic aspects of fetal programming, we measured genome-wide methylation (Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChips) and expression (Affymetrix transcriptome microarrays) in placental tissue of 41 GDM cases and 41 matched pregnancies without maternal complications from the Harvard Epigenetic Birth Cohort. Specific transcriptional and epigenetic perturbations associated with GDM status included alterations in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which were validated in an independent cohort, the Rhode Island Child Health Study. Gene ontology enrichment among gene regulation influenced by GDM revealed an over-representation of immune response pathways among differential expression, reflecting these coordinated changes in the MHC region. This differential methylation and expression may be capturing shifts in cellular composition, reflecting physiological changes in the placenta associated with GDM. Our study represents the largest investigation of transcriptomic and methylomic differences associated with GDM, providing comprehensive insight into how GDM shapes the intrauterine environment, which may have implications for fetal (re)programming.

  3. Leukocyte migration in experimental inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Van Rees

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Emigration of leukocytes from the circulation into tissue by transendothelial migration, is mediated subsequently by adhesion molecules such as selectins, chemokines and integrins. This multistep paradigm, with multiple molecular choices at each step, provides a diversity in signals. The influx of neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes into inflamed tissue is important in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The importance of each of these groups of adhesion molecules in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, either in human disease or in animal models, will be discussed below. Furthermore, the possibilities of blocking these different steps in the process of leukocyte extravasation in an attempt to prevent further tissue damage, will be taken into account.

  4. PAX 8 activates the enhancer of the human thyroperoxidase gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, C.; Miccadei, S; Saiardi, A.; Civitareale, D.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel natural target of the paired domain transcription factor PAX 8 in the enhancer element of the human thyroperoxidase gene, one of the most important thyroid differentiation markers. It is the primary enzyme involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and PAX 8 has been previously identified as an activating factor of the rat thyroperoxidase gene promoter. In vitro, PAX 8 binds a cis element of the human enhancer and its exogenous expression induces the enhancer act...

  5. Injury, inflammation and the emergence of human specific genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-12

    BIOMEDICAL HYPOTHESIS Injury, inflammation and the emergence of human-specific genes Andrew Baird, PhD; Todd Costantini, MD; Raul Coimbra, MD, PhD...medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. ABSTRACT In light of the central role of inflammation in...the biology of injury, namely infection, inflammation , and tissue repair and regene- ration. These genes include well-known anti-infection and human

  6. Analysis of some conventional ab initio gene finders using human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... using human and mouse DNA sequences .... two different levels: coding nucleotide sequence and exonic .... Table 3. Predicted number of exons in each class on multi-exon genes in three .... measures, hexamer frequency, usually in the form of ..... combination of gene prediction results from multiple ab.

  7. Analysis of some conventional ab initio gene finders using human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... parts of a given protein coding sequence so that the users be able to choose the best program(s) in accordance with their research goals. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Sequence data set. In assessing five ab initio gene prediction programs, a data set consisting of 110 known orthologous genes of human ...

  8. Clinical interpretation of leukocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, K S; Rakich, P M

    1989-07-01

    Basic information has been presented concerning leukocyte (neutrophil, monocyte, lymphocyte, eosinophil, and basophil) function, production, kinetics, and response to various physiological and disease states. Using this information, veterinary practitioners should be able to interpret leukogram data from sick and healthy dogs and cats. Specifically, characteristic leukogram patterns such as physiological leukocytosis, corticosteroid-associated changes, and the presence of infection or severe inflammation should be recognized. In addition, interpretation of individual leukocyte responses should be possible. Several tables have been provided to assist in constructing a differential diagnosis to explain increases or decreases in absolute leukocyte numbers that lie outside of expected reference intervals.

  9. Genomic signatures characterize leukocyte infiltration in myositis muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leukocyte infiltration plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of myositis, and is highly associated with disease severity. Currently, there is a lack of: efficacious therapies for myositis; understanding of the molecular features important for disease pathogenesis; and potential molecular biomarkers for characterizing inflammatory myopathies to aid in clinical development. Methods In this study, we developed a simple model and predicted that 1 leukocyte-specific transcripts (including both protein-coding transcripts and microRNAs should be coherently overexpressed in myositis muscle and 2 the level of over-expression of these transcripts should be correlated with leukocyte infiltration. We applied this model to assess immune cell infiltration in myositis by examining mRNA and microRNA (miRNA expression profiles in muscle biopsies from 31 myositis patients and 5 normal controls. Results Several gene signatures, including a leukocyte index, type 1 interferon (IFN, MHC class I, and immunoglobulin signature, were developed to characterize myositis patients at the molecular level. The leukocyte index, consisting of genes predominantly associated with immune function, displayed strong concordance with pathological assessment of immune cell infiltration. This leukocyte index was subsequently utilized to differentiate transcriptional changes due to leukocyte infiltration from other alterations in myositis muscle. Results from this differentiation revealed biologically relevant differences in the relationship between the type 1 IFN pathway, miR-146a, and leukocyte infiltration within various myositis subtypes. Conclusions Results indicate that a likely interaction between miR-146a expression and the type 1 IFN pathway is confounded by the level of leukocyte infiltration into muscle tissue. Although the role of miR-146a in myositis remains uncertain, our results highlight the potential benefit of deconvoluting the

  10. Genomic signatures characterize leukocyte infiltration in myositis muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Streicher, Katie; Shen, Nan; Higgs, Brandon W; Morehouse, Chris; Greenlees, Lydia; Amato, Anthony A; Ranade, Koustubh; Richman, Laura; Fiorentino, David; Jallal, Bahija; Greenberg, Steven A; Yao, Yihong

    2012-11-21

    Leukocyte infiltration plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of myositis, and is highly associated with disease severity. Currently, there is a lack of: efficacious therapies for myositis; understanding of the molecular features important for disease pathogenesis; and potential molecular biomarkers for characterizing inflammatory myopathies to aid in clinical development. In this study, we developed a simple model and predicted that 1) leukocyte-specific transcripts (including both protein-coding transcripts and microRNAs) should be coherently overexpressed in myositis muscle and 2) the level of over-expression of these transcripts should be correlated with leukocyte infiltration. We applied this model to assess immune cell infiltration in myositis by examining mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles in muscle biopsies from 31 myositis patients and 5 normal controls. Several gene signatures, including a leukocyte index, type 1 interferon (IFN), MHC class I, and immunoglobulin signature, were developed to characterize myositis patients at the molecular level. The leukocyte index, consisting of genes predominantly associated with immune function, displayed strong concordance with pathological assessment of immune cell infiltration. This leukocyte index was subsequently utilized to differentiate transcriptional changes due to leukocyte infiltration from other alterations in myositis muscle. Results from this differentiation revealed biologically relevant differences in the relationship between the type 1 IFN pathway, miR-146a, and leukocyte infiltration within various myositis subtypes. Results indicate that a likely interaction between miR-146a expression and the type 1 IFN pathway is confounded by the level of leukocyte infiltration into muscle tissue. Although the role of miR-146a in myositis remains uncertain, our results highlight the potential benefit of deconvoluting the source of transcriptional changes in myositis muscle or other

  11. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  12. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility genes in the HLA region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Judith

    2006-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on the short arm of chromosome 6 includes the classical HLA genes and in addition HLA-related and non-HLA related genes. The majority of the genes located in this region are directly or indirectly involved in the immune response. The polymorphic HLA

  13. Polymorphisms in human muscarinic receptor subtype genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, Martin C.; Teitsma, Christine A.

    2012-01-01

    A wide range of polymorphisms have been reported in muscarinic receptor subtype genes, mostly in M₁ and M₂ and, to a lesser extent, M₃ receptors. Most studies linking such genetic variability to phenotype have been performed for brain functions, but a more limited amount of information is also

  14. Mutations of the BRAF gene in human cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, H.; Bignell, G.R.; Cox, C.; Stephens, P.; Edkins, S.; Clegg, S.; Teague, J.; Woffendin, H.; Garnett, M.J.; Bottomley, W.; Davis, N.; Dicks, E.; Ewing, R.; Floyd, Y.; Gray, K.

    2002-01-01

    Cancers arise owing to the accumulation of mutations in critical genes that alter normal programmes of cell proliferation, differentiation and death. As the first stage of a systematic genome-wide screen for these genes, we have prioritized for analysis signalling pathways in which at least one gene is mutated in human cancer. The RAS RAF MEK ERK MAP kinase pathway mediates cellular responses to growth signals. RAS is mutated to an oncogenic form in about 15% of human cancer. The three RAF ge...

  15. From mouse to human: evolutionary genomics analysis of human orthologs of essential genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Georgi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the core set of genes that are necessary for basic developmental functions is one of the central goals in biology. Studies in model organisms identified a significant fraction of essential genes through the analysis of null-mutations that lead to lethality. Recent large-scale next-generation sequencing efforts have provided unprecedented data on genetic variation in human. However, evolutionary and genomic characteristics of human essential genes have never been directly studied on a genome-wide scale. Here we use detailed phenotypic resources available for the mouse and deep genomics sequencing data from human populations to characterize patterns of genetic variation and mutational burden in a set of 2,472 human orthologs of known essential genes in the mouse. Consistent with the action of strong, purifying selection, these genes exhibit comparatively reduced levels of sequence variation, skew in allele frequency towards more rare, and exhibit increased conservation across the primate and rodent lineages relative to the remainder of genes in the genome. In individual genomes we observed ~12 rare mutations within essential genes predicted to be damaging. Consistent with the hypothesis that mutations in essential genes are risk factors for neurodevelopmental disease, we show that de novo variants in patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder are more likely to occur in this collection of genes. While incomplete, our set of human orthologs shows characteristics fully consistent with essential function in human and thus provides a resource to inform and facilitate interpretation of sequence data in studies of human disease.

  16. Translational selection in human: More pronounced in housekeeping genes

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Lina

    2014-07-10

    Background: Translational selection is a ubiquitous and significant mechanism to regulate protein expression in prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. Recent evidence has shown that translational selection is weakly operative in highly expressed genes in human and other vertebrates. However, it remains unclear whether translational selection acts differentially on human genes depending on their expression patterns.Results: Here we report that human housekeeping (HK) genes that are strictly defined as genes that are expressed ubiquitously and consistently in most or all tissues, are under stronger translational selection.Conclusions: These observations clearly show that translational selection is also closely associated with expression pattern. Our results suggest that human HK genes are more efficiently and/or accurately translated into proteins, which will inevitably open up a new understanding of HK genes and the regulation of gene expression.Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Yuan Yuan, Baylor College of Medicine; Han Liang, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (nominated by Dr Laura Landweber) Eugene Koonin, NCBI, NLM, NIH, United States of America Sandor Pongor, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and biotechnology (ICGEB), Italy. © 2014 Ma et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  17. Are mice pigmentary genes throwing light on humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose S

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the rapid advances made in the molecular genetics of inherited disorders of hypo and hyperpigmentation during the past three years are reviewed. The main focus is on studies in mice as compared to homologues in humans. The main hypomelanotic diseases included are, piebaldism (white spotting due to mutations of c-KIT, PDGF and MGF genes; vitiligo (microphathalmia mice mutations of c-Kit and c-fms genes; Waardenburg syndrome (splotch locus mutations of mice PAX-3 or human Hup-2 genes; albinism (mutations of tyrosinase genes, Menkes disease (Mottled mouse, premature graying (mutations in light/brown locus/gp75/ TRP-1; Griscelli disease (mutations in TRP-1 and steel; Prader-willi and Angelman syndromes, tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism and hypomelanosis of lto (mutations of pink-eyed dilution gene/mapping to human chromosomes 15 q 11.2 - q12; and human platelet storage pool deficiency diseases due to defects in pallidin, an erythrocyte membrane protein (pallid mouse / mapping to 4.2 pallidin gene. The genetic characterization of hypermelanosis includes, neurofibromatosis 1 (Café-au-lait spots and McCune-Albright Syndrome. Rapid evolving knowledge about pigmentary genes will increase further the knowledge about these hypo and hyperpigmentary disorders.

  18. Localization of b-defensin genes in non human primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ventura

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Defensins are a family of host defence peptides that play an important role in the innate immunity of mammalian and avian species. In humans, four b-defensins have been isolated so far, corresponding to the products of the genes DEFB1 (h-BD1, GenBank accession number NM_005218; DEFB4 (h-Bd2, NM_004942.2, DEFB103 (h-BD3, NM_018661; and DEFB104 (hBD4, NM_080389 mapping on chromosome 8p23.22. We have localized b- defensin genes on metaphasic chromosomes of great apes and several non-human primate species to determine their physical mapping. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization and BAC probes containing the four b-defensin genes, we have mapped the homologous regions to the b-defensin genes on chromosome 8p23-p.22 in non-human primates, while no signals were detected on prosimians chromosomes.

  19. Genetic effects on gene expression across human tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battle, Alexis; Brown, Christopher D.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Aguet, François; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Cummings, Beryl B.; Gelfand, Ellen T.; Getz, Gad; Hadley, Kane; Handsaker, Robert E.; Huang, Katherine H.; Kashin, Seva; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Lek, Monkol; Li, Xiao; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Nedzel, Jared L.; Nguyen, Duyen T.; Noble, Michael S.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Trowbridge, Casandra A.; Tukiainen, Taru; Abell, Nathan S.; Balliu, Brunilda; Barshir, Ruth; Basha, Omer; Bogu, Gireesh K.; Brown, Andrew; Castel, Stephane E.; Chen, Lin S.; Chiang, Colby; Conrad, Donald F.; Cox, Nancy J.; Damani, Farhan N.; Davis, Joe R.; Delaneau, Olivier; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Eskin, Eleazar; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Frésard, Laure; Gamazon, Eric R.; Garrido-Martín, Diego; Gewirtz, Ariel D. H.; Gliner, Genna; Gloudemans, Michael J.; Guigo, Roderic; Hall, Ira M.; Han, Buhm; He, Yuan; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Howald, Cedric; Kyung Im, Hae; Jo, Brian; Yong Kang, Eun; Kim, Yungil; Kim-Hellmuth, Sarah; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Li, Gen; Li, Xin; Liu, Boxiang; Mangul, Serghei; McCarthy, Mark I.; McDowell, Ian C.; Mohammadi, Pejman; Monlong, Jean; Muñoz-Aguirre, Manuel; Ndungu, Anne W.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Nobel, Andrew B.; Oliva, Meritxell; Ongen, Halit; Palowitch, John J.; Panousis, Nikolaos; Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Park, Yoson; Parsana, Princy; Payne, Anthony J.; Peterson, Christine B.; Quan, Jie; Reverter, Ferran; Sabatti, Chiara; Saha, Ashis; Sammeth, Michael; Scott, Alexandra J.; Shabalin, Andrey A.; Sodaei, Reza; Stephens, Matthew; Stranger, Barbara E.; Strober, Benjamin J.; Sul, Jae Hoon; Tsang, Emily K.; Urbut, Sarah; van de Bunt, Martijn; Wang, Gao; Wen, Xiaoquan; Wright, Fred A.; Xi, Hualin S.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Zappala, Zachary; Zaugg, Judith B.; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Akey, Joshua M.; Bates, Daniel; Chan, Joanne; Claussnitzer, Melina; Demanelis, Kathryn; Diegel, Morgan; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Fernando, Marian S.; Halow, Jessica; Hansen, Kasper D.; Haugen, Eric; Hickey, Peter F.; Hou, Lei; Jasmine, Farzana; Jian, Ruiqi; Jiang, Lihua; Johnson, Audra; Kaul, Rajinder; Kellis, Manolis; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lee, Kristen; Billy Li, Jin; Li, Qin; Lin, Jessica; Lin, Shin; Linder, Sandra; Linke, Caroline; Liu, Yaping; Maurano, Matthew T.; Molinie, Benoit; Nelson, Jemma; Neri, Fidencio J.; Park, Yongjin; Pierce, Brandon L.; Rinaldi, Nicola J.; Rizzardi, Lindsay F.; Sandstrom, Richard; Skol, Andrew; Smith, Kevin S.; Snyder, Michael P.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Tang, Hua; Wang, Li; Wang, Meng; van Wittenberghe, Nicholas; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Nierras, Concepcion R.; Branton, Philip A.; Carithers, Latarsha J.; Guan, Ping; Moore, Helen M.; Rao, Abhi; Vaught, Jimmie B.; Gould, Sarah E.; Lockart, Nicole C.; Martin, Casey; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Volpi, Simona; Addington, Anjene M.; Koester, Susan E.; Little, A. Roger; Brigham, Lori E.; Hasz, Richard; Hunter, Marcus; Johns, Christopher; Johnson, Mark; Kopen, Gene; Leinweber, William F.; Lonsdale, John T.; McDonald, Alisa; Mestichelli, Bernadette; Myer, Kevin; Roe, Brian; Salvatore, Michael; Shad, Saboor; Thomas, Jeffrey A.; Walters, Gary; Washington, Michael; Wheeler, Joseph; Bridge, Jason; Foster, Barbara A.; Gillard, Bryan M.; Karasik, Ellen; Kumar, Rachna; Miklos, Mark; Moser, Michael T.; Jewell, Scott D.; Montroy, Robert G.; Rohrer, Daniel C.; Valley, Dana R.; Davis, David A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Undale, Anita H.; Smith, Anna M.; Tabor, David E.; Roche, Nancy V.; McLean, Jeffrey A.; Vatanian, Negin; Robinson, Karna L.; Sobin, Leslie; Barcus, Mary E.; Valentino, Kimberly M.; Qi, Liqun; Hunter, Steven; Hariharan, Pushpa; Singh, Shilpi; Um, Ki Sung; Matose, Takunda; Tomaszewski, Maria M.; Barker, Laura K.; Mosavel, Maghboeba; Siminoff, Laura A.; Traino, Heather M.; Flicek, Paul; Juettemann, Thomas; Ruffier, Magali; Sheppard, Dan; Taylor, Kieron; Trevanion, Stephen J.; Zerbino, Daniel R.; Craft, Brian; Goldman, Mary; Haeussler, Maximilian; Kent, W. James; Lee, Christopher M.; Paten, Benedict; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Vivian, John; Zhu, Jingchun; Brown, Andrew A.; Nguyen, Duyen Y.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Addington, Anjene; Koester, Susan; Lockhart, Nicole C.; Roe, Bryan; Valley, Dana; He, Amy Z.; Kang, Eun Yong; Quon, Gerald; Ripke, Stephan; Shimko, Tyler C.; Teran, Nicole A.; Zhang, Hailei; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Guigó, Roderic

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of the molecular function of the human genome and its variation across individuals is essential for identifying the cellular mechanisms that underlie human genetic traits and diseases. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project aims to characterize variation in gene expression

  20. Altered DNA methylation in leukocytes with trisomy 21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Kerkel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The primary abnormality in Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21, is well known; but how this chromosomal gain produces the complex DS phenotype, including immune system defects, is not well understood. We profiled DNA methylation in total peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL and T-lymphocytes from adults with DS and normal controls and found gene-specific abnormalities of CpG methylation in DS, with many of the differentially methylated genes having known or predicted roles in lymphocyte development and function. Validation of the microarray data by bisulfite sequencing and methylation-sensitive Pyrosequencing (MS-Pyroseq confirmed strong differences in methylation (p<0.0001 for each of 8 genes tested: TMEM131, TCF7, CD3Z/CD247, SH3BP2, EIF4E, PLD6, SUMO3, and CPT1B, in DS versus control PBL. In addition, we validated differential methylation of NOD2/CARD15 by bisulfite sequencing in DS versus control T-cells. The differentially methylated genes were found on various autosomes, with no enrichment on chromosome 21. Differences in methylation were generally stable in a given individual, remained significant after adjusting for age, and were not due to altered cell counts. Some but not all of the differentially methylated genes showed different mean mRNA expression in DS versus control PBL; and the altered expression of 5 of these genes, TMEM131, TCF7, CD3Z, NOD2, and NPDC1, was recapitulated by exposing normal lymphocytes to the demethylating drug 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine (5aza-dC plus mitogens. We conclude that altered gene-specific DNA methylation is a recurrent and functionally relevant downstream response to trisomy 21 in human cells.

  1. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  2. Automated discovery of functional generality of human gene expression programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg K Gerber

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An important research problem in computational biology is the identification of expression programs, sets of co-expressed genes orchestrating normal or pathological processes, and the characterization of the functional breadth of these programs. The use of human expression data compendia for discovery of such programs presents several challenges including cellular inhomogeneity within samples, genetic and environmental variation across samples, uncertainty in the numbers of programs and sample populations, and temporal behavior. We developed GeneProgram, a new unsupervised computational framework based on Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes that addresses each of the above challenges. GeneProgram uses expression data to simultaneously organize tissues into groups and genes into overlapping programs with consistent temporal behavior, to produce maps of expression programs, which are sorted by generality scores that exploit the automatically learned groupings. Using synthetic and real gene expression data, we showed that GeneProgram outperformed several popular expression analysis methods. We applied GeneProgram to a compendium of 62 short time-series gene expression datasets exploring the responses of human cells to infectious agents and immune-modulating molecules. GeneProgram produced a map of 104 expression programs, a substantial number of which were significantly enriched for genes involved in key signaling pathways and/or bound by NF-kappaB transcription factors in genome-wide experiments. Further, GeneProgram discovered expression programs that appear to implicate surprising signaling pathways or receptor types in the response to infection, including Wnt signaling and neurotransmitter receptors. We believe the discovered map of expression programs involved in the response to infection will be useful for guiding future biological experiments; genes from programs with low generality scores might serve as new drug targets that exhibit minimal

  3. An atlas of gene expression and gene co-regulation in the human retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Michele; Carissimo, Annamaria; Cutillo, Luisa; Lai, Ching-Hung; Mutarelli, Margherita; Moretti, Maria Nicoletta; Singh, Marwah Veer; Karali, Marianthi; Carrella, Diego; Pizzo, Mariateresa; Russo, Francesco; Ferrari, Stefano; Ponzin, Diego; Angelini, Claudia; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2016-07-08

    The human retina is a specialized tissue involved in light stimulus transduction. Despite its unique biology, an accurate reference transcriptome is still missing. Here, we performed gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of 50 retinal samples from non-visually impaired post-mortem donors. We identified novel transcripts with high confidence (Observed Transcriptome (ObsT)) and quantified the expression level of known transcripts (Reference Transcriptome (RefT)). The ObsT included 77 623 transcripts (23 960 genes) covering 137 Mb (35 Mb new transcribed genome). Most of the transcripts (92%) were multi-exonic: 81% with known isoforms, 16% with new isoforms and 3% belonging to new genes. The RefT included 13 792 genes across 94 521 known transcripts. Mitochondrial genes were among the most highly expressed, accounting for about 10% of the reads. Of all the protein-coding genes in Gencode, 65% are expressed in the retina. We exploited inter-individual variability in gene expression to infer a gene co-expression network and to identify genes specifically expressed in photoreceptor cells. We experimentally validated the photoreceptors localization of three genes in human retina that had not been previously reported. RNA-seq data and the gene co-expression network are available online (http://retina.tigem.it). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Co-dominant expression of the HLA-G gene and various forms of alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA in human first trimester trophoblast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Møller, C; Sørensen, S

    1998-01-01

    -implantation developmental processes. Animal studies of genomic imprinting of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens in the placenta have shown discordant results. To address this issue in the human placenta, we examined the expression of the non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I gene, HLA-G. Genomic......Genes may be silenced at the transcriptional level by 'genomic imprinting' in such a way that only one of the parental alleles is expressed. Imprinting may be tissue-specific and in some cases it seems also to be time-dependent during development. The phenomenon has been studied in pre- and post...... imprinting of the HLA-G locus could have implications for the interaction in the feto-maternal relationship. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), allele-specific amplification and Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) analysis followed by DNA sequencing were performed on Reverse...

  6. Almost all human genes resulted from ancient duplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Roy J.

    2006-01-01

    Results of protein sequence comparison at open criterion show a very large number of relationships that have, up to now, gone unreported. The relationships suggest many ancient events of gene duplication. It is well known that gene duplication has been a major process in the evolution of genomes. A collection of human genes that have known functions have been examined for a history of gene duplications detected by means of amino acid sequence similarity by using BLASTp with an expectation of two or less (open criterion). Because the collection of genes in build 35 includes sets of transcript variants, all genes of known function were collected, and only the longest transcription variant was included, yielding a 13,298-member library called KGMV (for known genes maximum variant). When all lengths of matches are accepted, >97% of human genes show significant matches to each other. Many form matches with a large number of other different proteins, showing that most genes are made up from parts of many others as a result of ancient events of duplication. To support the use of the open criterion, all of the members of the KGMV library were twice replaced with random protein sequences of the same length and average composition, and all were compared with each other with BLASTp at expectation two or less. The set of matches averaged 0.35% of that observed for the KGMV set of proteins. PMID:17146051

  7. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Anderson, Robert P. [Autoimmunity and Transplantation Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); McCluskey, James [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rossjohn, Jamie, E-mail: jamie.rossjohn@med.monash.edu.au [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  8. Gene × Smoking Interactions on Human Brain Gene Expression: Finding Common Mechanisms in Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolock, Samuel L.; Yates, Andrew; Petrill, Stephen A.; Bohland, Jason W.; Blair, Clancy; Li, Ning; Machiraju, Raghu; Huang, Kun; Bartlett, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have examined gene × environment interactions (G × E) in cognitive and behavioral domains. However, these studies have been limited in that they have not been able to directly assess differential patterns of gene expression in the human brain. Here, we assessed G × E interactions using two publically available datasets…

  9. Human γ-globin genes silenced independently of other genes in the β-globin locus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.O. Dillon (Niall); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractErythropoiesis during human development is characterized by switches in expression of beta-like globin genes during the transition from the embryonic through fetal to adult stages. Activation and high-level expression of the genes is directed by the locus control region (LCR), located 5'

  10. LINE FUSION GENES: a database of LINE expression in human genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hong-Seog

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs are the most abundant retrotransposons in humans. About 79% of human genes are estimated to contain at least one segment of LINE per transcription unit. Recent studies have shown that LINE elements can affect protein sequences, splicing patterns and expression of human genes. Description We have developed a database, LINE FUSION GENES, for elucidating LINE expression throughout the human gene database. We searched the 28,171 genes listed in the NCBI database for LINE elements and analyzed their structures and expression patterns. The results show that the mRNA sequences of 1,329 genes were affected by LINE expression. The LINE expression types were classified on the basis of LINEs in the 5' UTR, exon or 3' UTR sequences of the mRNAs. Our database provides further information, such as the tissue distribution and chromosomal location of the genes, and the domain structure that is changed by LINE integration. We have linked all the accession numbers to the NCBI data bank to provide mRNA sequences for subsequent users. Conclusion We believe that our work will interest genome scientists and might help them to gain insight into the implications of LINE expression for human evolution and disease. Availability http://www.primate.or.kr/line

  11. Replication timing-related and gene body-specific methylation of active human genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, Dvir; Toperoff, Gidon; Rosenberg, Michael; Hellman, Asaf

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how the epigenetic blueprint of the genome shapes human phenotypes requires systematic evaluation of the complex interplay between gene activity and the different layers of the epigenome. Utilizing microarray-based techniques, we explored the relationships between DNA methylation, DNA replication timing and gene expression levels across a variety of human tissues and cell lines. The analyses revealed unequal methylation levels among early- and late-replicating fractions of the genome: late-replicating DNA was hypomethylated compared with early-replicating DNA. Moreover, late-replicating regions were gradually demethylated with cell divisions, whereas the methylation of early-replicating regions was better maintained. As active genes concentrate at early-replicating regions, they are overall hypermethylated relative to inactive genes. Accordingly, we show that the previously reported positive correlation between gene-body methylation (methylation of the transcribed portion of genes) and gene expression is restricted to proliferative tissues and cell lines, whereas in tissues containing few proliferating cells, active and inactive genes have similar methylation levels. We further show that active gene bodies are hypermethylated not only compared with inactive gene bodies, but also compared with their flanking sequences. This specific hypermethylation of the active gene bodies is severely disrupted in cells of an immunodeficiency, centromeric region instability, facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome patient bearing mutated DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B). Our data show that a high methylation level is preferentially maintained in active gene bodies through independent cellular processes. Rather than serving as a distinctive mark between active and inactive genes, gene-body methylation appears to serve a vital, currently unknown function in active genes.

  12. Lensfree Holographic Imaging of Antibody Microarrays for High-Throughput Detection of Leukocyte Numbers and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Stybayeva, Gulnaz; Mudanyali, Onur; Seo, Sungkyu; Silangcruz, Jaime; Macal, Monica; Ramanculov, Erlan; Dandekar, Satya; Erlinger, Anthony; Ozcan, Aydogan; Revzin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of leukocytes is an integral part of blood analysis and blood-based diagnostics. In the present paper we combine lensless holographic imaging with antibody microarrays for rapid and multiparametric analysis of leukocytes from human blood. Monoclonal antibodies (Abs) specific for leukocyte surface antigens (CD4 and CD8) and cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2) were printed in an array so as to juxtapose cell capture and cytokine detection Ab spots. Integration of Ab microarrays into...

  13. Lead Exposure during Early Human Development and DNA Methylation of Imprinted Gene Regulatory Elements in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Xie, Changchun; Murphy, Susan K; Skaar, David; Nye, Monica; Vidal, Adriana C; Cecil, Kim M; Dietrich, Kim N; Puga, Alvaro; Jirtle, Randy L; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2016-05-01

    Lead exposure during early development causes neurodevelopmental disorders by unknown mechanisms. Epidemiologic studies have focused recently on determining associations between lead exposure and global DNA methylation; however, such approaches preclude the identification of loci that may alter human disease risk. The objective of this study was to determine whether maternal, postnatal, and early childhood lead exposure can alter the differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that control the monoallelic expression of imprinted genes involved in metabolism, growth, and development. Questionnaire data and serial blood lead levels were obtained from 105 participants (64 females, 41 males) of the Cincinnati Lead Study from birth to 78 months. When participants were adults, we used Sequenom EpiTYPER assays to test peripheral blood DNA to quantify CpG methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes at DMRs of 22 human imprinted genes. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear regression. Mean blood lead concentration from birth to 78 months was associated with a significant decrease in PEG3 DMR methylation (β = -0.0014; 95% CI: -0.0023, -0.0005, p = 0.002), stronger in males (β = -0.0024; 95% CI: -0.0038, -0.0009, p = 0.003) than in females (β = -0.0009; 95% CI: -0.0020, 0.0003, p = 0.1). Elevated mean childhood blood lead concentration was also associated with a significant decrease in IGF2/H19 (β = -0.0013; 95% CI: -0.0023, -0.0003, p = 0.01) DMR methylation, but primarily in females, (β = -0.0017; 95% CI: -0.0029, -0.0006, p = 0.005) rather than in males, (β = -0.0004; 95% CI: -0.0023, 0.0015, p = 0.7). Elevated blood lead concentration during the neonatal period was associated with higher PLAGL1/HYMAI DMR methylation regardless of sex (β = 0.0075; 95% CI: 0.0018, 0.0132, p = 0.01). The magnitude of associations between cumulative lead exposure and CpG methylation remained unaltered from 30 to 78 months. Our findings provide evidence that early childhood lead

  14. Upregulation of HLA Expression in Primary Uveal Melanoma by Infiltrating Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Essen, T. Huibertus; van Pelt, Sake I.; Bronkhorst, Inge H. G.; Versluis, Mieke; Némati, Fariba; Laurent, Cécile; Luyten, Gregorius P. M.; van Hall, Thorbald; van den Elsen, Peter J.; van der Velden, Pieter A.; Decaudin, Didier; Jager, Martine J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Uveal melanoma (UM) with an inflammatory phenotype, characterized by infiltrating leukocytes and increased human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, carry an increased risk of death due to metastases. These tumors should be ideal for T-cell based therapies, yet it is not clear why prognostically-infaust tumors have a high HLA expression. We set out to determine whether the level of HLA molecules in UM is associated with other genetic factors, HLA transcriptional regulators, or microenvironmental factors. Methods 28 enucleated UM were used to study HLA class I and II expression, and several regulators of HLA by immunohistochemistry, PCR microarray, qPCR and chromosome SNP-array. Fresh tumor samples of eight primary UM and four metastases were compared to their corresponding xenograft in SCID mice, using a PCR microarray and SNP array. Results Increased expression levels of HLA class I and II showed no dosage effect of chromosome 6p, but, as expected, were associated with monosomy of chromosome 3. Increased HLA class I and II protein levels were positively associated with their gene expression and with raised levels of the peptide-loading gene TAP1, and HLA transcriptional regulators IRF1, IRF8, CIITA, and NLRC5, revealing a higher transcriptional activity in prognostically-bad tumors. Implantation of fresh human tumor samples into SCID mice led to a loss of infiltrating leukocytes, and to a decreased expression of HLA class I and II genes, and their regulators. Conclusion Our data provides evidence for a proper functioning HLA regulatory system in UM, offering a target for T-cell based therapies. PMID:27764126

  15. Ontogenetic regulation of leukocyte recruitment in mouse yolk sac vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Markus; Quackenbush, Elizabeth J; Sushkova, Natalia; Altstätter, Johannes; Nussbaum, Claudia; Schmid, Stephan; Pruenster, Monika; Kurz, Angela; Margraf, Andreas; Steppner, Alina; Schweiger, Natalie; Borsig, Lubor; Boros, Ildiko; Krajewski, Nele; Genzel-Boroviczeny, Orsolya; Jeschke, Udo; Frommhold, David; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2013-05-23

    In adult mammals, leukocyte recruitment follows a well-defined cascade of adhesion events enabling leukocytes to leave the circulatory system and transmigrate into tissue. Currently, it is unclear whether leukocyte recruitment proceeds in a similar fashion during fetal development. Considering the fact that the incidence of neonatal sepsis increases dramatically with decreasing gestational age in humans, we hypothesized that leukocyte recruitment may be acquired only late during fetal ontogeny. To test this, we developed a fetal intravital microscopy model in pregnant mice and, using LysEGFP (neutrophil reporter) mice, investigated leukocyte recruitment during fetal development. We show that fetal blood neutrophils acquire the ability to roll and adhere on inflamed yolk sac vessels during late fetal development, whereas at earlier embryonic stages (before day E15), rolling and adhesion were essentially absent. Accordingly, flow chamber experiments showed that fetal EGFP(+) blood cells underwent efficient adhesion only when they were harvested on or after E15. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis on EGFP(+) fetal blood cells revealed that surface expression of CXCR2 and less pronounced P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) begin to increase only late in fetal life. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that inflammation-induced leukocyte recruitment is ontogenetically regulated and enables efficient neutrophil trafficking only during late fetal life.

  16. Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein in neutrophilic leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, P L; Heremans, J F; Schonne, E

    1969-09-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein previously shown to occur in many external secretions, is identified as one of the major proteins present in human and guinea pig neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The identification of this protein in leukocyte extracts was based upon a comparison of its electrophoretic, antigenic, and iron-combining properties with the corresponding properties of the same protein isolated from human and guinea pig milk. Immunochemical quantitations showed that lactoferrin occurs in human neutrophilic leukocytes at the concentration of 3 microg per 10(6) cells. Tissue cultures from guinea pig bone marrow and spleen actively synthesized the protein, as shown both by net production of lactoferrin and incorporation of labeled amino acids into the protein. Immunohistochemical data indicate that lactoferrin first appears in myeloid cells at the stage of the promyelocyte.

  17. Genes encoding longevity: from model organisms to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuningas, Maris; Mooijaart, Simon P; van Heemst, Diana; Zwaan, Bas J; Slagboom, P Eline; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2008-03-01

    Ample evidence from model organisms has indicated that subtle variation in genes can dramatically influence lifespan. The key genes and molecular pathways that have been identified so far encode for metabolism, maintenance and repair mechanisms that minimize age-related accumulation of permanent damage. Here, we describe the evolutionary conserved genes that are involved in lifespan regulation of model organisms and humans, and explore the reasons of discrepancies that exist between the results found in the various species. In general, the accumulated data have revealed that when moving up the evolutionary ladder, together with an increase of genome complexity, the impact of candidate genes on lifespan becomes smaller. The presence of genetic networks makes it more likely to expect impact of variation in several interacting genes to affect lifespan in humans. Extrapolation of findings from experimental models to humans is further complicated as phenotypes are critically dependent on the setting in which genes are expressed, while laboratory conditions and modern environments are markedly dissimilar. Finally, currently used methodologies may have only little power and validity to reveal genetic variation in the population. In conclusion, although the study of model organisms has revealed potential candidate genetic mechanisms determining aging and lifespan, to what extent they explain variation in human populations is still uncertain.

  18. Gene expression-based modeling of human cortical synaptic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Manu S; Raichle, Marcus E

    2013-04-16

    Postnatal cortical synaptic development is characterized by stages of exuberant growth, pruning, and stabilization during adulthood. How gene expression orchestrates these stages of synaptic development is poorly understood. Here we report that synaptic growth-related gene expression alone does not determine cortical synaptic density changes across the human lifespan, but instead, the dynamics of cortical synaptic density can be accurately simulated by a first-order kinetic model of synaptic growth and elimination that incorporates two separate gene expression patterns. Surprisingly, modeling of cortical synaptic density is optimized when genes related to oligodendrocytes are used to determine synaptic elimination rates. Expression of synaptic growth and oligodendrocyte genes varies regionally, resulting in different predictions of synaptic density among cortical regions that concur with previous regional data in humans. Our analysis suggests that modest rates of synaptic growth persist in adulthood, but that this is counterbalanced by increasing rates of synaptic elimination, resulting in stable synaptic number and ongoing synaptic turnover in the human adult cortex. Our approach provides a promising avenue for exploring how complex interactions among genes may contribute to neurobiological phenomena across the human lifespan.

  19. Transcriptional promiscuity of the human /alpha/-globin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitelaw, E.; Hogben, P.; Hanscombe, O.; Proudfoot, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    The human /alpha/-globin gene displays the unusual property of transcriptional promiscuity: that is, it functions in the absence of an enhancer when transfected into nonerythroid cell lines. It is also unusual in that its promoter region lies in a hypomethylated HpaII tiny fragment (HTF) island containing multiple copies of the consensus sequence for the SP1-binding site. The authors have investigated whether there is a relationship between these two observations. First, they investigated the mouse /alpha/-globin gene since it does not lie in an HTF island. They have demonstrated that it was not transcriptionally promiscuous. Second, they studied the transcriptional activity of the human /alpha/-globin gene in the absence of the GC-rich region containing putative SP1-binding sites and found a small (two- to threefold) but consistent positive effect of this region on transcriptional activity in both nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. However, this effect did not account for the promiscuous nature of the human /alpha/-globin gene. They found that in a nonreplicating system, the human //a/-globin gene, like that of the mouse, required a simian virus 40 enhancer in order to be transcriptionally active in nonerythroid and erythroid cell lines. Since they only observed enhancer independence of the human /alpha/-globin gene in a high-copy-number replicating system, they suggest that competition for trans-acting factors could explain these results. Finally, the authors' experiments with the erythroid cell line Putko suggest that there are no tissue-specific enhancers within 1 kilobase 5' of the human /alpha/-globin cap site or within the gene itself.

  20. The human protein disulfide isomerase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galligan James J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enzyme-mediated disulfide bond formation is a highly conserved process affecting over one-third of all eukaryotic proteins. The enzymes primarily responsible for facilitating thiol-disulfide exchange are members of an expanding family of proteins known as protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs. These proteins are part of a larger superfamily of proteins known as the thioredoxin protein family (TRX. As members of the PDI family of proteins, all proteins contain a TRX-like structural domain and are predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Subcellular localization and the presence of a TRX domain, however, comprise the short list of distinguishing features required for gene family classification. To date, the PDI gene family contains 21 members, varying in domain composition, molecular weight, tissue expression, and cellular processing. Given their vital role in protein-folding, loss of PDI activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous disease states, most commonly related to the unfolded protein response (UPR. Over the past decade, UPR has become a very attractive therapeutic target for multiple pathologies including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver disease, and type-2 diabetes. Understanding the mechanisms of protein-folding, specifically thiol-disulfide exchange, may lead to development of a novel class of therapeutics that would help alleviate a wide range of diseases by targeting the UPR.

  1. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in human neutrophils by real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandford Andrew J

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reference genes, which are often referred to housekeeping genes, are frequently used to normalize mRNA levels between different samples. However the expression level of these genes may vary among tissues or cells, and may change under certain circumstances. Thus the selection of reference gene(s is critical for gene expression studies. For this purpose, 10 commonly used housekeeping genes were investigated in isolated human neutrophils. Results Initial screening of the expression pattern demonstrated that 3 of the 10 genes were expressed at very low levels in neutrophils and were excluded from further analysis. The range of expression stability of the other 7 genes was (from most stable to least stable: GNB2L1 (Guanine nucleotide binding protein, beta polypeptide 2-like 1, HPRT1 (Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase 1, RPL32 (ribosomal protein L32, ACTB (beta-actin, B2M (beta-2-microglobulin, GAPD (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and TBP (TATA-binding protein. Relative expression levels of the genes (from high to low were: B2M, ACTB, GAPD, RPL32, GNB2L1, TBP, and HPRT1. Conclusion Our data suggest that GNB2L1, HPRT1, RPL32, ACTB, and B2M may be suitable reference genes in gene expression studies of neutrophils.

  2. Epitope tagging of endogenous genes in diverse human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Bonifant, Challice; Bunz, Fred; Lane, William S; Waldman, Todd

    2008-11-01

    Epitope tagging is a powerful and commonly used approach for studying the physical properties of proteins and their functions and localization in eukaryotic cells. In the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it has been possible to exploit the high efficiency of homologous recombination to tag proteins by modifying their endogenous genes, making it possible to tag virtually every endogenous gene and perform genome-wide proteomics experiments. However, due to the relative inefficiency of homologous recombination in cultured human cells, epitope-tagging approaches have been limited to ectopically expressed transgenes, with the attendant limitations of their nonphysiological transcriptional regulation and levels of expression. To overcome this limitation, a modification and extension of adeno-associated virus-mediated human somatic cell gene targeting technology is described that makes it possible to simply and easily create an endogenous epitope tag in the same way that it is possible to knock out a gene. Using this approach, we have created and validated human cell lines with epitope-tagged alleles of two cancer-related genes in a variety of untransformed and transformed human cell lines. This straightforward approach makes it possible to study the physical and biological properties of endogenous proteins in human cells without the need for specialized antibodies for individual proteins of interest.

  3. Crowdsourcing the Moral Limits of Human Gene Editing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juengst, Eric T

    2017-05-01

    In 2015, a flourish of "alarums and excursions" by the scientific community propelled CRISPR/Cas9 and other new gene-editing techniques into public attention. At issue were two kinds of potential gene-editing experiments in humans: those making inheritable germ-line modifications and those designed to enhance human traits beyond what is necessary for health and healing. The scientific consensus seemed to be that while research to develop safe and effective human gene editing should continue, society's moral uncertainties about these two kinds of experiments needed to be better resolved before clinical trials of either type should be attempted. In the United States, the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) convened the Committee on Human Gene Editing: Scientific, Medical and Ethical Considerations to pursue that resolution. The committee's 2017 consensus report has been widely interpreted as "opening the door" to inheritable human genetic modification and holding a line against enhancement interventions. But on a close reading it does neither. There are two reasons for this eccentric conclusion, both of which depend upon the strength of the committee's commitment to engaging diverse public voices in the gene-editing policy-making process. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  4. A novel exopolysaccharide from a clinical isolate of Prevotella nigrescens: purification, chemical characterization and possible role in modifying human leukocyte phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, K; Yamanaka, T; Yamamoto, N; Furukawa, T; Fukushima, H; Walker, C B; Leung, K-P

    2005-02-01

    Prevotella nigrescens, a gram-negative black-pigmented anaerobic rod, has frequently been isolated from periodontitis and periapical periodontitis lesions. We have isolated an exopolysaccharide-producing P. nigrescens, strain 22, from a chronic periodontitis lesion. The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition and function of the exopolysaccharide associated with this clinical isolate. The chemical composition and structure of the purified exopolysaccharide from strain 22 were determined by high performance liquid chromatography and methylation analysis. To define the biological function of this exopolysaccharide, a chemically induced exopolysaccharide nonproducing mutant, strain 328, which was derived from strain 22, was established. The biological effects of exopolysaccharide were determined by comparing the ability of strain 22, strain 328 or heat-killed strain 22 to form abscesses in mice and to interfere with the phagocytic activity of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Chemical analysis showed that isolated exopolysaccharide consisted of mannose (521.6 microg/mg), glucose (25.6 microg/mg), fructose (65.8 microg/mg), galactose (12.5 microg/mg), arabinose (6.2 microg/mg), xylose (3.2 microg/mg), rhamnose (6.1 microg/mg), and ribose (0.6 microg/mg). Methylation analysis of exopolysaccharide indicated that the linkages of mannose were primarily (1-->2, 1-->6) (1-->2) (1-->6), and (1-->3). Strain 22 and, to a lesser extent, its heat-killed counterpart induced greater abscess formation in mice than strain 328, even though the enzymatic profile of strain 22 was similar to that of strain 328. The ability of strain 328 to induce abscess formation was restored by adding the purified exopolysaccharide isolated from strain 22 to the cell suspension of strain 328. Exopolysaccharide alone failed to induce abscess formation in mice. Further, strain 328 but not the untreated or heat-killed strain 22, was phagocytosed by polymorphonuclear

  5. Human Intellectual Disability Genes Form Conserved Functional Modules in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Oti, Martin; Nijhof, Bonnie; Fernandes, Ana Clara; Kochinke, Korinna; Castells-Nobau, Anna; van Engelen, Eva; Ellenkamp, Thijs; Eshuis, Lilian; Galy, Anne; van Bokhoven, Hans; Habermann, Bianca; Brunner, Han G.; Zweier, Christiane; Verstreken, Patrik; Huynen, Martijn A.; Schenck, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Intellectual Disability (ID) disorders, defined by an IQ below 70, are genetically and phenotypically highly heterogeneous. Identification of common molecular pathways underlying these disorders is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of cognition and for the development of therapeutic intervention strategies. To systematically establish their functional connectivity, we used transgenic RNAi to target 270 ID gene orthologs in the Drosophila eye. Assessment of neuronal function in behavioral and electrophysiological assays and multiparametric morphological analysis identified phenotypes associated with knockdown of 180 ID gene orthologs. Most of these genotype-phenotype associations were novel. For example, we uncovered 16 genes that are required for basal neurotransmission and have not previously been implicated in this process in any system or organism. ID gene orthologs with morphological eye phenotypes, in contrast to genes without phenotypes, are relatively highly expressed in the human nervous system and are enriched for neuronal functions, suggesting that eye phenotyping can distinguish different classes of ID genes. Indeed, grouping genes by Drosophila phenotype uncovered 26 connected functional modules. Novel links between ID genes successfully predicted that MYCN, PIGV and UPF3B regulate synapse development. Drosophila phenotype groups show, in addition to ID, significant phenotypic similarity also in humans, indicating that functional modules are conserved. The combined data indicate that ID disorders, despite their extreme genetic diversity, are caused by disruption of a limited number of highly connected functional modules. PMID:24204314

  6. Leukocyte chemoattractant activity of diacylglycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, T.M.; Hoffman, R.D.; Nishijima, J.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    Phosphatidylinositol breakdown with the generation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (1,2-DG) and inositol phosphates occurs in response to receptor mediated stimulation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). In the authors attempt to demonstrate the direct role of 1,2-DG in cell migration, they have found 1,2 dioctanoyl glycerol (1,2-C8DG) to be a chemoattractant for 6C3HED, a mouse thymic lymphoma, and human peripheral blood PMN's. The chemoattractant activity for both cell types was observed at concentrations from 0.5 to 10mM in an under agarose assay. The maximum effect of 1,2-C8DG on 6C3HED cells was similar to that of 1mM lysophosphatidylcholine and the maximum effect of 1,2-C8DG on PMN's was similar to that of 10/sup -7/M f-met-leu-phe. Other 1,2-DG's with acyl chains ranging from 6 to 18 carbons in length and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol were also chemoattractants for 6C3HED, although their activities were less than 1,2-C8DG. In addition, phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), another activator of protein kinase C, was a chemoattractant for 6C3HED and human PMN's. PMA was more potent than 1,2-C8DG for both 6C3HED and PMN's with chemoattractant activity in the range of 30nM to 1..mu..M. These studies support the direct role of 1,2-DG in the transduction of chemotactic stimuli in leukocytes and further suggest that the formation of diacylglycerol represents a common step in the migratory responses of lymphoid and myeloid cells.

  7. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  8. The metalloproteinase ADAM8 promotes leukocyte recruitment in vitro and in acute lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreymueller, Daniela; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Schumacher, Julian; Fellendorf, Sandra; Hess, Franz Martin; Seifert, Anke; Babendreyer, Aaron; Bartsch, Jörg W; Ludwig, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Alveolar leukocyte recruitment is a hallmark of acute lung inflammation and involves transmigration of leukocytes through endothelial and epithelial layers. The disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) 8 is expressed on human isolated leukocytic cells and can be further upregulated on cultured endothelial and epithelial cells by proinflammatory cytokines. By shRNA-mediated knockdown we show that leukocytic ADAM8 is required on monocytic THP-1 cells for chemokine-induced chemotaxis as well as transendothelial and transepithelial migration. Furthermore, ADAM8 promotes αL-integrin upregulation and THP-1 cell adhesion to endothelial cells. On endothelial cells ADAM8 enhances transendothelial migration and increases cytokine-induced permeability. On epithelial cells the protease facilitates migration in a wound closure assay but does not affect transepithelial leukocyte migration. Blood leukocytes and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) from ADAM8-deficient mice show suppressed chemotactic response. Intranasal application of LPS to mice is accompanied with ADAM8 upregulation in the lung. In this model of acute lung inflammation ADAM8-deficient mice are protected against leukocyte infiltration. Finally, transfer experiments of BMDM in mice indicate that ADAM8 exerts a promigratory function predominantly on leukocytes. Our study provides in vitro and in vivo evidence that ADAM8 on leukocytes holds a proinflammatory function in acute lung inflammation by promoting alveolar leukocyte recruitment. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Automated Identification of Core Regulatory Genes in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin Narang

    Full Text Available Human gene regulatory networks (GRN can be difficult to interpret due to a tangle of edges interconnecting thousands of genes. We constructed a general human GRN from extensive transcription factor and microRNA target data obtained from public databases. In a subnetwork of this GRN that is active during estrogen stimulation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we benchmarked automated algorithms for identifying core regulatory genes (transcription factors and microRNAs. Among these algorithms, we identified K-core decomposition, pagerank and betweenness centrality algorithms as the most effective for discovering core regulatory genes in the network evaluated based on previously known roles of these genes in MCF-7 biology as well as in their ability to explain the up or down expression status of up to 70% of the remaining genes. Finally, we validated the use of K-core algorithm for organizing the GRN in an easier to interpret layered hierarchy where more influential regulatory genes percolate towards the inner layers. The integrated human gene and miRNA network and software used in this study are provided as supplementary materials (S1 Data accompanying this manuscript.

  10. Automated Identification of Core Regulatory Genes in Human Gene Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Vipin; Ramli, Muhamad Azfar; Singhal, Amit; Kumar, Pavanish; de Libero, Gennaro; Poidinger, Michael; Monterola, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Human gene regulatory networks (GRN) can be difficult to interpret due to a tangle of edges interconnecting thousands of genes. We constructed a general human GRN from extensive transcription factor and microRNA target data obtained from public databases. In a subnetwork of this GRN that is active during estrogen stimulation of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we benchmarked automated algorithms for identifying core regulatory genes (transcription factors and microRNAs). Among these algorithms, we identified K-core decomposition, pagerank and betweenness centrality algorithms as the most effective for discovering core regulatory genes in the network evaluated based on previously known roles of these genes in MCF-7 biology as well as in their ability to explain the up or down expression status of up to 70% of the remaining genes. Finally, we validated the use of K-core algorithm for organizing the GRN in an easier to interpret layered hierarchy where more influential regulatory genes percolate towards the inner layers. The integrated human gene and miRNA network and software used in this study are provided as supplementary materials (S1 Data) accompanying this manuscript.

  11. Human ferritin gene is assigned to chromosome 19.

    OpenAIRE

    Caskey, J H; Jones, C; Miller, Y E; Seligman, P A

    1983-01-01

    Ferritin is the intracellular iron storage protein. Tissue ferritin stores are markedly increased in hemochromatosis, a disease of iron overload that has been linked to chromosome 6. In order to provide further information concerning the genetics of ferritin synthesis and to determine if the structural gene for ferritin was on chromosome 6, studies were performed to identify the human chromosome that contains the ferritin gene. Ferritin immunoassays were performed on extracts of Chinese hamst...

  12. Hidden Markov Models for Human Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1997-01-01

    We analyse the sequential structure of human genomic DNA by hidden Markov models. We apply models of widely different design: conventional left-right constructs and models with a built-in periodic architecture. The models are trained on segments of DNA sequences extracted such that they cover...... complete internal exons flanked by introns, or splice sites flanked by coding and non-coding sequence. Together, models of donor site regions, acceptor site regions and flanked internal exons, show that exons - besides the reading frame - hold a specific periodic pattern. The pattern has the consensus: non...

  13. Polymorphic cis- and trans-regulation of human gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian G Cheung

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Expression levels of human genes vary extensively among individuals. This variation facilitates analyses of expression levels as quantitative phenotypes in genetic studies where the entire genome can be scanned for regulators without prior knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms, thus enabling the identification of unknown regulatory relationships. Here, we carried out such genetic analyses with a large sample size and identified cis- and trans-acting polymorphic regulators for about 1,000 human genes. We validated the cis-acting regulators by demonstrating differential allelic expression with sequencing of transcriptomes (RNA-Seq and the trans-regulators by gene knockdown, metabolic assays, and chromosome conformation capture analysis. The majority of the regulators act in trans to the target (regulated genes. Most of these trans-regulators were not known to play a role in gene expression regulation. The identification of these regulators enabled the characterization of polymorphic regulation of human gene expression at a resolution that was unattainable in the past.

  14. Aptamer-guided gene targeting in yeast and human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Patrick; Koh, Kyung Duk; Keskin, Havva; Pai, Rekha B.; Storici, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is a genetic technique to modify an endogenous DNA sequence in its genomic location via homologous recombination (HR) and is useful both for functional analysis and gene therapy applications. HR is inefficient in most organisms and cell types, including mammalian cells, often limiting the effectiveness of gene targeting. Therefore, increasing HR efficiency remains a major challenge to DNA editing. Here, we present a new concept for gene correction based on the development of DNA aptamers capable of binding to a site-specific DNA binding protein to facilitate the exchange of homologous genetic information between a donor molecule and the desired target locus (aptamer-guided gene targeting). We selected DNA aptamers to the I-SceI endonuclease. Bifunctional oligonucleotides containing an I-SceI aptamer sequence were designed as part of a longer single-stranded DNA molecule that contained a region with homology to repair an I-SceI generated double-strand break and correct a disrupted gene. The I-SceI aptamer-containing oligonucleotides stimulated gene targeting up to 32-fold in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and up to 16-fold in human cells. This work provides a novel concept and research direction to increase gene targeting efficiency and lays the groundwork for future studies using aptamers for gene targeting. PMID:24500205

  15. In the nose of the beholder: are olfactory influences on human mate choice driven by variation in immune system genes or sex hormone levels?

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    Roberts, Thomas; Roiser, Jonathan P

    2010-11-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) is the most polymorphic region of the genome, coding for proteins that mediate human immune response. This polymorphism may be maintained by balancing selection and certain populations show deviations from expected gene frequencies. Supporting this hypothesis, studies into olfactory preferences have suggested that females prefer the scent of males with dissimilar HLA to their own. However, it has also been proposed that androstenones play a role in female mate choice, and as these molecules inhibit the immune system, this has implications for the theory of HLA-driven mate preference. This review will critically analyze the findings of studies investigating olfactory preference in humans, and their implications for these two contrasting theories of mate choice.

  16. Gene expression in blood changes rapidly in neutrophils and monocytes after ischemic stroke in humans: a microarray study.

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    Tang, Yang; Xu, Huichun; Du, XinLi; Lit, Lisa; Walker, Wynn; Lu, Aigang; Ran, Ruiqiong; Gregg, Jeffrey P; Reilly, Melinda; Pancioli, Art; Khoury, Jane C; Sauerbeck, Laura R; Carrozzella, Janice A; Spilker, Judith; Clark, Joseph; Wagner, Kenneth R; Jauch, Edward C; Chang, Dongwoo J; Verro, Piero; Broderick, Joseph P; Sharp, Frank R

    2006-08-01

    Ischemic brain and peripheral white blood cells release cytokines, chemokines and other molecules that activate the peripheral white blood cells after stroke. To assess gene expression in these peripheral white blood cells, whole blood was examined using oligonucleotide microarrays in 15 patients at 2.4+/-0.5, 5 and 24 h after onset of ischemic stroke and compared with control blood samples. The 2.4-h blood samples were drawn before patients were treated either with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) alone or with tPA plus Eptifibatide (the Combination approach to Lysis utilizing Eptifibatide And Recombinant tPA trial). Most genes induced in whole blood at 2 to 3 h were also induced at 5 and 24 h. Separate studies showed that the genes induced at 2 to 24 h after stroke were expressed mainly by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and to a lesser degree by monocytes. These genes included: matrix metalloproteinase 9; S100 calcium-binding proteins P, A12 and A9; coagulation factor V; arginase I; carbonic anhydrase IV; lymphocyte antigen 96 (cluster of differentiation (CD)96); monocarboxylic acid transporter (6); ets-2 (erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2); homeobox gene Hox 1.11; cytoskeleton-associated protein 4; N-formylpeptide receptor; ribonuclease-2; N-acetylneuraminate pyruvate lyase; BCL6; glycogen phosphorylase. The fold change of these genes varied from 1.6 to 6.8 and these 18 genes correctly classified 10/15 patients at 2.4 h, 13/15 patients at 5 h and 15/15 patients at 24 h after stroke. These data provide insights into the inflammatory responses after stroke in humans, and should be helpful in diagnosis, understanding etiology and pathogenesis, and guiding acute treatment and development of new treatments for stroke.

  17. ErbB3 mRNA leukocyte levels as a biomarker for major depressive disorder

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    Milanesi Elena

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the identification of peripheral biomarkers that are associated with psychiatric diseases, such as Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, has become relevant because these biomarkers may improve the efficiency of the differential diagnosis process and indicate targets for new antidepressant drugs. Two recent candidate genes, ErbB3 and Fgfr1, are growth factors whose mRNA levels have been found to be altered in the leukocytes of patients that are affected by bipolar disorder in a depressive state. On this basis, the aim of the study was to determine if ErbB3 and Fgfr1 mRNA levels could be a biomarkers of MDD. Methods We measured by Real Time PCR ErbB3 and Fgfr1 mRNA expression levels in leukocytes of MDD patients compared with controls. Successively, to assess whether ErbB3 mRNA levels were influenced by previous antidepressant treatment we stratified our patients sample in two cohorts, comparing drug-naive versus drug-free patients. Moreover, we evaluated the levels of the transcript in MDD patients after 12 weeks of antidepressant treatment, and in prefrontal cortex of rats stressed and treated with an antidepressant drug of the same class. Results These results showed that ErbB3 but not Fgfr1 mRNA levels were reduced in leukocytes of MDD patients compared to healthy subjects. Furthermore, ErbB3 levels were not affected by antidepressant treatment in either human or animal models Conclusions Our data suggest that ErbB3 might be considered as a biomarker for MDD and that its deficit may underlie the pathopsysiology of the disease and is not a consequence of treatment. Moreover the study supports the usefulness of leukocytes as a peripheral system for identifying biomarkers in psychiatric diseases.

  18. Evolutionary Conservation in Genes Underlying Human Psychiatric Disorders

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    Lisa Michelle Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many psychiatric diseases observed in humans have tenuous or absent analogs in other species. Most notable among these are schizophrenia and autism. One hypothesis has posited that these diseases have arisen as a consequence of human brain evolution, for example, that the same processes that led to advances in cognition, language, and executive function also resulted in novel diseases in humans when dysfunctional. Here, the molecular evolution of genes associated with these and other psychiatric disorders are compared among species. Genes associated with psychiatric disorders are drawn from the literature and orthologous sequences are collected from eleven primate species (human, chimpanzee, bonobo, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, macaque, baboon, marmoset, squirrel monkey, and galago and thirty one non-primate mammalian species. Evolutionary parameters, including dN/dS, are calculated for each gene and compared between disease classes and among species, focusing on humans and primates compared to other mammals and on large-brained taxa (cetaceans, rhinoceros, walrus, bear, and elephant compared to their small-brained sister species. Evidence of differential selection in primates supports the hypothesis that schizophrenia and autism are a cost of higher brain function. Through this work a better understanding of the molecular evolution of the human brain, the pathophysiology of disease, and the genetic basis of human psychiatric disease is gained.

  19. Expression Divergence of Tandemly Arrayed Genes in Human and Mouse

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    Valia Shoja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs account for about one third of the duplicated genes in eukaryotic genomes, yet there has not been any systematic study of their gene expression patterns. Taking advantage of recently published large-scale microarray data sets, we studied the expression divergence of 361 two-member TAGs in human and 212 two-member TAGs in mouse and examined the effect of sequence divergence, gene orientation, and chromosomal proximity on the divergence of TAG expression patterns. Our results show that there is a weak negative correlation between sequence divergence of TAG members and their expression similarity. There is also a weak negative correlation between chromosomal proximity of TAG members and their expression similarity. We did not detect any significant relationship between gene orientation and expression similarity. We also found that downstream TAG members do not show significantly narrower expression breadth than upstream members, contrary to what we predict based on TAG expression divergence hypothesis that we propose. Finally, we show that both chromosomal proximity and expression correlation in TAGs do not differ significantly from their neighboring non-TAG gene pairs, suggesting that tandem duplication is unlikely to be the cause for the higher-than-random expression association between neighboring genes on a chromosome in human and mouse.

  20. Gene therapy for human osteoarthritis: principles and clinical translation.

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    Madry, Henning; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent chronic joint disease. Its key feature is a progressive articular cartilage loss. Gene therapy for OA aims at delivering gene-based therapeutic agents to the osteoarthritic cartilage, resulting in a controlled, site-specific, long-term presence to rebuild the damaged cartilage. An overview is provided of the principles of gene therapy for OA based on a PubMed literature search. Gene transfer to normal and osteoarthritic cartilage in vitro and in animal models in vivo is reviewed. Results from recent clinical gene therapy trials for OA are discussed and placed into perspective. Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors enable to directly transfer candidate sequences in human articular chondrocytes in situ, providing a potent tool to modulate the structure of osteoarthritic cartilage. However, few preclinical animal studies in OA models have been performed thus far. Noteworthy, several gene therapy clinical trials have been carried out in patients with end-stage knee OA based on the intraarticular injection of human juvenile allogeneic chondrocytes overexpressing a cDNA encoding transforming growth factor-beta-1 via retroviral vectors. In a recent placebo-controlled randomized trial, clinical scores were improved compared with placebo. These translational results provide sufficient reason to proceed with further clinical testing of gene transfer protocols for the treatment of OA.

  1. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

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    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  2. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Discovery of Human-Similar Gene Fusions in Canine Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvé, Ronan; Rault, Mélanie; Bahin, Mathieu; Lagoutte, Laetitia; Abadie, Jérôme; De Brito, Clotilde; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Botherel, Nadine; Rousseau, Audrey; Wucher, Valentin; Cadieu, Edouard; Thieblemont, Catherine; Hitte, Christophe; Cornevin, Laurence; Cabillic, Florian; Bachelot, Laura; Gilot, David; Hennuy, Benoit; Guillaudeux, Thierry; Le Goff, Arnaud; Derrien, Thomas; Hédan, Benoît; André, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    Canine cancers represent a tremendous natural resource due to their incidence and striking similarities to human cancers, sharing similar clinical and pathologic features as well as oncogenic events, including identical somatic mutations. Considering the importance of gene fusions as driver alterations, we explored their relevance in canine cancers. We focused on three distinct human-comparable canine cancers representing different tissues and embryonic origins. Through RNA-Seq, we discovered similar gene fusions as those found in their human counterparts: IGK-CCND3 in B-cell lymphoma, MPB-BRAF in glioma, and COL3A1-PDGFB in dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans-like. We showed not only similar partner genes but also identical breakpoints leading to oncogene overexpression. This study demonstrates similar gene fusion partners and mechanisms in human-dog corresponding tumors and allows for selection of targeted therapies in preclinical and clinical trials with pet dogs prior to human trials, within the framework of personalized medicine. Cancer Res; 77(21); 5721-7. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Temporal specification and bilaterality of human neocortical topographic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletikos, Mihovil; Sousa, André M M; Sedmak, Goran; Meyer, Kyle A; Zhu, Ying; Cheng, Feng; Li, Mingfeng; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Sestan, Nenad

    2014-01-22

    Transcriptional events involved in the development of human cerebral neocortex are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the temporal dynamics and laterality of gene expression in human and macaque monkey neocortex. We found that interareal differences exhibit a temporal hourglass pattern, dividing the human neocortical development into three major phases. The first phase, corresponding to prenatal development, is characterized by the highest number of differential expressed genes among areas and gradient-like expression patterns, including those that are different between human and macaque. The second, preadolescent phase, is characterized by lesser interareal expression differences and by an increased synchronization of areal transcriptomes. During the third phase, from adolescence onward, differential expression among areas increases again driven predominantly by a subset of areas, without obvious gradient-like patterns. Analyses of left-right gene expression revealed population-level global symmetry throughout the fetal and postnatal time span. Thus, human neocortical topographic gene expression is temporally specified and globally symmetric. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeted Disruption of the β2-Microglobulin Gene Minimizes the Immunogenicity of Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

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    Wang, Dachun; Quan, Yuan; Yan, Qing; Morales, John E; Wetsel, Rick A

    2015-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a promising source of cells for tissue regeneration, yet histoincompatibility remains a major challenge to their clinical application. Because the human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) molecules are the primary mediators of immune rejection, we hypothesized that cells derived from a hESC line lacking HLA-I expression could be transplanted without evoking a robust immune response from allogeneic recipients. In the present study, we used the replacement targeting strategy to delete exons 2 and 3 of β2-microglobulin on both gene alleles in hESCs. Because β2-microglobulin serves as the HLA-I light chain, disruption of the β2-microglobulin gene led to complete HLA-I deficiency on the cell surface of hESCs and their derivatives. Therefore, these cells were resistant to CD8+ T-cell-mediated destruction. Although interferon-γ (IFN-γ) treatment significantly induced β2-microglobulin expression, promoting CD8+ T cell-mediated killing of control hESCs and their derivatives, CD8+ T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity was barely observed with β2-microglobulin-null hESCs and their derivatives treated with IFN-γ. This genetic manipulation to disrupt HLA-I expression did not affect the self-renewal capacity, genomic stability, or pluripotency of hESCs. Despite being relatively sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell-mediated killing due to the lack of HLA-I expression, when transplanted into NK cell-depleted immunocompetent mice, β2-microglobulin-null hESCs developed into tumors resembling those derived from control hESCs in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. These results demonstrate that β2-microglobulin-null hESCs significantly reduce immunogenicity to CD8+ T cells and might provide a renewable source of cells for tissue regeneration without the need for HLA matching in the future. This study reports the generation of a novel β2-microglobulin (B2M)-/- human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line. Differentiated mature cells from this line

  6. Mining the human gut microbiome for novel stress resistance genes

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    Culligan, Eamonn P.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Hill, Colin; Sleator, Roy D.

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid advances in sequencing technologies in recent years, the human genome is now considered incomplete without the complementing microbiome, which outnumbers human genes by a factor of one hundred. The human microbiome, and more specifically the gut microbiome, has received considerable attention and research efforts over the past decade. Many studies have identified and quantified “who is there?,” while others have determined some of their functional capacity, or “what are they doing?” In a recent study, we identified novel salt-tolerance loci from the human gut microbiome using combined functional metagenomic and bioinformatics based approaches. Herein, we discuss the identified loci, their role in salt-tolerance and their importance in the context of the gut environment. We also consider the utility and power of functional metagenomics for mining such environments for novel genes and proteins, as well as the implications and possible applications for future research. PMID:22688726

  7. In vitro evaluation of canine leukocytes radiolabeled in whole blood with {sup 99m}Tc stannous colloid

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    Abushhiwa, Mohamed H. [Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria 3030 (Australia)], E-mail: m.abushhiwa@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au; Salehi, Nouria S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Whitton, Robert C.; Charles, Jennifer A.; Finnin, Peter J.; Lording, Peter M.; Caple, Ivan W.; Parry, Bruce W. [Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Melbourne, Werribee, Victoria 3030 (Australia)

    2008-08-15

    Introduction: Technetium-99m stannous colloid ({sup 99m}TcSnC)-labeled leukocytes are used to investigate a variety of inflammatory diseases in human medicine. The present study investigates the in vitro behavior of canine leukocytes labeled in whole blood with {sup 99m}TcSnC. Methods: Blood samples from 10 healthy dogs were labeled with {sup 99m}TcSnC using a standard procedure. The distribution of radioactivity among blood components (plasma, leukocyte layers and erythrocytes) was measured following separation of the radiolabeled samples across Histopaque density gradients. Phagocytic function of labeled and unlabeled leukocytes was estimated using zymosan particles. Labeling retention by leukocytes was determined at 1, 3, 4 and 7 h postlabeling. Results: The mean{+-}standard error percentage of radioactivity associated with plasma, erythrocyte and leukocyte fractions was 2.0{+-}0.21%, 55.5{+-}0.60% and 42.5{+-}0.54%, respectively (the last comprising 70.2{+-}0.83% in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and 29.8{+-}0.83% in mononuclear leukocytes). Labeled canine leukocytes had a phagocytic activity of 91.3{+-}0.28% (control, 91.7{+-}0.26%). The radiolabeled canine leukocytes retained 94.1{+-}0.30% of radioactivity at 7 h postlabeling. Conclusions: Radiolabeling of canine leukocytes in whole blood with {sup 99m}TcSnC has minor adverse effect on their phagocytic function. The radiolabeled canine leukocytes retained a large percentage of radioactivity for at least 7 h postlabeling.

  8. Gene copy-number polymorphism caused by retrotransposition in humans.

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    Daniel R Schrider

    Full Text Available The era of whole-genome sequencing has revealed that gene copy-number changes caused by duplication and deletion events have important evolutionary, functional, and phenotypic consequences. Recent studies have therefore focused on revealing the extent of variation in copy-number within natural populations of humans and other species. These studies have found a large number of copy-number variants (CNVs in humans, many of which have been shown to have clinical or evolutionary importance. For the most part, these studies have failed to detect an important class of gene copy-number polymorphism: gene duplications caused by retrotransposition, which result in a new intron-less copy of the parental gene being inserted into a random location in the genome. Here we describe a computational approach leveraging next-generation sequence data to detect gene copy-number variants caused by retrotransposition (retroCNVs, and we report the first genome-wide analysis of these variants in humans. We find that retroCNVs account for a substantial fraction of gene copy-number differences between any two individuals. Moreover, we show that these variants may often result in expressed chimeric transcripts, underscoring their potential for the evolution of novel gene functions. By locating the insertion sites of these duplicates, we are able to show that retroCNVs have had an important role in recent human adaptation, and we also uncover evidence that positive selection may currently be driving multiple retroCNVs toward fixation. Together these findings imply that retroCNVs are an especially important class of polymorphism, and that future studies of copy-number variation should search for these variants in order to illuminate their potential evolutionary and functional relevance.

  9. Pathway reporter genes define molecular phenotypes of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jitao David; Küng, Erich; Boess, Franziska; Certa, Ulrich; Ebeling, Martin

    2015-04-24

    The phenotype of a living cell is determined by its pattern of active signaling networks, giving rise to a "molecular phenotype" associated with differential gene expression. Digital amplicon based RNA quantification by sequencing is a useful technology for molecular phenotyping as a novel tool to characterize the state of biological systems. We show here that the activity of signaling networks can be assessed based on a set of established key regulators and expression targets rather than the entire transcriptome. We compiled a panel of 917 human pathway reporter genes, representing 154 human signaling and metabolic networks for integrated knowledge- and data-driven understanding of biological processes. The reporter genes are significantly enriched for regulators and effectors covering a wide range of biological processes, and faithfully capture gene-level and pathway-level changes. We apply the approach to iPSC derived cardiomyocytes and primary human hepatocytes to describe changes in molecular phenotype during development or drug response. The reporter genes deliver an accurate pathway-centric view of the biological system under study, and identify known and novel modulation of signaling networks consistent with literature or experimental data. A panel of 917 pathway reporter genes is sufficient to describe changes in the molecular phenotype defined by 154 signaling cascades in various human cell types. AmpliSeq-RNA based digital transcript imaging enables simultaneous monitoring of the entire pathway reporter gene panel in up to 150 samples. We propose molecular phenotyping as a useful approach to understand diseases and drug action at the network level.

  10. Dual Stimulus-Dependent Effect of Oenothera paradoxa Extract on the Respiratory Burst in Human Leukocytes: Suppressing for Escherichia coli and Phorbol Myristate Acetate and Stimulating for Formyl-Methionyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Burzynska-Pedziwiatr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a growing body of evidence suggests that plant polyphenol