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Sample records for human leukemia cell

  1. Human monoclonal antibodies reactive with human myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

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    Posner, M R; Santos, D J; Elboim, H S; Tumber, M B; Frackelton, A R

    1989-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), in remission, were depleted of CD8-positive T-cells and cultured with Epstein-Barr virus. Four of 20 cultures (20%) secreted human IgG antibodies selectively reactive with the cell surfaces of certain human leukemia cell lines. Three polyclonal, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed, B-cell lines were expanded and fused with the human-mouse myeloma analogue HMMA2.11TG/O. Antibody from secreting clones HL 1.2 (IgG1), HL 2.1 (IgG3), and HL 3.1 (IgG1) have been characterized. All three react with HL-60 (promyelocytic), RWLeu4 (CML promyelocytic), and U937 (monocytic), but not with KG-1 (myeloblastic) or K562 (CML erythroid). There is no reactivity with T-cell lines, Burkitt's cell lines, pre-B-leukemia cell lines, or an undifferentiated CML cell line, BV173. Leukemic cells from two of seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and one of five with acute lymphocytic leukemia react with all three antibodies. Normal lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, red blood cells, bone marrow cells, and platelets do not react. Samples from patients with other diverse hematopoietic malignancies showed no reactivity. Immunoprecipitations suggest that the reactive antigen(s) is a lactoperoxidase iodinatable series of cell surface proteins with molecular weights of 42,000-54,000 and a noniodinatable protein with a molecular weight of 82,000. Based on these data these human monoclonal antibodies appear to react with myelomonocytic leukemic cells and may detect a leukemia-specific antigen or a highly restricted differentiation antigen.

  2. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

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    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  3. Human T cell leukemia virus reactivation with progression of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

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    Lee Ratner

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL has a very poor prognosis, despite trials of a variety of different treatment regimens. Virus expression has been reported to be limited or absent when ATLL is diagnosed, and this has suggested that secondary genetic or epigenetic changes are important in disease pathogenesis.We prospectively investigated combination chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy for this disorder. Nineteen patients were prospectively enrolled between 2002 and 2006 at five medical centers in a phase II clinical trial of infusional chemotherapy with etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine, daily prednisone, and bolus cyclophosphamide (EPOCH given for two to six cycles until maximal clinical response, and followed by antiviral therapy with daily zidovudine, lamivudine, and alpha interferon-2a for up to one year. Seven patients were on study for less than one month due to progressive disease or chemotherapy toxicity. Eleven patients achieved an objective response with median duration of response of thirteen months, and two complete remissions. During chemotherapy induction, viral RNA expression increased (median 190-fold, and virus replication occurred, coincident with development of disease progression.EPOCH chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy is an active therapeutic regimen for adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, but viral reactivation during induction chemotherapy may contribute to treatment failure. Alternative therapies are sorely needed in this disease that simultaneously prevent virus expression, and are cytocidal for malignant cells.

  4. Resistance of human and mouse myeloid leukemia cells to UV radiation

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    Poljak-Blazi, M.; Osmak, M.; Hadzija, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of mouse bone marrow and myeloid leukemia cells and sensitivity of human myeloid leukemia cells to UV light was tested. Criteria were the in vivo colony-forming ability of UV exposed cells and the inhibition of DNA synthesis during post-irradiation incubation for 24 h in vitro. Mouse bone marrow cells irradiated with a small dose of UV light (5 J/m 2 ) and injected into x-irradiated animals did not form hemopoietic colonies on recipient's spleens, and recipients died. However, mouse leukemia cells, after irradiation with higher doses of UV light, retained the ability to form colonies on the spleens, and all recipient mice died with typical symptoms of leukemia. In vitro, mouse bone marrow cells exhibited high sensitivity to UV light compared to mouse myeloid leukemia cells. Human leukemia cells were also resistant to UV light, but more sensitive than mouse leukemia cells. (author)

  5. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

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    ... Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  6. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

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    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Human interleukin for DA cells or leukemia inhibitory factor is released by Vero cells in human embryo coculture.

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    Papaxanthos-Roche, A; Taupin, J L; Mayer, G; Daniel, J Y; Moreau, J F

    1994-09-01

    In the light of the newly discovered implications of human interleukin for DA cells and leukemia inhibitory factor in embryology, we searched for the presence of this soluble cytokine in the supernatant of Vero cell coculture systems. Using a bioassay as well as a specific ELISA, we demonstrated that Vero cells are able to release large quantities of human interleukin for DA cells and leukemia inhibitory factor in the embryo-growing medium of such cocultures.

  8. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  9. Murine and human leukemias.

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    Burchenal, J H

    1975-01-01

    Essentially all the drugs which are active against human leukemias and lymphomas are active against one type or another of the rodent leukemias and lymphomas. Leukemia L1210 has been generally the most successful screening tool for clinically active compounds. Leukemia P388, however, seems to be better in detecting active antibiotics and natural products and P1534 is particularly sensitive to the Vinca alkaloids, while L5178Y, EARAD, and 6C3HED are useful in detecting the activities of various asparaginase containing fractions. Cell cultures of these leukemias can demonstrate mechanism of drug action and quantitate resistance. Spontaneous AKR leukemia is a model of the advanced human disease. In these leukemias vincristine and prednisone produce a 4 log cell kill. Cytoxan and arabinosyl cytosine (Ara-C) are also effective. On the other hand drugs such as mercaptopurine (6MP) and methotrexate which are highly active in the maintenance phase of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and in L1210 have little or no activity against the AKR spontaneous system. Mouse leukemias can also detect schedule dependence, synergistic combinations, cross resistance, oral activity, and the ability of drugs to pass the blood brain barrier. A case in point is the Ara-C analog 2,2'-anhydro-arabinofuranosyl-5-fluorocytosine (AAFC) which is not schedule dependent, is active orally, is potentiated by thioguanine, and is effective against intracerebrally inoculated mouse leukemia. AAFC and its analogs might thus be a considerable improvement over Ara-C which is at the present time the most important component of the combination treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

  10. Putative tyrosine kinases expressed in K-562 human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partanen, J.; Maekelae, T.P.; Lehvaeslaiho, H.; Alitalo, K.; Alitalo, R.

    1990-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is important in the transmission of growth and differentiation signals; known tyrosine kinases include several oncoproteins and growth factor receptors. Interestingly, some differentiated cell types, such as erythrocytes and platelets contain high amounts of phosphotyrosine. The authors analyzed tyrosine kinases expressed in the K-562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, which has a bipotential erythroid and megakaryoblastoid differentiation capacity. Analysis of 359 polymerase chain reaction-amplified cDNA clones led to the identification of 14 different tyrosine kinase-related sequences (JTK1-14). Two of the clones (JTK2 and JTK4) represent unusual members of the fibroblast growth factor receptor gene family, and the clones JTK5, JTK11, and JTK14 may also belong to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases but lack a close relationship to any known tyrosine kinase. Each of these different genes has its own characteristic expression pattern in K-562 cells and several other human tumor cell lines. In addition, the JTK11 and JTK14 mRNAs are induced during the megakaryoblastoid differentiation of K-562 cells. These tyrosine kinases may have a role in the differentiation of megakaryoblasts or in the physiology of platelets

  11. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

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    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin + ) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34 + CD38 - Lin -/low ). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G 0 /G 1 (7μM) and G 2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment

  13. Identification of CD34+ and CD34− leukemia-initiating cells in MLL-rearranged human acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Aoki, Yuki; Watanabe, Takashi; Saito, Yoriko; Kuroki, Yoko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Mariko; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori; Kaneko, Akiko; Ono, Rintaro; Sato, Kaori; Suzuki, Nahoko; Fujiki, Saera; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Eiichi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ohara, Osamu; Mizutani, Shuki

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene with AF4, AF9, or ENL results in acute leukemia with both lymphoid and myeloid involvement. We characterized leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in primary infant MLL-rearranged leukemia using a xenotransplantation model. In MLL-AF4 patients, CD34+CD38+CD19+ and CD34−CD19+ cells initiated leukemia, and in MLL-AF9 patients, CD34−CD19+ cells were LICs. In MLL-ENL patients, either CD34+ or CD34− cells were LICs, depending on the pattern of CD34 expression. In contrast, in patients with these MLL translocations, CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− cells were enriched for normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with in vivo long-term multilineage hematopoietic repopulation capacity. Although LICs developed leukemic cells with clonal immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) rearrangement in vivo, CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− cells repopulated recipient bone marrow and spleen with B cells, showing broad polyclonal IGH rearrangement and recipient thymus with CD4+ single positive (SP), CD8+ SP, and CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) T cells. Global gene expression profiling revealed that CD9, CD32, and CD24 were over-represented in MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, and MLL-ENL LICs compared with normal HSCs. In patient samples, these molecules were expressed in CD34+CD38+ and CD34− LICs but not in CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− HSCs. Identification of LICs and LIC-specific molecules in primary human MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for MLL-rearranged leukemia. PMID:25538041

  14. Interleukin-2 production by human leukemia cell lines of pre-B cell origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holan, V.; Minowada, J.

    1993-01-01

    Cells of 7 tested human leukemia cell lines of pre-B cell origin (as characterized by immunophenotyping and by the expression of cytoplasmic micro chains, but not by surface immunoglobulins) produced after stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) a lymphokine activity which supported the growth of the interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent CTLL-2 cell line. Three pieces of evidence indicate that the secreted lymphokine was functionally and antigenically very similar, if not identical, to human IL-2: (1) The lymphokine supported the growth of murine IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells, which did not respond to human lymphokines other than IL-2, but it did not stimulate the growth of murine IL-3-dependent FDC-P2 cells, (2) the biological activity of the lymphokine was was inhibited by monoclonal antibody (mAb) anti-human-IL-2, and (3) the proliferation of IL-2-dependent cells in the presence of the active materials was completely inhibited by the inclusion of the anti-mouse-IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) mAb. Since leukemia cells of immature B-cell origin also synthesize IL-2R, the human pre-B cell leukemias could represent another type of hematological malignancy where the autocrine processes of IL-2 production and utilization are involved in the expansion of the disease. (author)

  15. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

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    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  16. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero, María Teresa; Estévez, Sara; Negrín, Gledy; Quintana, José; López, Mariana; Pérez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge; León, Francisco; Estévez, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. ► Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x L . ► The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. ► Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G 2 -M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x L . Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  17. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

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    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  18. Synergistic interactions between HDAC and sirtuin inhibitors in human leukemia cells.

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    Michele Cea

    Full Text Available Aberrant histone deacetylase (HDAC activity is frequent in human leukemias. However, while classical, NAD(+-independent HDACs are an established therapeutic target, the relevance of NAD(+-dependent HDACs (sirtuins in leukemia treatment remains unclear. Here, we assessed the antileukemic activity of sirtuin inhibitors and of the NAD(+-lowering drug FK866, alone and in combination with traditional HDAC inhibitors. Primary leukemia cells, leukemia cell lines, healthy leukocytes and hematopoietic progenitors were treated with sirtuin inhibitors (sirtinol, cambinol, EX527 and with FK866, with or without addition of the HDAC inhibitors valproic acid, sodium butyrate, and vorinostat. Cell death was quantified by propidium iodide cell staining and subsequent flow-cytometry. Apoptosis induction was monitored by cell staining with FITC-Annexin-V/propidium iodide or with TMRE followed by flow-cytometric analysis, and by measuring caspase3/7 activity. Intracellular Bax was detected by flow-cytometry and western blotting. Cellular NAD(+ levels were measured by enzymatic cycling assays. Bax was overexpressed by retroviral transduction. Bax and SIRT1 were silenced by RNA-interference. Sirtuin inhibitors and FK866 synergistically enhanced HDAC inhibitor activity in leukemia cells, but not in healthy leukocytes and hematopoietic progenitors. In leukemia cells, HDAC inhibitors were found to induce upregulation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family-member whose translocation to mitochondria is normally prevented by SIRT1. As a result, leukemia cells become sensitized to sirtuin inhibitor-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, NAD(+-independent HDACs and sirtuins cooperate in leukemia cells to avoid apoptosis. Combining sirtuin with HDAC inhibitors results in synergistic antileukemic activity that could be therapeutically exploited.

  19. The Natural Antiangiogenic Compound AD0157 Induces Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis in Human Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Melissa García-Caballero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Evasion of apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer especially relevant in the development and the appearance of leukemia drug resistance mechanisms. The development of new drugs that could trigger apoptosis in aggressive hematological malignancies, such as AML and CML, may be considered a promising antileukemic strategy. AD0157, a natural marine pyrrolidinedione, has already been described as a compound that inhibits angiogenesis by induction of apoptosis in endothelial cells. The crucial role played by defects in the apoptosis pathways in the pathogenesis, progression and response to conventional therapies of several forms of leukemia, moved us to analyze the effect of this compound on the growth and death of leukemia cells. In this work, human myeloid leukemia cells (HL60, U937 and KU812F were treated with AD0157 ranging from 1 to 10 μM and an experimental battery was applied to evaluate its apoptogenic potential. We report here that AD0157 was highly effective to inhibit cell growth by promotion of apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells, and provide evidence of its mechanisms of action. The apoptogenic activity of AD0157 on leukemia cells was verified by an increased chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation, and confirmed by an augmentation in the apoptotic subG1 population, translocation of the membrane phosphatidylserine from the inner face of the plasma membrane to the cell surface and by cleavage of the apoptosis substrates PARP and lamin-A. In addition, AD0157 in the low micromolar range significantly enhanced the activities of the initiator caspases-8 and -9, and the effector caspases-3/-7 in a dose-dependent manner. Results presented here throw light on the apoptogenic mechanism of action of AD0157, mediated through caspase-dependent cascades, with an especially relevant role played by mitochondria. Altogether, these results suggest the therapeutic potential of this compound for the treatment of human myeloid leukemia.

  20. Ezrin dephosphorylation/downregulation contributes to ursolic acid-mediated cell death in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Liu, L; Chen, J; Zhao, Z; Peng, Y; Li, P; Gao, N

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin links the actin filaments with the cell membrane and has a functional role in the apoptotic process. It appears clear that ezrin is directly associated with Fas, leading to activation of caspase cascade and cell death. However, the exact role of ezrin in ursolic acid (UA)-induced apoptosis remains unclear. In this study, we show for the first time that UA induces apoptosis in both transformed and primary leukemia cells through dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin, association and polarized colocalization of Fas and ezrin, as well as formation of death-inducing signaling complex. These events are dependent on Rho-ROCK1 signaling pathway. Knockdown of ezrin enhanced cell death mediated by UA, whereas overexpression of ezrin attenuated UA-induced apoptosis. Our in vivo study also showed that UA-mediated inhibition of tumor growth of mouse leukemia xenograft model is in association with the dephosphorylation/downregulation of ezrin. Such findings suggest that the cytoskeletal protein ezrin may represent an attractive target for UA-mediated lethality in human leukemia cells

  1. Antibodies to the human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type I in Dutch haemophiliacs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Miedema, F.; Breederveld, C.; Terpstra, F.; Roos, M.; Schellekens, P.; Melief, C.

    1986-01-01

    95 Dutch haemophiliacs were tested for antibodies to membrane antigens on cells infected with human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I-MA) by indirect immunofluorescence and to purified HTLV-I by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies to HTLV-I-MA were present in 8 of 95 (8%) haemophiliacs,

  2. Effects of Ligusticum porteri (Osha) Root Extract on Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells

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    Nguyen, Khanh; Sparks, Jean; Omoruyi, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ligusticum porteri roots have been traditionally used in folk medicine, but the scientific basis is unclear. Objective: To investigate the cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects of L. porteri root extract on human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells and H2O2-induced oxidative damaged HL-60 cells. Materials and Methods: HL-60 cells were incubated with different concentrations of root extract, and cells were harvested for viability assays on day 3 and 7. Cytokine l...

  3. Dose- and Time-Dependent Response of Human Leukemia (HL-60 Cells to Arsenic Trioxide Treatment

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    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL has been based on the administration of all-trans retinoic acid plus anthracycline chemotherapy, which is very effective as first line therapy; however 25 to 30% of patients will relapse with their disease becoming refractory to conventional therapy. Recently, studies have shown arsenic trioxide to be effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In this study, we used the human leukemia (HL-60 cell line as a model to evaluate the cytoxicity of arsenic trioxide based on the MTT assay. Data obtained from this assay indicated that arsenic trioxide significantly reduced the viability of HL-60 cells, showing LD50 values of 14.26 + 0.5μg/mL, 12.54 + 0.3μg/mL, and 6.4 + 0.6μg/mL upon 6, 12, and 24 hours of exposure, respectively; indicating a dose- and time-dependent response relationship. Findings from the present study indicate that arsenic trioxide is highly cytotoxic to human leukemia (HL-60 cells, supporting its use as an effective therapeutic agent in the management of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  4. Novel human polyomaviruses, Merkel cell polyomavirus and human polyomavirus 9, in Japanese chronic lymphocytic leukemia cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imajoh Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the rarest adult leukemia in Japan, whereas it is the most common leukemia in the Western world. Recent studies from the United States and Germany suggest a possible etiological association between Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV and CLL, although no data have been reported from Eastern countries. To increase the volume of relevant data, this study investigated the prevalence and DNA loads of MCPyV and human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9, another lymphotropic polyomavirus, in Japanese CLL cases. Findings We found that 9/27 CLL cases (33.3 % were positive for MCPyV using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. The viral DNA loads ranged from 0.000017 to 0.0012 copies per cell. All cases were negative for HPyV9. One MCPyV-positive CLL case was evaluated by mutational analysis of the large T (LT gene, which indicated the presence of wild-type MCPyV without a nucleotide deletion. DNA sequence analysis of the entire small T (ST gene and the partial LT gene revealed that a Japanese MCPyV isolate, designated CLL-JK, had two nucleotide gaps when compared with the reference sequence of the North American isolate MCC350. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that MCPyV is present in a subset of Japanese CLL cases with low viral DNA loads. MCPyV and HPyV9 are unlikely to contribute directly to the development of CLL in the majority of Japanese cases. MCPyV isolated from the Japanese CLL cases may constitute an Asian group and its pathogenicity needs to be clarified in future studies.

  5. Induction of apoptosis by hydrolyzable tannins from Eugenia jambos L. on human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L L; Lee, C Y; Yen, K Y

    2000-08-31

    Eugenia jambos L. (Myrtaceae) is an antipyretic and anti-inflammatory herb of Asian folk medicine. A 70% acetone extract exerted the strongest cytotoxic effects on human leukemia cells (HL-60) from a preliminary screening of 15 plants. The cytotoxic principles were separated by bio-assay-guided fractionation to HL-60 cells; two hydrolyzable tannins (1-O-galloyl castalagin and casuarinin) were isolated from the 70% acetone extract. All significantly inhibited human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 and showed less cytotoxicity to human adenocarcinoma cell line SK-HEP-1 and normal cell lines of human lymphocytes and Chang liver cells. Thus, these compounds were exhibited the dose-dependent manner in HL-60 cells and the IC(50) were 10.8 and 12.5 microM, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the presence of apoptotic cells with low DNA content, a decrease of cell population at G(2)/M phase, and a concomitant increase of cell population at G(1) phase. The apoptosis induced by these two compounds was also demonstrated by DNA fragmentation assay and microscopic observation. These results suggest that the cytotoxic mechanism of both antitumor principle constituents might be the induction of apoptosis in HL-60 cells.

  6. Migration of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells into human bone marrow stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrynikola, V; Bianchi, A; Bradstock, K; Gottlieb, D; Hewson, J

    1994-10-01

    Most cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arise from malignant transformation of B-cell precursors in the bone marrow. Recent studies have shown that normal and leukemic B-cell precursors bind to bone marrow stromal cells through the beta-1 integrins VLA-4 and VLA-5, thereby exposing early lymphoid cells to regulatory cytokines. It has been recently reported that the pre-B cell line NALM-6 is capable of migrating under layers of murine stromal cells in vitro (Miyake et al. J Cell Biol 1992;119:653-662). We have further analyzed leukemic cell motility using human bone marrow fibroblasts (BMF) as a stromal layer. The precursor-B ALL cell line NALM-6 rapidly adhered to BMF, and underwent migration or tunneling into BMF layers within 5 h, as demonstrated by light and electron microscopy, and confirmed by a chromium-labeling assay. Migration was also observed with the precursor-B ALL lines Reh and KM-3, with a T leukemia line RPMI-8402, the monocytic line U937, and the mature B line Daudi. In contrast, mature B (Raji), myeloid (K562, HL-60), and T lines (CCRF-CEM, MOLT-4) did not migrate. When cases of leukemia were analyzed, BMF migration was largely confined to precursor-B ALL, occurring in eight of 13 cases tested. Of other types of leukemia, migration was observed in one of four cases of T-ALL, but no evidence was seen in six acute myeloid leukemias and two patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Only minimal migration into BMF was observed with purified sorted CD10+ CD19+ early B cells from normal adult marrow, while normal mature B lymphocytes from peripheral blood did not migrate. ALL migration was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to the beta sub-unit of the VLA integrin family, and by a combination of antibodies to VLA-4 and VLA-5. Partial inhibition was also observed when leukemic cells were incubated with antibodies to VLA-4, VLA-5, or VLA-6 alone. In contrast, treatment of stromal cells with antibodies to vascular cell adhesion molecule or

  7. Differential expression of the ufo/axl oncogene in human leukemia-lymphoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challier, C; Uphoff, C C; Janssen, J W; Drexler, H G

    1996-05-01

    The ufo protein (also termed axl) is a member of a new family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is encoded by a transforming gene that was initially isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells by DNA-mediated transformation of NIH/3T3 cells. The ligand, Gas6, a protein S-related molecule lacking any known function yet, has recently been identified. We report the expression pattern of ufo mRNA in a panel of 76 human continuous leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. The gene was not expressed in cell lines derived from lymphoid malignancies (n=28), but transcription was seen in 3/11 myeloid, 0/6 monocytic, 9/13 erythroid and 11/18 megakaryocytic cell lines. Several cell lines were treated with phorbol ester leading to significant upregulation of the ufo message in constitutively positive cells. An apparent ufo mRNA overexpression was not found in any of the positive leukemia cell lines, but was identified in the drug-resistant subclones of the cervix carcinoma cell line HeLa. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA did not provide evidence for gene amplification, but the HeLa subclones showed banding patterns suggestive of gene rearrangement. Two main ufo mRNA bands of 3.2 and 5.0 kb were identified; no differences in the half-lives (t1/2 = 2.5 h) of these two mRNA species could be identified. In summary, ufo, representing a novel type of receptor tyrosine kinase, is expressed solely in myeloid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemias but not in lymphoid malignancies. These and previous data suggest an involvement of the ufo receptor tyrosine kinase in normal and malignant myelopoiesis; however, its exact role, if any, and mode of operation in leukemogenesis remains to be determined.

  8. Epigenetic inactivation of Notch-Hes pathway in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Qing Kuang

    Full Text Available The Notch pathway can have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles, depending on cell context. For example, Notch signaling promotes T cell differentiation and is leukemogenic in T cells, whereas it inhibits early B cell differentiation and acts as a tumor suppressor in B cell leukemia where it induces growth arrest and apoptosis. The regulatory mechanisms that contribute to these opposing roles are not understood. Aberrant promoter DNA methylation and histone modifications are associated with silencing of tumor suppressor genes and have been implicated in leukemogenesis. Using methylated CpG island amplification (MCA/DNA promoter microarray, we identified Notch3 and Hes5 as hypermethylated in human B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We investigated the methylation status of other Notch pathway genes by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Notch3, JAG1, Hes2, Hes4 and Hes5 were frequently hypermethylated in B leukemia cell lines and primary B-ALL, in contrast to T-ALL cell lines and patient samples. Aberrant methylation of Notch3 and Hes5 in B-ALL was associated with gene silencing and was accompanied by decrease of H3K4 trimethylation and H3K9 acetylation and gain of H3K9 trimethylation and H3K27 trimethylation. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment restored Hes5 expression and decreased promoter hypermethylation in most leukemia cell lines and primary B-ALL samples. Restoration of Hes5 expression by lentiviral transduction resulted in growth arrest and apoptosis in Hes5 negative B-ALL cells but not in Hes5 expressing T-ALL cells. These data suggest that epigenetic modifications are implicated in silencing of tumor suppressor of Notch/Hes pathway in B-ALL.

  9. Epigenetic inactivation of Notch-Hes pathway in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Fang, Zhihong; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A; Yang, Hui; Wei, Yue; Gonzalez-Cervantes, Emilio A; Boumber, Yanis; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    The Notch pathway can have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles, depending on cell context. For example, Notch signaling promotes T cell differentiation and is leukemogenic in T cells, whereas it inhibits early B cell differentiation and acts as a tumor suppressor in B cell leukemia where it induces growth arrest and apoptosis. The regulatory mechanisms that contribute to these opposing roles are not understood. Aberrant promoter DNA methylation and histone modifications are associated with silencing of tumor suppressor genes and have been implicated in leukemogenesis. Using methylated CpG island amplification (MCA)/DNA promoter microarray, we identified Notch3 and Hes5 as hypermethylated in human B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated the methylation status of other Notch pathway genes by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Notch3, JAG1, Hes2, Hes4 and Hes5 were frequently hypermethylated in B leukemia cell lines and primary B-ALL, in contrast to T-ALL cell lines and patient samples. Aberrant methylation of Notch3 and Hes5 in B-ALL was associated with gene silencing and was accompanied by decrease of H3K4 trimethylation and H3K9 acetylation and gain of H3K9 trimethylation and H3K27 trimethylation. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment restored Hes5 expression and decreased promoter hypermethylation in most leukemia cell lines and primary B-ALL samples. Restoration of Hes5 expression by lentiviral transduction resulted in growth arrest and apoptosis in Hes5 negative B-ALL cells but not in Hes5 expressing T-ALL cells. These data suggest that epigenetic modifications are implicated in silencing of tumor suppressor of Notch/Hes pathway in B-ALL.

  10. on Lymphoblastic Leukemia Jurkat Cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    human tumor cell line (Hela) by using MTT assay. [13]. In the present study, we have observed the cytotoxic effect of ethanolic extract of C. arvensis against Jurkat cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, by using Trypan blue, MTS assay and FACS analysis. It was shown from the trypan blue exclusion assay that ...

  11. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam; Neil, James C

    2017-03-01

    The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV. IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level with the most

  12. Anti-mutagenic and Pro-apoptotic Effects of Apigenin on Human Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Hashemi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available "nDiet can play a vital role in cancer prevention. Nowadays the scientists are looking for food materials which can potentially prevent the cancer occurrence. The purpose of this research is to examine anti-mutagenic and apoptotic effects of apigenin in human lymphoma cells. In present study human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (Eheb cell line were cultured in RPMI 1640 (Sigma, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin-streptomycin, L-glutamine and incubated at 37 ºC for 2 days. In addition cancer cell line was treated by and apigenin and cellular vital capacity was determined by MTT assay. Then effect of apigenin in human lymphoma B cells was examined by flow cytometry techniques. The apigenin was subsequently evaluated in terms of anti-mutagenic properties by a standard reverse mutation assay (Ames test. This was performed with histidine auxotroph strain of Salmonella typhimurium (TA100. Thus, it requires histidine from a foreign supply to ensure its growth. The aforementioned strain gives rise to reverted colonies when expose to sodium azide as a carcinogen substance. During MTT assay, human chronic lymphocytic leukemia revealed to have a meaningful cell death when compared with controls (P<0.01 Apoptosis was induced suitably after 48 hours by flow cytometry assay. In Ames test apigenin prevented the reverted mutations and the hindrance percent of apigenin was 98.17%.These results have revealed apigenin induced apoptosis in human lymphoma B cells in vitro.

  13. Human T-cell leukemia virus types I and II exhibit different DNase I protection patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, R.; Harrich, D.; Garcia, J.A.; Gaynor, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus types I (HTLV-I) and II (HTLV-II) are human retroviruses which normally infect T-lymphoid cells. HTLV-I infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, and HTLV-II is associated with an indolent form of hairy-cell leukemia. To identify potential transcriptional regulatory elements of these two related human retroviruses, the authors performed DNase I footprinting of both the HTLV-I and HTLV-II long terminal repeats (LTRs) by using extracts prepared from uninfected T cells, HTLV-I and HTLV-II transformed T cells, and HeLa cells. Five regions of the HTLV-I LTR and three regions of the HTLV-II LTR showed protection by DNase I footprinting. All three of the 21-base-pair repeats previously shown to be important in HTLV transcriptional regulation were protected in the HTLV-I LTR, whereas only one of these repeats was protected in the HTLV-II LTR. Several regions exhibited altered protection in extracts prepared from lymphoid cells as compared with HeLa cells, but there were minimal differences in the protection patterns between HTLV-infected and uninfected lymphoid extracts. A number of HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTR fragments which contained regions showing protection in DNase I footprinting were able to function as inducible enhancer elements in transient CAT gene expression assays in the presence of the HTLV-II tat protein. The alterations in the pattern of the cellular proteins which bind to the HTLV-I and HTLV-II LTRs may in part be responsible for differences in the transcriptional regulation of these two related viruses

  14. Effects of the antitumoural dequalinium on NB4 and K562 human leukemia cell lines. Mitochondrial implication in cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Eva; Nieto, Elena; García-Pérez, Ana Isabel; Delgado, M Dolores; Pinilla, Montserrat; Sancho, Pilar

    2005-10-01

    Dequalinium (DQA) is a delocalized lipophylic cation that selectively targets the mitochondria of carcinoma cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of DQA action are not yet well understood. We have studied the effects of DQA on two different leukemia cell lines: NB4, derived from acute promyelocytic leukemia, and K562, derived from chronic myeloid leukemia. We found that DQA displays differential cytotoxic activity in these cell lines. In NB4 cells, a low DQA concentration (2microM) induces a mixture of apoptosis and necrosis, whereas a high DQA concentration (20microM) induces mainly necrosis. However, K562 cell death was always by necrosis as the cells showed a resistance to apoptosis at all time-periods and DQA concentrations assayed. In both cell lines, the cell death seems to be mediated by alterations of mitochondrial function as evidenced by loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, O2*- accumulation and ATP depletion. The current study improves the knowledge on DQA as a novel anticancer agent with a potential application in human acute promyelocytic leukemia chemotherapy.

  15. Sorafenib promotes graft-versus-leukemia activity in mice and humans through IL-15 production in FLT3-ITD-mutant leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Nimitha R; Baumgartner, Francis; Braun, Lukas; O'Sullivan, David; Thomas, Simone; Waterhouse, Miguel; Müller, Tony A; Hanke, Kathrin; Taromi, Sanaz; Apostolova, Petya; Illert, Anna L; Melchinger, Wolfgang; Duquesne, Sandra; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Osswald, Lena; Yan, Kai-Li; Weber, Arnim; Tugues, Sonia; Spath, Sabine; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Follo, Marie; Claus, Rainer; Lübbert, Michael; Rummelt, Christoph; Bertz, Hartmut; Wäsch, Ralph; Haag, Johanna; Schmidts, Andrea; Schultheiss, Michael; Bettinger, Dominik; Thimme, Robert; Ullrich, Evelyn; Tanriver, Yakup; Vuong, Giang Lam; Arnold, Renate; Hemmati, Philipp; Wolf, Dominik; Ditschkowski, Markus; Jilg, Cordula; Wilhelm, Konrad; Leiber, Christian; Gerull, Sabine; Halter, Jörg; Lengerke, Claudia; Pabst, Thomas; Schroeder, Thomas; Kobbe, Guido; Rösler, Wolf; Doostkam, Soroush; Meckel, Stephan; Stabla, Kathleen; Metzelder, Stephan K; Halbach, Sebastian; Brummer, Tilman; Hu, Zehan; Dengjel, Joern; Hackanson, Björn; Schmid, Christoph; Holtick, Udo; Scheid, Christof; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Stölzel, Friedrich; Ordemann, Rainer; Müller, Lutz P; Sicre-de-Fontbrune, Flore; Ihorst, Gabriele; Kuball, Jürgen; Ehlert, Jan E; Feger, Daniel; Wagner, Eva-Maria; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Schnell, Jacqueline; Kuchenbauer, Florian; Bunjes, Donald; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Richardson, Simon; Gill, Saar; Kröger, Nicolaus; Ayuk, Francis; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio; Müller, Antonia M; Kondo, Takeshi; Teshima, Takanori; Klaeger, Susan; Kuster, Bernhard; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan; Weisdorf, Daniel; van der Velden, Walter; Dörfel, Daniela; Bethge, Wolfgang; Hilgendorf, Inken; Hochhaus, Andreas; Andrieux, Geoffroy; Börries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke; Magenau, John; Reddy, Pavan; Labopin, Myriam; Antin, Joseph H; Henden, Andrea S; Hill, Geoffrey R; Kennedy, Glen A; Bar, Merav; Sarma, Anita; McLornan, Donal; Mufti, Ghulam; Oran, Betul; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shah, Omid; Negrin, Robert S; Nagler, Arnon; Prinz, Marco; Burchert, Andreas; Neubauer, Andreas; Beelen, Dietrich; Mackensen, Andreas; von Bubnoff, Nikolas; Herr, Wolfgang; Becher, Burkhard; Socié, Gerard; Caligiuri, Michael A; Ruggiero, Eliana; Bonini, Chiara; Häcker, Georg; Duyster, Justus; Finke, Jürgen; Pearce, Erika; Blazar, Bruce R; Zeiser, Robert

    2018-03-01

    Individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harboring an internal tandem duplication (ITD) in the gene encoding Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) who relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) have a 1-year survival rate below 20%. We observed that sorafenib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, increased IL-15 production by FLT3-ITD + leukemia cells. This synergized with the allogeneic CD8 + T cell response, leading to long-term survival in six mouse models of FLT3-ITD + AML. Sorafenib-related IL-15 production caused an increase in CD8 + CD107a + IFN-γ + T cells with features of longevity (high levels of Bcl-2 and reduced PD-1 levels), which eradicated leukemia in secondary recipients. Mechanistically, sorafenib reduced expression of the transcription factor ATF4, thereby blocking negative regulation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) activation, which enhanced IL-15 transcription. Both IRF7 knockdown and ATF4 overexpression in leukemia cells antagonized sorafenib-induced IL-15 production in vitro. Human FLT3-ITD + AML cells obtained from sorafenib responders following sorafenib therapy showed increased levels of IL-15, phosphorylated IRF7, and a transcriptionally active IRF7 chromatin state. The mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity and glycolytic capacity of CD8 + T cells increased upon sorafenib treatment in sorafenib responders but not in nonresponders. Our findings indicate that the synergism of T cells and sorafenib is mediated via reduced ATF4 expression, causing activation of the IRF7-IL-15 axis in leukemia cells and thereby leading to metabolic reprogramming of leukemia-reactive T cells in humans. Therefore, sorafenib treatment has the potential to contribute to an immune-mediated cure of FLT3-ITD-mutant AML relapse, an otherwise fatal complication after allo-HCT.

  16. Anti-mutagenic and Pro-apoptotic Effects of Apigenin on Human Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Hashemi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diet can play a vital role in cancer prevention. Nowadays the scientists are looking for food materials which can potentially prevent the cancer occurrence. The purpose of this research is to examine anti-mutagenic and apoptotic effects of apigenin in human lymphoma cells. In present study human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (Eheb cell line were cultured in RPMI 1640 (Sigma, supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, penicillin-streptomycin, L-glutamine and incubated at 37 ºC for 2 days. In addition cancer cell line was treated by and apigenin and cellular vital capacity was determined by MTT assay. Then effect of apigenin in human lymphoma B cells was examined by flow cytometry techniques. The apigenin was subsequently evaluated in terms of anti-mutagenic properties by a standard reverse mutation assay (Ames test. This was performed with histidine auxotroph strain of Salmonella typhimurium (TA100. Thus, it requires histidine from a foreign supply to ensure its growth. The aforementioned strain gives rise to reverted colonies when expose to sodium azide as a carcinogen substance. During MTT assay, human chronic lymphocytic leukemia revealed to have a meaningful cell death when compared with controls (P

  17. PCFT/SLC46A1 promoter methylation and restoration of gene expression in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonen, Nitzan; Bram, Eran E.; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

    2008-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT/SLC46A1) displays optimal and prominent folate and antifolate transport activity at acidic pH in human carcinoma cells but poor activity in leukemia cells. Consistently herein, human leukemia cell lines expressed poor PCFT transcript levels, whereas various carcinoma cell lines showed substantial PCFT gene expression. We identified a CpG island with high density at nucleotides -200 through +100 and explored its role in PCFT promoter silencing. Leukemia cells with barely detectable PCFT transcripts consistently harbored 85-100% methylation of this CpG island, whereas no methylation was found in carcinoma cells. Treatment with 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine which induced demethylation but not with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, restored 50-fold PCFT expression only in leukemia cells. These findings constitute the first demonstration of the dominant epigenetic silencing of the PCFT gene in leukemia cells. The potential translational implications of the restoration of PCFT expression in chemotherapy of leukemia are discussed

  18. Quantitation of human thymus/leukemia-associated antigen by radioimmunoassay in different forms of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechik, B E; Jason, J; Shore, A; Baker, M; Dosch, H M; Gelfand, E W

    1979-12-01

    Using a radioimmunoassay, increased levels of a human thymus/leukemia-associated antigen (HThy-L) have been detected in leukemic cells and plasma from most patients with E-rosette-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and a number of patients with E-rosette-negative ALL, acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), acute monomyelocytic leukemia (AMML), and acute undifferentiated leukemia (AVL). Low levels of HThy-L have been demonstrated in white cells from patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (stable phase) and in mononuclear cells from patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia. The relationship between HThy-L and differentiation of hematopoietic cells is discussed.

  19. RUNX1 promotes cell growth in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia by transcriptional regulation of key target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Catherine E; Gusscott, Samuel; Wong, Rachel J; Shevchuk, Olena O; Rana, Gurneet; Giambra, Vincenzo; Tyshchenko, Kateryna; Islam, Rashedul; Hirst, Martin; Weng, Andrew P

    2018-05-04

    RUNX1 is frequently mutated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The spectrum of RUNX1 mutations has led to the notion that it acts as a tumor suppressor in this context; however, other studies have placed RUNX1 along with transcription factors TAL1 and NOTCH1 as core drivers of an oncogenic transcriptional program. To reconcile these divergent roles, we knocked down RUNX1 in human T-ALL cell lines and deleted Runx1 or Cbfb in primary mouse T-cell leukemias. RUNX1 depletion consistently resulted in reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. RUNX1 upregulated variable sets of target genes in each cell line, but consistently included a core set of oncogenic effectors including IGF1R and NRAS. Our results support the conclusion that RUNX1 has a net positive effect on cell growth in the context of established T-ALL. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Expression of the transcription factor Evi-1 in human erythroleukemia cell lines and in leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenay-Roupie, M; Bouscary, D; Melle, J; Viguié, F; Picard, F; Guesnu, M; Dreyfus, F

    1997-02-01

    The Evi-1 proto-oncogene is a zinc finger DNA binding protein. Although activation of the Evi-1 gene has been associated with chromosomal rearrangements of the 3q25-q28 region, ectopic expression of Evi-1 could also be observed in acute myelogenous leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes without cytogenetic abnormalities of the 3q26 locus. In this study, human erythroleukemic cell lines were screened for the expression of Evi-1 mRNA by northern blotting. Evi-1 was expressed in all the erythroid cell lines, whether undifferentiated (K 562, HEL, LAMA 84) or exhibiting spontaneous terminal erythroid differentiation (KU 812, JK-1). Evi-1 mRNA levels were constant or elevated in hemoglobin-synthesizing KU 812 or K 562 cells in response to erythropoietin or hemin treatment, respectively. In human acute myeloblastic leukemias (AML), 11/30 expressed Evi-1 by RT-PCR. Among these cases, 4/6 erythroleukemias without abnormalities of the 3q25-q28 region were found positive. The presence of acidophilic erythroblasts (15-47% of bone marrow cells) accounted for the existence of a terminal erythroid differentiation in all Evi-1-positive AML M6, whereas one negative case was poorly differentiated and referred to as AML M6 variant. These results suggest that Evi-1 mRNA expression can coexist with erythroid differentiation.

  1. Leukemia inhibitory factor favours neurogenic differentiation of long-term propagated human midbrain precursor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K; Widmer, Hans R; Zimmer, Jens

    2009-01-01

    There is a lot of excitement about the potential use of multipotent neural stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the strategy is compromised by the general loss of multipotency and ability to generate neurons after long-term in vitro propagation. In the present study......, human embryonic (5 weeks post-conception) ventral mesencephalic (VM) precursor cells were propagated as neural tissue-spheres (NTS) in epidermal growth factor (EGF; 20 ng/ml) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2; 20 ng/ml). After more than 325 days, the NTS were transferred to media containing either...... EGF+FGF2, EGF+FGF2+heparin or leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF; 10 ng/ml)+FGF2+heparin. Cultures were subsequently propagated for more than 180 days with NTS analyzed at various time-points. Our data show for the first time that human VM neural precursor cells can be long-term propagated as NTS...

  2. Human HMGA2 protein overexpressed in mice induces precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efanov, A; Zanesi, N; Coppola, V; Nuovo, G; Bolon, B; Wernicle-Jameson, D; Lagana, A; Hansjuerg, A; Pichiorri, F; Croce, C M

    2014-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a neoplasia of thymocytes characterized by the rapid accumulation of the precursors of T lymphocytes. HMGA2 (high-mobility group AT-hook 2) gene expression is extremely low in normal adult tissues, but it is overexpressed in many tumors. To identify the biological function of HMGA2, we generated transgenic mice carrying the human HMGA2 gene under control of the V H promoter/Eμ enhancer. Approximately 90% of Eμ-HMGA2 transgenic mice became visibly sick between 4 and 8 months due to the onset and progression of a T-ALL-like disease. Characteristic features included severe alopecia (30% of mice); enlarged lymph nodes and spleen; and profound immunological abnormalities (altered cytokine levels, hypoimmunoglobulinemia) leading to reduced immune responsiveness. Immunophenotyping showed accumulation of CD5+CD4+, CD5+CD8+ or CD5+CD8+CD4+ T-cell populations in the spleens and bone marrow of sick animals. These findings show that HMGA2-driven leukemia in mice closely resembles spontaneous human T-ALL, indicating that HMGA2 transgenic mice should serve as an important model for investigating basic mechanisms and potential new therapies of relevance to human T-ALL

  3. The small molecule calactin induces DNA damage and apoptosis in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Chih; Lin, Yi-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2012-09-01

    We purified calactin from the roots of the Chinese herb Asclepias curassavica L. and analyzed its biologic effects in human leukemia cells. Our results showed that calactin treatment caused DNA damage and resulted in apoptosis. Increased phosphorylation levels of Chk2 and H2AX were observed and were reversed by the DNA damage inhibitor caffeine in calactin-treated cells. In addition, calactin treatment showed that a decrease in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins Cyclin B1, Cdk1, and Cdc25C was consistent with a G2/M phase arrest. Furthermore, calactin induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9, and PARP cleavage. Pretreatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 significantly blocked the loss of viability in calactin-treated cells. It is indicated that calactin-induced apoptosis may occur through an ERK signaling pathway. Our data suggest that calactin is a potential anticancer compound.

  4. Isolation and identification of gene mediating radiation-induced apoptosis in human leukemia U937 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Xin; Luo Ying; Dong Yan; Sun Zhixian

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Increasing evidences suggest that Caspase family proteases play an important role in the effector mechanism of apoptotic cell death. Radiation (IR) can induce apoptosis in tumor cells, so it is very important to isolate and identify the member of the Caspase family proteases involved in IR-induced apoptosis, and this would contribute to the understanding of the mechanism responsible for apoptosis execution. Methods: A PCR approach to isolate genes for IR-induced apoptosis was developed. The approach used degenerated oligonucleotide encoding the highly conserved peptides that were present in all known Caspases. Results: Protease inhibitors special for Caspases could block the apoptotic cell death caused by IR, and Caspase-3 was isolated from irradiated human leukemia U937 cells. Conclusion: Caspases involve in IR-induced apoptosis, and Caspase-3 is the pivotal element of IR-induced apoptosis

  5. Modeling Human Leukemia Immunotherapy in Humanized Mice

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    Jinxing Xia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The currently available human tumor xenograft models permit modeling of human cancers in vivo, but in immunocompromised hosts. Here we report a humanized mouse (hu-mouse model made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue plus hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a leukemia-associated fusion gene MLL-AF9. In addition to normal human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution as seen in non-leukemic hu-mice, these hu-mice showed spontaneous development of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, which was transplantable to secondary recipients with an autologous human immune system. Using this model, we show that lymphopenia markedly improves the antitumor efficacy of recipient leukocyte infusion (RLI, a GVHD-free immunotherapy that induces antitumor responses in association with rejection of donor chimerism in mixed allogeneic chimeras. Our data demonstrate the potential of this leukemic hu-mouse model in modeling leukemia immunotherapy, and suggest that RLI may offer a safe treatment option for leukemia patients with severe lymphopenia.

  6. Effects of Ligusticum porteri (Osha) Root Extract on Human Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Sparks, Jean; Omoruyi, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Ligusticum porteri roots have been traditionally used in folk medicine, but the scientific basis is unclear. To investigate the cytotoxicity, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects of L. porteri root extract on human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells and H 2 O 2 -induced oxidative damaged HL-60 cells. HL-60 cells were incubated with different concentrations of root extract, and cells were harvested for viability assays on day 3 and 7. Cytokine levels (interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], interleukin-2 [IL-2], and interleukin-10 [IL-10]) and antioxidant indexes (malondialdehyde [MDA], reduced glutathione [GSH], superoxide dismutase [SOD], and catalase [CAT]) in H 2 O 2 -induced-stressed HL-60 were measured after 2 days. The viability of HL-60 challenged with H 2 O 2 declined by 42% compared to unstressed cells. After 7 days of incubation with 200 or 400 μg/mL L. porteri , the viability of HL-60 cells was two-fold higher than the control. Stressed HL-60 cells treated with 100, 200, and 400 μg/mL L. porteri reduced the lipid peroxidation by 12%-13%. We noted an increase in GSH levels, SOD and CAT activities in stressed HL-60 supplemented with 400 μg/mL root extract. Treatment with 400 μg/mL L. porteri significantly ( P effect against the oxidation of reduced glutathione (GSH)Treatment with L. porteri root extract may be effective in preventing oxidative damage through increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase [SOD] and catalase [CAT]) in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

  7. The effect of tributyltin on human eosinophilic [correction of eosinophylic] leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Jolanta; Włosiak, Przemysław; Wilk, Anna; Antonik, Justyna; Czyz, Jarosław; Madeja, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    Organotin compounds are chemicals that are widely used in industry and agriculture as plastic stabilizers, catalysts and biocides. Many of them, including tributyltin (TBT), have been detected in human food and, as a consequence, detectable levels have been found in human blood. As organotin compounds were shown to possess immunotoxic activity, we focused our attention on the effect of TBT on the basic determinants of the function of eosinophils, i.e. cell adhesiveness and motility. We used human eosinophylic leukemia EoL-1 cells, a common in vitro cellular model of human eosinophils. Here, we demonstrate that TBT causes a dose-dependent decrease in the viability of EoL-1 cells. When administered at sub-lethal concentrations, TBT significantly decreases the adhesion of EoL-1 cells to human fibroblasts (HSFs) and inhibits their migration on fibroblast surfaces. Since the basic function of eosinophils is to invade inflamed tissues, our results indicate that TBT, and possibly other organotin compounds, may affect major cellular properties involved in the determination of in vivo eosinophil function.

  8. Silencing of human T-cell leukemia virus type I gene transcription by epigenetic mechanisms

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    Mueller Nancy

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL after a long latent period. Among accessory genes encoded by HTLV-I, the tax gene is thought to play a central role in oncogenesis. However, Tax expression is disrupted by several mechanims including genetic changes of the tax gene, deletion/hypermethylation of 5'-LTR. To clarify the role of epigenetic changes, we analyzed DNA methylation and histone modification in the whole HTLV-I provirus genome. Results The gag, pol and env genes of HTLV-I provirus were more methylated than pX region, whereas methylation of 5'-LTR was variable and 3'-LTR was not methylated at all. In ATL cell lines, complete DNA methylation of 5'-LTR was associated with transcriptional silencing of viral genes. HTLV-I provirus was more methylated in primary ATL cells than in carrier state, indicating the association with disease progression. In seroconvertors, DNA methylation was already observed in internal sequences of provirus just after seroconversion. Taken together, it is speculated that DNA methylation first occurs in the gag, pol and env regions and then extends in the 5' and 3' directions in vivo, and when 5'-LTR becomes methylated, viral transcription is silenced. Analysis of histone modification in the HTLV-I provirus showed that the methylated provirus was associated with hypoacetylation. However, the tax gene transcript could not be detected in fresh ATL cells regardless of hyperacetylated histone H3 in 5'-LTR. The transcription rapidly recovered after in vitro culture in such ATL cells. Conclusion These results showed that epigenetic changes of provirus facilitated ATL cells to evade host immune system by suppressing viral gene transcription. In addition, this study shows the presence of another reversible mechanism that suppresses the tax gene transcription without DNA methylation and hypoacetylated histone.

  9. Induction of cytosine arabinoside-resistant human myeloid leukemia cell death through autophagy regulation by hydroxychloroquine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yundeok; Eom, Ju-In; Jeung, Hoi-Kyung; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Young Sam; Min, Yoo Hong

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) on cell death of cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C)-resistant human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Ara-C-sensitive (U937, AML-2) and Ara-C-resistant (U937/AR, AML-2/AR) human AML cell lines were used to evaluate HCQ-regulated cytotoxicity, autophagy, and apoptosis as well as effects on cell death-related signaling pathways. We found that HCQ-induced dose- and time-dependent cell death in Ara-C-resistant cells compared to Ara-C-sensitive cell lines. The extent of cell death and features of HCQ-induced autophagic markers including increase in microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) I conversion to LC3-II, beclin-1, ATG5, as well as green fluorescent protein-LC3 positive puncta and autophagosome were remarkably greater in U937/AR cells. Also, p62/SQSTM1 was increased in response to HCQ. p62/SQSTM1 protein interacts with both LC3-II and ubiquitin protein and is degraded in autophagosomes. Therefore, a reduction of p62/SQSTM1 indicates increased autophagic degradation, whereas an increase of p62/SQSTM1 by HCQ indicates inhibited autophagic degradation. Knock down of p62/SQSTM1 using siRNA were prevented the HCQ-induced LC3-II protein level as well as significantly reduced the HCQ-induced cell death in U937/AR cells. Also, apoptotic cell death and caspase activation in U937/AR cells were increased by HCQ, provided evidence that HCQ-induced autophagy blockade. Taken together, our data show that HCQ-induced apoptotic cell death in Ara-C-resistant AML cells through autophagy regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Potentiation of luteolin cytotoxicity by flavonols fisetin and quercetin in human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sak, Katrin; Kasemaa, Kristi; Everaus, Hele

    2016-09-14

    Despite numerous studies chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) still remains an incurable disease. Therefore, all new compounds and novel strategies which are able to eradicate CLL cells should be considered as valuable clues for a potential future remedy against this malignancy. In the present study, the cytotoxic profiles of natural flavonoids were described in two human CLL cell lines, HG-3 and EHEB, indicating the flavone luteolin as the most potent flavonoid with half-maximal inhibitory constants (IC50) of 37 μM and 26 μM, respectively. Luteolin significantly increased the apoptotic cell population in both cell lines by increasing the activities of caspases-3 and -9 and triggering the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Two flavonols, fisetin and quercetin, were somewhat less efficient in suppressing cellular viability, whereas baicalein, chrysin, (+)-catechin and hesperetin exerted only a small or no response at doses as high as 100 μM. Both fisetin and quercetin were able to augment the cytotoxic activity of luteolin in both cell lines by reducing the IC50 values up to four fold. As a result of this, luteolin displayed cytotoxicity activity already at low micromolar concentrations that could potentially be physiologically achievable through oral ingestion. No other tested flavonoids were capable of sensitizing CLL cells to luteolin pointing to a specific binding of fisetin and quercetin to the cellular targets which interfere with the signaling pathways induced by luteolin. Although further molecular studies to unravel this potentiating mechanism are certainly needed, this phenomenon could contribute to future remedies for prevention and treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  11. Vitamin K3 triggers human leukemia cell death through hydrogen peroxide generation and histone hyperacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Changjun; Kang, Jiuhong; Zheng, Rongliang

    2005-10-01

    Vitamin K3 (VK3) is a well-known anticancer agent, but its mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, VK3 was found to simultaneously induce cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, including superoxide anion (O2*-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation, and histone hyperacetylation in human leukemia HL-60 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Catalase (CAT), an antioxidant enzyme that specifically scavenges H2O2, could significantly diminish both histone acetylation increase and cell death caused by VK3, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD), an enzyme that specifically eliminates O2*-, showed no effect on both of these, leading to the conclusion that H2O2 generation, but not O2*- generation, contributes to VK3-induced histone hyperacetylation and cell death. This conclusion was confirmed by the finding that enhancement of VK3-induced H2O2 generation by vitamin C (VC) could significantly promote both the histone hyperacetylation and cell death. Further studies suggested that histone hyperacetylation played an important role in VK3-induced cell death, since sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, showed no effect on ROS generation, but obviously potentiated VK3-induced histone hyperacetylation and cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel mechanism for the anticancer activity of VK3, i.e., VK3 induced tumor cell death through H2O2 generation, which then further induced histone hyperacetylation.

  12. Holotoxin A1 Induces Apoptosis by Activating Acid Sphingomyelinase and Neutral Sphingomyelinase in K562 and Human Primary Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Hoon Yun

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine triterpene glycosides are attractive candidates for the development of anticancer agents. Holotoxin A1 is a triterpene glycoside found in the edible sea cucumber, Apostichopus (Stichopus japonicus. We previously showed that cladoloside C2, the 25(26-dihydro derivative of holotoxin A1, induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells by activating ceramide synthase 6. Thus, we hypothesized that holotoxin A1, which is structurally similar to cladoloside C2, might induce apoptosis in human leukemia cells through the same molecular mechanism. In this paper, we compared holotoxin A1 and cladoloside C2 for killing potency and mechanism of action. We found that holotoxin A1 induced apoptosis more potently than cladoloside C2. Moreover, holotoxin A1 induced apoptosis in K562 cells by activating caspase-8 and caspase-3, but not by activating caspase-9. During holotoxin A1-induced apoptosis, acid sphingomyelinase (SMase and neutral SMase were activated in both K562 cells and human primary leukemia cells. Specifically inhibiting acid SMase and neutral SMаse with chemical inhibitors or siRNAs significantly inhibited holotoxin A1–induced apoptosis. These results indicated that holotoxin A1 might induce apoptosis by activating acid SMase and neutral SMase. In conclusion, holotoxin A1 represents a potential anticancer agent for treating leukemia. Moreover, the aglycone structure of marine triterpene glycosides might affect the mechanism involved in inducing apoptosis.

  13. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia.

  14. Nyctanthes arbortristis mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles: Cytotoxicity assay against THP-1 human leukemia cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Priti; Kumari, Niraj; Jha, Anal K.; Singh, K. P.; Prasad, K.

    2018-05-01

    Green synthesis, characterizations and applications of nanoparticles have become an important branch of nanotechnology now a day. In this paper, green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using the aqueous extract of Nyctanthes arbortristis as a reducing and stabilizing agent, has been discussed. Present synthetic method is very handy, cost-effective and reproducible. Formation of AgNPs was characterized by X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy techniques. The phytochemicals responsible for nano-transformation were principally flavonoids, phenols and glycosides present in the leaves. Further, the dose dependent cytotoxicity assay of biosynthesized AgNPs against THP-1 human leukemia cell lines showed the encouraging results.

  15. [Experimental study on aging effect of Angelica sinensis polysaccharides combined with cytarabine on human leukemia KG1alpha cell lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chun-Yan; Geng, Shan; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Jia-Hong; Zhang, Xian-Ping; Jiang, Rong; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2014-04-01

    The latest findings of our laboratory showed that Angelica sinensis polysaccharide (ASP) showed a definite effect in regulating the aging of hematopoietic stem cells. Leukemia is a type of malignant hematopoietic tumor in hematopoietic stem cells. There have been no relevant reports about ASP's effect in regulating the aging of leukemia cells. In this study, human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) KG1alpha cell lines in logarithmic growth phase were taken as the study object, and were divided into the ASP group, the cytarabine (Ara-C) group, the ASP + Ara-C group and the control group. The groups were respectively treated with different concentration of ASP, Ara-C and ASP + Ara-C for different periods, with the aim to study the effect of ASP combined with Ara-C in regulating the aging of human acute myeloid leukemia KG1alpha cell lines and its relevant mechanism. The results showed that ASP, Ara-C and ASP + Ara-C could obviously inhibit KG1alpha cell proliferation in vitro, block the cells in G0/G1 phase. The cells showed the aging morphological feature. The percentage of positive stained aging cells was dramatically increased, and could significantly up-regulate the expression of aging-related proteins P16 and RB, which were more obvious in the ASP + Ara-C group. In conclusion, the aging mechanism of KG1alpha cell induced by ASP and Ara-C may be related to the regulation of the expression of aging-related proteins, suggesting that the combined administration of ASP and anticancer drugs plays a better role in the treatment of leukemia .

  16. 92R Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Human CCR9+ Leukemia Cells Growth in NSG Mice Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somovilla-Crespo, Beatriz; Martín Monzón, Maria Teresa; Vela, Maria; Corraliza-Gorjón, Isabel; Santamaria, Silvia; Garcia-Sanz, Jose A; Kremer, Leonor

    2018-01-01

    CCR9 is as an interesting target for the treatment of human CCR9 + -T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, since its expression is limited to immature cells in the thymus, infiltrating leukocytes in the small intestine and a small fraction of mature circulating T lymphocytes. 92R, a new mouse mAb (IgG2a isotype), was raised using the A-isoform of hCCR9 as immunogen. Its initial characterization demonstrates that binds with high affinity to the CCR9 N-terminal domain, competing with the previously described 91R mAb for receptor binding. 92R inhibits human CCR9 + tumor growth in T and B-cell deficient Rag2 -/- mice. In vitro assays suggested complement-dependent cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity as possible in vivo mechanisms of action. Unexpectedly, 92R strongly inhibited tumor growth also in a model with compromised NK and complement activities, suggesting that other mechanisms, including phagocytosis or apoptosis, might also be playing a role on 92R-mediated tumor elimination. Taken together, these data contribute to strengthen the hypothesis of the immune system's opportunistic nature.

  17. Phosphorylation regulates human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex function

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    Ward Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a pathogenic complex deltaretrovirus, which is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In addition to the structural and enzymatic viral gene products, HTLV-1 encodes the positive regulatory proteins Tax and Rex along with viral accessory proteins. Tax and Rex proteins orchestrate the timely expression of viral genes important in viral replication and cellular transformation. Rex is a nucleolar-localizing shuttling protein that acts post-transcriptionally by binding and facilitating the export of the unspliced and incompletely spliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. HTLV-1 Rex (Rex-1 is a phosphoprotein and general protein kinase inhibition correlates with reduced function. Therefore, it has been proposed that Rex-1 function may be regulated through site-specific phosphorylation. Results We conducted a phosphoryl mapping of Rex-1 over-expressed in transfected 293 T cells using a combination of affinity purification and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We achieved 100% physical coverage of the Rex-1 polypeptide and identified five novel phosphorylation sites at Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-97, and Ser-106. We also confirmed evidence of two previously identified residues, Ser-70 and Thr-174, but found no evidence of phosphorylation at Ser-177. The functional significance of these phosphorylation events was evaluated using a Rex reporter assay and site-directed mutational analysis. Our results indicate that phosphorylation at Ser-97 and Thr-174 is critical for Rex-1 function. Conclusion We have mapped completely the site-specific phosphorylation of Rex-1 identifying a total of seven residues; Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-70, Ser-97, Ser-106, and Thr-174. Overall, this work is the first to completely map the phosphorylation sites in Rex-1 and provides important insight into

  18. A Rapid Culture Technique Produces Functional Dendritic-Like Cells from Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

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    Jian Ning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Most anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies involving dendritic cells (DC as vaccines rely upon the adoptive transfer of DC loaded with exogenous tumour-peptides. This study utilized human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells as progenitors from which functional dendritic-like antigen presenting cells (DLC were generated, that constitutively express tumour antigens for recognition by CD8+ T cells. DLC were generated from AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3 using rapid culture techniques and appropriate cytokines. DLC were evaluated for their cell-surface phenotype, antigen uptake and ability to stimulate allogeneic responder cell proliferation, and production of IFN-γ; compared with DC derived from normal human PBMC donors. KG-1 and MUTZ-3 DLC increased expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR, and MUTZ-3 DLC downregulated CD14 and expressed CD1a. Importantly, both KG-1 and MUTZ-3-derived DLC promoted proliferation of allogeneic responder cells more efficiently than unmodified cells; neither cells incorporated FITC-labeled dextran, but both stimulated IFN-γ production from responding allogeneic CD8+ T cells. Control DC produced from PBMC using the FastDC culture also expressed high levels of critical cell surface ligands and demonstrated good APC function. This paper indicates that functional DLC can be cultured from the AML cell lines KG-1 and MUTZ-3, and FastDC culture generates functional KG-1 DLC.

  19. Effect of adenosine on the growth of human T-lymphocyte leukemia cell line MOLT-4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štreitová, Denisa; Weiterová, Lenka; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jiřina; Horváth, Viktor; Kozubík, Alois; Znojil, V.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 6 (2007), s. 419-426 ISSN 0735-7907 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : MOLT-4 leukemia cell s * cell growth * adenosine Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.106, year: 2007

  20. Anti-Proliferative and Apoptotic Effects of Beta-Ionone in Human Leukemia Cell Line K562

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    Zohreh Faezizadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Beta-ionone is an aroma compound found in the Rosaceae family. Some evidence supported that beta-ionone has a great potential for cancer prevention. To date, the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of beta-ionone in human leukemia cell line K562 were not studied. Objectives Hence, we investigated whether beta-ionone could inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in the K562 cells. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, human leukemia cell line K562 was cultured and anti-proliferation effect of beta-ionone with different doses (25 - 400 µm at different times (24 - 96 hours on treated cells was evaluated by the MTT assay. To determine apoptosis rate, the Hoechst 33342 staining and flow cytometry was performed. Results The MTT assay showed that beta-ionone inhibited proliferation of K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner significantly (P = 0.0008. Moreover, the increased apoptotic rate was found after incubation of K562 cells with 200 µm beta-ionone. The Hoechst staining and flow cytometry analysis indicated that beta-ionone could increase apoptosis of K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions The results demonstrated that beta-ionone has anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on K562 cells, and in the future may be used in the treatment of some leukemia sub-types.

  1. Cucurbitacin E as a new inhibitor of cofilin phosphorylation in human leukemia U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Souichi; Matsuda, Hisashi; Kurume, Ai; Oda, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Seikou; Yamashita, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Masayuki

    2010-05-01

    Cucurbitane-type triterpenes, cucurbitacins B and E, were reported to exhibit cytotoxic effects in several cell lines mediated by JAK/STAT3 signaling. However, neither compound inhibited phosphorylation of STAT3 in human leukemia (U937) cells at low concentrations. We therefore synthesized a biotin-linked cucurbitacin E to isolate target proteins based on affinity for the molecule. As a result, cofilin, which regulates the depolymerization of actin, was isolated and suggested to be a target. Cucurbitacins E and I inhibited the phosphorylation of cofilin in a concentration-dependent manner, and their effective concentrations having the same range as the concentrations at which they had cytotoxic effects in U937 cells. In addition, the fibrous-/globular-actin ratio was decreased after treatment with cucurbitacin E in HT1080 cells. These findings suggested that the inhibition of cofilin's phosphorylation increased the severing activity of cofilin, and then the depolymerization of actin was enhanced after treatment with cucurbitacin E at lower concentrations. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shi Hao; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-AL...

  3. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides in human monocytic leukemia cells: from gene expression to network construction

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    Ou Chern-Han

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ganoderma lucidum has been widely used as a herbal medicine for promoting health and longevity in China and other Asian countries. Polysaccharide extracts from Ganoderma lucidum have been reported to exhibit immuno-modulating and anti-tumor activities. In previous studies, F3, the active component of the polysaccharide extract, was found to activate various cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-α. This gave rise to our investigation on how F3 stimulates immuno-modulating or anti-tumor effects in human leukemia THP-1 cells. Results Here, we integrated time-course DNA microarray analysis, quantitative PCR assays, and bioinformatics methods to study the F3-induced effects in THP-1 cells. Significantly disturbed pathways induced by F3 were identified with statistical analysis on microarray data. The apoptosis induction through the DR3 and DR4/5 death receptors was found to be one of the most significant pathways and play a key role in THP-1 cells after F3 treatment. Based on time-course gene expression measurements of the identified pathway, we reconstructed a plausible regulatory network of the involved genes using reverse-engineering computational approach. Conclusion Our results showed that F3 may induce death receptor ligands to initiate signaling via receptor oligomerization, recruitment of specialized adaptor proteins and activation of caspase cascades.

  4. Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides in human monocytic leukemia cells: from gene expression to network construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun-Chieh; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Chen, Jenn-Han; Hsu, Jia-Wei; Cheng, Hsu-Chieh; Ou, Chern-Han; Yang, Wen-Bin; Chen, Shui-Tein; Wong, Chi-Huey; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2007-11-09

    Ganoderma lucidum has been widely used as a herbal medicine for promoting health and longevity in China and other Asian countries. Polysaccharide extracts from Ganoderma lucidum have been reported to exhibit immuno-modulating and anti-tumor activities. In previous studies, F3, the active component of the polysaccharide extract, was found to activate various cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-alpha. This gave rise to our investigation on how F3 stimulates immuno-modulating or anti-tumor effects in human leukemia THP-1 cells. Here, we integrated time-course DNA microarray analysis, quantitative PCR assays, and bioinformatics methods to study the F3-induced effects in THP-1 cells. Significantly disturbed pathways induced by F3 were identified with statistical analysis on microarray data. The apoptosis induction through the DR3 and DR4/5 death receptors was found to be one of the most significant pathways and play a key role in THP-1 cells after F3 treatment. Based on time-course gene expression measurements of the identified pathway, we reconstructed a plausible regulatory network of the involved genes using reverse-engineering computational approach. Our results showed that F3 may induce death receptor ligands to initiate signaling via receptor oligomerization, recruitment of specialized adaptor proteins and activation of caspase cascades.

  5. Salinomycin overcomes ABC transporter-mediated multidrug and apoptosis resistance in human leukemia stem cell-like KG-1a cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Dominik; Daniel, Volker; Sadeghi, Mahmoud; Opelz, Gerhard; Naujokat, Cord

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells are known to exhibit multidrug resistance by expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters which constitute transmembrane proteins capable of exporting a wide variety of chemotherapeutic drugs from the cytosol. We show here that human promyeloblastic leukemia KG-1a cells exposed to the histone deacetylase inhibitor phenylbutyrate resemble many characteristics of leukemia stem cells, including expression of functional ABC transporters such as P-glycoprotein, BCRP and MRP8. Consequently, KG-1a cells display resistance to the induction of apoptosis by various chemotherapeutic drugs. Resistance to apoptosis induction by chemotherapeutic drugs can be reversed by cyclosporine A, which effectively inhibits the activity of P-glycoprotein and BCRP, thus demonstrating ABC transporter-mediated drug resistance in KG-1a cells. However, KG-1a are highly sensitive to apoptosis induction by salinomycin, a polyether ionophore antibiotic that has recently been shown to kill human breast cancer stem cell-like cells and to induce apoptosis in human cancer cells displaying multiple mechanisms of drug and apoptosis resistance. Whereas KG-1a cells can be adapted to proliferate in the presence of apoptosis-inducing concentrations of bortezomib and doxorubicin, salinomycin does not permit long-term adaptation of the cells to apoptosis-inducing concentrations. Thus, salinomycin should be regarded as a novel and effective agent for the elimination of leukemia stem cells and other tumor cells exhibiting ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance.

  6. Epigenetic heterochromatin markers distinguish terminally differentiated leukocytes from incompletely differentiated leukemia cells in human blood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popova, Evgenya Y.; Claxton, David F.; Lukášová, Emilie; Bird, Philip I.; Grigoryev, Sergei A.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 4 (2006), s. 453-462 ISSN 0301-472X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : terminal cell differentiation * chromatin structure * chronic myeloid leukemia Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.408, year: 2006

  7. Bidirectional enhancing activities between human T cell leukemia-lymphoma virus type I and human cytomegalovirus in human term syncytiotrophoblast cells cultured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, F D; Aboagye-Mathiesen, G; Szabó, J; Liu, X; Mosborg-Petersen, P; Kiss, J; Hager, H; Zdravkovic, M; Andirkó, I; Aranyosi, J

    1995-12-01

    The syncytiotrophoblast layer of the human placenta has an important role in limiting transplacental viral spread from mother to fetus. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is capable of establishing a latent infection in syncytiotrophoblast cells, with restriction of gene expression to immediate-early and early proteins. We analyzed the extent of replication of human T cell leukemia-lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) in human term syncytiotrophoblasts infected with HTLV-I alone or coinfected with HTLV-I and HCMV. Although syncytiotrophoblasts could be infected with cell-free HTLV-I, no viral protein expression was found in the singly infected cells. On the contrary, coinfection of the cells with HTLV-I and HCMV resulted in simultaneous replication of both viruses. Bidirectional enhancing activities between HTLV-I and HCMV were mediated primarily by the Tax and immediate-early proteins, respectively. The stimulatory effect of HTLV-I Tax on HCMV replication appeared to be mediated partly by tumor necrosis factor beta and transforming growth factor beta-1. We observed formation of pseudotypes with HTLV-I nucleocapsids within HCMV envelopes, whereas HCMV was not pseudotyped by HTLV-I envelopes in dually infected syncytiotrophoblast cells. Our data suggest that in vivo dual infection of syncytiotrophoblast cells with HTLV-I and HCMV may facilitate the transplacental transmission of both viruses.

  8. Specific receptors for phorbol diesters on freshly isolated human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cells: comparable binding characteristics despite different cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, B J; Moore, J O; Weinberg, J B

    1984-02-01

    Freshly isolated human leukemia cells have been shown in the past to display varying in vitro responses to phorbol diesters, depending on their cell type. Specific receptors for the phorbol diesters have been demonstrated on numerous different cells. This study was designed to characterize the receptors for phorbol diesters on leukemia cells freshly isolated from patients with different kinds of leukemia and to determine if differences in binding characteristics for tritium-labeled phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (3H-PDBu) accounted for the different cellular responses elicited in vitro by phorbol diesters. Cells from 26 patients with different kinds of leukemia were studied. PDBu or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) caused cells from patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), acute promyelocytic (APML), acute myelomonocytic (AMML), acute monocytic (AMoL), acute erythroleukemia (AEL), chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) in blast crisis (myeloid), acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL), and hairy cell leukemia (HCL) (n = 15) to adhere to plastic and spread. However, they caused no adherence or spreading and only slight aggregation of cells from patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), or CML-blast crisis (lymphoid) (n = 11). All leukemia cells studied, irrespective of cellular type, displayed specific receptors for 3H-PDBu. The time courses for binding by all leukemia types were similar, with peak binding at 5-10 min at 37 degrees C and 120 min at 4 degrees C. The binding affinities were similar for patients with ALL (96 +/- 32 nM, n = 4), CLL (126 +/- 32 nM, n = 6), and acute nonlymphoid leukemia (73 +/- 14 nM, n = 11). Likewise, the numbers of specific binding sites/cell were comparable for the patients with ALL (6.2 +/- 1.3 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 4), CLL (5.0 +/- 2.0 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 6), and acute nonlymphoid leukemia (4.4 +/- 1.9 X 10(5) sites/cell, n = 11). Thus, the differing responses to phorbol diesters of

  9. Clonal evolution of pre-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells precedes human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeti, Ravindra

    2014-01-01

    Massively parallel DNA sequencing has uncovered recurrent mutations in many human cancers. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cancer genome/exome resequencing has identified numerous recurrently mutated genes with an average of 5 mutations in each case of de novo AML. In order for these multiple mutations to accumulate in a single lineage of cells, they are serially acquired in clones of self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), termed pre-leukemic HSC. Isolation and characterization of pre-leukemic HSC have shown that their mutations are enriched in genes involved in regulating DNA methylation, chromatin modifications, and the cohesin complex. On the other hand, genes involved in regulating activated signaling are generally absent. Pre-leukemic HSC have been found to persist in clinical remission and may ultimately give rise to relapsed disease through the acquisition of novel mutations. Thus, pre-leukemic HSC may constitute a key cellular reservoir that must be eradicated for long-term cures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Potent anti-leukemia activities of humanized CD19-targeted CAR-T cells in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiang; Wang, Gang; Cheng, Hai; Wei, Chen; Qi, Kunming; Sang, Wei; Zhenyu, Li; Shi, Ming; Li, Huizhong; Qiao, Jianlin; Pan, Bin; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Qingyun; Zeng, Lingyu; Niu, Mingshan; Jing, Guangjun; Zheng, Junnian; Xu, Kailin

    2018-04-10

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has shown promising results for relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The immune response induced by murine single-chain variable fragment (scFv) of the CAR may limit CAR-T cell persistence and thus increases the risk of leukemia relapse. In this study, we developed a novel humanized scFv from the murine FMC63 antibody. A total of 18 R/R ALL patients with or without prior murine CD19 CAR-T therapy were treated with humanized CD19-targeted CAR-T cells (hCART19s). After lymphodepletion chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, the patients received a single dose (1 × 10 6 /kg) of autologous hCART19s infusion. Among the 14 patients without previous CAR-T therapy, 13 (92.9%) achieved complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi) on day 30, whereas 1 of the 3 patients who failed a second murine CAR-T infusion achieved CR after hCART19s infusion. At day 180, the overall and leukemia-free survival rates were 65.8% and 71.4%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of relapse was 22.6%, and the non-relapse mortality rate was 7.1%. During treatment, 13 patients developed grade 1-2 cytokine release syndrome (CRS), 4 patients developed grade 3-5 CRS, and 1 patient experienced reversible neurotoxicity. These results indicated that hCART19s could induce remission in patients with R/R B-ALL, especially in patients who received a reinfusion of murine CAR-T. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Proteomic analysis of the response to cell cycle arrests in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Tony; Endo, Aki; Lamond, Angus I

    2015-01-02

    Previously, we analyzed protein abundance changes across a 'minimally perturbed' cell cycle by using centrifugal elutriation to differentially enrich distinct cell cycle phases in human NB4 cells (Ly et al., 2014). In this study, we compare data from elutriated cells with NB4 cells arrested at comparable phases using serum starvation, hydroxyurea, or RO-3306. While elutriated and arrested cells have similar patterns of DNA content and cyclin expression, a large fraction of the proteome changes detected in arrested cells are found to reflect arrest-specific responses (i.e., starvation, DNA damage, CDK1 inhibition), rather than physiological cell cycle regulation. For example, we show most cells arrested in G2 by CDK1 inhibition express abnormally high levels of replication and origin licensing factors and are likely poised for genome re-replication. The protein data are available in the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (

  12. Development Refractoriness of MLL-Rearranged Human B Cell Acute Leukemias to Reprogramming into Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Muñoz-López

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are a powerful tool for disease modeling. They are routinely generated from healthy donors and patients from multiple cell types at different developmental stages. However, reprogramming leukemias is an extremely inefficient process. Few studies generated iPSCs from primary chronic myeloid leukemias, but iPSC generation from acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemias (ALL has not been achieved. We attempted to generate iPSCs from different subtypes of B-ALL to address the developmental impact of leukemic fusion genes. OKSM(L-expressing mono/polycistronic-, retroviral/lentiviral/episomal-, and Sendai virus vector-based reprogramming strategies failed to render iPSCs in vitro and in vivo. Addition of transcriptomic-epigenetic reprogramming “boosters” also failed to generate iPSCs from B cell blasts and B-ALL lines, and when iPSCs emerged they lacked leukemic fusion genes, demonstrating non-leukemic myeloid origin. Conversely, MLL-AF4-overexpressing hematopoietic stem cells/B progenitors were successfully reprogrammed, indicating that B cell origin and leukemic fusion gene were not reprogramming barriers. Global transcriptome/DNA methylome profiling suggested a developmental/differentiation refractoriness of MLL-rearranged B-ALL to reprogramming into pluripotency.

  13. Plumbagin exerts an immunosuppressive effect on human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yura [Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon Ae [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jiyeon, E-mail: yeon@eulji.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-22

    Of the hematological disorders typified by poor prognoses and survival rates, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is one of the most commonly diagnosed. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, the treatment options for this cancer remain limited. In this manuscript, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of plumbagin, mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling; the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cell line was used as our experimental system. Plumbagin is a natural, plant derived compound, which exerts an anti-proliferative activity against many types of human cancer. Our experiments confirm that plumbagin induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells, with no significant cytotoxicity seen for normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plumbagin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, and the transcription of NF-κB target genes. Our results now show that plumbagin is a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and suppressor of T-ALL cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Plumbagin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in T-ALL MOLT-4 cells. • Plumbagin activates phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) JNK and p38. • Plumbagin inhibits LPS-mediated NF-κB signaling cascade. • Plumbagin inhibits LPS-mediated transcriptional activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  14. HUMAN NK CELLS: FROM SURFACE RECEPTORS TO THE THERAPY OF LEUKEMIAS AND SOLID TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LORENZO eMORETTA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are major effector cells of the innate immunity. The discovery, over two decades ago, of MHC-class I specific NK receptors and subsequently of activating receptors, recognizing ligands expressed by tumor or virus-infected cells, paved the way to our understanding of the mechanisms of selective recognition and killing of tumor cells. Although NK cells can efficiently kill tumor cells of different histotypes in vitro, their activity may be limited in vivo by their inefficient trafficking to tumor lesions and by the inhibition of their function induced by tumor cells themselves and by the tumor microenvironment. On the other hand, the important role of NK cells has been clearly demonstrated in the therapy of high risk leukemias in the haploidentical hematopoietic cell (HSC transplantation setting. NK cells derived from donor HSC kill leukemic cells residual after the conditioning regimen, thus preventing leukemia relapses. In addition, they also kill residual dendritic cells and T lymphocytes, thus preventing both GvHD and graft rejection.

  15. The effect of β-ionone on telomerase activity in the human leukemia cell line K562

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Faezizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Telomerase is highly activated in most human cancer cells, therefore, its inhibition has been proposed as a novel and promising strategy for cancer therapy. Many plant-derived anticancer agents act through inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of apoptosis. β-ionone, a carotenoid compound isolated from Roseaceae, has been reported to possess anticancer properties. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism of β-ionone-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cell line K562 with special emphasis on its role in telomerase inhibition. Method: In this study the anti-proliferation effect of β-ionone on K562 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Apoptosis rate was detected by Hoechst staining and flow cytometry analysis. Telomerase activity was measured by (TRAP ELISA assay. Results: Exposure of K562 cells to β-ionone caused a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis and Hoechst staining showed that percentage of apoptotic cells markedly increased with an increase in β-ionone concentration. Compared to control cells, treatment of K562 cells with β-ionone resulted in a significant decrease of telomerase activity. Moreover, a positive correlation was detected between telomerase inhibition and apoptosis induction in the treated K562 cells. Conclusion: Based on these results, β-ionone is an appropriate candidate for inhibiting telomerase activity in K562 cells. Therefore, it may be utilized as a novel drug against some leukemia cell lines.

  16. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  17. Role of Tax protein in human T-cell leukemia virus type-I leukemogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboud Mordechai

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, the neurological syndrome TSP/HAM and certain other clinical disorders. The viral Tax protein is considered to play a central role in the process leading to ATL. Tax modulates the expression of many viral and cellular genes through the CREB/ATF-, SRF- and NF-κB-associated pathways. In addition, Tax employs the CBP/p300 and p/CAF co-activators for implementing the full transcriptional activation competence of each of these pathways. Tax also affects the function of various other regulatory proteins by direct protein-protein interaction. Through these activities Tax sets the infected T-cells into continuous uncontrolled replication and destabilizes their genome by interfering with the function of telomerase and topoisomerase-I and by inhibiting DNA repair. Furthermore, Tax prevents cell cycle arrest and apoptosis that would otherwise be induced by the unrepaired DNA damage and enables, thereby, accumulation of mutations that can contribute to the leukemogenic process. Together, these capacities render Tax highly oncogenic as reflected by its ability to transform rodent fibroblasts and primary human T-cells and to induce tumors in transgenic mice. In this article we discuss these effects of Tax and their apparent contribution to the HTLV-1 associated leukemogenic process. Notably, however, shortly after infection the virus enters into a latent state, in which viral gene expression is low in most of the HTLV-1 carriers' infected T-cells and so is the level of Tax protein, although rare infected cells may still display high viral RNA. This low Tax level is evidently insufficient for exerting its multiple oncogenic effects. Therefore, we propose that the latent virus must be activated, at least temporarily, in order to elevate Tax to its effective level and that during this transient activation state the infected cells may acquire some oncogenic mutations which can enable them to

  18. Role of Tax protein in human T-cell leukemia virus type-I leukemogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azran, Inbal; Schavinsky-Khrapunsky, Yana; Aboud, Mordechai

    2004-08-13

    HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), the neurological syndrome TSP/HAM and certain other clinical disorders. The viral Tax protein is considered to play a central role in the process leading to ATL. Tax modulates the expression of many viral and cellular genes through the CREB/ATF-, SRF- and NF-kappaB-associated pathways. In addition, Tax employs the CBP/p300 and p/CAF co-activators for implementing the full transcriptional activation competence of each of these pathways. Tax also affects the function of various other regulatory proteins by direct protein-protein interaction. Through these activities Tax sets the infected T-cells into continuous uncontrolled replication and destabilizes their genome by interfering with the function of telomerase and topoisomerase-I and by inhibiting DNA repair. Furthermore, Tax prevents cell cycle arrest and apoptosis that would otherwise be induced by the unrepaired DNA damage and enables, thereby, accumulation of mutations that can contribute to the leukemogenic process. Together, these capacities render Tax highly oncogenic as reflected by its ability to transform rodent fibroblasts and primary human T-cells and to induce tumors in transgenic mice. In this article we discuss these effects of Tax and their apparent contribution to the HTLV-1 associated leukemogenic process. Notably, however, shortly after infection the virus enters into a latent state, in which viral gene expression is low in most of the HTLV-1 carriers' infected T-cells and so is the level of Tax protein, although rare infected cells may still display high viral RNA. This low Tax level is evidently insufficient for exerting its multiple oncogenic effects. Therefore, we propose that the latent virus must be activated, at least temporarily, in order to elevate Tax to its effective level and that during this transient activation state the infected cells may acquire some oncogenic mutations which can enable them to further progress towards

  19. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) enhances MAP2 + and HUC/D + neurons and influences neurite extension during differentiation of neural progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (L1F), a member of the Interleukin 6 cytokine family, has a role in differentiation of Human Neural Progenitor (hNP) cells in vitro. hNP cells, derived from Human Embryonic Stem (hES) cells, have an unlimited capacity for self-renewal in monolayer cultu...

  20. Novel insights into the antiproliferative effects and synergism of quercetin and menadione in human leukemia Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Irina; Ionescu, Diana; Filippi, Alexandru; Mocanu, Maria Magdalena; Iftime, Adrian; Babes, Ramona; Tofolean, Ioana Teodora; Irimia, Ruxandra; Goicea, Alexandru; Popescu, Valentin; Dimancea, Alexandru; Neagu, Andrei; Ganea, Constanta

    2014-07-01

    The flavonoid quercetin and menadione (vitamin K3) are known as potent apoptogens in human leukemia Jurkat T cells. We explored some underlying mechanisms and the potential relevance of the combination quercetin-menadione for clinical applications. In acute treatments, quercetin manifested a strong antioxidant character, but induced a transient loss of Δψm, likely mediated by opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. After removal of quercetin, persistent mitochondrial hyperpolarization was generated via stimulation of respiratory Complex I. In contrast, menadione-induced Δψm dissipation was only partially and transiently reversed after menadione removal. Results indicate that Ca(2+) release is a necessary event in quercetin-induced cell death and that the survival response to quercetin is delineated within 1h from exposure. Depending on dose, the two agents exhibited either antagonistic or synergistic effects in reducing clonogenicity of Jurkat cells. 24-h combinatorial regimens at equimolar concentrations of 10-15 μM, which are compatible with a clinically achievable (and safe) scheme, reduced cell viability at efficient rates. Altogether, these findings support the idea that the combination quercetin-menadione could improve the outcome of conventional leukemia therapies, and warrant the utility of additional studies to investigate the therapeutic effects of this combination in different cellular or animal models for leukemia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus I Tax Protein Sensitizes p53-Mutant Cells to DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Valia T.; Green, Allison M.; Khurgel, Moshe; Semmes, Oliver J.; Kupfer, Gary M.

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in p53 are a common cause of resistance of cancers to standard chemotherapy and, thus, treatment failure. Reports have shown that Tax, a human T-cell leukemia virus type I encoded protein that has been associated with genomic instability and perturbation of transcription and cell cycle, sensitizes HeLa cells to UV treatment. The extent to which Tax can sensitize cells and the mechanism by which it exerts its effect are unknown. In this study, we show that Tax sensitizes p53-mutant cells to a broad range of DNA-damaging agents, including mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylator, etoposide, a topoisomerase II drug, and UV light, but not ionizing radiation, a double-strand break agent, or vinblastine, a tubulin poison. Tax caused hypersensitivity in all p53-deleted cell lines and several, but not all, mutant-expressed p53–containing cell lines, while unexpectedly being protective in p53 wild-type (wt) cells. The effect observed in p53-deleted lines could be reversed for this by transfection of wt p53. We also show that Tax activates a p53-independent proapoptotic program through decreased expression of the retinoblastoma protein and subsequent increased E2F1 expression. The expression of several proapoptotic proteins was also induced by Tax, including Puma and Noxa, culminating in a substantial increase in Bax dimerization. Our results show that Tax can sensitize p53-mutant cells to DNA damage while protecting p53 wt cells, a side benefit that might result in reduced toxicity in normal cells. Such studies hold the promise of a novel adjunctive therapy that could make cancer chemotherapy more effective. PMID:18559532

  2. Regulation of IFN regulatory factor 4 expression in human T cell leukemia virus-I-transformed T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonia; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Mamane, Yael; Genin, Pierre; Azimi, Nazli; Waldmann, Thomas; Hiscott, John

    2002-09-15

    IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-4 is a lymphoid/myeloid-restricted member of the IRF transcription factor family that plays an essential role in the homeostasis and function of mature lymphocytes. IRF-4 expression is tightly regulated in resting primary T cells and is transiently induced at the mRNA and protein levels after activation by Ag-mimetic stimuli such as TCR cross-linking or treatment with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (PMA/ionomycin). However, IRF-4 is constitutively upregulated in human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infected T cells as a direct gene target for the HTLV-I Tax oncoprotein. In this study we demonstrate that chronic IRF-4 expression in HTLV-I-infected T lymphocytes is associated with a leukemic phenotype, and we examine the mechanisms by which continuous production of IRF-4 is achieved in HTLV-I-transformed T cells. IRF-4 expression in HTLV-1-infected cells is driven through activation of the NF-kappaB and NF-AT pathways, resulting in the binding of p50, p65, and c-Rel to the kappaB1 element and p50, c-Rel, and NF-ATp to the CD28RE element within the -617 to -209 region of the IRF-4 promoter. Furthermore, mutation of either the kappaB1 or CD28RE sites blocks Tax-mediated transactivation of the human IRF-4 promoter in T cells. These experiments constitute the first detailed analysis of human IRF-4 transcriptional regulation within the context of HTLV-I infection and transformation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

  3. PML-RARα stabilized by zinc in human acute promyelocytic leukemia NB4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo; Wang, Jia-Yu; Zhou, Jun-Jie; Zhou, Feng; Cheng, Wei; Liu, Ying-Ting; Wang, Jie; Chen, Xiao; Chen, Dian-Hua; Luo, Lan; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2017-10-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized and driven by the promyelocytic leukemia protein-retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML-RARα) fusion gene. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of PML-RARα degradation in the treatment against APL. Considering the presence of two zinc fingers in the PML-RARα fusion protein, we explored the function of zinc homeostasis in maintaining PML-RARα stability. We demonstrated for the first time that zinc depletion by its chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) triggered PML-RARα degradation in NB4 APL cells via the proteasome pathway rather than the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. In contrast, autophagy protected TPEN-mediated PML-RARα degradation in NB4 APL cells. We further demonstrated that crosstalk between zinc homeostasis and nitric oxide pathway played a key role in maintaining PML-RARα stability in NB4 APL cells. These results demonstrate that zinc homeostasis is vital for maintaining PML-RARα stability, and zinc depletion by TPEN may be useful as a potential strategy to trigger PML-RARα degradation in APL cells. We also found that TPEN triggered apoptosis of NB4 APL cells in a time-dependent manner. The relationship between PML-RARα degradation and apoptosis triggered by TPEN deserves further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Localization of ORC1 During the Cell Cycle in Human Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick D. Coffman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the origin recognition complex (ORC with replication origins is a critical parameter in eukaryotic replication initiation. In mammals the ORC remains bound except during mitosis, thus the localization of ORC complexes allows localization of origins. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes human ORC1 was used to localize ORC complexes in populations of human MOLT-4 cells separated by cell cycle position using centrifugal elutriation. ORC1 staining in cells in early G1 is diffuse and primarily peripheral. As the cells traverse G1, ORC1 accumulates and becomes more localized towards the center of the nucleus, however around the G1/S boundary the staining pattern changes and ORC1 appears peripheral. By mid to late S phase ORC1 immunofluorescence is again concentrated at the nuclear center. During anaphase, ORC1 staining is localized mainly in the pericentriolar regions. These findings suggest that concerted movements of origin DNA sequences in addition to the previously documented assembly and disassembly of protein complexes are an important aspect of replication initiation loci in eukaryotes.

  5. Application of Adoptive T-Cell Therapy Using Tumor Antigen-Specific T-Cell Receptor Gene Transfer for the Treatment of Human Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Ochi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen great strides in the field of cancer immunotherapy, especially the treatment of melanoma. Beginning with the identification of cancer antigens, followed by the clinical application of anti-cancer peptide vaccination, it has now been proven that adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT using cancer antigen-specific T cells is the most effective option. Despite the apparent clinical efficacy of ACT, the timely preparation of a sufficient number of cancer antigen-specific T cells for each patient has been recognized as its biggest limitation. Currently, therefore, attention is being focused on ACT with engineered T cells produced using cancer antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR gene transfer. With regard to human leukemia, ACT using engineered T cells bearing the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene still remains in its infancy. However, several reports have provided preclinical data on TCR gene transfer using Wilms' tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and also preclinical and clinical data on TCR gene transfer involving minor histocompatibility antigen, both of which have been suggested to provide additional clinical benefit. In this review, we examine the current status of anti-leukemia ACT with engineered T cells carrying the leukemia antigen-specific TCR gene, and discuss the existing barriers to progress in this area.

  6. Hibiscus anthocyanins rich extract-induced apoptotic cell death in human promyelocytic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.-C.; Huang, H.-P.; Hsu, J.-D.; Yang, S.-F.; Wang, C.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa Linne (Malvaceae), an attractive plant believed to be native to Africa, is cultivated in the Sudan and Eastern Taiwan. Anthocyanins exist widely in many vegetables and fruits. Some reports demonstrated that anthocyanins extracted from H. sabdariffa L., Hibiscus anthocyanins (HAs) (which are a group of natural pigments existing in the dried calyx of H. sabdariffa L.) exhibited antioxidant activity and liver protection. Therefore, in this study, we explored the effect of HAs on human cancer cells. The result showed that HAs could cause cancer cell apoptosis, especially in HL-60 cells. Using flow cytometry, we found that HAs treatment (0-4 mg/ml) markedly induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The result also revealed increased phosphorylation in p38 and c-Jun, cytochrome c release, and expression of tBid, Fas, and FasL in the HAs-treated HL-60 cells. We further used SB203580 (p38 inhibitor), PD98059 (MEK inhibitor), SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), and wortmannin (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase; PI-3K inhibitor) to evaluate their effect on the HAs-induced HL-60 death. The data showed that only SB203580 had strong potential in inhibiting HL-60 cell apoptosis and related protein expression and phosphorylation. Therefore, we suggested that HAs mediated HL-60 apoptosis via the p38-FasL and Bid pathway. According to these results, HAs could be developed as chemopreventive agents. However, further investigations into the specificity and mechanism(s) of HAs are needed

  7. Transplantability of human lymphoid cell line, lymphoma, and leukemia in splenectomized and/or irradiated nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, S.; Shimosato, Y.; Kuroki, M.; Sato, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of splenectomy and/or whole-body irradiation of nude mice before xenotransplantation of lymphoid cell lines, lymphoma, and leukemia were studied. Transplantation after whole-body irradiation resulted in the increased ''take'' rate of three cultured cell lines (two of T-cell-derived acute lymphocytic leukemia and one of B-cell derived acute lymphocytic leukemia) and in the tumorous growth of Burkitt-derived Raji and spontaneously transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. With splenectomy plus irradiation as a pretreatment, tumorous growth occurred in four other cell lines which were not transplantable after irradiation only (two cell lines of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cord blood cells and one each of null acute lymphocytic leukemia and nodular lymphoma-derived cell lines). Direct transplantation of leukemia and lymphoma cells into the pretreated mice was successful in 7 of 24 cases (29%). B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid lymphoma was transplantable in three of seven cases (43%). However, lymphoma and leukemia of peripheral T-cell origin was difficult to transplant even with pretreatment, and only one pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma grew to a significant size (2 cm). One tumor each of B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid and T-cell diffuse lymphoblastic lymphoma became transplantable

  8. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  9. Kaempferol increases apoptosis in human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and inhibits multidrug resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh, Maliheh; Tabarraei, Alijan; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Erfanian, Saiedeh; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2018-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is one of the most life-threatening hematological malignancies. Defects in the cell growth and apoptotic pathways are responsible for both disease pathogenesis and treatment resistance. Therefore, pro-apoptotic agents are potential candidates for APL treatment. Kaempferol is a flavonoid with antioxidant and anti-tumor properties. This study was designed to investigate the cytotoxic, pro-apoptotic, and differentiation-inducing effects of kaempferol on HL-60 and NB4 leukemia cells. Resazurin assay was used to determine cell viability following treatment with kaempferol (12.5-100 μM) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10 μM; used as a positive control). Apoptosis and differentiation were also detected using propidium iodide and NBT staining techniques, respectively. Furthermore, the expression levels of genes involved in apoptosis (PI3 K, AKT, BCL2, BAX, p53, p21, PTEN, CASP3, CASP8, and CASP9), differentiation (PML-RAR and HDAC1), and multi-drug resistance (ABCB1 and ABCC1) were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. The protein expressions of Bax/Bcl2 and casp3 were confirmed using Western blot. The results showed that kaempferol decreased cell viability and increased subG1 population in the tested leukemic cells. This effect was associated with decreased expression of Akt, BCL2, ABCB1, and ABCC1 genes, while the expression of CASP3 and BAX/BCL-2 ratio were significantly increased at both gene and protein levels. Kaempferol promoted apoptosis and inhibited multidrug resistance in a concentration-dependent manner, without any differential effect on leukemic cells. In conclusion, this study suggested that kaempferol may be utilized as an appropriate alternative for ATRA in APL patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. BCL-2 inhibition targets oxidative phosphorylation and selectively eradicates quiescent human leukemia stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Sach, Alexander; Callahan, Kevin; Rossi, Randall M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Ashton, John M.; Pei, Shanshan; Grose, Valerie; O’Dwyer, Kristen M.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Brookes, Paul S.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most forms of chemotherapy employ mechanisms involving induction of oxidative stress, a strategy that can be effective due to the elevated oxidative state commonly observed in cancer cells. However, recent studies have shown that relative redox levels in primary tumors can be heterogeneous, suggesting that regimens dependent on differential oxidative state may not be uniformly effective. To investigate this issue in hematological malignancies, we evaluated mechanisms controlling oxidative state in primary specimens derived from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patients. Our studies demonstrate three striking findings. First, the majority of functionally-defined leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are characterized by relatively low levels of reactive oxygen species (termed “ROS-low”). Second, ROS-low LSCs aberrantly over-express BCL-2. Third, BCL-2 inhibition reduced oxidative phosphorylation and selectively eradicated quiescent LSCs. Based on these findings, we propose a model wherein the unique physiology of ROS-low LSCs provides an opportunity for selective targeting via disruption of BCL-2-dependent oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:23333149

  11. Characterization of a nuclear export signal within the human T cell leukemia virus type I transactivator protein Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alefantis, Timothy; Barmak, Kate; Harhaj, Edward W; Grant, Christian; Wigdahl, Brian

    2003-06-13

    Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-I transactivator protein Tax plays an integral role in the etiology of adult T cell leukemia, as expression of Tax in T lymphocytes has been shown to result in immortalization. In addition, Tax is known to interface with numerous transcription factor families, including activating transcription factor/cAMP response element-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappaB, requiring Tax to localize to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. In this report, the nucleocytoplasmic localization of Tax was examined in Jurkat, HeLa, and U-87 MG cells. The results reported herein indicate that Tax contains a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) that, when fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), can direct nuclear export via the CRM-1 pathway, as determined by leptomycin B inhibition of nuclear export. However, cytoplasmic localization of full-length Tax was not altered by treatment with leptomycin B, suggesting that native Tax utilizes another nuclear export pathway. Additional support for the presence of a functional NES has also been shown because the NES mutant Tax(L200A)-GFP localized to the nuclear membrane in the majority of U-87 MG cells. Evidence has also been provided suggesting that the Tax NES likely exists as a conditionally masked signal because the truncation mutant TaxDelta214-GFP localized constitutively to the cytoplasm. These results suggest that Tax localization may be directed by specific changes in Tax conformation or by specific interactions with cellular proteins leading to changes in the availability of the Tax NES and nuclear localization signal.

  12. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi Hao; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-ALL patients and animal models, the nature and origin of LICs are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent studies on LICs in T-ALL and the potential mechanisms of LIC emergence in this disease. We focus on the oncogenic transcription factors TAL1, LMO2 , and NOTCH1 and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulatory programs in normal hematopoietic stem cells and T-ALL.

  13. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Hao Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs, which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-ALL patients and animal models, the nature and origin of LICs are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent studies on LICs in T-ALL and the potential mechanisms of LIC emergence in this disease. We focus on the oncogenic transcription factors TAL1, LMO2, and NOTCH1 and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulatory programs in normal hematopoietic stem cells and T-ALL.

  14. The biologic properties of recombinant human thrombopoietin in the proliferation and megakaryocytic differentiation of acute myeloblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, I; Kanakura, Y; Kato, T; Ikeda, H; Horikawa, Y; Ishikawa, J; Kitayama, H; Nishiura, T; Tomiyama, Y; Miyazaki, H; Matsuzawa, Y

    1996-10-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is implicated as a primary regulator of megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis. However, the biologic effects of TPO on human acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) cells are largely unknown. To determine if recombinant human (rh) TPO has proliferation-supporting and differentiation-inducing activities in AML cells, 15 cases of AML cells that were exclusively composed of undifferentiated leukemia cells and showed growth response to rhTPO in a short-term culture (72 hours) were subjected to long-term suspension culture with or without rhTPO. Of 15 cases, rhTPO supported proliferation of AML cells for 2 to 4 weeks in 4 cases whose French-American-British subtypes were M0, M2, M4, and M7, respectively. In addition to the proliferation-supporting activity, rhTPO was found to induce AML cells to progress to some degree of megakaryocytic differentiation at both morphologic and surface-phenotypic level in 2 AML cases with M0 and M7 subtypes. The treatment of AML cells with rhTPO resulted in rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of the TPO-receptor, c-mpl, and STAT3 in all of cases tested. By contrast, the expression of erythroid/megakaryocyte-specific transcription factors (GATA-1, GATA-2, and NF-E2) was markedly induced or enhanced in only 2 AML cases that showed megakaryocytic differentiation in response to rhTPO. These results suggested that, at least in a fraction of AML cases, TPO could not only support the proliferation of AML cells irrespective of AML subtypes, but could also induce megakaryocytic differentiation, possibly through activation of GATA-1, GATA-2, and NF-E2.

  15. Differentiation-promoting activity of pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit extracts in HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaii, Satoru; Lansky, Ephraim P

    2004-01-01

    Differentiation refers to the ability of cancer cells to revert to their normal counterparts, and its induction represents an important noncytotoxic therapy for leukemia, and also breast, prostate, and other solid malignancies. Flavonoids are a group of differentiation-inducing chemicals with a potentially lower toxicology profile than retinoids. Flavonoid-rich polyphenol fractions from the pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruit exert anti-proliferative, anti-invasive, anti-eicosanoid, and pro-apoptotic actions in breast and prostate cancer cells and anti-angiogenic activities in vitro and in vivo. Here we tested flavonoid-rich fractions from fresh (J) and fermented (W) pomegranate juice and from an aqueous extraction of pomegranate pericarps (P) as potential differentiation-promoting agents of human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells. Four assays were used to assess differentiation: nitro blue tetrazolium reducing activity, nonspecific esterase activity, specific esterase activity, and phagocytic activity. In addition, the effect of these extracts on HL-60 proliferation was evaluated. Extracts W and P were strong promoters of differentiation in all settings, with extract J showing only a relatively mild differentiation-promoting effect. The extracts had proportional inhibitory effects on HL-60 cell proliferation. The results highlight an important, previously unknown, mechanism of the cancer preventive and suppressive potential of pomegranate fermented juice and pericarp extracts.

  16. Regulation of cancer stem cell properties by CD9 in human B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hiroto [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Wilson Xu, C. [Drug Development Program, Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Naito, Motohiko [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Nishida, Hiroko [Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Toshihiro; Ghani, Farhana Ishrat; Iwata, Satoshi [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Inukai, Takeshi; Sugita, Kanji [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi (Japan); Morimoto, Chikao, E-mail: morimoto@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokanedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Drug Development Program, Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} We performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for CSC properties in B-ALL. {yields} Leukemogenic fusion/Src family proteins were markedly regulated in the CD9{sup +} cells. {yields} Proliferation of B-ALL cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. {yields} Knockdown of CD9 by RNAi remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. {yields} CD9-knockdown affected the expression and phosphorylation of Src family and USP22. -- Abstract: Although the prognosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has improved considerably in recent years, some of the cases still exhibit therapy-resistant. We have previously reported that CD9 was expressed heterogeneously in B-ALL cell lines and CD9{sup +} cells exhibited an asymmetric cell division with greater tumorigenic potential than CD9{sup -} cells. CD9{sup +} cells were also serially transplantable in immunodeficient mice, indicating that CD9{sup +} cell possess self-renewal capacity. In the current study, we performed more detailed analysis of CD9 function for the cancer stem cell (CSC) properties. In patient sample, CD9 was expressed in the most cases of B-ALL cells with significant correlation of CD34-expression. Gene expression analysis revealed that leukemogenic fusion proteins and Src family proteins were significantly regulated in the CD9{sup +} population. Moreover, CD9{sup +} cells exhibited drug-resistance, but proliferation of bulk cells was inhibited by anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody. Knockdown of CD9 remarkably reduced the leukemogenic potential. Furthermore, gene ablation of CD9 affected the expression and tyrosine-phosphorylation of Src family proteins and reduced the expression of histone-deubiquitinase USP22. Taken together, our results suggest that CD9 links to several signaling pathways and epigenetic modification for regulating the CSC properties of B-ALL.

  17. Double control systems for human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 by innate and acquired immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannagi, Mari; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kinpara, Shuichi; Shimizu, Yukiko; Takamori, Ayako; Utsunomiya, Atae

    2011-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative retrovirus of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1-specific T-cell responses elicit antitumor and antiviral effects in experimental models, and are considered to be one of the most important determinants of the disease manifestation, since they are activated in HAM/TSP but not in ATL patients. The combination of low T-cell responses and elevated HTLV-1 proviral loads are features of ATL, and are also observed in a subpopulation of HTLV-1 carriers at the asymptomatic stage, suggesting that these features may be underlying risk factors. These risks may potentially be reduced by vaccination to activate HTLV-1-specific T-cell responses. HAM/TSP and ATL patients also differ in their levels of HTLV-1 mRNA expression, which are generally low in vivo but slightly higher in HAM/TSP patients. Our recent study indicated that viral expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells is suppressed by stromal cells in culture through type-I IFNs. The suppression was reversible after isolation from the stromal cells, mimicking a long-standing puzzling phenomenon in HTLV-1 infection where the viral expression is very low in vivo and rapidly induced in vitro. Collectively, HTLV-1 is controlled by both acquired and innate immunity in vivo: HTLV-1-specific T-cells survey infected cells, and IFNs suppress viral expression. Both effects would contribute to a reduction in viral pathogenesis, although they may potentially influence or conflict with one another. The presence of double control systems for HTLV-1 infection provides a new concept for understanding the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-mediated malignant and inflammatory diseases. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  19. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  20. Phenethyl isothiocyanate inhibits growth of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells via reactive oxygen species generation and caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yating; Wei, Sixi; Wang, Jishi; Fang, Qin; Chai, Qixiang

    2014-07-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a potential cancer chemopreventive constituent of cruciferous vegetables, including watercress, has been reported to inhibit cancer cell growth by arresting the cell cycle and inducing apoptosis in various human cancer cell models. However, the role of PEITC in the inhibition of human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cell growth and its underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, PEITC was found to induce cell death through the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress and oxidative damage. Heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1), which participates in the development of numerous tumors and the sensitivity of these tumors to chemotherapeutic drugs, plays a protective role by modulating oxidative injury. Therefore, the present study assessed the inhibitory effect of PEITC on K562 cells and whether HO‑1 facilitated cell apoptosis and ROS generation. PEITC was found to suppress cell growth and cause apoptosis by promoting Fas and Fas ligand expression, increasing ROS generation and by the successive release of cytochrome c as well as the activation of caspase‑9 and caspase‑3. PEITC was also combined with the HO‑1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX and the inducer hemin to assess whether HO‑1 determines cell survival and ROS generation. The results of the present study suggest that PEITC may be a potential anti‑tumor compound for CML therapy, and that HO‑1 has a critical function in PEITC‑induced apoptosis and ROS generation.

  1. Sorafenib promotes graft-versus-leukemia activity in mice and humans through IL-15 production in FLT3-ITD-mutant leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathew, N.R.; Baumgartner, F.; Braun, L.; O'Sullivan, D.; Thomas, S.; Waterhouse, M.; Muller, T.A.; Hanke, K.; Taromi, S.; Apostolova, P.; Illert, A.L.; Melchinger, W.; Duquesne, S.; Schmitt-Graeff, A.; Osswald, L.; Yan, K.L.; Weber, A; Tugues, S.; Spath, S.; Pfeifer, D.; Follo, M.; Claus, R.; Lubbert, M.; Rummelt, C.; Bertz, H.; Wasch, R.; Haag, J.; Schmidts, A.; Schultheiss, M.; Bettinger, D.; Thimme, R.; Ullrich, E.; Tanriver, Y.; Vuong, G.L.; Arnold, R.; Hemmati, P.; Wolf, D.; Ditschkowski, M.; Jilg, C.; Wilhelm, K.; Leiber, C.; Gerull, S.; Halter, J.; Lengerke, C.; Pabst, T.; Schroeder, T.; Kobbe, G.; Rosler, W.; Doostkam, S.; Meckel, S.; Stabla, K.; Metzelder, S.K.; Halbach, S.; Brummer, T.; Hu, Z; Dengjel, J.; Hackanson, B.; Schmid, C.; Holtick, U.; Scheid, C.; Spyridonidis, A.; Stolzel, F.; Ordemann, R.; Muller, L.P.; Sicre-de-Fontbrune, F.; Ihorst, G.; Kuball, J.; Ehlert, J.E.; Feger, D.; Wagner, E.M.; Cahn, J.Y.; Schnell, J.; Kuchenbauer, F.; Bunjes, D.; Chakraverty, R.; Richardson, S.; Gill, S.; Kroger, N.; Ayuk, F.; Vago, L.; Ciceri, F.; Muller, A.M.; Kondo, T.; Teshima, T.; Klaeger, S.; Kuster, B.; Kim, D.D.H.; Weisdorf, D.; Velden, W.J. van der; Dorfel, D.; Bethge, W.; Hilgendorf, I.; Hochhaus, A.; Andrieux, G.; Borries, M.; Busch, H.; Magenau, J.; Reddy, P.; Labopin, M.; Antin, J.H., et al.

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harboring an internal tandem duplication (ITD) in the gene encoding Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) who relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) have a 1-year survival rate below 20%. We observed that sorafenib, a

  2. A human monoclonal antibody drug and target discovery platform for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and phage display

    OpenAIRE

    Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Suschak, Jessica M.; Samija, Ivan; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Childs, Richard W.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Bishop, Michael R.; Rader, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only potentially curative treatment available for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). Here, we show that post-alloHSCT antibody repertoires can be mined for the discovery of fully human monoclonal antibodies to B-CLL cell-surface antigens. Sera collected from B-CLL patients at defined times after alloHSCT showed selective binding to primary B-CLL cells. Pre-alloHSCT sera, donor sera, and control sera w...

  3. Inhibition of apoptosis in T cells expressing human T cell leukemia virus type I Tax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copeland, K. F.; Haaksma, A. G.; Goudsmit, J.; Krammer, P. H.; Heeney, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    This study set out to determine whether T cell dysfunction associated with HTLV-I led to increased sensitivity of infected cells to apoptosis or, owing to their potential to develop ATL, if infected cells would become resistant to this process. To test this hypothesis we utilized the monoclonal

  4. Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I infection of a CD4+ proliferative/cytotoxic T cell clone progresses in at least two distinct phases based on changes in function and phenotype of the infected cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yssel, H.; de Waal Malefyt, R.; Duc Dodon, M. D.; Blanchard, D.; Gazzolo, L.; de Vries, J. E.; Spits, H.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) infection on the function and the phenotype of a human proliferating/cytotoxic T cell clone, specific for tetanus toxin, was investigated. During the period after infection, two distinct phases were observed, based on growth

  5. PDZ domain-binding motif of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein augments the transforming activity in a rat fibroblast cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Akira; Higuchi, Masaya; Niinuma, Akiko; Ohashi, Minako; Fukushi, Masaya; Oie, Masayasu; Akiyama, Tetsu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Gejyo, Fumitake; Fujii, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    While human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is associated with the development of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), HTLV-2 has not been reported to be associated with such malignant leukemias. HTLV-1 Tax1 oncoprotein transforms a rat fibroblast cell line (Rat-1) to form multiple large colonies in soft agar, and this activity is much greater than that of HTLV-2 Tax2. We have demonstrated here that the increased number of transformed colonies induced by Tax1 relative to Tax2 was mediated by a PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) in Tax1, which is absent in Tax2. Tax1 PBM mediated the interaction of Tax1 with the discs large (Dlg) tumor suppressor containing PDZ domains, and the interaction correlated well with the transforming activities of Tax1 and the mutants. Through this interaction, Tax1 altered the subcellular localization of Dlg from the detergent-soluble to the detergent-insoluble fraction in a fibroblast cell line as well as in HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. These results suggest that the interaction of Tax1 with PDZ domain protein(s) is critically involved in the transforming activity of Tax1, the activity of which may be a crucial factor in malignant transformation of HTLV-1-infected cells in vivo

  6. Effects of Vitamin K3 and K5 on Daunorubicin-resistant Human T Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Eri; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Anticancer efficacy of vitamin K derivatives on multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been scarcely investigated. The effects of vitamins K3 and K5 on proliferation of human leukemia MOLT-4 cells and on daunorubicin-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells were estimated by a WST assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, followed by flow cytometry. Vitamins K3 and K5 significantly inhibited proliferation of leukemic cells at 10 and 100 μM (pVitamin K3 induced cell apoptosis at 10 and 100 μM in both MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cells (pVitamin K5 also increased apoptotic cells, while rather inducing necrotic cell death. Vitamins K3 and K5 suppress MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cell-proliferation partially through induction of apoptosis, and these vitamin derivatives can overcome drug resistance due to P-glycoprotein expression. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. The Recognition of N-Glycans by the Lectin ArtinM Mediates Cell Death of a Human Myeloid Leukemia Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernanda Caroline; Soares, Sandro Gomes; Tamarozzi, Mirela Barros; Rego, Eduardo Magalhães; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2011-01-01

    ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit), interacts with N-glycosylated receptors on the surface of several cells of hematopoietic origin, triggering cell migration, degranulation, and cytokine release. Because malignant transformation is often associated with altered expression of cell surface glycans, we evaluated the interaction of ArtinM with human myelocytic leukemia cells and investigated cellular responses to lectin binding. The intensity of ArtinM binding varied across 3 leukemia cell lines: NB4>K562>U937. The binding, which was directly related to cell growth suppression, was inhibited in the presence of Manα1-3(Manα1-6)Manβ1, and was reverted in underglycosylated NB4 cells. ArtinM interaction with NB4 cells induced cell death (IC50 = 10 µg/mL), as indicated by cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential unassociated with caspase activation or DNA fragmentation. Moreover, ArtinM treatment of NB4 cells strongly induced reactive oxygen species generation and autophagy, as indicated by the detection of acidic vesicular organelles in the treated cells. NB4 cell death was attributed to ArtinM recognition of the trimannosyl core of N-glycans containing a ß1,6-GlcNAc branch linked to α1,6-mannose. This modification correlated with higher levels of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V transcripts in NB4 cells than in K562 or U937 cells. Our results provide new insights into the potential of N-glycans containing a β1,6-GlcNAc branch linked to α1,6-mannose as a novel target for anti-leukemia treatment. PMID:22132163

  8. The recognition of N-glycans by the lectin ArtinM mediates cell death of a human myeloid leukemia cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Caroline Carvalho

    Full Text Available ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit, interacts with N-glycosylated receptors on the surface of several cells of hematopoietic origin, triggering cell migration, degranulation, and cytokine release. Because malignant transformation is often associated with altered expression of cell surface glycans, we evaluated the interaction of ArtinM with human myelocytic leukemia cells and investigated cellular responses to lectin binding. The intensity of ArtinM binding varied across 3 leukemia cell lines: NB4>K562>U937. The binding, which was directly related to cell growth suppression, was inhibited in the presence of Manα1-3(Manα1-6Manβ1, and was reverted in underglycosylated NB4 cells. ArtinM interaction with NB4 cells induced cell death (IC(50 = 10 µg/mL, as indicated by cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential unassociated with caspase activation or DNA fragmentation. Moreover, ArtinM treatment of NB4 cells strongly induced reactive oxygen species generation and autophagy, as indicated by the detection of acidic vesicular organelles in the treated cells. NB4 cell death was attributed to ArtinM recognition of the trimannosyl core of N-glycans containing a ß1,6-GlcNAc branch linked to α1,6-mannose. This modification correlated with higher levels of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V transcripts in NB4 cells than in K562 or U937 cells. Our results provide new insights into the potential of N-glycans containing a β1,6-GlcNAc branch linked to α1,6-mannose as a novel target for anti-leukemia treatment.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  10. Characterization of a serine protease-mediated cell death program activated in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, A.R.; Holohan, C.; Torriglia, A.; Lee, B.F.; Stenson-Cox, C.

    2006-01-01

    Tightly controlled proteolysis is a defining feature of apoptosis and caspases are critical in this regard. Significant roles for non-caspase proteases in cell death have been highlighted. Staurosporine causes a rapid induction of apoptosis in virtually all mammalian cell types. Numerous studies demonstrate that staurosporine can activate cell death under caspase-inhibiting circumstances. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteolytic mechanisms responsible for cell death under these conditions. To that end, we show that inhibitors of serine proteases can delay cell death in one such system. Furthermore, through profiling of proteolytic activation, we demonstrate, for the first time, that staurosporine activates a chymotrypsin-like serine protease-dependent cell death in HL-60 cells independently, but in parallel with the caspase controlled systems. Features of the serine protease-mediated system include cell shrinkage and apoptotic morphology, regulation of caspase-3, altered nuclear morphology, generation of an endonuclease and DNA degradation. We also demonstrate a staurosporine-induced activation of a putative 16 kDa chymotrypsin-like protein during apoptosis

  11. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax and cell cycle progression: role of cyclin D-cdk and p110Rb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuveut, C; Low, K G; Maldarelli, F; Schmitt, I; Majone, F; Grassmann, R; Jeang, K T

    1998-06-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 is etiologically linked to the development of adult T-cell leukemia and various human neuropathies. The Tax protein of human T-cell leukemia virus type I has been implicated in cellular transformation. Like other oncoproteins, such as Myc, Jun, and Fos, Tax is a transcriptional activator. How it mechanistically dysregulates the cell cycle is unclear. Previously, it was suggested that Tax affects cell-phase transition by forming a direct protein-protein complex with p16(INK4a), thereby inactivating an inhibitor of G1-to-S-phase progression. Here we show that, in T cells deleted for p16(INK4a), Tax can compel an egress of cells from G0/G1 into S despite the absence of serum. We also show that in undifferentiated myocytes, expression of Tax represses cellular differentiation. In both settings, Tax expression was found to increase cyclin D-cdk activity and to enhance pRb phosphorylation. In T cells, a Tax-associated increase in steady-state E2F2 protein was also documented. In searching for a molecular explanation for these observations, we found that Tax forms a protein-protein complex with cyclin D3, whereas a point-mutated and transcriptionally inert Tax mutant failed to form such a complex. Interestingly, expression of wild-type Tax protein in cells was also correlated with the induction of a novel hyperphosphorylated cyclin D3 protein. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tax might directly influence cyclin D-cdk activity and function, perhaps by a route independent of cdk inhibitors such as p16(INK4a).

  12. Core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by the TAL1 complex in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jamieson, Catriona H M; Staudt, Louis M; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2012-08-14

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of humancell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3, and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected autoregulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1 and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MYB oncogene, forming a positive feed-forward regulatory loop that reinforces and stabilizes the TAL1-regulated oncogenic program. One of the critical downstream targets in this circuitry is the TRIB2 gene, which is oppositely regulated by TAL1 and E2A/HEB and is essential for the survival of T-ALL cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CD90 and CD110 correlate with cancer stem cell potentials in human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Nishida, Hiroko; Iwata, Satoshi; Dang, Nam H.; Morimoto, Chikao

    2009-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently identified in myeloid leukemia, published data on lymphoid malignancy have been sparse. T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of T-cell precursors and is generally aggressive. As CD34 is the only positive-selection marker for CSCs in T-ALL, we performed extensive analysis of CD markers in T-ALL cell lines. We found that some of the tested lines consisted of heterogeneous populations of cells with various levels of surface marker expression. In particular, a small subpopulation of CD90 (Thy-1) and CD110 (c-Mpl) were shown to correlate with stem cell properties both in vitro and in transplantation experiments. As these markers are expressed on hematopoietic stem cells, our results suggest that stem cell-like population are enriched in CD90+/CD110+ fraction and they are useful positive-selection markers for the isolation of CSCs in some cases of T-ALL.

  14. CD90 and CD110 correlate with cancer stem cell potentials in human T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Hiroto; Nishida, Hiroko; Iwata, Satoshi [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Dang, Nam H. [Department of Hematologic Malignancies, Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Morimoto, Chikao, E-mail: morimoto@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Clinical Immunology, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan)

    2009-05-29

    Although cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently identified in myeloid leukemia, published data on lymphoid malignancy have been sparse. T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized by the abnormal proliferation of T-cell precursors and is generally aggressive. As CD34 is the only positive-selection marker for CSCs in T-ALL, we performed extensive analysis of CD markers in T-ALL cell lines. We found that some of the tested lines consisted of heterogeneous populations of cells with various levels of surface marker expression. In particular, a small subpopulation of CD90 (Thy-1) and CD110 (c-Mpl) were shown to correlate with stem cell properties both in vitro and in transplantation experiments. As these markers are expressed on hematopoietic stem cells, our results suggest that stem cell-like population are enriched in CD90+/CD110+ fraction and they are useful positive-selection markers for the isolation of CSCs in some cases of T-ALL.

  15. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thys, Ryan G., E-mail: rthys@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Lehman, Christine E., E-mail: clehman@wakehealth.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1016 (United States); Pierce, Levi C.T., E-mail: Levipierce@gmail.com [Human Longevity, Inc., San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Wang, Yuh-Hwa, E-mail: yw4b@virginia.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Virginia, 1340 Jefferson Park Avenue, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0733 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  16. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thys, Ryan G.; Lehman, Christine E.; Pierce, Levi C.T.; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Environmental/chemotherapeutic agents cause DNA breakage in MLL and CBFB in HSPCs. • Diethylnitrosamine-induced DNA breakage at MLL and CBFB shown for the first time. • Chemical-induced DNA breakage occurs at topoisomerase II cleavage sites. • Chemical-induced DNA breaks display a pattern similar to those in leukemia patients. • Long-term exposures suggested to generate DNA breakage at leukemia-related genes. - Abstract: Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The

  17. The pathogenesis of tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell leukemia type I-associated myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casseb J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical spastic paraparesis/human T-cell leukemia type I-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM is caused by a human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I after a long incubation period. TSP/HAM is characterized by a chronic progressive paraparesis with sphincter disturbances, no/mild sensory loss, the absence of spinal cord compression and seropositivity for HTLV-I antibodies. The pathogenesis of this entity is not completely known and involves a multivariable phenomenon of immune system activation against the presence of HTLV-I antigens, leading to an inflammatory process and demyelination, mainly in the thoracic spinal cord. The current hypothesis about the pathogenesis of TSP/HAM is: 1 presence of HTLV-I antigens in the lumbar spinal cord, noted by an increased DNA HTLV-I load; 2 CTL either with their lytic functions or release/production of soluble factors, such as CC-chemokines, cytokines, and adhesion molecules; 3 the presence of Tax gene expression that activates T-cell proliferation or induces an inflammatory process in the spinal cord; 4 the presence of B cells with neutralizing antibody production, or complement activation by an immune complex phenomenon, and 5 lower IL-2 and IFN-gamma production and increased IL-10, indicating drive to a cytokine type 2 pattern in the TSP/HAM subjects and the existence of a genetic background such as some HLA haplotypes. All of these factors should be implicated in TSP/HAM and further studies are necessary to investigate their role in the development of TSP/HAM.

  18. Humanized CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins exhibit promising anti-T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Li, Jialu; Zhu, Xuejun; Tang, Xiaowen; Bao, Yangyi; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Yuhui; Tian, Fang; Liu, Xiaomei; Yang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Nanobodies, named as VHHs (variable domain of heavy chain of HCAb [heavy-chain antibodies]), are derived from heavy-chain-only antibodies that circulate in sera of camelids. Their exceptional physicochemical properties, possibility of humanization, and unique antigen recognition properties make them excellent candidates for targeted delivery of biologically active components, including immunotoxins. In our previous efforts, we have successfully generated the monovalent and bivalent CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins, which can effectively trigger the apoptosis of CD7-positive malignant cells. To pursue the possibility of translating those immunotoxins into clinics, we humanized the nanobody sequences (designated as dhuVHH6) as well as further truncated the Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE)-derived PE38 toxin to produce a more protease-resistant form, which is named as PE-LR, by deleting majority of PE domain II. Three new types of immunotoxins, dhuVHH6-PE38, dVHH6-PE-LR, and dhuVHH6-PE-LR, were successfully constructed. These recombinant immunotoxins were expressed in Escherichia coli and showed that nanobody immunotoxins have the benefits of easy soluble expression in a prokaryotic expression system. Flow cytometry results revealed that all immunotoxins still maintained the ability to bind specifically to CD7-positive T lymphocyte strains without binding to CD7-negative control cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that these proteins can be endocytosed into the cytoplasm after binding with CD7-positive cells and that this phenomenon was not observed in CD7-negative cells. WST-8 experiments showed that all immunotoxins retained the highly effective and specific growth inhibition activity in CD7-positive cell lines and primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Further in vivo animal model experiments showed that humanized dhuVHH6-PE38 immunotoxin can tolerate higher doses and extend the survival of NOD-Prkdc em26 Il2rg em26 Nju (NCG) mice

  19. Leukemia inhibitory factor increases the proliferation of human endometrial stromal cells and expression of genes related to pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Salehnia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concerning the low population of human endometrial mesenchymal cells within the tissue and their potential application in the clinic and tissue engineering, some researches have been focused on their in vitro expansion. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF as a proliferative factor on the expansion and proliferation of human endometrial stromal cells. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the isolated and cultured human endometrial stromal cells from women at ovulatory phase aged 20-35 years, after fourth passage were divided into control and LIF-treated groups. In the experimental group, the endometrial cells were treated by 10 ng/ml LIF in culture media and the cultured cells without adding LIF considered as control group. Both groups were evaluated and compared for proliferation rate using MTT assay, for CD90 marker by flow cytometric analysis and for the expression of Oct4, Nanog, PCNA and LIFr genes using real-time RT-PCR. Results: The proliferation rate of control and LIF-treated groups were 1.17±0.17 and 1.61±0.06 respectively and there was a significant increase in endometrial stromal cell proliferation following in vitro treatment by LIF compared to control group (p=0.049. The rate of CD90 positive cells was significantly increased in LIFtreated group (98.96±0.37% compared to control group (94.26±0.08% (p=0.0498. Also, the expression ratio of all studied genes was significantly increased in the LIFtreated group compared to control group (p=0.0479. Conclusion: The present study showed that LIF has a great impact on proliferation, survival, and maintenance of pluripotency of human endometrial stromal cells and it could be applicable in cell therapies.

  20. Suppression of NRF2–ARE activity sensitizes chemotherapeutic agent-induced cytotoxicity in human acute monocytic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Hui; Wang, Huihui; Xue, Peng; Hou, Yongyong; Dong, Jian; Zhou, Tong; Qu, Weidong; Peng, Shuangqing; Li, Jin; Carmichael, Paul L.; Nelson, Bud; Clewell, Rebecca; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E.; Pi, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of the antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent transcription, plays a pivotal role in chemical detoxification in normal and tumor cells. Consistent with previous findings that NRF2–ARE contributes to chemotherapeutic resistance of cancer cells, we found that stable knockdown of NRF2 by lentiviral shRNA in human acute monocytic leukemia (AML) THP-1 cells enhanced the cytotoxicity of several chemotherapeutic agents, including arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ), etoposide and doxorubicin. Using an ARE-luciferase reporter expressed in several human and mouse cells, we identified a set of compounds, including isonicotinic acid amides, isoniazid and ethionamide, that inhibited NRF2–ARE activity. Treatment of THP-1 cells with ethionamide, for instance, significantly reduced mRNA expression of multiple ARE-driven genes under either basal or As 2 O 3 -challenged conditions. As determined by cell viability and cell cycle, suppression of NRF2–ARE by ethionamide also significantly enhanced susceptibility of THP-1 and U937 cells to As 2 O 3 -induced cytotoxicity. In THP-1 cells, the sensitizing effect of ethionamide on As 2 O 3 -induced cytotoxicity was highly dependent on NRF2. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that ethionamide suppresses NRF2–ARE signaling and disrupts the transcriptional network of the antioxidant response in AML cells, leading to sensitization to chemotherapeutic agents. - Highlights: • Identification of novel inhibitors of ARE-dependent transcription • Suppression of NRF2–ARE sensitizes THP-1 cells to chemotherapy. • Ethionamide suppresses ARE-dependent transcriptional activity. • Ethionamide and isoniazid increase the cytotoxicity of As 2 O 3 in AML cells. • Sensitization of THP-1 cells to As 2 O 3 toxicity by ethionamide is NRF2-dependent.

  1. Myeloid Dysregulation in a Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of PTPN11-Associated Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Mulero-Navarro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Somatic PTPN11 mutations cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML. Germline PTPN11 defects cause Noonan syndrome (NS, and specific inherited mutations cause NS/JMML. Here, we report that hematopoietic cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs harboring NS/JMML-causing PTPN11 mutations recapitulated JMML features. hiPSC-derived NS/JMML myeloid cells exhibited increased signaling through STAT5 and upregulation of miR-223 and miR-15a. Similarly, miR-223 and miR-15a were upregulated in 11/19 JMML bone marrow mononuclear cells harboring PTPN11 mutations, but not those without PTPN11 defects. Reducing miR-223’s function in NS/JMML hiPSCs normalized myelogenesis. MicroRNA target gene expression levels were reduced in hiPSC-derived myeloid cells as well as in JMML cells with PTPN11 mutations. Thus, studying an inherited human cancer syndrome with hiPSCs illuminated early oncogenesis prior to the accumulation of secondary genomic alterations, enabling us to discover microRNA dysregulation, establishing a genotype-phenotype association for JMML and providing therapeutic targets.

  2. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion–induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo

  3. Auger electron-emitting "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 radioimmunoconjugates are cytotoxic to human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells displaying the CD123"+/CD131"− phenotype of leukemia stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Catherine; Leyton, Jeffrey V.; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Minden, Mark; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric IgG_1 monoclonal antibody CSL360 recognizes the CD123"+/CD131"− phenotype expressed by leukemic stem cells (LSC). Auger electron-emitting "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 radioimmunoconjugates incorporating nuclear translocation sequence (NLS) peptides bound specifically to Raji cells transfected with CD123 and exhibited a K_D of 11 nmols/L in a competition receptor-binding assay using CD123-transfected CHO cells. "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 was bound, internalized and transported to the nucleus of human AML-5 myeloid leukemia cells. The clonogenic survival of AML-5 cells was reduced by "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 up to 3.7-fold. Isotype control "1"1"1In-DTPA-chIgG_1 was 2-fold less cytotoxic, and unlabeled CSL360, DTPA-NLS-CSL360 or free "1"1"1In acetate did not decrease cell survival. These results are promising for further evaluation of "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 for Auger electron radioimmunotherapy of AML targeting the critical LSC subpopulation. - Highlights: • "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 the CD123"+/CD131"− phenotype of leukemic stem cells (LSC). • "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 was bound, internalized and imported into the nucleus of AML-5 leukemia cells. • "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 reduced the clonogenic survival of AML-5 leukemia cells by 4-fold.

  4. Caveolin-1 contributes to realgar nanoparticle therapy in human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi D

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dan Shi,1,* Yan Liu,1,* Ronggang Xi,1 Wei Zou,2 Lijun Wu,3 Zhiran Zhang,1 Zhongyang Liu,1 Chao Qu,1 Baoli Xu,1 Xiaobo Wang1 1Department of Pharmacy, The 210th Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, 2College of Life Science, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, Liaoning, 3Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is characterized by the t(9;22 (q34;q11-associated Bcr-Abl fusion gene, which is an essential element of clinical diagnosis. As a traditional Chinese medicine, realgar has been widely used for the treatment of various diseases for >1,500 years. Inspired by nano-drug, realgar nanoparticles (NPs have been prepared with an average particle size of <100 nm in a previous work. Compared with coarse realgar, the realgar NPs have higher bioavailability. As a principal constituent protein of caveolae, caveolin-1 (Cav-1 participates in regulating various cellular physiological and pathological processes including tumorigenesis and tumor development. In previous studies, it was found that realgar NPs can inhibit several types of tumor cell proliferation. However, the therapeutic effect of realgar NPs on CML has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, it was demonstrated that realgar NPs can inhibit the proliferation of K562 cells and degrade Bcr-Abl fusion protein effectively. Both apoptosis and autophagy were activated in a dose-dependent manner in realgar NPs treated cells, and the induction of autophagy was associated with class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Morphological analysis indicated that realgar NPs induced differentiation effectively in CML cells. Furthermore, it was identified that Cav-1 might play a crucial role in realgar NP therapy. In order to study the effects of Cav-1 on K562 cells during

  5. Humanized CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins exhibit promising anti-T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2017-03-01

    all immunotoxins still maintained the ability to bind specifically to CD7-positive T lymphocyte strains without binding to CD7-negative control cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that these proteins can be endocytosed into the cytoplasm after binding with CD7-positive cells and that this phenomenon was not observed in CD7-negative cells. WST-8 experiments showed that all immunotoxins retained the highly effective and specific growth inhibition activity in CD7-positive cell lines and primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL cells. Further in vivo animal model experiments showed that humanized dhuVHH6-PE38 immunotoxin can tolerate higher doses and extend the survival of NOD-Prkdcem26Il2rgem26Nju (NCG mice transplanted with CEM cells without any obvious decrease in body weight. Further studies on NCG mice model with patient-derived T-ALL cells, dhuVHH6-PE38 treatment, significantly prolonged mice survival with ~40% survival improvement. However, it was also noticed that although dhuVHH6-PE-LR showed strong antitumor effect in vitro, its in vivo antitumor efficacy was disappointing. Conclusion: We have successfully constructed a targeted CD7 molecule-modified nanobody (CD7 molecule-improved nanobody immunotoxin dhuVHH6-PE38 and demonstrated its potential for treating CD7-positive malignant tumors, especially T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Keywords: CD7, humanized nanobody, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, patient-derived xenograft model, recombinant immunotoxins, Pseudomonas exotoxin A

  6. Flavonoid 4′-O-Methylkuwanon E from Morus alba Induces the Differentiation of THP-1 Human Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kollar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. In this work we studied cytodifferentiation effects of newly characterized prenyl flavonoid 4′-O-methylkuwanon E (4ME isolated from white mulberry (Morus alba L.. Main Methods. Cell growth and viability were measured by dye exclusion assay; cell cycle and surface antigen CD11b were monitored by flow cytometry. For the cytodifferentiation of cells the NBT reduction assay was employed. Regulatory proteins were assessed by western blotting. Key Findings. 4ME induced dose-dependent growth inhibition of THP-1 cells, which was not accompanied by toxic effect. Inhibition of cells proliferation caused by 4ME was associated with the accumulation in G1 phase and with downregulation of hyperphosphorylated pRb. Treatment with 4ME led to significant induction of NBT-reducing activity of PMA stimulated THP-1 cells and upregulation expression of differentiation-associated surface antigen CD11b. Our results suggest that monocytic differentiation induced by 4ME is connected with up-regulation of p38 kinase activity. Significance. Our study provides the first evidence that 4ME induces the differentiation of THP-1 human monocytic leukemia cells and thus is a potential cytodifferentiating anticancer agent.

  7. Anti-proliferative and differentiation-inducing activities of the green tea catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, H L; Ip, W K; Wong, C K; Mak, N K; Chen, Z Y; Leung, K N

    2002-12-06

    A novel approach for the treatment of leukemia is the differentiation therapy in which immature leukemia cells are induced to attain a mature phenotype when exposed to differentiation inducers, either alone or in combinations with other chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive drugs. Over the past decade, numerous studies indicated that green tea catechins (GTC) could suppress the growth and induce apoptosis on a number of human cancer cell lines. However, the differentiation-inducing activity of GTC on human tumors remains poorly understood. In the present study, the effect of the major GTC epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and differentiation of a human eosinophilc leukemic cell line, EoL-1, was examined. Our results showed that EGCG suppressed the proliferation of the EoL-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an estimated IC(50) value of 31.5 microM. On the other hand, EGCG at a concentration of 40 microM could trigger the EoL-1 cells to undergo morphological differentiation into mature eosinophil-like cells. Using RT-PCR and flow cytometry, it was found that EGCG upregulated the gene and protein expression of two eosinophil-specific granule proteins, the major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), in EoL-1 cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that EGCG can exhibit anti-leukemic activity on a human eosinophilic cell line EoL-1 by suppressing the proliferation and by inducing the differentiation of the leukemia cells.

  8. Spread of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) in the Dutch homosexual community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; de Wolf, F.; van de Wiel, B.; Smit, L.; Bakker, M.; Albrecht-van Lent, N.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Sequential sera of 697 homosexual men, participating in a prospective study (1984-1986) of the risk to acquire human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or AIDS, were tested for antibodies to human T-cell leukaemia virus (HTLV-I) by particle agglutination and immunoblotting. No intravenous drug users were

  9. Effects of highly ripened cheeses on HL-60 human leukemia cells: antiproliferative activity and induction of apoptotic DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, S; Ohkura, N; Suzuki, K; Yamasaki, M; Nishiyama, K; Kobayashi, H; Hoshi, Y; Kadooka, Y; Igoshi, K

    2010-04-01

    To establish cheese as a dairy product with health benefits, we examined the multifunctional role of cheeses. In this report, we clarify whether different types of commercial cheeses may possess antiproliferative activity using HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines as a cancer model. Among 12 cheese extracts tested, 6 (Montagnard, Pont-l'Eveque, Brie, Camembert, Danablue, and Blue) revealed strong growth inhibition activity and induction of DNA fragmentation in HL-60 cells. Based on the quantification of nitrogen contents in different cheese samples, a positive correlation between the ripeness of various cheeses and their antiproliferative activity tested in HL-60 cells was displayed. Four varieties of Blue cheese ripened for 0, 1, 2, or 3 mo demonstrated that the Blue cheese ripened for a long term was capable of causing the strong suppression of the cell growth and the induction of apoptotic DNA damage as well as nucleic morphological change in HL-60 cells. Collectively, these results obtained suggest a potential role of highly ripened cheeses in the prevention of leukemic cell proliferation. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human T cell leukemia virus type I prevents cell surface expression of the T cell receptor through down-regulation of the CD3-gamma, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal Malefyt, R.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J. E.; Sancho, J.; Terhorst, C.; Alarcon, B.

    1990-01-01

    Infection and transformation by human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) up-regulates expression of several inducible genes including those coding for cytokines involved in the proliferation of normal and leukemic T cells. We demonstrate that HTLV-I can also shut off expression of the CD3-gamma,

  11. Targeting neuropilin-1 in human leukemia and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Katja; Jaalouk, Diana E; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Zurita, Amado J; Kuniyasu, Akihiko; Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Marini, Frank C; Lichtiger, Benjamin; O'Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Cortes, Jorge E; Koivunen, Erkki; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2011-01-20

    Targeted drug delivery offers an opportunity for the development of safer and more effective therapies for the treatment of cancer. In this study, we sought to identify short, cell-internalizing peptide ligands that could serve as directive agents for specific drug delivery in hematologic malignancies. By screening of human leukemia cells with a combinatorial phage display peptide library, we isolated a peptide motif, sequence Phe-Phe/Tyr-Any-Leu-Arg-Ser (F(F)/(Y)XLRS), which bound to different leukemia cell lines and to patient-derived bone marrow samples. The motif was internalized through a receptor-mediated pathway, and we next identified the corresponding receptor as the transmembrane glycoprotein neuropilin-1 (NRP-1). Moreover, we observed a potent anti-leukemia cell effect when the targeting motif was synthesized in tandem to the pro-apoptotic sequence (D)(KLAKLAK)₂. Finally, our results confirmed increased expression of NRP-1 in representative human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines and in a panel of bone marrow specimens obtained from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myelogenous leukemia compared with normal bone marrow. These results indicate that NRP-1 could potentially be used as a target for ligand-directed therapy in human leukemias and lymphomas and that the prototype CGFYWLRSC-GG-(D)(KLAKLAK)₂ is a promising drug candidate in this setting.

  12. Hairy cell leukemia-variant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadri, Mohammad I.; Al-Sheikh, Iman H.

    2001-01-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia variant is a very rare chronic lymphoproliferative disorder and is closely related to hairy cell leukemia. We hereby describe a case of hairy cell leukaemia variant for the first time in Saudi Arabia. An elderly Saudi man presented with pallor, massive splenomegaly, and moderate hepatomegaly. Hemoglobin was 7.7 g/dl, Platelets were 134 x109/l and white blood count was 140x10 9/l with 97% being abnormal lymphoid cells with cytoplasmic projections. The morphology, cytochemistry, and immunophenotype of the lymphoid cells were classical of hairy cell leukaemia variant. The bone marrow was easily aspirated and findings were consistent with hairy cell leukaemia variant. (author)

  13. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. PMID:25613934

  14. Resveratrol-induced transcriptional up-regulation of ASMase (SMPD1) of human leukemia and cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Naoki [Department of Pathophysiological Laboratory Science, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan); Omori, Yukari [Department of Pathophysiological Laboratory Science, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Sobue, Sayaka; Ichihara, Masatoshi [College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan); Suzuki, Motoshi [Division of Molecular Carcinogenesis, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kyogashima, Mamoru [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Nihon Pharmaceutical University, Saitama (Japan); Nakamura, Mitsuhiro [Department of Drug Information, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu (Japan); Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko [College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan); Nozawa, Yoshinori [Tokai Gakuin University, Kakamigahara (Japan); Murate, Takashi, E-mail: murate@isc.chubu.ac.jp [College of Life and Health Sciences, Chubu University, Kasugai (Japan)

    2016-02-19

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant-derived phytoalexin present in plants, whose pleiotropic effects for health benefits have been previously reported. Its anti-cancer activity is among the current topics for novel cancer treatment. Here, effects of RSV on cell proliferation and the sphingolipid metabolism of K562, a human leukemia cell line, were analyzed. Some experiments were also performed in HCT116, a human colon cancer cell line. RSV inhibited cell proliferation of both cell lines. Increased cellular ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin and S1P by RSV were observed in RSV-treated K562 cells. Further analysis revealed that acid sphingomyelinase mRNA and enzyme activity levels were increased by RSV. Desipramine, a functional ASMase inhibitor, prevented RSV-induced ceramide increase. RSV increased ATF3, EGR1, EGR3 proteins and phosphorylated c-Jun and FOXO3. However, co-transfection using these transcription factor expression vectors and ASMase promoter reporter vector revealed positive effects of EGR1 and EGR3 but not others. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated the direct binding of EGR1/3 transcription factors with ASMase 5′-promoter. These results indicate that increased EGR1/3 and ASMase expression play an important role in cellular ceramide increase by RSV treatment. - Highlights: • Resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation of K562 and HCT116 cells. • Resveratrol increased cellular ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin and S1P. • ASMase mRNA and activity were increased with resveratrol. • ASMase inhibition suppressed RSV-induced ceramide accumulation. • Increased ASMase transcription was at least partially due to EGR family proteins.

  15. Resveratrol-induced transcriptional up-regulation of ASMase (SMPD1) of human leukemia and cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Naoki; Omori, Yukari; Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Sobue, Sayaka; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Murate, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant-derived phytoalexin present in plants, whose pleiotropic effects for health benefits have been previously reported. Its anti-cancer activity is among the current topics for novel cancer treatment. Here, effects of RSV on cell proliferation and the sphingolipid metabolism of K562, a human leukemia cell line, were analyzed. Some experiments were also performed in HCT116, a human colon cancer cell line. RSV inhibited cell proliferation of both cell lines. Increased cellular ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin and S1P by RSV were observed in RSV-treated K562 cells. Further analysis revealed that acid sphingomyelinase mRNA and enzyme activity levels were increased by RSV. Desipramine, a functional ASMase inhibitor, prevented RSV-induced ceramide increase. RSV increased ATF3, EGR1, EGR3 proteins and phosphorylated c-Jun and FOXO3. However, co-transfection using these transcription factor expression vectors and ASMase promoter reporter vector revealed positive effects of EGR1 and EGR3 but not others. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated the direct binding of EGR1/3 transcription factors with ASMase 5′-promoter. These results indicate that increased EGR1/3 and ASMase expression play an important role in cellular ceramide increase by RSV treatment. - Highlights: • Resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation of K562 and HCT116 cells. • Resveratrol increased cellular ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin and S1P. • ASMase mRNA and activity were increased with resveratrol. • ASMase inhibition suppressed RSV-induced ceramide accumulation. • Increased ASMase transcription was at least partially due to EGR family proteins.

  16. In vitro activation of transcription by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, M A; Markowitz, R B; Dynan, W S

    1992-05-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) regulatory protein Tax activates transcription of the proviral long terminal repeats and a number of cellular promoters. We have developed an in vitro system to characterize the mechanism by which Tax interacts with the host cell transcription machinery. Tax was purified from cells infected with a baculovirus expression vector. Addition of these Tax preparations to nuclear extracts from uninfected human T lymphocytes activated transcription of the HTLV-I long terminal repeat approximately 10-fold. Transcription-stimulatory activity copurified with the immunoreactive 40-kDa Tax polypeptide on gel filtration chromatography, and, as expected, the effect of recombinant Tax was diminished in HTLV-I-infected T-lymphocyte extracts containing endogenous Tax. Tax-mediated transactivation in vivo has been previously shown to require 21-bp-repeat Tax-responsive elements (TxREs) in the promoter DNA. Stimulation of transcription in vitro was also strongly dependent on these sequences. To investigate the mechanism of Tax transactivation, cellular proteins that bind the 21-bp-repeat TxREs were prepared by DNA affinity chromatography. Recombinant Tax markedly increased the formation of a specific host protein-DNA complex detected in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These data suggest that Tax activates transcription through a direct interaction with cellular proteins that bind to the 21-bp-repeat TxREs.

  17. Regulation of tumor necrosis factor gene expression by ionizing radiation in human myeloid leukemia cells and peripheral blood monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.L.; Datta, R.; Hallahan, D.E.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that ionizing radiation induces the expression of certain cytokines, such as TNF alpha/cachectin. However, there is presently no available information regarding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of cytokine gene expression by ionizing radiation. In this report, we describe the regulation of the TNF gene by ionizing radiation in human myeloid leukemia cells. The increase in TNF transcripts by x rays was both time- and dose-dependent as determined by Northern blot analysis. Similar findings were obtained in human peripheral blood monocytes. Transcriptional run-on analyses have demonstrated that ionizing radiation stimulates the rate of TNF gene transcription. Furthermore, induction of TNF mRNA was increased in the absence of protein synthesis. In contrast, ionizing radiation had little effect on the half-life of TNF transcripts. These findings indicate that the increase in TNF mRNA observed after irradiation is regulated by transcriptional mechanisms and suggest that production of this cytokine by myeloid cells may play a role in the pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation

  18. Two-dimensional analysis of metabolically and cell surface radiolabeled proteins of some human lymphoid and myeloid leukemia cell lines. II. Glycosylated and phosphorylated proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorvath, B; Duraj, J; Sedlak, J; Pleskova, I

    1986-01-01

    Cell surface glycoproteins, radiolabelled by the sodium metaperiodate/tritiated borohydride technique, and cell phosphoproteins, metabolically radiolabelled with /sup 32/P-orthophosphate were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis in some myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines. Some markedly expressed major glycoproteins were predominant in some of the cell lines (such as 95k and 100k glycoproteins with marked charge heterogeneity in non-T, non-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines NALM 6 and NALM 16), but markedly quantitatively reduced in other examined cell lines, such as lymphoblastoid cell line UHKT 34/2. /sup 32/P-orthophosphate radiolabelled phosphoprotein two-dimensional patterns of the examined lymphoid leukemia cell lines were essentially similar, with some minor differences, in examined lymphoid and myeloid leukemia cell lines, such as marked expression of a series of large phosphoproteins in the molecular weight range 80-100k in lymphoid cell lines and almost complete absence of these phosphoproteins on the examined myeloid leukemia cell lines. Another configuration of acidic phosphoproteins (30-35k) exhibited individual cell line variability and differences between both individual myeloid leukemia cell lines and between the lymphoid and myeloid cell lines examined. (author) 2 figs., 15 refs.

  19. Cytotoxic Capacity of IL-15-Stimulated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Rhabdomyosarcoma in Humanized Preclinical Mouse Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Kreyenberg, Hermann [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Volk, Andreas [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Kuçi, Selim; Willasch, Andre [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Koscielniak, Ewa [Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Olgahospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Fulda, Simone [Institute for Experimental Cancer Research in Pediatrics, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Wels, Winfried S. [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Boenig, Halvard [Institute for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Division for Cell Processing, German Red Cross Blood Donor Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter, E-mail: eva.rettinger@kgu.de, E-mail: peter.bader@kgu.de [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2012-04-09

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has become an important treatment modality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD) status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc{sup −}, NSG) were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB), and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at equal amounts were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells 250 times more CIK than THP-1 cells were needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliable 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells have potent cytotoxic capacity

  20. Apoptosis- and differentiation-inducing activities of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid isomer, on human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wai-Nam; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2014-11-01

    Conjugated linolenic acids (CLNAs) are a group of naturally occurring positional and geometrical isomers of the C18 polyunsaturated essential fatty acid, linolenic acid (LNA), with three conjugated double bonds (C18:3). Although previous research has demonstrated the growth-inhibitory effects of CLNA on a wide variety of cancer cell lines in vitro, their action mechanisms and therapeutic potential on human myeloid leukemia cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, we found that jacaric acid (8Z,10E,12Z-octadecatrienoic acid), a CLNA isomer which is present in jacaranda seed oil, inhibited the in vitro growth of human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Mechanistic studies showed that jacaric acid triggered cell cycle arrest of EoL-1 cells at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis of the EoL-1 cells, as measured by the Cell Death Detection ELISAPLUS kit, Annexin V assay and JC-1 dye staining. Notably, the jacaric acid-treated EoL-1 cells also underwent differentiation as revealed by morphological and phenotypic analysis. Collectively, our results demonstrated the capability of jacaric acid to inhibit the growth of EoL-1 cells in vitro through triggering cell cycle arrest and by inducing apoptosis and differentiation of the leukemia cells. Therefore, jacaric acid might be developed as a potential candidate for the treatment of certain forms of myeloid leukemia with minimal toxicity and few side effects.

  1. Suppression of NRF2–ARE activity sensitizes chemotherapeutic agent-induced cytotoxicity in human acute monocytic leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hui [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Huihui [School of Public Health, China Medical University, 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang (China); Xue, Peng [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Hou, Yongyong [School of Public Health, China Medical University, 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang (China); Dong, Jian [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Institute of Biology and Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Zhou, Tong [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Qu, Weidong [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Peng, Shuangqing [Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Li, Jin; Carmichael, Paul L. [Unilever, Safety & Environmental Assurance Centre, Colworth Science Park, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire MK44 1LQ (United Kingdom); Nelson, Bud; Clewell, Rebecca; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E. [The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@mail.cmu.edu.cn [School of Public Health, China Medical University, 77 Puhe Road, Shenyang North New Area, Shenyang (China); The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a master regulator of the antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent transcription, plays a pivotal role in chemical detoxification in normal and tumor cells. Consistent with previous findings that NRF2–ARE contributes to chemotherapeutic resistance of cancer cells, we found that stable knockdown of NRF2 by lentiviral shRNA in human acute monocytic leukemia (AML) THP-1 cells enhanced the cytotoxicity of several chemotherapeutic agents, including arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}), etoposide and doxorubicin. Using an ARE-luciferase reporter expressed in several human and mouse cells, we identified a set of compounds, including isonicotinic acid amides, isoniazid and ethionamide, that inhibited NRF2–ARE activity. Treatment of THP-1 cells with ethionamide, for instance, significantly reduced mRNA expression of multiple ARE-driven genes under either basal or As{sub 2}O{sub 3}-challenged conditions. As determined by cell viability and cell cycle, suppression of NRF2–ARE by ethionamide also significantly enhanced susceptibility of THP-1 and U937 cells to As{sub 2}O{sub 3}-induced cytotoxicity. In THP-1 cells, the sensitizing effect of ethionamide on As{sub 2}O{sub 3}-induced cytotoxicity was highly dependent on NRF2. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that ethionamide suppresses NRF2–ARE signaling and disrupts the transcriptional network of the antioxidant response in AML cells, leading to sensitization to chemotherapeutic agents. - Highlights: • Identification of novel inhibitors of ARE-dependent transcription • Suppression of NRF2–ARE sensitizes THP-1 cells to chemotherapy. • Ethionamide suppresses ARE-dependent transcriptional activity. • Ethionamide and isoniazid increase the cytotoxicity of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} in AML cells. • Sensitization of THP-1 cells to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} toxicity by ethionamide is NRF2-dependent.

  2. Cytotoxic capacity of IL-15-stimulated cytokine-induced killer cells against human acute myeloid leukemia and rhabdomyosarcoma in humanized preclinical mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eRettinger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT has become an important treatment modality for patients with high risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD. To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-, NSG were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow (BM followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB, and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at an effector to target cell (E:T ratio of 1:1 were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells an E:T ratio of 250:1 was needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliably 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells

  3. Oridonin effectively reverses the drug resistance of cisplatin involving induction of cell apoptosis and inhibition of MMP expression in human acute myeloid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is the first generation platinum-based chemotherapy agent. However, the extensive application of cisplatin inevitably causes drug resistance, which is a major obstacle to cancer chemotherapy. Oridonin is a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens with potent anticancer activity. The aim of our study is to investigate the role of oridonin to reverse the cisplatin-resistance in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. The effect of oridonin on human AML cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay, cell migration and invasion were evaluated by transwell migration and invasion assays in cisplatin-resistant human AML cells. Furthermore, cell apoptosis was examined by flow cytometry. The inhibitive effect of oridonin in vivo was determined using xenografted nude mice. In addition, the expressions of MMP2 and MMP9 were detected by Western blot. There was a synergistic antitumor effect between cisplatin and oridonin on cisplatin-resistant human AML cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the combination of cisplatin and oridonin synergistically induced cell apoptosis. Furthermore, the combination treatment not only inhibited AML cell migration and invasion, but more significantly, decreased the expressions of MMP2 and MMP9 proteins. Our results suggest that the synergistic effect between both agents is likely to be driven by the inhibition of MMP expression and the resulting increased apoptosis.

  4. Alterations in polyamine levels induced by phorbol diesters and other agents that promote differentiation in human promyelocytic leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huberman, E.; Weeks, C.; Herrmann, A.; Callaham, M.; Slaga, T.

    1981-02-01

    Polyamine levels were evaluated in human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells after treatment with inducers of terminal differentiation. Differentiation in these cells was determined by increases in the percentage of morphologically mature cells and in lysozyme activity. Treatment of the HL-60 cells with phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate or other inducers of terminal differentiation such as dimethylsulfoxide and retinoic acid resulted in increased levels of putrescine. However, no increase in putrescine could be detected after PMA treatment of a HL-60 cell variant that exhibited a decreased susceptibility to PMA-induced terminal differentiation. Similarly, no increase in putrescine was observed with two nontumor-promoters (phorbol 12,13-diacetate and 4-O-methyl-PMA) or with anthralin, a non-phorbol tumor promoter. In addition to enhancing putrescine levels, PMA also increased the amount of spermidine and decreased the amount of spermine. The increase in putrescine and spermidine preceded the expression of the various differentiation markers. Unlike the changes observed in the polyamine levels after PMA treatment, the activities of ornithine and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases, which are polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, did not significantly change. ..cap alpha..-Methylornithine and ..cap alpha..-difluoromethylornithine and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), which are inhibitors of the polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, did not affect differentiation in control or PMA-treated cells. Because of these observations, we suggest that the change in polyamine levels involve biochemical pathways other than the known biosynthetic ones. By-products of these pathways may perhaps be the controlling factors involved in the induction of terminal differentiation in the HL-60 and other cell types as well.

  5. Inheritance of leukemia in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamada, Nanao

    1991-01-01

    Since Gardner et al. reported an increased incidence of leukemia among children of workers of a nuclear reactor in Sellafield, UK, there have been a number of discussions on the possibility of increased incidence of leukemia among children born from parents exposed to radiation or chemical agents. In this present paper, apart from the leukemia incidence in children from atomic bomb survivors which was discussed by Dr. Yoshimoto, familial leukemia, i.e., a cluster of leukemia among family members within four genetic relations, was discussed with special reference to the age distribution, type of leukemia and consanguinity. Leukemia in twin and leukemias in individuals with congenital anomalies with or without chromosome abnormalities were also discussed. (author)

  6. 6′-Hydroxy Justicidin B Triggers a Critical Imbalance in Ca2+ Homeostasis and Mitochondrion-Dependent Cell Death in Human Leukemia K562 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyang Luo

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Justicia procumbens (J. procumbens is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine which was used for the treatment of fever, pain, and cancer. A compound 6′-hydroxy justicidin B (HJB isolated from J. procumbens exhibits promising biological properties. However, the mechanism of action and the in vivo behavior of HJB remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of action of HJB on human leukemia K562 cells and its pharmacokinetic properties in rats. The results demonstrated that HJB significantly inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells and promoted apoptosis. Besides, HJB resulted in decreased mitochondrial membrane potential deltaPSIm, increased the level of the calcium homeostasis regulator protein TRPC6 and cytosolic calcium. The activity of caspase-8, caspase-9 and the expression of p53 were significantly increased after treatment with HJB. Additionally, HJB has rapid absorption rate and relative long elimination t1/2, indicating a longer residence time in vivo. The results indicate that HJB inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells and induced apoptosis by affecting the function of mitochondria and calcium homeostasis to activate the p53 signaling pathway. The pharmacokinetic study of HJB suggested it is absorbed well and has moderate metabolism in vivo. These results present HJB as a potential novel alternative to standard human leukemia therapies.

  7. Zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway in a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman HS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heshu Sulaiman Rahman,1–3 Abdullah Rasedee,1,2 Ahmad Bustamam Abdul,2,4 Nazariah Allaudin Zeenathul,1,2 Hemn Hassan Othman,1,3 Swee Keong Yeap,2 Chee Wun How,2 Wan Abd Ghani Wan Nor Hafiza4,51Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sulaimanyah, Sulaimanyah City, Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq; 4Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 5College of Medical Laboratory Technology, Institute for Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaAbstract: This investigation evaluated the antileukemia properties of a zerumbone (ZER-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC prepared by hot high-pressure homogenization techniques in an acute human lymphoblastic leukemia (Jurkat cell line in vitro. The apoptogenic effect of the ZER-NLC on Jurkat cells was determined by fluorescent and electron microscopy, Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate, Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, cell cycle analysis, and caspase activity. An MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed that ZER-NLC did not have adverse effects on normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. ZER-NLC arrested the Jurkat cells at G2/M phase with inactivation of cyclin B1 protein. The study also showed that the antiproliferative effect of ZER-NLC on Jurkat cells is through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol, and subsequent cleavage of poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP. These findings show that the ZER-NLC is a potentially useful treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia in humans.Keywords: zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, mitochondrial pathway

  8. Low CD4/CD8 T-cell ratio associated with inflammatory arthropathy in human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Ohsugi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1 can cause an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL as well as inflammatory diseases such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. A transgenic mouse that expresses HTLV-1 Tax also develops T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and an inflammatory arthropathy that resembles rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this study was to identify the primary T-cell subsets involved in the development of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By 24 months of age, Tax transgenic mice developed severe arthropathy with a cumulative incidence of 22.8%. The pathological findings of arthropathy in Tax transgenic mice were similar to those seen in human rheumatoid arthritis or mouse models of rheumatoid arthritis, with synovial proliferation and a positive rheumatoid factor. Before the onset of spontaneous arthropathy, young and old Tax transgenic mice were not sensitive to collagen and did not develop arthritis after immunization with type II collagen. The arthropathic Tax transgenic mice showed a significantly decreased proportion of splenic CD4(+ T cells, whereas the proportion of splenic CD8(+ T cells was increased. Regulatory T cells (CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ were significantly decreased and CD8(+ T cells that expressed the chemokine receptor CCR4 (CD8(+CCR4(+ were significantly increased in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice. The expression of tax mRNA was strong in the spleen and joints of arthropathic mice, with a 40-fold increase compared with healthy transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal that Tax transgenic mice develop rheumatoid-like arthritis with proliferating synovial cells in the joints; however, the proportion of different splenic T-cell subsets in these mice was completely different from other commonly used animal models of rheumatoid arthritis. The crucial T-cell subsets in arthropathic Tax transgenic mice appear to resemble

  9. T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Robbie L.; Cooper, Barry; Krause, John R.

    2013-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia is a rare and unusual malignancy characterized by the proliferation of small- to medium-sized prolymphocytes of postthymic origin with distinctive clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic features. Involvement of the peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and skin can occur. The clinical course is typically very aggressive with poor response to conventional chemotherapy and short survival rates, and the only potential long-ter...

  10. The roles of MCP-1 and protein kinase C delta activation in human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Yang, Eun Ju; Kim, In Sik

    2009-12-01

    Idiopathic hypereosinophilc syndrome is a disorder associated with clonally eosinophilic proliferation. The importance of FIP1-like-1-platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (FIP1L1-PDGFRA) in the pathogenesis and classification of HES has been recently reported. In this study, we investigated the contribution of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 to chemotactic activity and protein kinase C delta (PKC delta in the human eosinophilic leukemia cell line EoL-1. These cells express CCR2 protein among the CC chemokine receptors (CCR1-5). MCP-1 induces strong migration of EoL-1 cells and the chemotaxis signal in response to MCP-1 involves a G(i)/G(o) protein, phospholipase C (PLC), PKC delta, p38 MAPK and NF-kappaB. MCP-1 activates p38 MAPK via G(i)/G(o) protein, PLC and PKC delta cascade. MCP-1 also induces NF-kappaB translocation and the activation is inhibited by PKC delta activation. The increase in the basal expression and activity of PKC delta in EoL-1 cells, compared to normal eosinophils, inhibits apoptosis in EoL-1 cells. Anti-apoptotic mechanism of PKC delta is related to inhibition of caspase 3 and caspase 9, but not to FIP1L1-PDGFRA. PKC delta functions as an anti-apoptotic molecule, and is involved in EoL-1 cell movement stimulated by MCP-1. This study contributes to an understanding of MCP-1 in eosinophil biology and pathogenic mechanism of eosinophilic disorders.

  11. Coamplification of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase genes in blood cells: Correlation with various leukemias and abnormal megakaryocytopoiesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapidot-Lifson, Y.; Prody, C.A.; Ginzberg, D.; Meytes, D.; Zakut, H.; Soreq, H.

    1989-01-01

    To study the yet unknown role of the ubiquitous family of cholinesterases (ChoEases) in developing blood cells, the recently isolated cDNAs encoding human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase were used in blot hybridization with peripheral blood DNA from various leukemic patients. Hybridization signals and modified restriction patterns were observed with both cDNA probes in 4 of the 16 leukemia DNA preparations examined. These reflected the amplification of the corresponding AcCho-Ease and BtChoEase genes (ACHE and CHE) and alteration in their structure. Parallel analysis of 30 control samples revealed nonpolymorphic, much weaker hybridization signals for each of the probes. In view of previous reports on the effect of acetylcholine analogs and ChoEase inhibitors in the induction of megakaryocytopoiesis and production of platelets in the mouse. The authors further searched for such phenomena in nonleukemic patients with platelet production disorders. Amplifications of both ACHE and CHE genes were found in 2 of the 4 patients so far examined. Pronounced coamplification of these two related but distinct genes in correlation with pathological production of blood cells suggests a functional role for members of the ChoEase family in megakaryocytopoiesis and raises the question whether the coamplification of these genes could be casually involved in the etiology of hemocytopoietic disorders

  12. Downregulation of proapoptotic Bim augments IL-2-independent T-cell transformation by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia, immortalizes and transforms primary human T cells in vitro in both an interleukin (IL)-2-dependent and IL-2-independent manner. Expression of the HTLV-1 oncoprotein Tax transforms the growth of the mouse T-cell line CTLL-2 from being IL-2-dependent to IL-2-independent. Withdrawal of IL-2 from normal activated T cells induces apoptosis, which is mediated through the inducible expression of several proapoptotic proteins, including Bim. In this study, we found that Tax protects IL-2-depleted T cells against Bim-induced apoptosis. Withdrawal of IL-2 from CTLL-2 cells induced a prominent increase in the level of Bim protein in CTLL-2 cells, but not in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells. This inhibition of Bim in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 cells was mediated by two mechanisms: downregulation of Bim mRNA and posttranscriptional reduction of Bim protein. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also inhibited IL-2 depletion-induced expression of Bim, however, this decrease in Bim protein expression was not due to downregulation of Bim mRNA, thus indicating that Bim mRNA downregulation in Tax-transformed CTLL-2 occurs only after long-term expression of Tax. Transient expression of Tax in CTLL-2 cells also induced Erk activation, however, this was not involved in the reduction of Bim protein. Knockdown of Bim expression in CTLL-2 cells augmented Tax-induced IL-2-independent transformation. HTLV-1 infection of human T cells also reduced their levels of Bim protein, and restoring Bim expression in HTLV-1-infected cells reduced their proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that Tax-induced downregulation of Bim in HTLV-1-infected T cells promotes their IL-2-independent growth, thereby supporting the persistence of HTLV-1 infection in vivo. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Taraxinic acid, a hydrolysate of sesquiterpene lactone glycoside from the Taraxacum coreanum NAKAI, induces the differentiation of human acute promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Hye; Shin, Kyung-Min; Kim, Na-Young; Hong, Jung-Pyo; Lee, Yong Sup; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Park, Hee-Juhn; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2002-11-01

    The present work was performed to elucidate the active moiety of a sesquiterpene lactone, taraxinic acid-1'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1). from Taraxacum coreanum NAKAI on the cytotoxicity of various cancer cells. Based on enzymatic hydrolysis and MTT assay, the active moiety should be attributed to the aglycone taraxinic acid (1a). rather than the glycoside (1). Taraxinic acid exhibited potent antiproliferative activity against human leukemia-derived HL-60. In addition, this compound was found to be a potent inducer of HL-60 cell differentiation as assessed by a nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test, esterase activity assay, phagocytic activity assay, morphology change, and expression of CD 14 and CD 66 b surface antigens. These results suggest that taraxinic acid induces the differentiation of human leukemia cells to monocyte/macrophage lineage. Moreover, the expression level of c-myc was down-regulated during taraxinic acid-dependent HL-60 cell differentiation, whereas p21(CIP1) and p27(KIP1) were up-regulated. Taken together, our results suggest that taraxinic acid may have potential as a therapeutic agent in human leukemia.

  14. Macrophage and NK-mediated killing of precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells targeted with a-fucosylated anti-CD19 humanized antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlawska-Wasowska, K; Ward, E; Stevens, S; Wang, Y; Herbst, R; Winter, S S; Wilson, B S

    2013-06-01

    This work reports the tumoricidal effects of a novel investigational humanized anti-CD19 monoclonal antibody (Medi-551). An a-fucosylated antibody with increased affinity for human FcγRIIIA, Medi-551 is shown to mediate both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Medi-551/CD19 complexes internalize slowly (>5 h) and thus remain accessible to effector cells for prolonged periods. We evaluated in vitro ADCC and ADCP activities of primary human natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages against precursor-B (pre-B) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines and pediatric patient blasts. Fluorescent imaging studies document immunological synapses formed between anti-CD19-bound target leukemia cells and effector cells and capture the kinetics of both NK-mediated killing and macrophage phagocytosis. Genetic polymorphisms in FcγRIIIA-158F/V modulate in vitro activities of effector cells, with FcγRIIIA-158V homozygotes or heterozygotes showing the strongest activity. Medi-551 treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice engrafted with human pre-B cells led to prolonged animal survival and markedly reduced disease burden in blood, liver and bone marrow. These data show that anti-CD19 antibodies effectively recruit immune cells to pre-B ALL cells and support a move forward to early phase trials in this disease.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of 3 H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

  17. Compound K, a metabolite of ginseng saponin, induces apoptosis via caspase-8-dependent pathway in HL-60 human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung-Hee; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Choi, Jung-Hye; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2009-01-01

    Compound K [20-O-β-(D-glucopyranosyl)-20(S)-protopanaxadiol], a metabolite of the protopanaxadiol-type saponins of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, has been reported to possess anti-tumor properties to inhibit angiogenesis and to induce tumor apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Compound K on apoptosis and explored the underlying mechanisms involved in HL-60 human leukemia cells. We examined the effect of Compound K on the viabilities of various cancer cell lines using MTT assays. DAPI assay, Annexin V and PI double staining, Western blot assay and immunoprecipitation were used to determine the effect of Compound K on the induction of apoptosis. Compound K was found to inhibit the viability of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with an IC 50 of 14 μM. Moreover, this cell death had typical features of apoptosis, that is, DNA fragmentation, DNA ladder formation, and the externalization of Annexin V targeted phosphatidylserine residues in HL-60 cells. In addition, compound-K induced a series of intracellular events associated with both the mitochondrial- and death receptor-dependent apoptotic pathways, namely, (1) the activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9; (2) the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential; (3) the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO to the cytosol; (4) the translocation of Bid and Bax to mitochondria; and (5) the downregulations of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, a caspase-8 inhibitor completely abolished caspase-3 activation, Bid cleavage, and subsequent DNA fragmentation by Compound K. Interestingly, the activation of caspase-3 and -8 and DNA fragmentation were significantly prevented in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that Compound K-induced apoptosis is dependent on de novo protein synthesis. The results indicate that caspase-8 plays a key role in Compound K-stimulated apoptosis via the activation of caspase-3 directly or indirectly through Bid cleavage, cytochrome c release, and caspase-9 activation

  18. Human T cell lymphotropic virus type I genomic expression and impact on intracellular signaling pathways during neurodegenerative disease and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, J; Wigdahl, B

    2000-01-01

    HTLV-I has been identified as the etiologic agent of neoplasia within the human peripheral blood T lymphocyte population, and a progressive neurologic disorder based primarily within the central nervous system. We have examined the role of HTLV-I in these two distinctly different clinical syndromes by examining the life cycle of the virus, with emphasis on the regulation of viral gene expression within relevant target cell populations. In particular, we have examined the impact of specific viral gene products, particularly Tax, on cellular metabolic function. Tax is a highly promiscuous and pleiotropic viral oncoprotein, and is the most important factor contributing to the initial stages of viral-mediated transformation of T cells after HTLV-I infection. Tax, which weakly binds to Tax response element 1 (TRE-1) in the viral long terminal repeat (LTR), can dramatically trans-activate viral gene expression by interacting with cellular transcription factors, such as activated transcription factors and cyclic AMP response element binding proteins (ATF/CREB), CREB binding protein (CBP/p300), and factors involved with the basic transcription apparatus. At the same time, Tax alters cellular gene expression by directly or indirectly interacting with a variety of cellular transcription factors, cell cycle control elements, and cellular signal transduction molecules ultimately resulting in dysregulated cell proliferation. The mechanisms associated with HTLV-I infection, leading to tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) are not as clearly resolved. Possible explanations of viral-induced neurologic disease range from central nervous system (CNS) damage caused by direct viral invasion of the CNS to bystander CNS damage caused by the immune response to HTLV-I infection. It is interesting to note that it is very rare for an HTLV-I infected individual to develop both adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and TSP in his/her life time, suggesting that the mechanisms governing development of these

  19. Compound A398, a novel podophyllotoxin analogue: cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis in human leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alethéia L Silveira

    Full Text Available Despite advances in oncology research, cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Thus, there is a demand for the development of more selective and effective antitumor agents. This study showed that A398, a novel podophyllotoxin analogue, was cytotoxic to the HT-29, MCF-7, MOLT-4 and HL-60 tumor cell lines, being less active in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and normal cell lines FGH and IEC-6. Tests using the HepG2 lineage indicated that its metabolites do not contribute to its cytotoxicity. In the HL-60 cells, A398 induced apoptosis in a time and concentration-dependent manner, promoting mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of Bcl-2, phosphatidylserine exposure, activation of caspases -8, -9 and -3, and DNA fragmentation. The production of reactive oxygen species does not seem to be a crucial event for the apoptotic process. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of kinases ERK1/2, JNK and p38 resulted in an increased percentage of death induced by A398. These results indicate that the compound induced apoptosis through activation of intrinsic and extrinsic death pathways with the mechanism involving the inhibition of the MAPKs and Bcl-2. Taken together, our findings suggest that A398 has an anticancer potential, proving itself to be a candidate for preclinical studies.

  20. Structure-activity relationship studies of 5,7-dihydroxyflavones as naturally occurring inhibitors of cell proliferation in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Masayuki; Nishida, Kyohei; Tanaka, Kaori; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Koketsu, Mamoru

    2013-07-01

    Flavonoids are widely occurring polyphenols that are found in plants. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationships of 5,7-dihydroxyflavones, with a focus on the effect of B ring structure substitution on the antiproliferative effects of the compounds in human leukemia HL-60 cells. We prepared a series of 5,7-dihydroxyflavones and evaluated their ability to inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells by using the MTT assay. The apoptosis- and cell differentiation-inducing ability of the most potent flavones were investigated using staining and morphological analyses. This study explored the antileukemic and chemopreventive potency of 5,7-dihydroxyflavones, particularly diosmetin and chrysoeriol, which have both hydroxy and methoxy groups on the B ring.

  1. In Vitro Cytotoxic Effects of Cuscuta chinensis Whole Extract on Human Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zeraati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major paths for drug development isthe study of bioactivities of natural products. Therefore, theaim of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects ofaqueous extract of whole Cuscuta chinensis Lam., which is atraditional medicinal herb commonly used in Iran and otheroriental countries, on the human caucasian acute lymphoblasticleukemia (CCRF-CEM and another human lymphocyte,Jurkat (JM cell lines.Methods: In vitro cytotoxic screening with various concentrations(0, 0.1, 1, 10, 25 and 50 μg/ml of the extract wasperformed using microscope and methyl tetrazolium bromidetest (MTT.Results: The minimum effective concentration of the plantextract was 1 μg/ml, and increasing the dose to 10 μg/mlinduced increasingly stronger effects. The inhibitory concentration50% (IC50 of the extract against CCRF wasabout 3 μg/ml in 24 hours and 2.5 μg/ml in 48 hrs. In contrast,the extract did not have cytotoxic effect for the JMcells at these doses.Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that C.chinensis is toxic against CCRF-CEM and JM tumor cells.Whether or not such effects can be employed for the treatmentof such tumors must await future studies.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 310-314.

  2. Anti-Cancerous Effect of Inonotus taiwanensis Polysaccharide Extract on Human Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cells through ROS-Independent Intrinsic Mitochondrial Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tsai-Ling; Wang, Ting-Yin; Lee, Chin-Huei; Yiin, Shuenn-Jiun; Ho, Chun-Te; Wu, Sheng-Hua; You, Huey-Ling; Chern, Chi-Liang

    2018-01-29

    Acute leukemia is one of the commonly diagnosed neoplasms and causes human death. However, the treatment for acute leukemia is not yet satisfactory. Studies have shown that mushroom-derived polysaccharides display low toxicity and have been used clinically for cancer therapy. Therefore, we set out to evaluate the anti-cancerous efficacy of a water-soluble polysaccharide extract from Inonotus taiwanensis (WSPIS) on human acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 and U937 cell lines in vitro. Under our experimental conditions, WSPIS elicited dose-dependent growth retardation and induced apoptotic cell death. Further analysis showed that WSPIS-induced apoptosis was associated with a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, such as the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), followed by the activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage. However, a broad caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD.fmk, could not prevent WSPIS-induced apoptosis. These data imply that mechanism(s) other than caspase might be involved. Thus, the involvement of endonuclease G (endoG), a mediator arbitrating caspase-independent oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, was examined. Western blotting demonstrated that WSPIS could elicit nuclear translocation of endoG. MMP disruption after WSPIS treatment was accompanied by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. However, pretreatment with N -acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) could not attenuate WSPIS-induced apoptosis. In addition, our data also show that WSPIS could inhibit autophagy. Activation of autophagy by rapamycin decreased WSPIS-induced apoptosis and cell death. Taken together, our findings suggest that cell cycle arrest, endonuclease G-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy inhibition contribute to the anti-cancerous effect of WSPIS on human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

  3. Anti-Cancerous Effect of Inonotus taiwanensis Polysaccharide Extract on Human Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cells through ROS-Independent Intrinsic Mitochondrial Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai-Ling Chao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia is one of the commonly diagnosed neoplasms and causes human death. However, the treatment for acute leukemia is not yet satisfactory. Studies have shown that mushroom-derived polysaccharides display low toxicity and have been used clinically for cancer therapy. Therefore, we set out to evaluate the anti-cancerous efficacy of a water-soluble polysaccharide extract from Inonotus taiwanensis (WSPIS on human acute monocytic leukemia THP-1 and U937 cell lines in vitro. Under our experimental conditions, WSPIS elicited dose-dependent growth retardation and induced apoptotic cell death. Further analysis showed that WSPIS-induced apoptosis was associated with a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, such as the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, followed by the activation of caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage. However, a broad caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD.fmk, could not prevent WSPIS-induced apoptosis. These data imply that mechanism(s other than caspase might be involved. Thus, the involvement of endonuclease G (endoG, a mediator arbitrating caspase-independent oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, was examined. Western blotting demonstrated that WSPIS could elicit nuclear translocation of endoG. MMP disruption after WSPIS treatment was accompanied by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. However, pretreatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC could not attenuate WSPIS-induced apoptosis. In addition, our data also show that WSPIS could inhibit autophagy. Activation of autophagy by rapamycin decreased WSPIS-induced apoptosis and cell death. Taken together, our findings suggest that cell cycle arrest, endonuclease G-mediated apoptosis, and autophagy inhibition contribute to the anti-cancerous effect of WSPIS on human acute monocytic leukemia cells.

  4. Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Tax-Induced IκB-ζ Modulates Tax-Dependent and Tax-Independent Gene Expression in T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichiro Kimura

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL and various inflammatory disorders including HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax is known to cause permanent activation of many cellular transcription factors including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate response element-binding protein, and activator protein 1 (AP-1. Here, we show that NF-κB-binding cofactor inhibitor of NF-κB-ζ (IκB-ζ is constitutively expressed in HTLV-I-infected T cell lines and ATL cells, and Tax transactivates the IκB-ζ gene, mainly through NF-κB. Microarray analysis of IκB-ζ-expressing uninfected T cells demonstrated that IκB-ζ induced the expression of NF-κB. and interferon-regulatory genes such as B cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3, guanylate-binding protein 1, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. The transcriptional activation domain, nuclear localization signal, and NF-κB-binding domain of IκB-ζ were required for Bcl3 induction, and IκB-ζ synergistically enhanced Tax-induced Bcl3 transactivation in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Interestingly, IκB-ζ inhibited Tax-induced NF-κB, AP-1 activation, and HTLV-I transcription. Furthermore, IκB-ζ interacted with Tax in vitro and this interaction was also observed in an HTLV-I-transformed T cell line. These results suggest that IκB-ζ modulates Tax-dependent and Tax-independent gene transcription in T cells. The function of IκB-ζ may be of significance in ATL genesis and pathogenesis of HTLV-I-associated diseases.

  5. Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Tax-Induced IκB-ζ Modulates Tax-Dependent and Tax-Independent Gene Expression in T Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Ryuichiro; Senba, Masachika; Cutler, Samuel J; Ralph, Stephen J; Xiao, Gutian; Mori, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and various inflammatory disorders including HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax is known to cause permanent activation of many cellular transcription factors including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate response element-binding protein, and activator protein 1 (AP-1). Here, we show that NF-κB-binding cofactor inhibitor of NF-κB-ζ (IκB-ζ) is constitutively expressed in HTLV-I-infected T cell lines and ATL cells, and Tax transactivates the IκB-ζ gene, mainly through NF-κB. Microarray analysis of IκB-ζ-expressing uninfected T cells demonstrated that IκB-ζ induced the expression of NF-κB. and interferon-regulatory genes such as B cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (Bcl3), guanylate-binding protein 1, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. The transcriptional activation domain, nuclear localization signal, and NF-κB-binding domain of IκB-ζ were required for Bcl3 induction, and IκB-ζ synergistically enhanced Tax-induced Bcl3 transactivation in an NF-κB-dependent manner. Interestingly, IκB-ζ inhibited Tax-induced NF-κB, AP-1 activation, and HTLV-I transcription. Furthermore, IκB-ζ interacted with Tax in vitro and this interaction was also observed in an HTLV-I-transformed T cell line. These results suggest that IκB-ζ modulates Tax-dependent and Tax-independent gene transcription in T cells. The function of IκB-ζ may be of significance in ATL genesis and pathogenesis of HTLV-I-associated diseases. PMID:24027435

  6. Treatment of Aggressive NK-Cell Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Jensen, Paw; Johansen, Preben

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive NK-cell leukemia is a rare malignancy with neoplastic proliferation of natural killer cells. It often presents with constitutional symptoms, a rapid declining clinical course, and a poor prognosis with a median survival of a few months. The disease is usually resistant to cytotoxic...... literature concerning treatment of aggressive NK-cell leukemia....

  7. Hairy cell leukemia: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Timothy; Mobarek, Dalia; Wegge, Julia; Tabbara, Imad A

    2008-10-01

    Hairy cell Leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder that was characterized in the late 1950s. HCL is defined, according to the WHO classification, as a mature (peripheral) B-cell neoplasm (1). HCL accounts for between 2-3% of all leukemia cases, with about 600 new cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year (1). HCL occurs more commonly in males, with an overall male to female ratio of approximately 4:1. The median age of onset is 52 years. This disease is seen more commonly in Caucasians and appears to be especially frequent in Ashkenazi Jewish males, with rare occurrence in persons of Asian and African descents (1). Hairy cells are distinct, clonal B cells arrested at a late stage of maturation. They are small B lymphoid cells that possess oval nuclei and abundant cytoplasm with characteristic micro-filamentous ("hairy") projections. They strongly express CD103, CD22, and CD11c (2). These cells typically infiltrate the bone marrow, the spleen, and to a lesser extent the liver, lymph nodes, and skin. Many patients present with splenomegaly and pancytopenia. Other clinical manifestations include recurrent opportunistic infections and vasculitis. Historically, HCL was considered uniformly fatal (2). However, recent treatment advances, using purine analogues such as Cladribine and Pentostatin, led to a significant improvement in prognosis with achievement of high response rates and durable remissions (2).

  8. Chaetominine reduces MRP1-mediated drug resistance via inhibiting PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling pathway in K562/Adr human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jingyun; Wei, Xing [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center for Biomanufacturing Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Lu, Yanhua, E-mail: luyanhua@ecust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center for Biomanufacturing Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai (China)

    2016-05-13

    Drug resistance limits leukemia treatment and chaetominine, a cytotoxic alkaloid that promotes apoptosis in a K562 human leukemia cell line via the mitochondrial pathway was studied with respect to chemoresistance in a K562/Adr human resistant leukemia cell line. Cytotoxicity assays indicated that K562/Adr resistance to adriamycin (ADR) did not occur in the presence of chaetominine and that chaetominine increased chemosensitivity of K562/Adr to ADR. Data show that chaetominine enhanced ADR-induced apoptosis and intracellular ADR accumulation in K562/Adr cells. Accordingly, chaetominine induced apoptosis by upregulating ROS, pro-apoptotic Bax and downregulating anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. RT-PCR and western-blot confirmed that chaetominine suppressed highly expressed MRP1 at mRNA and protein levels. But little obvious alternation of another drug transporter MDR1 mRNA was observed. Furthermore, inhibition of MRP1 by chaetominine relied on inhibiting Akt phosphorylation and nuclear Nrf2. In summary, chaetominine strongly reverses drug resistance by interfering with the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling, resulting in reduction of MRP1-mediated drug efflux and induction of Bax/Bcl-2-dependent apoptosis in an ADR-resistant K562/Adr leukemia cell line. - Highlights: • Chaetominine enhanced chemosensitivity of ADR against K562/Adr cells. • Chaetominine increased intracellular ADR levels via inhibiting MRP1. • Chaetominine induced apoptosis of K562/Adr cells through upregulation of ROS and modulation of Bax/Bcl-2. • Inhibition of MRP1 and Nrf2 by chaetominine treatment was correlative with blockade of PI3K/Akt signaling.

  9. In Vitro Activation of the IκB Kinase Complex by Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type-1 Tax*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Negi, Veera S.; Keitany, Gladys; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Orth, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type-I expresses Tax, a 40-kDa oncoprotein that activates IκB kinase (IKK), resulting in constitutive activation of NFκB. Herein, we have developed an in vitro signaling assay to analyze IKK complex activation by recombinant Tax. Using this assay in combination with reporter assays, we demonstrate that Tax-mediated activation of IKK is independent of phosphatases. We show that sustained activation of the Tax-mediated activation of the NFκB pathway is dependent on an intact Hsp90-IKK complex. By acetylating and thereby preventing activation of the IKK complex by the Yersinia effector YopJ, we demonstrate that Tax-mediated activation of the IKK complex requires a phosphorylation step. Our characterization of an in vitro signaling assay system for the mechanism of Tax-mediated activation of the IKK complex with a variety of mutants and inhibitors results in a working model for the biochemical mechanism of Tax-induced activation. PMID:18223255

  10. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    , we identified the key transcription regulators, their time-dependent activities and target genes. Systematic siRNA knockdown of 52 transcription factors confirmed the roles of individual factors in the regulatory network. Our results indicate that cellular states are constrained by complex networks......Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...... involving both positive and negative regulatory interactions among substantial numbers of transcription factors and that no single transcription factor is both necessary and sufficient to drive the differentiation process....

  11. Diagnosis and Clinical Management of Human Papilloma Virus-Related Gingival Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Patient With Leukemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Alaa; Dixon, Douglas R; Oda, Dolphine; London, Robert M

    2016-02-01

    Close clinical inspection for intraoral lesions in patients with leukemia that develop chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is critical. Additionally, neoplasias developing in bone marrow transplant patients after treatment for leukemia represent a significant obstacle for long-term patient survival, necessitating lifetime follow-up by health care providers. This case report describes the identification, diagnosis, and treatment of gingival squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in a patient with leukemia who was treated previously with a stem cell transplant and referred for routine periodontal care. A 53-year-old male was referred to the Department of Periodontics for an assessment of tooth #10 with 2+ mobility and associated cross-bite occlusion. The patient was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia at age 39 years, received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and later developed cGVHD followed by human papilloma virus (HPV) infections. During the periodontal evaluation, a large, non-painful, exophytic, alveolar gingival mass was identified and later diagnosed as SCC. It is unusual that oral SCC presents as an exophytic, gingival swelling. The patient received comprehensive periodontal management in coordination with his otolaryngology team before and during the diagnosis of SCC secondary to cGVHD and HPV infection. Patients with a history of HSCT treatment for leukemia and subsequent cGVHD are at a high risk of developing second primary oral malignancies, including SCC. Exposure to oncogenic HPV infection may compound this risk. Therefore, it is important for dentists to be aware of special treatment concerns and to frequently screen these patients to achieve early diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms.

  12. A human monoclonal antibody drug and target discovery platform for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Suschak, Jessica M; Samija, Ivan; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Childs, Richard W; Pavletic, Steven Z; Bishop, Michael R; Rader, Christoph

    2009-11-12

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only potentially curative treatment available for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). Here, we show that post-alloHSCT antibody repertoires can be mined for the discovery of fully human monoclonal antibodies to B-CLL cell-surface antigens. Sera collected from B-CLL patients at defined times after alloHSCT showed selective binding to primary B-CLL cells. Pre-alloHSCT sera, donor sera, and control sera were negative. To identify post-alloHSCT serum antibodies and subsequently B-CLL cell-surface antigens they recognize, we generated a human antibody-binding fragment (Fab) library from post-alloHSCT peripheral blood mononuclear cells and selected it on primary B-CLL cells by phage display. A panel of Fab with B-CLL cell-surface reactivity was strongly enriched. Selection was dominated by highly homologous Fab predicted to bind the same antigen. One Fab was converted to immunoglobulin G1 and analyzed for reactivity with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from B-CLL patients and healthy volunteers. Cell-surface antigen expression was restricted to primary B cells and up-regulated in primary B-CLL cells. Mining post-alloHSCT antibody repertoires offers a novel route to discover fully human monoclonal antibodies and identify antigens of potential therapeutic relevance to B-CLL and possibly other cancers. Trials described herein were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as nos. NCT00055744 and NCT00003838.

  13. BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibition and RARγ antagonism work cooperatively in human HL60 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, Mariarita; Yap, Jeremy L.; Yu, Jianshi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Cione, Erika [Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, Ed. Polifunzionale, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, CS (Italy); Fletcher, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kane, Maureen A., E-mail: mkane@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by chromosomal translocations that result in fusion proteins, including the promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor, alpha fusion protein (PML–RARα). All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment is the standard drug treatment for APL yielding cure rates >80% by activating transcription and proteasomal degradation of retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARα). Whereas combination therapy with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has increased survival further, patients that experience relapse and are refractory to atRA and/or As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a clinically significant problem. BCL-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and over-expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins has been associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in APL including impairment of the ability of atRA to induce growth arrest and differentiation. Here we investigated the novel BH3 domain mimetic, JY-1-106, which antagonizes the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-x{sub L}) and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) alone and in combination with retinoids including atRA, AM580 (RARα agonist), and SR11253 (RARγ antagonist). JY-1-106 reduced cell viability in HL-60 cells alone and in combination with retinoids. The combination of JY-1-106 and SR11253 had the greatest impact on cell viability by stimulating apoptosis. These studies indicate that dual BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibitors and retinoids could work cooperatively in leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Novel Bcl-x{sub L}/Mcl-1 inhibitor JY-1-106 reduces HL60 cell viability. • JY-1-106 is investigated in combination with retinoic acid, AM580, and SR11253. • AM580 is an RARα agonist; SR11253 is an RARγ antagonist. • Combined use of JY-1-106/SR11253 exhibited the greatest cell viability reduction. • JY-1-106 alone or in combination with retinoids induces apoptosis.

  14. Inhibition of the NAD-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT2 induces granulocytic differentiation in human leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Sunami

    Full Text Available Sirtuins, NAD-dependent protein deacetylases, play important roles in cellular functions such as metabolism and differentiation. Whether sirtuins function in tumorigenesis is still controversial, but sirtuins are aberrantly expressed in tumors, which may keep cancerous cells undifferentiated. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibition of sirtuin family proteins induces cellular differentiation in leukemic cells. The sirtuin inhibitors tenovin-6 and BML-266 induce granulocytic differentiation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL cell line NB4. This differentiation is likely caused by an inhibition of SIRT2 deacetylase activity, judging from the accumulation of acetylated α-tubulin, a major SIRT2 substrate. Unlike the clinically used differentiation inducer all-trans retinoic acid, tenovin-6 shows limited effects on promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RAR-α stability and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body formation in NB4 cells, suggesting that tenovin-6 does not directly target PML-RAR-α activity. In agreement with this, tenovin-6 induces cellular differentiation in the non-APL cell line HL-60, where PML-RAR-α does not exist. Knocking down SIRT2 by shRNA induces granulocytic differentiation in NB4 cells, which demonstrates that the inhibition of SIRT2 activity is sufficient to induce cell differentiation in NB4 cells. The overexpression of SIRT2 in NB4 cells decreases the level of granulocytic differentiation induced by tenovin-6, which indicates that tenovin-6 induces granulocytic differentiation by inhibiting SIRT2 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting SIRT2 is a viable strategy to induce leukemic cell differentiation.

  15. In vivo expansion of co-transplanted T cells impacts on tumor re-initiating activity of human acute myeloid leukemia in NSG mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte von Bonin

    Full Text Available Human cells from acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients are frequently transplanted into immune-compromised mouse strains to provide an in vivo environment for studies on the biology of the disease. Since frequencies of leukemia re-initiating cells are low and a unique cell surface phenotype that includes all tumor re-initiating activity remains unknown, the underlying mechanisms leading to limitations in the xenotransplantation assay need to be understood and overcome to obtain robust engraftment of AML-containing samples. We report here that in the NSG xenotransplantation assay, the large majority of mononucleated cells from patients with AML fail to establish a reproducible myeloid engraftment despite high donor chimerism. Instead, donor-derived cells mainly consist of polyclonal disease-unrelated expanded co-transplanted human T lymphocytes that induce xenogeneic graft versus host disease and mask the engraftment of human AML in mice. Engraftment of mainly myeloid cell types can be enforced by the prevention of T cell expansion through the depletion of lymphocytes from the graft prior transplantation.

  16. The pleiotropic effects of fisetin and hesperetin on human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells are mediated through apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and alterations in signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Baran, Yusuf

    2015-11-01

    Fisetin and hesperetin, flavonoids from various plants, have several pharmaceutical activities including antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. However, studies elucidating the role and the mechanism(s) of action of fisetin and hesperetin in acute promyelocytic leukemia are absent. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the antiproliferative and apoptotic actions exerted by fisetin and hesperetin on human HL60 acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. The viability of HL60 cells was evaluated using the MTT assay, apoptosis by annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining and cell cycle distribution using flow cytometry, and changes in caspase-3 enzyme activity and mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Moreover, we performed whole-genome microarray gene expression analysis to reveal genes affected by fisetin and hesperetin that can be important for developing of future targeted therapy. Based on data obtained from microarray analysis, we also described biological networks modulated after fisetin and hesperetin treatment by KEGG and IPA analysis. Fisetin and hesperetin treatment showed a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of proliferation and induced G2/M arrest for both agents and G0/G1 arrest for hesperetin at only the highest concentrations. There was a disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential together with increased caspase-3 activity. Furthermore, fisetin- and hesperetin-triggered apoptosis was confirmed by annexin V/PI analysis. The microarray gene profiling analysis revealed some important biological pathways including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and inhibitor of DNA binding (ID) signaling pathways altered by fisetin and hesperetin treatment as well as gave a list of genes modulated ≥2-fold involved in cell proliferation, cell division, and apoptosis. Altogether, data suggested that fisetin and hesperetin have anticancer properties and deserve further investigation.

  17. Interaction between C/EBPβ and Tax down-regulates human T-cell leukemia virus type I transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hivin, P.; Gaudray, G.; Devaux, C.; Mesnard, J.-M.

    2004-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax protein trans-activates viral transcription through three imperfect tandem repeats of a 21-bp sequence called Tax-responsive element (TxRE). Tax regulates transcription via direct interaction with some members of the activating transcription factor/CRE-binding protein (ATF/CREB) family including CREM, CREB, and CREB-2. By interacting with their ZIP domain, Tax stimulates the binding of these cellular factors to the CRE-like sequence present in the TxREs. Recent observations have shown that CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) forms stable complexes on the CRE site in the presence of CREB-2. Given that C/EBPβ has also been found to interact with Tax, we analyzed the effects of C/EBPβ on viral Tax-dependent transcription. We show here that C/EBPβ represses viral transcription and that Tax is no more able to form a stable complex with CREB-2 on the TxRE site in the presence of C/EBPβ. We also analyzed the physical interactions between Tax and C/EBPβ and found that the central region of C/EBPβ, excluding its ZIP domain, is required for direct interaction with Tax. It is the first time that Tax is described to interact with a basic leucine-zipper (bZIP) factor without recognizing its ZIP domain. Although unexpected, this result explains why C/EBPβ would be unable to form a stable complex with Tax on the TxRE site and could then down-regulate viral transcription. Lastly, we found that C/EBPβ was able to inhibit Tax expression in vivo from an infectious HTLV-I molecular clone. In conclusion, we propose that during cell activation events, which stimulate the Tax synthesis, C/EBPβ may down-regulate the level of HTLV-I expression to escape the cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte response

  18. p53 functional impairment and high p21waf1/cip1 expression in human T-cell lymphotropic/leukemia virus type I-transformed T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereseto, A; Diella, F; Mulloy, J C; Cara, A; Michieli, P; Grassmann, R; Franchini, G; Klotman, M E

    1996-09-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic/leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) is associated with T-cell transformation both in vivo and in vitro. Although some of the mechanisms responsible for transformation remain unknown, increasing evidence supports a direct role of viral as well as dysregulated cellular proteins in transformation. We investigated the potential role of the tumor suppressor gene p53 and of the p53-regulated gene, p21waf1/cip1 (wild-type p53 activated fragment 1/cycling dependent kinases [cdks] interacting protein 1), in HTLV-I-infected T cells. We have found that the majority of HTLV-I-infected T cells have the wild-type p53 gene. However, its function in HTLV-I-transformed cells appears to be impaired, as shown by the lack of appropriate p53-mediated responses to ionizing radiation (IR). Interestingly, the expression of the p53 inducible gene, p21waf1/cip1, is elevated at the messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels in all HTLV-I-infected T-cell lines examined as well as in Taxl-1, a human T-cell line stably expressing Tax. Additionally, Tax induces upregulation of a p21waf1/cip1 promoter-driven luciferase gene in p53 null cells, and increases p21waf1/cip1 expression in Jurkat T cells. These findings suggest that the Tax protein is at least partially responsible for the p53-independent expression of p21waf1/cip1 in HTLV-I-infected cells. Dysregulation of p53 and p21waf1/cip1 proteins regulating cell-cycle progression, may represent an important step in HTLV-I-induced T-cell transformation.

  19. Brief Report: Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Reprogramming to Pluripotency Is a Rare Event and Selects for Patient Hematopoietic Cells Devoid of Leukemic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hee; Salci, Kyle R; Reid, Jennifer C; Orlando, Luca; Tanasijevic, Borko; Shapovalova, Zoya; Bhatia, Mickie

    2017-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming has provided critical insights into disease processes by modeling the genetics and related clinical pathophysiology. Human cancer represents highly diverse genetics, as well as inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity, where cellular model systems capable of capturing this disease complexity would be invaluable. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents one of most heterogeneous cancers and has been divided into genetic subtypes correlated with unique risk stratification over the decades. Here, we report our efforts to induce pluripotency from the heterogeneous population of human patients that represents this disease in the clinic. Using robust optimized reprogramming methods, we demonstrate that reprogramming of AML cells harboring leukemic genomic aberrations is a rare event with the exception of those with de novo mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) mutations that can be reprogrammed and model drug responses in vitro. Our findings indicate that unlike hematopoietic cells devoid of genomic aberrations, AML cells harboring driver mutations are refractory to reprogramming. Expression of MLL fusion proteins in AML cells did not contribute to induced reprogramming success, which continued to select for patient derived cells devoid of AML patient-specific aberrations. Our study reveals that unanticipated blockades to achieving pluripotency reside within the majority of transformed AML patient cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:2095-2102. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Kaempferol induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Bau, Da-Tian; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous evidences have shown that plant flavonoids (naturally occurring substances) have been reported to have chemopreventive activities and protect against experimental carcinogenesis. Kaempferol, one of the flavonoids, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and may have cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the precise underlying mechanism regarding induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair system are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether kaempferol induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Percentages of viable cells were measured via a flow cytometry assay. DNA damage was examined by Comet assay and DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation (ladder) was examined by DNA gel electrophoresis. The changes of protein levels associated with DNA repair were examined by Western blotting. Results showed that kaempferol dose-dependently decreased the viable cells. Comet assay indicated that kaempferol induced DNA damage (Comet tail) in a dose-dependent manner and DAPI staining also showed increased doses of kaempferol which led to increased DNA condensation, these effects are all of dose-dependent manners. Western blotting indicated that kaempferol-decreased protein expression associated with DNA repair system, such as phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (p-ATR), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53 and MDC1 protein expressions, but increased the protein expression of p-p53 and p-H2AX. Protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy, and we found that kaempferol increased the levels of p-H2AX and p-p53 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, in the present study, we found that kaempferol induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair and inhibited DNA repair associated protein expression in HL-60

  1. Establishment of a new human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (KMO-90) with 1;19 translocation carrying p53 gene alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomatsu, M; Hayashi, Y; Kawamura, M; Yugami, S; Shitara, T

    1993-10-01

    A new human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (KMO-90) was established from the bone marrow sample of a 12-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carrying 1;19 chromosome translocation. KMO-90 cells expressed HLA-DR, CD10, CD19, and CD22 antigens. These cells had also cytoplasmic immunoglobulin lacking surface immunoglobulin, indicating that these had a pre-B phenotype. Chromosome analysis of this cell line showed 48, XX, +8, +19, t(1;19)(q23;p13). Southern blot analysis showed the same sized rearrangements of the E2A gene in KMO-90 cells as those in the original leukemic cells. By means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis, we detected E2A/PBX1 fusion transcripts in KMO-90 cells. KMO-90 is useful when studying the role of the 1;19 translocation in the etiology of pre-B ALL. Furthermore, we studied alterations of the p53 gene in this cell line by polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. KMO-90 cells were identified to have a point mutation at codon 177 (CCC-->TCC) of the p53 gene, suggesting that alterations of the p53 gene may have an important role in the establishment of this cell line.

  2. Compound K, a metabolite of ginseng saponin, induces apoptosis via caspase-8-dependent pathway in HL-60 human leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jung-Hye

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compound K [20-O-β-(D-glucopyranosyl-20(S-protopanaxadiol], a metabolite of the protopanaxadiol-type saponins of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, has been reported to possess anti-tumor properties to inhibit angiogenesis and to induce tumor apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Compound K on apoptosis and explored the underlying mechanisms involved in HL-60 human leukemia cells. Methods We examined the effect of Compound K on the viabilities of various cancer cell lines using MTT assays. DAPI assay, Annexin V and PI double staining, Western blot assay and immunoprecipitation were used to determine the effect of Compound K on the induction of apoptosis. Results Compound K was found to inhibit the viability of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner with an IC50 of 14 μM. Moreover, this cell death had typical features of apoptosis, that is, DNA fragmentation, DNA ladder formation, and the externalization of Annexin V targeted phosphatidylserine residues in HL-60 cells. In addition, compound-K induced a series of intracellular events associated with both the mitochondrial- and death receptor-dependent apoptotic pathways, namely, (1 the activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9; (2 the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential; (3 the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO to the cytosol; (4 the translocation of Bid and Bax to mitochondria; and (5 the downregulations of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Furthermore, a caspase-8 inhibitor completely abolished caspase-3 activation, Bid cleavage, and subsequent DNA fragmentation by Compound K. Interestingly, the activation of caspase-3 and -8 and DNA fragmentation were significantly prevented in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that Compound K-induced apoptosis is dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Conclusions The results indicate that caspase-8 plays a key role in Compound K-stimulated apoptosis via the activation of caspase-3 directly or indirectly through

  3. Hematopoietic growth factors and human acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenberg, B; Touw, I

    1988-10-22

    The study of myelopoietic maturation arrest in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) has been eased by availability of the human recombinant hemopoietic growth factors, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), granulocyte-(G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-(GM-CSF) and multilineage stimulating factor (IL-3). Nonphysiological expansion of the leukemic population is not due to escape from control by these factors. Proliferation in vitro of AML cells is dependent on the presence of one or several factors in most cases. The pattern of factor-dependency does not correlate with morphological criteria in individual cases, and may thus offer a new tool for classification of AML. Overproduction of undifferentiated cells is not due to abnormal expression of receptors for the stimulating factors acting at an immature level. Rather, autocrine secretion of early acting lymphokines maintains proliferation of the leukemic clone. When looking at causes of leukemic dysregulation, yet undefined inhibitors of differentiation probably are of equal importance as dysequilibrated stimulation by lymphokines.

  4. Direct trans-activation of the human cyclin D2 gene by the oncogene product Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y; Ohtani, K; Iwanaga, R; Matsumura, Y; Nakamura, M

    2001-03-01

    Cyclins are one of the pivotal determinants regulating cell cycle progression. We previously reported that the trans-activator Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) induces endogenous cyclin D2 expression along with cell cycle progression in a resting human T-cell line, Kit 225, suggesting a role of cyclin D2 in Tax-mediated cell cycle progression. The cyclin D2 gene has a typical E2F binding element, raising the possibility that induction of cyclin D2 expression is a consequence of cell cycle progression. In this study, we examined the role and molecular mechanism of induction of the endogenous human cyclin D2 gene by Tax. Introduction of p19(INK4d), a cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor of the INK4 family specific for D-type CDK, inhibited Tax-mediated activation of E2F, indicating requirement of D-type CDK in Tax-mediated activation of E2F. Previously indicated E2F binding element and two NF-kappaB-like binding elements in the 1.6 kbp cyclin D2 promoter fragment had little, if any, effect on responsiveness to Tax. We found that trans-activation of the cyclin D2 promoter by Tax was mainly mediated by a newly identified NF-kappaB-like element with auxiliary contribution of a CRE-like element residing in sequences downstream of -444 which were by themselves sufficient for trans-activation by Tax. These results indicate that Tax directly trans-activates the cyclin D2 gene, resulting in growth promotion and perhaps leukemogenesis through activation of D-type CDK.

  5. Circumvention of acquired resistance to doxorubicin in K562 human leukemia cells by oxatomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, M; Fujita, R; Furusawa, S; Takayanagi, M; Sasaki, K; Satoh, S

    2001-10-01

    We studied the effect of oxatomide, an antiallergic drug, on the resistance of K562 cells to doxorubicin. Oxatomide synergistically potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin in doxorubicin-resistant K562 cells (K562/DXR) at a concentration of 1-10 microM, but had hardly any synergistic effect on the parental cell line (K562) at the same concentration. Oxatomide inhibit P-glycoprotein pump-efflux activity and the binding of [3H]-azidopine to the cell-surface protein P-glycoprotein, in a dose-related manner. These results indicate that oxatomide reverses the multidrug-resistance phenotype through direct interaction with P-glycoprotein.

  6. Allium compounds, dipropyl and dimethyl thiosulfinates as antiproliferative and differentiating agents of human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Merhi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Faten Merhi1, Jacques Auger2, Francine Rendu1, Brigitte Bauvois11UMR 7131 UPMC Paris Universitas/CNRS, Groupe Hospitalier Broussais-HEGP, Paris, France; 2University F. Rabelais, IRBI, UPRESA CNRS 6035, Tours, FranceAbstract: Epidemiologic studies support the premise that Allium vegetables may lower the risk of cancers. The beneficial effects appear related to the organosulfur products generated upon processing of Allium. Leukemia cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML display high proliferative capacity and have a reduced capacity of undergoing apoptosis and maturation. Whether the sulfur-containing molecules thiosulfinates (TS, diallyl TS (All2TS, dipropyl TS (Pr2TS and dimethyl TS (Me2TS, are able to exert chemopreventative activity against AML is presently unknown. The present study was an evaluation of proliferation, cytotoxicity, differentiation and secretion of AML cell lines (U937, NB4, HL-60, MonoMac-6 in response to treatment with these TS and their related sulfides (diallylsulfide, diallyl disulfide, dipropyl disulfide, dimethyl disulfide. As assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, gelatin zymogaphy and RT-PCR, we showed that Pr2TS and Me2TS, but not All2TS and sulfides, 1 inhibited cell proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner and this process was neither due to cytotoxicity nor apoptosis, 2 induced macrophage maturation, and 3 inhibited the levels of secreted MMP-9 (protein and activity and TNF-α protein, without altering mRNA levels. By establishing for the first time that Pr2TS and Me2TS affect proliferation, differentiation and secretion of leukemic cell lines, this study provides the opportunity to explore the potential efficiency of these molecules in AML.Keywords: acute myeloid leukemia, thiosulfinate, proliferation, differentiation, matrix metalloproteinase-9

  7. Relationship Between Structure and Antiproliferative Activity of Novel 5-amino-4-cyanopyrazole-1-formaldehydehydrazono Derivatives on HL-60RG Human Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Yukitoshi; Nagahara, Katsuhiko

    2017-11-01

    Pyrazole derivatives have been reported to have potent antimicrobial and anticancer activity. We recently synthesized and determined the effects of analogs, benzamidoxime derivatives, on mammalian cells and discovered that benzamidoximes had an antiproliferative effect. Here we synthesized and determined the anticancer effects of hydrazonopyrazole derivatives on a mammalian cancer cell line. We synthesized 12 hydrazonopyrazole derivatives with several constant alkyl chain length or branched chains at the side chain to investigate their anticancer cell activity, using the human myelogenous leukemia cell line HL-60RG. Among all hydrazonopyrazole derivatives we synthesized, the hydrazonopyrazole derivative with a branched chain at the side chain rather than a constant alkyl chain significantly inhibited cell viability. The strongest hydrazonopyrazole derivative, 5-amino-4-cyanopyrazole-1-formaldehydehydrazono-3'-pentanal, tended to damage cells dose-dependently. This cell growth attenuation was a result of apoptosis, activating caspase-3 and fragmented DNA. Hydrazonopyrazole derivatives induced apoptosis of HL-60RG leukemia cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Matrine induced G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis in human acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslı Tetik Vardarlı

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Matrine, a natural product extracted from the root of Sophora flavescens, is a promising alternative drug in different types of cancer. Here, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects and underlying molecular mechanisms of matrine on human acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cell line, CCRF-CEM. Cell viability and IC50 values were determined by WST-1 cell cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis rates were analyzed by flow cytometry. Expression patterns of 44 selected miRNAs and 44 RNAs were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR using the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Real-Time PCR System. Matrine inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis of CCRF-CEM cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that matrine-treated CCRF-CEM cells significantly accumulated in the G0/G1 phase compared with the untreated control cells. hsa-miR-376b-3p (-37.09 fold, p = 0.008 and hsa-miR-106b-3p (-16.67 fold, p = 0.028 expressions were decreased, whereas IL6 (95.47 fold, p = 0.000011 and CDKN1A (140.03 fold, p = 0.000159 expressions were increased after matrine treatment. Our results suggest that the downregulation of hsa-miR-106b-3p leads to the upregulation of target p21 gene, CDKN1A, and plays a critical role in the cell cycle progression by arresting matrine-treated cells in the G0/G1 phase.

  9. 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yao; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Han, Kai-Lin; Yang, Yao; Song, Bin-Bin; Guo, Qian-Nan; Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Zhang, Yong-Min; Teng, Yu-Ou; Yu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative (HKL 2H) inhibited K562’s proliferation. • HKL 2H caused the morphology change of G 2 /M phase arrest and typical apoptosis. • HKL 2H induced G2/M cell cycle phase arrest in K562 cells. • HKL 2H induced apoptosis in K562 cells through the mitochondrial pathway. - Abstract: Our previous study successfully identified that the novel isatin derivative (E)-methyl 3-(1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) acrylate (HKL 2H) acts as an anticancer agent at an inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) level of 3 nM. In this study, the molecular mechanism how HKL 2H induces cytotoxic activity in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells was investigated. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the cells were arrested in the G 2 /M phase and accumulated subsequently in the sub-G 1 phase in the presence of HKL 2H. HKL 2H treatment down-regulated the expressions of CDK1 and cyclin B but up-regulated the level of phosphorylated CDK1. Annexin-V staining and the classic DNA ladder studies showed that HKL 2H induced the apoptosis of K562 cells. Our study further showed that HKL 2H treatment caused the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, activated caspase-3 and lowered the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in K562 cells, suggesting that the HKL 2H-causing programmed cell death of K562 cells was caused via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together, our data demonstrated that HKL 2H, a 5-(2-carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative, notably induces G 2 /M cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in K562 cells, indicating that this compound could be a promising anticancer candidate for further investigation

  10. 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative induces G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yao; Zhao, Hong-Ye; Han, Kai-Lin; Yang, Yao; Song, Bin-Bin; Guo, Qian-Nan [Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Ministry of Education, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industry Microbiology, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Fan, Zhen-Chuan [Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety (Tianjin University of Science and Technology), Ministry of Education, Tianjin 300457 (China); Obesita and Algaegen LLC, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Zhang, Yong-Min [Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, Institut Parisien de Chimie Moléculaire UMR CNRS 8232, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Teng, Yu-Ou, E-mail: tyo201485@tust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Ministry of Education, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industry Microbiology, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Yu, Peng, E-mail: yupeng@tust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Microbiology, Ministry of Education, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Industry Microbiology, College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • 5-(2-Carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative (HKL 2H) inhibited K562’s proliferation. • HKL 2H caused the morphology change of G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and typical apoptosis. • HKL 2H induced G2/M cell cycle phase arrest in K562 cells. • HKL 2H induced apoptosis in K562 cells through the mitochondrial pathway. - Abstract: Our previous study successfully identified that the novel isatin derivative (E)-methyl 3-(1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-2,3-dioxoindolin-5-yl) acrylate (HKL 2H) acts as an anticancer agent at an inhibitory concentration (IC{sub 50}) level of 3 nM. In this study, the molecular mechanism how HKL 2H induces cytotoxic activity in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells was investigated. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the cells were arrested in the G{sub 2}/M phase and accumulated subsequently in the sub-G{sub 1} phase in the presence of HKL 2H. HKL 2H treatment down-regulated the expressions of CDK1 and cyclin B but up-regulated the level of phosphorylated CDK1. Annexin-V staining and the classic DNA ladder studies showed that HKL 2H induced the apoptosis of K562 cells. Our study further showed that HKL 2H treatment caused the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, activated caspase-3 and lowered the Bcl-2/Bax ratio in K562 cells, suggesting that the HKL 2H-causing programmed cell death of K562 cells was caused via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Taken together, our data demonstrated that HKL 2H, a 5-(2-carboxyethenyl) isatin derivative, notably induces G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in K562 cells, indicating that this compound could be a promising anticancer candidate for further investigation.

  11. Failure in activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax in non-hematopoietic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizukoshi, Terumi; Komori, Hideyuki; Mizuguchi, Mariko [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Abdelaziz, Hussein [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Medical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Hara, Toshifumi [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Higuchi, Masaya [Division of Virology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Tanaka, Yuetsu [Department of Immunology, Graduate School and Faculty of Medicine, Ryukyu University, Okinawa (Japan); Ohara, Yoshiro [Department of Microbiology, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa (Japan); Funato, Noriko [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Fujii, Masahiro [Division of Virology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Nakamura, Masataka, E-mail: naka.gene@tmd.ac.jp [Human Gene Sciences Center, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax (Tax1) plays crucial roles in leukemogenesis in part through activation of NF-κB. In this study, we demonstrated that Tax1 activated an NF-κB binding (gpκB) site of the gp34/OX40 ligand gene in a cell type-dependent manner. Our examination showed that the gpκΒ site and authentic NF-κB (IgκB) site were activated by Tax1 in hematopoietic cell lines. Non-hematopoietic cell lines including hepatoma and fibroblast cell lines were not permissive to Tax1-mediated activation of the gpκB site, while the IgκB site was activated in those cells in association with binding of RelB. However RelA binding was not observed in the gpκB and IgκB sites. Our results suggest that HTLV-1 Tax1 fails to activate the canonical pathway of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. Cell type-dependent activation of NF-κB by Tax1 could be associated with pathogenesis by HTLV-1 infection. - Highlights: • HTLV-1 Tax1 does not activate RelA of NF-κB in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 activates the NF-κB non-canonical pathway in non-hematopoietic cell lines. • Tax1 does not induce RelA nuclear translocation in those cell lines, unlike TNFα. • The OX40L promoter κB site is activated by ectopic, but not endogenous, RelA.

  12. Homozygous deletion of the α- and β1-interferon genes in human leukemia and derived cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, M.O.; Ziemin, S.; Le Beau, M.M.; Pitha, P.; Smith, S.D.; Chilcote, R.R.; Rowley, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The loss of bands p21-22 from one chromosome 9 homologue as a consequence of a deletion of the short arm [del(9p)], unbalanced translocation, or monosomy 9 is frequently observed in the malignant cells of patients with lymphoid neoplasias, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The α- and β 1 -interferon genes have been assigned to this chromosome region (9p21-22). The authors now present evidence of the homozygous deletion of the interferon genes in neoplastic hematopoietic cell lines and primary leukemia cells in the presence or absence of chromosomal deletions that are detectable at the level of the light microscope. In these cell lines, the deletion of the interferon genes is accompanied by a deficiency of 5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase, an enzyme of purine metabolism. These homozygous deletions may be associated with the loss of a tumor-suppressor gene that is involved in the development of these neoplasias. The relevant genes may be either the interferon genes themselves or a gene that has a tumor-suppressor function and is closely linked to them

  13. Knockdown of HOXA10 reverses the multidrug resistance of human chronic mylogenous leukemia K562/ADM cells by downregulating P-gp and MRP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ying-Jie; Jia, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Jian-Yong; Li, You-Jie; Wang, Hong; Xie, Shu-Yang

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of leukemia cells is a major obstacle in chemotherapeutic treatment. The high expression and constitutive activation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein-1 (MRP-1) have been reported to play a vital role in enhancing cell resistance to anticancer drugs in many tumors. The present study aimed to investigate the reversal of MDR by silencing homeobox A10 (HOXA10) in adriamycin (ADR)-resistant human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) K562/ADM cells by modulating the expression of P-gp and MRP-1. K562/ADM cells were stably transfected with HOXA10-targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The results of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis showed that the mRNA and protein expression of HOXA10 was markedly suppressed following transfection with a shRNA-containing vector. The sensitivity of the K562/ADM cells to ADR was enhanced by the silencing of HOXA10, due to the increased intracellular accumulation of ADR. The accumulation of ADR induced by the silencing of HOXA10 may be due to the downregulation of P-gp and MRP-1. Western blot analysis revealed that downregulating HOXA10 inhibited the protein expression of P-gp and MRP-1. Taken together, these results suggest that knockdown of HOXA10 combats resistance and that HOXA10 is a potential target for resistant human CML.

  14. Targeted immunotherapy in acute myeloblastic leukemia: from animals to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Marie; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Chomienne, Christine; Padua, Rose-Ann

    2005-10-01

    Immunity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is demonstrated in humans by the graft-versus-leukemia effect in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Specific leukemic antigens have progressively been discovered and circulating specific T lymphocytes against Wilms tumor antigen, proteinase peptide or fusion-proteins produced from aberrant oncogenic chromosomal translocations have been detected in leukemic patients. However, due to the fact that leukemic blasts develop various escape mechanisms, antileukemic specific immunity is not able to control leukemic cell proliferation. The aim of immunotherapy is to overcome tolerance and boost immunity to elicit an efficient immune response against leukemia. We review different immunotherapy strategies tested in preclinical animal models of AML and the human trials that spurred from encouraging results obtained in animal models, demonstrate the feasibility of immunotherapy in AML patients.

  15. Effects of ceramide inhibition on radiation-induced apoptosis in human leukemia MOLT-4 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Eriko; Inanami, Osamu; Asanuma, Taketoshi; Kuwabara, Mikinori [Hokkaido Univ., Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2006-03-15

    In the present study, using inhibitors of ceramide synthase (fumonisin B{sub 1}), ketosphinganine synthetase (L-cycloserine), acid sphingomyelinase (D609 and desipramine) and neutral sphingomyelinase (GW4869), the role of ceramide in X-ray-induced apoptosis was investigated in MOLT-4 cells. The diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) assay showed that the intracellular concentration of ceramide increased time-dependently after X irradiation of cells, and this radiation-induced accumulation of ceramide did not occur prior to the appearance of apoptotic cells. Treatment with D609 significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, but did not inhibit the increase of intracellular ceramide. Treatment with desipramine or GW4869 prevented neither radiation-induced apoptosis nor the induced increase of ceramide. On the other hand, fumonisin B{sub 1} and L-cycloserine had no effect on the radiation-induced induction of apoptosis, in spite of significant inhibition of the radiation-induced ceramide. From these results, it was suggested that the increase of the intracellular concentration of ceramide was not essential for radiation-induced apoptosis in MOLT-4 cells. (author)

  16. Effects of ceramide inhibition on radiation-induced apoptosis in human leukemia MOLT-4 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Eriko; Inanami, Osamu; Asanuma, Taketoshi; Kuwabara, Mikinori

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, using inhibitors of ceramide synthase (fumonisin B 1 ), ketosphinganine synthetase (L-cycloserine), acid sphingomyelinase (D609 and desipramine) and neutral sphingomyelinase (GW4869), the role of ceramide in X-ray-induced apoptosis was investigated in MOLT-4 cells. The diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) assay showed that the intracellular concentration of ceramide increased time-dependently after X irradiation of cells, and this radiation-induced accumulation of ceramide did not occur prior to the appearance of apoptotic cells. Treatment with D609 significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis, but did not inhibit the increase of intracellular ceramide. Treatment with desipramine or GW4869 prevented neither radiation-induced apoptosis nor the induced increase of ceramide. On the other hand, fumonisin B 1 and L-cycloserine had no effect on the radiation-induced induction of apoptosis, in spite of significant inhibition of the radiation-induced ceramide. From these results, it was suggested that the increase of the intracellular concentration of ceramide was not essential for radiation-induced apoptosis in MOLT-4 cells. (author)

  17. GLUT-1-independent infection of the glioblastoma/astroglioma U87 cells by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib

    2006-01-01

    The human glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) functions as a receptor for human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). GLUT-1 is a twelve-transmembrane cell surface receptor with six extracellular (ECL) and seven intracellular domains. To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we utilized polyclonal antibodies to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the large extracellular domain of GLUT-1. The antibodies caused significant blocking of envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and pseudotyped virus infection of HeLa cells but had no significant effect on infection of U87 cells. This differential effect correlated with the detection of high-level surface expression of GLUT-1 on HeLa cells and very weak staining of U87 cells. To investigate this in terms of viral cytotropism, we cloned GLUT-1 cDNA from U87 cells and isolated two different versions of cDNA clones: the wild-type sequence (encoding 492 residues) and a mutant cDNA with a 5-base pair deletion (GLUT-1Δ5) between nucleotides 1329 and 1333. The deletion, also detected in genomic DNA, resulted in a frame-shift and premature termination producing a truncated protein of 463 residues. Transfection of the wild-type GLUT-1 but not GLUT-1Δ5 cDNA into CHO cells resulted in efficient surface expression of the human GLUT-1. Co-expression of GLUT-1 with GLUT-1Δ5 produces a trans-inhibition by GLUT-1Δ5 of GLUT-1-mediated HTLV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated fusion. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated physical interaction of the wild-type and mutant proteins. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses demonstrated lower GLUT-1 RNA expression in U87 cells. We propose two mechanisms to account for the impaired cell surface expression of GLUT-1 on U87 cells: low GLUT-1 RNA expression and the formation of GLUT-1/GLUT-1Δ5 heterodimers that are retained intracellularly. Significant RNAi-mediated reduction of endogenous GLUT-1 expression impaired HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with HeLa cells but not with U87 cells. We propose a GLUT-1-independent mechanism

  18. Berberine Induces Apoptotic Cell Death via Activation of Caspase-3 and -8 in HL-60 Human Leukemia Cells: Nuclear Localization and Structure-Activity Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Shinya; Uto, Takuhiro; Goto, Aya; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Katsushi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    Berberine (BBR), an isoquinoline alkaloid, is a well-known bioactive compound contained in medicinal plants used in traditional and folk medicines. In this study, we investigated the subcellular localization and the apoptotic mechanisms of BBR were elucidated. First, we confirmed the incorporation of BBR into the cell visually. BBR showed antiproliferative activity and promptly localized to the nucleus from 5[Formula: see text]min to 15[Formula: see text]min after BBR treatment in HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells. Next, we examined the antiproliferative activity of BBR (1) and its biosynthetically related compounds (2-7) in HL-60 cells. BBR exerted strongest antiproliferative activity among 1-7 and the results of structures and activity relation suggested that a methylenedioxyl group in ring A, an [Formula: see text]-alkyl group at C-9 position, and the frame of isoquinoline may be necessary for antiproliferative activity. Moreover, BBR showed the most potent antiproliferative activity in HL-60 cells among human cancer and normal cell lines tested. Next, we examined the effect of BBR on molecular events known as apoptosis induction. In HL-60 cells, BBR induced chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation, and triggered the activation of PARP, caspase-3 and caspase-8 without the activation of caspase-9. BBR-induced DNA fragmentation was abolished by pretreatment with inhibitors against caspase-3 and caspase-8, but not against caspase-9. ERK and p38 were promptly phosphorylated after 15 min of BBR treatment, and this was correlated with time of localization to the nucleus of BBR. These results demonstrated that BBR translocated into nucleus immediately after treatments and induced apoptotic cell death by activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8.

  19. Characterization of the apoptotic response of human leukemia cells to organosulfur compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, W Wei-Lynn; Langler, Richard F; Penn, Linda Z; Boutros, Paul C; Wasylishen, Amanda R; Guckert, Kristal D; O'Brien, Erin M; Griffiths, Rebecca; Martirosyan, Anna R; Bros, Christina; Jurisica, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Novel therapeutic agents that selectively induce tumor cell death are urgently needed in the clinical management of cancers. Such agents would constitute effective adjuvant approaches to traditional chemotherapy regimens. Organosulfur compounds (OSCs), such as diallyl disulfide, have demonstrated anti-proliferative effects on cancer cells. We have previously shown that synthesized relatives of dysoxysulfone, a natural OSC derived from the Fijian medicinal plant, Dysoxylum richi, possess tumor-specific antiproliferative effects and are thus promising lead candidates. Because our structure-activity analyses showed that regions flanking the disulfide bond mediated specificity, we synthesized 18 novel OSCs by structural modification of the most promising dysoxysulfone derivatives. These compounds were tested for anti-proliferative and apoptotic activity in both normal and leukemic cells. Six OSCs exhibited tumor-specific killing, having no effect on normal bone marrow, and are thus candidates for future toxicity studies. We then employed mRNA expression profiling to characterize the mechanisms by which different OSCs induce apoptosis. Using Gene Ontology analysis we show that each OSC altered a unique set of pathways, and that these differences could be partially rationalized from a transcription factor binding site analysis. For example, five compounds altered genes with a large enrichment of p53 binding sites in their promoter regions (p < 0.0001). Taken together, these data establish OSCs derivatized from dysoxysulfone as a novel group of compounds for development as anti-cancer agents

  20. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tingfang Yang,1 Shuluan Yao,2 Xianfeng Zhang,3 Yan Guo2 1Department of Pediatrics, Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jining Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychiatry, Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro, the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 µg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells’ apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro’s dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days. Keywords: andrographolide, PI3K, AKT, Burkitt lymphoma, Jurkat cell

  1. The TAL1 complex targets the FBXW7 tumor suppressor by activating miR-223 in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Marc R.; Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Li, Xiaoyu; Kreslavsky, Taras; Novina, Carl D.; Brand, Marjorie; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; von Boehmer, Harald; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in 60% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and initiates T-ALL in mouse models. By performing global microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling after depletion of TAL1, together with genome-wide analysis of TAL1 occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel DNA sequencing, we identified the miRNA genes directly controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GAT...

  2. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingfang; Yao, Shuluan; Zhang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro), the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 μg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells’ apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro’s dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days. PMID:27114702

  3. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or a swollen spleen. Certain factors affect treatment options and prognosis (chance of recovery). The treatment options ... cell leukemia has not responded to treatment. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  4. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  5. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Myeloid Malignancies Treatment . Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment . Gender and age may affect the risk of hairy ... in the shape of blood cells. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample is ...

  6. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  7. Honey bee venom combined with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3as a highly efficient inducer of differentiation in human acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni-Kouchesfahani, Homa; Nabioni, Mohammad; Khosravi, Zahra; Rahimi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Most cancer cells exhibit a defect in their capacity to mature into nonreplicating adult cells and existing in a highly proliferating state. Differentiation therapy by agents such as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3(1,25-(OH)2 VD3) represents a useful approach for the treatment of cancer including acute myeloid leukemia. Human myeloid leukemia cell lines are induced to terminal differentiation into monocyte lineage by 1,25-(OH)2 VD3. However, usage of these findings in the clinical trials is limited by calcemic effects of 1,25-(OH)2 VD3. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on a combination of low concentrations 1,25-(OH)2 VD3 with other compounds to induce differentiation of HL-60 cells. In this study, the effect of honey bee venom (BV) and 1,25-(OH)2 VD3, individually and in combination, on proliferation and differentiation of human myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells were assayed. In this in vitro study, toxic and nontoxic concentrations of BV and 1,25-(OH)2 VD3 were tested using Trypan blue stained cell counting and (3[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. In addition, differentiation of cells was assayed using a Wright-Giemsa staining and nitroblue tetrazolium reduction test. Data were analyzed by a one-way analysis of the variance test using SPSS software. Our findings showed that both the BV and 1,25-(OH)2 VD3, in a dose and time-dependent manner, caused cell death at high concentrations and inhibited cell proliferation at lower concentrations. About 5 nM of 1,25-(OH)2 VD3 induced differentiation of HL-60 cells to monocytes after 72 h. 2.5 μg/ml of BV suppressed proliferation of HL-60 cells but had not any effects on their differentiation, whereas in combination with 5 nM of 1,25-(OH)2 VD3, it enhanced antiproliferative and differentiation potency of 1,25-(OH)2 VD3. These results indicate that BV potentiates the 1,25-(OH)2 VD3-induced HL-60 cell differentiation into monocytes.

  8. Inhibition of human T cell leukemia virus type 2 replication by the suppressive action of class II transactivator and nuclear factor Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Giovanna; Pilotti, Elisabetta; Mortara, Lorenzo; De Lerma Barbaro, Andrea; Casoli, Claudio; Accolla, Roberto S

    2006-08-22

    The master regulator of MHC-II gene transcription, class II transactivator (CIITA), acts as a potent inhibitor of human T cell leukemia virus type 2 (HTLV-2) replication by blocking the activity of the viral Tax-2 transactivator. Here, we show that this inhibitory effect takes place at the nuclear level and maps to the N-terminal 1-321 region of CIITA, where we identified a minimal domain, from positions 64-144, that is strictly required to suppress Tax-2 function. Furthermore, we show that Tax-2 specifically cooperates with cAMP response element binding protein-binding protein (CBP) and p300, but not with p300/CBP-associated factor, to enhance transcription from the viral promoter. This finding represents a unique difference with respect to Tax-1, which uses all three coactivators to transactivate the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 LTR. Direct sequestering of CBP or p300 is not the primary mechanism by which CIITA causes suppression of Tax-2. Interestingly, we found that the transcription factor nuclear factor Y, which interacts with CIITA to increase transcription of MHC-II genes, exerts a negative regulatory action on the Tax-2-mediated HTLV-2 LTR transactivation. Thus, CIITA may inhibit Tax-2 function, at least in part, through nuclear factor Y. These findings demonstrate the dual defensive role of CIITA against pathogens: it increases the antigen-presenting function for viral determinants and suppresses HTLV-2 replication in infected cells.

  9. HDAC6 inhibition enhances 17-AAG--mediated abrogation of hsp90 chaperone function in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rekha; Fiskus, Warren; Yang, Yonghua; Lee, Pearl; Joshi, Rajeshree; Fernandez, Pravina; Mandawat, Aditya; Atadja, Peter; Bradner, James E; Bhalla, Kapil

    2008-09-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is a heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) deacetylase. Treatment with pan-HDAC inhibitors or depletion of HDAC6 by siRNA induces hyperacetylation and inhibits ATP binding and chaperone function of hsp90. Treatment with 17-allylamino-demothoxy geldanamycin (17-AAG) also inhibits ATP binding and chaperone function of hsp90, resulting in polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of hsp90 client proteins. In this study, we determined the effect of hsp90 hyperacetylation on the anti-hsp90 and antileukemia activity of 17-AAG. Hyperacetylation of hsp90 increased its binding to 17-AAG, as well as enhanced 17-AAG-mediated attenuation of ATP and the cochaperone p23 binding to hsp90. Notably, treatment with 17-AAG alone also reduced HDAC6 binding to hsp90 and induced hyperacetylation of hsp90. This promoted the proteasomal degradation of HDAC6. Cotreatment with 17-AAG and siRNA to HDAC6 induced more inhibition of hsp90 chaperone function and depletion of BCR-ABL and c-Raf than treatment with either agent alone. In addition, cotreatment with 17-AAG and tubacin augmented the loss of survival of K562 cells and viability of primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) samples. These findings demonstrate that HDAC6 is an hsp90 client protein and hyperacetylation of hsp90 augments the anti-hsp90 and antileukemia effects of 17-AAG.

  10. Stage-Specific Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Map the Progression of Myeloid Transformation to Transplantable Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotini, Andriana G; Chang, Chan-Jung; Chow, Arthur; Yuan, Han; Ho, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Tiansu; Vora, Shailee; Solovyov, Alexander; Husser, Chrystel; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Perumal, Deepak; Klimek, Virginia M; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Rampal, Raajit K; Silverman, Lewis; Reddy, E Premkumar; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Parekh, Samir; Greenbaum, Benjamin D; Leslie, Christina S; Kharas, Michael G; Papapetrou, Eirini P

    2017-03-02

    Myeloid malignancy is increasingly viewed as a disease spectrum, comprising hematopoietic disorders that extend across a phenotypic continuum ranging from clonal hematopoiesis to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we derived a collection of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines capturing a range of disease stages encompassing preleukemia, low-risk MDS, high-risk MDS, and secondary AML. Upon their differentiation, we found hematopoietic phenotypes of graded severity and/or stage specificity that together delineate a phenotypic roadmap of disease progression culminating in serially transplantable leukemia. We also show that disease stage transitions, both reversal and progression, can be modeled in this system using genetic correction or introduction of mutations via CRISPR/Cas9 and that this iPSC-based approach can be used to uncover disease-stage-specific responses to drugs. Our study therefore provides insight into the cellular events demarcating the initiation and progression of myeloid transformation and a new platform for testing genetic and pharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Distinct Dasatinib-Induced Mechanisms of Apoptotic Response and Exosome Release in Imatinib-Resistant Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Juan Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although dasatinib is effective in most imatinib mesylate (IMT-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients, the underlying mechanism of its effectiveness in eliminating imatinib-resistant cells is only partially understood. This study investigated the effects of dasatinib on signaling mechanisms driving-resistance in imatinib-resistant CML cell line K562 (K562RIMT. Compared with K562 control cells, exsomal release, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling and autophagic activity were increased significantly in K562RIMT cells and mTOR-independent beclin-1/Vps34 signaling was shown to be involved in exosomal release in these cells. We found that Notch1 activation-mediated reduction of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN was responsible for the increased Akt/mTOR activities in K562RIMT cells and treatment with Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor prevented activation of Akt/mTOR. In addition, suppression of mTOR activity by rapamycin decreased the level of activity of p70S6K, induced upregulation of p53 and caspase 3, and led to increase of apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. Inhibition of autophagy by spautin-1 or beclin-1 knockdown decreased exosomal release, but did not affect apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. In summary, in K562RIMT cells dasatinib promoted apoptosis through downregulation of Akt/mTOR activities, while preventing exosomal release and inhibiting autophagy by downregulating expression of beclin-1 and Vps34. Our findings reveal distinct dasatinib-induced mechanisms of apoptotic response and exosomal release in imatinib-resistant CML cells.

  12. The Tim-3-galectin-9 Secretory Pathway is Involved in the Immune Escape of Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

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    Isabel Gonçalves Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a severe and often fatal systemic malignancy. Malignant cells are capable of escaping host immune surveillance by inactivating cytotoxic lymphoid cells. In this work we discovered a fundamental molecular pathway, which includes ligand-dependent activation of ectopically expressed latrophilin 1 and possibly other G-protein coupled receptors leading to increased translation and exocytosis of the immune receptor Tim-3 and its ligand galectin-9. This occurs in a protein kinase C and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin-dependent manner. Tim-3 participates in galectin-9 secretion and is also released in a free soluble form. Galectin-9 impairs the anti-cancer activity of cytotoxic lymphoid cells including natural killer (NK cells. Soluble Tim-3 prevents secretion of interleukin-2 (IL-2 required for the activation of cytotoxic lymphoid cells. These results were validated in ex vivo experiments using primary samples from AML patients. This pathway provides reliable targets for both highly specific diagnosis and immune therapy of AML.

  13. Natural and semi-synthetic clerodanes of Croton cajucara and their cytotoxic effects against ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, Maria Aparecida M. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Martins, Jenilce R.; Pinto, Angelo C.; Kaiser, Carlos R. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Echevarria, Aurea [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: echevarr@ufrrj.br

    2007-03-15

    The clerodane-type diterpene, trans-dehydrocrotonin (1) the major component of Croton cajucara has shown striking correlation with its therapeutic use in traditional folk medicine. Phytochemical investigations led to the isolation of the metabolites 1, cajucarinolide (6), isocajucarinolide (7), trans-crotonin (2), trans-cajucarin B (3), cis-cajucarin B (4), trans-cajucarin A (5), N-methyltyrosine, vanillic acid and 4-hydroxy-benzoic acid. 6 and 7 were synthesized in good yield by regiospecific oxidation of 1 using singlet-oxygen. All clerodanes were studied for their cytotoxic effects against human K562 leukemia and Ehrlich carcinoma cells. Ehrlich carcinoma assays with IC{sub 50} = 166 {mu}M (1), 164 {mu}M (2), 65 {mu}M (6) and 10 {mu}M (7) related to cell growth inhibitory effects were dose dependent. Furthermore, moderate cytotoxic activity against K562 leukemia cells was observed with IC{sub 50} = 38 {mu}M (3), 33 {mu}M (5), 36 {mu}M (6) and 43 {mu}M (7). The semi-synthetic 2, 6 and 7 showed similar results when compared to the corresponding natural clerodanes. (author)

  14. Natural and semi-synthetic clerodanes of Croton cajucara and their cytotoxic effects against ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Maria Aparecida M.; Martins, Jenilce R.; Pinto, Angelo C.; Kaiser, Carlos R.; Esteves-Souza, Andressa; Echevarria, Aurea

    2007-01-01

    The clerodane-type diterpene, trans-dehydrocrotonin (1) the major component of Croton cajucara has shown striking correlation with its therapeutic use in traditional folk medicine. Phytochemical investigations led to the isolation of the metabolites 1, cajucarinolide (6), isocajucarinolide (7), trans-crotonin (2), trans-cajucarin B (3), cis-cajucarin B (4), trans-cajucarin A (5), N-methyltyrosine, vanillic acid and 4-hydroxy-benzoic acid. 6 and 7 were synthesized in good yield by regiospecific oxidation of 1 using singlet-oxygen. All clerodanes were studied for their cytotoxic effects against human K562 leukemia and Ehrlich carcinoma cells. Ehrlich carcinoma assays with IC 50 = 166 μM (1), 164 μM (2), 65 μM (6) and 10 μM (7) related to cell growth inhibitory effects were dose dependent. Furthermore, moderate cytotoxic activity against K562 leukemia cells was observed with IC 50 = 38 μM (3), 33 μM (5), 36 μM (6) and 43 μM (7). The semi-synthetic 2, 6 and 7 showed similar results when compared to the corresponding natural clerodanes. (author)

  15. The autophagy induced by curcumin via MEK/ERK pathway plays an early anti-leukemia role in human Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia SUP-B15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Guo

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Curcumin induce autophagic cell death in SUP-B15 cells via activating RAF/MEK/ERK pathway. These findings suggest that autophagic mechanism contribute to the curcumin-induced early SUP-B15 cell death, and autophagy is another anti-leukemia mechanism of curcumin.

  16. N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine induces caspase-8-dependent cytochrome c release and apoptosis through ROS generation in human leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Choi, Yun Jung; Han, Youngsoo; Yun, Yeon-Sook; Hong, Sung Hee

    2009-01-01

    N,N-dimethyl phytosphingosine (DMPS) blocks the conversion of sphingosine to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) by the enzyme sphingosine kinase (SK). In this study, we elucidated the apoptotic mechanisms of DMPS action on a human leukemia cell line using functional pharmacologic and genetic approaches. First, we demonstrated that DMPS-induced apoptosis is evidenced by nuclear morphological change, distinct internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and an increased sub-G1 cell population. DMPS treatment led to the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, accompanied by the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and led to cytochrome c release, depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and downregulation of the anti-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family. Ectopic expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL conferred resistance of HL-60 cells to DMPS-induced cell death, suggesting that DMPS-induced apoptosis occurs predominantly through the activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We also observed that DMPS activated the caspase-8-Bid-Bax pathway and that the inhibition of caspase-8 by z-IETD-fmk or small interfering RNA suppressed the cleavage of Bid, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and apoptotic cell death. In addition, cells subjected to DMPS exhibited significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and ROS scavengers, such as quercetin and Tiron, but not N-acetylcysteine (NAC), inhibited DMPS-induced activations of caspase-8, -3 and subsequent apoptotic cell death, indicating the role of ROS in caspase-8-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that caspase-8 acts upstream of caspase-3, and that the caspase-8-mediated mitochondrial pathway is important in DMPS-induced apoptosis. Our results also suggest that ROS are critical regulators of caspase-8-mediated apoptosis in DMPS-treated leukemia cells.

  17. Leukotactin-1/CCL15 induces cell migration and differentiation of human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells through PKCdelta activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, In Sik

    2010-06-01

    Leukotactin-1 (Lkn-1)/CCL15 is a CC chemokine that binds to the CCR1 and CCR3. Lkn-1 functions as an essential factor in the migration of monocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Although eosinophils express both receptors, the role of Lkn-1 in immature eosinophils remains to be elucidated. In this present study, we investigated the contribution of the CCR1-binding chemokines to chemotactic activity and in the differentiation in the human eosinophilic leukemia cell line EoL-1. Lkn-1 induced the stronger migration of EoL-1 cells than other CCR1-binding chemokines such as RANTES/CCL5, MIP-1alpha/CCL3 and HCC-4/CCL16. Lkn-1-induced chemotaxis was inhibited by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(i)/G(o) protein; U73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C and rottlerin, an inhibitor of protein kinase C delta (PKCdelta). Lkn-1 increased PKCdelta activity, which was partially blocked by the pertussis toxin and U73122. Lkn-1 enhanced the butyric acid-induced differentiation via PKCdelta after binding to the increased CCR1 because Lkn-1 caused EoL-1 cells to change morphologically into mature eosinophil-like cells. Likewise, Lkn-1 increased the expression of both eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and the major basic protein (MBP). PKCdelta activation due to Lkn-1 is involved in migration, as well as the butyric acid-induced differentiation. This finding contributes to an understanding of CC chemokines in eosinophil biology and to the development of novel therapies for the treatment of eosinophilic disorders. This study suggests the pivotal roles of Lkn-1 in the regulation of the movement and development of eosinophils.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Dibutyric cAMP and Butyric Acid on the Differentiation of Human Eosinophilic Leukemia EoL-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, YunJae

    2015-12-01

    Purification of enough numbers of circulating eosinophils is difficult because eosinophils account for less than 5% peripheral blood leukocytes. Human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells have been considered an in vitro source of eosinophils as they can differentiate into mature eosinophil-like cells when incubated with dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP) or butyric acid. In this study, the viability and phenotypic maturation of EoL-1 cells stimulated by either dbcAMP or butyric acid were comparatively analyzed. After treatment with 100 µM dbcAMP or 0.5 µM butyric acid, EoL-1 cells showed morphological signs of differentiation, although the number of nonviable EoL-1 cells was significantly increased following butyric acid treatment. Stimulation of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid more effectively induced the expression of mature eosinophil markers than stimulation with dbcAMP. These results suggest that treatment of EoL-1 cells with 0.5 µM butyric acid for limited duration could be an effective strategy for inducing their differentiation. Considering that expression of CCR3 was not sufficient in EoL-1 cells stimulated with 0.5 µM butyric acid, treatment of the chemically stimulated EoL-1 cells with cytokines, which primarily support eosinophil maturation, would help to obtain differentiated EoL-1 cells with greater functional maturity.

  19. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairy cell leukemia treatment options include surveillance, chemotherapy, targeted therapy/immunotherapy, and splenectomy. The decision to treat is based on cytopenias, splenomegaly, or infectious complications. Get detailed information about hairy cell leukemia in this clinician summary.

  20. Cytotoxicity, Antiproliferative Effects, and Apoptosis Induction of Methanolic Extract of Cynometra cauliflora Linn. Whole Fruit on Human Promyelocytic Leukemia HL-60 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T-Johari S. A. Tajudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methanolic extract of Cynometra cauliflora whole fruit was assayed for cytotoxicity against the human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 and the normal mouse fibroblast NIH/3T3 cell lines by using the MTT assay. The CD50 of the extract for 72 hours was 0.9 μg/mL whereas the value for the cytotoxic drug vincristine was 0.2 μg/mL. The viability of the NIH/3T3 cells was at 80.0% when treated at 15.0 μg/mL. The extract inhibited HL-60 cell proliferation with dose dependence. AO/PI staining of HL-60 cells treated with the extract revealed that majority of cells were in the apoptotic cell death mode. Flow cytometry analysis of HL-60 cells treated at CD50 of the extract showed that the early apoptotic cells were 31.0, 26.3 and 19.9% at 24, 48, and 72 hours treatment, respectively. The percentage of late apoptotic cells was increased from 62.0 at 24 hours to 64.1 and 70.2 at 48 and 72 hours, respectively. Meanwhile, percent of necrotic cells were 4.9, 6.6, and 8.5 at 24, 48, and 72 hours, respectively. This study has shown that the methanolic extract of C. cauliflora whole fruit was cytotoxic towards HL-60 cells and induced the cells into apoptotic cell death mode, but less cytotoxic towards NIH/3T3 cells.

  1. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 post-transcriptional control protein p28 is required for viral infectivity and persistence in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Kesic, Matthew; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2008-05-12

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type 1 and type 2 are related but distinct pathogenic complex retroviruses. HTLV-1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a variety of immune-mediated disorders including the chronic neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In contrast, HTLV-2 displays distinct biological differences and is much less pathogenic, with only a few reported cases of leukemia and neurological disease associated with infection. In addition to the structural and enzymatic proteins, HTLV encodes regulatory (Tax and Rex) and accessory proteins. Tax and Rex positively regulate virus production and are critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. Using an over-expression system approach, we recently reported that the accessory gene product of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 open reading frame (ORF) II (p30 and p28, respectively) acts as a negative regulator of both Tax and Rex by binding to and retaining their mRNA in the nucleus, leading to reduced protein expression and virion production. Further characterization revealed that p28 was distinct from p30 in that it was devoid of major transcriptional modulating activity, suggesting potentially divergent functions that may be responsible for the distinct pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. In this study, we investigated the functional significance of p28 in HTLV-2 infection, proliferation, and immortaliztion of primary T-cells in culture, and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. An HTLV-2 p28 knockout virus (HTLV-2Deltap28) was generated and evaluated. Infectivity and immortalization capacity of HTLV-2Deltap28 in vitro was indistinguishable from wild type HTLV-2. In contrast, we showed that viral replication was severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-2Deltap28 and the mutant virus failed to establish persistent infection. We provide direct evidence that p28 is dispensable for viral replication and cellular immortalization of

  2. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 post-transcriptional control protein p28 is required for viral infectivity and persistence in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesic Matthew

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV type 1 and type 2 are related but distinct pathogenic complex retroviruses. HTLV-1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a variety of immune-mediated disorders including the chronic neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In contrast, HTLV-2 displays distinct biological differences and is much less pathogenic, with only a few reported cases of leukemia and neurological disease associated with infection. In addition to the structural and enzymatic proteins, HTLV encodes regulatory (Tax and Rex and accessory proteins. Tax and Rex positively regulate virus production and are critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. Using an over-expression system approach, we recently reported that the accessory gene product of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 open reading frame (ORF II (p30 and p28, respectively acts as a negative regulator of both Tax and Rex by binding to and retaining their mRNA in the nucleus, leading to reduced protein expression and virion production. Further characterization revealed that p28 was distinct from p30 in that it was devoid of major transcriptional modulating activity, suggesting potentially divergent functions that may be responsible for the distinct pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. Results In this study, we investigated the functional significance of p28 in HTLV-2 infection, proliferation, and immortaliztion of primary T-cells in culture, and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. An HTLV-2 p28 knockout virus (HTLV-2Δp28 was generated and evaluated. Infectivity and immortalization capacity of HTLV-2Δp28 in vitro was indistinguishable from wild type HTLV-2. In contrast, we showed that viral replication was severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-2Δp28 and the mutant virus failed to establish persistent infection. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that p28 is dispensable for

  3. BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia

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    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase with a regulatory role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. A mutation in the RAF gene, especially in BRAF protein, leads to an increased stimulation of this cascade, causing uncontrolled cell division and development of malignancy. Several mutations have been observed in the gene coding for this protein in a variety of human malignancies, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL. BRAF V600E is the most common mutation reported in exon15 of BRAF, which is observed in almost all cases of classic HCL, but it is negative in other B-cell malignancies, including the HCL variant. Therefore it can be used as a marker to differentiate between these B-cell disorders. We also discuss the interaction between miRNAs and signaling pathways, including MAPK, in HCL. When this mutation is present, the use of BRAF protein inhibitors may represent an effective treatment. In this review we have evaluated the role of the mutation of the BRAF gene in the pathogenesis and progression of HCL.

  4. Two cis-acting elements responsible for posttranscriptional trans-regulation of gene expression of human T-cell leukemia virus type I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiki, Motoharu; Inoue, Junichiro; Hidaka, Makoto; Yoshida, Mitsuaki

    1988-01-01

    The pX sequence of human T-cell leukemia virus type I codes for two nuclear proteins, p40 tax and p27 rex and a cytoplasmic protein, p21 X-III . p40 tax activates transcription from the long terminal repeat (LTR), whereas p27 rex modulates posttranscriptional processing to accumulate gag and env mRNAs that retain intron sequences. In this paper, the authors identify two cis-acting sequence elements needed for regulation by p27 rex : a 5' splice signal and a specific sequence in the 3' LTR. These two sequence elements are sufficient for regulation by p27 rex ; expression of a cellular gene (metallothionein I) became sensitive to rex regulation when the LTR was inserted at the 3' end of this gene. The requirement for these two elements suggests and unusual regulatory mechanism of RNA processing in the nucleus

  5. Prevalence of antibody to adult T-cell leukemia virus-associated antigens (ATLA) in Japanese monkeys and other non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, M; Komuro, A; Nozawa, K; Shotake, T; Ishikawa, K; Yamamoto, K; Ishida, T; Honjo, S; Hinuma, Y

    1984-02-15

    The prevalence of adult T-cell-leukemia virus (ATLV) infection was examined in Japanese monkeys living naturally in various parts of Japan and in other species of non-human primates imported into and kept in Japan. Sera of 2,650 Japanese monkeys from 41 troops throughout Japan were tested. High incidences of anti-ATLV-associated antigen (ATLA)-positive monkeys were found in most troops, not only in the endemic area of human ATL(Southwestern Japan), but also in non-endemic areas. The incidence of sero-positive individuals increased gradually with age, reaching a maximum when the animals became adult, indicating age dependency, like that found by epidemiological studies on humans. Anti-ATLA antibodies were also detected in 90 of 815 sera of imported non-human primates of 33 species other than Japanese monkeys. All the anti-ATLA sero-positive monkeys were Catarrhines (Old World monkeys), mainly macaques of Asian origin. Some sero-positive monkeys were also found among animals of African origin, but no antibody was detected in Prosimians and Platyrrhines (New World monkeys). The clear-cut difference between the geographical distribution of sero-positive simians and that of humans indicates the improbability of direct transmission of ATLV from simians to humans.

  6. Immunological aspects of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), a possible neoplasm of regulatory T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yasuaki; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2008-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinct disease caused by the first discovered human oncogenic retrovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1). The peculiarity of this disease is not only in its causative agent HTLV-1 but also in the character of leukemia cells. ATLL cells express the mature helper/inducer T-cell antigens, CD2, CD3, CD4 and CD5 but usually lacking CD8. Despite CD4 expression, it has long been known that ATLL cells exhibit strong immunosuppressive activity ...

  7. Ex vivo assays to study self-renewal and long-term expansion of genetically modified primary human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Schepers, Hein

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of the concept of the leukemia stem cell, assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Although the in vivo NOD-SCID xenotransplantation model is still the favored model of choice in most cases, this system has some limitations as well, such

  8. EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone from Elephantopus mollis H.B.K., induces apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells through thioredoxin- and reactive oxygen species-mediated signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu eLi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elephantopus mollis H.B.K. (EM is a traditional herbal medicine with multiple pharmacological activities. However, the efficacy of EM in treating human leukemia is currently unknown. In the current study, we report that EM23, a natural sesquiterpene lactone isolated from EM, inhibits the proliferation of human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells and acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells by inducing apoptosis. Translocation of membrane-associated phospholipid phosphatidylserines, changes in cell morphology, activation of caspases and cleavage of PARP were concomitant with this inhibition. The involvement of the mitochondrial pathway in EM23-mediated apoptosis was suggested by observed disruptions in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP. Mechanistic studies indicated that EM23 caused a marked increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a ROS scavenger, almost fully reversed EM23-mediated apoptosis. In EM23-treated cells, the expression levels of thioredoxin (Trx and thioredoxinreductase (TrxR, two components of the Trx system involved in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis, were significantly down-regulated. Concomitantly, Trx regulated the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 and its downstream regulatory targets, the p38, JNK, and ERK MAPKs. EM23-mediated activation of ASK1/MAPKs was significantly inhibited in the presence of NAC. Furthermore, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB was suppressed by EM23, as suggested by the observed blockage of p65 nuclear translocation, phosphorylation and reversion of IκBα degradation following EM23 treatment. Taken together, these results provide important insights into the anticancer activities of the EM component EM23 against human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells and acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells.

  9. Identification of an osteoclast transcription factor that binds to the human T cell leukemia virus type I-long terminal repeat enhancer element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, D; Santiago, P; Horne, W C; Baron, R

    1997-10-03

    Transgenic mice expressing human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-tax under the control of HTLV-I-long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter develop skeletal abnormalities with high bone turnover and myelofibrosis. In these animals, Tax is highly expressed in bone with a pattern of expression restricted to osteoclasts and spindle-shaped cells within the endosteal myelofibrosis. To test the hypothesis that lineage-specific transcription factors promote transgene expression from the HTLV-I-LTR in osteoclasts, we first examined tax expression in transgenic bone marrow cultures. Expression was dependent on 1alpha,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol and coincided with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression, a marker of osteoclast differentiation. Furthermore, Tax was expressed in vitronectin receptor-positive mononuclear precursors as well as in mature osteoclast-like cells (OCLs). Consistent with our hypothesis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed the presence of an OCL nuclear factor (NFOC-1) that binds to the LTR 21-base pair direct repeat, a region critical for the promoter activity. This binding is further enhanced by Tax. Since NFOC-1 is absent in macrophages and conserved in osteoclasts among species including human, such a factor may play a role in lineage determination and/or in expression of the differentiated osteoclast phenotype.

  10. Study of the Cytotoxic Effects of the New Synthetic Isothiocyanate CM9 and Its Fullerene Derivative on Human T-Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena De Gianni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One important strategy to develop effective anticancer agents is based on natural products. Many active phytochemicals are in human clinical trials and have been used for a long time, alone and in association with conventional anticancer drugs, for the treatment of various types of cancers. A great number of in vitro, in vivo and clinical reports document the multi-target anticancer activities of isothiocyanates and of compounds characterized by a naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide scaffold. In order to search for new anticancer agents with a better pharmaco-toxicological profile, we investigated hybrid compounds obtained by inserting isothiocyanate group(s on a naphthalenetetracarboxylic diimide scaffold. Moreover, since water-soluble fullerene derivatives can cross cell membranes thus favoring the delivery of anticancer therapeutics, we explored the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of hybrid compounds conjugated with fullerene. We studied their cytostatic and cytotoxic effects on a human T-lymphoblastoid cell line by using different flow cytometric assays. In order to better understand their pharmaco-toxicological potential, we also analyzed their genotoxicity. Our global results show that the synthesized compounds reduced significantly the viability of leukemia cells. However, the conjugation with a non-toxic vector did not increase their anticancer potential. This opens an interesting research pattern for certain fullerene properties.

  11. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax-Deregulated Autophagy Pathway and c-FLIP Expression Contribute to Resistance against Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhou, Jiansuo; Shi, Juan; Zhang, Yaxi; Liu, Shilian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein is considered to play a central role in the process that leads to adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). HTLV-1 Tax-expressing cells show resistance to apoptosis induced by Fas ligand (FasL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). The regulation of Tax on the autophagy pathway in HeLa cells and peripheral T cells was recently reported, but the function and underlying molecular mechanism of the Tax-regulated autophagy are not yet well defined. Here, we report that HTLV-1 Tax deregulates the autophagy pathway, which plays a protective role during the death receptor (DR)-mediated apoptosis of human U251 astroglioma cells. The cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), which is upregulated by Tax, also contributes to the resistance against DR-mediated apoptosis. Both Tax-induced autophagy and Tax-induced c-FLIP expression require Tax-induced activation of IκB kinases (IKK). Furthermore, Tax-induced c-FLIP expression is regulated through the Tax-IKK-NF-κB signaling pathway, whereas Tax-triggered autophagy depends on the activation of IKK but not the activation of NF-κB. In addition, DR-mediated apoptosis is correlated with the degradation of Tax, which can be facilitated by the inhibitors of autophagy. IMPORTANCE Our study reveals that Tax-deregulated autophagy is a protective mechanism for DR-mediated apoptosis. The molecular mechanism of Tax-induced autophagy is also illuminated, which is different from Tax-increased c-FLIP. Tax can be degraded via manipulation of autophagy and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. These results outline a complex regulatory network between and among apoptosis, autophagy, and Tax and also present evidence that autophagy represents a new possible target for therapeutic intervention for the HTVL-1 related diseases. PMID:24352466

  12. Modulation of butyrate anticancer activity by solid lipid nanoparticle delivery: an in vitro investigation on human breast cancer and leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglietta, Federica; Serpe, Loredana; Canaparo, Roberto; Vivenza, Nicoletta; Riccio, Giovanna; Imbalzano, Erica; Gasco, Paolo; Zara, Gian Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Histone modification has emerged as a promising approach to cancer therapy. The short-chain fatty acid, butyric acid, a histone deacetylase (HD) inhibitor, has shown anticancer activity. Butyrate transcriptional activation is indeed able to withdraw cancer cells from the cell cycle, leading to programmed cell death. Since butyrate's clinical use is hampered by unfavorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, delivery systems, such as solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), have been developed to overcome these constraints. In order to outline the influence of butyrate delivery on its anticancer activity, the effects of butyrate as a free (sodium butyrate, NB) or nanoparticle (cholesteryl butyrate solid lipid nanoparticles, CBSLN) formulation on the growth of different human cancer cell lines, such as the promyelocytic leukemia, HL-60, and the breast cancer, MCF-7 was investigated. A detailed investigation into the mechanism of the induced cytotoxicity was also carried out, with a special focus on the modulation of HD and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) mRNA gene expression by real time PCR analysis. In HL-60 cells, CBSLN induced a higher and prolonged expression level of the butyrate target genes at lower concentrations than NB. This led to a significant decrease in cell proliferation, along with considerable apoptosis, cell cycle block in the G0/G1 phase, significant inhibition of total HD activity and overexpression of the p21 protein. Conversely, in MCF-7 cells, CBSLN did not enhance the level of expression of the butyrate target genes, leading to the same anticancer activity as that of NB. Solid lipid nanoparticles were able to improve butyrate anticancer activity in HL-60, but not in MCF-7 cells. This is consistent with difference in properties of the cells under study, such as expression of the TP53 tumor suppressor, or the transporter for short-chain fatty acids, SLC5A8.

  13. Repression of tax expression is associated both with resistance of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-infected T cells to killing by tax-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes and with impaired tumorigenicity in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Machiko; Ohashi, Takashi; Nishikawa, Keiko; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Furuta, Rika A; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Hanabuchi, Shino; Harashima, Nanae; Masuda, Takao; Kannagi, Mari

    2004-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) causes adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). Although the viral transactivation factor, Tax, has been known to have apparent transforming ability, the exact function of Tax in ATL development is still not clear. To understand the role of Tax in ATL development, we introduced short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against Tax in a rat HTLV-1-infected T-cell line. Our results demonstrated that expression of siRNA targeting Tax successfully downregulated Tax expression. Repression of Tax expression was associated with resistance of the HTLV-1-infected T cells to Tax-specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte killing. This may be due to the direct effect of decreased Tax expression, because the Tax siRNA did not alter the expression of MHC-I, CD80, or CD86. Furthermore, T cells with Tax downregulation appeared to lose the ability to develop tumors in T-cell-deficient nude rats, in which the parental HTLV-1-infected cells induce ATL-like lymphoproliferative disease. These results indicated the importance of Tax both for activating host immune response against the virus and for maintaining the growth ability of infected cells in vivo. Our results provide insights into the mechanisms how the host immune system can survey and inhibit the growth of HTLV-1-infected cells during the long latent period before the onset of ATL.

  14. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-01-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  15. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  16. Serial transmission of human T-cell leukemia virus type I by blood transfusion in rabbits and its prevention by use of X-irradiated stored blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotani, S.; Yoshimoto, S.; Yamato, K.; Fujishita, M.; Yamashita, M.; Ohtsuki, Y.; Taguchi, H.; Miyoshi, I.

    1986-06-15

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) was serially transmitted for 5 passages from rabbit to rabbit by blood transfusion. The virus could be transmitted with 20 ml of whole blood or washed blood cell suspension (fresh or stored for 1-2 weeks at 4 degrees C) but not with cell-free plasma from seroconverted rabbits. Seroconversion occurred 2-4 weeks after blood transfusion and serum anti-HTLV-I titers ranged from 1:20 to 1:640 with the immunofluorescence assay. From transfusion recipients of the 1st to 4th passages, virus-producing cell lines were established by culturing lymphocytes in the presence of T-cell growth factor (TCGF). Three of the 4 cell lines became TCGF-independent after 2-12 months of continuous culture. Blood was transfused between rabbits of opposite sexes and the recipient origin of each cell line was determined by chromosome analysis. We also investigated the effect of X-irradiation (6,000 rad) on blood from seropositive rabbits. Seroconversion likewise occurred in rabbits transfused with blood that had been irradiated immediately before transfusion but not in rabbits transfused with blood that had been irradiated and stored for 1-2 weeks at 4 degrees C. Thus, our rabbit model shows that HTLV-I is serially transmissible by blood transfusion and that this can be prevented by irradiation of blood. The same procedure, therefore, may be useful for the prevention of transfusion-related transmission of HTLV-I in humans.

  17. Involvement of p38 MAPK- and JNK-modulated expression of Bcl-2 and Bax in Naja nigricollis CMS-9-induced apoptosis of human leukemia K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Jung; Liu, Wen-Hsin; Kao, Pei-Hsiu; Wang, Jeh-Jeng; Chang, Long-Sen

    2010-06-15

    CMS-9, a phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) isolated from Naja nigricollis venom, induced apoptosis of human leukemia K562 cells, characterized by mitochondrial depolarization, modulation of Bcl-2 family members, cytochrome c release and activation of caspases 9 and 3. Moreover, an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was noted. Pretreatment with BAPTA-AM (Ca2+ chelator) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, ROS scavenger) proved that Ca2+ was an upstream event in inducing ROS generation. Upon exposure to CMS-9, activation of p38 MAPK and JNK was observed in K562 cells. BAPTA-AM or NAC abrogated CMS-9-elicited p38 MAPK and JNK activation, and rescued viability of CMS-9-treated K562 cells. SB202190 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) and SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) suppressed CMS-9-induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, Bcl-2 down-regulation, Bax up-regulation and increased mitochondrial translocation of Bax. Inactivation of PLA(2) activity reduced drastically the cytotoxicity of CMS-9, and a combination of lysophosphatidylcholine and stearic acid mimicked the cytotoxic effects of CMS-9. Taken together, our data suggest that CMS-9-induced apoptosis of K562 cells is catalytic activity-dependent and is mediated through mitochondria-mediated death pathway triggered by Ca2+/ROS-evoked p38 MAPK and JNK activation. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adaptive response to mutagenesis and its molecular basis in a human T-cell leukemia line primed with a low dose of γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, P.K.; Xiang, X.Q.; Sun, W.Z.; Liu, X.Y.; Zhang, Y.P.; Wei, K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect was studied of a low dose of γ-ray preexposure on the frequency and molecular spectrum of radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus in a human T-cell leukemia line. When the cells were preexposed to 0.01 Gy of γ-rays, the yield of mutations induced by a subsequent 2-Gy challenge dose was reduced by 60%, compared with the 2 Gy of irradiation alone. The data of Southern blot analysis showed that 47% of the mutants induced by 2 Gy in the cells without low-dose preexposure were of the deletion or rearranged mutations type. In contrast, in the low-dose radioadapted cells the proportion of this type of 2-Gy-induced mutations decreased to 28%. This is close to the control level (22%) of spontaneous mutations. Our results confirm that a low dose of γ-ray preexposure leads to a decreased susceptibility to gene deletions and rearrangements after high-dose irradiation. (orig.)

  19. Murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector has differential integration patterns in human cell lines used to produce recombinant factor VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cristina Correa de Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nowadays recombinant factor VIII is produced in murine cells including in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO and baby hamster kidney cells (BHK. Previous studies, using the murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K, modified two recombinant human cell lines, HepG2 and Hek293 to produce recombinant factor VIII. In order to characterize these cells, the present study aimed to analyze the integration pattern of retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K.METHODS: This study used ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction to locate the site of viral vector integration by sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The sequences were compared to genomic databases to characterize respective clones.RESULTS: The retroviral vector presented different and non-random profiles of integration between cells lines. A preference of integration for chromosomes 19, 17 and 11 was observed for HepG2FVIIIdB/P140K and chromosome 9 for Hek293FVIIIdB/P140K. In genomic regions such as CpG islands and transcription factor binding sites, there was no difference in the integration profiles for both cell lines. Integration in intronic regions of encoding protein genes (RefSeq genes was also observed in both cell lines. Twenty percent of integrations occurred at fragile sites in the genome of the HepG2 cell line and 17% in Hek293.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the cell type can affect the profile of chromosomal integration of the retroviral vector used; these differences may interfere in the level of expression of recombinant proteins.

  20. Murine leukemia virus vector integration favors promoter regions and regional hot spots in a human T-cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukahara, Tomonori; Agawa, Hideyuki; Matsumoto, Sayori; Matsuda, Mizuho; Ueno, Shuichi; Yamashita, Yuki; Yamada, Koichiro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kojima, Katsuhiko; Takeshita, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Genomic analysis of integration will be important in evaluating the safety of human gene therapy with retroviral vectors. Here, we investigated MLV vector integration sites in human T-cells, since they are amenable to gene transfer studies, and have been used therapeutically in clinical trials. We mapped 340 MLV vector integration sites in the infected human T-cell clones we established. The data showed that MLV preferred integration near the transcription start sites (±5 kb), near CpG islands (±1 kb), and within the first intron of RefSeq genes. We also identified MLV integration hot spots that contained three or more integrations within a 100 kb region. RT-PCR revealed that mRNA-levels of T-cell clones that contained MLV integrations near transcription start sites or introns were dysregulated compared to the uninfected cells. These studies help define the profile of MLV integration in T-cells and the risks associated with MLV-based gene therapy

  1. Modulation of the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter1 (hENT1) activity by IL-4 and PMA in B cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Calotti, Paula; Galmarini, Carlos María; Cañones, Cristian; Gamberale, Romina; Saénz, Daniel; Avalos, Julio Sánchez; Chianelli, Mónica; Rosenstein, Ruth; Giordano, Mirta

    2008-02-15

    Nucleoside transporters (NTs) are essential for the uptake of therapeutic nucleoside analogs, broadly used in cancer treatment. The mechanisms responsible for NT regulation are largely unknown. IL-4 is a pro-survival signal for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells and has been shown to confer resistance to nucleoside analogs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether IL-4 is able to modulate the expression and function of the human equilibrative NT1 (hENT1) in primary cultures of CLL cells and, consequently, to affect cytotoxicity induced by therapeutic nucleosides analogs. We found that treatment with IL-4 (20 ng/ml for 24 h) increased mRNA hENT1 expression in CLL cells without affecting that of normal B cells. Given that the enhanced mRNA levels of hENT1 in CLL cells did not result in increased transport activity, we examined the possibility that hENT1 induced by IL-4 may require post-translational modifications to become active. We found that the acute stimulation of PKC in IL-4-treated CLL cells by short-term incubation with PMA significantly increased hENT1 transport activity and favoured fludarabine-induced apoptosis. By contrast, and in line with previous reports, IL-4 plus PMA protected CLL cells from a variety of cytotoxic agents. Our findings indicate that the combined treatment with IL-4 and PMA enhances hENT1 activity and specifically sensitizes CLL cells to undergo apoptosis induced by fludarabine.

  2. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Detailed Analysis of Apoptosis and Delayed Luminescence of Human Leukemia Jurkat T Cells after Proton Irradiation and Treatments with Oxidant Agents and Flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Baran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following previous work, we investigated in more detail the relationship between apoptosis and delayed luminescence (DL in human leukemia Jurkat T cells under a wide variety of treatments. We used menadione and hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress and two flavonoids, quercetin, and epigallocatechin gallate, applied alone or in combination with menadione or H2O2. 62 MeV proton beams were used to irradiate cells under a uniform dose of 2 or 10 Gy, respectively. We assessed apoptosis, cell cycle distributions, and DL. Menadione, H2O2 and quercetin were potent inducers of apoptosis and DL inhibitors. Quercetin decreased clonogenic survival and the NAD(PH level in a dose-dependent manner. Proton irradiation with 2 Gy but not 10 Gy increased the apoptotic rate. However, both doses induced a substantial G2/M arrest. Quercetin reduced apoptosis and prolonged the G2/M arrest induced by radiation. DL spectroscopy indicated that proton irradiation disrupted the electron flow within Complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thus explaining the massive necrosis induced by 10 Gy of protons and also suggested an equivalent action of menadione and quercetin at the level of the Fe/S center N2, which may be mediated by their binding to a common site within Complex I, probably the rotenone-binding site.

  4. Tax relieves transcriptional repression by promoting histone deacetylase 1 release from the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 long terminal repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hanxin; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Linton, Rebecca; Park, Hyeon Ung; Schiltz, R Louis; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Brady, John N

    2004-07-01

    Expression of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is regulated by the viral transcriptional activator Tax. Tax activates viral transcription through interaction with the cellular transcription factor CREB and the coactivators CBP/p300. In this study, we have analyzed the role of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) on HTLV-1 gene expression from an integrated template. First we show that trichostatin A, an HDAC inhibitor, enhances Tax expression in HTLV-1-transformed cells. Second, using a cell line containing a single-copy HTLV-1 long terminal repeat, we demonstrate that overexpression of HDAC1 represses Tax transactivation. Furthermore, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay allowed us to analyze the interaction of transcription factors, coactivators, and HDACs with the basal and activated HTLV-1 promoter. We demonstrate that HDAC1 is associated with the inactive, but not the Tax-transactivated, HTLV-1 promoter. In vitro and in vivo glutathione S-transferase-Tax pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that there is a direct physical association between Tax and HDAC1. Importantly, biotinylated chromatin pull-down assays demonstrated that Tax inhibits and/or dissociates the binding of HDAC1 to the HTLV-1 promoter. Our results provide evidence that Tax interacts directly with HDAC1 and regulates binding of the repressor to the HTLV-1 promoter.

  5. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia in a Black Malian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... BPDCN in Mali. KEYWORDS: Acute Leukemia, black african, dendritic cell, Mali ... myeloid neoplasm by the 2008 world health organization classification of .... There are many standardized treatment regimens, and many protocols with ... leukemia chemotherapy regimen[7,11] or chronic leukemia treatment ...

  6. Dimethyl sulfoxide potentiates death receptor-mediated apoptosis in the human myeloid leukemia U937 cell line through enhancement of mitochondrial membrane depolarization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondráček, Jan; Souček, Karel; Sheard, M. A.; Chramostová, Kateřina; Andrysík, Zdeněk; Hofmanová, Jiřina; Kozubík, Alois

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2006), s. 81-89 ISSN 0145-2126 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA524/03/0766 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : human myeloid leukemia * DMSO * apoptosis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.483, year: 2006

  7. Safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a fully human monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coiffier, Bertrand; Lepretre, Stéphane; Pedersen, Lars Møller

    2008-01-01

    Safety and efficacy of the fully human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, ofatumumab, was analyzed in a multicenter dose-escalating study including 33 patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Three cohorts of 3 (A), 3 (B), and 27 (C) patients received 4, once weekly, infusio...

  8. Premature chromosome condensation studies in human leukemia. I. Pretreatment characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittelman, W N; Broussard, L C; McCredie, K

    1979-11-01

    The phenomenon of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) was used to compare the bone marrow proliferation characteristics of 163 patients with various forms of leukemia prior to the initiation of new therapy. The proliferative potential index (PPI, or fraction of G1 cells in late G1 phase) and the fraction of cells in S phase was determined and compared to the type of disease and the bone marrow blast infiltrate for each patient. Previously untreated patients with acute leukemia exhibited an average PPI value three times that of normal bone marrow (37.5% for acute myeloblastic leukemia [AML], acute monomyeloblastic leukemia [AMML], or acute promyelocytic leukemia [APML] and 42% for acute lymphocytic leukemia [ALL] or acute undifferentiated leukemia [AUL]). Untreated chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients showed intermediate PPI values (25.2%), whereas CML patients with controlled disease exhibited nearly normal PPI values (14.6%). On the other hand, blastic-phase CML patients exhibited PPI values closer to that observed in patients with acute leukemia (35.4%). Seven patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) exhibited even higher PPI values. No correlations were observed between PPI values, fraction of cells in S phase, and marrow blast infiltrate. For untreated acute disease patients, PPI values were prognostic for response only at low and high PPI values. These results suggest that the PCC-determined proliferative potential is a biologic reflection of the degree of malignancy within the bone marrow.

  9. Silencing of BCR/ABL Chimeric Gene in Human Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cell Line K562 by siRNA-Nuclear Export Signal Peptide Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Yasuhiro; Kashihara, Shinichi; Minematsu, Go; Fujii, Hirofumi; Naemura, Madoka; Kotake, Yojiro; Morita, Yasutaka; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Fokina, Alesya A; Stetsenko, Dmitry A; Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Fujii, Masayuki

    2017-06-01

    Herein we described the synthesis of siRNA-NES (nuclear export signal) peptide conjugates by solid phase fragment coupling and the application of them to silencing of bcr/abl chimeric gene in human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. Two types of siRNA-NES conjugates were prepared, and both sense strands at 5' ends were covalently linked to a NES peptide derived from TFIIIA and HIV-1 REV, respectively. Significant enhancement of silencing efficiency was observed for both of them. siRNA-TFIIIA NES conjugate suppressed the expression of BCR/ABL gene to 8.3% at 200 nM and 11.6% at 50 nM, and siRNA-HIV-1REV NES conjugate suppressed to 4.0% at 200 nM and 6.3% at 50 nM, whereas native siRNA suppressed to 36.3% at 200 nM and 30.2% at 50 nM. We could also show complex of siRNA-NES conjugate and designed amphiphilic peptide peptideβ7 could be taken up into cells with no cytotoxicity and showed excellent silencing efficiency. We believe that the complex siRNA-NES conjugate and peptideβ7 is a promising candidate for in vivo use and therapeutic applications.

  10. Cellular determinants involving mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis correlate with the synergic cytotoxicity of epigallocatechin-3-gallate and menadione in human leukemia Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofolean, Ioana Teodora; Ganea, Constanta; Ionescu, Diana; Filippi, Alexandru; Garaiman, Alexandru; Goicea, Alexandru; Gaman, Mihnea-Alexandru; Dimancea, Alexandru; Baran, Irina

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the growth-suppressive action of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on human leukemia Jurkat T cells. Results show a strong correlation between the dose-dependent reduction of clonogenic survival following acute EGCG treatments and the EGCG-induced decline of the mitochondrial level of Ca(2+). The cell killing ability of EGCG was synergistically enhanced by menadione. In addition, the cytotoxic effect of EGCG applied alone or in combination with menadione was accompanied by apoptosis induction. We also observed that in acute treatments EGCG displays strong antioxidant properties in the intracellular milieu, but concurrently triggers some oxidative stress generating mechanisms that can fully develop on a longer timescale. In parallel, EGCG dose-dependently induced mitochondrial depolarization during exposure, but this condition was subsequently reversed to a persistent hyperpolarized mitochondrial state that was dependent on the activity of respiratory Complex I. Fluorimetric measurements suggest that EGCG is a mitochondrial Complex III inhibitor and indicate that EGCG evokes a specific cellular fluorescence with emission at 400nm and two main excitation bands (at 330nm and 350nm) that may originate from a mitochondrial supercomplex containing dimeric Complex III and dimeric ATP-synthase, and therefore could provide a valuable means to characterize the functional properties of the respiratory chain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitochondrial disfunction and apoptosis in leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria PALLAG

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a process which involves the intentional degradation of the cell from the inside, the participation of the mitochondria to propagate the apoptotic signal, the alteration of the phospholipid cell membrane composition, the perturbation and alteration of the cell metabolism.The antineoplastic drugs is inducing the apoptotic process in the sensitive cells.It have been studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Using Annexin V-PE Apoptosis Detection Kit and flow cytometer, the amount of cells undergoing apoptosis, in various stages of the antineoplasic treatment, was detected. At the same time, were monitored, the serum level of malondialdehyde. The results obtained confirm the alteration of the mitochondrial metabolism. We can observed the mitochondrial dysfunction role in cell apoptosis.

  12. Inhibitiory properties of cytoplasmic extract of Lactobacilli isolated from common carp intestine on human chronic myelocytic leukemia K562 cell line: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabiri F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Lactobacillus species are genetically diverse groups of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB that have been introduced as probiotics, because of some characteristics such as their anti-tumor properties, helping the intestinal flora balance, production of antibiotics, stimulation of host immune response, etc. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cytoplasmic extraction and cell wall of Lactobacillus species isolated from the intestine of common carp on human chronic myelocytic leukemia or K562 cancer cell lines."n"nMethods: The intestinal contents of 115 common carp captured from the natural resources of West Azerbaijan province in Iran were examined for LAB. After isolation, the identification of Lactobacilli was done according to traditional and molecular bacteriological tests. Subsequently, a suspension of each bacterium was prepared and the protein content of the cytoplasm was extracted. Cell wall disintegration was done by cell lysis buffer and sonication. The effects of cytoplasmic extraction and cell wall on K562 cell line proliferation were investigated by MTT assays."n"nResults: The cytoplasmic extraction of the isolated Lactobacilli had significant (p<0.05 anti

  13. β-Elemene piperazine derivatives induce apoptosis in human leukemia cells through downregulation of c-FLIP and generation of ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying Yu

    Full Text Available β-Elemene is an active component of the herb medicine Curcuma Wenyujin with reported antitumor activity. To improve its antitumor ability, five novel piperazine derivatives of β-elemene, 13-(3-methyl-1-piperazinyl-β-elemene (DX1, 13-(cis-3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl-β-elemene (DX2, 13-(4-ethyl-1-piperazinyl-β-elemene (DX3, 13-(4-isopropyl-1-piperazinyl-β-elemene (DX4 and 13-piperazinyl-β-elemene (DX5, were synthesized. The antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of these derivatives were determined in human leukemia HL-60, NB4, K562 and HP100-1 cells. DX1, DX2 and DX5, which contain a secondary amino moiety, were more active in inhibiting cell growth and in inducing apoptosis than DX3 and DX4. The apoptosis induction ability of DX1 was associated with the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2, a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, and the activation of caspase-8. Pretreatment with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and catalase completely blocked DX1-induced H(2O(2 production, but only partially its activation of caspase-8 and induction of apoptosis. HL-60 cells were more sensitive than its H(2O(2-resistant subclone HP100-1 cells to DX1-induced apoptosis. The activation of caspase-8 by these compounds was correlated with the decrease in the levels of cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 augmented the decrease in c-FLIP levels and apoptosis induced by these derivatives. FADD- and caspase-8-deficient Jurkat subclones have a decreased response to DX1-induced apoptosis. Our data indicate that these novel β-elemene piperazine derivatives induce apoptosis through the decrease in c-FLIP levels and the production of H(2O(2 which leads to activation of both death receptor- and mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathways.

  14. HA-1 T TCR T Cell Immunotherapy for the Treating of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-30

    HLA-A*0201 HA-1 Positive Cells Present; Minimal Residual Disease; Recurrent Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Recurrent Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Molecular interactions involved in the transactivation of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 promoter mediated by Tax and CREB-2 (ATF-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachon, F; Thebault, S; Peleraux, A; Devaux, C; Mesnard, J M

    2000-05-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein activates viral transcription through three 21-bp repeats located in the U3 region of the HTLV-1 long terminal repeat and called Tax-responsive elements (TxREs). Each TxRE contains nucleotide sequences corresponding to imperfect cyclic AMP response elements (CRE). In this study, we demonstrate that the bZIP transcriptional factor CREB-2 is able to bind in vitro to the TxREs and that CREB-2 binding to each of the 21-bp motifs is enhanced by Tax. We also demonstrate that Tax can weakly interact with CREB-2 bound to a cellular palindromic CRE motif such as that found in the somatostatin promoter. Mutagenesis of Tax and CREB-2 demonstrates that both N- and C-terminal domains of Tax and the C-terminal region of CREB-2 are required for direct interaction between the two proteins. In addition, the Tax mutant M47, defective for HTLV-1 activation, is unable to form in vitro a ternary complex with CREB-2 and TxRE. In agreement with recent results suggesting that Tax can recruit the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) on the HTLV-1 promoter, we provide evidence that Tax, CREB-2, and CBP are capable of cooperating to stimulate viral transcription. Taken together, our data highlight the major role played by CREB-2 in Tax-mediated transactivation.

  16. Green synthesis palladium nanoparticles mediated by white tea (Camellia sinensis extract with antioxidant, antibacterial, and antiproliferative activities toward the human leukemia (MOLT-4 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizi S

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan Azizi,1 Mahnaz Mahdavi Shahri,2 Heshu Sulaiman Rahman,3–5 Raha Abdul Rahim,6 Abdullah Rasedee,5 Rosfarizan Mohamad1,7 1Department of Bioprocess Technology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Department of Chemistry, Shiraz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shiraz, Iran; 3College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sulaimani, Sulaimani Nwe, 4College of Health Science, Komar University of Science and Technology (KUST, Chaq-Chaq Qularaise, Sulaimani City, Iraq; 5Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 6Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, 7Laboratory of Biopolymer and Derivatives, Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products, Universiti Putra Malaysia, UPM Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Among nanoparticles used for medical applications, palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs are among the least investigated. This study was undertaken to develop PdNPs by green synthesis using white tea (W.tea; Camellia sinensis extract to produce the Pd@W.tea NPs. The Pd@W.tea NPs were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry, and evaluated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The Pd@W.tea NPs were spherical (size 6–18 nm and contained phenols and flavonoids acquired from the W.tea extract. Pd@W.tea NPs has good 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, OH, and NO-scavenging properties as well as antibacterial effects toward Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli. MTT assay showed that Pd@W.tea NPs (IC50 =0.006 µM were more antiproliferative toward the human leukemia (MOLT-4 cells than the W.tea extract (IC50 =0.894 µM, doxorubicin (IC50 =2.133 µM, or cisplatin (IC50 =0.013 µM, whereas they were relatively innocuous for normal human fibroblast (HDF-a cells. The anticancer cell effects of Pd@W.tea NPs are mediated through the induction of apoptosis

  17. A radiolabeled antibody targeting CD123+ leukemia stem cells – initial radioimmunotherapy studies in NOD/SCID mice engrafted with primary human AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V. Leyton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT with anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody CSL360 modified with nuclear translocation sequence (NLS peptides and labeled with the Auger electron-emitter, 111In (111In-NLS-CSL360 was studied in the prevalent NOD/SCID mouse AML engraftment assay. Significant decreases in CD123+ leukemic cells and impairment of leukemic stem cell self-renewal were achieved with high doses of RIT. However, NOD/SCID mice were very radiosensitive to these doses. At low non-toxic treatment doses, 111In-NLS-CSL360 demonstrated a trend towards improved survival associated with decreased spleen/body weight ratio, an indicator of leukemia burden, and almost complete eradication of leukemia from the bone marrow in some mice.

  18. The human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 p30II protein activates p53 and induces the TIGAR and suppresses oncogene-induced oxidative stress during viral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Megan; Hutchison, Tetiana; Malu, Aditi; White, Averi; Kim, Janice; Gardner, Rachel; Smith, Katie; Nelson, Katherine; Bergeson, Rachel; McKee, Ryan; Harrod, Carolyn; Ratner, Lee; Lüscher, Bernhard; Martinez, Ernest; Harrod, Robert

    2018-05-01

    In normal cells, aberrant oncogene expression leads to the accumulation of cytotoxic metabolites, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can cause oxidative DNA-damage and apoptosis as an intrinsic barrier against neoplastic disease. The c-Myc oncoprotein is overexpressed in many lymphoid cancers due to c-myc gene amplification and/or 8q24 chromosomal translocations. Intriguingly, p53 is a downstream target of c-Myc and hematological malignancies, such as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), frequently contain wildtype p53 and c-Myc overexpression. We therefore hypothesized that p53-regulated pro-survival signals may thwart the cell's metabolic anticancer defenses to support oncogene-activation in lymphoid cancers. Here we show that the Tp53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR) promotes c-myc oncogene-activation by the human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) latency-maintenance factor p30 II , associated with c-Myc deregulation in ATL clinical isolates. TIGAR prevents the intracellular accumulation of c-Myc-induced ROS and inhibits oncogene-induced cellular senescence in ATL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and multiple myeloma cells with elevated c-Myc expression. Our results allude to a pivotal role for p53-regulated antioxidant signals as mediators of c-Myc oncogenic functions in viral and non-viral lymphoid tumors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Leukemia Mediated Endothelial Cell Activation Modulates Leukemia Cell Susceptibility to Chemotherapy through a Positive Feedback Loop Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Pezeshkian

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the chances of achieving disease-free survival are low. Studies have demonstrated a supportive role of endothelial cells (ECs in normal hematopoiesis. Here we show that similar intercellular relationships exist in leukemia. We demonstrate that leukemia cells themselves initiate these interactions by directly modulating the behavior of resting ECs through the induction of EC activation. In this inflammatory state, activated ECs induce the adhesion of a sub-set of leukemia cells through the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. These adherent leukemia cells are sequestered in a quiescent state and are unaffected by chemotherapy. The ability of adherent cells to later detach and again become proliferative following exposure to chemotherapy suggests a role of this process in relapse. Interestingly, differing leukemia subtypes modulate this process to varying degrees, which may explain the varied response of AML patients to chemotherapy and relapse rates. Finally, because leukemia cells themselves induce EC activation, we postulate a positive-feedback loop in leukemia that exists to support the growth and relapse of the disease. Together, the data defines a new mechanism describing how ECs and leukemia cells interact during leukemogenesis, which could be used to develop novel treatments for those with AML.

  20. Direct evidence for a chronic CD8+-T-cell-mediated immune reaction to tax within the muscle of a human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1-infected patient with sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Simona; Cochet, Madeleine; Mikol, Jacqueline; Teixeira, Antonio; Gessain, Antoine; Pique, Claudine

    2004-10-01

    Human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection can lead to the development of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), concomitantly with or without other inflammatory disorders such as myositis. These pathologies are considered immune-mediated diseases, and it is assumed that migration within tissues of both HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells and anti-HTLV-1 cytotoxic T cells represents a pivotal event. However, although HTLV-1-infected T cells were found in inflamed lesions, the antigenic specificity of coinfiltrated CD8(+) T cells remains to be determined. In this study, we performed both ex vivo and in situ analyses using muscle biopsies obtained from an HTLV-1-infected patient with HAM/TSP and sporadic inclusion body myositis. We found that both HTLV-1-infected CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells directed to the dominant Tax antigen can be amplified from muscle cell cultures. Moreover, we were able to detect in two successive muscle biopsies both tax mRNA-positive mononuclear cells and T cells recognized by the Tax11-19/HLA-A*02 tetramer and positive for perforin. These findings provide the first direct demonstration that anti-Tax cytotoxic T cells are chronically recruited within inflamed tissues of an HTLV-1 infected patient, which validates the cytotoxic immune reaction model for the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-associated inflammatory disease.

  1. The PDZ domain binding motif (PBM) of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax can be substituted by heterologous PBMs from viral oncoproteins during T-cell transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tomoya; Takahashi, Masahiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Oie, Masayasu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Kiyono, Tohru; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Fujii, Masahiro

    2010-04-01

    Several tumor viruses, such as human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV), human papilloma virus (HPV), human adenovirus, have high-oncogenic and low-oncogenic subtypes, and such subtype-specific oncogenesis is associated with the PDZ-domain binding motif (PBM) in their transforming proteins. HTLV-1, the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia, encodes Tax1 with PBM as a transforming protein. The Tax1 PBM was substituted with those from other oncoviruses, and the transforming activity was examined. Tax1 mutants with PBM from either HPV-16 E6 or adenovirus type 9 E4ORF1 are fully active in the transformation of a mouse T-cell line from interleukin-2-dependent growth into independent growth. Interestingly, one such Tax1 PBM mutant had an extra amino acid insertion derived from E6 between PBM and the rest of Tax1, thus suggesting that the amino acid sequences of the peptides between PBM and the rest of Tax1 and the numbers only slightly affect the function of PBM in the transformation. Tax1 and Tax1 PBM mutants interacted with tumor suppressors Dlg1 and Scribble with PDZ-domains. Unlike E6, Tax1 PBM mutants as well as Tax1 did not or minimally induced the degradations of Dlg1 and Scribble, but instead induced their subcellular translocation from the detergent-soluble fraction into the insoluble fraction, thus suggesting that the inactivation mechanism of these tumor suppressor proteins is distinct. The present results suggest that PBMs of high-risk oncoviruses have a common function(s) required for these three tumor viruses to transform cells, which is likely associated with the subtype-specific oncogenesis of these tumor viruses.

  2. [Gene Expression Profile of Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells Induced by Hsp90 Selective inhibitor 17-AAG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Na-Na; Li, Zhi-Heng; Tao, Yan-Fang; Xu, Li-Xiao; Pan, Jian; Hu, Shao-Yan

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the apoptotic effects of Hsp90 selective inhibitor 17-AAG on human leukemia HL-60 and NB4 cells and analyse its possible mechanism. CCK-8 assay was used to quantify the growth inhibition of cells after exposure to 17-AAG for 24 hours. Flow cytometrve with annexin V/propidium iodide staining was used to detect apoptosis of leukemia cells. Then Western blot was used to detect the activation of apoptosis related protein caspase-3 and PARP level. Gene expression profile of NB4 cells treated with 17-AAG was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. The inhibition of leukemia cell proliferation displayed a dose-dependent manner. Annexin V assay, cell cycle analysis and activation of PARP demonstrate that 17-AAG induced apoptosis leukemia cells. Real-time PCR array analysis showed that expression of 56 genes significantly up-regulated and expression of 23 genes were significantly down-regulated after 17-AAG treatment. The 17-AAG can inhibit the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of leukemia cells. After leukemia cells are treated with 17-AAG, the significant changes of apoptosis-related genes occured, and the cell apoptosis occurs via activating apoptosis related signaling pathway.

  3. Allogeneic cellular immunotherapy for chronic B-cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, Mels

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) as treatment modality has curative potential in patients suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), illustrating susceptibility of these leukemic cells for the

  4. Selective host range restriction of goat cells for recombinant murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus type A.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischinger, P J; Thiel, H J; Blevins, C S; Dunlop, N M

    1981-01-01

    We isolated a strain of normal goat fibroblasts which was uniquely selective in that it allowed the replication of xenotropic murine leukemia virus but not polytropic recombinant murine leukemia virus. In addition, feline leukemia virus type A replication was severely diminished in these goat cells, whereas feline leukemia virus type B and feline endogenous RD114-CCC viruses replicated efficiently. No other known cells exhibit this pattern of virus growth restriction. These goat cells allow t...

  5. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairy cell leukemia treatment options include watchful waiting when there are no symptoms, chemotherapy, biologic therapy, surgery, and targeted therapy. Learn more about the diagnosis and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent hairy cell leukemia in this expert-reviewed summary.

  6. 19-nor vitamin-D analogs: a new class of potent inhibitors of proliferation and inducers of differentiation of human myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asou, H; Koike, M; Elstner, E; Cambell, M; Le, J; Uskokovic, M R; Kamada, N; Koeffler, H P

    1998-10-01

    We have studied the in vitro biological activities and mechanisms of action of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) and nine potent 1,25D3 analogs on proliferation and differentiation of myeloid leukemia cell lines (HL-60, retinoic acid-resistant HL-60 [RA-res HL-60], NB4 and Kasumi-1). The common novel structural motiff for almost all the analogs included removal of C-19 (19-nor); each also had unsaturation of the side chain. All the compounds were potent; for example, the concentration of analogs producing a 50% clonal inhibition (ED50) ranged between 1 x 10(-9) to 4 x 10(-11) mol/L when using the HL-60 cell line. The most active compound [1, 25(OH)2-16,23E-diene-26-trifluoro-19-nor-cholecalciferol (Ro 25-9716)] had an ED50 of 4 x 10(-11) mol/L; in contrast, the 1,25D3 produced an ED50 of 10(-9) mol/L with the HL-60 target cells. Ro 25-9716 (10(-9) mol/L, 3 days) was a strong inducer of myeloid differentiation because it caused 92% of the HL-60 cells to express CD11b and 75% of these cells to reduce nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT). This compound (10(-8) mol/L, 4 days) also caused HL-60 cells to arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle (88% cells in G1 v 48% of the untreated control cells). The p27(kip-1), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor which is important in blocking the cell cycle, was induced more quickly and potently by Ro 25-9716 (10(-7) mol/L, 0 to 5 days) than by 1,25D3, suggesting a possible mechanism by which these analogs inhibit proliferation of leukemic growth. The NB4 promyelocytic leukemia cells cultured with the Ro 25-9716 were also inhibited in their clonal proliferation (ED50, 5 x 10(-11) mol/L) and their expression of CD11b was enhanced (80% positive [10(-9) mol/L, 4 days] v 27% untreated NB4 cells). Moreover, the combination of Ro 25-9716 (10(-9) mol/L) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, 10(-7) mol/L) induced 92% of the NB4 cells to reduce NBT, whereas only 26% of the cells became NBT positive after a similar exposure to the combination of 1,25D3

  7. Seroprevalence and correlates of human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type 1 antibodies among pregnant women at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoye AE

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Augustine Ejike Okoye,1 Obike Godswill Ibegbulam,2 Robinson Chukwudi Onoh,3 Paul Olisaemeka Ezeonu,3 Ngozi I Ugwu,1 Lucky Osaheni Lawani,3 Chukwudi Simon Anigbo,2 Charles E Nonyelu21Department of Haematology and Immunology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, 2Department of Haematology and Immunology, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH, Ituku-Ozalla, 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, NigeriaBackground: Human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus transmitted vertically from mother to child parenterally and sexually by infected lymphocytes.Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies and associated risk factors for HTLV-1 infection among pregnant women in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, southeast Nigeria.Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out from July to October 2010. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited consecutively from the antenatal clinic. Five milliliters of blood was collected from each of the participants into a plain sterile bottle and allowed to clot. The serum obtained was stored at -20°C until required for analysis. The serum samples were then analyzed for antibodies to HTLV-1 using a one-step incubation double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Participants' demographic characteristics and degree of exposure to the risk factors associated with HTLV-1 infection were captured using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of results was done using SPSS version 17.Results: The average age of the pregnant women was 28.94 years (standard deviation 4.17. The age-group with the highest representation was those between the ages of 26 and 30 years. Thirty-six percent of the population was above 30 years old. The result of the tests showed that only one respondent, a 31-year-old pregnant woman tested positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Therefore, the

  8. A novel cell growth-promoting factor identified in a B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.; Holan, V.; Minowada, J.

    1993-01-01

    A novel leukemia cell growth-promoting activity has been identified in the culture supernatant from a human B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1. The supernatant from unstimulated cultures of the BALL-1 cells significantly promoted the growth of 16 out of 24 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines of different lineages (T, B and non-lymphoid) in a minimal concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and 5 out of 12 cases of fresh leukemia cells in FBS-free medium. The growth-promoting sieve filtration and dialysis. The MW of the factor was less than 10 kDa. The growth-promoting activity was heat and acid stable and resistant to trypsin treatment. The factor isolated from the BALL-1 supernatant was distinct from known polypeptide growth factors with MW below 10 kDa, such as epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor α, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II and insulin, as determine by specific antibodies and by cell-growth-promoting tests. The factor is the BALL-1 supernatant did not promote the proliferation of normal human fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes or mouse fibroblast cell line, BALB/C 3T3. In addition to the BALL-1 supernatant, a similar growth-promoting activity was found in the culture supernatant from 13 of 17 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested. The activity in these culture supernatant promoted the growth of leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in autocrine and/or paracrine fashions. These observations suggest that the low MW cell growth-promoting activity found in the BALL-1 culture supernatant is mediated by a novel factor which may be responsible for the clonal expansion of particular leukemic clones. (author)

  9. CAR-T cells targeting CLL-1 as an approach to treat acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jinghua; Chen, Siyu; Xiao, Wei; Li, Wende; Wang, Liang; Yang, Shuo; Wang, Weida; Xu, Liping; Liao, Shuangye; Liu, Wenjian; Wang, Yang; Liu, Nawei; Zhang, Jianeng; Xia, Xiaojun; Kang, Tiebang

    2018-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of adult acute leukemia. Standard chemotherapies can induce complete remission in selected patients; however, a majority of patients eventually relapse and succumb to the disease. Thus, the development of novel therapeutics for AML is urgently needed. Human C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL-1) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, and its expression is restricted to myeloid cells and the majority of AML blasts. Moreov...

  10. Radiogenic leukemia revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced leukemia is considered to be similar to the de novo disease. However, following an analysis of clinical and hematological findings in leukemia occurring in irradiated cervical cancer patients, adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, and spondylitics treated with x-ray, striking differences were noted. Acute leukemias in cervical cancer patients and Japanese survivors were similar in type to acute de novo leukemias in adults. Cell types among spondylitics were very dissimilar; rare forms, eg, acute erythromyelocytic leukemia (AEL) and acute megakaryocytic leukemia, were increased. Pancytopenia occurred in 25 of 35 cases and erythromyelodysplastic disorders were noted in seven of 35 acute cases. The leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders closely resembled those occurring in patients treated with alkylating agents. This similarity suggests a common pathogenesis involving marrow stem cell injury and extra-medullary mediators of hematopoiesis. Investigation of early acute leukemias and myelodysplastic disorders with newer techniques may provide valuable insights into the pathogenesis of leukemia in humans

  11. Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Kusumi, Shizuyo

    1992-01-01

    Leukemia is the first malignant disease found among A-bomb survivors. Leukemia registration has greatly contributed to epidemiological and hematological studies on A-bomb radiation-related leukemia and other hematopoietic diseases, consisting of community population and the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) sample (approximately 120,000 persons containing A-bomb survivors). Using the fixed LSS cohort, the prevalence rate of leukemia reached the peak during the years 1950-1954, and thereafter, it has been gradually decreased. However, risk patterns for leukemia are still unsolved: has leukemia risk increased in recent years?; are serial changes in leukemia risk influenced by age at the time of exposure (ATE)?; is there variation between Hiroshima and Nagasaki?; and others. To solve these questions, leukemia data are now under analysis using the revised DS86. Relative risk for leukemia, especially chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), is found to be linearly increased with increasing bone marrow doses. Serial patterns of both excess risk and excess relative risk have revealed that leukemia risk is high at 5-10 years after A-bombing in younger A-bomb survivors ATE. The influence of age ATE on serial changes is noticeable in ALL. Another factor involved in the prevalence of leukemia is background (spontaneously developed leukemia), which is the recent interest because young A-bomb survivors ATE reach the cancer-prone age. (N.K.)

  12. Induction of Mitochondrial Dependent Apoptosis in Human Leukemia K562 Cells by Meconopsis integrifolia: A Species from Traditional Tibetan Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Fan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Meconopsis integrifolia (M. integrifolia is one of the most popular members in Traditional Tibetan Medicine. This study aimed to investigate the anticancer effect of M. integrifolia and to detect the underlying mechanisms of these effects. Methods: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and trypan blue assay were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of M. integrifolia. Changes in cell nuclear morphology and reactive oxygen species (ROS level were observed by fluorescent microscopy. Apoptosis ratio, DNA damage and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP loss were analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blotting assay was adopted to detect the proteins related to apoptosis. Immunofluorescence was used to observe the release of cytochrome C. Results: The obtained data revealed that M. integrifolia could significantly inhibit K562 cell viability, mainly by targeting apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Collapse in cell morphology, chromatin condensation, DNA damage and ROS accumulation were observed. Further mechanism detection revealed that mitochondrion might be a key factor in M. integrifolia-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: M. integrifolia could induce mitochondria mediated apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase with little damage to normal cells, suggesting that M. integrifolia might be a potential and efficient anticancer agent that deserves further investigation.

  13. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells: A novel role of cannabidiol in the regulation of p22phox and Nox4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKallip, Robert J; Jia, Wentao; Schlomer, Jerome; Warren, James W; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2006-09-01

    In the current study, we examined the effects of the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, cannabidiol, on the induction of apoptosis in leukemia cells. Exposure of leukemia cells to cannabidiol led to cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2)-mediated reduction in cell viability and induction in apoptosis. Furthermore, cannabidiol treatment led to a significant decrease in tumor burden and an increase in apoptotic tumors in vivo. From a mechanistic standpoint, cannabidiol exposure resulted in activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and a decrease in full-length Bid, suggesting possible cross-talk between the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. The role of the mitochondria was further suggested as exposure to cannabidiol led to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c. It is noteworthy that cannabidiol exposure led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production as well as an increase in the expression of the NAD(P)H oxidases Nox4 and p22(phox). Furthermore, cannabidiol-induced apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels could be blocked by treatment with the ROS scavengers or the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. Finally, cannabidiol exposure led to a decrease in the levels of p-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which could be blocked by treatment with a CB2-selective antagonist or ROS scavenger. Together, the results from this study reveal that cannabidiol, acting through CB2 and regulation of Nox4 and p22(phox) expression, may be a novel and highly selective treatment for leukemia.

  14. Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Dickinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT lies with the ability of the engrafting immune system to remove residual leukemia cells via a graft-versus-leukemia effect (GvL, caused either spontaneously post-HSCT or via donor lymphocyte infusion. GvL effects can also be initiated by allogenic mismatched natural killer cells, antigen-specific T cells, and activated dendritic cells of leukemic origin. The history and further application of this GvL effect and the main mechanisms will be discussed and reviewed in this chapter.

  15. Using Proteomics to 1) Identify the Bone Marrow Homing Receptors Expressed on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and 2) Elucidate Critical Signaling Pathways Responsible for the Blockage of Hematopoietic Differentiation in Leukemia

    KAUST Repository

    Chin, Chee J.

    2011-05-22

    Successful hematopoiesis requires the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow (BM) niche, where they can differentiate to produce all blood lineages. Leukemia arises when there is a blockage of differentiation and uncontrolled proliferation in the hematopoietic cells during their development. To refine therapies for leukemia, this study sought to improve the homing of healthy donor HSPCs for better transplantation and to find new candidates for differentiating and blocking proliferation in leukemic cells. Characterizing the molecular effectors mediating cell migration forms the basis for improving clinical transplantation of HSPCs. E-selectin/ligand interactions play a critical role in the homing of HSPCs to the BM, however, the identity of E-selectin ligands remains elusive. We aimed to use mass spectrometry (MS) to fully analyze the E-selectin ligands expressed on HSPCs. Immunoprecipitation studies coupled with MS confirmed the expression of three known E-selectin ligands, the hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and CD43, and revealed the presence of many interesting candidates on HSPCs-like cell line and on primary human BM CD34+ cells. The MS dataset represents a rich resource for further characterization of E-selectin ligands, which will lead to improvement of HSPCs transplantation. 4 Understanding the critical pathways underlying the initiation and maintenance of leukemia plays a key role in treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Ligation of the glycoprotein, CD44, using monoclonal antibodies or its natural ligand, hyaluronic acid, drives the differentiation of immature leukemic cells towards mature terminally differentiated cells, inhibits their proliferation and in some case induces their apoptosis. The aim of this study is to characterize the phosphoproteome of AML cells in response to CD44-induced differentiation. This will afford novel insights into the

  16. Lentin, a novel and potent antifungal protein from shitake mushroom with inhibitory effects on activity of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase and proliferation of leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Patrick H K; Ng, T B

    2003-11-14

    From the fruiting bodies of the edible mushroom Lentinus edodes, a novel protein designated lentin with potent antifungal activity was isolated. Lentin was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose, and adsorbed on Affi-gel blue gel and Mono S. The N-terminal sequence of lentin manifested similarity to endoglucanase. Lentin, which had a molecular mass of 27.5 kDa, inhibited mycelial growth in a variety of fungal species including Physalospora piricola, Botrytis cinerea and Mycosphaerella arachidicola. Lentin also exerted an inhibitory activity on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and proliferation of leukemia cells.

  17. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax genotype analysis in Okinawa, the southernmost and remotest islands of Japan: Different distributions compared with mainland Japan and the potential value for the prognosis of aggressive adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakihama, Shugo; Saito, Mineki; Kuba-Miyara, Megumi; Tomoyose, Takeaki; Taira, Naoya; Miyagi, Takashi; Hayashi, Masaki; Kinjo, Shigeko; Nakachi, Sawako; Tedokon, Iori; Nishi, Yukiko; Tamaki, Keita; Morichika, Kazuho; Uchihara, Jun-Nosuke; Morishima, Satoko; Karube, Ken-Nosuke; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Fukushima, Takuya

    2017-10-01

    Okinawa, comprising remote islands off the mainland of Japan, is an endemic area of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1), the causative virus of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (HAM). We investigated the tax genotype of HTLV-1 among 29 HTLV-1 carriers, 74 ATL patients, and 33 HAM patients in Okinawa. The genotype distribution-60 (44%) taxA cases and 76 (56%) taxB cases-differed from that of a previous report from Kagoshima Prefecture in mainland Japan (taxA, 10%; taxB, 90%). A comparison of the clinical outcomes of 45 patients (taxA, 14; taxB, 31) with aggressive ATL revealed that the overall response and 1-year overall survival rates for taxA (50% and 35%, respectively) were lower than those for taxB (71% and 49%, respectively). In a multivariate analysis of two prognostic indices for aggressive ATL, Japan Clinical Oncology Group-Prognostic Index and Prognostic Index for acute and lymphoma ATL, with respect to age, performance status, corrected calcium, soluble interleukin-2 receptor, and tax genotype, the estimated hazard ratio of taxA compared with taxB was 2.68 (95% confidence interval, 0.87-8.25; P=0.086). Our results suggest that the tax genotype has clinical value as a prognostic factor for aggressive ATL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyvalent integrin antagonist-decorated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for triggering apoptosis in human leukemia cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Say, Rıdvan; Yazar, Suzan; Uğur, Alper; Hür, Deniz; Denizli, Adil; Ersöz, Arzu

    2013-01-01

    Integrin family members are the main mediators of cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix and active as intra- and extracellular signaling molecules in a variety of processes. They bind to their ligands by interacting with short amino acid sequences, that is, RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) sequence. RGD sequences have been used to enhance cell binding to artificial surfaces, so RGD mimics have been used to block integrin binding to its ligand. Integrin–ligand interactions are dependent on divalent cations, and Mg 2+ provide higher-affinity binding to ligand for many integrins. In this study, we have designed new integrin antagonists using methacryloyl amidoaspartic acid (MAASP) monomer-conjugated silanized super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, the size of the nanoparticles was verified with an average size of 32.6 nm) and poly(MAASP-co-EDMA) shell-decorated silanized SPIONs. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe uptake of modified SPIONs into the cells, including receptor-mediated endocytosis. Our aim is to bind these modified SPIONs to the integrin-mediated aspartic acid ends of MAASP monomers and block integrin binding to their ligand.

  19. Polyvalent integrin antagonist-decorated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for triggering apoptosis in human leukemia cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Say, R Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I dvan, E-mail: rsay@anadolu.edu.tr [Anadolu Universitesi, Kimya Boeluemue, Fen Fakueltesi (Turkey); Yazar, Suzan [Sanovel Pharmaceutical Company (Turkey); Ugur, Alper; Huer, Deniz [Anadolu Universitesi, Kimya Boeluemue, Fen Fakueltesi (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Ersoez, Arzu [Anadolu Universitesi, Kimya Boeluemue, Fen Fakueltesi (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    Integrin family members are the main mediators of cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix and active as intra- and extracellular signaling molecules in a variety of processes. They bind to their ligands by interacting with short amino acid sequences, that is, RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) sequence. RGD sequences have been used to enhance cell binding to artificial surfaces, so RGD mimics have been used to block integrin binding to its ligand. Integrin-ligand interactions are dependent on divalent cations, and Mg{sup 2+} provide higher-affinity binding to ligand for many integrins. In this study, we have designed new integrin antagonists using methacryloyl amidoaspartic acid (MAASP) monomer-conjugated silanized super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs, the size of the nanoparticles was verified with an average size of 32.6 nm) and poly(MAASP-co-EDMA) shell-decorated silanized SPIONs. Several mechanisms have been proposed to describe uptake of modified SPIONs into the cells, including receptor-mediated endocytosis. Our aim is to bind these modified SPIONs to the integrin-mediated aspartic acid ends of MAASP monomers and block integrin binding to their ligand.

  20. X-ray repair replication in L1210 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.C.; Byfield, J.E.; Bennett, L.R.; Chan, P.Y.M.

    1974-01-01

    Repair replication has been studied in detail in mouse L1210 leukemia cells. A method of identifying and quantitating repair replication using a pre- and postradiation block of normal replication with cytosine arabinoside is illustrated. The method derived does not require isolation of DNA per se and appears to be satisfactory for screening for inhibitors of repair replication. Repair replication can be demonstrated at doses in the 1000-rad range in bromouridine deoxyriboside-substituted cells and at slightly higher doses in nonsubstituted cells. Drugs that are known to bind to DNA inhibit this x-ray-induced repair replication. Drugs with these properties may be identified by the methods described and compared quantitatively in their ability to inhibit this type of x-ray damage. Since these phenomena can be demonstrated for low radiation doses and at drug concentrations attainable in vivo during human cancer chemotherapy this class of anticancer agent may be worthy of closer study. Application to the L1210 leukemia system should permit comparison of in vitro and in vivo drug effects in the context of the extensive in vivo pharmacological data already available for L1210 cells. (U.S.)

  1. Autophagy contributes to 4-Amino-2-Trifluoromethyl-Phenyl Retinate-induced differentiation in human acute promyelocytic leukemia NB4 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yue; Li, Ge; Wang, Ke; Xie, Ya-Ya; Zhou, Ren-Peng; Meng, Yao; Ding, Ran; Ge, Jin-Fang; Chen, Fei-Hu, E-mail: cfhchina@sohu.com

    2017-03-15

    As a classic differentiation agent, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been widely used in treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, clinical application of ATRA has limitations. Our previous studies suggested that 4-Amino-2-Trifluoromethyl-Phenyl Retinate (ATPR), a novel all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) derivative designed and synthesized by our team, could induce differentiation of APL cells in vivo and in vitro. To explore the underlying mechanism of ATPR, the effect of ATPR on autophagy of APL cells was observed in the present study. The results showed that the differentiation effect of ATPR on APL cells was accompanied with autophagy induction and PML-RARα degradation via activating Notch1 signaling pathway. Moreover, inhibition of autophagy using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) that targets essential autophagy gene ATG5 abrogated the ATPR-induced cell differentiation. Furthermore, when pretreated with DAPT, a γ-secretase inhibitor, the Notch1 signaling pathway was blocked in APL cells, followed by the reduction of ATPR-induced autophagy and differentiation. Taken together, these results suggested that autophagy play an important role in ATPR-induced cell differentiation, which may provide a novel approach to cure APL patients. - Highlights: • ATPR induces autophagy in APL cell line NB4 cells. • Autophagy induction is essential for cell differentiation in NB4 cells. • Notch1 signaling is involved in ATPR-induced autophagy and differentiation in NB4 cells.

  2. Stimulation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 enhancer by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I tax gene product involves the action of inducible cellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhnlein, E; Siekevitz, M; Ballard, D W; Lowenthal, J W; Rimsky, L; Bogérd, H; Hoffman, J; Wano, Y; Franza, B R; Greene, W C

    1989-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) preferentially infects CD4+ T lymphocytes and may exist as a latent provirus within these cells for extended periods. The transition to a productive retroviral infection results in T-cell death and clinically may lead to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Accelerated production of infectious HIV-1 virions appears to be closely linked to a heightened state of T-cell activation. The transactivator (Tax) protein of the type I human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I) can produce such an activated T-cell phenotype and augments activity of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. One Tax-responsive region within the HIV-1 long terminal repeat has been mapped to a locus composed of two 10-base-pair direct repeats sharing homology with the binding site for the eucaryotic transcription factor NF-kappaB (GGGACTTTCC). Tax-expressing Jurkat T cells contain one or more inducible cellular proteins that specifically associate with the HIV-1 enhancer at these binding sites. Microscale DNA affinity precipitation assays identified a Tax-inducible 86-kilodalton protein, HIVEN86A, as one of these HIV-1 enhancer-binding factors. The interaction of HIVEN86A, and presumably other cellular proteins, with the HIV-1 enhancer appears functionally important as oligonucleotides corresponding to this enhancer were sufficient to impart Tax inducibility to an unresponsive heterologous promoter. These findings suggest that the Tax-inducible cellular protein HIVEN86A plays an important role in the transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 enhancer. These specific protein-DNA interactions may also be important for the transition of HIV-1 from a latent to a productive mode of infection. Furthermore, these findings highlight an intriguing biological interplay between HTLV-1 and HIV-1 through a cellular transcriptional pathway that is normally involved in T-cell activation and growth.

  3. Antileukemic Effect of Tualang Honey on Acute and Chronic Leukemia Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Muhd Khuzaimi Nik Man

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complementary medicine using natural product as antitumor is on the rise. Much research has been performed on Tualang Honey and it was shown to have therapeutic potential in wound healing, and antimicrobial activity and be antiproliferative against several cancer models such as human osteosarcoma (HOS, human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and cervical (HeLa cancer cell lines. To date, there was limited study on antileukemic properties of Tualang (Koompassia excelsa Honey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileukemic effect of Tualang Honey on acute and chronic leukemia cell lines. Leukemia cell lines (K562 and MV4-11 and human mononuclear cell isolated from peripheral blood were grown in RPM1 1640 culture medium. The cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Tualang Honey. After incubation, the evaluation of viability and apoptosis was performed. The morphological changes of leukemia cells were the presence of cytoplasmic blebs followed by apoptotic bodies and round shape of cells. IC50 against K562 and MV4-11 was determined. Tualang Honey gave 53.9% and 50.6% apoptosis activity on K562 and MV4-11, respectively, while on human mononuclear cell it was 37.4%. Tualang Honey has the apoptosis-inducing ability for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (K562 and MV4-11 cell lines.

  4. Case report 429: Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Hino, Megumu; Torizuka, Kanji; Kyoto Univ.; Uchiyama, Takahashi; Uchino, Haruto

    1987-01-01

    The radiological and pathological skeletal manifestations in a case of adult T-cell leukemia are presented. The authors have emphasized the presence of multiple areas of localized subperiosteal resorption as a helpful finding in the differential diagnosis between adult T-cell leukemia and multiple myeloma and hyperparathyroidism. A possible mechanism for these radiological features and its similarity to those of other T-cell malignancies are discussed briefly. (orig./SHA)

  5. Design, development, and validation of a high-throughput drug-screening assay for targeting of human leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, Katja; Pasqualini, Renata; Cortes, Jorge E.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Lichtiger, Benjamin; O'Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Sidman, Richard L.; Arap, Wadih; Koivunen, Erkki

    2015-01-01

    Background We introduce an ex vivo methodology to perform drug library screening against human leukemia. Method Our strategy relies on human blood or bone marrow cultures under hypoxia; under these conditions, leukemia cells deplete oxygen faster than normal cells, causing a hemoglobin oxygenation shift. We demonstrate several advantages: (I) partial recapitulation of the leukemia microenvironment, (ii) use of native hemoglobin oxygenation as real-time sensor/reporter, (iii) cost-effectiveness, (iv) species-specificity, and (v) format that enables high-throughput screening. Results As a proof-of-concept, we screened a chemical library (size ∼20,000) against human leukemia cells. We identified 70 compounds (“hit” rate=0.35%; Z-factor=0.71) with activity; we examined 20 to find 18 true-positives (90%). Finally, we show that carbonohydraxonic diamide group-containing compounds are potent anti-leukemia agents that induce cell death in leukemia cells and patient-derived samples. Conclusions This unique functional assay can identify novel drug candidates as well as find future applications in personalized drug selection for leukemia patients. PMID:24496871

  6. The 57Fe hyperfine interactions in iron storage proteins in liver and spleen tissues from normal human and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia: a Mössbauer effect study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Alenkina, I. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Study of human spleen and liver tissues from healthy persons and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. Small variations in the 57 Fe hyperfine parameters for normal and patient’s tissues were detected and related to small variations in the 57 Fe local microenvironment in ferrihydrite cores. The differences in the relative parts of more crystalline and more amorphous core regions were also supposed for iron storage proteins in normal and patients’ spleen and liver tissues

  7. The 57Fe hyperfine interactions in iron storage proteins in liver and spleen tissues from normal human and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia: a Mössbauer effect study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Alenkina, I. V.; Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Study of human spleen and liver tissues from healthy persons and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. Small variations in the 57Fe hyperfine parameters for normal and patient's tissues were detected and related to small variations in the 57Fe local microenvironment in ferrihydrite cores. The differences in the relative parts of more crystalline and more amorphous core regions were also supposed for iron storage proteins in normal and patients' spleen and liver tissues.

  8. The {sup 57}Fe hyperfine interactions in iron storage proteins in liver and spleen tissues from normal human and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia: a Mössbauer effect study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@gmail.com; Alenkina, I. V. [Ural Federal University, Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, A. V.; Konstantinova, T. S. [Ural State Medical University (Russian Federation); Semionkin, V. A. [Ural Federal University, Department of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control, Institute of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Study of human spleen and liver tissues from healthy persons and two patients with mantle cell lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia was carried out using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution. Small variations in the {sup 57}Fe hyperfine parameters for normal and patient’s tissues were detected and related to small variations in the {sup 57}Fe local microenvironment in ferrihydrite cores. The differences in the relative parts of more crystalline and more amorphous core regions were also supposed for iron storage proteins in normal and patients’ spleen and liver tissues.

  9. HTLV 1 associated adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia a clinicopathologic, immunophenotypic tale of three cases from non-endemic region of south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiq Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by human T-cell lymphotrophic virus-1, affects mostly adults with systemic involvement and poor prognosis. Diagnosis of adult T-Cell leukemia/Lymphoma is challenging. The clinico-pathologic and immuno-phenotypic features of the three cases will be presented.

  10. Therapeutic activity of two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthou Christian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that allanxanthone C and macluraxanthone, two xanthones purified from Guttiferae trees, display in vitro antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and leukemia B cell lines. Results Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of the two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human CLL, developed by engrafting CD5-transfected chronic leukemia B cells into SCID mice. Treatment of the animals with five daily injections of either allanxanthone C or macluraxanthone resulted in a significant prolongation of their survival as compared to control animals injected with the solvent alone (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0141, respectively. The same treatment of mice which were not xenografted induced no mortality. Conclusion These data show for the first time the in vivo antileukemic activities of two plant-derived xanthones, and confirm their potential interest for CLL therapy.

  11. Seroprevalence and correlates of human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus type 1 antibodies among pregnant women at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Augustine Ejike; Ibegbulam, Obike Godswill; Onoh, Robinson Chukwudi; Ezeonu, Paul Olisaemeka; Ugwu, Ngozi I; Lawani, Lucky Osaheni; Anigbo, Chukwudi Simon; Nonyelu, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphoma/leukemia virus (HTLV)-1 is a retrovirus transmitted vertically from mother to child parenterally and sexually by infected lymphocytes. The objective of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies and associated risk factors for HTLV-1 infection among pregnant women in University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, southeast Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was carried out from July to October 2010. Two hundred pregnant women were recruited consecutively from the antenatal clinic. Five milliliters of blood was collected from each of the participants into a plain sterile bottle and allowed to clot. The serum obtained was stored at -20°C until required for analysis. The serum samples were then analyzed for antibodies to HTLV-1 using a one-step incubation double-antigen sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Participants' demographic characteristics and degree of exposure to the risk factors associated with HTLV-1 infection were captured using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis of results was done using SPSS version 17. The average age of the pregnant women was 28.94 years (standard deviation 4.17). The age-group with the highest representation was those between the ages of 26 and 30 years. Thirty-six percent of the population was above 30 years old. The result of the tests showed that only one respondent, a 31-year-old pregnant woman tested positive for HTLV-1 antibodies. Therefore, the seroprevalence of HTLV-1 antibodies among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic at University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital was 0.5%, with a 95% confidence interval of 0%-2.8%. Some of the sociodemographic risk factors of HTLV-1 infection found to be applicable to the 31-year-old woman who tested positive included positive history of previous sexually transmitted diseases, high parity, low socioeconomic status, female sex, and age above 30 years. The pregnant women that participated in this study were exposed to risk

  12. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax requires direct access to DNA for recruitment of CREB binding protein to the viral promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzmeier, B A; Giebler, H A; Nyborg, J K

    1998-02-01

    Efficient human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) replication and viral gene expression are dependent upon the virally encoded oncoprotein Tax. To activate HTLV-1 transcription, Tax interacts with the cellular DNA binding protein cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and recruits the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP), forming a nucleoprotein complex on the three viral cyclic AMP-responsive elements (CREs) in the HTLV-1 promoter. Short stretches of dG-dC-rich (GC-rich) DNA, immediately flanking each of the viral CREs, are essential for Tax recruitment of CBP in vitro and Tax transactivation in vivo. Although the importance of the viral CRE-flanking sequences is well established, several studies have failed to identify an interaction between Tax and the DNA. The mechanistic role of the viral CRE-flanking sequences has therefore remained enigmatic. In this study, we used high resolution methidiumpropyl-EDTA iron(II) footprinting to show that Tax extended the CREB footprint into the GC-rich DNA flanking sequences of the viral CRE. The Tax-CREB footprint was enhanced but not extended by the KIX domain of CBP, suggesting that the coactivator increased the stability of the nucleoprotein complex. Conversely, the footprint pattern of CREB on a cellular CRE lacking GC-rich flanking sequences did not change in the presence of Tax or Tax plus KIX. The minor-groove DNA binding drug chromomycin A3 bound to the GC-rich flanking sequences and inhibited the association of Tax and the Tax-CBP complex without affecting CREB binding. Tax specifically cross-linked to the viral CRE in the 5'-flanking sequence, and this cross-link was blocked by chromomycin A3. Together, these data support a model where Tax interacts directly with both CREB and the minor-groove viral CRE-flanking sequences to form a high-affinity binding site for the recruitment of CBP to the HTLV-1 promoter.

  13. Protein domains involved in both in vivo and in vitro interactions between human T-cell leukemia virus type I tax and CREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, M J; Paulssen, E J; Seeler, J S; Gaynor, R B

    1995-06-01

    Gene expression from the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat (LTR) is mediated by three cis-acting regulatory elements known as 21-bp repeats and the transactivator protein Tax. The 21-bp repeats can be subdivided into three motifs known as A, B, and C, each of which is important for maximal gene expression in response to Tax. The B motif contains nucleotide sequences known as a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) or tax-response element which binds members of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors. Though mutations of this element in the HTLV-I LTR eliminate tax activation, Tax will not activate most other promoters containing these CRE sites. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which Tax activates gene expression in conjunction with members of the ATF/CREB family. We found that Tax enhanced the binding of one member of the ATF/CREB family, CREB 1, to each of the three HTLV-I LTR 21-bp repeats but not another member designated CRE-BP1 or CREB2. Tax enhanced the binding of CREB1 to nonpalindromic CRE binding sites such as those found in the HTLV-I LTR, but Tax did not enhance the binding of CREB1 to palindromic CRE binding sites such as found in the somatostatin promoter. This finding may help explain the failure of Tax to activate promoters containing consensus CRE sites. These studies were extended by use of the mammalian two-hybrid system. Tax was demonstrated to interact directly with CREB1 but not with other bZIP proteins, including CREB2 and Jun. Site-directed mutagenesis of both Tax and CREB1 demonstrated that the amino terminus of Tax and both the basic and the leucine zipper regions of CREB1 were required for direct interactions between these proteins both in vivo and in vitro. This interaction occurred in vivo and thus did not require the presence of the HTLV-I 21-bp repeats, as previously suggested. These results define the domains required for interaction between Tax and CREB that are likely critical for the

  14. Nanomechanical measurement of adhesion and migration of leukemia cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuo Long; Ma, Jing; Tong, Ming-Hui; Chan, Barbara Pui; Wong, Alice Sze Tsai; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan

    The adhesion and traction behavior of leukemia cells in their microenvironment is directly linked to their migration, which is a prime issue affecting the release of cancer cells from the bone marrow and hence metastasis. In assessing the effectiveness of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) treatment, the conventional batch-cell transwell-migration assay may not indicate the intrinsic effect of the treatment on migration, since the treatment may also affect other cellular behavior, such as proliferation or death. In this study, the pN-level adhesion and traction forces between single leukemia cells and their microenvironment were directly measured using optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy. The effects of PMA on K562 and THP1 leukemia cells were studied, and the results showed that PMA treatment significantly increased cell adhesion with extracellular matrix proteins, bone marrow stromal cells, and human fibroblasts. PMA treatment also significantly increased the traction of THP1 cells on bovine serum albumin proteins, although the effect on K562 cells was insignificant. Western blots showed an increased expression of E-cadherin and vimentin proteins after the leukemia cells were treated with PMA. The study suggests that PMA upregulates adhesion and thus suppresses the migration of both K562 and THP1 cells in their microenvironment. The ability of optical tweezers and traction-force microscopy to measure directly pN-level cell-protein or cell-cell contact was also demonstrated.

  15. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  16. Retinoic acid-induced granulocytic differentiation of HL60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells is preceded by downregulation of autonomous generation of inositol lipid-derived second messengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porfiri, E.; Hoffbrand, A.V.; Wickremasinghe, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Inositol phosphates (InsPs) and diacyglycerol (DAG) are second messengers derived via the breakdown of inositol phospholipids, and which play important signalling roles in the regulation of proliferation of some cell types. The authors have studied the operation of this pathway during the early stages of retionic acid (RA)-induced granulocytic differentiation of HL60 myeloid leukemia cells. The autonomous breakdown of inositol lipids that occurred in HL60 cells labeled with [3H] inositol was completely abolished following 48 hours of RA treatment. The rate of influx of 45Ca2+ was also significantly decreased at 48 hours, consistent with the role of inositol lipid-derived second messengers in regulating Ca2+ entry into cells. The downregulation of inositol lipid metabolism clearly preceded the onset of reduced proliferation induced by RA treatment, and was therefore not a consequence of decreased cell growth. The generation of InsPs in RA-treated cells was reactivated by the fluoroaluminate ion, a direct activator of guanine nucleotide-binding protein(s) (G proteins) that regulate the inositol lipid signalling pathway. Subtle alterations to a regulatory mechanism may therefore mediate the RA-induced downregulation of this pathway. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the autonomous generation of inositol lipid-derived second messengers may contribute to the continuous proliferation of HL60 cells, and that the RA-induced downregulation of this pathway may, in turn, play a role in signalling the cessation of proliferation that preceedes granulocytic differentiation

  17. SET-NUP214 fusion in acute myeloid leukemia- and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia-derived cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaborski Margarete

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SET-NUP214 fusion resulting from a recurrent cryptic deletion, del(9(q34.11q34.13 has recently been described in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and in one case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The fusion protein appears to promote elevated expression of HOXA cluster genes in T-ALL and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. We screened a panel of ALL and AML cell lines for SET-NUP214 expression to find model systems that might help to elucidate the cellular function of this fusion gene. Results Of 141 human leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested, only the T-ALL cell line LOUCY and the AML cell line MEGAL expressed the SET(TAF-Iβ-NUP214 fusion gene transcript. RT-PCR analysis specifically recognizing the alternative first exons of the two TAF-I isoforms revealed that the cell lines also expressed TAF-Iα-NUP214 mRNA. Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and array-based copy number analysis were both consistent with del(9(q34.11q34.13 as described. Quantitative genomic PCR also confirmed loss of genomic material between SET and NUP214 in both cell lines. Genomic sequencing localized the breakpoints of the SET gene to regions downstream of the stop codon and to NUP214 intron 17/18 in both LOUCY and MEGAL cells. Both cell lines expressed the 140 kDa SET-NUP214 fusion protein. Conclusion Cell lines LOUCY and MEGAL express the recently described SET-NUP214 fusion gene. Of special note is that the formation of the SET exon 7/NUP214 exon 18 gene transcript requires alternative splicing as the SET breakpoint is located downstream of the stop codon in exon 8. The cell lines are promising model systems for SET-NUP214 studies and should facilitate investigating cellular functions of the the SET-NUP214 protein.

  18. Evaluation of effects of various drugs on platelet functions using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced megakaryocytic human erythroid leukemia cells

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    Tada T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tomoki Tada,1 Kensaku Aki,2 Wataru Oboshi,1,3 Kazuyoshi Kawazoe,4 Toshiyuki Yasui,5 Eiji Hosoi2 1Subdivision of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Tokushima University, 2Department of Cells and Immunity Analytics, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, 3Department of Medical Technology, Kagawa Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Kagawa, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy Practice Pedagogy, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, 5Department of Reproductive and Menopausal Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School, Tokushima, Japan Background: The hyperfunction and activation of platelets have been strongly implicated in the development and recurrence of arterial occlusive disease, and various antiplatelet drugs are used to treat and prevent such diseases. New antiplatelet drugs and many other drugs have been developed, but some drugs may have adverse effects on platelet functions. Objective: The aim of this study was to establish an evaluation method for evaluating the effect and adverse effect of various drugs on platelet functions. Materials and methods: Human erythroid leukemia (HEL cells were used after megakaryocytic differentiation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as an alternative to platelets. Drugs were evaluated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i mobilization in Fura2-loaded phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced HEL cells. Aspirin and cilostazol were selected as antiplatelet drugs and ibuprofen and sodium valproate as other drugs. Results: There was a positive correlation between [Ca2+]i and platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. Aspirin (5.6–560 µM and cilostazol (5–10 µM significantly inhibited thrombin-induced increases in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, ibuprofen (8–200 µM and sodium valproate (50–1,000 µg/mL also significantly inhibited

  19. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type I-Mediated Repression of PDZ-LIM Domain-Containing Protein 2 Involves DNA Methylation But Independent of the Viral Oncoprotein Tax

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    Pengrong Yan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I is the etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. Our recent studies have shown that one important mechanism of HTLV-I-Mediated tumorigenesis is through PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 (PDLIM2 repression, although the involved mechanism remains unknown. Here, we further report that HTLV-I-Mediated PDLIM2 repression was a pathophysiological event and the PDLIM2 repression involved DNA methylation. Whereas DNA methyltransferases 1 and 3b but not 3a were upregulated in HTLV-I-transformed T cells, the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC restored PDLIM2 expression and induced death of these malignant cells. Notably, the PDLIM2 repression was independent of the viral regulatory protein Tax because neither short-term induction nor long-term stable expression of Tax could downregulate PDLIM2 expression. These studies provide important insights into PDLIM2 regulation, HTLV-I leukemogenicity, long latency, and cancer health disparities. Given the efficient antitumor activity with no obvious toxicity of 5-aza-dC, these studies also suggest potential therapeutic strategies for ATL.

  20. [Acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid and arsenic trioxide regulate the productions and activities of matrix metalloproteinases in human skin fibroblasts and human leukemia cell line THP-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ya-hui; Li, Ping; Zhao, Jing-xia; Liu, Xin; Huang, Qi-fu

    2010-11-01

    In order to reveal the treatment mechanism of Chinese medicine with the effect of activating blood and resolving putridity, we selected acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO), the main monomeric components of frankincense and arsenolite which are two most commonly used Chinese medicine with effect of activating blood and resolving putridity. We combined AKBA and ATO as a compound, and explored its regulatory role in productions and activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 in human skin fibroblasts (HSFbs) and human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 in inflammatory state. In order to simulate the inflammatory micro-environment of chronic wounds, we established 3 cell models: HSFb model activated by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), THP-1 cell model activated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and HSFb-THP-1 cell coculture system. AKBA and ATO were cocultured with these cell models. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), gelatin zymography assay and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used to test the secretions, activities and mRNA expressions of MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9. In the study of the regulatory mechanism of AKBA and ATO on MMPs, AKBA and ATO were cocultured with the cell models. ELISA was used to test the secretions of TNF-α and interleukin-1beta (IL-β) and Western blot was used to test the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated proteinkinase (p38MAPK). Compound of AKBA and ATO inhibited MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expressions, secretions and activities respectively in HSFbs and THP-1 cells in inflammatory state (PTHP-1 cells and cell coculture system (PTHP-1 cells (P<0.05, P<0.01). The combined use of AKBA and ATO which in line with the rule of activating blood and resolving putridity inhibits fibroblasts and inflammatory cells in producing MMPs in inflammatory state through inhibiting the

  1. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol disrupts sodium butyrate-induced p21WAF1/CIP1 expression and maturation while reciprocally potentiating apoptosis in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Roberto R; Almenara, Jorge A; Cartee, Leanne; Betts, Vicki; Chellappan, Srikumar P; Grant, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Interactions between the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor flavopiridol (FP) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate (SB) have been examined in human leukemia cells (U937) in relation to differentiation and apoptosis. Whereas 1 mM of SB or 100 nM of FP minimally induced apoptosis (4% and 10%, respectively) at 24 h, simultaneous exposure of U937 cells to these agents dramatically increased cell death (e.g., approximately 60%), reflected by both morphological and Annexin/propidium iodide-staining features, procaspase 3 activation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Similar interactions were observed in human promyelocytic (HL-60), B-lymphoblastic (Raji), and T-lymphoblastic (Jurkat) leukemia cells. Coadministration of FP opposed SB-mediated accumulation of cells in G0G1 and differentiation, reflected by reduced CD11b expression, but instead dramatically increased procaspase-3, procaspase-8, Bid, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, as well as mitochondrial damage (e.g., loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release). FP also blocked SB-related p21WAF1-CIP1 induction through a caspase-independent mechanism and triggered the caspase-mediated cleavage of p27KIP1 and retinoblastoma protein. The latter event was accompanied by a marked reduction in retinoblastoma protein/E2F1 complex formation. However, FP did not modify the extent of SB-associated acetylation of histones H3 and H4. Treatment of cells with FP/SB also resulted in the caspase-mediated cleavage of Bcl-2 and caspase-independent down-regulation of Mcl-1. Levels of cyclins A, D1, and E, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis also declined in SB/FP-treated cells. Finally, FP/SB coexposure potently induced apoptosis in two primary acute myelogenous leukemia samples. Together, these findings demonstrate that FP, when combined with SB, induces multiple perturbations in cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, which oppose leukemic cell differentiation but instead

  2. B cell markers in Ph1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimena, G; De Rossi, G; Gastaldi, R; Guglielmi, C; Mandelli, F

    1980-01-01

    A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) where the blast cells had B cell markers and displayed the presence of a typical Ph1 chromosome, originated by a standard t (9;22) translocation, is reported. Cytological and clinical aspects during the entire course of the disease were consistent with the diagnosis of ALL. Evidence of differentiation along a well-defined lymphoid cell line in a Ph1-positive cell confirms the presence of the Ph1 chromosome in conditions other than chronic granulocytic leukemia and shows that it possibly does not occur in an exclusively undifferentiated totipotent stem cell.

  3. Modulating Leukemia-Initiating Cell Quiescence to Improve Leukemia Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    T- cells and in innate immunity (Lacorazza et al., 2002). It controls the proliferation and homing of CD8+ T- cells via the Kruppel-like factors...Lin2Sca12IL7R2Kit1FccRII/ IIIhighCD34high), megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor cell (MEP) (Lin2Sca12IL7R2Kit1FccRII/IIIlowCD34low), and common lymphoid ...to this model, the first wave gives rise exclusively to innate immune B cells in early embryonic life and may be derived from progenitor cells

  4. Immunogenicity moderation effect of interleukin-24 on myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Miao, Jingcheng; Xia, Wei; Gu, Zong-Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that interleukin-24 (IL-24) has tumor-suppressing activity by multiple pathways. However, the immunogenicity moderation effect of IL-24 on malignant cells has not been explored extensively. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-24 in immunogenicity modulation of the myelogenous leukemia cells. Data show that myelogenous leukemia cells express low levels of immunogenicity molecules. Treatment with IL-24 could enhance leukemia cell immunogenicity, predominantly regulate leukemia cells to produce immune-associated cytokines, and improve the cytotoxic sensitivity of these cells to immune effector cells. IL-24 expression could retard transplanted leukemia cell tumor growth in vivo in athymic nude mice. Moreover, IL-24 had marked effects on downregulating the expression of angiogenesis-related proteins vascular endothelial growth factor, cluster of differentiation (CD) 31, CD34, collagen IV and metastasis-related factors CD147, membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and MMP-2 and MMP-9 in transplanted tumors. These findings indicated novel functions of this antitumor gene and characterized IL-24 as a promising agent for further clinical trial for hematologic malignancy immunotherapy.

  5. The leukocyte common antigen (CD45) on human pre-B leukemia cells: variant glycoprotein form expression during the cell exposure to phorbol ester is blocked by a nonselective protein kinase inhibitor H7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duraj, J.; Sedlak, J.; Chorvath, B.; Rauko, P.

    1997-01-01

    The human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line REH6 was utilized for characterization of CD45 glycoprotein by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing four distinct CD45 antigen specificities, i.e. nonrestricted CD45, restricted, CD45RA, CD45RB and CD45R0. Immunoprecipitation revealed two antigen specificities on REH6 cells of m.w. 220 kDa and 190 kDa, both presenting wide range of isoelectric point pI∼6.0-7.5. Nonrestricted CD45 epitopes were not affected by the sialyl acid cleavage with sodium meta-periodate or neuraminidase, but were sensitive to both, tunicamycin, the N-glycosylation inhibitor and monensin, an inhibitor of protein transport through the Golgi compartment. O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase from Pasteurella haemolytica A1 partially cleaved CD45RA and CD45RB epitopes, while nonrestricted CD45 determinants were not affected by this enzyme. Limited proteolysis of this antigen resulted in the appearance of 160-180 kDa peptide domains which retained CD45 epitopes. Further, the treatment of cells with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) induced marked down-regulation of 220 and 190 kDa isoforms and the appearance of new 210, 180 and 170 kDa variant glycoprotein forms which were not found on parental cells. This PMA effect was not accompanied by the programmed cell death and was markedly blocked by a nonselective protein kinase (PK) inhibitor iso-quinoline sulfonamide H7. Modulation of CD45 by phorbol esters might serve as an in vitro model for an additional insight into the function of CD45 in hematopoietic cells. (author)

  6. Using Proteomics to 1) Identify the Bone Marrow Homing Receptors Expressed on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and 2) Elucidate Critical Signaling Pathways Responsible for the Blockage of Hematopoietic Differentiation in Leukemia

    KAUST Repository

    Chin, Chee J.

    2011-01-01

    Successful hematopoiesis requires the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow (BM) niche, where they can differentiate to produce all blood lineages. Leukemia arises when there is a blockage of differentiation

  7. The human polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (hPNKP) inhibitor A12B4C3 radiosensitizes human myeloid leukemia cells to Auger electron-emitting anti-CD123 111In-NLS-7G3 radioimmunoconjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zereshkian, Arman; Leyton, Jeffrey V.; Cai, Zhongli; Bergstrom, Dane; Weinfeld, Michael; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are believed to be responsible for initiating and propagating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and for causing relapse after treatment. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) targeting these cells may improve the treatment of AML, but is limited by the low density of target epitopes. Our objective was to study a human polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (hPNKP) inhibitor that interferes with DNA repair as a radiosensitizer for the Auger electron RIT agent, 111 In-NLS-7G3, which recognizes the CD123 + /CD131 - phenotype uniquely displayed by LSCs. Methods: The surviving fraction (SF) of CD123 + /CD131 - AML-5 cells exposed to 111 In-NLS-7G3 (33–266 nmols/L; 0.74 MBq/μg) or to γ-radiation (0.25-5 Gy) was determined by clonogenic assays. The effect of A12B4C3 (25 μmols/L) combined with 111 In-NLS-7G3 (16–66 nmols/L) or with γ-radiation (0.25–2 Gy) on the SF of AML-5 cells was assessed. The density of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the nucleus was measured using the γ-H2AX assay. Cellular dosimetry was estimated based on the subcellular distribution of 111 In-NLS-7G3 measured by cell fractionation. Results: Binding of 111 In-NLS-7G3 to AML-5 cells was reduced by 2.2-fold in the presence of an excess (1 μM) of unlabeled NLS-7G3, demonstrating specific binding to the CD123 + /CD131 - epitope. 111 In-NLS-7G3 reduced the SF of AML-5 cells from 86.1 ± 11.0% at 33 nmols/L to 10.5 ± 3.6% at 266 nmols/L. Unlabeled NLS-7G3 had no significant effect on the SF. Treatment of AML-5 cells with γ-radiation reduced the SF from 98.9 ± 14.9% at 0.25 Gy to 0.03 ± 0.1% at 5 Gy. A12B4C3 combined with 111 In-NLS-7G3 (16–66 nmols/L) enhanced the cytotoxicity up to 1.7-fold compared to treatment with radioimmunoconjugates alone and was associated with a 1.6-fold increase in DNA DSBs in the nucleus. A12B4C3 enhanced the cytotoxicity of γ-radiation (0.25–0.5 Gy) on AML-5 cells by up to 1.5-fold, and DNA DSBs were increased by 1.7-fold. Exposure to

  8. Quinacrine induces apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells via p38 MAPK-elicited BCL2 down-regulation and suppression of ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changchien, Jung-Jung; Chen, Ying-Jung; Huang, Chia-Hui; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Chang, Long-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies have revealed the anti-cancer activity of quinacrine, its effect on leukemia is not clearly resolved. We sought to explore the cytotoxic effect and mechanism of quinacrine action in human leukemia K562 cells. Quinacrine induced K562 cell apoptosis accompanied with ROS generation, mitochondrial depolarization, and down-regulation of BCL2L1 and BCL2. Upon exposure to quinacrine, ROS-mediated p38 MAPK activation and ERK inactivation were observed in K562 cells. Quinacrine-induced cell death and mitochondrial depolarization were suppressed by the p38MAPK inhibitor SB202190 and constitutively active MEK1 over-expression. Activation of p38 MAPK was shown to promote BCL2 degradation. Further, ERK inactivation suppressed c-Jun-mediated transcriptional expression of BCL2L1. Over-expression of BCL2L1 and BCL2 attenuated quinacrine-evoked mitochondrial depolarization and rescued the viability of quinacrine-treated cells. Taken together, our data indicate that quinacrine-induced K562 cell apoptosis is mediated through mitochondrial alterations triggered by p38 MAPK-mediated BCL2 down-regulation and suppression of ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression. - Highlights: • Quinacrine induces K562 cell apoptosis via down-regulation of BCL2 and BCL2L1. • Quinacrine induces p38 MAPK activation and ERK inactivation in K562 cells. • Quinacrine elicits p38 MAPK-mediated BCL2 down-regulation. • Quinacrine suppresses ERK/c-Jun-mediated BCL2L1 expression

  9. Bilateral proliferative retinopathy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kumawat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old child with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with vitreous hemorrhage due to proliferative retinopathy in both eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in both eyes to clear nonresolving vitreous hemorrhage after systemic stabilization. Visual recovery was limited by the disc drag in the right eye and subfoveal exudation in the left eye. Etiopathogenesis and management of proliferative retinopathy in acute leukemias are discussed.

  10. New insights into prevalence, genetic diversity, and proviral load of human T-cell leukemia virus types 1 and 2 in pregnant women in Gabon in equatorial central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etenna, Sonia Lekana-Douki; Caron, Mélanie; Besson, Guillaume; Makuwa, Maria; Gessain, Antoine; Mahé, Antoine; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2008-11-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is highly endemic in areas of central Africa; mother-to-child transmission and sexual transmission are considered to be the predominant routes. To determine the prevalence and subtypes of HTLV-1/2 in pregnant women in Gabon, we conducted an epidemiological survey in the five main cities of the country. In 907 samples, the HTLV-1 seroprevalence was 2.1%, which is lower than that previously reported. Only one case of HTLV-2 infection was found. The HTLV-1 seroprevalence increased with age and differed between regions (P cosmopolitan subtype A. The new strains of subtype B exhibited wide genetic diversity, but there was no evidence of clustering of specific genomes within geographical regions of the country. Some strains were closely related to simian T-cell leukemia virus type 1 strains of great apes, suggesting that in these areas some HTLV-1 strains could arise from relatively recent interspecies transmission. The sole HTLV-2 strain belonged to subtype B. In this study we showed that the prevalence of HTLV-1 in the southeast is one of the highest in the world for pregnant women.

  11. One-year enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay follow-up of human interleukin for Da cells/leukemia inhibitory factor in blood and urine of 22 kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, D; Taupin, J L; Combe, C; Potaux, L; Gualde, N; Moreau, J F

    1994-12-15

    The cytokine human interleukin for Da cells/leukemia inhibitory factor (HILDA/LIF) exerts multiple biological effects in vitro. In mice, high circulating levels of HILDA/LIF induce a wide range of pathophysiological events, some of them closely involved with immunological and inflammatory responses. Using a sandwich ELISA recognizing the natural human HILDA/LIF molecule with a threshold of 50 pg/ml in urine and 150 pg/ml in plasma, we monitored the urine and plasma HILDA/LIF levels of 22 patients in their first year after a kidney transplant. HILDA/LIF urine excretion is increased during acute rejection, and infections also trigger heavy HILDA/LIF plasma concentrations or urine excretion. In addition, this study raises the question of HILDA/LIF involvement in post-kidney-transplant phenomena such as hypercalcemia, osteoporosis, or the reversal of anemia.

  12. Tax Protein-induced Expression of Antiapoptotic Bfl-1 Protein Contributes to Survival of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected T-cells*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaire, Héloïse; Riquet, Aurélien; Moncollin, Vincent; Biémont-Trescol, Marie-Claude; Duc Dodon, Madeleine; Hermine, Olivier; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Mahieux, Renaud; Mesnard, Jean-Michel; Pierre, Marlène; Gazzolo, Louis; Bonnefoy, Nathalie; Valentin, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). ATLL is a severe malignancy with no effective treatment. HTLV-1 regulatory proteins Tax and HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor (HBZ) play a major role in ATLL development, by interfering with cellular functions such as CD4+ T-cell survival. In this study, we observed that the expression of Bfl-1, an antiapoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family, is restricted to HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines and to T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ proteins. We showed that Tax-induced bfl-1 transcription through the canonical NF-κB pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated that Tax cooperated with c-Jun or JunD, but not JunB, transcription factors of the AP-1 family to stimulate bfl-1 gene activation. By contrast, HBZ inhibited c-Jun-induced bfl-1 gene activation, whereas it increased JunD-induced bfl-1 gene activation. We identified one NF-κB, targeted by RelA, c-Rel, RelB, p105/p50, and p100/p52, and two AP-1, targeted by both c-Jun and JunD, binding sites in the bfl-1 promoter of T-cells expressing both Tax and HBZ. Analyzing the potential role of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival, we demonstrated that these cells are differentially sensitive to silencing of Bfl-1, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2. Indeed, both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL knockdowns decreased the survival of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, although no cell death was observed after Bcl-2 knockdown. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Bfl-1 knockdown sensitizes HTLV-1-infected T-cells to ABT-737 or etoposide treatment. Our results directly implicate Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL in HTLV-1-infected T-cell survival and suggest that both Bfl-1 and Bcl-xL represent potential therapeutic targets for ATLL treatment. PMID:22553204

  13. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion

    2005-01-01

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RARα and PLZF-RARα fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RARα from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells

  14. Lapatinib induces autophagic cell death and differentiation in acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YJ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jen Chen,1–4 Li-Wen Fang,5 Wen-Chi Su,6,7 Wen-Yi Hsu,1 Kai-Chien Yang,1 Huey-Lan Huang8 1Department of Medical Research, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Department of Nutrition, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 6Research Center for Emerging Viruses, China Medical University Hospital, 7Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, 8Department of Bioscience Technology, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Lapatinib is an oral-form dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB/Her superfamily members with anticancer activity. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanism of action of lapatinib on several human leukemia cells lines, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells. We found that lapatinib inhibited the growth of human AML U937, HL-60, NB4, CML KU812, MEG-01, and ALL Jurkat T cells. Among these leukemia cell lines, lapatinib induced apoptosis in HL-60, NB4, and Jurkat cells, but induced nonapoptotic cell death in U937, K562, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, lapatinib treatment caused autophagic cell death as shown by positive acridine orange staining, the massive formation of vacuoles as seen by electronic microscopy, and the upregulation of LC3-II, ATG5, and ATG7 in AML U937 cells. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and knockdown of ATG5, ATG7, and Beclin-1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA partially rescued lapatinib-induced cell death. In addition, the induction of phagocytosis and ROS production as well as the upregulation of surface markers CD14 and CD68 was detected in lapatinib-treated U937 cells, suggesting the induction of

  15. 'Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma' with bone demineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchida, Toshiyuki; Nishitani, Hiromu; Matsuura, Keiichi

    1985-01-01

    Two patients with T-cell malignancy having radiographic manifestations of generalized and localized bone demineralization are reported. One, a 53-year-old-man, had marked osteoporosis and severe hypercalcemia, but no clinical evidence of leukemia throughout his illness. At autopsy there was no definite evidence of bone involvement. Histologic proof was obtained from abdominal skin which revealed ''adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL).'' The second case, a 33-year-old man, complained of arthralgia in his hands and feet; radiographs showed severe localized demineralization and pathologic fractures. Specimens of his peripheral blood, cervical lymph nodes, and bone marrow revealed ATLL cells. (orig.)

  16. T315 Decreases Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Viability through a Combination of Apoptosis Induction and Autophagic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Fang Chiu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available T315, an integrin-linked kinase (ILK inhibitor, has been shown to suppress the proliferation of breast cancer, stomach cancer and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Here we demonstrate that T315 decreases cell viability of acute myeloid leukemia (AML cell lines (HL-60 and THP-1 and primary leukemia cells from AML patients in a dose-responsive manner. Normal human bone marrow cells are less sensitive than leukemia cells to T315. T315 down regulates protein kinase B (Akt and p-Akt and induces caspase activation, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP cleavage, apoptosis and autophagy through an ILK-independent manner. Interestingly, pretreatment with autophagy inhibitors rescues cells from apoptosis and concomitant PARP cleavage, which implicates a key role of autophagic cell death in T315-mediated cytotoxicity. T315 also demonstrates efficacy in vivo, suppressing the growth of THP-1 xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice when administered intraperitoneally. This study shows that autophagic cell death and apoptosis cooperatively contribute to the anticancer activity of T315 in AML cells. In conclusion, the complementary roles of apoptotic and autophagic cell death should be considered in the future assessment of the translational value of T315 in AML therapy.

  17. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells are active participants in microenvironmental cross-talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Attekum, Martijn H. A.; Eldering, Eric; Kater, Arnon P.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is widely accepted. Nevertheless, the understanding of the complex interplay between the various types of bystander cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is incomplete. Numerous studies have indicated that bystander

  18. Role for protein geranylgeranylation in adult T-cell leukemia cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Mizuho; Uota, Shin; Saitoh, Yasunori; Takahashi, Mayumi; Sugimoto, Haruyo; Amet, Tohti; Arai, Ayako; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease that develops in human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I)-infected individuals. Despite the accumulating knowledge of the molecular biology of HTLV-I-infected cells, effective therapeutic strategies remain to be established. Recent reports showed that the hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)-CoA reductase inhibitor statins have anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects on certain tumor cells through inhibition of protein prenylation. Here, we report that statins hinder the survival of ATL cells and induce apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of protein geranylgeranylation is responsible for these effects, since simultaneous treatment with isoprenoid precursors, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate or farnesyl pyrophosphate, but not a cholesterol precursor squalene, restored the viability of ATL cells. Simvastatin inhibited geranylgeranylation of small GTPases Rab5B and Rac1 in ATL cells, and a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor GGTI-298 reduced ATL cell viability more efficiently than a farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277. These results not only unveil an important role for protein geranylgeranylation in ATL cell survival, but also implicate therapeutic potentials of statins in the treatment of ATL

  19. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells are active participants in microenvironmental cross-talk

    OpenAIRE

    van Attekum, Martijn HA; Eldering, Eric; Kater, Arnon P

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is widely accepted. Nevertheless, the understanding of the complex interplay between the various types of bystander cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is incomplete. Numerous studies have indicated that bystander cells provide chronic lymphocytic leukemia-supportive functions, but it has also become clear that chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells actively engage in the formation of a supportive tumor microenv...

  20. Radioisotope examination of hairy-cell leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortynova, J.; Friedmann, B.; Bakos, K.; Malaskova, V.; Voslarova, Z.; Vopatova, M.

    1983-01-01

    13 patients with hairy-cell leukemia were simultaneously tested using different radioisotope methods (scintiscan of the spleen and bone marrow, total blood volume and erythrocytic pool in the spleen, erythrocyte and platelet kinetics). Some of the methods (bone marrow scintiscan, total blood volume and erythrocytic pool in the spleen, and kinetic studies) produced characteristic results in those patients: they could add precision to the diagnosis of the disease, and they could also be used for better elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of other clinical signs characteristic of hairy-cell leukemia. In spite of the undeniably significant value of the said methods for precise diagnosis of hairy-cell leukemia, histological tests of the bioptic material of bone marrow and spleen and bone marrow needle biopsy remain better and indispensable methods. (author)

  1. Ultraconserved regions encoding ncRNAs are altered in human leukemias and carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calin, George A; Liu, Chang-gong; Ferracin, Manuela; Hyslop, Terry; Spizzo, Riccardo; Sevignani, Cinzia; Fabbri, Muller; Cimmino, Amelia; Lee, Eun Joo; Wojcik, Sylwia E; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Tili, Esmerina; Rossi, Simona; Taccioli, Cristian; Pichiorri, Flavia; Liu, Xiuping; Zupo, Simona; Herlea, Vlad; Gramantieri, Laura; Lanza, Giovanni; Alder, Hansjuerg; Rassenti, Laura; Volinia, Stefano; Schmittgen, Thomas D; Kipps, Thomas J; Negrini, Massimo; Croce, Carlo M

    2007-09-01

    Noncoding RNA (ncRNA) transcripts are thought to be involved in human tumorigenesis. We report that a large fraction of genomic ultraconserved regions (UCRs) encode a particular set of ncRNAs whose expression is altered in human cancers. Genome-wide profiling revealed that UCRs have distinct signatures in human leukemias and carcinomas. UCRs are frequently located at fragile sites and genomic regions involved in cancers. We identified certain UCRs whose expression may be regulated by microRNAs abnormally expressed in human chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and we proved that the inhibition of an overexpressed UCR induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells. Our findings argue that ncRNAs and interaction between noncoding genes are involved in tumorigenesis to a greater extent than previously thought.

  2. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  3. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 tax requires CADM1/TSLC1 for inactivation of the NF-κB inhibitor A20 and constitutive NF-κB signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshree Pujari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activation of NF-κB by the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 oncoprotein, Tax, is vital for the development and pathogenesis of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. K63-linked polyubiquitinated Tax activates the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid raft microdomain. Tax also interacts with TAX1BP1 to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulatory ubiquitin-editing A20 enzyme complex. However, the molecular mechanisms of Tax-mediated IKK activation and A20 protein complex inactivation are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that membrane associated CADM1 (Cell adhesion molecule1 recruits Ubc13 to Tax, causing K63-linked polyubiquitination of Tax, and IKK complex activation in the membrane lipid raft. The c-terminal cytoplasmic tail containing PDZ binding motif of CADM1 is critical for Tax to maintain persistent NF-κB activation. Finally, Tax failed to inactivate the NF-κB negative regulator ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 complex, and activate the IKK complex in the lipid raft in absence of CADM1. Our results thus indicate that CADM1 functions as a critical scaffold molecule for Tax and Ubc13 to form a cellular complex with NEMO, TAX1BP1 and NRP, to activate the IKK complex in the plasma membrane-associated lipid rafts, to inactivate NF-κB negative regulators, and maintain persistent NF-κB activation in HTLV-1 infected cells.

  4. Advanced Data Mining of Leukemia Cells Micro-Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Richard S. Segall; Ryan M. Pierce

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides continuation and extensions of previous research by Segall and Pierce (2009a) that discussed data mining for micro-array databases of Leukemia cells for primarily self-organized maps (SOM). As Segall and Pierce (2009a) and Segall and Pierce (2009b) the results of applying data mining are shown and discussed for the data categories of microarray databases of HL60, Jurkat, NB4 and U937 Leukemia cells that are also described in this article. First, a background section is pro...

  5. Role of adapter function in oncoprotein-mediated activation of NF-kappaB. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax interacts directly with IkappaB kinase gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, D Y; Giordano, V; Kibler, K V; Nakano, H; Jeang, K T

    1999-06-18

    Mechanisms by which the human T-cell leukemia virus type I Tax oncoprotein activates NF-kappaB remain incompletely understood. Although others have described an interaction between Tax and a holo-IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex, the exact details of protein-protein contact are not fully defined. Here we show that Tax binds to neither IKK-alpha nor IKK-beta but instead complexes directly with IKK-gamma, a newly characterized component of the IKK complex. This direct interaction with IKK-gamma correlates with Tax-induced IkappaB-alpha phosphorylation and NF-kappaB activation. Thus, our findings establish IKK-gamma as a key molecule for adapting an oncoprotein-specific signaling to IKK-alpha and IKK-beta.

  6. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response

  7. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  8. Heterogeneity of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbath, K D; Ball, E D; Larcom, P; Davis, R B; Griffin, J D

    1985-01-01

    The expression of differentiation-associated surface antigens by the clonogenic leukemic cells from 20 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was studied with a panel of seven cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (anti-Ia, -MY9, -PM-81, -AML-2-23, -Mol, -Mo2, and -MY3). The surface antigen phenotypes of the clonogenic cells were compared with the phenotypes of the whole leukemic cell population, and with the phenotypes of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In each case the clonogenic ...

  9. Mast cell leukemia associated with undefined morphology and chronic basophilic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Cavit; Alacacioglu, Inci; Piskin, Ozden; Ates, Halil; Cehreli, Ruksan; Calibasi, Gizem; Yuksel, Erdinc; Ozkal, Sermin; Ozsan, Guner H

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is rare type of neoplasia with an incidence of 1% in a large series of 342 adult patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). Chronic basophilic leukemia (CBL) is an extremely rare type of leukemia with appearance of 7 cases in the literature. A 73 year-old female patient who presented with weaknes, had a prolonged duration of hematologic remission after treatment of her CBL by hydroxyurea (HU). Evolution of SM occurring as a second neoplasia concurrently with relapse of de novo CBL was demonstrated by mast cells (MCs) infiltration in the bone marrow (BM) biopsy and smear and increase in tryptase level. Transformation to MCL with simultaneous occurrance of accelerated phase of CBL were documented by the appearance of MCs in both BM and peripheral blood (PB) smears, antigen expressions detected by flow cytometry and spesific stains. Sequence analysis of c-kit gene revealed c-kit exon 11 K550N mutation. Undefined associations of MCL with different mast cell morphology, increase in IL-6 level and accelerated phase of de novo CBL was described. Elevations in CRP and IL-6 levels occurring with increases in basophil counts to high levels revealed that febrile episodes with abdominal pain seen in our patient were induced by increase in IL-6 levels released from neoplastic basophils. Neoplastic basophils with diffuse and coarse basophilic granules possibly mimic neutrophils with toxic granules and cause wrong characterization of neoplastic basophils as neutrophils by the automated blood cell counters and misleaded physicians.

  10. Presentation of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein by dendritic cells: the underlying mechanism of HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Sharrón L; Schell, Todd D; Acheampong, Edward; Rahman, Saifur; Khan, Zafar K; Jain, Pooja

    2009-11-01

    HTLV-1 is the etiologic agent of a debilitating neurologic disorder, HAM/TSP. This disease features a robust immune response including the oligoclonal expansion of CD8+ CTLs specific for the viral oncoprotein Tax. The key pathogenic process resulting in the proliferation of CTLs and the presentation of Tax peptide remains uncharacterized. We have investigated the role of APCs, particularly DCs, in priming of the anti-Tax CTL response under in vitro and in vivo conditions. We investigated two routes (direct vs. indirect) of Tax presentation using live virus, infected primary CD4+/CD25+ T cells, and the CD4+ T cell line (C8166, a HTLV-1-mutated line that only expresses Tax). Our results indicated that DCs are capable of priming a pronounced Tax-specific CTL response in cell cultures consisting of naïve PBLs as well as in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice (line HHD II). DCs were able to direct the presentation of Tax successfully through infected T cells, live virus, and cell-free Tax. These observations were comparable with those made with a known stimulant of DC maturation, a combination of CD40L and IFN-gamma. Our studies clearly establish a role for this important immune cell component in HTLV-1 immuno/neuropathogenesis and suggest that modulation of DC functions could be an important tool for therapeutic interventions.

  11. Vincristine sulfate loaded dextran microspheres amalgamated with thermosensitive gel offered sustained release and enhanced cytotoxicity in THP-1, human leukemia cells: In vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Vivek; Kush, Preeti; Pandey, Ravi Shankar; Jain, Upendra Kumar; Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender

    2016-04-01

    Vincristine sulfate (VCS) is a drug of choice for the treatment of childhood and adult acute lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as well as solid tumors including sarcomas. However, poor biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic traits of VCS like short serum half-life (12 min), high dosing frequency (1.4 mg/m(2) per week for 4 weeks) and extensive protein binding (75%) limit the clinical potential of VCS in cancer therapy. In present investigation, injectable vincristine sulfate loaded dextran microspheres (VCS-Dextran-MSs) were prepared and amalgamated with chitosan-β-glycerophosphate gel (VCS-Dextran-MSs-Gel) to surmount the biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic limitations of VCS that consequently induced synergistic sustained release pattern of the drug. Particle size and zeta-potential of VCS-Dextran-MSs were measured to be 6.8 ± 2.4 μm and -18.3 ± 0.11 mV along with the encapsulation efficiency of about 60.4 ± 4.5%. Furthermore, VCS-Dextran-MSs and VCS-Dextran-MSs-Gel exhibited slow release pattern and 94.7% and 95.8% of the drug was released in 72 h and 720 h, respectively. Results from cell viability assay and pharmacokinetic as well as histopathological analysis in mice indicated that VCS-Dextran-MSs-Gel offers superior therapeutic potential and higher AUClast than VCS-Dextran-MSs and drug solution. In conclusion, VCS-Dextran-MSs-Gel warrants further preclinical tumor growth study to scale up the technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression profile of CREB knockdown in myeloid leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Cheng, Jerry C; Voutila, Jon; Judelson, Dejah; Taylor, Julie; Nelson, Stanley F; Sakamoto, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    The cAMP Response Element Binding Protein, CREB, is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in several model systems, including neuronal and hematopoietic cells. We demonstrated that CREB is overexpressed in acute myeloid and leukemia cells compared to normal hematopoietic stem cells. CREB knockdown inhibits leukemic cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, but does not affect long-term hematopoietic reconstitution. To understand downstream pathways regulating CREB, we performed expression profiling with RNA from the K562 myeloid leukemia cell line transduced with CREB shRNA. By combining our expression data from CREB knockdown cells with prior ChIP data on CREB binding we were able to identify a list of putative CREB regulated genes. We performed extensive analyses on the top genes in this list as high confidence CREB targets. We found that this list is enriched for genes involved in cancer, and unexpectedly, highly enriched for histone genes. Furthermore, histone genes regulated by CREB were more likely to be specifically expressed in hematopoietic lineages. Decreased expression of specific histone genes was validated in K562, TF-1, and primary AML cells transduced with CREB shRNA. We have identified a high confidence list of CREB targets in K562 cells. These genes allow us to begin to understand the mechanisms by which CREB contributes to acute leukemia. We speculate that regulation of histone genes may play an important role by possibly altering the regulation of DNA replication during the cell cycle

  13. Effect of the replacement of aspartic acid/glutamic acid residues with asparagine/glutamine residues in RNase He1 from Hericium erinaceus on inhibition of human leukemia cell line proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroko; Motoyoshi, Naomi; Itagaki, Tadashi; Suzuki, Mamoru; Inokuchi, Norio

    2015-01-01

    RNase He1 from Hericium erinaceus, a member of the RNase T1 family, has high identity with RNase Po1 from Pleurotus ostreatus with complete conservation of the catalytic sequence. However, the optimal pH for RNase He1 activity is lower than that of RNase Po1, and the enzyme shows little inhibition of human tumor cell proliferation. Hence, to investigate the potential antitumor activity of recombinant RNase He1 and to possibly enhance its optimum pH, we generated RNase He1 mutants by replacing 12 Asn/Gln residues with Asp/Glu residues; the amino acid sequence of RNase Po1 was taken as reference. These mutants were then expressed in Escherichia coli. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we successfully modified the optimal pH for enzyme activity and generated a recombinant RNase He1 that inhibited the proliferation of cells in the human leukemia cell line. These properties are extremely important in the production of anticancer biologics that are based on RNase activity.

  14. Tumor SHB gene expression affects disease characteristics in human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalpour, Maria; Li, Xiujuan; Cavelier, Lucia; Gustafsson, Karin; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Höglund, Martin; Welsh, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The mouse Shb gene coding for the Src Homology 2-domain containing adapter protein B has recently been placed in context of BCRABL1-induced myeloid leukemia in mice and the current study was performed in order to relate SHB to human acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Publicly available AML databases were mined for SHB gene expression and patient survival. SHB gene expression was determined in the Uppsala cohort of AML patients by qPCR. Cell proliferation was determined after SHB gene knockdown in leukemic cell lines. Despite a low frequency of SHB gene mutations, many tumors overexpressed SHB mRNA compared with normal myeloid blood cells. AML patients with tumors expressing low SHB mRNA displayed longer survival times. A subgroup of AML exhibiting a favorable prognosis, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with a PMLRARA translocation, expressed less SHB mRNA than AML tumors in general. When examining genes co-expressed with SHB in AML tumors, four other genes ( PAX5, HDAC7, BCORL1, TET1) related to leukemia were identified. A network consisting of these genes plus SHB was identified that relates to certain phenotypic characteristics, such as immune cell, vascular and apoptotic features. SHB knockdown in the APL PMLRARA cell line NB4 and the monocyte/macrophage cell line MM6 adversely affected proliferation, linking SHB gene expression to tumor cell expansion and consequently to patient survival. It is concluded that tumor SHB gene expression relates to AML survival and its subgroup APL. Moreover, this gene is included in a network of genes that plays a role for an AML phenotype exhibiting certain immune cell, vascular and apoptotic characteristics.

  15. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van Vlierberghe (Pieter); T. Palomero (Teresa); H. Khiabanian (Hossein); J. van der Meulen (Joni); M. Castillo (Mireia); N. van Roy (Nadine); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); J. Philippé (Jan); S. González-García (Sara); M.L. Toribio (María); T. Taghon (Tom); L.C. Zuurbier (Linda); B. Cauwelier (Barbara); C.J. Harrison (Christine); C. Schwab (Claire); M. Pisecker (Markus); S. Strehl; A.W. Langerak (Anton); J. Gecz (Jozef); E. Sonneveld (Edwin); R. Pieters (Rob); E. Paietta (Elisabeth); J. Rowe (Jacob); P.H. Wiernik (Peter); Y. Benoit (Yves); J. Soulier (Jean); B. Poppe (Bruce); X. Yao (Xiaopan); C. Cordon-Cardo (Carlos); J.P.P. Meijerink (Jules); R. Rabadan (Raul); F. Speleman (Franki); A.A. Ferrando (Adolfo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating

  16. Advanced Data Mining of Leukemia Cells Micro-Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S. Segall

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides continuation and extensions of previous research by Segall and Pierce (2009a that discussed data mining for micro-array databases of Leukemia cells for primarily self-organized maps (SOM. As Segall and Pierce (2009a and Segall and Pierce (2009b the results of applying data mining are shown and discussed for the data categories of microarray databases of HL60, Jurkat, NB4 and U937 Leukemia cells that are also described in this article. First, a background section is provided on the work of others pertaining to the applications of data mining to micro-array databases of Leukemia cells and micro-array databases in general. As noted in predecessor article by Segall and Pierce (2009a, micro-array databases are one of the most popular functional genomics tools in use today. This research in this paper is intended to use advanced data mining technologies for better interpretations and knowledge discovery as generated by the patterns of gene expressions of HL60, Jurkat, NB4 and U937 Leukemia cells. The advanced data mining performed entailed using other data mining tools such as cubic clustering criterion, variable importance rankings, decision trees, and more detailed examinations of data mining statistics and study of other self-organized maps (SOM clustering regions of workspace as generated by SAS Enterprise Miner version 4. Conclusions and future directions of the research are also presented.

  17. TAL1/SCL is downregulated upon histone deacetylase inhibition in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, B. A.; de Almeida, S. F.; Laranjeira, A. B. A.; Carmo-Fonseca, M.; Yunes, J. A.; Coffer, P. J.; Barata, J. T.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (TAL)-1 is a major T-cell oncogene associated with poor prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). TAL1 binds histone deacetylase 1 and incubation with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) promotes apoptosis of leukemia

  18. Stimulation of interleukin-13 expression by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 oncoprotein Tax via a dually active promoter element responsive to NF-kappaB and NFAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbermann, Katrin; Schneider, Grit; Grassmann, Ralph

    2008-11-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax oncoprotein transforms human lymphocytes and is critical for the pathogenesis of HTLV-1-induced adult T-cell leukaemia. In HTLV-transformed cells, Tax upregulates interleukin (IL)-13, a cytokine with proliferative and anti-apoptotic functions that is linked to leukaemogenesis. Tax-stimulated IL-13 is thought to result in autocrine stimulation of HTLV-infected cells and thus may be relevant to their growth. The causal transactivation of the IL-13 promoter by Tax is predominantly dependent on a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-binding P element. Here, it was shown that the isolated IL-13 Tax-responsive element (IL13TaxRE) was sufficient to mediate IL-13 transactivation by Tax and NFAT1. However, cyclosporin A, a specific NFAT inhibitor, revealed that Tax transactivation of IL13TaxRE or wild-type IL-13 promoter was independent of NFAT and that NFAT did not contribute to IL-13 upregulation in HTLV-transformed cells. By contrast, Tax stimulation was repressible by an efficient nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB inhibitor (IkBaDN), indicating the requirement for NF-kappaB. The capacity of NF-kappaB to stimulate IL13TaxRE was demonstrated by a strong response to NF-kappaB in reporter assays and by direct binding of NF-kappaB to IL13TaxRE. Thus, IL13TaxRE in the IL-13 promoter represents a dually active promoter element responsive to NF-kappaB and NFAT. Together, these results indicate that Tax causes IL-13 upregulation in HTLV-1-infected cells via NF-kappaB.

  19. NALP3 inflammasome upregulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor cause glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W. Paugh (Steven); E.J. Bonten (Erik J.); D. Savic (Daniel); L.B. Ramsey (Laura B.); W.E. Thierfelder (William E.); P. Gurung (Prajwal); R.K.S. Malireddi (R. K. Subbarao); M. Actis (Marcelo); A. Mayasundari (Anand); J. Min (Jaeki); D.R. Coss (David R.); L.T. Laudermilk (Lucas T.); J.C. Panetta (John); J.R. McCorkle (J. Robert); Y. Fan (Yiping); K.R. Crews (Kristine R.); G. Stocco (Gabriele); M.R. Wilkinson (Mark R.); A.M. Ferreira (Antonio M.); C. Cheng (Cheng); W. Yang (Wenjian); S.E. Karol (Seth E.); C.A. Fernandez (Christian A.); B. Diouf (Barthelemy); C. Smith (Colton); J.K. Hicks (J Kevin); A. Zanut (Alessandra); A. Giordanengo (Audrey); D.J. Crona; J.J. Bianchi (Joy J.); L. Holmfeldt (Linda); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Pieters (Rob); S. Jeha (Sima); T.L. Dunwell (Thomas L.); F. Latif (Farida); D. Bhojwani (Deepa); W.L. Carroll (William L.); C.-H. Pui (Ching-Hon); R.M. Myers (Richard M.); R.K. Guy (R Kiplin); T.-D. Kanneganti (Thirumala-Devi); M.V. Relling (Mary); W.E. Evans (William)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and resistance to glucocorticoids in leukemia cells confers poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the prednisolone sensitivity of primary leukemia

  20. Activity of the hypoxia-activated prodrug, TH-302, in preclinical human acute myeloid leukemia models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portwood, Scott; Lal, Deepika; Hsu, Yung-Chun; Vargas, Rodrigo; Johnson, Megan K; Wetzler, Meir; Hart, Charles P; Wang, Eunice S

    2013-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematologic neoplasm. Recent evidence has shown the bone marrow microenvironment in patients with AML to be intrinsically hypoxic. Adaptive cellular responses by leukemia cells to survive under low oxygenation also confer chemoresistance. We therefore asked whether therapeutic exploitation of marrow hypoxia via the hypoxia-activated nitrogen mustard prodrug, TH-302, could effectively inhibit AML growth. We assessed the effects of hypoxia and TH-302 on human AML cells, primary samples, and systemic xenograft models. We observed that human AML cells and primary AML colonies cultured under chronic hypoxia (1% O2, 72 hours) exhibited reduced sensitivity to cytarabine-induced apoptosis as compared with normoxic controls. TH-302 treatment resulted in dose- and hypoxia-dependent apoptosis and cell death in diverse AML cells. TH-302 preferentially decreased proliferation, reduced HIF-1α expression, induced cell-cycle arrest, and enhanced double-stranded DNA breaks in hypoxic AML cells. Hypoxia-induced reactive oxygen species by AML cells were also diminished. In systemic human AML xenografts (HEL, HL60), TH-302 [50 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.) 5 times per week] inhibited disease progression and prolonged overall survival. TH-302 treatment reduced the number of hypoxic cells within leukemic bone marrows and was not associated with hematologic toxicities in nonleukemic or leukemic mice. Later initiation of TH-302 treatment in advanced AML disease was as effective as earlier TH-302 treatment in xenograft models. Our results establish the preclinical activity of TH-302 in AML and provide the rationale for further clinical studies of this and other hypoxia-activated agents for leukemia therapy. ©2013 AACR.

  1. Cell surface antigens of radiation leukemia virus-induced BALB/c leukemias defined by syngeneic cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yukio; Oettgen, H.F.; Obata, Yuichi; Nakayama, Eiichi.

    1989-01-01

    Two cell surface antigens of mouse leukemias were defined by BALB/c cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated against syngeneic radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia, BALBRV1 or BALBRVD. Hyperimmunization of BALB/c mice with irradiated leukemias followed by in vitro sensitization of primed spleen cells resulted in the generation of CTL with high killing activity. The specificity of CTL was examined by direct cytotoxicity assays and competitive inhibition assays. A shared cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRV1 antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRV1 CTL. BALBRV1 antigen was expressed not only on RadLV-induced BALB/c leukemias except for BALBRVD, but also on spontaneous or X-ray-induced BALB/c leukemias, chemically-induced leukemias with the H-2 d haplotype and some chemically-induced BALB/c sarcomas. In contrast, a unique cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRVD antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRVD CTL. BALBRVD antigen was expressed only on BALBRVD, but not on thirty-nine normal lymphoid or tumor cells. These two antigens could be distinguished from those previously defined on Friend, Moloney, Rauscher or Gross murine leukemia virus (MuLV) leukemias, or MuLV-related antigens. Both cytotoxic responses were blocked by antisera against H-2K d , but not H-2D d . The relationship of BALBRV1 antigen and BALBRVD antigen to endogenous MuLV is discussed with regard to the antigenic distribution on tumor cell lines. (author)

  2. FoxP3+ regulatory T cells are distinct from leukemia cells in HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulza, Frederic; Nosaka, Kisato; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Pagliuca, Tony; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2009-11-15

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). It has been postulated that ATLL cells might act as regulatory T cells (T(regs)) which, in common with ATLL cells, express both CD25 and FoxP3, and so contribute to the severe immune suppression typical of ATLL. We report here that the frequency of CD25(+) cells varied independently of the frequency of FoxP3(+) cells in both a cross-sectional study and in a longitudinal study of 2 patients with chronic ATLL. Furthermore, the capacity of ATLL cells to suppress proliferation of heterologous CD4(+)CD25(-) cells correlated with the frequency of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) cells but was independent of CD25 expression. Finally, the frequency of CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells was inversely correlated with the lytic activity of HTLV-1-specific CTLs in patients with ATLL. We conclude that ATLL is not a tumor of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, and that a population of FoxP3(+) cells distinct from ATLL cells has regulatory functions and may impair the cell-mediated immune response to HTLV-1 in patients with ATLL.

  3. Prenylated Flavonoids from Morus alba L. Cause Inhibition of G1/S Transition in THP-1 Human Leukemia Cells and Prevent the Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kollar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morus alba L. (MA is a natural source of many compounds with different biological effects. It has been described to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity of three flavonoids isolated from MA (kuwanon E, cudraflavone B, and 4′-O-methylkuwanon E and to determine their effects on proliferation of THP-1 cells, and on cell cycle progression of cancer cells. Anti-inflammatory effects were also determined for all three given flavonoids. Methods used in the study included quantification of cells by hemocytometer and WST-1 assays, flow cytometry, western blotting, ELISA, and zymography. From the three compounds tested, cudraflavone B showed the strongest effects on cell cycle progression and viability of tumor and/or immortalized cells and also on inflammatory response of macrophage-like cells. Kuwanon E and 4′-O-methylkuwanon E exerted more sophisticated rather than direct toxic effect on used cell types. Our data indicate that mechanisms different from stress-related or apoptotic signaling pathways are involved in the action of these compounds. Although further studies are required to precisely define the mechanisms of MA flavonoid action in human cancer and macrophage-like cells, here we demonstrate their effects combining antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory activities, respectively.

  4. Identification of glycan structure alterations on cell membrane proteins in desoxyepothilone B resistant leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Miyako; Saldanha, Rohit; Göbel, Anja; Kavallaris, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to tubulin-binding agents used in cancer is often multifactorial and can include changes in drug accumulation and modified expression of tubulin isotypes. Glycans on cell membrane proteins play important roles in many cellular processes such as recognition and apoptosis, and this study investigated whether changes to the glycan structures on cell membrane proteins occur when cells become resistant to drugs. Specifically, we investigated the alteration of glycan structures on the cell membrane proteins of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cells that were selected for resistance to desoxyepothilone B (CEM/dEpoB). The glycan profile of the cell membrane glycoproteins was obtained by sequential release of N- and O-glycans from cell membrane fraction dotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membrane with PNGase F and β-elimination respectively. The released glycan alditols were analyzed by liquid chromatography (graphitized carbon)-electrospray ionization tandem MS. The major N-glycan on CEM cell was the core fucosylated α2-6 monosialo-biantennary structure. Resistant CEM/dEpoB cells had a significant decrease of α2-6 linked sialic acid on N-glycans. The lower α2-6 sialylation was caused by a decrease in activity of β-galactoside α2-6 sialyltransferase (ST6Gal), and decreased expression of the mRNA. It is clear that the membrane glycosylation of leukemia cells changes during acquired resistance to dEpoB drugs and that this change occurs globally on all cell membrane glycoproteins. This is the first identification of a specific glycan modification on the surface of drug resistant cells and the mechanism of this downstream effect on microtubule targeting drugs may offer a route to new interventions to overcome drug resistance.

  5. The human protooncogene product p33pim is expressed during fetal hematopoiesis and in diverse leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amson, R.; Przedborski, S.; Telerman, A.; Sigaux, F.; Flandrin, G.; Givol, D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors measured the human pim-1 protooncogene (PIM) expression during fetal development and in hematopoietic malignancies. The data indicate that during human fetal hematopoiesis the 33-kDa pim product, p33pim, is highly expressed in the liver and the spleen. In contrast, a the adult stage it is only slightly expressed in circulating granulocytes. Out of 70 hematopoietic malignancies analyzed, 51 patients and 19 cell lines, p33pim was overexpressed in ∼ 30% of the samples, particularly in myeloid and lymphoid acute leukemias. This overexpression was unrelated to any stage of cellular differentiation and was not due to gene rearrangement or amplification. These results imply a physiological role of the pim-1 protooncogene during hematopoietic development and a deregulation in various leukemias

  6. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma treatment in Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Dantas Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a peripheral disease associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. Treatment is carried out according to clinical type with watchful waiting being recommended for less aggressive types. Aggressive adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is generally treated with chemotherapy and/or antivirals. The objective of this study was to correlate the survival of patients diagnosed in Bahia, Brazil, with the therapeutic approaches employed and to evaluate what issues existed in their treatment processes. Methods: Eighty-three adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma patients (26 smoldering, 23 chronic, 16 acute, 13 lymphoma and five primary cutaneous tumoral with available data were included in this study. Results: Complete response was achieved in seven smoldering patients with symptomatic treatment, in two with chronic disease using antivirals/chemotherapy, in one with acute disease using antivirals and in one lymphoma using the LSG15 regimen [vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisolone (VCAP; doxorubicin, ranimustine, and prednisolone (AMP; and vindesine, etoposide, carboplatin, and prednisolone (VECP]. Smoldering patients who received symptomatic treatment presented longer survival. Favorable chronic patients treated with antivirals presented longer survival compared to the unfavorable subtype. However, for the acute form, first-line chemotherapy was better, albeit without significance, than antivirals. Only one of the patients with lymphoma and primary cutaneous tumors responded. Conclusions: Watchful waiting associated with phototherapy represents the best option for smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma with survival in Bahia being superior to that described in Japan. There was a trend of better results with zidovudine/interferon-alpha in favorable chronic disease. Excellent results were achieved in the lymphoma type treated with the LSG15 protocol. Patients are diagnosed late

  7. Retroviral expression screening of oncogenes in natural killer cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Lim; Moriuchi, Ryozo; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Makishima, Hideki; Wada, Tomoaki; Kisanuki, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Ruri; Ota, Jun; Koinuma, Koji; Ishikawa, Madoka; Takada, Shuji; Yamashita, Yoshihiro; Oshimi, Kazuo; Mano, Hiroyuki

    2005-08-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is an intractable malignancy that is characterized by the outgrowth of NK cells. To identify transforming genes in ANKL, we constructed a retroviral cDNA expression library from an ANKL cell line KHYG-1. Infection of 3T3 cells with recombinant retroviruses yielded 33 transformed foci. Nucleotide sequencing of the DNA inserts recovered from these foci revealed that 31 of them encoded KRAS2 with a glycine-to-alanine mutation at codon 12. Mutation-specific PCR analysis indicated that the KRAS mutation was present only in KHYG-1 cells, not in another ANKL cell line or in clinical specimens (n=8).

  8. Vildagliptin and its metabolite M20.7 induce the expression of S100A8 and S100A9 in human hepatoma HepG2 and leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Mitsutoshi; Karaki, Fumika; Fujii, Hideaki; Atsuda, Koichiro; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2016-10-19

    Vildagliptin is a potent, orally active inhibitor of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has been reported that vildagliptin can cause hepatic dysfunction in patients. However, the molecular-mechanism of vildagliptin-induced liver dysfunction has not been elucidated. In this study, we employed an expression microarray to determine hepatic genes that were highly regulated by vildagliptin in mice. We found that pro-inflammatory S100 calcium-binding protein (S100) a8 and S100a9 were induced more than 5-fold by vildagliptin in the mouse liver. We further examined the effects of vildagliptin and its major metabolite M20.7 on the mRNA expression levels of S100A8 and S100A9 in human hepatoma HepG2 and leukemia HL-60 cells. In HepG2 cells, vildagliptin, M20.7, and sitagliptin - another DPP-4 inhibitor - induced S100A9 mRNA. In HL-60 cells, in contrast, S100A8 and S100A9 mRNAs were significantly induced by vildagliptin and M20.7, but not by sitagliptin. The release of S100A8/A9 complex in the cell culturing medium was observed in the HL-60 cells treated with vildagliptin and M20.7. Therefore, the parental vildagliptin- and M20.7-induced release of S100A8/A9 complex from immune cells, such as neutrophils, might be a contributing factor of vildagliptin-associated liver dysfunction in humans.

  9. Localized nasal cavity, sinus, and massive bilateral orbital involvement by human T cell leukemia virus 1 adult T cell lymphoma, with epidermal hypertrophy due to mite infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Laveaux

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available HTLV1 adult T cell lymphoma occurs tends to be widely disseminated and aggressive, with only brief responses to chemotherapy. Aside from cervical adenopathy, involvement of head and neck structures is uncommon and orbital involvement rare. We report a case of nasal cavity HTLV lymphoma with massive bilateral orbital involvement and proptosis, resulting in complete left and partial right eye amaurosis. No other sites of disease were found. Response to chemotherapy was rapid and complete, with almost complete restoration of vision and oculo-motor function; the patient has remained in remission for one year. An associated problem was striking bilateral hypertrophic, hyperkeratotic eyelid and breast lesions due to mite infestation. 

  10. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Deborah; Saccomani, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive disease caused by the malignant transformation of immature progenitors primed towards T-cell development. Clinically, T-ALL patients present with diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by immature T-cell blasts high blood cell counts, mediastinal involvement, and diffusion to the central nervous system. In the past decade, the genomic landscape of T-ALL has been the target of intense research. The identification of specific genomic alterations has contributed to identify strong oncogenic drivers and signaling pathways regulating leukemia growth. Notwithstanding, T-ALL patients are still treated with high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially exposing these patients to considerable acute and long-term side effects. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways relevant for the pathogenesis of T-ALL and the opportunities offered for targeted therapy. PMID:28872614

  11. Alternative Splice Variants Modulates Dominant-Negative Function of Helios in T-Cell Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong Zhao

    Full Text Available The molecular defects which lead to multistep incidences of human T-cell leukemia have yet to be identified. The DNA-binding protein Helios (known as IKZF2, a member of the Ikaros family of Krüppel-like zinc-finger proteins, functions pivotally in T-cell differentiation and activation. In this study, we identify three novel short Helios splice variants which are T-cell leukemic specific, and demonstrate their dominant-negative function. We then test the cellular localization of distinct Helios isoforms, as well as their capability to form heterodimer with Ikaros, and the association with complexes comprising histone deacetylase (HDAC. In addition, the ectopic expression of T-cell leukemic Helios isoforms interferes with T-cell proliferation and apoptosis. The gene expression profiling and pathway analysis indicated the enrichment of signaling pathways essential for gene expression, translation, cell cycle checkpoint, and response to DNA damage stimulus. These data indicate the molecular function of Helios to be involved in the leukemogenesis and phenotype of T-cell leukemia, and also reveal Helios deregulation as a novel marker for T-cell leukemia.

  12. Oxidative stress in normal hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Azin; Kalantari, Heybatullah; Lorestani, Marzieh Zeinvand; Shirzad, Reza; Saki, Najmaldin

    2018-04-01

    Leukemia is developed following the abnormal proliferation of immature hematopoietic cells in the blood when hematopoietic stem cells lose the ability to turn into mature cells at different stages of maturation and differentiation. Leukemia initiating cells are specifically dependent upon the suppression of oxidative stress in the hypoglycemic bone marrow (BM) environment to be able to start their activities. Relevant literature was identified by a PubMed search (2000-2017) of English-language literature using the terms 'oxidative stress,' 'reactive oxygen species,' 'hematopoietic stem cell,' and 'leukemia.' The generation and degradation of free radicals is a main component of the metabolism in aerobic organisms. A certain level of ROS is required for proper cellular function, but values outside this range will result in oxidative stress (OS). Long-term overactivity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has harmful effects on the function of cells and their vital macromolecules, including the transformation of proteins into autoantigens and increased degradation of protein/DNA, which eventually leads to the change in pathways involved in the development of cancer and several other disorders. According to the metabolic disorders of cancer, the relationship between OS changes, the viability of cancer cells, and their response to chemotherapeutic agents affecting this pathway are undeniable. Recently, studies have been conducted to determine the effect of herbal agents and cancer chemotherapy drugs on oxidative stress pathways. By emphasizing the role of oxidative stress on stem cells in the incidence of leukemia, this paper attempts to state and summarize this subject. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Search for infective mammalian type-C virus-related genes in the DNA of human sarcomas and leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, M O; Gilden, R V; Charman, H; Rice, N; Heberling, R; McAllister, R M

    1978-06-15

    DNA was extracted from two human sarcoma cell lines, TE-32 and TE-418, and the leukemic cells from five children with acute myelocytic leukemia, three children with acute lymphocytic leukemia and four adults with acute myelocytic leukemia. The DNAs, assayed for infectivity by transfection techniques, induced no measurable virus by methods which would detect known mammalian C-type antigens or RNA-directed DNA polymerase in TE-32, D-17 dog cells and other indicator cells, nor did they recombine with or rescue endogenous human or exogenous murine or baboon type-C virus. Model systems used as controls were human sarcoma cells, TE-32 and HT-1080, and human lymphoma cells TE-543, experimentally infected with KiMuLV, GaLV or baboon type-C virus, all of which released infectious virus and whose DNAs were infectious for TE-32 and D-17 dog cells. Other model systems included two baboon placentas and one embryonic cell strain spontaneously releasing infectious endogenous baboon virus and yielding DNAs infectious for D-17 dog cells but not for TE-32 cells. Four other baboon embryonic tissues and two embryonic cell strains, releasing either low levels of virus or no virus, did not yield infectious DNA.

  14. Induced apoptosis by mild hyperthermia occurs via telomerase inhibition on the three human myeloid leukemia cell lines: TF-1, K562, and HL-60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deezagi, Abdolkhaleg; Manteghi, Sanaz; Khosravani, Pardis; Vaseli-Hagh, Neda; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand the effect of hyperthermia on the telomerase activity in human leukemic cell lines (HL-60, K562, and TF-1). The cells were treated by hyperthermia at the range of 41-44 degrees C for 120 min and incubated for 96 h. Then telomerase activity, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. The results indicated that hyperthermia significantly induced apoptosis on the cells. The cells exhibited pre-apoptotic pattern at 41 and 42 degrees C at 60-120 min and apoptotic pattern at 43 and 44 degrees C over 30 min after hyperthermia. Telomerase activity (that was assayed immediately after hyperthermia) was stable at 41-42 degrees C for 60 min but decreased to 35-40% at 120 min. However, at severe hyperthermia (43-44 degrees C) telomerase activity was decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Following hyperthermia (41-44 degrees C up to 120 min), the cells were incubated for 96 h. In these conditions, the telomerase activity was decreased by about 60-80% in comparison with that untreated control cells.

  15. Zebrafish Models of Human Leukemia: Technological Advances and Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Nicholas R; Laroche, Fabrice J F; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Feng, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Insights concerning leukemic pathophysiology have been acquired in various animal models and further efforts to understand the mechanisms underlying leukemic treatment resistance and disease relapse promise to improve therapeutic strategies. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a vertebrate organism with a conserved hematopoietic program and unique experimental strengths suiting it for the investigation of human leukemia. Recent technological advances in zebrafish research including efficient transgenesis, precise genome editing, and straightforward transplantation techniques have led to the generation of a number of leukemia models. The transparency of the zebrafish when coupled with improved lineage-tracing and imaging techniques has revealed exquisite details of leukemic initiation, progression, and regression. With these advantages, the zebrafish represents a unique experimental system for leukemic research and additionally, advances in zebrafish-based high-throughput drug screening promise to hasten the discovery of novel leukemia therapeutics. To date, investigators have accumulated knowledge of the genetic underpinnings critical to leukemic transformation and treatment resistance and without doubt, zebrafish are rapidly expanding our understanding of disease mechanisms and helping to shape therapeutic strategies for improved outcomes in leukemic patients.

  16. Purification and Characterization of Glutaminase Free Asparaginase from Enterobacter cloacae: In-Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxic Potential against Human Myeloid Leukemia HL-60 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Husain

    Full Text Available Asparaginase is an important antileukemic agent extensively used worldwide but the intrinsic glutaminase activity of this enzymatic drug is responsible for serious life threatening side effects. Hence, glutaminase free asparaginase is much needed for upgradation of therapeutic index of asparaginase therapy. In the present study, glutaminase free asparaginase produced from Enterobacter cloacae was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme was found to be homodimer of approximately 106 kDa with monomeric size of approximately 52 kDa and pI 4.5. Purified enzyme showed optimum activity between pH 7-8 and temperature 35-40°C, which is close to the internal environment of human body. Monovalent cations such as Na+ and K+ enhanced asparaginase activity whereas divalent and trivalent cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ inhibited the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters Km, Vmax and Kcat of purified enzyme were found to be 1.58×10-3 M, 2.22 IU μg-1 and 5.3 × 104 S-1, respectively. Purified enzyme showed prolonged in vitro serum (T1/2 = ~ 39 h and trypsin (T1/2 = ~ 32 min half life, which is therapeutically remarkable feature. The cytotoxic activity of enzyme was examined against a panel of human cancer cell lines, HL-60, MOLT-4, MDA-MB-231 and T47D, and highest cytotoxicity observed against HL-60 cells (IC50 ~ 3.1 IU ml-1, which was comparable to commercial asparaginase. Cell and nuclear morphological studies of HL-60 cells showed that on treatment with purified asparaginase symptoms of apoptosis were increased in dose dependent manner. Cell cycle progression analysis indicates that enzyme induces apoptosis by cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss showed that enzyme also triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, the enzyme was found to be nontoxic for human noncancerous cells FR-2 and nonhemolytic for human erythrocytes.

  17. Effect of benzo[a]pyrene on the production of vascular endothelial growth factor by human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jie; Chan, Lai-Sheung; Wong, Chris Kong-Chu; Wong, Ngok-Shun; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Leung, Kok-Nam; Mak, Naiki K

    2011-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) has been shown to affect both the development and response of T and B cells in the immune system. However, the effect of BaP on other immune cells, such as eosionophils, is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of BaP on the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) using an in vitro eosinophilic EoL-1 cell and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) co-culture system. EoL-1-conditioned medium was found to promote the growth of HUVEC in a time-dependent manner. The growth stimulating activity was due to the production of VEGF by the EoL-1 cells. The production of VEGF was correlated with the enhanced expression of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (p-ERKs) and the upregulated expression of VEGF mRNA. Furthermore, BaP-induced expression of VEGF mRNA was reduced by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Results from this study suggested that BaP might affect the growth of endothelial cells through the modulation of VEGF production by eosinophils.

  18. Incidence of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma in nonendemic areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Chihara, Dai

    2015-02-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a mature T-cell neoplasm with extremely poor prognosis caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The distribution of HTLV-1 and the incidence of ATLL in endemic areas have been well described, however, little is known about the incidences and the trends of the disease in nonendemic areas. Recently, studies have shown that the HTLV-1 carriers are increasing in nonendemic areas. Also, the incidence of ATLL seems to be significantly increasing in nonendemic areas suggesting that HTLV-1 carriers have emigrated from endemic areas. These epidemiologic studies indicate the necessity of edification of the disease caused by HTLV-1 and establishing appropriate preventive methods against infection in nonendemic areas.

  19. KIT D816V Positive Acute Mast Cell Leukemia Associated with Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marta; Teixeira, Maria Dos Anjos; Casais, Cláudia; Mesquita, Vanessa; Seabra, Patrícia; Cabral, Renata; Palla-García, José; Lau, Catarina; Rodrigues, João; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Freitas, Inês; Vizcaíno, Jose Ramón; Coutinho, Jorge; Escribano, Luis; Orfao, Alberto; Lima, Margarida

    2018-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) leukemia (MCL) is extremely rare. We present a case of MCL diagnosed concomitantly with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). A 41-year-old woman presented with asthenia, anorexia, fever, epigastralgia, and diarrhea. She had a maculopapular skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly, retroperitoneal adenopathies, pancytopenia, 6% blast cells (BC) and 20% MC in the peripheral blood, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, cholestasis, hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and increased serum tryptase (184  μ g/L). The bone marrow (BM) smears showed 24% myeloblasts, 17% promyelocytes, and 16% abnormal toluidine blue positive MC, and flow cytometry revealed 12% myeloid BC, 34% aberrant promyelocytes, a maturation blockage at the myeloblast/promyelocyte level, and 16% abnormal CD2-CD25+ MC. The BM karyotype was normal, and the KIT D816V mutation was positive in BM cells. The diagnosis of MCL associated with AML was assumed. The patient received corticosteroids, disodium cromoglycate, cladribine, idarubicin and cytosine arabinoside, high-dose cytosine arabinoside, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The outcome was favorable, with complete hematological remission two years after diagnosis and one year after HSCT. This case emphasizes the need of an exhaustive laboratory evaluation for the concomitant diagnosis of MCL and AML, and the therapeutic options.

  20. Adaptive immunity to leukemia is inhibited by cross-reactive induced regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Manlove, Luke S.; Berquam-Vrieze, Katherine E.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Williams, Richard T.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have transient responses to current therapies. However, the fusion of BCR to ABL generates a potential leukemia-specific antigen that could be a target for immunotherapy. We demonstrate that the immune system can limit BCR-ABL+ leukemia progression although ultimately this immune response fails. To address how BCR-ABL+ leukemia escapes immune surveillance, we developed a peptide: MHC-II tetramer that labels endogenous BCR-ABL-specific CD4+ T cell...

  1. Growth regulation on human acute myeloid leukemia effects of five recombinant hematopoietic factors in a serum-free culture system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delwel, E.; Salem, M.; Pellens, C.; Dorssers, L.; Wagemaker, G.; Clark, S.; Loewenberg, B

    1988-01-01

    The response of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells to the distinct hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs), ie, recombinant interleukin-3 (IL-3), granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF), granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF), macrophage-CSF (M-CSF), and erythropoietin (Epo) was investigated under well-defined

  2. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Diastereomeric and Geometric Analogs of Calcipotriol, PRI-2202 and PRI-2205, Against Human HL-60 Leukemia and MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Kutner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Diastereomeric and geometric analogs of calcipotriol, PRI-2202 and PRI-2205, were synthesized as advanced intermediates from vitamin D C-22 benzothiazoyl sulfones and side-chain aldehydes using our convergent strategy. Calcitriol, calcipotriol (PRI-2201 and tacalcitol (PRI-2191 were used as the reference compounds. Among a series of tested analogs the diastereomeric analog PRI-2202 showed the strongest antiproliferative activity on the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, whereas the geometric analog PRI-2205 was the weakest. Both analogs were less potent in antiproliferative activity against HL-60 cells compared to the reference compounds. The ability to potentiate antiproliferative effect of cisplatin or doxorubicin against HL-60 cells or that of tamoxifen against the MCF-7 cell line was observed at higher doses of PRI-2202 or PRI-2205 than those of the reference compounds. The proapoptotic activity of tamoxifen, expressed as the diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, as well as the increased phosphatidylserine expression, was partially attenuated by calcitriol, PRI-2191, PRI-2201 and PRI-2205. The treatment of the MCF-7 cells with tamoxifen alone resulted in an increase in VDR expression. Moreover, a further increase in VDR expression was observed when the analogs PRI-2201 or PRI-2205, but not PRI-2191, were used in combination with tamoxifen. This observation could partially explain the potentiation of the antiproliferative effect of tamoxifen by vitamin D analogs.

  3. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Diastereomeric and Geometric Analogs of Calcipotriol, PRI-2202 and PRI-2205, Against Human HL-60 Leukemia and MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milczarek, Magdalena; Chodyński, Michał; Filip-Psurska, Beata; Martowicz, Agnieszka; Krupa, Małgorzata; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Kutner, Andrzej; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2013-10-31

    Diastereomeric and geometric analogs of calcipotriol, PRI-2202 and PRI-2205, were synthesized as advanced intermediates from vitamin D C-22 benzothiazoyl sulfones and side-chain aldehydes using our convergent strategy. Calcitriol, calcipotriol (PRI-2201) and tacalcitol (PRI-2191) were used as the reference compounds. Among a series of tested analogs the diastereomeric analog PRI-2202 showed the strongest antiproliferative activity on the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, whereas the geometric analog PRI-2205 was the weakest. Both analogs were less potent in antiproliferative activity against HL-60 cells compared to the reference compounds. The ability to potentiate antiproliferative effect of cisplatin or doxorubicin against HL-60 cells or that of tamoxifen against the MCF-7 cell line was observed at higher doses of PRI-2202 or PRI-2205 than those of the reference compounds. The proapoptotic activity of tamoxifen, expressed as the diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, as well as the increased phosphatidylserine expression, was partially attenuated by calcitriol, PRI-2191, PRI-2201 and PRI-2205. The treatment of the MCF-7 cells with tamoxifen alone resulted in an increase in VDR expression. Moreover, a further increase in VDR expression was observed when the analogs PRI-2201 or PRI-2205, but not PRI-2191, were used in combination with tamoxifen. This observation could partially explain the potentiation of the antiproliferative effect of tamoxifen by vitamin D analogs.

  4. Vitamin K2 and cotylenin A synergistically induce monocytic differentiation and growth arrest along with the suppression of c-MYC expression and induction of cyclin G2 expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniwa, Yasuhisa; Kasukabe, Takashi; Kumakura, Shunichi

    2015-08-01

    Although all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is a standard and effective drug used for differentiation therapy in acute promyelocytic leukemia, ATRA-resistant leukemia cells ultimately emerge during this treatment. Therefore, the development of new drugs or effective combination therapy is urgently needed. We demonstrate that the combined treatment of vitamin K2 and cotylenin A synergistically induced monocytic differentiation in HL-60 cells. This combined treatment also synergistically induced NBT-reducing activity and non-specific esterase-positive cells as well as morphological changes to monocyte/macrophage-like cells. Vitamin K2 and cotylenin A cooperatively inhibited the proliferation of HL-60 cells in short-term and long-term cultures. This treatment also induced growth arrest at the G1 phase. Although 5 µg/ml cotylenin A or 5 µM vitamin K2 alone reduced c-MYC gene expression in HL-60 cells to approximately 45% or 80% that of control cells, respectively, the combined treatment almost completely suppressed c-MYC gene expression. We also demonstrated that the combined treatment of vitamin K2 and cotylenin A synergistically induced the expression of cyclin G2, which had a positive effect on the promotion and maintenance of cell cycle arrest. These results suggest that the combination of vitamin K2 and cotylenin A has therapeutic value in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  5. KRAS (G12D Cooperates with AML1/ETO to Initiate a Mouse Model Mimicking Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Shanmin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: It has been demonstrated that KRAS mutations represent about 90% of cancer-associated mutations, and that KRAS mutations play an essential role in neoplastic transformation. Cancer-associated RAS mutations occur frequently in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, suggesting a functional role for Ras in leukemogenesis. Methods: We successfully established a mouse model of human leukemia by transplanting bone marrow cells co-transfected with the K-ras (G12D mutation and AML1/ETO fusion protein. Results: Mice transplanted with AML/ETO+KRAS co-transduced cells had the highest mortality rate than mice transplanted with AML/ETO- or KRAS-transduced cells (115d vs. 150d. Upon reaching a terminal disease stage, EGFP-positive cells dominated their spleen, lymph nodes, peripheral blood and central nervous system tissue. Immunophenotyping, cytologic analyses revealed that AML/ETO+KRAS leukemias predominantly contained immature myeloid precursors (EGFP+/c-Kit+/Mac-1-/Gr-1-. Histologic analyses revealed that massive leukemic infiltrations were closely packed in dense sheets that effaced the normal architecture of spleen and thymus in mice transplanted with AML1/ETO + KRAS co-transduced cells. K-ras mRNA and protein expression were upregulated in bone marrow cells of the K-ras group and AML1/ETO + Kras group. The phosphorylation of MEK/ERK was significantly enhanced in the AML1/ETO + Kras group. The similar results of the AML1/ETO + Nras group were consistent with those reported previously. Conclusion: Co-transduction of KrasG12D and AML1/ETO induces acute monoblastic leukemia. Since expression of mutant K-ras alone was insufficient to induce leukemia, this model may be useful for investigating the multi-step leukemogenesis model of human leukemia.

  6. Selective cytotoxicity of the antibacterial peptide ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog towards leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Ming; Zhang, Jiaxin; Zhuge, Qiang

    2017-05-15

    Some cationic antibacterial peptides, with typical amphiphilic α-helical conformations in a membrane-mimicking environment, exhibit anticancer properties as a result of a similar mechanism of action towards both bacteria and cancer cells. We previously reported the cDNA sequence of the antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-Cecropin A precursor cloned from drury (Hyphantria cunea) (dHC). In the present study, we synthesized and structurally characterized ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog, ABP-dHC-Cecropin A-K(24). Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog adopt a well-defined α-helical structure in a 50% trifluorethanol solution. The cytotoxicity and cell selectivity of these peptides were further examined in three leukemia cell lines and two non-cancerous cell lines. The MTT assay indicated both of these peptides have a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect in leukemia cells, although the observed cytotoxicity was greater with ABP-dHC-Cecropin A-K(24) treatment, whereas they were not cytotoxic towards the non-cancerous cell lines. Moreover, ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog had a lower hemolytic effect in human red blood cells. Together, these results suggest the peptides are selectively cytotoxic towards leukemia cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy determined that the peptides were concentrated at the surface of the leukemia cells, and changes in the cell membrane were determined with a permeability assay, which suggested that the anticancer activity of ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog is a result of its presence at the leukemia cell membrane. ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog may represent a novel anticancer agent for leukemia therapy, considering its cancer cell selectivity and relatively low cytotoxicity in normal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The human CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab shows antitumor activity and hampers leukemia-microenvironment interactions in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matas-Céspedes, Alba; Vidal-Crespo, Anna; Rodriguez, Vanina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a proof-of-concept for the efficacy of the anti-CD38 antibody daratumumab in the poor prognosis CD38+ chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) subtype. Experimental Design: The mechanism of action of daratumumab was assessed in CLL primary cells and cell lines using peripheral blo...

  8. Nature of leukemic stem cells in murine myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Nemoto, K.; Nishimura, M.; Hayata, I.; Inoue, T.; Seki, M.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the nature of myelogenous leukemic stem cells in mice. L-8057, a megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line used in this study, produces in vivo and in vitro colonies. By means of typical chromosomal aberrations in L-8057, one can conveniently detect the origin of the cells in each colony derived from a leukemic stem cell. Direct evidence of whether cells from each colony had leukemogenicity in recipient mice was successfully obtained by the colony transplantation assay. Both leukemic colony-forming unit-spleen (L-CFU-s) and leukemic colony-forming unit-culture (L-CFU-c) in L-8057 may have belonged to the same differentiating stage in the stem cells because of their similar radiosensitivity, although some parts of the L-CFU of L-8057 seemed to have lost their capability to regenerate L-CFU-s when the cells were plated in dishes. This leukemic stem cell preserves high self-renewal ability in vitro after 10 passages. In addition, in vitro colony formation by this leukemic cell during the above course of serial passages did not require any additional exogenous stimulators. The same sort of trials have been made on other types of leukemias. Leukemic stem cells showed remarkable variety in their response to stimulating factors and in their self-renewal activity, which suggests that they may have consisted of heterogeneous populations

  9. Modulation of ceramide metabolism in T-leukemia cell lines potentiates apoptosis induced by the cationic antimicrobial peptide bovine lactoferricin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Suzanne J; Ridgway, Neale D; Hoskin, David W

    2008-03-01

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that selectively induces apoptosis in several different types of human cancer cells. However, the potential use of LfcinB as an anticancer agent is presently limited by the need for relatively high concentrations of the peptide to trigger apoptosis. Ceramide is a membrane sphingolipid that is believed to function as a second messenger during apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the role of ceramide in LfcinB-induced apoptosis in CCRF-CEM and Jurkat T-leukemia cell lines. Exposure to LfcinB caused nuclear condensation and fragmentation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and DNA fragmentation in CCRF-CEM and Jurkat T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines. Treatment with C6 ceramide, a cell-permeable, short-chain ceramide analog, also induced apoptotic nuclear morphology, PARP cleavage, and DNA fragmentation in T-leukemia cells. Although LfcinB treatment did not cause ceramide to accumulate in CCRF-CEM or Jurkat cells, the addition of C6 ceramide to LfcinB-treated T-leukemia cells resulted in increased DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, modulation of cellular ceramide metabolism either by inhibiting ceramidases with D-erythro-2-(N-myristoylamino)-1-phenyl-1-propanol or N-oleoylethanolamine, or by blocking glucosylceramide synthase activity with 1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol, enhanced the ability of LfcinB to trigger apoptosis in both Jurkat and CCRF-CEM cells. In addition, LfcinB-induced apoptosis of T-leukemia cells was enhanced in the presence of the antiestrogen tamoxifen, which has multiple effects on cancer cells, including inhibition of glucosylceramide synthase activity. We conclude that manipulation of cellular ceramide levels in combination with LfcinB therapy warrants further investigation as a novel strategy for the treatment of T cell-derived leukemias.

  10. De novo design of peptide immunogens that mimic the coiled coil region of human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 glycoprotein 21 transmembrane subunit for induction of native protein reactive neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Roshni; Lynch, Marcus P; Rawale, Sharad V; Sun, Yiping; Kazanji, Mirdad; Kaumaya, Pravin T P

    2004-06-04

    Peptide vaccines able to induce high affinity and protective neutralizing antibodies must rely in part on the design of antigenic epitopes that mimic the three-dimensional structure of the corresponding region in the native protein. We describe the design, structural characterization, immunogenicity, and neutralizing potential of antibodies elicited by conformational peptides derived from the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) gp21 envelope glycoprotein spanning residues 347-374. We used a novel template design and a unique synthetic approach to construct two peptides (WCCR2T and CCR2T) that would each assemble into a triple helical coiled coil conformation mimicking the gp21 crystal structure. The peptide B-cell epitopes were grafted onto the epsilon side chains of three lysyl residues on a template backbone construct consisting of the sequence acetyl-XGKGKGKGCONH2 (where X represents the tetanus toxoid promiscuous T cell epitope (TT) sequence 580-599). Leucine substitutions were introduced at the a and d positions of the CCR2T sequence to maximize helical character and stability as shown by circular dichroism and guanidinium hydrochloride studies. Serum from an HTLV-1-infected patient was able to recognize the selected epitopes by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mice immunized with the wild-type sequence (WCCR2T) and the mutant sequence (CCR2T) elicited high antibody titers that were capable of recognizing the native protein as shown by flow cytometry and whole virus ELISA. Sera and purified antibodies from immunized mice were able to reduce the formation of syncytia induced by the envelope glycoprotein of HTLV-1, suggesting that antibodies directed against the coiled coil region of gp21 are capable of disrupting cell-cell fusion. Our results indicate that these peptides represent potential candidates for use in a peptide vaccine against HTLV-1.

  11. RESULTS OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA

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    A. Mousavi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is an accepted treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML in first remission, the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and high risk groups of ALL who relapse with conventional chemotherapy. We assessed results of HCT for pediatric leukemia in our center. A total of 92 children, 63 with diagnose of AML, 23 with ALL and 6 with CML received allogeneic transplantation from HLA full matched siblings (57.6% and autologous transplantation (42.4%. Source of hematopoietic cells were peripheral blood 83.7%, bone marrow 15.2% and cord blood 1.6%. The median transplanted nucleated cells were 6.4 ± 4.7 ×108 /Kg (body weight of patients and mononuclear cells were 5.5 ± 2.9×108/Kg. The most common conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide + busulfan. Prophylaxis regimen for GVHD was cyclosporin ± methotrexate. GVHD occurred in 50 (54.3% patients. Eighty five of children had engraftment, 26 (28.6% relapsed and 57 (62% are alive. The most common cause of death was relapse (68.6%. Five years overall survival of patients with AML and ALL were 49% and 44% respectively and disease free survival of them were 52% and 49%. One year overall survival and disease free survival of CML was 57%. Overall survival increased with increasing age of patients at transplantation time (P = 0.06. Longer survival significantly related to earlier WBC and platelet recovery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.006 respectively. Considering acceptable overall and disease free survival of patients after HCT, we concluded that is a good modality in treatment of leukemia of children.

  12. Acute leukemia after successful chemotherapy for oat cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, V.L.; Keppen, M.D.; Eichner, E.R.; Pitha, J.V.; Murray, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A report of acute myelomonocytic leukemia following successful therapy for oat cell carcinoma is presented. The patient had been treated with extensive cytotoxic and radiation therapy, and was without clinical evidence of disease at one year follow-up. Eighteen months later, a peripheral smear revealed numerous blasts with monocytoid characteristics. This unusual presentation is discussed and compared with several other cases appearing in the recent literature

  13. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  14. Mutational analysis of the cell cycle inhibitor Kip1/p27 in childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markaki, E-A; Stiakaki, E; Zafiropoulos, A; Arvanitis, D A; Katzilakis, N; Dimitriou, H; Spandidos, D A; Kalmanti, M

    2006-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins, their regulatory subunits, govern cell-cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. Kip1/p27 is the main cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which arrests cell division inhibiting G1-S transition. Kip1/p27 seems to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of several human malignancies and its lower expression has been shown to correlate with a poor prognosis in adult solid tumors. Bone marrow blasts from 49 children with leukemia, 37 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 12 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were studied. Exon 3 of Kip1/p27 was amplified using the polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR). Single strand conformational polymorphism and heterodouplex analysis were performed to detect DNA sequence with altered conformations and were subsequently sequenced to document mutations. Mutations in Kip1/p27 gene were detected in 2 out of 3 T-ALL, 6 out of 12 AML patients, and only 1 out of 34 B lineage ALL cases. Although the patient groups are small, a highly significant relation of the mutation status with the type of leukemia (P = 0.0037) and the risk group according to treatment protocols (P = 0.00021) was estimated. A statistically significant difference in the white blood count was observed (P = 0.019) between the mutated and non-mutated patient groups although no statistically significant association of the mutation status with the hemoglobin and platelets values, karyotype, age, sex, disease progression, and outcome was determined. Based upon these results, the Kip1/p27 mutations should be considered for further prospective testing as an additional parameter for risk stratification and treatment of childhood leukemia. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Targeting Human C-Type Lectin-Like Molecule-1 (CLL1) with a Bispecific Antibody for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Immunotherapy**

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Hua; Zhou, Quan; Deshmukh, Vishal; Phull, Hardeep; Ma, Jennifer; Tardif, Virginie; Naik, Rahul R.; Bouvard, Claire; Zhang, Yong; Choi, Seihyun; Lawson, Brian R.; Zhu, Shoutian; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most common acute adult leukemia and the second most common pediatric leukemia, still has a poor prognosis. Human C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1) is a recently identified myeloid lineage restricted cell surface marker, which is overexpressed in over 90% of AML patient myeloid blasts and in leukemic stem cells. Here, we describe the synthesis of a novel bispecific antibody, αCLL1-αCD3, using the genetically encoded unnatural amino acid, p-acetylphenylalan...

  16. TLX1 and NOTCH coregulate transcription in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Riz, Irene; Hawley, Teresa S; Luu, Truong V; Lee, Norman H; Hawley, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The homeobox gene TLX1 (for T-cell leukemia homeobox 1, previously known as HOX11) is inappropriately expressed in a major subgroup of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) where it is strongly associated with activating NOTCH1 mutations. Despite the recognition that these genetic lesions cooperate in leukemogenesis, there have been no mechanistic studies addressing how TLX1 and NOTCH1 functionally interact to promote the leukemic phenotype. Results Global gene expre...

  17. Decreased cisplatin uptake by resistant L1210 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromas, R.A.; North, J.A.; Burns, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance remains poorly understood compared to other forms of anti-neoplastic drug resistance. In this report radiolabelled cisplatin and rapid separation techniques were used to compare drug uptake by L1210 leukemia cells that are sensitive (K25) or resistant (SCR9) to cisplatin. Uptake of cisplatin by both cell lines was linear without saturation kinetics up to 100 μM. The resistant ZCR9 cells had 36-60% reduced drug uptake as compared to its sensitive parent line, K25. In contrast, there was no difference in the rate of efflux. We conclude that a decreased rate of uptake is one possible mechanism of cellular cisplatin resistance. (Author)

  18. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

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    Aileen G Rowan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL, human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1, contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1 to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  19. Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0380 TITLE: Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias PRINCIPAL...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias 5b. GRANT NUMBER...leukemias still have poor prognosis, particularly in the elderly, and require hematopoietic cell transplants to fully kill the tumor, which is both

  20. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Nuno R. dos; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; Silva, Ricardo C. da; Fernandes, Mónica T.

    2010-01-01

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL

  1. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nuno R. dos, E-mail: nrsantos@ualg.pt; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; Silva, Ricardo C. da; Fernandes, Mónica T. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-11-05

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL.

  2. Radioimmunodetection of human leukemia with anti-interleukin-2 receptor antibody in severe combined immunodeficiency mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Makoto; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Zheng-Sheng, Yao; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Hosono, Masako N.; Sakahara, Harumi; Imada, Kazunori; Okuma, Minoru; Uchiyama, Takashi; Konishi, Junji

    1995-01-01

    Anti-Tac monoclonal antibody recognizes human interleukin-2 receptor, which is overexpressed in leukemic cells of most adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) patients. To examine the potency of anti-Tac for targeting of ATL, biodistributions of intravenously administered 125 I- and 111 In-labeled anti-Tac were examined in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice inoculated with ATL cells. Significant amounts of radiolabeled anti-Tac were found in the spleen and thymus. The trafficking of ATL cells in SCID mice was detected using 111 In-oxine-labeled ATL cells. These results were coincident with the histologically confirmed infiltration of ATL cells. The radiolabeled anti-Tac seemed potent for targeting of ATL

  3. Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma T-Cell Lymphoma Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Young Adult Lymphoma Overview Treatment Options Relapsed/Refractory Long-term ...

  4. Paradoxical expression of IL-28B mRNA in peripheral blood in human T-cell leukemia virus Type-1 mono-infection and co-infection with hepatitis C Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamihira Shimeru

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 carriers co-infected with and hepatitis C virus (HCV have been known to be at higher risk of their related diseases than mono-infected individuals. The recent studies clarified that IL-28B polymorphism rs8099917 is associated with not only the HCV therapeutic response by IFN, but also innate immunity and antiviral activity. The aim of our research was to clarify study whether IL-28B gene polymorphism (rs8099917 is associated with HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. Results The genotyping and viral-serological analysis for 340 individuals showed that IL-28B genotype distribution of rs8099917 SNP did not differ significantly by respective viral infection status. However, the IL-28B mRNA expression level was 3.8 fold higher in HTLV-1 mono-infection than HTLV-1/HCV co-infection. The high expression level was associated with TT (OR, 6.25, whiles the low expression was associated with co-infection of the two viruses (OR, 9.5. However, there was no association between down-regulation and ATL development (OR, 0.8. Conclusion HTLV-1 mono-infection up-regulates the expression of IL-28B transcripts in genotype-dependent manner, whiles HTLV-1/HCV co-infection down-regulates regardless of ATL development.

  5. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forester, Craig M.; Braunreiter, Chi L.; Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab; Hedlund, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  6. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  7. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of mRNA decay: half-life of Beta-actin mRNA in human leukemia CCRF-CEM and Nalm-6 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barredo Julio C

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We describe an alternative method to determine mRNA half-life (t1/2 based on the Real-Time RT-PCR procedure. This approach was evaluated by using the β-actin gene as a reference molecule for measuring of mRNA stability. Results Human leukemia Nalm-6 and CCRF-CEM cells were treated with various concentrations of Actinomycin D to block transcription and aliquots were removed periodically. Total RNA was isolated and quantified using the RiboGreen® fluorescent dye with the VersaFluor Fluorometer System. One μg of total RNA was reverse transcribed and used as template for the amplification of a region of the β-actin gene (231 bp. To generate the standard curve, serial ten-fold dilutions of the pBactin-231 vector containing the cDNA amplified fragment were employed, β-actin mRNAs were quantified by Real-Time RT-PCR using the SYBR® Green I fluorogenic dye and data analyzed using the iCycle iQ system software. Using this method, the β-actin mRNA exhibited a half-life of 6.6 h and 13.5 h in Nalm-6 and CCRF-CEM cells, respectively. The t1/2 value obtained for Nalm-6 is comparable to those estimated from Northern blot studies, using normal human leukocytes (5.5 h. Conclusions We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reliable method based on Real-Time RT-PCR for measuring mRNA half-life. Our results confirm that β-actin mRNA half-life can be affected by the cellular growth rate.

  8. Bovine lactoferricin causes apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells by sequential permeabilization of the cell membrane and targeting of mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mader, Jamie S.; Richardson, Angela; Salsman, Jayme; Top, Deniz; Antueno, Roberto de; Duncan, Roy; Hoskin, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that kills Jurkat T-leukemia cells by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. However, the process by which LfcinB triggers mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is not well understood. Here, we show that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells was preceded by LfcinB binding to, and progressive permeabilization of the cell membrane. Colloidal gold electron microscopy revealed that LfcinB entered the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells prior to the onset of mitochondrial depolarization. LfcinB was not internalized by endocytosis because endocytosis inhibitors did not prevent LfcinB-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, intracellular delivery of LfcinB via fusogenic liposomes caused the death of Jurkat T-leukemia cells, as well as normal human fibroblasts. Collectively, these findings suggest that LfcinB caused damage to the cell membrane that allowed LfcinB to enter the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells and mediate cytotoxicity. In addition, confocal microscopy showed that intracellular LfcinB co-localized with mitochondria in Jurkat T-leukemia cells, while flow cytometry and colloidal gold electron microscopy showed that LfcinB rapidly associated with purified mitochondria. Furthermore, purified mitochondria treated with LfcinB rapidly lost transmembrane potential and released cytochrome c. We conclude that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells resulted from cell membrane damage and the subsequent disruption of mitochondrial membranes by internalized LfcinB

  9. IL-15 improves the cytotoxicity of cytokine-induced killer cells against leukemia cells by upregulating CD3+CD56+ cells and downregulating regulatory T cells as well as IL-35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qianshan; Chen, Tianping; Tao, Lili; Wang, Huiping; Pan, Ying; Xiong, Shudao; Zhai, Zhimin

    2013-01-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are usually generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells with the stimulation of IL-2 in vitro. Unlike the conventional IL-2-stimulated CIK cells (IL-2-CIK cells), we investigated the characteristics and potential mechanism of IL-15-stimulated CIK cells (IL-15-CIK cells) in this study. Compared with IL-2-CIK cells, the percentage of CD3CD56 cells was significantly increased in IL-15-CIK cells, but the expression of regulatory T (Treg) cells and IL-35 was significantly decreased in IL-15-CIK cells. Meanwhile, the in vitro cytotoxicity against human myeloid leukemia cells K562 of IL-15-CIK cells was significantly augmented compared with IL-2-CIK cells. These data suggest that IL-15 may improve the cytotoxicity of CIK cells against leukemia cells by upregulating CD3CD56 cells and downregulating Treg cells and IL-35.

  10. Troglitazone inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells with t(14;18).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenokuchi, M; Saigo, K; Nakamachi, Y; Kawano, S; Hashimoto, M; Fujioka, T; Koizumi, T; Tatsumi, E; Kumagai, S

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has been detected in several human leukemia cells. Recent studies reported that PPARgamma ligands inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in both normal and malignant B-lineage cells. We investigated the expression of PPARgamma and the effects of PPARgamma ligands on UTree-O2, Bay91 and 380, three B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines with t(14;18), which show a poor prognosis, accompanying c-myc abnormality. Western blot analysis identified expression of PPARgamma protein and real-time PCR that of PPARgamma mRNA on the three cell lines. Troglitazone (TGZ), a synthetic PPARgamma ligand, inhibited cell growth in these cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with G(1) cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We also found this effect PPARgamma independent since PPARgamma antagonists failed to reverse this effect. We assessed the expression of c-myc, an apoptosis-regulatory gene, since c-myc abnormality was detected in most B-ALL cells with t(14;18). TGZ was found to dose-dependently downregulate the expression of c-myc mRNA and c-myc protein in the three cell lines. These results suggest that TGZ inhibits cell growth via induction of G(1) cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in these cell lines and that TGZ-induced apoptosis, at least in part, may be related to the downregulation of c-myc expression. Moreover, the downregulation of c-myc expression by TGZ may depend on a PPARgamma-independent mechanism. Further studies indicate that PPARgamma ligands may serve as a therapeutic agent in B-ALL with t(14;18).

  11. CAR-T cells targeting CLL-1 as an approach to treat acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghua; Chen, Siyu; Xiao, Wei; Li, Wende; Wang, Liang; Yang, Shuo; Wang, Weida; Xu, Liping; Liao, Shuangye; Liu, Wenjian; Wang, Yang; Liu, Nawei; Zhang, Jianeng; Xia, Xiaojun; Kang, Tiebang; Chen, Gong; Cai, Xiuyu; Yang, Han; Zhang, Xing; Lu, Yue; Zhou, Penghui

    2018-01-10

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of adult acute leukemia. Standard chemotherapies can induce complete remission in selected patients; however, a majority of patients eventually relapse and succumb to the disease. Thus, the development of novel therapeutics for AML is urgently needed. Human C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL-1) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, and its expression is restricted to myeloid cells and the majority of AML blasts. Moreover, CLL-1 is expressed in leukemia stem cells (LSCs), but absent in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which may provide a potential therapeutic target for AML treatment. We tested the expression of CLL-1 antigen on peripheral blood cells and bone marrow cells in healthy donor and AML patients. Then, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) containing a CLL1-specific single-chain variable fragment, in combination with CD28, 4-1BB costimulatory domains, and CD3-ζ signaling domain. We further investigate the function of CLL-1 CAR-T cells. The CLL-1 CAR-T cells specifically lysed CLL-1 + cell lines as well as primary AML patient samples in vitro. Strong anti-leukemic activity was observed in vivo by using a xenograft model of disseminated AML. Importantly, CLL-1 + myeloid progenitor cells and mature myeloid cells were specifically eliminated by CLL-1 CAR-T cells, while normal HSCs were not targeted due to the lack of CLL-1 expression. CLL-1 CAR-T represents a promising immunotherapy for the treatment of AML.

  12. Establishing long-term cultures with self-renewing acute myeloid leukemia stem/progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gosliga, Djoke; Schepers, Hein; Rizo, Aleksandra; van der Kolk, Dorina; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Objective. With the emergence of the concept of the leukemia stem cell, assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Methods. We have cultured acute myeloid leukemia CD34(+) cells on bone marrow stroma. Long-term expansion was monitored and self-renewal was

  13. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling transplantation. Methods: A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1 received SS-BM, G-BM, or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling. Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD], overall survival, transplant-related mortality [TRM], and leukemia-free survival [LFS] were analyzed. Results: When compared to SS-BM, G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P 0.05. Conclusions: G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM. We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  14. Increased regulatory T cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Siti-Zuleha; Hassan, Norfarazieda; Lee, Le-Jie; Md Noor, Sabariah; Osman, Raudhawati; Abdul-Jalil, Marsitah; Nordin, Abdul-Jalil; Abdullah, Maha

    2015-10-01

    Regulation in adaptive immune response balances a fine line that prevents instigation of self-damage or fall into unresponsiveness permitting abnormal cell growth. Mechanisms that keep this balance in check include regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs consist of a small but heterogeneous population which may be identified by the phenotype, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127-. Role of Tregs in pathogenesis of cancers is thus far supported by evidence of increased Tregs in various cancers and may contribute to poorer prognosis. Tregs may also be important in acute leukemias. A review of the literature on Tregs in acute leukemias was conducted and Tregs were determined in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs). Studies on Tregs in B-cell ALL are few and controversial. We observed a significantly increased percentage of Tregs (mean ± SD, 9.72 ± 3.79% vs. 7.05 ± 1.74%; P = 0.047) in the bone marrow/peripheral blood of ALL (n = 17) compared to peripheral blood of normal controls (n = 35). A positive trend between Tregs and age (R = 0.474, P = 0.055, n = 17) implicates this factor of poor prognosis in B-cell ALL. Tregs in cancer are particularly significant in immunotherapy. The manipulation of the immune system to treat cancer has for a long time ignored regulatory mechanisms inducible or in place. In lymphoma studies tumor-specific mechanisms that are unlike conventional methods in the induction of Tregs have been hypothesized. In addition, tumor-infiltrating Tregs may present different profiles from peripheral blood pictures. Tregs will continue to be dissected to reveal their mysteries and their impact on clinical significance.

  15. Cyanobacteria from Terrestrial and Marine Sources Contain Apoptogens Able to Overcome Chemoresistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liwei; Herfindal, Lars; Jokela, Jouni; Shishido, Tania Keiko; Wahlsten, Matti; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81) cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemic activity, such as adenosine and its analogs. A cytotoxicity test on human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) fibroblasts indicated that 21 of the 28 extracts containing anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML) activity showed selectivity in favor of leukemia cells. Extracts L26-O and L30-O were able to partly overcome the chemotherapy resistance induced by the oncogenic protein Bcl-2, whereas extract L1-O overcame protection from the deletion of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, cyanobacteria are a prolific resource for anti-leukemia compounds that have potential for pharmaceutical applications. Based on the variety of cellular responses, we also conclude that the different anti-leukemic compounds in the cyanobacterial extracts target different elements of the death machinery of mammalian cells. PMID:24705501

  16. Cyanobacteria from Terrestrial and Marine Sources Contain Apoptogens Able to Overcome Chemoresistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81 cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemic activity, such as adenosine and its analogs. A cytotoxicity test on human embryonic kidney (HEK293T fibroblasts indicated that 21 of the 28 extracts containing anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML activity showed selectivity in favor of leukemia cells. Extracts L26-O and L30-O were able to partly overcome the chemotherapy resistance induced by the oncogenic protein Bcl-2, whereas extract L1-O overcame protection from the deletion of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, cyanobacteria are a prolific resource for anti-leukemia compounds that have potential for pharmaceutical applications. Based on the variety of cellular responses, we also conclude that the different anti-leukemic compounds in the cyanobacterial extracts target different elements of the death machinery of mammalian cells.

  17. Apoptosis of bone marrow leukemia cells in mice after low dose radiation at different time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangyu; Yu Mingming; Li Xianjun; Liu Zhixiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the apoptosis of bone marrow leukemia cell in mice after low dose radiation (LDR) at different time and the experimental basis for LDR auxiliary therapy on leukemia. Methods: WEHI-3 cells were injected into BALB/c mice through tail veins to make an experimental mice model of myelornonocytic leukemia. 60 leukemia mice models were divided half-and half. 30 mice models in experimental group were irradiated with LDR of 75mGy at the same time while the others 30 in the control group were not. 6 mice models with LDR and 6 mice models without LDR would be killed at the time the 1st day, the 2nd day, the 3rd day, the 5th day- and the l0th day after LDR in order to extract bone marrow samples. The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells in bone marrow was examined. Results: The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells in experimental group was increasing after LDR and went to top on the 2nd day and the 3rd day. The apoptosis percentage of leukemia cells was remarkably different between experimental and control group, all P<0.05. Conclusion: LDR could significantly increase the apoptosis percentage of bone marrow leukemia cells in mice. Its mechanism is remarkably different in kill and wound of big dose radiation to tumour cells. It is probably related to of the increase immune exciting response as to promote some cytokine secretion, in leukemia mice. (authors)

  18. Xenotransplantation elicits salient tumorigenicity of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells via aberrant AKT activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Nasu, Kentaro; Tamai, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Mai; Satoh, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    The transplantation of human cancer cells into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(null) (NOG) mice often causes highly malignant cell populations like cancer stem cells to emerge. Here, by serial transplantation in NOG mice, we established two highly tumorigenic adult T-cell leukemia-derived cell lines, ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8. When transplanted s.c., these cells formed tumors significantly earlier and from fewer initial cells than their parental lines ST1 and TL-Om1. We found that protein kinase B (AKT) signaling was upregulated in ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8 cells, and that this upregulation was due to the decreased expression of a negative regulator, INPP5D. Furthermore, the introduction of a constitutively active AKT mutant expression vector into ST1 cells augmented the tumorigenicity of the cells, whereas treatment with the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 attenuated the progression of tumors induced by ST1-N6 cells. Collectively, our results reveal that the AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in the malignancy of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  19. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Palomero, Teresa; Odom, Duncan T.; O'Neil, Jennifer; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Margolin, Adam; Neuberg, Donna S.; Winter, Stuart S.; Larson, Richard S.; Li, Wei; Liu, X. Shirley; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant expression of 1 or more transcription factor oncogenes is a critical component of the molecular pathogenesis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional programs downstream of T-ALL oncogenes are mostly unknown. TAL1/SCL is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor oncogene aberrantly expressed in 60% of human T-ALLs. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip to identify 71 direct transcriptional targets of TAL1/SCL. ...

  20. Expression of human kinase suppressor of Ras 2 (hKSR-2) gene in HL60 leukemia cells is directly upregulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and is required for optimal cell differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuening; Wang, T.-T.; White, John H.; Studzinski, George P.

    2007-01-01

    Induction of terminal differentiation of neoplastic cells offers potential for a novel approach to cancer therapy. One of the agents being investigated for this purpose in preclinical studies is 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25D), which can convert myeloid leukemia cells into normal monocyte-like cells, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we report that 1,25D upregulates the expression of hKSR-2, a new member of a small family of proteins that exhibit evolutionarily conserved function of potentiating ras signaling. The upregulation of hKSR-2 is direct, as it occurs in the presence of cycloheximide, and occurs primarily at the transcriptional level, via activation of vitamin D receptor, which acts as a ligand-activated transcription factor. Two VDRE-type motifs identified in the hKSR-2 gene bind VDR-RXR alpha heterodimers present in nuclear extracts of 1,25D-treated HL60 cells, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that these VDRE motifs bind VDR in 1,25D-dependent manner in intact cells, coincident with the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to these motifs. Treatment of the cells with siRNA to hKSR-2 reduced the proportion of the most highly differentiated cells in 1,25D-treated cultures. These results demonstrate that hKSR-2 is a direct target of 1,25D in HL60 cells, and is required for optimal monocytic differentiation

  1. Relationship between triterpenoid anticancer drug resistance, autophagy, and caspase-1 in adult T-cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Nakanishi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the inflammasome inhibitor cucurbitacin D (CuD induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines. Here, we investigated the effects of CuD and a B-cell lymphoma extra-large (Bcl-xL inhibitor on autophagy in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL isolated from adult T-cell leukemia (ATL patients. CuD induced PBL cell death in patients but not in healthy donors. This effect was not significantly inhibited by treatment with rapamycin or 3-methyladenine (3-MA. The Bcl-xL inhibitor Z36 induced death in primary cells from ATL patients including that induced by CuD treatment, effects that were partly inhibited by 3-MA. Similarly, cell death induced by the steroid prednisolone was enhanced in the presence of Z36. A western blot analysis revealed that Z36 also promoted CuD-induced poly(ADP ribose polymerase cleavage. Interestingly, the effects of CuD and Z36 were attenuated in primary ATL patient cells obtained upon recurrence after umbilical cord blood transplantation, as compared to those obtained before chemotherapy. Furthermore, cells from this patient expressed a high level of caspase-1, and treatment with caspase-1 inhibitor-enhanced CuD-induced cell death. Taken together, these results suggest that rescue from resistance to steroid drugs can enhance chemotherapy, and that caspase-1 is a good marker for drug resistance in ATL patients.

  2. Peripheral T-lymphocytes express WNT7A and its restoration in leukemia-derived lymphoblasts inhibits cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa-Hernández, Alejandra B; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Jave-Suarez, Luis F; Barros-Núñez, Patricio; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Meza-Canales, Ivan D; García-Castro, Beatriz; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica A; Rosales-Aviña, Judith A; Barrera-Chairez, Esperanza; Ortíz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Hernández-Flores, Georgina

    2012-01-01

    WNT7a, a member of the Wnt ligand family implicated in several developmental processes, has also been reported to be dysregulated in some types of tumors; however, its function and implication in oncogenesis is poorly understood. Moreover, the expression of this gene and the role that it plays in the biology of blood cells remains unclear. In addition to determining the expression of the WNT7A gene in blood cells, in leukemia-derived cell lines, and in samples of patients with leukemia, the aim of this study was to seek the effect of this gene in proliferation. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells, sorted CD3 and CD19 cells, four leukemia-derived cell lines, and blood samples from 14 patients with Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 19 clinically healthy subjects. Reverse transcription followed by quantitative Real-time Polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis were performed to determine relative WNT7A expression. Restoration of WNT7a was done employing a lentiviral system and by using a recombinant human protein. Cell proliferation was measured by addition of WST-1 to cell cultures. WNT7a is mainly produced by CD3 T-lymphocytes, its expression decreases upon activation, and it is severely reduced in leukemia-derived cell lines, as well as in the blood samples of patients with ALL when compared with healthy controls (p ≤0.001). By restoring WNT7A expression in leukemia-derived cells, we were able to demonstrate that WNT7a inhibits cell growth. A similar effect was observed when a recombinant human WNT7a protein was used. Interestingly, restoration of WNT7A expression in Jurkat cells did not activate the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. To our knowledge, this is the first report evidencing quantitatively decreased WNT7A levels in leukemia-derived cells and that WNT7A restoration in T-lymphocytes inhibits cell proliferation. In addition, our results also support the possible function of WNT7A as a tumor suppressor gene as well as a therapeutic

  3. Hairy-cell leukemia: a rare blood disorder in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephine, F P; Nissapatorn, V

    2006-01-01

    We report a 68-year-old Indian man who was referred to the Hematology Unit for investigation for thrombocytopenia, an incidental finding during a pre-operative screening for prostatectomy. Physical examination was unremarkable. There was no splenomegaly, hepatomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Complete blood counts showed normal hemoglobin and total white cell count with moderate thrombocytopenia. Hairy-cell leukemia was diagnosed based on peripheral blood film, bone-marrow aspirate and trephine biopsy findings, supported by immunophenotyping results by flow cytometry. The purpose of this report is to create awareness of this uncommon presentation and to emphasize that a single-lineage cytopenia or absence of splenomegaly does not exclude the diagnosis of hairy-cell leukemia. Careful attention to morphological detail is important for early diagnosis, especially when low percentages of "hairy" cells are present in the peripheral blood and bone marrow. Early diagnosis is important to ensure that patients obtain maximum benefit from the newer therapeutic agents that have greatly improved the prognosis in this rare disorder.

  4. CD117 expression on blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryainova N.V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to analyze the frequency of CD117 (c-KIT antigen expression on the blast cells in acute myeloid leukemia (AML, evaluation of the presence of the relationship between the expression of the c-KIT and leukemia according to the FAB classification and definition of co-expression of the antigen CD117, antigens CD33 and CD34. The data of 47 patients with AML were diagnosed. M0 AML variant was established in 3 (6% patients, M1 – in 2 (4%, M2 – in 9 (20%, M4 – in 22 (47% and M5 – in 11 (23%. For immunophenotypic stu¬dies monoclonal antibodies (mAb that detect antigens of anti-CD34, anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 (Becton Dickinson, USA were used. The presence of the antigen CD117 was detected in 39 people, accounting for 83% of all surveyed. Antigen c-KIT was present in 48.117.0% cells on average: in all 3 cases – AML M0, in2 cases of AML M1, in 6 cases – AML M2, 20 of 22 cases – AML M4 and in 8 of 11 AML M5 cases. Average levels of CD117 in investigated leukemia cases statistically differed significantly (p=0.0067. Among 39 CD117- positive patients in 25 (53% co-expression of CD117+/CD34+ was revealed. Expression of CD117+/CD34- was observed in 14 cases (30%, CD117-/CD34+ – in 4 cases (8,5%, CD117-/CD34- – in 4 cases (8.5%. CD34 had of 64% of cells of myeloid origin. A high positive cor¬relation between expression of CD117 and CD34 (r=+0,5169 was determined, being statistically significant (p0,0067.

  5. Leukemic blast cell colony formation in semisolid culture with erythropoietin: a case report of acute poorly differentiated erythroid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, M; Jinnai, I; Tagawa, M; Amenomori, T; Nishino, K; Yao, E; Nonaka, H; Kuriyama, K; Yoshida, Y; Matsuo, T

    1987-02-01

    The bone marrow of a patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia developed unique colonies after a 14-day culture in erythropoietin (EPO)-containing methylcellulose. The colonies consisted of 20 to 200 nonhemoglobinized large blast cells. Cytogenetic analysis of single colonies revealed hypotetraploid karyotypes with several marker chromosomes that were identical to those found in directly sampled bone marrow. The concurrently formed erythroid bursts showed only normal karyotypes. No leukemic colony formation was observed in other culture systems with either colony-stimulating activity (CSA) or phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocyte-conditioned medium (PHA-LCM). The leukemic colonies exhibited a complete EPO-dose dependency similar to that of the patient's normal BFU-E. Although cytochemical and immunologic marker studies of the bone marrow cells failed to clarify the cell lineage of the leukemic cells with extraordinarily large cell size, ultrastructural study revealed erythroid differentiation such as siderosome formation in the cytoplasm and ferritin particles in the rhophecytosis invaginations. These findings indicate that the patient had poorly differentiated erythroid leukemia and that some of the clonogenic cells might respond to EPO in vitro. Corresponding to this biological feature, the leukemic cells were markedly decreased in number in response to repeated RBC transfusions, and partial remission was obtained. These observations suggest that erythroid leukemia distinct from erythroleukemia (M6) with a myeloblastic component, can develop as a minor entity of human acute leukemia.

  6. Modulation of monocytic leukemia cell function and survival by high gradient magnetic fields and mathematical modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotskii, Vitalii; Syrovets, Tatiana; Schmidt, Zoe W; Dejneka, Alexandr; Simmet, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    The influence of spatially modulated high gradient magnetic fields on cellular functions of human THP-1 leukemia cells is studied. We demonstrate that arrays of high-gradient micrometer-sized magnets induce i) cell swelling, ii) prolonged increased ROS production, and iii) inhibit cell proliferation, and iv) elicit apoptosis of THP-1 monocytic leukemia cells in the absence of chemical or biological agents. Mathematical modeling indicates that mechanical stress exerted on the cells by high magnetic gradient forces is responsible for triggering cell swelling and formation of reactive oxygen species followed by apoptosis. We discuss physical aspects of controlling cell functions by focused magnetic gradient forces, i.e. by a noninvasive and nondestructive physical approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. EBI2 overexpression in mice leads to B1 B cell expansion and chronic lymphocytic leukemia-(CLL)-like B cell malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss Arfelt, Kristine; Barington, Line; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-01-01

    -targeted expression of human EBI2 in mice reduces germinal center-dependent immune responses, reduces total IgM and IgG levels, and leads to increased proliferation and upregulation of cellular oncogenes. Furthermore, hEBI2 overexpression leads to an abnormally expanded CD5+ B1a B cell subset present as early as 4......Human and mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develop from CD5+ B cells that in mice and macaques are known to define the distinct B1a B cell lineage. B1a cells are characterized by lack of germinal center development and the B1a cell population is increased in mice with reduced germinal...... cells towards the extrafollicular area, whereas downregulation is essential for germinal center formation. We therefore speculated whether increased expression of EBI2 would lead to an expanded B1 cell subset and, ultimately, progression to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here we demonstrate that B cell...

  8. Simplified Method to Produce Human Bioactive Leukemia Inhibitory Factor in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houman Kahroba

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Human leukemia inhibitory factor (hLIF is a poly functional cytokine with numerous regulatory effects on different cells. Main application of hLIF is maintaining pluripotency of embryonic stem cells. hLIF indicated effective work in implantation rate of fertilized eggs and multiple sclerosis (MS treatment. Low production of hLIF in eukaryotic cells and prokaryotic host’s problems for human protein production convinced us to develop a simple way to reach high amount of this widely used clinical and research factor. Objectives In this study we want to purify recombinant human leukemia inhibitory factor in single simple method. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study, gene expression: human LIF gene was codon optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and attached his-tag tail to make it extractable. After construction and transformation of vector to E. coli, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG used for induction. Single step immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC used for purification confirmed by Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE and western blotting. Bioactivity of the hLIF were tested by MTT assay with TF-1 cells and CISH gene stimulation in monocyte and TF-1 by real-time PCR. Induction by 0.4 mM of IPTG in 25°C for 3 hours indicated best result for soluble expression. SPSS indicated P ˂ 0.05 that is significant for our work. Results Cloning, expression, and extraction of bio active rhLIF was successfully achieved according MTT assay and real time PCR after treatment of TF-1 and monocyte cell lines. Conclusions We developed an effective single step purification method to produce bioactive recombinant hLIF in E. coli. For the first time we used CISH gene stimulating for bioactivity test for qualifying of recombinant hLIF for application.

  9. HLA-haploidentical transplantation with regulatory and conventional T-cell adoptive immunotherapy prevents acute leukemia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Massimo F; Di Ianni, Mauro; Ruggeri, Loredana; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Pierini, Antonio; Massei, Maria Speranza; Amico, Lucia; Urbani, Elena; Del Papa, Beatrice; Zei, Tiziana; Iacucci Ostini, Roberta; Cecchini, Debora; Tognellini, Rita; Reisner, Yair; Aversa, Franco; Falini, Brunangelo; Velardi, Andrea

    2014-07-24

    Posttransplant relapse is still the major cause of treatment failure in high-risk acute leukemia. Attempts to manipulate alloreactive T cells to spare normal cells while killing leukemic cells have been unsuccessful. In HLA-haploidentical transplantation, we reported that donor-derived T regulatory cells (Tregs), coinfused with conventional T cells (Tcons), protected recipients against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The present phase 2 study investigated whether Treg-Tcon adoptive immunotherapy prevents posttransplant leukemia relapse. Forty-three adults with high-risk acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia 33; acute lymphoblastic leukemia 10) were conditioned with a total body irradiation-based regimen. Grafts included CD34(+) cells (mean 9.7 × 10(6)/kg), Tregs (mean 2.5 × 10(6)/kg), and Tcons (mean 1.1 × 10(6)/kg). No posttransplant immunosuppression was given. Ninety-five percent of patients achieved full-donor type engraftment and 15% developed ≥grade 2 acute GVHD. The probability of disease-free survival was 0.56 at a median follow-up of 46 months. The very low cumulative incidence of relapse (0.05) was significantly better than in historical controls. These results demonstrate the immunosuppressive potential of Tregs can be used to suppress GVHD without loss of the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. Humanized murine models provided insights into the mechanisms underlying separation of GVL from GVHD, suggesting the GVL effect is due to largely unopposed Tcon alloantigen recognition in bone marrow. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Pre-malignant lymphoid cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Human malignancies progress through a multistep process that includes the development of critical somatic mutations over the clinical course. Recent novel findings have indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into multilineage hematopoietic cells, are an important cellular target for the accumulation of critical somatic mutations in hematological malignancies and play a central role in myeloid malignancy development. In contrast to myeloid malignancies, mature lymphoid malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are thought to originate directly from differentiated mature lymphocytes; however, recent compelling data have shown that primitive HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid malignancies. Several representative mutations of hematological malignancies have been identified within the HSCs of CLL and lymphoma patients, indicating that the self-renewing long-lived fraction of HSCs can serve as a reservoir for the development of oncogenic events. Novel mice models have been established as human mature lymphoma models, in which specific oncogenic events target the HSCs and immature progenitor cells. These data collectively suggest that HSCs can be the cellular target involved in the accumulation of oncogenic events in the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid and myeloid malignancies.

  11. Ibrutinib enhances chimeric antigen receptor T-cell engraftment and efficacy in leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraietta, Joseph A; Beckwith, Kyle A; Patel, Prachi R; Ruella, Marco; Zheng, Zhaohui; Barrett, David M; Lacey, Simon F; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; McGettigan, Shannon E; Cook, Danielle R; Zhang, Changfeng; Xu, Jun; Do, Priscilla; Hulitt, Jessica; Kudchodkar, Sagar B; Cogdill, Alexandria P; Gill, Saar; Porter, David L; Woyach, Jennifer A; Long, Meixiao; Johnson, Amy J; Maddocks, Kami; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Byrd, John C; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-03-03

    Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is highly promising but requires robust T-cell expansion and engraftment. A T-cell defect in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) due to disease and/or therapy impairs ex vivo expansion and response to CAR T cells. To evaluate the effect of ibrutinib treatment on the T-cell compartment in CLL as it relates to CAR T-cell generation, we examined the phenotype and function of T cells in a cohort of CLL patients during their course of treatment with ibrutinib. We found that ≥5 cycles of ibrutinib therapy improved the expansion of CD19-directed CAR T cells (CTL019), in association with decreased expression of the immunosuppressive molecule programmed cell death 1 on T cells and of CD200 on B-CLL cells. In support of these findings, we observed that 3 CLL patients who had been treated with ibrutinib for ≥1 year at the time of T-cell collection had improved ex vivo and in vivo CTL019 expansion, which correlated positively together and with clinical response. Lastly, we show that ibrutinib exposure does not impair CAR T-cell function in vitro but does improve CAR T-cell engraftment, tumor clearance, and survival in human xenograft models of resistant acute lymphocytic leukemia and CLL when administered concurrently. Our collective findings indicate that ibrutinib enhances CAR T-cell function and suggest that clinical trials with combination therapy are warranted. Our studies demonstrate that improved T-cell function may also contribute to the efficacy of ibrutinib in CLL. These trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01747486, #NCT01105247, and #NCT01217749. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. [Ultrastructure and Raman Spectral Characteristics of Two Kinds of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao-Yue; Cheng, Xue-Lian; Dong, Shu-Xu; Zhao, Shi-Xuan; Wang, Ying; Ru, Yong-Xin

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the Raman spectral characteristics of leukemia cells from 4 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (M 3 ) and 3 patients with acute monoblastic leukemia (M 5 ), establish a novel Raman label-free method to distinguish 2 kinds of acute myeloid leukemia cells so as to provide basis for clinical research. Leukemia cells were collected from bone marrow of above-mentioned patients. Raman spectra were acquired by Horiba Xplora Raman spectrometer and Raman spectra of 30-50 cells from each patient were recorded. The diagnostic model was established according to principle component analysis (PCA), discriminant function analysis (DFA) and cluster analysis, and the spectra of leukemia cells from 7 patients were analyzed and classified. Characteristics of Raman spectra were analyzed combining with ultrastructure of leukemia cells. There were significant differences between Raman spectra of 2 kinds of leukemia cells. Compared with acute monoblastic leukemia cells, the spectra of acute promyelocytic leukemia cells showed stronger peaks in 622, 643, 757, 852, 1003, 1033, 1117, 1157, 1173, 1208, 1340, 1551, 1581 cm -1 . The diagnostic models established by PCA-DFA and cluster analysis could successfully classify these Raman spectra of different samples with a high accuracy of 100% (233/233). The model was evaluated by "Leave-one-out" cross-validation and reached a high accuracy of 97% (226/233). The level of macromolecules of M 3 cells is higher than that of M 5 . The diagnostic models established by PCA-DFA can classify these Raman spectra of different cells with a high accuracy. Raman spectra shows consistent result with ultrastructure by TEM.

  13. (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone inhibits tubulin polymerization, induces G2/M arrest, and triggers apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhães, Hemerson I.F.; Wilke, Diego V.; Bezerra, Daniel P.; Cavalcanti, Bruno C.; Rotta, Rodrigo; Lima, Dênis P. de; Beatriz, Adilson; Moraes, Manoel O.; Diniz-Filho, Jairo; Pessoa, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone (PHT) is a known cytotoxic compound belonging to the phenstatin family. However, the exact mechanism of action of PHT-induced cell death remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying PHT-induced cytotoxicity. We found that PHT displayed potent cytotoxicity in different tumor cell lines, showing IC 50 values in the nanomolar range. Cell cycle arrest in G 2 /M phase along with the augmented metaphase cells was found. Cells treated with PHT also showed typical hallmarks of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine exposure, increase of the caspase 3/7 and 8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. Studies conducted with isolated tubulin and docking models confirmed that PHT binds to the colchicine site and interferes in the polymerization of microtubules. These results demonstrated that PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization, arrests cancer cells in G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle, and induces their apoptosis, exhibiting promising anticancer therapeutic potential. - Highlights: • PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization. • PHT arrests cancer cells in G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle. • PHT induces caspase-dependent apoptosis

  14. (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone inhibits tubulin polymerization, induces G{sub 2}/M arrest, and triggers apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhães, Hemerson I.F. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Wilke, Diego V. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Bezerra, Daniel P., E-mail: danielpbezerra@gmail.com [Centro de Pesquisa Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Cavalcanti, Bruno C. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Rotta, Rodrigo; Lima, Dênis P. de; Beatriz, Adilson [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas (Laboratório LP4), Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Moraes, Manoel O.; Diniz-Filho, Jairo [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Pessoa, Claudia, E-mail: c_pessoa@yahoo.com [Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    (4-Methoxyphenyl)(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)methanone (PHT) is a known cytotoxic compound belonging to the phenstatin family. However, the exact mechanism of action of PHT-induced cell death remains to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying PHT-induced cytotoxicity. We found that PHT displayed potent cytotoxicity in different tumor cell lines, showing IC{sub 50} values in the nanomolar range. Cell cycle arrest in G{sub 2}/M phase along with the augmented metaphase cells was found. Cells treated with PHT also showed typical hallmarks of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, phosphatidylserine exposure, increase of the caspase 3/7 and 8 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation without affecting membrane integrity. Studies conducted with isolated tubulin and docking models confirmed that PHT binds to the colchicine site and interferes in the polymerization of microtubules. These results demonstrated that PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization, arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle, and induces their apoptosis, exhibiting promising anticancer therapeutic potential. - Highlights: • PHT inhibits tubulin polymerization. • PHT arrests cancer cells in G{sub 2}/M phase of the cell cycle. • PHT induces caspase-dependent apoptosis.

  15. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform (p...... penetrance. p42-deficient leukemia could be transferred by a Mac1+c-Kit+ population that gave rise only to myeloid cells in recipient mice. Expression profiling of this population against normal Mac1+c-Kit+ progenitors revealed a signature shared with MLL-AF9-transformed AML.......42) while retaining the 30kDa isoform (p30)-we modified the mouse Cebpa locus to express only p30. p30 supported the formation of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. However, p42 was required for control of myeloid progenitor proliferation, and p42-deficient mice developed AML with complete...

  16. High-resolution Antibody Array Analysis of Childhood Acute Leukemia Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kanderová, V.; Kuzilkova, D.; Stuchlý, J.; Vašková, M.; Brdička, Tomáš; Fišer, K.; Hrušák, O.; Lund-Johansen, F.; Kalina, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2016), s. 1246-1261 ISSN 1535-9476 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06064 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : acute lymphoblastic-leukemia * acute promyelocytic leukemia * cytometric immunobead assay * caspase-dependent cleavage * acute myeloid-leukemia * gene-expression * fusion proteins * flow-cytometry * pcr data * b-cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.540, year: 2016

  17. Paraptosis cell death induction by the thiamine analog benfotiamine in leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Sugimori

    Full Text Available Benfotiamine is a synthetic thiamine analogue that stimulates transketolase, a cellular enzyme essential for glucose metabolism. Currently, benfotiamine is used to treat diabetic neuropathy. We recently reported that oral benfotiamine induced a temporary but remarkable recovery from acute myeloid leukemia in an elderly patient who was ineligible for standard chemotherapy due to dementia and renal failure. In the present study we present evidences that benfotiamine possess antitumor activity against leukemia cells. In a panel of nine myeloid leukemia cell lines benfotiamine impaired the viability of HL-60, NB4, K562 and KG1 cells and also inhibited the growing of primary leukemic blasts. The antitumor activity of benfotiamine is not mediated by apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy, but rather occurs though paraptosis cell death induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that benfotiamine inhibited the activity of constitutively active ERK1/2 and concomitantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 kinase in leukemic cells. In addition, benfotiamine induced the down regulation of the cell cycle regulator CDK3 which resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest in the sensitive leukemic cells. Moreover, combination index studies showed that benfotiamine enhanced the antiproliferative activities of cytarabine against leukemia cells. These findings suggest that benfotiamine has antitumor therapeutic potential.

  18. Paraptosis cell death induction by the thiamine analog benfotiamine in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimori, Naomi; Espinoza, J Luis; Trung, Ly Quoc; Takami, Akiyoshi; Kondo, Yukio; An, Dao Thi; Sasaki, Motoko; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakao, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Benfotiamine is a synthetic thiamine analogue that stimulates transketolase, a cellular enzyme essential for glucose metabolism. Currently, benfotiamine is used to treat diabetic neuropathy. We recently reported that oral benfotiamine induced a temporary but remarkable recovery from acute myeloid leukemia in an elderly patient who was ineligible for standard chemotherapy due to dementia and renal failure. In the present study we present evidences that benfotiamine possess antitumor activity against leukemia cells. In a panel of nine myeloid leukemia cell lines benfotiamine impaired the viability of HL-60, NB4, K562 and KG1 cells and also inhibited the growing of primary leukemic blasts. The antitumor activity of benfotiamine is not mediated by apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy, but rather occurs though paraptosis cell death induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that benfotiamine inhibited the activity of constitutively active ERK1/2 and concomitantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 kinase in leukemic cells. In addition, benfotiamine induced the down regulation of the cell cycle regulator CDK3 which resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest in the sensitive leukemic cells. Moreover, combination index studies showed that benfotiamine enhanced the antiproliferative activities of cytarabine against leukemia cells. These findings suggest that benfotiamine has antitumor therapeutic potential.

  19. Autologous CLL cell vaccination early after transplant induces leukemia-specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Ute E; Hainz, Ursula; Stevenson, Kristen; Goldstein, Natalie R; Pasek, Mildred; Naito, Masayasu; Wu, Di; Ho, Vincent T; Alonso, Anselmo; Hammond, Naa Norkor; Wong, Jessica; Sievers, Quinlan L; Brusic, Ana; McDonough, Sean M; Zeng, Wanyong; Perrin, Ann; Brown, Jennifer R; Canning, Christine M; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey; Armand, Philippe; Neuberg, Donna; Lee, Jeng-Shin; Antin, Joseph H; Mulligan, Richard C; Sasada, Tetsuro; Ritz, Jerome; Soiffer, Robert J; Dranoff, Glenn; Alyea, Edwin P; Wu, Catherine J

    2013-09-01

    Patients with advanced hematologic malignancies remain at risk for relapse following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). We conducted a prospective clinical trial to test whether vaccination with whole leukemia cells early after transplantation facilitates the expansion of leukemia-reactive T cells and thereby enhances antitumor immunity. We enrolled 22 patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 18 of whom received up to 6 vaccines initiated between days 30 and 45 after transplantation. Each vaccine consisted of irradiated autologous tumor cells admixed with GM-CSF-secreting bystander cells. Serial patient PBMC samples following transplantation were collected, and the impact of vaccination on T cell activity was evaluated. At a median follow-up of 2.9 (range, 1-4) years, the estimated 2-year progression-free and overall survival rates of vaccinated subjects were 82% (95% CI, 54%-94%) and 88% (95% CI, 59%-97%), respectively. Although vaccination only had a modest impact on recovering T cell numbers, CD8+ T cells from vaccinated patients consistently reacted against autologous tumor, but not alloantigen-bearing recipient cells with increased secretion of the effector cytokine IFN-γ, unlike T cells from nonvaccinated CLL patients undergoing allo-HSCT. Further analysis confirmed that 17% (range, 13%-33%) of CD8+ T cell clones isolated from 4 vaccinated patients by limiting dilution of bulk tumor-reactive T cells solely reacted against CLL-associated antigens. Our studies suggest that autologous tumor cell vaccination is an effective strategy to advance long-term leukemia control following allo-HSCT. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00442130. NCI (5R21CA115043-2), NHLBI (5R01HL103532-03), and Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Translational Research Program.

  20. REGULATORY T-CELLS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'arena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T-cells (Tregs constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosis, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in either cancer and autoimmune disorders.

  1. Docosahexaenoic acid induces apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Guièze

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disorder with an increased infectious risk remaining one of the main causes of death. Development of therapies with higher safety profile is thus a challenging issue. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 is an omega-3 fatty acid, a natural compound of normal cells, and has been shown to display antitumor potency in cancer. We evaluated the potential in vitro effect of DHA in primary CLL cells. DHA induces high level of in vitro apoptosis compared to oleic acid in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Estimation of IC50 was only of 4.813 μM, which appears lower than those reported in solid cancers. DHA is highly active on CLL cells in vitro. This observation provides a rationale for further studies aiming to understand its mechanisms of action and its potent in vivo activity.

  2. Plasma cell leukemia: update on biology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Roberto; D'Agostino, Mattia; Cerrato, Chiara; Gay, Francesca; Palumbo, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare, but very aggressive, plasma cell dyscrasia, representing a distinct clinicopathological entity as compared to multiple myeloma (MM), with peculiar biological and clinical features. A hundred times rarer than MM, the disease course is characterized by short remissions and poor survival. PCL is defined by an increased percentage (>20%) and absolute number (>2 × 10 9 /l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. PCL is defined as 'primary' when peripheral plasmacytosis is detected at diagnosis, 'secondary' when leukemization occurs in a patient with preexisting MM. Novel agents have revolutionized the outcomes of MM patients and have been introduced also for the treatment of PCL. Here, we provide an update on biology and treatment options for PCL.

  3. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus-induced fusion of murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, A.; Chen, T.; Lowy, A.; Cortez, N.G.; Silagi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive fusion occurs upon cocultivation of murine fibroblasts producing ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with a large variety of murine cell lines in the presence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B, the active component of the antifungal agent Fungizone. The resulting polykaryocytes contain nuclei from both infected and uninfected cells, as evidenced by autoradiographic labeling experiments in which one or the other parent cell type was separately labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine and fused with an unlabeled parent. This cell fusion specifically requires the presence of an ecotropic MuLV-producing parent and is not observed for cells producing xenotropic, amphotropic, or dualtropic viruses. Mouse cells infected with nonecotropic viruses retain their sensitivity toward fusion, whereas infection with ecotropic viruses abrogates the fusion of these cells upon cocultivation with other ecotropic MuLV-producing cells. Nonmurine cells lacking the ecotropic gp70 receptor are not fused under similar conditions. Fusion is effectively inhibited by monospecific antisera to gp70, but not by antisera to p15(E), and studies with monoclonal antibodies identify distinct amino- and carboxy-terminal gp70 regions which play a role in the fusion reaction. The enhanced fusion which occurs in the presence of amphotericin B provides a rapid and sensitive assay for the expression of ecotropic MuLVs and should facilitate further mechanistic studies of MuLV-induced fusion of murine cells

  4. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC_5_0 values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. - Highlights: • Myricetin, a common dietary flavonoid, is a novel inhibitor of hIMPDH1/2. • Myricetin directly binds with hIMPDH1/2 and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia cells. • The cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells is markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine.

  5. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang [Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Mei Long Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lu, Weiqiang, E-mail: wqlu@bio.ecnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences and School of Life Sciences, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241 (China); Huang, Jin, E-mail: huangjin@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Mei Long Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-09-02

    Human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC{sub 50} values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. - Highlights: • Myricetin, a common dietary flavonoid, is a novel inhibitor of hIMPDH1/2. • Myricetin directly binds with hIMPDH1/2 and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia cells. • The cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells is markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine.

  6. Sequence analysis of the MYC oncogene involved in the t(8;14)(q24;q11) chromosome translocation in a human leukemia T-cell line indicates that putative regulatory regions are not altered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finver, S.N.; Nishikura, K.; Finger, L.R.; Haluska, F.G.; Finan, J.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors cloned the translocation-associated and homologous normal MYC alleles from SKW-3, a leukemia T-cell line with the t(8; 14)(q24; q11) translocation, and determined the sequence of the MYC oncogene first exon and flanking 5' putative regulatory regions. S1 nuclease protection experiments utilizing a MYC first exon probe demonstrated transcriptional deregulation of the MYC gene associated with the T-cell receptor α locus on the 8q + chromosome of SKW-3 cells. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the translocation-associated (8q +) MYC allele identified a single base substitution within the upstream flanking region; the homologous nontranslocated allele contained an additional substitution and a two-base deletion. None of the deletions or substitutions localized to putative 5' regulatory regions. The MYC first exon sequence was germ line in both alleles. These results demonstrate that alterations within the putative 5' MYC regulatory regions are not necessarily involved in MYC deregulation in T-cell leukemias, and they show that juxtaposition of the T-cell receptor α locus to a germ-line MYC oncogene results in MYC deregulation

  7. Expression of HER2/Neu in B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Pomerantz, Alan; Demichelis-Gomez, Roberta; Barrera-Lumbreras, Georgina; Barrales-Benitez, Olga; Aguayo-Gonzalez, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The expression of HER2/neu in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia has been reported in previous studies. The objective of this research was to study the expression of HER2/neu on the blasts of patients with acute leukemia from the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. From June 2015 to February 2016, a HER2/neu monoclonal antibody was added to the panel of antibodies that we routinely use in patients with acute leukemia. An expression of ≥ 30% was considered positive. We studied 33 patients: 19 had de novo leukemia (57.6%), three (9.1%) were in relapse, and in 11 (33.3%) their status could not be specified. Seventeen patients (51.5%) were classified as B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a median expression of HER2/neu of 0.3% (range 0-90.2). Three patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia were positive for HER2/neu: 89.4%, 90.9%, and 62.4%. The first and third patient had de novo B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The second patient was in second relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplant. All three patients were categorized as high-risk at the time of diagnosis. In the studied Mexican population, we found a positive expression of HER2/neu in 17% of the B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, similar to previous studies in which the expression was found in 15-50%.

  8. DNA segment containing C/sub β1/, a gene for the constant region of the β chain of the T-cell antigen receptor, was inserted into chromosome 6 in cells from one patients with human T-cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ino, T.; Kurosawa, Y.; Yoshida, M.C.; Hirano, M.

    1987-01-01

    DNA rearrangements that occurred in the vicinity of T-cell antigen receptor β-chain gene clusters residing on chromosome 7 were examined in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In one patient, it was observed that, for the T-cell receptor β-chain genes, a D/sub β 1/-J/sub β2.3/ (where D is diversity and J is joining) junction was found on one chromosome, while the other chromosome kept the germ-line configuration. If this D/sub β/-J/sub β/ junction was formed by the customary deletion mechanism, the C/sub β1/ gene (where C is constant) located between the D/sub β1/ and J/sub Β2.3/ loci should have disappeared from this chromosome. The C/sub β1/ gene indeed was absent from the rearranged chromosome 7, but it was found on chromosome 6 as an inserted segment. The implications of the observations are discussed

  9. Targeting of the BLT2 in chronic myeloid leukemia inhibits leukemia stem/progenitor cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Meifang; Ai, Hongmei; Li, Tao [Department of Laboratory Medicine, JingZhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China); Rajoria, Pasupati; Shahu, Prakash [Department of Clinical Medicine, Medical School of Yangtze University, Jingzhou (China); Li, Xiansong, E-mail: lixiansongjz@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, JingZhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China)

    2016-04-15

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has significantly improved clinical outcome for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. However, patients develop resistance when the disease progresses to the blast phase (BP) and the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that BCR-ABL activates BLT2 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to promote leukemogenesis and this involves the p53 signaling pathway. Compared to normal bone marrow (NBM), the mRNA and protein levels of BLT2 are significantly increased in BP-CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. This is correlated with increasing BCR-ABL expression. In contrast, knockdown of BCR-ABL or inhibition of its tyrosine kinase activity decreases Blt2 protein level. BLT2 inhibition induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, colony formation and self-renewal capacity of CD34{sup +} cells from TKI-resistant BP-CML patients. Importantly, the inhibitory effects of BCR-ABL TKI on CML stem/progenitor cells are further enhanced upon combination with BLT2 inhibition. We further show that BLT2 activation selectively suppresses p53 but not Wnt or BMP-mediated luciferase activity and transcription. Our results demonstrate that BLT2 is a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL and critically involved in the resistance of BP-CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitors to TKIs treatment. Our findings suggest that BLT2 and p53 can serve as therapeutic targets for CML treatment. - Highlights: • BCR-ABL regulates BLT2 expression to promote leukemogenesis. • BLT2 is essential to maintain CML cell function. • Activation of BLT2 suppresses p53 signaling pathway in CML